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Sample records for marina grishakova silvi

  1. Nonpoint Source: Marinas and Boating

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Because marinas are located right at the water's edge, there is a strong potential for marina waters to become contaminated with pollutants generated from the various activities that occur at marinas—such as boat cleaning and fueling operations.

  2. A Model of Beaver Meadow Complex Evolution in the Silvies River Basin, Oregon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C.; Grant, G.; Campbell, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the pervasive incision seen in the American West is due, in part, to the removal of beaver (Castor canadensis) in the first half of the 19th century. New restoration strategies for these systems focus on the reintroduction of beaver and construction of beaver dam analogs. Such dams locally raise streams beds and water tables, reconnect incised channels to their former floodplains, trap sediment, increase hydraulic diversity, and promote riparian vegetation. However, the geomorphic and hydrologic impacts of both the original beaver dams and their analogs are poorly understood. Observations in the Silvies River basin in Oregon, USA - an upland, semi-arid catchment with extremely high historic beaver populations and a presently recovering population, inform a conceptual model for valley floor evolution with beaver dams. The evolution of the beaver dam complex is characterized by eight stages of morphologic adjustment: water impoundment, sediment deposition, pond filling, multi-thread meadow creation, dam breaching, channel incision, channel widening, and floodplain development. Well-constructed beaver dams, given sufficient time and sediment flux, will evolve from a series of ponds to a multi-threaded channel flowing through a wet meadow complex. If a dam in the system fails, due to overtopping, undercutting, lack of maintenance, or abandonment, the upstream channel will concentrate into a single channel and incise, followed over time by widening once critical bank heights are exceeded. From stratigraphic, dendrochronologic, and geomorphic measurements, we are constraining average timescales associated with each stage's duration and transitional period. Measured sedimentation rates behind modern beaver dam analogs on five stream systems permit calculation of sediment flux over recent time periods, and aid in developing regional rates of sediment deposition over a range of drainage areas and gradients. Stratigraphic and

  3. 33 CFR 80.1118 - Marina Del Rey, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marina Del Rey, CA. 80.1118... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1118 Marina Del Rey, CA. (a) A line drawn from Marina Del Rey Breakwater South Light 1 to Marina Del Rey Light 4. (b) A line drawn from Marina Del...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1124 - Ventura Marina, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ventura Marina, CA. 80.1124... NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1124 Ventura Marina, CA. A line drawn from Ventura Marina South Jetty Light 6 to Ventura Marina Breakwater South Light 3; thence to Ventura...

  5. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commercial marina... ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.404 Commercial marina harbor limits. The landward limits of commercial marina... of harbors at commercial marinas will be designated by TVA on the basis of the size and extent...

  6. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commercial marina... ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.404 Commercial marina harbor limits. The landward limits of commercial marina... of harbors at commercial marinas will be designated by TVA on the basis of the size and extent...

  7. 17. MARINA WAY, HARBOUR WAY, AND MARITIME CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. MARINA WAY, HARBOUR WAY, AND MARITIME CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER (SEE ALSO HABS No. CA-2718), WITH RICHMOND SHIPYARD NO. 3. S. - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, 1401 Marina Way South, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  8. 33 CFR 80.1118 - Marina Del Rey, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marina Del Rey, CA. 80.1118 Section 80.1118 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1118 Marina Del Rey, CA. (a) A line drawn from Marina Del Rey Breakwater South Light...

  9. ASSESSING ROOT DEMOGRAPHY AND CARBOHYDRATE DYNAMICS OF ZOSTERA MARINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help establish protective criteria for Zostera marina a more complete understanding of the factors affecting the status, condition, distribution and ecophysiology of Z. marina is needed. While Z. marina shoots are readily observed, assessing growth and carbon dynamics of roots...

  10. ASSESSING ROOT DEMOGRAPHY AND CARBOHYDRATE DYNAMICS OF ZOSTERA MARINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help establish protective criteria for Zostera marina a more complete understanding of the factors affecting the status, condition, distribution and ecophysiology of Z. marina is needed. While Z. marina shoots are readily observed, assessing growth and carbon dynamics of roots...

  11. Yield of Cassia angustifolia in combination with different tree species in a silvi-herbal trial under hot arid conditions in India.

    PubMed

    Arya, Ranjana

    2003-01-01

    A silvi-herbal trial was conducted in the hot arid region of India to study the performance of a shrub (Cassia angustifolia) in combination with different tree species. The study area was frequented by frost. Leaf yield of C. angustifolia under different treatments was estimated. It was found that the shrubs produced a significantly higher yield of leaves in the vicinity of the tree species as compared to the shrubs at a far distance from the trees. This was perhaps because of more protection of crops near the canopy of the plants during frosts. The yield was not much affected by the variation of tree species indicating that the effect of tree-shrub combination was not profound. C. angustifolia as inter-crop provides support to the farming system by way of conferring stability and generating assured income.

  12. Saint Marina: the protectress of nephrology.

    PubMed

    Eftychiadis, A C; Marketos, S G

    1999-01-01

    Saint virgin and martyr Marina (Margarita) of Antioch in Pisidia (255-270) is recognized as the patron saint of kidney sufferers and the protectress of nephrology. Beginning in the 13th century she heals in particular patients suffering from nephropathies, pregnant women having a difficult childbirth, barren women and sickly children. She protects the patients from every side effect and complication. Saint Marina is represented in hagiography as a victor, defeating the dragon satan, holding a hammer or a cross and wearing a belt around her back in the area of kidneys. According to writers, artists and sculptors the belt is the perceivable means of Saint Marina for the miraculous recovery from and healing of kidney diseases. Therefore, kidney sufferers and pregnant women put belts upon her relics for blessing and then wore them. From the Middle Ages and Renaissance and up to the contemporary period Saint Marina (Margarita) was considered the patron saint of kidney sufferers. Justifiably she is recognized by the modern medical world as the protectress of nephrology.

  13. A Guide for Marina and Harbor Managers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    recommend changes in the context and format, - 1o determine possible future uses or futurp =* -s. Ten small boat harbor and marinas were selected...managers were asked if there were ways to improve the guide by adding information, deleting information, or changing the format. None of the managers...felt that any of 37 the information should be deleted, some recommendations were made for format changes , and all of the managers had recommendations

  14. Allelopathic effect of Chattonella marina var. marina (Raphidophyceae) on Gymnodinium catenatum (Dinophycea).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Herrera, Leyberth J; Band-Schmidt, Christine J; López-Cortés, David J; Hernández-Guerrero, Claudia J; Bustillos-Guzmán, José J; Núñez-Vázquez, Erick

    2016-01-01

    The allelopathic effect of the raphidophyte Chattonella marina var. marina on the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum was determined. Both species are harmful algal bloom forming algae, produce toxic metabolites, and can co-exist in the environment. In general, raphidophytes tend to dominate over dinoflagellates, which may indicate an allelopathic effect of the former algae. Strains of C. marina var. marina and G. catenatum isolated from Bahía de La Paz were cultured in bi-algal cultures with and without cell contact. Additionally, cultures of G. catenatum were exposed to cell-free culture filtrates of the raphidophyte to test whether soluble allelopathic molecules are active. During late stationary phase, both species were cultivated in mixed cultures for 72h using the following cell abundance proportions: 20×10(3)cellsL(-1): 20×10(3)cellsL(-1) (1:1; G. catenatum: C. marina); 10×10(3)cellsL(-1): 20×10(3)cellsL(-1) (1:2), and 20×10(3)cellsL(-1): 10×10(3)cellsL(-1) (2:1). Cells of G. catenatum were also exposed to different volumes of cell filtrates of C. marina (10, 20, and 50mL) using the same cell abundance proportions for 24h. Samples were taken daily for cell counts and microscopic observations. Growth inhibition was higher when there was cell contact between both species, however mortality of G. catenatum was also observed without direct cell contact, indicating that toxic metabolites are liberated to the culture medium. Changes in cell morphology of G. catenatum occurred in the presence of cells and filtrates of C. marina, such as loss of flagella and motility, swelling, loss of girdle and sulci, prominent nucleus, rupture of cell membrane, and cell lysis. Induction of temporary cysts was also observed. These results suggest that toxic metabolites are liberated to the medium by C. marina, affecting G. catenatum by inhibiting its growth and causing changes in its life history, providing new insights of interactions between raphidophytes and

  15. Non-structural Carbohydrate Reserves of Eelgrass Zostera marina

    Treesearch

    Marianne K. Burke; William C. Dennison; Kenneth A. Moore

    1996-01-01

    The high minimum light requirement of eelgrass Zostera marina L. suggests that this species has difficulty in maintaining a positive carbon balance except under high fight conditions. The carbon balance of Z. marina can be studied by following seasonal changes in non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) reserves, however, little is...

  16. 33 CFR 110.111 - Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. 110.111 Section 110.111 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.111 Marina del Rey Harbor, Calif. An area...

  17. Repair and Dredging of Bear Creek Marina Final Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    Leatherback sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), Atlantic hawksbill sea turtle , (Eretmochelys imbricate), the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), the loggerhead...biological resources. Threatened and endangered species (sturgeon and sea turtles ) would not be affected. Marine mammals (dolphins) would not be...would also restrict sediments from affecting seagrass beds outside of the marina and deter sturgeon, sea turtles and marina mammals from entering the

  18. TOTAL DISSOLVED AND BIOAVAILABLE METALS AT LAKE TEXOMA MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved metals in water and total metals in sediments have been measured at marina areas in Lake Texoma during June 1999 to October 2001, and October 2001, respectively. The metals most often found in the highest concentrations in marina water were Na and Ca, followed by Mg an...

  19. MARINA & MAINE STREETS FACING NW. DARKER COLORED HOME ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MARINA & MAINE STREETS FACING NW. DARKER COLORED HOME ON SE CORNER. NYSTROM VILLAGE, LIKE ATCHISON VILLAGE (HAER CA-326-N), HOUSED WORKERS DURING WORLD WAR II - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Nystrom Village, Marina & Maine Streets, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  20. 33 CFR 80.1118 - Marina Del Rey, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Marina Del Rey, CA. 80.1118 Section 80.1118 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1118 Marina Del Rey, CA. (a) A line drawn from...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1124 - Ventura Marina, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ventura Marina, CA. 80.1124 Section 80.1124 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1124 Ventura Marina, CA. A line drawn from...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1118 - Marina Del Rey, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marina Del Rey, CA. 80.1118 Section 80.1118 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1118 Marina Del Rey, CA. (a) A line drawn from...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1124 - Ventura Marina, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ventura Marina, CA. 80.1124 Section 80.1124 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1124 Ventura Marina, CA. A line drawn from...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1124 - Ventura Marina, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventura Marina, CA. 80.1124 Section 80.1124 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1124 Ventura Marina, CA. A line drawn from...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1124 - Ventura Marina, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ventura Marina, CA. 80.1124 Section 80.1124 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1124 Ventura Marina, CA. A line drawn from...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1118 - Marina Del Rey, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Marina Del Rey, CA. 80.1118 Section 80.1118 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1118 Marina Del Rey, CA. (a) A line drawn from...

  7. TOTAL DISSOLVED AND BIOAVAILABLE METALS AT LAKE TEXOMA MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved metals in water and total metals in sediments have been measured at marina areas in Lake Texoma during June 1999 to October 2001, and October 2001, respectively. The metals most often found in the highest concentrations in marina water were Na and Ca, followed by Mg an...

  8. A New Heterotrophic Cryptomonad: Hemiarma marina n. g., n. sp.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-11-01

    We report a new heterotrophic cryptomonad Hemiarma marina n. g., n. sp. that was collected from a seaweed sample from the Republic of Palau. In our molecular phylogenetic analyses using the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, H. marina formed a clade with two marine environmental sequences, and the clade was placed as a sister lineage of the freshwater cryptomonad environmental clade CRY1. Alternatively, in the concatenated large and small subunit ribosomal RNA gene phylogeny, H. marina was placed as a sister lineage of Goniomonas. Light and electron microscopic observations showed that H. marina shares several ultrastructural features with cryptomonads, such as flattened mitochondrial cristae, a periplast cell covering, and ejectisomes that consist of two coiled ribbon structures. On the other hand, H. marina exhibited unique behaviors, such as attaching to substrates with its posterior flagellum and displaying a jumping motion. H. marina also had unique periplast arrangement and flagellar transitional region. On the basis of both molecular and morphological information, we concluded that H. marina should be treated as new genus and species of cryptomonads. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  9. DIGITAL IMAGE ANALYSIS OF ZOSTERA MARINA LEAF INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for assessing leaf injury in Zostera marina (eelgrass) utilize subjective indexes for desiccation injury and wasting disease. Because of the subjective nature of these measures, they are inherently imprecise making them difficult to use in quantifying complex leaf...

  10. DIGITAL IMAGE ANALYSIS OF ZOSTERA MARINA LEAF INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current methods for assessing leaf injury in Zostera marina (eelgrass) utilize subjective indexes for desiccation injury and wasting disease. Because of the subjective nature of these measures, they are inherently imprecise making them difficult to use in quantifying complex leaf...

  11. Toxicity comparison between Chattonella marina and Karenia brevis using marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma): Evidence against the suspected ichthyotoxins of Chattonella marina.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Xu, Jingliang; Tsang, Tsui Yun; Au, Doris W T

    2010-07-01

    The marine alga Chattonella marina is often associated with massive fish mortality worldwide. Here, we challenge brevetoxins and free fatty acids as the ichthyotoxins of C. marina by comparing the toxicity of C. marina with a brevetoxins-producing alga Karenia brevis as well as their organic solvent extracts using the seawater medaka Oryzias melastigma. Opposite to K. brevis, toxicity of C. marina was highly correlated with its growth rate and exhibited no dose response relationship between cell density and fish mortality. Fish exposed to C. marina developed significant hyperventilation response, but K. brevis induced hypoventilation response in medaka. Moreover, the organic extracts from C. marina showed no toxicity to fish whereas organic extracts from K. brevis showed significantly higher toxicity than the whole K. brevis culture. The toxins produced by C. marina may be protein in nature or small and labile molecular compounds which are not able to be extracted by traditional organic extraction methods.

  12. 75 FR 1110 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Marina Abramovic: The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Exhibition Determinations: ``Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the... included in the exhibition ``Marina Abramovic: The Artist Is Present,'' imported from abroad for temporary...

  13. Roseivirga marina sp. nov., isolated from seawater.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Sun, Cong; Wang, Rui-Jun; Wu, Min

    2015-11-01

    Strain PSRT was isolated from seawater of the Pacific Ocean. Cells of the strain were Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped and motile by gliding. Growth was observed at 4-40 °C (optimum 25-30 °C), at pH 6.0-9.5 (optimum pH 7.0-7.5) and with 0.5-8 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 2-3 %). The major fatty acids were iso-C15 : 1 G (18.9 %), iso-C15 : 0 (26.3 %) and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (17.9 %). The predominant isoprenoid quinone was MK-7, and the DNA G+C content was 49.3 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain PSRT was most closely related to Roseivirga spongicola UST030701-084T (96.9 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity), and they formed a distinct clade in neighbour-joining, maximum-likelihood and maximum-parsimony phylogenetic trees with significant bootstrap supports. Based on phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic characteristics, strain PSRT represents a novel species of the genus Roseivirga, for which the name Roseivirga marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PSRT ( = MCCC 1K00459T = KCTC 42444T).

  14. Salinity tolerance and genetic diversity of the dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Li, Yun; Chen, Jiaxin

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the relationship between salinity tolerance and genetic diversity of plankton, we collected a wild species of plankton from Taipingjiao, Qingdao. The fragment of ITS1-5.8S rDNA-ITS2 was extracted and sequenced. The results showed that the plankton belongs to Oxyrrhis marina. The salinity tolerance of O. marina ranges from 4 to 60. Seven selected groups were built up to evaluate salinity tolerance and to assess genetic diversity by RAPD. The salinity tolerance comparison revealed considerable differences among groups: the strains of O. marina in group 4 could survive under salinity from 4 to 32, while the strains selected for salinity 60 died under the salinity lower than 16. Analysis of genetic diversity of the seven groups showed that the mean genetic diversity index value was 0.28, but it was only 0.16 in selected group of 4 and was 0.24 for group 60. The result of AMOVA suggested a significantly positive relationship between the salinity tolerance and genetic diversity of O. marina ( P<0.01). This study indicates that consideration of intraspecific genetic divergence in O. marina might be indispensable when using it as a model in the study of salinity tolerance of wild plankton.

  15. Economic Impacts from Spending by Marina Slip Reenter at Raystown Lake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Reservoir, marina • Raystown Lake , marina • Hartwell Lake , private dock • Lake Barkley, private dock • Lake Sidney Lanier, private dock and marina ERDC...ney Lanier ( Georgia ), Raystown Lake (Pennsylvania), and Harry S. Tru- man Dam and Reservoir (Missouri). The ERB staff designed the survey...ER D C/ EL T R- 08 -5 Recreation Management Support Program Economic Impacts from Spending by Marina Slip Renters at Raystown Lake

  16. 78 FR 29022 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the...'19'' W (NAD 83) for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display listed in 33 CFR 165.1191...

  17. 77 FR 37604 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks, Berkeley Marina, Berkeley, CA... enforce the safety zone for the Berkeley Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in the Captain of the... Marina Fourth of July Fireworks display in 33 CFR 165.1191. This safety zone will be in effect from 9:30...

  18. 75 FR 4783 - Federal Consistency Appeal by Villa Marina Yacht Harbour, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Federal Consistency Appeal by Villa Marina Yacht Harbour... record in an administrative appeal filed by Villa Marina Yacht Harbour, Inc. (Villa Marina). DATES: The...

  19. Cumulative impact of marinas on estuarine water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, T. L.; Overton, M. F.; Brill, E. D.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a modeling approach for assessing and managing the cumulative impact of marinas on estuarine systems. In doing so, both a water-quality model and a planning and management model are developed. The water-quality model predicts biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and fecal coliform (FC) loadings from marina sources in a hypothetical North Carolina estuary. By running the water-quality model repeatedly with varied loading input, impact coefficients are determined. These impact coefficients are used in the planning and management model, the output of which gives the sizes and locations of marinas in the estuarine system such that dissolved oxygen (DO) and FC water-quality standards are maintained. Five different estuarine development scenarios are considered. Each scenario is evaluated with respect to both maximum and uniform land development constraints. In addition, two alternative fecal coliform standards are used with each of the development options.

  20. Cumulative Impact of Marinas on Estuarine Water Quality

    PubMed

    McAllister; Overton; Brill

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a modeling approach for assessing and managing the cumulative impact of marinas on estuarine systems. In doing so, both a water-quality model and a planning and management model are developed. The water-quality model predicts biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and fecal coliform (FC) loadings from marina sources in a hypothetical North Carolina estuary. By running the water-quality model repeatedly with varied loading input, impact coefficients are determined. These impact coefficients are used in the planning and management model, the output of which gives the sizes and locations of marinas in the estuarine system such that dissolved oxygen (DO) and FC water-quality standards are maintained.Five different estuarine development scenarios are considered. Each scenario is evaluated with respect to both maximum and uniform land development constraints. In addition, two alternative fecal coliform standards are used with each of the development options.

  1. Euzebyella marina sp. nov., isolated from seawater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Jiao; Zhao, Jia-Rui; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Chen, Guo-Zhong; Zhou, Ming-Yang; Mo, Xu-Hua; He, Hai-Lun; Chen, Shiyong

    2017-04-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, yellow-pigmented, non-flagellated, non-gliding, oxidase- and catalase-positive bacterium, designated CY01T, was isolated from seawater of the Yellow Sea. CY01T grew at 15-37 °C (optimum, 30 °C), pH 5-8 (optimum, 6.5-7.5) and with 0.5-12 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 0.5-3.5 %). It could not produce flexirubin-type pigment or reduce nitrate to nitrite. CY01T showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the type strain of Euzebyella saccharophila (97.0 %) and clustered tightly with the species of the genus Euzebyella in the phylogenetic trees based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences. The major cellular fatty acids of CY01T were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 1G and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone MK-6. Polar lipids included phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), four unidentified lipids and one unidentified aminolipid. The genomic DNA G+C content was 38.2 mol%. Based on the results of the polyphasic characterization of CY01T, it represents a novel species of the genus Euzebyella, for which the name Euzebyella marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CY01T (=CCTCC AB 2014348T=KCTC 42440T).

  2. Susceptibility of fish to Chattonella marina is determined by its tolerance to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Xu, Jingliang; Chan, Alice K Y; Au, Doris W T

    2011-01-01

    The harmful alga Chattonella marina has caused massive fish kills and economic losses worldwide. However, the fish kill mechanisms by C. marina have not been identified. The present study has confirmed that a significant elevation of blood osmolality is the universal response in moribund fish exposed to C. marina and the possible reasons leading to contradictory reports were identified. Both osmotic distress and respiratory impairment are important mechanisms leading to fish kill by C. marina. The susceptibility of marine fish to C. marina appears to be inversely related to their tolerance to hypoxia, with the hypoxia intolerant goldlined seabream being the most susceptible, and the hypoxia tolerant green grouper being the most tolerant to C. marina. Further studies in the marine medaka (Oryzias melastigma) showed that fish susceptibility to C. marina is directly related to susceptibility of the fish to hypoxia, but not related to its tolerance to hypersalinity stress.

  3. Photoresponse in the heterotrophic marine dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Aaron J; Sherr, Barry F; Sherr, Evelyn B

    2011-01-01

    Expressed rhodopsins were detected by proteomic analysis in an investigation of potential signal receptors in the cell membrane of the marine heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina (CCMP604). We inferred these to be sensory rhodopsins, a type of G-protein-coupled receptor trans-membrane signaling molecule. Because phototactic behavior based on sensory rhodopsins has been reported in other protists, we investigated the photosensory response of O. marina. This dinoflagellate exhibited strongest positive phototaxis at low levels (2-3 μE/m(2)/s) of white light when the cells were previously light adapted and well fed. Positive phototaxis was also found for blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), and red (680 nm) wavelengths. In a further test, O. marina showed significantly greater phototaxis toward concentrated algal food illuminated by blue light to stimulate red chlorophyll-a autofluorescence in the prey, compared with using bleached algae as prey. Concentration of a cytoplasmic downstream messenger molecule, cyclic adenosine monophosphate, a component of the signaling pathway of G-protein-coupled receptor molecules, rapidly increased in O. marina cells after exposure to white light. In addition, treatment with hydroxylamine, a rhodopsin signaling inhibitor, significantly decreased their phototactic response. Our results demonstrate that a heterotrophic marine dinoflagellate can orient to light based on rhodopsins present in the outer cell membrane and may be able to use photosensory response to detect algal prey based on chlorophyll autofluorescence. © 2011 The Author(s). Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology© 2011 International Society of Protistologists.

  4. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in oyster tissue around three coastal marinas

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.M.; Stokes, T.P.

    1985-12-01

    Marinas present the potential for introduction of various pollutants into the surrounding waters such as coliform bacteria, primary pathogens, heavy metals, and petroleum hydrocarbons. Little data have been presented specifically addressing the effects of recreational marinas on petroleum hydrocarbon levels or, for that matter, other constituent levels in oysters near those marinas. In order to obtain such data, a comprehensive assessment of water and oyster quality around three coastal marinas was conducted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental control (SCDHEC) during 1983. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were selected as the petroleum hydrocarbon fraction of interest since they are mainly of pyrogenic origin; have been shown to be the most toxic/carcinogenic fraction of oil; have been shown to affect the respiration and heart rates of mussels; and have been shown to be linked to neoplasia in clams and proliferative disorders in mussels. C. virginica was chosen as the mollusc of interest because of its widespread distribution in the estuaries of South Carolina, its importance as an economic and recreational resource, and its suitability as a sentinel organism for monitoring coastal pollution.

  5. Splenic immunotoxicity in developing cane toads (Rhinella marina) from Bermuda.

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Mathis, Michael; Fort, Chelsea E; Fort, Hayley M; Fort, Troy D; Linzey, Donald W; Bacon, Jamie P

    2016-10-01

    The impacts of contaminated sediment from 2 ponds in Bermuda on immune function in newly metamorphosed cane toads were examined. In the present study, a partial life-cycle experiment exposing Gosner stage 20 cane toad tadpoles to pond sediment and laboratory culture water through metamorphosis and into a juvenile state was performed. A basic immunology battery, including general necropsy, spleen somatic index, spleen white pulp content, splenocyte tissue density, and splenocyte viability, was conducted in newly metamorphosed Rhinella marina exposed to Bermuda freshwater sediment and baseline specimens collected from 2 separate populations in south Texas and south Florida, USA. Immune function was evaluated using a lymphocyte proliferation assay with subset specimens infected with Mycobacterium chelonae. In the Bermuda population exposed to pond sediment, splenocyte tissue density was markedly lower and lymphocyte proliferation substantially less relative to cohorts exposed to control sediment and to the North American populations. Considerable increases in spleen weight and liver and spleen lesions related to M. chelonae infection were recorded in challenged Bermuda R. marina compared with unchallenged specimens. Overall, immune function in Bermuda R. marina was compromised compared with North American mainland R. marina regardless of treatment but more dramatically in specimens exposed to Bermuda pond sediments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2604-2612. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  6. TOTAL AND BIOAVAILABLE METALS AT MARINA SEDIMENTS IN LAKE TEXOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total and bioavailable metals in sediments were measured at marina areas in Lake Texoma during the fall of 2001. The metals most often found in the highest concentrations in sediments were Ca (56811 mg/kg) and Al (31095 mg/kg), followed by Fe (19393 mg/kg), K (6089 mg/kg), and Mg...

  7. 18 CFR 1304.404 - Commercial marina harbor limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Commercial marina harbor limits. 1304.404 Section 1304.404 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION IN THE TENNESSEE RIVER SYSTEM AND REGULATION OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER...

  8. TOTAL AND BIOAVAILABLE METALS AT MARINA SEDIMENTS IN LAKE TEXOMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total and bioavailable metals in sediments were measured at marina areas in Lake Texoma during the fall of 2001. The metals most often found in the highest concentrations in sediments were Ca (56811 mg/kg) and Al (31095 mg/kg), followed by Fe (19393 mg/kg), K (6089 mg/kg), and Mg...

  9. Economic Impacts from Spending by Marina Slip Renters at Harry S. Truman Dam and Reservoir

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Raystown Lake , marina • Hartwell Lake , private dock • Lake Barkley, private dock • Lake Sidney Lanier, private dock and marina ERDC/EL TR-08-7 ix...and Development Center (ERDC) surveyed marina slip renters at Lake Sidney Lanier ( Georgia ), Raystown Lake (Pennsylvania), and Harry S. Truman Dam...are adjusted to 2004 dollars. The economic im- pacts estimated for Harry S. Truman Dam and Reservoir are useful for accountability purposes, lake

  10. 6. VIEW OF TOWN CENTER, MARINA VIEW TOWERS SOUTH BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF TOWN CENTER, MARINA VIEW TOWERS SOUTH BUILDING (ORIGINALLY TOWN CENTER PLAZA WEST) AT 1000-1100 SIXTH STREET; TOWN CENTER PLAZA WEST WAS DESIGNED BY I.M. PEI & PARTNERS AND BUILT IN 1962 BY WEBB & KNAPP - Southwest Washington, Urban Renewal Area, Bounded by Independence Avenue, Washington Avenue, South Capitol Street, Canal Street, P Street, Maine Avenue & Washington Channel, Fourteenth Street, D Street, & Twelfth Street, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Anti-adipogenic and Pro-osteoblastogenic Activities of Spergularia marina Extract.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, Fatih; Kim, Jung-Ae; Ahn, Byul-Nim; Kim, Mihyang; Kong, Chang-Suk

    2014-09-01

    For decades, Spergularia marina, a local food that is popular in South Korea, has been regarded as a nutritious source of amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. While several halophytes are reported to possess distinct bioactivities, S. marina has yet to be promoted as a natural source of bioactives. In this study, the effects of S. marina on the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and the osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts and C2C12 myoblast cells were evaluated. The anti-adipogenic effect of S. marina was assessed by measuring lipid accumulation and adipogenic differentiation marker expression. S. marina treatment significantly reduced lipid accumulation and notably decreased the gene levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c. In addition, S. marina enhanced osteoblast differentiation, as indicated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and increased levels of osteoblastogenesis indicators, namely bone morphogenetic protein-2, osteocalcin, and type I collagen. In conclusion, S. marina could be a source of functional food ingredients that improve osteoporosis and obesity. Further studies, including activity-based fractionation, will elucidate the mechanism of action and active ingredients of S. marina, which would provide researchers with a better understanding of the nutraceutical and therapeutic applications of S. marina.

  12. Anti-adipogenic and Pro-osteoblastogenic Activities of Spergularia marina Extract

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, Fatih; Kim, Jung-Ae; Ahn, Byul-Nim; Kim, Mihyang; Kong, Chang-Suk

    2014-01-01

    For decades, Spergularia marina, a local food that is popular in South Korea, has been regarded as a nutritious source of amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. While several halophytes are reported to possess distinct bioactivities, S. marina has yet to be promoted as a natural source of bioactives. In this study, the effects of S. marina on the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and the osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts and C2C12 myoblast cells were evaluated. The anti-adipogenic effect of S. marina was assessed by measuring lipid accumulation and adipogenic differentiation marker expression. S. marina treatment significantly reduced lipid accumulation and notably decreased the gene levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c. In addition, S. marina enhanced osteoblast differentiation, as indicated by increased alkaline phosphatase activity and increased levels of osteoblastogenesis indicators, namely bone morphogenetic protein-2, osteocalcin, and type I collagen. In conclusion, S. marina could be a source of functional food ingredients that improve osteoporosis and obesity. Further studies, including activity-based fractionation, will elucidate the mechanism of action and active ingredients of S. marina, which would provide researchers with a better understanding of the nutraceutical and therapeutic applications of S. marina. PMID:25320716

  13. Fragility of Floating Docks for Small Craft Marinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, A.; Eskijian, M.; Lynett, P. J.; Ayca, A.

    2015-12-01

    Because of the damage resulting from the 2010 Chile and 2011 Japanese tele-tsunamis, damage to the small craft marinas in California has become an important concern. This paper will explain the methodology and results used to simulate the demand and also the structural capacity of the floating dock system, composed of floating docks, fingers and moored vessels during tsunami events. The intent is to develop a predictive tool to understand the vulnerability of California's small craft harbors to tsunami events. To validate the methodology, the probabilistic model will be applied to Santa Cruz Harbor. Maps of maximum velocity and mean current direction from the 2011 Japan tsunami have been developed using a numerical model. Cleat and pile guide locations will be recorded and georeferenced from aerial images before the event. The fragility curves for each dock/finger system will be compared with damage reports and aerial images from just after the tsunami event. A discussion of how the fragility curves compare with the damage reports will be included. It is anticipated that these curves will be useful to marina operators to use as a tool to determine where rehabilitation might be necessary to mitigate some of the damage from the next event. Conclusions will focus on how results can be used by marina operators to reduce harbor vulnerability to tsunamis.

  14. Heavy metals in oyster tissue around three coastal marinas

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.M.; Thompson, A.M.

    1986-04-01

    The past decade has presented an unprecedented period of growth and development along the coastline of South Carolina. The majority of this development has been to serve the recreation and tourism industry and, as such, has included the construction of numerous recreational marinas in the coastal waters of the State. Various plans have been presented for the siting of marinas in pristine estuarine waters. This has raised much concern due to the possible impacts of such development on the plentiful oyster resource found in those waters. Marinas present the potential for the introduction of pollutants such as heavy metals into the surrounding waters. This investigation was conducted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) during 1983, and yielded a multifaceted data base composed of physiocochemical and bacteriological analyses from water, chemical analyses from sediment and chemical/bacteriological physiological analyses from the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin). C. virginica was chosen as the organism of interest due to its wide distribution in the estuaries of South Carolina, its importance as an economic and recreational resource and its suitability as a sentinel organism for monitoring coastal pollution.

  15. Development of approaches to predict the distribution of Zostera marina and Z. japonica in Pacific Northwest estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dominant species of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries is the intertidal and shallow subtidal seagrass, Zostera marina. Beds of Z. marina constitute a critical habitat, including providing habitat for juvenile salmon. Additionally, the n...

  16. Development of approaches to predict the distribution of Zostera marina and Z. japonica in Pacific Northwest estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dominant species of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries is the intertidal and shallow subtidal seagrass, Zostera marina. Beds of Z. marina constitute a critical habitat, including providing habitat for juvenile salmon. Additionally, the n...

  17. Regenerated extracellular NH4 (+) affects the motile chemosensory responses of batch-cultured Oxyrrhis marina.

    PubMed

    Martel, Claire M

    2010-04-01

    Regenerated extracellular NH4 (+)in laboratory batch cultures of the heterotrophic marine microzooplankter Oxyrrhis marina affects the strength and consistency of chemotaxes elicited by synthetic and biogenic chemoattractants. The ecological relevance of experiments with batch-cultured O. marina and limitations of the microcapillary assay for the study of chemosensory behaviours are discussed.

  18. Sensitivity to chilling temperatures and distribution differ in the mangrove species Kandelia candel and Avicennia marina.

    PubMed

    Kao, Wen-Yuan; Shih, Chen-Ning; Tsai, Tyng-Tyng

    2004-07-01

    We compared the effects of short-term (hours) and long-term (days) exposure to chilling temperatures on the photosynthetic gas exchange, leaf characteristics and chlorophyll a fluorescence of seedlings of the mangrove species Kandelia candel Druce and Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. Both species occur along the west coast of Taiwan, but K. candel occurs further north than A. marina. We hypothesized that temperature was one of the major environmental factors limiting the northern distribution of A. marina. Avicennia marina was more sensitive to chilling temperatures than K. candel. Leaves of both species showed reductions in light-saturated photosynthetic rates (Amax), stomatal conductance (gs) and quantum yield of photosystem II after a 1-h exposure to 15 degrees C, with A. marina showing significantly greater reductions in Amax and gs than K. candel. No significant differences in Amax, gs and electron transport rate (ETR) were found between leaves of K. candel grown at 15 and 30 degrees C for 10 days. However, leaves of A. marina grown for 10 days at 15 degrees C had significantly lower Amax, gs and ETR than plants grown at 30 degrees C. After 20 days at 15 degrees C, leaf mass per area of both species was increased significantly, whereas area-based chlorophyll concentrations were reduced, with significantly greater changes in A. marina than in K. candel. We concluded that sensitivity to low winter temperatures is a primary limiting factor in the distribution of A. marina along the western coast of Taiwan. Copyright 2004 Heron Publishing

  19. Comparison of photosynthetic characteristics of the seagrasscongeners Zostera marina L. and Zostera japonica Ascher. & Graeb.

    EPA Science Inventory

    On the Pacific coast of North America two seagrass species in the genus Zostera co-exist; the native species Zostera marina, and an introduced species, Z. japonica. These two species typically occupy separate habitat niches, with Z. marina occupying the lower intertidal and shal...

  20. 18 CFR 1304.403 - Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks. 1304.403 Section 1304.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE... OTHER ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.403 Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks. All...

  1. 18 CFR 1304.403 - Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks. 1304.403 Section 1304.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE... OTHER ALTERATIONS Miscellaneous § 1304.403 Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks. All...

  2. Comparison of photosynthetic characteristics of the seagrasscongeners Zostera marina L. and Zostera japonica Ascher. & Graeb.

    EPA Science Inventory

    On the Pacific coast of North America two seagrass species in the genus Zostera co-exist; the native species Zostera marina, and an introduced species, Z. japonica. These two species typically occupy separate habitat niches, with Z. marina occupying the lower intertidal and shal...

  3. 76 FR 37650 - Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks Display Berkeley, CA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Berkeley Pier, Berkeley, CA in support of the 4th of July Festival Berkeley Marina Fireworks...

  4. The protozoa dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina contains selenoproteins and the relevant translation apparatus.

    PubMed

    Osaka, Takashi; Beika, Asa; Hattori, Asuka; Kohno, Yoshinori; Kato, Koichi H; Mizutani, Takaharu

    2003-01-03

    In the phylogenetic tree, selenoproteins and the corresponding translation machinery are found in Archaea, Eubacteria, and animals, but not in fungi and higher plants. As very little is known about Protozoa, we searched for the presence of selenoproteins in the primitive dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina, belonging to the Protoctista kingdom. Four selenoproteins could be obtained from O. marina cells cultured in the presence of 75Se. Using O. marina or bovine liver cytosolic extracts, we could serylate and selenylate in vitro total O. marina tRNAs. Moreover, the existence of a tRNA(Sec) could be deduced from in vivo experiments. Lastly, an anti-serum against the specialized mammalian translation elongation factor mSelB reacted with a protein of 48-kDa molecular mass. Altogether, our data showed that O. marina contains selenoproteins and suggests that the corresponding translation machinery is related to that found in animals.

  5. Role of commercial harbours and recreational marinas in the spread of non-indigenous fouling species.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Jasmine; Caronni, Sarah; Occhipinti-Ambrogi, Anna; Marchini, Agnese

    2017-09-01

    The role of commercial harbours as sink and source habitats for non-indigenous species (NIS) and the role of recreational boating for their secondary spread were investigated by analysing the fouling community of five Italian harbours and five marinas in the western Mediterranean Sea. It was first hypothesised that NIS assemblages in the recreational marinas were subsets of those occurring in commercial harbours. However, the data did not consistently support this hypothesis: the NIS pools of some marinas significantly diverged from harbours even belonging to the same coastal stretches, including NIS occurring only in marinas. This study confirms harbours as hotspots for marine NIS, but also reveals that numbers of NIS in some marinas is higher than expected, suggesting that recreational vessels effectively facilitate NIS spread. It is recommended that this vector of NIS introduction is taken into account in the future planning of sustainable development of maritime tourism in Europe.

  6. Blue carbon stocks in Baltic Sea eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhr, Maria Emilia; Boström, Christoffer; Canal-Vergés, Paula; Holmer, Marianne

    2016-11-01

    Although seagrasses cover only a minor fraction of the ocean seafloor, their carbon sink capacity accounts for nearly one-fifth of the total oceanic carbon burial and thus play a critical structural and functional role in many coastal ecosystems. We sampled 10 eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows in Finland and 10 in Denmark to explore seagrass carbon stocks (Corg stock) and carbon accumulation rates (Corg accumulation) in the Baltic Sea area. The study sites represent a gradient from sheltered to exposed locations in both regions to reflect expected minimum and maximum stocks and accumulation. The Corg stock integrated over the top 25 cm of the sediment averaged 627 g C m-2 in Finland, while in Denmark the average Corg stock was over 6 times higher (4324 g C m-2). A conservative estimate of the total organic carbon pool in the regions ranged between 6.98 and 44.9 t C ha-1. Our results suggest that the Finnish eelgrass meadows are minor carbon sinks compared to the Danish meadows, and that majority of the Corg produced in the Finnish meadows is exported. Our analysis further showed that > 40 % of the variation in the Corg stocks was explained by sediment characteristics, i.e. dry density, porosity and silt content. In addition, our analysis show that the root : shoot ratio of Z. marina explained > 12 % and the contribution of Z. marina detritus to the sediment surface Corg pool explained > 10 % of the variation in the Corg stocks. The mean monetary value for the present carbon storage and carbon sink capacity of eelgrass meadows in Finland and Denmark, were 281 and 1809 EUR ha-1, respectively. For a more comprehensive picture of seagrass carbon storage capacity, we conclude that future blue carbon studies should, in a more integrative way, investigate the interactions between sediment biogeochemistry, seascape structure, plant species architecture and the hydrodynamic regime.

  7. A mutualistic interaction between the bacterium Pseudomonas asplenii and the harmful algal species Chattonella marina (Raphidophyceae).

    PubMed

    Park, Bum Soo; Joo, Jae-Hyoung; Baek, Kyung-Duck; Han, Myung-Soo

    2016-06-01

    Several studies on various Chattonella species have reported that bacteria may play an important role in Chattonella bloom initiation, however, no studies have described how these bacteria promote the growth of C. marina. The interaction between C. marina and bacteria was investigated for identification and characterization of potential growth-promoting bacteria. In preliminary tests, the growth promoting effect of Pseudomonas species (25 strains) was investigated and P. asplenii (≥2.27) was determined as a growth-promoting bacteria for both C. marina strains (CCMP 2049 and 2050). This bacterium exerted optimal growth-promoting effects on C. marina, causing an increase in the initial density of P. asplenii to approximately 1×10(7)cellsmL(-1), which was used as the initial density in this study. To determine whether the growth-promoting activity was direct or indirect, P. asplenii was incubated in the algal media and then a filtrate of this culture was added to both C. marina strains. The P. asplenii filtrate stimulated the growth of C. marina and maintained the growth-promoting effects after high temperature (121°C for 20min) and pressure (15psi) treatment. Thus, P. asplenii is able to promote C. marina growth through the release of a heat-resistant substance, such as inorganic nutrients. A nutrient analysis indicated that this bacterium elevated the phosphate concentration. Interestingly, P. asplenii was unable to survive in phosphate-limited media but could grow in phosphate-limited media incubating C. marina. Moreover, this bacterium could secrete significantly more phosphate in the presence of C. marina (p<0.0001). These results suggested that P. asplenii and C. marina may have a mutualistic interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments.

  9. Reconstructing Contaminant Deposition in a San Francisco Bay Marina, California

    PubMed Central

    Love, Adam H.; Esser, Bradley K.; Hunt, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Two sediment cores were collected from a marina in the San Francisco Bay to characterize historical sediment contamination resulting from the direct discharge of industrial wastewater from Naval Air Station Alameda. Depth profiles of trace metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, and radionuclides were determined with a 12-cm spacing down to a depth of 120 cm. The chronology of sediment accumulation is established by depth profiles of sedimentary time markers in conjunction with information on site history. The traditional approach of determining sediment accumulation rates by measuring atmospheric 210Pb deposition was obscured by a larger source of 210Pb in the sediments from the decay of anthropogenic 226Ra, likely from luminescent paints used at this facility and released to the marina. The sedimentation rates inferred from the data indicate that the greatest amount of contamination by trace metals and petroleum hydrocarbons took place between 1940 and 1960. In addition, anthropogenic 226Ra activities are positively correlated with some of the contaminants in the sediments, allowing the wastewater discharged from the facility to be distinguished from baywide contamination. In locations such as this, where there is a complex history of contaminant deposition, a source-specific tracer may be the only feasible method of attributing historical contamination to a point source. PMID:20333267

  10. Sulfide Intrusion and Detoxification in the Seagrass Zostera marina

    PubMed Central

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Gaseous sulfide intrusion into seagrasses growing in sulfidic sediments causes little or no harm to the plant, indicating the presence of an unknown sulfide tolerance or detoxification mechanism. We assessed such mechanism in the seagrass Zostera marina in the laboratory and in the field with scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, chromatographic and spectrophotometric methods, and stable isotope tracing coupled with a mass balance of sulfur compounds. We found that Z. marina detoxified gaseous sediment-derived sulfide through incorporation and that most of the detoxification occurred in underground tissues, where sulfide intrusion was greatest. Elemental sulfur was a major detoxification compound, precipitating on the inner wall of the aerenchyma of underground tissues. Sulfide was metabolized into thiols and entered the plant sulfur metabolism as well as being stored as sulfate throughout the plant. We conclude that avoidance of sulfide exposure by reoxidation of sulfide in the rhizosphere or aerenchyma and tolerance of sulfide intrusion by incorporation of sulfur in the plant are likely major survival strategies of seagrasses in sulfidic sediments. PMID:26030258

  11. Influence of neighboring plants on shading stress resistance and recovery of eelgrass, Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Camilla; Boström, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    Stressful environments may enhance the occurrence of facilitative interspecific interactions between plants. In several regions, Zostera marina occurs in mixed assemblages. However, the potential effects of plant diversity on stress responses and stability properties of Z. marina are poorly understood. We investigated the resistance and recovery of Z. marina subjected to shading (1 mo) in a field experiment lasting 2.5 mo. We shaded Z. marina planted in mono- and polycultures (Potamogeton perfoliatus, P. pectinatus, P. filiformis) in a factorial design (Shading×Richness) at 2 m depth. We estimated the resistance and recovery of Z. marina by measuring four response variables. Polyculture Z. marina lost proportionally less biomass than monocultures, thus having a greater resistance to shading. In contrast, after a 1 mo recovery period, monocultures exhibited higher biomass gain, and a faster recovery than polycultures. Our results suggest that plant species richness enhances the resistance of Z. marina through facilitative mechanisms, while the faster recovery in monocultures is possibly due to interspecific competition. Our results highlight the need of a much better understanding of the effects of interspecific interactions on ecosystem processes in mixed seagrass meadows, and the preservation of diverse plant assemblages to maintain ecosystem functioning.

  12. Simultaneous measurements of H+ and O2 fluxes in Zostera marina and its physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Lin, A-Peng; Wang, Guang-Ce; Zhou, Wen-Qin

    2013-08-01

    Zostera marina (eelgrass) is an important ecological component of many shallow, temperate lagoons. Evidence suggests that Z. marina has a high bicarbonate utilization capability, which could be promoted by possible proton extrusion and the consequent formation of an 'acid zone' in the apoplastic space (unstirred layer) of its leaves. It has been found that 50 mM of the buffer Tris significantly inhibited the photosynthetic O(2) evolution of Z. marina and it was proposed that this was because of Tris's ability to bond with protons outside the cell wall. To investigate if H(+) played an important role in the photosynthetic carbon utilization of Z. marina, it is very important to simultaneously monitor the photosynthesis status and possible H(+) fluxes. However, probably because of the lack of suitable techniques, this has never been attempted. In this study, experiments were undertaken on Z. marina by monitoring H(+) and O(2) fluxes and the relative electron transport rates during light-dark transition. During stable photosynthesis, in addition to an obvious O(2) outflow, there was a significant net H(+) influx connected to Z. marina photosynthesis. The inhibitory effects of both Tris and respiration inhibitors on apparent O(2) evolution of Z. marina were confirmed. However, evidence did not support the proposed Tris inhibition mechanism.

  13. Seagrasses are negatively affected by organic matter loading and Arenicola marina activity in a laboratory experiment.

    PubMed

    Govers, Laura L; Pieck, Timon; Bouma, Tjeerd J; Suykerbuyk, Wouter; Smolders, Alfons J P; van Katwijk, Marieke M

    2014-06-01

    When two ecosystem engineers share the same natural environment, the outcome of their interaction will be unclear if they have contrasting habitat-modifying effects (e.g., sediment stabilization vs. sediment destabilization). The outcome of the interaction may depend on local environmental conditions such as season or sediment type, which may affect the extent and type of habitat modification by the ecosystem engineers involved. We mechanistically studied the interaction between the sediment-stabilizing seagrass Zostera noltii and the bioturbating and sediment-destabilizing lugworm Arenicola marina, which sometimes co-occur for prolonged periods. We investigated (1) if the negative sediment destabilization effect of A. marina on Z. noltii might be counteracted by positive biogeochemical effects of bioirrigation (burrow flushing) by A. marina in sulfide-rich sediments, and (2) if previously observed nutrient release by A. marina bioirrigation could affect seagrasses. We tested the individual and combined effects of A. marina presence and high porewater sulfide concentrations (induced by organic matter addition) on seagrass biomass in a full factorial lab experiment. Contrary to our expectations, we did not find an effect of A. marina on porewater sulfide concentrations. A. marina activities affected the seagrass physically as well as by pumping nutrients, mainly ammonium and phosphate, from the porewater to the surface water, which promoted epiphyte growth on seagrass leaves in our experimental set-up. We conclude that A. marina bioirrigation did not alleviate sulfide stress to seagrasses. Instead, we found synergistic negative effects of the presence of A. marina and high sediment sulfide levels on seagrass biomass.

  14. Unravelling the pathway of respiratory toxicity in goldlined seabream (Rhabdosargus sarba) induced by the harmful alga Chattonella marina.

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Xu, Jingliang; Chiang, Michael W L; Au, Doris W T

    2011-08-01

    The harmful alga Chattonella marina has caused massive fish kills and economic losses worldwide. Suffocation is generally believed to be the major cause of fish death by C. marina. However, the specific mechanisms leading to respiratory disorder in fish and subsequent fish kills by C. marina remain unknown. The goldlined seabream, highly susceptible to C. marina, was employed to investigate temporal changes of physiological, histopathological and biochemical parameters related to respiratory function at different stages of exposure to C. marina. Hemoglobin oxidation and blood lyses were not found in goldlined seabream exposed to C. marina, which could not be the key reasons accounting for pO(2) drop in the stressed fish. Gill histopathology such as irregular organization of lamellae, mucous with algal cells trapped in interfilamental spaces, were typical in C. marina exposed fish. A surge of plasma lactate occurred in goldlined seabream shortly after exposure to C. marina (0.5h) and sustained throughout the exposure period, indicating rapid onset of and persistent anaerobic respiration in C. marina exposed fish. Depletion of plasma glucose was clearly evident in goldlined seabream showing stress symptoms and near death. Yet, fish alive in the C. marina bloom did not exhibit plasma glucose depletion. The results suggest that availability of fermentable fuel as indicated by glucose level is critical to determine fish survival in C. marina exposure. Overall, our findings have rebuked the involvement of hemolysins and/or nitric oxide as the culprits for C. marina toxicity to fish. This study is the first to demonstrate the pathway of respiratory toxicity induced by the harmful alga C. marina in fish.

  15. Hydroacoustic basis for detection and characterization of eelgrass (Zostera marina)

    SciTech Connect

    Sabol, B.; McCarthy, E.; Rocha, K.

    1997-06-01

    Understanding the distribution and density of seagrasses is important for a variety of environmental applications. Physical techniques for detection and characterization are labor and cost intensive and provide little insight into spatial distribution. optical-based techniques are limited by water clarity - frequently resulting in systematic underestimation of the extent of seagrasses. Active hydroacoustic techniques have shown the ability to detect seagrasses but the phenomenology behind detection is poorly understood. Laboratory and in-situ hydroacoustic measurements are presented for eelgrass (Zostera marina), a common seagrass in the United States. Based on these data, hydroacoustic approaches for wide area detection and mapping are discussed and several are demonstrated within areas of established eelgrass beds in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

  16. Effect of Temperature and Nutrient Manipulations on eelgrass Zostera marina L. from the Pacific Northwest, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global climate change will have a large impact on the three predominate drivers of estuarine seagrass productivity, temperature, light and nutrients. I experimentally evaluate the response of Pacific Northwest Z. marina to interactive effects of temperature and nutrient conditio...

  17. Estuarine intertidal sediment temperature variability in Zoster marina and Z. japonica habitats in Yaquina Bay, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical characterization of intertidal estuarine plant habitats over time may reveal distribution-limiting thresholds. Temperature data from loggers embedded in sediment in transects crossing Zostera marina and Z. japonica habitats in lower Yaquina Bay, Oregon display signific...

  18. Estuarine intertidal sediment temperature variability in Zoster marina and Z. japonica habitats in Yaquina Bay, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical characterization of intertidal estuarine plant habitats over time may reveal distribution-limiting thresholds. Temperature data from loggers embedded in sediment in transects crossing Zostera marina and Z. japonica habitats in lower Yaquina Bay, Oregon display signific...

  19. The bathymetric distribution of intertidal eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three coastal estuaries of Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native eelgrass Zostera marina L. within the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones of three Oregon coastal estuaries (Tillamook, Yaquina, and Alsea) were determined by digital classification of aerial color infrared (CIR) orthophotographs. Stratified random surv...

  20. Settlement with Marina will Result in Cleaner Air on Block Island

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A marina in Block Island, R.I., has reduced its emissions and taken steps to comply with federal clean air laws following an inspection and follow-up action from the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  1. Distribution of intertidal eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) with bathymetry in three Pacific Northwest estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native intertidal eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) and non-vegetated substrates in three coastal estuaries of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) were determined using color infrared (CIR) aerial orthophotography during daylight low tides. Comparison of the digital classif...

  2. The bathymetric distribution of intertidal eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three coastal estuaries of Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native eelgrass Zostera marina L. within the intertidal and shallow subtidal zones of three Oregon coastal estuaries (Tillamook, Yaquina, and Alsea) were determined by digital classification of aerial color infrared (CIR) orthophotographs. Stratified random surv...

  3. Recolonization of intertidal Zostera marina L. (eelgrass) following experimental shoot removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recovery of eelgrass (Zostera marina) from physical disturbances is understudied and no attention has been given to the likely differences in damage recovery rates between the continuous lower intertidal perennial meadows and higher intertidal eelgrass patches. In the present...

  4. ZOSTERA MARINA IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARY: WHAT FACTORS CONTROL INTERTIDAL DISTRIBUTION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of four factors (desiccation, macroalgae, erosion, light) on the distribution of Zostera marina was examined across tidal and bathymetric slope gradients. Data detailing seagrass characteristics, including 1 production, macroalgae biomass and sediment characteristics ...

  5. Effect of Temperature and Nutrient Manipulations on eelgrass Zostera marina L. from the Pacific Northwest, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global climate change will have a large impact on the three predominate drivers of estuarine seagrass productivity, temperature, light and nutrients. I experimentally evaluate the response of Pacific Northwest Z. marina to interactive effects of temperature and nutrient conditio...

  6. Recolonization of intertidal Zostera marina L. (eelgrass) following experimental shoot removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    The recovery of eelgrass (Zostera marina) from physical disturbances is understudied and no attention has been given to the likely differences in damage recovery rates between the continuous lower intertidal perennial meadows and higher intertidal eelgrass patches. In the present...

  7. ZOSTERA MARINA IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARY: WHAT FACTORS CONTROL INTERTIDAL DISTRIBUTION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of four factors (desiccation, macroalgae, erosion, light) on the distribution of Zostera marina was examined across tidal and bathymetric slope gradients. Data detailing seagrass characteristics, including 1 production, macroalgae biomass and sediment characteristics ...

  8. Distribution of intertidal eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) with bathymetry in three Pacific Northwest estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Distributions of native intertidal eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) and non-vegetated substrates in three coastal estuaries of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) were determined using color infrared (CIR) aerial orthophotography during daylight low tides. Comparison of the digital classif...

  9. DIGESTIVE BIOAVAILABILITY TO A DEPOSIT FEDDER (ARENICOLA MARINA) OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS ASSOCIATED WITH ANTHRPOGENIC PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine sediments around urban areas serve as catch basins for anthropogenic particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using incubations with gut fluids extracted from a deposit-feeding polychaete (Arenicola marina), we determined the digestive bioavailability ...

  10. Growth and alkaline phosphatase activity of Chattonella marina and Heterosigma akashiwo in response to phosphorus limitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Liang, Yu

    2015-02-01

    The growth and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) of two raphidophyceae species Chattonella marina and Heterosigma akashiwo were investigated in response to P-limitation and subsequent addition of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP, NaH2PO4) and two dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) compounds: guanosine 5-monophosphate (GMP) and triethyl phosphate (TEP). APA levels increased greatly after P-starvation as the decrease of the cellular phosphorus quotes (Qp). C. marina responded to P-limitation quickly and strongly, with 10-fold increase in APA within 24 hr after P-starvation. The larger difference between maximal and minimal QP values in C. marina indicated its high capacity in P storage. APA of H. akashiwo was maximally enlarged about 2.5 times at 48 hr of P-starvation. After the addition of nutrients, cell numbers of C. marina increased in all treatments including the P-free culture, demonstrating the higher endurance of C. marina to P-limitation. However, those of H. akashiwo increased only in DIP and GMP cultures. APA increased only after the addition of the monophosphate ester GMP. The results suggest that quick responses of C. marina to P-limitation, high capacity in P storage as well as endurance for P-depletion provide this species an ecological advantage in phytoplankton community competition under DIP-limited conditions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effects of used lubricating oil on two mangroves Aegiceras corniculatum and Avicennia marina.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yong; Tam, N F Y

    2007-01-01

    An outdoor experiment was set up to investigate the effects of used lubricating oil (5 L/m2) on Aegiceras corniculatum Blanco. and Avicennia marina (Forsk) Vierh., two salt-excreting mangroves. A. marina was more sensitive to used lubricating oil than A. corniculatum and canopy-oiling resulted in more direct physical damage and stronger lethal effects than base-oiling. When treated with canopy-oiling, half of A. corniculatum plants survived for the whole treatment time (90 d); but, for A. marina, high mortality (83%) resulted from canopy-oiling within 3 weeks and no plants survived for 80 d. Base-oiling had no lethal effects onA. corniculatum plants even at the termination of this experiment, but 83% of A. marina plants died 80 d after treatment. Forty days after canopy-oiling, 93% of A. corniculatum leaves fell and no live leaves remained on A. marina plants. By the end of the experiment, base-oiling treatment resulted in about 45% of A. corniculatum leaves falling, while all A. marina leaves and buds were burned to die. Lubricating oil resulted in physiological damage to A. corniculatum leaves, including decreases in chlorophyll and carotenoid contents, nitrate reductase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities, and increases in malonaldehyde contents. For both species, oil pollution significantly reduced leaf, root, and total biomass, but did not significantly affect stem biomass. Oil pollution resulted in damage to the xylem vessels of fine roots but not to those of mediate roots.

  12. Complete genome of Cobetia marina JCM 21022T and phylogenomic analysis of the family Halomonadaceae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xianghai; Xu, Kuipeng; Han, Xiaojuan; Mo, Zhaolan; Mao, Yunxiang

    2016-09-01

    Cobetia marina is a model proteobacteria in researches on marine biofouling. Its taxonomic nomenclature has been revised many times over the past few decades. To better understand the role of the surface-associated lifestyle of C. marina and the phylogeny of the family Halomonadaceae, we sequenced the entire genome of C. marina JCM 21022T using single molecule real-time sequencing technology (SMRT) and performed comparative genomics and phylogenomics analyses. The circular chromosome was 4 176 300 bp with an average GC content of 62.44% and contained 3 611 predicted coding sequences, 72 tRNA genes, and 21 rRNA genes. The C. marina JCM 21022T genome contained a set of crucial genes involved in surface colonization processes. The comparative genome analysis indicated the significant diff erences between C. marina JCM 21022T and Cobetia amphilecti KMM 296 (formerly named C. marina KMM 296) resulted from sequence insertions or deletions and chromosomal recombination. Despite these diff erences, pan and core genome analysis showed similar gene functions between the two strains. The phylogenomic study of the family Halomonadaceae is reported here for the first time. We found that the relationships were well resolved among every genera tested, including Chromohalobacter, Halomonas, Cobetia, Kushneria, Zymobacter, and Halotalea.

  13. Current European Labyrinthula zosterae Are Not Virulent and Modulate Seagrass (Zostera marina) Defense Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brakel, Janina; Werner, Franziska Julie; Tams, Verena; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina

    2014-01-01

    Pro- and eukaryotic microbes associated with multi-cellular organisms are receiving increasing attention as a driving factor in ecosystems. Endophytes in plants can change host performance by altering nutrient uptake, secondary metabolite production or defense mechanisms. Recent studies detected widespread prevalence of Labyrinthula zosterae in European Zostera marina meadows, a protist that allegedly caused a massive amphi-Atlantic seagrass die-off event in the 1930's, while showing only limited virulence today. As a limiting factor for pathogenicity, we investigated genotype×genotype interactions of host and pathogen from different regions (10–100 km-scale) through reciprocal infection. Although the endophyte rapidly infected Z. marina, we found little evidence that Z. marina was negatively impacted by L. zosterae. Instead Z. marina showed enhanced leaf growth and kept endophyte abundance low. Moreover, we found almost no interaction of protist×eelgrass-origin on different parameters of L. zosterae virulence/Z. marina performance, and also no increase in mortality after experimental infection. In a target gene approach, we identified a significant down-regulation in the expression of 6/11 genes from the defense cascade of Z. marina after real-time quantitative PCR, revealing strong immune modulation of the host's defense by a potential parasite for the first time in a marine plant. Nevertheless, one gene involved in phenol synthesis was strongly up-regulated, indicating that Z. marina plants were probably able to control the level of infection. There was no change in expression in a general stress indicator gene (HSP70). Mean L. zosterae abundances decreased below 10% after 16 days of experimental runtime. We conclude that under non-stress conditions L. zosterae infection in the study region is not associated with substantial virulence. PMID:24691450

  14. Cellulomonas marina sp. nov., isolated from deep-sea water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limin; Xi, Lijun; Qiu, Danheng; Song, Lei; Dai, Xin; Ruan, Jisheng; Huang, Ying

    2013-08-01

    A bacterial strain FXJ8.089(T) was isolated from deep-sea water collected from the southwest Indian Ocean (49° 39' E 37° 47' S) at a depth of 2800 m, and its taxonomic position was investigated by a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain FXJ8.089(T) belonged to the genus Cellulomonas and had the highest similarities with Cellulomonas oligotrophica (96.9 %) and Cellulomonas aerilata (96.6 %). It contained MK-9(H4) as the predominant menaquinone. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylinositol mannosides. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type was A4β with an interpeptide bridge L-Orn-D-Glu. The cell-wall sugars were glucose, mannose and ribose. The DNA G+C content was 70.3 mol%. The strain also showed a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics that were distinct from the closely related species. Based on phenotypic and genotypic data, strain FXJ8.089(T) (= CGMCC 4.6945(T) = DSM 24960(T)) represents a novel species of the genus Cellulomonas, for which the name Cellulomonas marina sp. nov. is proposed.

  15. Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Food Web Structure in Different Environmental Settings.

    PubMed

    Thormar, Jonas; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Baden, Susanne; Boström, Christoffer; Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Olesen, Birgit; Rasmussen, Jonas Ribergaard; Svensson, Carl Johan; Holmer, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the structure of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) meadows and associated food webs in two eelgrass habitats in Denmark, differing in exposure, connection to the open sea, nutrient enrichment and water transparency. Meadow structure strongly reflected the environmental conditions in each habitat. The eutrophicated, protected site had higher biomass of filamentous algae, lower eelgrass biomass and shoot density, longer and narrower leaves, and higher above to below ground biomass ratio compared to the less nutrient-enriched and more exposed site. The faunal community composition and food web structure also differed markedly between sites with the eutrophicated, enclosed site having higher biomass of consumers and less complex food web. These relationships resulted in a column shaped biomass distribution of the consumers at the eutrophicated site whereas the less nutrient-rich site showed a pyramidal biomass distribution of consumers coupled with a more diverse consumer community. The differences in meadow and food web structure of the two seagrass habitats, suggest how physical setting may shape ecosystem response and resilience to anthropogenic pressure. We encourage larger, replicated studies to further disentangle the effects of different environmental variables on seagrass food web structure.

  16. Auditing a flooded quarry prior to marina development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillie, Priscilla W.

    1992-07-01

    Development of a marina in a flooded brownstone quarry will require construction of a canal to the Connecticut River through an isthmus separating the two systems. An environmental audit over a 16-month period developed quantitative limnological data required by regulatory agencies. The deep quarry basin, protected by high sandstone walls, became strongly stratified in summer. Development of littoral vegetation in the quarry was prevented by the steep sides of the basin. Unusual characteristics of the manmade quarry basin, compared to most natural lakes in Connecticut, included a mean depth of 14 m, an intense thermocline, and negative heterograde oxygen profiles with metalimnetic minima. Alkalinity, conductivity, and nutrient levels differed significantly between the quarry and the river. Mean chlorophyll a concentrations in the two systems were similar, but the distribution of phytoplankton classes were quite different. The environmental audit, by comparing physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the quarry to those of the river, allowed prediction of changes in trophic status when the two systems are joined.

  17. Mobile epifauna on Zostera marina, and infauna of its inflorescences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig-Armonies, Monika

    1988-06-01

    The faunal colonization of the leaves and inflorescences of intertidal Zostera marina L. and of the ambient water has been studied at the Island of Sylt (North Sea). The abundance of the snail Littorina littorea L. and the isopod Jaera albifrons Leach correlates significantly with leaf surface area. This is not the case with the abundance of meiofaunal Plathelminthes, Nematoda, Copepoda, and Polychaeta. However, they increase significantly with the numbers of generative shoots in the sampled seagrass bunches. Members of these taxa inhabit the Zostera inflorescences, and average abundance increases with the degree of decay of inflorescences. This temporary microhabitat presumably offers food and shelter. Copepods and ostracods dominate in the ambient water. Planktonic calanoid copepods correlate with the amount of sampled seawater, while Ostracoda correlate with the amount of resuspended detritus suggesting that they were resuspended themselves. The study shows that some meiofaunal taxa can rapidly exploit a short-lived habitat such as the Zostera inflorescences. Juvenile polychaetes use inflorescences as a nursery.

  18. Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Food Web Structure in Different Environmental Settings

    PubMed Central

    Thormar, Jonas; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Baden, Susanne; Boström, Christoffer; Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Olesen, Birgit; Rasmussen, Jonas Ribergaard; Svensson, Carl Johan; Holmer, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    This study compares the structure of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) meadows and associated food webs in two eelgrass habitats in Denmark, differing in exposure, connection to the open sea, nutrient enrichment and water transparency. Meadow structure strongly reflected the environmental conditions in each habitat. The eutrophicated, protected site had higher biomass of filamentous algae, lower eelgrass biomass and shoot density, longer and narrower leaves, and higher above to below ground biomass ratio compared to the less nutrient-enriched and more exposed site. The faunal community composition and food web structure also differed markedly between sites with the eutrophicated, enclosed site having higher biomass of consumers and less complex food web. These relationships resulted in a column shaped biomass distribution of the consumers at the eutrophicated site whereas the less nutrient-rich site showed a pyramidal biomass distribution of consumers coupled with a more diverse consumer community. The differences in meadow and food web structure of the two seagrass habitats, suggest how physical setting may shape ecosystem response and resilience to anthropogenic pressure. We encourage larger, replicated studies to further disentangle the effects of different environmental variables on seagrass food web structure. PMID:26752412

  19. Spawning synchrony in Arenicola marina: evidence for sex pheromonal control

    PubMed Central

    Hardege, J. D.; Bentley, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical communication systems controlling reproductive behaviour have been shown in a number of marine polychaetes. This study investigated the use of sex pheromones to coordinate spawning behaviour in gravid lugworms (Arenicola marina). Lugworms typically reproduce in the autumn, during low water of spring tides, and often exhibit epidemic spawning. Females release gametes within the burrow whereas males deposit spermatozoa on to the beach surface. The incoming tide dilutes the spermatozoa and transports them to the females' burrows. Sperm is diluted rapidly and sperm concentrations fall below the minimum required for fertilization within a few minutes. The present investigation establishes the existence of chemical signals synchronizing spawning for the first time in an iteroparous polychaete. The process can be divided into two steps, the induction of gamete release by waterborne chemical cues and burrow irrigation behaviour in females: burrow irrigation representing the means by which spermatozoa are carried to the eggs. In both sexes, the release of gametes can be induced by exposure to sea water into which other individuals had previously spawned. Males also respond to odour compounds from other males. The overall effect of the chemical signals results in synchronized, mass spawning of a population.

  20. Distinct community dynamics at two artificial habitats in a recreational marina.

    PubMed

    Oricchio, Felipe T; Pastro, Gabriela; Vieira, Edson A; Flores, Augusto A V; Gibran, Fernando Z; Dias, Gustavo M

    2016-12-01

    Man-made facilities along coastlines modify water circulation and sedimentation dynamics which can affect the structure of marine benthic and pelagic communities. To test how environmental heterogeneity associated with a recreational marina affects the structure of the fouling community and the benthic-pelagic link, we conducted an experiment in which predation effects on recruitment and community structure were assessed in two artificial habitats: inside the marina, an area of calm waters and often disturbed by boating activity, and the breakwater, a more hydrodynamic area. Using visual censuses and video footages we also described the predation pressure and the identity of predators on the two areas. Inside the marina, the recruitment of ascidians and serpulids, but not of bryozoans, was restricted in some occasions, possibly due to reduced water circulation. Predation, mainly by the silver porgy fish Diplodus argenteus, reduced the survivor of didemnid ascidians on both areas, but predation intensity was 40 times higher in the breakwater than inside the marina. While the two artificial habitats did not necessarily support distinct communities, low recruitment coupled to weak predation inside the marina, a less dynamic environment, likely imply lower resilience and more susceptibility to disturbance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of San Diego Bay marinas.

    PubMed

    Neira, Carlos; Cossaboon, Jennifer; Mendoza, Guillermo; Hoh, Eunha; Levin, Lisa A

    2017-01-15

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have garnered much attention due to their bioaccumulation, carcinogenic properties, and persistence in the environment. Investigation of the spatial distribution, composition, and sources of PAHs in sediments of three recreational marinas in San Diego Bay, California revealed significant differences among marinas, with concentrations in one site exceeding 16,000ngg(-1). 'Hotspots' of PAH concentration suggest an association with stormwater outfalls draining into the basins. High-molecular weight PAHs (4-6 rings) were dominant (>86%); the average percentage of potentially carcinogenic PAHs was high in all sites (61.4-70%) but ecotoxicological risks varied among marinas. Highly toxic benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was the main contributor (>90%) to the total toxic equivalent quantity (TEQ) in marinas. PAHs in San Diego Bay marina sediments appear to be derived largely from pyrogenic sources, potentially from combustion products that reach the basins by aerial deposition and stormwater drainage from nearby streets and parking lots. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiological Responses of Oxyrrhis marina to the Altered Fatty Acid Composition of Virally Infected Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goode, A.; Fields, D.; Martinez-Martinez, J.

    2016-02-01

    Emiliania huxleyi is a coccolithophore that forms some of the largest phytoplankton blooms in the ocean. E. huxleyi abundance, distribution, and composition of essential fatty acids make them a key component in marine food webs. E. huxleyi-specific viruses have been shown to control the bloom duration and change the lipid composition of E. huxleyi cells. Alteration of essential fatty acids at the base of the food web may have downstream effects on trophic interactions. Oxyrrhis marina has been studied extensively, and is used as a micrograzer model organism. We investigated differential physiological responses of O. marina to a diet ( 100:1 prey:predator ratio) of virallyinfected versus uninfected E. huxleyi cells over a maximum 7-day period. Our results showed higher O. marina grazing rates on uninfected cells (p<0.05). However, O. marina had faster growth rates (p<0.05) and a smaller relative increase in saturated fatty acids and decrease in monounsaturated fatty acids (p<0.05) when fed infected E. huxleyi cells. This suggests a higher nutritional value of infected cells and/or better assimilation by O. marina of infected cells' carbon. In the marine environment this would translate into larger carbon transport to higher trophic levels when blooms become infected.

  3. Antifouling paint booster biocides (Irgarol 1051 and diuron) in marinas and ports of Bushehr, Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Abolfazl; Molaei, Saeideh; Sheijooni Fumani, Neda; Abedi, Ehsan

    2016-04-15

    In the present study, antifouling paint booster biocides, Irgarol 1051 and diuron were measured in ports and marinas of Bushehr, Iran. Results showed that in seawater samples taken from ports and marinas, Irgarol was found at the range of less than LOD to 63.4ngL(-1) and diuron was found to be at the range of less than LOD to 29.1ngL(-1) (in Jalali marina). 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA), as a degradation product of diuron, was also analyzed and its maximum concentration was 390ngL(-1). Results for analysis of Irgarol 1051 in sediments showed a maximum concentration of 35.4ngg(-1) dry weight in Bandargah marina. A comparison between the results of this study and those of other published works showed that Irgarol and diuron pollutions in ports and marinas of Bushehr located in the Persian Gulf were less than the average of reports from other parts of the world. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. FACTORS CONTROLLING ZOSTERA MARINA L. GROWTH IN THE EASTERN AND WESTERN PACIFIC OCEAN: COMPARISONS BETWEEN SOUTH KOREA AND OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zostera marina distribution is circum-global and tolerates a wide range of environmental conditions. Consequently, it is likely that populations have adapted to local environmental conditions of light, temperature and nutrient supply. We compared Z. marina growth dynamics over a ...

  5. Friday Harbor Marina Expansion Study--San Juan Island, Washington: Final Detailed Project Report and Environmental Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    Juan Marina Inc. Don F. Brown Self Steve F. Brown San Juan Marina Inc. Thoms Chittenden Self Alex D. Crichton Self Alan C,-mings KGMI-Bellingham Lois...Self Susan E. Risser Self Noble W. Starr Self Thomas C. Starr Self Corinne R. Towne Se"I Michael P. Vouri Bellingham Marine Industries June M. Vynne Self

  6. INTERTIDAL SEDIMENT TEMPERATURE VARIANCE AS A POSSIBLE LIMITING FACTOR FOR EELGRASSES ZOSTERA MARINA AND ZOSTERA JAPONICA IN YAQUINA BAY, OR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The eelgrass species Zostera marina and Z. japonica co-occur in most Pacific Northwest estuaries; Z. marina is regarded as a native species, Z. japonica as non-indigenous, introduced in Yaquina Bay in approximately 1975. The mean tidal range is ~2 m, extreme ~3m. The vertical d...

  7. FACTORS CONTROLLING ZOSTERA MARINA L. GROWTH IN THE EASTERN AND WESTERN PACIFIC OCEAN: COMPARISONS BETWEEN SOUTH KOREA AND OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zostera marina distribution is circum-global and tolerates a wide range of environmental conditions. Consequently, it is likely that populations have adapted to local environmental conditions of light, temperature and nutrient supply. We compared Z. marina growth dynamics over a ...

  8. INTERTIDAL SEDIMENT TEMPERATURE VARIANCE AS A POSSIBLE LIMITING FACTOR FOR EELGRASSES ZOSTERA MARINA AND ZOSTERA JAPONICA IN YAQUINA BAY, OR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The eelgrass species Zostera marina and Z. japonica co-occur in most Pacific Northwest estuaries; Z. marina is regarded as a native species, Z. japonica as non-indigenous, introduced in Yaquina Bay in approximately 1975. The mean tidal range is ~2 m, extreme ~3m. The vertical d...

  9. Do small marinas drive habitat specific impacts? A case study from Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Di Franco, Antonio; Graziano, Mariagrazia; Franzitta, Giulio; Felline, Serena; Chemello, Renato; Milazzo, Marco

    2011-05-01

    Many human activities add new structures to the marine landscape. Despite the fact that human structures cause some inevitable impacts, surprisingly little information exists on the effects of marina on natural marine assemblages. The aim of this paper is to assess habitat-specific response of benthic sessile organisms of rocky shores in relation to the presence of a small marina. Sampling was carried out at three coastal habitats (midshore, lowshore and subtidal) by means of visual censuses adopting an after-control-impact (ACI) experimental design. It appears that the marina affects the structure and composition of benthic communities of both the midshore and the lowshore. Little effect was evident on shallow subtidal assemblage structure. The results of the present study clearly show habitat-specific responses of coastal benthic assemblages to the presence of infrastructure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biodynamic modelling and the prediction of accumulated trace metal concentrations in the polychaete Arenicola marina.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martinez, M Carmen; Smith, Brian D; DelValls, T Angel; Luoma, Samuel N; Rainbow, Philip S

    2009-10-01

    The use of biodynamic models to understand metal uptake directly from sediments by deposit-feeding organisms still represents a special challenge. In this study, accumulated concentrations of Cd, Zn and Ag predicted by biodynamic modelling in the lugworm Arenicola marina have been compared to measured concentrations in field populations in several UK estuaries. The biodynamic model predicted accumulated field Cd concentrations remarkably accurately, and predicted bioaccumulated Ag concentrations were in the range of those measured in lugworms collected from the field. For Zn the model showed less but still good comparability, accurately predicting Zn bioaccumulation in A. marina at high sediment concentrations but underestimating accumulated Zn in the worms from sites with low and intermediate levels of Zn sediment contamination. Therefore, it appears that the physiological parameters experimentally derived for A. marina are applicable to the conditions encountered in these environments and that the assumptions made in the model are plausible.

  11. Ruegeria marina sp. nov., isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Huo, Ying-Yi; Xu, Xue-Wei; Li, Xue; Liu, Chen; Cui, Heng-Lin; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Wu, Min

    2011-02-01

    A Gram-negative, neutrophilic and rod-shaped bacterium, strain ZH17(T), was isolated from a marine sediment of the East China Sea and subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic characterization. The isolate grew in the presence of 0-7.5 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 6.5-9.0; optimum growth was observed with 0.5-3.0 % (w/v) NaCl and at pH 7.5. Chemotaxonomic analysis showed ubiquinone-10 as predominant respiratory quinone and C(18 : 1)ω7c, 11-methyl C(18 : 1)ω7c, C(16 : 0), C(12 : 0) 3-OH and C(16 : 0) 2-OH as major fatty acids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 63.5 mol%. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate belongs to the genus Ruegeria. Strain ZH17(T) exhibited the closest phylogenetic affinity to the type strain of Ruegeria pomeroyi, with 97.2 % sequence similarity, and less than 97 % sequence similarity with respect to other described species of the genus Ruegeria. The DNA-DNA reassociation value between strain ZH17(T) and R. pomeroyi DSM 15171(T) was 50.7 %. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, strain ZH17(T) represents a novel species of the genus Ruegeria, for which the name Ruegeria marina sp. nov. (type strain ZH17(T) =CGMCC 1.9108(T) =JCM 16262(T)) is proposed.

  12. Sexual Recruitment in Zostera marina: Progress toward a Predictive Model.

    PubMed

    Furman, Bradley T; Peterson, Bradley J

    2015-01-01

    Ecophysiological stress and physical disturbance are capable of structuring meadows through a combination of direct biomass removal and recruitment limitation; however, predicting these effects at landscape scales has rarely been successful. To model environmental influence on sexual recruitment in perennial Zostera marina, we selected a sub-tidal, light-replete study site with seasonal extremes in temperature and wave energy. During an 8-year observation period, areal coverage increased from 4.8 to 42.7%. Gains were stepwise in pattern, attributable to annual recruitment of patches followed by centrifugal growth and coalescence. Recruitment varied from 13 to 4,894 patches per year. Using a multiple linear regression approach, we examined the association between patch appearance and relative wave energy, atmospheric condition and water temperature. Two models were developed, one appropriate for the dispersal of naked seeds, and another for rafted flowers. Results indicated that both modes of sexual recruitment varied as functions of wind, temperature, rainfall and wave energy, with a regime shift in wind-wave energy corresponding to periods of rapid colonization within our site. Temporal correlations between sexual recruitment and time-lagged climatic summaries highlighted floral induction, seed bank and small patch development as periods of vulnerability. Given global losses in seagrass coverage, regions of recovery and re-colonization will become increasingly important. Lacking landscape-scale process models for seagrass recruitment, temporally explicit statistical approaches presented here could be used to forecast colonization trajectories and to provide managers with real-time estimates of future meadow performance; i.e., when to expect a good year in terms of seagrass expansion. To facilitate use as forecasting tools, we did not use statistical composites or normalized variables as our predictors. This study, therefore, represents a first step toward linking

  13. Citreicella marina sp. nov., isolated from deep-sea sediment.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiliang; Fu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Jianning; Chen, Shuangxi; Zhong, Huanzi; Sun, Fengqin; Shao, Zongze

    2011-04-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on a novel strain, designated CK-I3-6(T), which was isolated from deep-sea sediment of the south-west Indian Ocean Ridge. Cells were Gram-reaction-negative, oxidase- and catalase-positive, rod-shaped and non-motile. Growth was observed at 4-38 °C and in 1-12 % (w/v) NaCl. Cells were able to degrade gelatin and oxidize thiosulfate but did not reduce nitrate. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain CK-I3-6(T) belonged to the genus Citreicella with a sequence similarity of 97.3 % to Citreicella thiooxidans CHLG 1(T), while similarities with other taxa were <95.7 %. DNA-DNA hybridization showed that strain CK-I3-6(T) and C. thiooxidans CHLG 1(T) showed a low DNA-DNA relatedness (48±3 %). The principal fatty acids were C(16 : 0) (7.8 %), C(18 : 1)ω7c (66.6 %), summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)ω6c and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c; 6.3 %) and C(19 : 0)ω8c cyclo (10.0 %). The chromosomal DNA G+C content was 67.5 mol%. On the basis of the combined genotypic and phenotypic data, strain CK-I3-6(T) represents a novel species of the genus Citreicella, for which the name Citreicella marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CK-I3-6(T) ( = CCTCC AB 209064(T)  = LMG 25230(T)  = MCCC 1A03060(T)).

  14. Isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane use in cane toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Kaleigh E.; Strahl-Heldreth, Danielle; Clark-Price, Stuart C.

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthetic chamber concentrations of isoflurane, sevoflurane and desflurane that resulted in loss of righting reflex within 15 minutes in 50 per cent of toads (Rhinella marina) exposed (ED50-LRR<15MIN) were identified. The median and range ED50-LRR<15MIN was 1.4 (0.9–1.4) per cent for isoflurane, 1.75 (1.1–1.9) per cent for sevoflurane and 4.4 (4.3–5.5) per cent for desflurane. Subsequently, toads were exposed to 1.5 times the ED50-LRR<15MIN and times to loss and return of righting reflex were identified. All toads for all anaesthetics lost righting reflex. The median and range loss of righting reflex was 4:00 (3:00–5:30) minutes for isoflurane, 4:45 (3:30–7:00) minutes for sevoflurane, and 4:15 (4:00–5:30) minutes for desflurane and was not different between anaesthetics. Time to return of righting reflex was 175 (123–211) minutes for isoflurane, 192 (116–383) minutes for sevoflurane and 74 (52–220) minutes for desflurane. Time to return of righting reflex was significantly shorter for desflurane compared with isoflurane or sevoflurane. The use of isoflurane, sevoflurane or desflurane can be used to provide immobilisation to cane toads and potentially other anurans. Induction times are likely similar when using an anaesthetic chamber to provide anaesthesia. However recovery time may take twice as long when utilising isoflurane or sevoflurane over desflurane. PMID:27651914

  15. Sexual Recruitment in Zostera marina: Progress toward a Predictive Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ecophysiological stress and physical disturbance are capable of structuring meadows through a combination of direct biomass removal and recruitment limitation; however, predicting these effects at landscape scales has rarely been successful. To model environmental influence on sexual recruitment in perennial Zostera marina, we selected a sub-tidal, light-replete study site with seasonal extremes in temperature and wave energy. During an 8-year observation period, areal coverage increased from 4.8 to 42.7%. Gains were stepwise in pattern, attributable to annual recruitment of patches followed by centrifugal growth and coalescence. Recruitment varied from 13 to 4,894 patches per year. Using a multiple linear regression approach, we examined the association between patch appearance and relative wave energy, atmospheric condition and water temperature. Two models were developed, one appropriate for the dispersal of naked seeds, and another for rafted flowers. Results indicated that both modes of sexual recruitment varied as functions of wind, temperature, rainfall and wave energy, with a regime shift in wind-wave energy corresponding to periods of rapid colonization within our site. Temporal correlations between sexual recruitment and time-lagged climatic summaries highlighted floral induction, seed bank and small patch development as periods of vulnerability. Given global losses in seagrass coverage, regions of recovery and re-colonization will become increasingly important. Lacking landscape-scale process models for seagrass recruitment, temporally explicit statistical approaches presented here could be used to forecast colonization trajectories and to provide managers with real-time estimates of future meadow performance; i.e., when to expect a good year in terms of seagrass expansion. To facilitate use as forecasting tools, we did not use statistical composites or normalized variables as our predictors. This study, therefore, represents a first step toward linking

  16. Hydrogen peroxide is not the cause of fish kills associated with Chattonella marina: cytological and physiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Anderson, Donald M; Au, Doris W T

    2005-05-15

    Chattonella marina, a harmful algal bloom (HAB) causative species, was used to study the mortality, physiology, and pathology of a marine stenohaline fish, goldlined seabream exposed to the toxic alga. The median lethal time (LT50) was 3 h upon exposure to 8000 cells/ml of C. marina. Significant induction of filamental chloride cells (CCs) [i.e. increases in CC fractional area and in the volume density of CCs], concomitant with significant reduction of blood osmolality, were found in C. marina treated fish. To verify whether the toxicity of C. marina was mediated through oxidative stress, a hydrogen peroxide exposure experiment was carried out and the toxicity as well as cytological and physiological changes were compared with the C. marina treatment. Hydrogen peroxide at a concentration of 500 microM H2O2, (i.e. 25 times higher than that produced by 8000 cells/ml of C. marina (20 microM H2O2)) was unable to induce similar CC alterations and osmoregulatory impairment in fish as observed in the C. marina treatment. Non-specific membrane damage such as severe loss of microvilli projections on the CC apical opening and rupture of epithelial membranes in the lamellae were observed. The LT50 was 6 h, two times longer than that with 8000 cells/ml of C. marina. Based on the cytological and physiological evidence and toxicity data, the mechanism by which C. marina kills fish appears to be very different from that caused by H2O2/ROS. Osmoregulatory distress is the major cause of fish death upon exposure to C. marina.

  17. New species of Parapharyngodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae) from Grenada, West Indies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bursey, Charles; Drake, Michael; Cole, Rebecca; Sterner, Mauritz; Pinckney, Rhonda; Zieger, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestine of the cane toad, Rhinella marina, is described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. is the 48th species assigned to the genus and the 16th species from the Neotropical region. It differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of caudal papillae, an echinate anterior cloacal lip, and a blunt spicule of 67–104 μm. This is only the second report of R. marina harboring a species of Parapharyngodon.

  18. New species of Parapharyngodon (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) in Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae) from Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Bursey, Charles; Drake, Michael; Cole, Rebecca; Sterner Iii, Mauritz; Pinckney, Rhonda; Zieger, Ulrike

    2013-06-01

    Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Pharyngodonidae) from the large intestine of the cane toad, Rhinella marina, is described and illustrated. Parapharyngodon grenadaensis n. sp. is the 48th species assigned to the genus and the 16th species from the Neotropical region. It differs from other species in the genus by possessing 4 pairs of caudal papillae, an echinate anterior cloacal lip, and a blunt spicule of 67-104 μm. This is only the second report of R. marina harboring a species of Parapharyngodon.

  19. Profiling Private Dock and Marina-Slip Holders at Corps of Engineers Projects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    Inc. 56 482 538 90 Hartwell Lake Portman Marina 30 500 530 94 Wolf Creek Dam Jamestown Marina 29 500 529 95 Wolf Creek Dam Wolf Creek 0 526 526...provided as Table 2. A greater number of private docks was located on Lake Sidney Lanier than at any other Corps project. As a result, the State of... Georgia records more than 52 percent of all dock permits issued by the Corps —more than all other Corps projects combined. Community-dock permits were

  20. Microbial communities in sediment from Zostera marina patches, but not the Z. marina leaf or root microbiomes, vary in relation to distance from patch edge.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Cassandra L; Voerman, Sofie E; Lang, Jenna M; Stachowicz, John J; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2017-01-01

    Zostera marina (also known as eelgrass) is a foundation species in coastal and marine ecosystems worldwide and is a model for studies of seagrasses (a paraphyletic group in the order Alismatales) that include all the known fully submerged marine angiosperms. In recent years, there has been a growing appreciation of the potential importance of the microbial communities (i.e., microbiomes) associated with various plant species. Here we report a study of variation in Z. marina microbiomes from a field site in Bodega Bay, CA. We characterized and then compared the microbial communities of root, leaf and sediment samples (using 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR and sequencing) and associated environmental parameters from the inside, edge and outside of a single subtidal Z. marina patch. Multiple comparative approaches were used to examine associations between microbiome features (e.g., diversity, taxonomic composition) and environmental parameters and to compare sample types and sites. Microbial communities differed significantly between sample types (root, leaf and sediment) and in sediments from different sites (inside, edge, outside). Carbon:Nitrogen ratio and eelgrass density were both significantly correlated to sediment community composition. Enrichment of certain taxonomic groups in each sample type was detected and analyzed in regard to possible functional implications (especially regarding sulfur metabolism). Our results are mostly consistent with prior work on seagrass associated microbiomes with a few differences and additional findings. From a functional point of view, the most significant finding is that many of the taxa that differ significantly between sample types and sites are closely related to ones commonly associated with various aspects of sulfur and nitrogen metabolism. Though not a traditional model organism, we believe that Z. marina can become a model for studies of marine plant-microbiome interactions.

  1. Microbial communities in sediment from Zostera marina patches, but not the Z. marina leaf or root microbiomes, vary in relation to distance from patch edge

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Cassandra L.; Voerman, Sofie E.; Lang, Jenna M.; Stachowicz, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Zostera marina (also known as eelgrass) is a foundation species in coastal and marine ecosystems worldwide and is a model for studies of seagrasses (a paraphyletic group in the order Alismatales) that include all the known fully submerged marine angiosperms. In recent years, there has been a growing appreciation of the potential importance of the microbial communities (i.e., microbiomes) associated with various plant species. Here we report a study of variation in Z. marina microbiomes from a field site in Bodega Bay, CA. Methods We characterized and then compared the microbial communities of root, leaf and sediment samples (using 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR and sequencing) and associated environmental parameters from the inside, edge and outside of a single subtidal Z. marina patch. Multiple comparative approaches were used to examine associations between microbiome features (e.g., diversity, taxonomic composition) and environmental parameters and to compare sample types and sites. Results Microbial communities differed significantly between sample types (root, leaf and sediment) and in sediments from different sites (inside, edge, outside). Carbon:Nitrogen ratio and eelgrass density were both significantly correlated to sediment community composition. Enrichment of certain taxonomic groups in each sample type was detected and analyzed in regard to possible functional implications (especially regarding sulfur metabolism). Discussion Our results are mostly consistent with prior work on seagrass associated microbiomes with a few differences and additional findings. From a functional point of view, the most significant finding is that many of the taxa that differ significantly between sample types and sites are closely related to ones commonly associated with various aspects of sulfur and nitrogen metabolism. Though not a traditional model organism, we believe that Z. marina can become a model for studies of marine plant-microbiome interactions. PMID

  2. Negative effects of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) presence in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds in Flensborg fjord, Denmark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinther, Hanne Fogh; Laursen, Jens Sund; Holmer, Marianne

    2008-03-01

    The effect of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis) presence in eelgrass ( Zostera marina) beds was studied from June 2004 to July 2005 in Flensborg fjord, Denmark. The field experiments were conducted at two stations, one with only Z. marina (Eelgrass station) present and one where M. edulis were present in the Z. marina beds (Mixed station). Zostera marina parameters were measured (growth of leaves, shoot density, leaf length, and nutrient content) in combination with epiphyte cover and sediment parameters (sulphate reduction rates, sediment nutrient fluxes, organic content, C, N and P content) to examine possible positive and negative effects of the mussels on eelgrass performance. The fluxes of ammonium from the sediments were stimulated at all sampling dates at the Mixed station, and possibly stimulated epiphyte growth at this station. Further 15N signals in epiphytes from the Mixed station suggested that excretion products from the mussels were important nitrogen sources at this station. Sulphate reduction rates were enhanced at the Mixed station and also sediment sulphide concentrations increased under mussel influence, which may have resulted in sulphide toxicity and decreased growth of Z. marina at this station. The study indicates that for Z. marina beds in Flensborg Fjord the effects of M. edulis in seagrass beds are primarily negative, and raises the question whether this leads to negative effects on the stability and expansion of Z. marina beds.

  3. Removal of harmful alga, Chattonella marina, by recyclable natural magnetic sphalerite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Wu, Dan; Chu, Ka Him; Ye, Liqun; Yip, Ho Yin; Cai, Zhonghua; Wong, Po Keung

    2017-02-15

    Fish-killing harmful algal blooms (HABs) of Chattonella marina causes serious hazards and risks to fish farming and environment throughout the world. At present, it is necessary to explore cost-effective and recyclable materials for controlling C. marina blooms to reduce the cost and control the potential side effect to the environment. A novel earth-abundant natural magnetic sphalerite (NMS) for removing C. marina was systematically investigated, including the effect of NMS dosage, temperature, pH and salinity on algal removal efficiency. Algal cells could be rapidly removed by NMS (1-2g/L) through adsorption and physical interaction. The algal destruction process was enhanced under the following reaction conditions: temperature>25°C, salinity>30 ppt and pH value<7.5. The reusability of magnetic recycled NMS and effect of light irradiation on algal cell removal were also determined. NMS exhibited excellent stability after repeated algal cell removal, and the efficiency was further enhanced by light illumination. The current study suggested that using NMS to control C. marina blooms could be a novel promising strategy, which is cost-effective, stable, and easy for recycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. ESCHERICHIA COLI AND TOTAL COLIFORMS IN WATER AND SEDIMENTS AT LAKE MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli, a fecal coliform, and total coliforms were monitored between September 1999 to October 2001 in five marinas on Lake Texoma, located on the Oklahoma and Texas border. General trend was that densities of E. coli were lower in the summer season due to the lower ...

  5. 76 FR 18391 - Safety Zone; Texas International Boat Show Power Boat Races; Corpus Christi Marina, Corpus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Races; Corpus Christi Marina, Corpus Christi, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... American Tri-Hull Championship will consist of a series of power boat races for approximately 8-12 vessels that are 18-feet long. The temporary safety zone is necessary for the safety of race participants...

  6. Isolation and characterization of a marine algicidal bacterium against the harmful raphidophyceae Chattonella marina.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Sook; Lee, Dae-Sung; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Lee, Woe Jae; Lee, Myung-Suk

    2009-02-01

    A bacterial strain named AB-4 showing algicidal activity against Chattonella marina was isolated from coastal water of ULjin, Republic of Korea. The isolated strain was identified as Bacillus sp. by culture morphology, biochemical reactions, and homology research based on 16S rDNA. The bacterial culture led to the lysis of algal cells, suggesting that the isolated strain produced a latent algal-lytic compound. Amongst changes in algicidal activity by different culture filtrate volumes, the 10% (100 microl/ml) concentration showed the biggest change in algicidal activity; there, estimated algicidal activity was 95%. The swimming movements of Chattonella marina cells were inhibited because of treatment of the bacterial culture; subsequently, Chattonella marina cells became swollen and rounded. With longer exposure time, algal cells were disrupted and cellular components lost their integrity and decomposed. The released algicide(s) were heat-tolerant and stable in pH variations, except pH 3, 4, and 5. Culture filtrate of Bacillus sp. AB-4 was toxic against harmful algae bloom (HAB) species and nontoxic against livefood organisms. Bacillus sp. AB-4 showed comparatively strong activity against Akashiwo sanguinea, Fibriocapsa japonica, Heterosigma akashiwo, and Scrippsiella trochoidea. These results suggest that the algicidal activity of Bacillus sp. AB-4 is potentially useful for controlling outbreaks of Chattonella marina.

  7. Population structure and genetic diversity among eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds and depths in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Ort, Brian S; Cohen, C Sarah; Boyer, Katharyn E; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2012-07-01

    The seagrass Zostera marina is widely distributed in coastal regions throughout much of the northern hemisphere, forms the foundation of an important ecological habitat, and is suffering population declines. Studies in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans indicate that the degree of population genetic differentiation is location dependent. San Francisco Bay, California, USA, is a high-current, high-wind environment where rafting of seed-bearing shoots has the potential to enhance genetic connectivity among Z. marina populations. We tested Z. marina from six locations, including one annual population, within the bay to assess population differentiation and to compare levels of within-population genetic diversity. Using 7 microsatellite loci, we found significant differentiation among all populations. The annual population had significantly higher clonal diversity than the others but showed no detectible differences in heterozygosity or allelic richness. There appears to be sufficient input of genetic variation through sexual reproduction or immigration into the perennial populations to prevent significant declines in the number and frequency of alleles. In additional depth comparisons, we found differentiation among deep and shallow portions in 1 of 3 beds evaluated. Genetic drift, sweepstakes recruitment, dispersal limitation, and possibly natural selection may have combined to produce genetic differentiation over a spatial scale of 3-30 km in Z. marina. This implies that the scale of genetic differentiation may be smaller than expected for seagrasses in other locations too. We suggest that populations in close proximity may not be interchangeable for use as restoration material.

  8. OCCURRENCE OF METYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AT FIVE MARINAS IN LAKE TEXOMA

    EPA Science Inventory



    Occurrence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in five marinas was monitored between June 1999 and November 2000 in Lake Texoma located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas. MTBE is a commonly used gasoline additive and a suspected carcinogen. Lake water was collected at loc...

  9. 77 FR 21868 - Safety Zone; Marina Salvage, Bellingham Bay, Bellingham, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ..., WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone in and around the Squalicum Harbor Marina, located in Bellingham, WA. This action is... necessary to protect vessels, persons and law enforcement vessels in ] Bellingham, WA, from hazards created...

  10. Biochemical characterization of the eelgrass Zostera marina at its southern distribution limit in the North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro; Munoz-Salazar, R.; Ward, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    The eelgrass Zostera marina L. is distributed along the Baja California Peninsula (Mexico) where it is exposed to a wide range of irradiances and temperatures that could promote changes in its biochemical composition. Consequently, the objective of this study was to characterize the variations in the levels of chlorophyll, carbohydrates, proteins, fiber, ash and calories in the shoots of Z. marina from the north (San Quintin) and south (Ojo de Liebre and San Ignacio lagoons) of the peninsula. Temperature in the southern lagoons was 5-6??C higher than in the northern lagoon; likewise, in situ irradiance was two-fold greater in the south than in the north. As a result of the lower irradiance levels, the concentration of chlorophyll in the shoots of Z. marina was twice as high (1.7 mg gWW-1) in the northern lagoon than in the southern ones (0.8 mg gWW-1). Similar to chlorophyll levels, the concentration of soluble carbohydrates in the shoots was greater in the northern lagoon than in the southern ones, suggesting that the high levels of chlorophyll are enough to compensate for the low irradiance levels and to maintain a positive carbon balance at San Quintin. On the other hand, the levels of proteins in the shoots from the north of the peninsula were slightly lower than those from the southern populations. In general, these results suggest that the different environmental conditions to which Z. marina is exposed along the peninsula impact its biochemical composition.

  11. 18 CFR 1304.403 - Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pump-out facilities to shore-based treatment plants or intermediate transfer facilities; (j) A reliable... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks. 1304.403 Section 1304.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE...

  12. 18 CFR 1304.403 - Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pump-out facilities to shore-based treatment plants or intermediate transfer facilities; (j) A reliable... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks. 1304.403 Section 1304.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE...

  13. 18 CFR 1304.403 - Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pump-out facilities to shore-based treatment plants or intermediate transfer facilities; (j) A reliable... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Marina sewage pump-out stations and holding tanks. 1304.403 Section 1304.403 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE...

  14. EFFECTS OF EROSION AND MACROALGAE ON INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) IN A NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC ESTUARY (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) in open-coast northeastern Pacific estuaries is primarily intertidal, yet little research has been done on the natural factors controlling its upper intertidal growth limits. This two-year study in the Yaquina Estuary (Newport, Oregon, USA) evaluated the...

  15. ESCHERICHIA COLI AND TOTAL COLIFORMS IN WATER AND SEDIMENTS AT LAKE MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Escherichia coli, a fecal coliform, and total coliforms were monitored between September 1999 to October 2001 in five marinas on Lake Texoma, located on the Oklahoma and Texas border. General trend was that densities of E. coli were lower in the summer season due to the lower ...

  16. 76 FR 38020 - Safety Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina; Marblehead, OH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Point Fireworks, Bay Point Marina.... This Zone is intended to restrict vessels from portions of Lake Erie for the Bay Point Fireworks. This... fireworks displays. DATES: This regulation is effective from 10 p.m. on July 2, 2011 through 10:20 p.m....

  17. OCCURRENCE OF METYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AT FIVE MARINAS IN LAKE TEXOMA

    EPA Science Inventory



    Occurrence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in five marinas was monitored between June 1999 and November 2000 in Lake Texoma located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas. MTBE is a commonly used gasoline additive and a suspected carcinogen. Lake water was collected at loc...

  18. EFFECTS OF EROSION AND MACROALGAE ON INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) IN A NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC ESTUARY (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) in open-coast northeastern Pacific estuaries is primarily intertidal, yet little research has been done on the natural factors controlling its upper intertidal growth limits. This two-year study in the Yaquina Estuary (Newport, Oregon, USA) evaluated the...

  19. MONITORING CHLOROPHYLL-A AS A MEASURE OF ALGAE IN LAKE TEXOMA MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake water quality in five marinas on Lake Texoma was determined over a two year period. Quality parameters were methyl tert-butyl ether, nitrate, some metals, fecal coliform and algae. Common blue-green algae can produce a toxin harmful to other aquatic organisms and humans. ...

  20. 33 CFR 162.200 - Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area. 162.200 Section 162.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.200...

  1. 33 CFR 162.200 - Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marina del Rey, Calif.; restricted area. 162.200 Section 162.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.200...

  2. MONITORING CHLOROPHYLL-A AS A MEASURE OF ALGAE IN LAKE TEXOMA MARINAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lake water quality in five marinas on Lake Texoma was determined over a two year period. Quality parameters were methyl tert-butyl ether, nitrate, some metals, fecal coliform and algae. Common blue-green algae can produce a toxin harmful to other aquatic organisms and humans. ...

  3. The cane or marine toad, Rhinella marina (Anura, Bufonidae): two genetically and morphologically distinct species.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Aldemar A; Lampo, Margarita; Cipriani, Roberto

    2016-04-18

    Rhinella marina is a Neotropical toad that has been introduced widely worldwide. Its toxic effects to frog-eating predators threaten the native and domestic fauna of some regions where it has been introduced. Despite previous studies suggesting two genetically distinct cryptic species within R. marina, one east and one west of the Andes, its taxonomic status remained unresolved due to the absence of morphological complementary evidence. For the first time, data from two mitochondrial genes (ND3 and CR) and 23 morphometric landmarks are combined to evaluate the taxonomic status of this species. Our results support the hypothesis of two separate evolutionary lineages within R. marina and demonstrate that these lineages have significantly diverged in skull shape. We identified two distinct morphotypes, one eastern and one Andean western, with no overlapping morphospaces. The geographic pattern of genetic variation was consistent with a stable structured population with no evidence of recent demographic or geographic expansions. The concordance between the observed geographic patterns in morphometric and genic traits calls for the recognition of two species under R. marina name.

  4. [Adaptability of mangrove Avicennia marina seedlings to simulated tide-inundated times].

    PubMed

    Liao, Bao-wen; Qiu, Feng-ying; Zhang, Liu-en; Han, Jing; Guan, Wei

    2010-05-01

    A laboratory test on the effects of differents simulated tide-inundated times with 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 h x d(-1) on the growth of Avicennia marina seedlings was conducted. The ten growth information indices including chlorophyll, root vigor, growth, biomass and photosynthetic rate were mensurated. The principal components analysis was made combining the ten growth information indices. The 210 d experimental results showed that the chlorophyll, root vigor, growth and biomass would rise first and then fall as the extension of the inundate time; and they changed suddenly at the threshold inundate time 16 h x d(-1). The growth and biomass of Avicennia marina seedlings with more than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day were less than them with no more than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day. The maximum value of stem increment each month, leaf blade increment each month, dry weight of stem, dry weight of root and total biomass were under the 10 hours tide-inundated time per day. It concluded that Avicennia marina seedlings would grow adaptively with less than 16 hours tide-inundated time per day, 8-12 hours of tide-inundated time per day is the most suitable for the growth of Avicennia marina seedlings, while 16 h x d(-1) is a critical tide-inundated time when the plant responded to be obviously inadaptable.

  5. Transcriptome sequencing and analysis of leaf tissue of Avicennia marina using the Illumina platform.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianzi; Lu, Xiang; Zhang, Wanke; Huang, Rongfeng; Chen, Shouyi; Zheng, Yizhi

    2014-01-01

    Avicennia marina is a widely distributed mangrove species that thrives in high-salinity habitats. It plays a significant role in supporting coastal ecosystem and holds unique potential for studying molecular mechanisms underlying ecological adaptation. Despite and sometimes because of its numerous merits, this species is facing increasing pressure of exploitation and deforestation. Both study on adaptation mechanisms and conservation efforts necessitate more genomic resources for A. marina. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing of an A. marina foliar cDNA library to generate a transcriptome dataset for gene and marker discovery. We obtained 40 million high-quality reads and assembled them into 91,125 unigenes with a mean length of 463 bp. These unigenes covered most of the publicly available A. marina Sanger ESTs and greatly extended the repertoire of transcripts for this species. A total of 54,497 and 32,637 unigenes were annotated based on homology to sequences in the NCBI non-redundant and the Swiss-prot protein databases, respectively. Both Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed some transcriptomic signatures of stress adaptation for this halophytic species. We also detected an extraordinary amount of transcripts derived from fungal endophytes and demonstrated the utility of transcriptome sequencing in surveying endophyte diversity without isolating them out of plant tissues. Additionally, we identified 3,423 candidate simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from 3,141 unigenes with a density of one SSR locus every 8.25 kb sequence. Our transcriptomic data will provide valuable resources for ecological, genetic and evolutionary studies in A. marina.

  6. Transcriptome Sequencing and Analysis of Leaf Tissue of Avicennia marina Using the Illumina Platform

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wanke; Huang, Rongfeng; Chen, Shouyi; Zheng, Yizhi

    2014-01-01

    Avicennia marina is a widely distributed mangrove species that thrives in high-salinity habitats. It plays a significant role in supporting coastal ecosystem and holds unique potential for studying molecular mechanisms underlying ecological adaptation. Despite and sometimes because of its numerous merits, this species is facing increasing pressure of exploitation and deforestation. Both study on adaptation mechanisms and conservation efforts necessitate more genomic resources for A. marina. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing of an A. marina foliar cDNA library to generate a transcriptome dataset for gene and marker discovery. We obtained 40 million high-quality reads and assembled them into 91,125 unigenes with a mean length of 463 bp. These unigenes covered most of the publicly available A. marina Sanger ESTs and greatly extended the repertoire of transcripts for this species. A total of 54,497 and 32,637 unigenes were annotated based on homology to sequences in the NCBI non-redundant and the Swiss-prot protein databases, respectively. Both Gene Ontology (GO) analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis revealed some transcriptomic signatures of stress adaptation for this halophytic species. We also detected an extraordinary amount of transcripts derived from fungal endophytes and demonstrated the utility of transcriptome sequencing in surveying endophyte diversity without isolating them out of plant tissues. Additionally, we identified 3,423 candidate simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from 3,141 unigenes with a density of one SSR locus every 8.25 kb sequence. Our transcriptomic data will provide valuable resources for ecological, genetic and evolutionary studies in A. marina. PMID:25265387

  7. Chapter F. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 - Marina District

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Rourke, Thomas D.

    1992-01-01

    During the earthquake, a total land area of about 4,300 km2 was shaken with seismic intensities that can cause significant damage to structures. The area of the Marina District of San Francisco is only 4.0 km2--less than 0.1 percent of the area most strongly affected by the earthquake--but its significance with respect to engineering, seismology, and planning far outstrips its proportion of shaken terrain and makes it a centerpiece for lessons learned from the earthquake. The Marina District provides perhaps the most comprehensive case history of seismic effects at a specific site developed for any earthquake. The reports assembled in this chapter, which provide an account of these seismic effects, constitute a unique collection of studies on site, as well as infrastructure and societal, response that cover virtually all aspects of the earthquake, ranging from incoming ground waves to the outgoing airwaves used for emergency communication. The Marina District encompasses the area bounded by San Francisco Bay on the north, the Presidio on the west, and Lombard Street and Van Ness Avenue on the south and east, respectively. Nearly all of the earthquake damage in the Marina District, however, occurred within a considerably smaller area of about 0.75 km2, bounded by San Francisco Bay and Baker, Chestnut, and Buchanan Streets. At least five major aspects of earthquake response in the Marina District are covered by the reports in this chapter: (1) dynamic site response, (2) soil liquefaction, (3) lifeline performance, (4) building performance, and (5) emergency services.

  8. Establishment of Avicennia marina mangroves on accreting coastline at Sungai Haji Dorani, Selangor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamin, Noraini Mohd.; Zakaria, Rozainah; Hashim, Roslan; Yin, Yu

    2011-10-01

    Avicennia marina saplings were established within a restoration area at Sg. Hj. Dorani, Malaysia between May and August 2010. Sapling establishment was achieved following the construction of segmented and hard breakwater as mitigating measure against coastal erosion. Geostructures known as brush faschines were installed within the restoration area as secondary sediment and seed traps. There was a steady increase in the sand content of the soil from 5% in November 2008 to 18% in May 2010. The dominant soil content was silt but it fluctuated and declined slightly over the same period, between 80% in November 2008 and 72% in May 2010. The accreting shoreline behind the breakwater had stabilised within 18 months. Subsequently, the first batch of A. marina wild seedlings or wildings was established on the mud surface in September 2009. Only about 10% of these wildings survived and showed high survival rate (90%) over the next eight months. Wildings that were naturally established near mother trees showed good growth performance. No wilding was established after the fruiting season in August 2010 as all seeds that were dispersed into the restoration area were washed away by September 2010. Tall, A. marina wild saplings (1 m) planted within the restoration area showed higher survival rate (80%) compared to planted saplings of Rhizophora apiculata (30%). Final planting of a thousand 1 m tall A. marina wild saplings was carried out from June 2010, in clumps of 20 and in 1 m × 1 m spacing. By the end of September 2010 clusters of regenerating A. marina mangroves about 1.5 m tall were successfully established on the accreting coastline.

  9. Influence of model selection on the predicted distribution of the seagrass Zostera marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, Anna-Leena; von Numers, Mikael; Boström, Christoffer

    2013-04-01

    There is an increasing need to model the distribution of species and habitats for effective conservation planning, but there is a paucity of models for the marine environment. We used presence (131) and absence (219) records of the marine angiosperm Zostera marina L. from the archipelago of SW Finland, northern Baltic Sea, to model its distribution in a 5400 km2 area. We used depth, slope, turbidity, wave exposure and distance to sandy shores as environmental predictors, and compared a presence-absence method: generalised additive model (GAM), with a presence only method: maximum entropy (Maxent). Models were validated using semi-independent data sets. Both models performed well and described the niche of Z. marina fairly consistently, although there were differences in the way the models weighted the environmental variables, and consequently the spatial predictions differed somewhat. A notable outcome from the process was that with relatively equal model performance, the area actually predicted in geographical space can vary by twofold. The area predicted as suitable for Z. marina by the ensemble was almost half of that predicted by the GAM model by itself. The ensemble of model predictions increased the model predictive capability marginally and clearly shifted the model towards a more conservative prediction, increasing specificity, but at the same time sacrificing sensitivity. The environmental predictors selected into the final models described the potential distribution of Z. marina well and showed that in the northern Baltic the species occupies a narrow niche, typically thriving in shallow and moderately exposed to exposed locations near sandy shores. We conclude that a prediction based on a combination of model results provides a more realistic estimate of the core area suitable for Z. marina and should be the modelling approach implemented in conservation planning and management.

  10. Silicon alleviates cadmium toxicity in Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. seedlings in relation to root anatomy and radial oxygen loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Yan, Chongling; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Wang, Wenyun; Du, Jingna; Duan, Hanhui

    2013-11-15

    The effects of Si on growth, the anatomy of the roots, radial oxygen loss (ROL) and Fe/Mn plaque on the root surface were investigated in Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. seedlings under Cd stress. Si prompted the growth of seedlings and reduced the Cd concentration in the root, stem and leaf of A. marina. Si prompted the development of the apoplastic barrier in the roots, which may be related to the reduction of Cd uptake. The higher amount of ROL and Mn plaque on the root surface due to Si were also related to the promotion of Cd tolerance in A. marina seedlings. Therefore, it is concluded that the alteration of the anatomy of the roots, the increase of ROL and Mn plaque of A. marina seedlings play an important role in alleviation of Cd toxicity due to Si. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A comparative evaluation of biological activities and bioactive compounds of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Zostera noltei from southern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Luísa; Laukaityte, Simona; Engelen, Aschwin H; Rodrigues, Maria João; Pereira, Hugo; Vizetto-Duarte, Catarina; Barreira, Luísa; Rodríguez, Hortensia; Alberício, Fernando; Varela, João

    2016-01-01

    This work assessed the antioxidant potential, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition and the in vitro cytotoxic activity of extracts of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Zostera noltei collected from southern Portugal. The total phenolic contents (TPCs), the rosmarinic acid (RA) concentration (HPLC/DAD) and the fatty acid (FA) profile (GC/MS) are also described. Z. marina had the highest TPC, radical scavenging activity against DPPH radicals and copper chelating activity. Z. noltei had metal chelation capacity to copper and iron ions. None of the species was able to inhibit AChE. Both seagrasses had high levels of polyunsaturated FAs. Z. marina significantly and selectively reduced the viability of tumorous neuronal cells. Z. noltei was highly toxic for the three cell lines tested and was selective against hepatocarcinoma cells at the concentration of 100 μg/mL. RA was the main compound identified in Z. marina, but not in Z. noltei.

  12. Determining bathymetric distributions of the eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three turbid estuaries of the eastern North Pacific coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved methods for determining bathymetric distributions of dominant intertidal plants throughout their estuarine range are needed. Zostera marina is a seagrass native to estuaries of the northeastern Pacific and many other sectors of the world ocean. The technique described ...

  13. Determining bathymetric distributions of the eelgrass Zostera marina L. in three turbid estuaries of the eastern North Pacific coast

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved methods for determining bathymetric distributions of dominant intertidal plants throughout their estuarine range are needed. Zostera marina is a seagrass native to estuaries of the northeastern Pacific and many other sectors of the world ocean. The technique described ...

  14. In Situ Carbon Stable Isotope Tracer Experiments Elucidate Carbon Translocation Rates and Allocation Patterns in Zostera marina L. (eelgrass)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intertidal seagrass Zostera marina is an important species that provides critical habitat for a number of estuarine species. Despite its widespread distribution, there is limited information on seasonal patterns of carbon dynamics of plants growing in situ, particularly esti...

  15. EFFECTS OF MICROTOPOGRAPHIC VARIATION ON MORPHOMETRICS AND SURVIVAL OF THE ANNUAL FORM OF THE EELGRASS, ZOSTERA MARINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We sampled a disjunct population of the annual form of the seagrass Zostera marina occurring in the upper intertidal zone of Yaquina Bay, Oregon to determine whether there are differences in recruitment, growth, survivorship and morphology associated with microtopographic locatio...

  16. In Situ Carbon Stable Isotope Tracer Experiments Elucidate Carbon Translocation Rates and Allocation Patterns in Zostera marina L. (eelgrass)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intertidal seagrass Zostera marina is an important species that provides critical habitat for a number of estuarine species. Despite its widespread distribution, there is limited information on seasonal patterns of carbon dynamics of plants growing in situ, particularly esti...

  17. Analysis of transcriptional regulation and tissue-specific expression of Avicennia marina Plasma Membrane Protein 3 suggests it contributes to Na(+) transport and homoeostasis in A. marina.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, Rajalakshmi; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2015-07-01

    Plasma membrane proteins (PMP3) play a role in cation homoeostasis. The 5' flanking sequence of stress inducible, Avicennia marina PMP3 (AmPMP3prom) was transcriptionally fused to (a) GUS or (b) GFP-AmPMP3 and analyzed in transgenic tobacco. Tissue-histochemical GUS and GFP:AmPMP3 localization are co-incident under basal and stress conditions. AmPMP3prom directed GUS activity is highest in roots. Basal transcription is conferred by a 388bp segment upstream of the translation start site. A 463bp distal enhancer in the AmPMP3prom confers enhanced expression under salinity in all tissues and also responds to increases in salinity. The effect of a central, stem-specific negative regulatory region is suppressed by the distal enhancer. The A. marina rhizosphere encounters dynamic changes in salinity at the inter-tidal interface. The complex, tissue-specific transcriptional responsiveness of AmPMP3 to salinity appears to have evolved in response to these changes. Under salinity, guard cell and phloem-specific expression of GFP:AmPMP3 is highly enhanced. Mesophyll, trichomes, bundle sheath, parenchymatous cortex and xylem parenchyma also show GFP:AmPMP3 expression. Cis-elements conferring stress, root and vascular-specific expression are enriched in the AmPMP3 promoter. Pronounced vascular-specific AmPMP3 expression suggests a role in salinity induced Na(+) transport, storage, and secretion in A. marina. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Entamoeba marina n. sp.; a New Species of Entamoeba Isolated from Tidal Flat Sediment of Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Takashi; Ishida, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    The genus Entamoeba includes anaerobic lobose amoebae, most of which are parasites of various vertebrates and invertebrates. We report a new Entamoeba species, E. marina n. sp. that was isolated from a sample of tidal flat sediment collected at Iriomote Island, Okinawa, Japan. Trophozoites of E. marina were 12.8-32.1 μm in length and 6.8-15.9 μm in width, whereas the cysts were 8.9-15.8 μm in diam. and contained four nuclei. The E. marina cells contained a rounded nucleus with a small centric karyosome and uniformly arranged peripheral chromatin. Although E. marina is morphologically indistinguishable from other tetranucleated cyst-forming Entamoeba species, E. marina can be distinguished from them based on the combination of molecular phylogenetic analyses using SSU rDNA gene and the difference of collection sites. Therefore, we propose E. marina as a new species of the genus Entamoeba. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  19. Inhibition of five natural products from Chinese herbs on the growth of Chattonella marina.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; He, Zheng-Bing; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2016-09-01

    The effects of five natural products from Chinese herbs including evodiamine, curcumin, 4-methoxysalicylaldehyde, esculin hydrate, and gramine on the growth of Chattonella marina, one of the most noxious red tide algae, were observed. Among them, gramine exhibited the highest inhibitory rate with LC50, 96h of 0.51 mg/l. After exposure to gramine, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and content of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in C. marina, suggesting that gramine could induce microalgae oxidative stress. In addition, chlorophyll a and the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (Fv/Fm) decreased following exposure to gramine, indicating the inhibition of photosynthesis activity in the microalgae. Combined with the fast inhibition against the algal cells and environmentally friendly character of gramine, we proposed that gramine might be a potential algaecide against marine harmful algae and that the oxidative damage and photosynthesis inhibition might be responsible for the toxicity of gramine on harmful algae.

  20. Root metabolic responses to short term anaerobiosis in the temperate sea grass Zostera marina L

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Pregnall, A.M.; Alberte, R.S.

    1986-04-01

    The submerged angiosperm Z. marina grows in highly reducing marine sediments. The roots experience periods of oxygen deprivation at night when photosynthesis-mediated oxygen transport from the shoot ceases. Despite this apparently inhospitable environment, Z. marina is extremely productive. This study sought to determine root metabolic responses to short term anaerobiosis. Roots were incubated for 4 h in the presence of /sup 14/C-sucrose. Amino acids and Krebs cycle intermediates were then extracted and label was quantified. Ethanol and lactate were the most heavily labeled metabolites following short term anaerobiosis. Despite increased synthesis of ethanol during anaerobiosis, endogenous levels do not increase significantly. Instead over 90% of newly synthesized ethanol is released by roots into the incubation medium. The authors conclude that release of ethanol by roots occurs naturally and prevents excessive accumulation of a potentially toxic product.

  1. The effect of wind direction and building surroundings on a marina bay in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katona, Cosmin; Safta, Carmen Anca

    2017-01-01

    The wind effect has usually a major importance in the marina bay. These environmental sites are an interplay between tourist and commercial activities, requiring a high-detailed and definition studies of the dynamic fluid in the harbor. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used elaborately in urban surroundings research. However, most CFD studies were performed for harbors for only a confined number of wind directions and/or without considering the building surroundings effects. This paper presents the results of different simulations based on various wind flows and the CFD simulation of coupled urban wind flow and general wind directions upon a semi-closed area. Thus the importance of wind effects on the evaluation of the marina bay will be pointed out to achieve a safe and secure mooring at the berth and eventually a good potential of renewable energy for an impending green harbor.

  2. The influence of flavonoid amendment on the absorption of cadmium in Avicennia marina roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Lu, Haoliang; Liu, Jingchun; Hong, Hualong; Yan, Chongling

    2015-10-01

    Flavonoid is a key factor for the tolerance to cadmium in plants. Concentration-dependent kinetics experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of flavonoid amendment on the Cd(2+) uptake in Avicennia marina (Forsk) Vierh. roots. We found that compared with the control, saturation concentration and maximal absorption rate of Cd was higher under flavonoid amendment (p<0.05). When roots were exposed to ion transport inhibitor (LaCl3), flavonoid amendment also facilitated Cd transport in roots. Flavonoids had no influence on Cd(2+) uptake in root cell walls. In conclusion, flavonoids enhance the tolerance to Cd and have a significant stimulative effect on symplasm transport of Cd in A. marina roots. Ca(2+)-channel was not the unique means of symplasm transport for Cd(2+) absorption.

  3. Biology of the Marine Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrophic dinoflagellates are prevalent protists in marine environments, which play an important role in the carbon cycling and energy flow in the marine planktonic community. Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae), a widespread heterotrophic dinoflagellate, is a model species used for a broad range of ecological, biogeographic, and evolutionary studies. Despite the increasing research effort on this species, there lacks a synthesis of the existing data and a coherent picture of this organism. Here we reviewed the literature to provide an overview of what is known regarding the biology of O. marina, and identify areas where further studies are needed. As an early branch of the dinoflagellate lineage, O. marina shares similarity with typical dinoflagellates in permanent condensed chromosomes, less abundant nucleosome proteins compared to other eukaryotes, multiple gene copies, the occurrence of trans-splicing in nucleus-encoded mRNAs, highly fragmented mitochondrial genome, and disuse of ATG as a start codon for mitochondrial genes. On the other hand, O. marina also exhibits some distinct cytological features (e.g., different flagellar structure, absence of girdle and sulcus or pustules, use of intranuclear spindle in mitosis, presence of nuclear plaque, and absence of birefringent periodic banded chromosomal structure) and genetic features (e.g., a single histone-like DNA-associated protein, cob-cox3 gene fusion, 5′ oligo-U cap in the mitochondrial transcripts of protein-coding genes, the absence of mRNA editing, the presence of stop codon in the fused cob-cox3 mRNA produced by post-transcriptional oligoadenylation, and vestigial plastid genes). The best-studied biology of this dinoflagellate is probably the prey and predators types, which include a wide range of organisms. On the other hand, the abundance of this species in the natural waters and its controlling factors, genome organization and gene expression regulation that underlie the unusual cytological and

  4. Improved oxidation of naringenin to carthamidin and isocarthamidin by Rhodotorula marina.

    PubMed

    Madej, Anna; Popłoński, Jarosław; Huszcza, Ewa

    2014-05-01

    A novel single-step microbial transformation process for the efficient production of carthamidin and isocarthamidin from naringenin by yeast Rhodotorula marina in an aerated bioreactor was described. The biotransformation led to the total product concentration of 233 mg/l. The highest conversion efficiency observed for carthamidin was 0.31 mg/mg of naringenin and for isocarthamidin 0.47 mg/mg of naringenin.

  5. Economic Impacts from Spending by Marina Slip Renters and Private Dock Owners at Lake Sidney Lanier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    and private docks at Lake Sid- ney Lanier ( Georgia ), Lake Barkley (Kentucky/Tennessee), and Hartwell Lake ( Georgia /North Carolina/South Carolina...north- ern Georgia . This economic assessment is based on the results of a 1999 survey of the samples of Lake Sidney Lanier marina slip renters and pri...renters, and private dock owners and guests at Lake Sidney Lanier, located in northern Georgia and situated within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

  6. Morphology, morphogenesis and molecular phylogeny of a new marine ciliate, Trichototaxis marina n. sp. (Ciliophora, Urostylida).

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoteng; Gao, Feng; Shao, Chen; Hu, Xiaozhong; Warren, Alan

    2014-10-01

    The live morphology, infraciliature and morphogenesis of a new urostylid ciliate, Trichototaxis marina n. sp., collected from coastal water in Qingdao, China, were studied based on the observations of live and silver stained specimens. The new species is characterised as follows: body very flexible and contractile, slight to brick-reddish in colour due to irregularly-shaped, brick-red pigments; ca. 70 adoral membranelles; about 17 frontal cirri arranged in a bicorona; average 67 midventral pairs, the right base of each pair being conspicuously larger than the left base; five to seven transverse cirri; constantly two frontoterminal, one buccal and two pretransverse ventral cirri; two or three left marginal rows; right and innermost left marginal rows with 56-92 and 66-106 cirri, respectively; six bipolar dorsal kineties; more than 100 macronuclear nodules. The characteristic morphogenetic feature in T. marina is the development of the left marginal rows, that is, only one left marginal row is newly built the other one or two being retained from the parental cell. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit ribosomal gene sequence data reveal a close relationship of T. marina with members of family Pseudokeronopsidae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. A Zostera marina manganese superoxide dismutase gene involved in the responses to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Tang, Xuexi; Wang, You; Zang, Yu; Zhou, Bin

    2016-01-10

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an essential enzyme playing a pivotal role in the protection mechanism against oxidative stress by reducing superoxide radicals. In the present study, the full-length cDNA sequence of manganese superoxide dismutase was identified from Zostera marina (ZmMnSOD) via raid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) analysis. The open reading frame (ORF) encoded a polypeptide of 254 amino acid residues, which shared 69%-77% similarity with previous identified SODs. Analysis of the deduced amino acid revealed conserved features, including functional domains, signature motifs and metal binding sites. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ZmMnSOD was closer to the SODs from angiosperm than those from other organisms. The mRNA expression level of ZmMnSOD at different temperatures was investigated using real-time PCR and it was significantly up-regulated from 5°C to 15°C, and then dramatically down-regulated. The recombinant ZmMnSOD protein was purified and exhibited Mn(2+) ions dependency specific enzymatic activity and strong antioxidant activity over a wide temperature range. All these results indicate that ZmMnSOD is an authentic member of the plant SOD family and may play important roles in minimizing the effect of oxidative damage in Z. marina against temperature stress and affect the adaptability of Z. marina to global warming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Conceptual bases for prey biorecognition and feeding selectivity in the microplanktonic marine phagotroph Oxyrrhis marina.

    PubMed

    Martel, Claire M

    2009-05-01

    It is suspected that phagotrophic marine protozoa might possess feeding receptors that enable them to discern the nutritional quality of individual prey items (during prey-handling) on the basis of their cell-surface biochemistry. This article reviews advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that mediate the biorecognition and selection of nonself (microalgal) prey items by the microplanktonic marine phagotroph Oxyrrhis marina. The potential importance of lectin-glycan interactions is first considered in view of findings which demonstrate that O. marina possesses lectin-like feeding receptors specific for prey-surface (mannose) glycoconjugates. Secondly, some conceptual bases for indirect or 'opsonic' modes of prey biorecognition mediated by soluble prey-labelling proteins are presented. Finally, the possibility that some accounts of selective feeding in O. marina might result from the noxious effects of prey-associated chemicals rather than active 'distaste' by phagotrophic cells is discussed. Recent evidence for toxic superoxide (O(2)(-)) production by marine microalgae is afforded particular attention given that release of O(2)(-) anions can be exacerbated by the binding of mannose-specific lectins to the microalgal cell wall; a novel model for grazing-activated chemical defence is proposed.

  9. [Hydroxyectoine synthesis and release under osmotic shock in Cobetia marina CICC10367].

    PubMed

    Lang, Yajun; Ren, Yanan; Bai, Lin; Zhang, Linghua

    2009-12-01

    To obtain hydroxyectoine-producing strain with tolerance to osmotic shock and improve hydroxyectoine productivity by adopting "bacteria milking" process. We isolated a strain from salt lake, and then carried out the identifications of morphology, physiological and biochemical characteristics of the strain. We also investigated the effects of the medium and its NaCl concentration on the hydroxyectoine synthesis of this strain. Under optimal condition, hydroxyectoine was produced by adopting "bacteria milking" process. A hydroxyectoine-producing strain was obtained and identified as Cobetia marina CICC10367 (C. marina CICC10367). It could enhance hydroxyeceoine synthesis when the medium adopting monosodium glutamate as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen at 90 g/L NaCl. The highest synthesized hydroxyectoine concentration was 694.5 mg/L in the above described medium. After the "bacteria milking" process of six osmotic shock, the total concentration of hydroxyectoine was 4179.0 mg/L, the productivity was 597.0 mg/L/d, and the conversion rate of hydroxyectoine on substrate was 80.2 mg/g. C. marina CICC10367 was able to synthesize hydroxyectoine under NaCl induction and tolerant to osmotic stress. The hydroxyectoine productivity and conversion rate of hydroxyectoine on substrate were both significantly improved by adopting "bacteria milking" process.

  10. Rhizosphere microbiome metagenomics of gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) in the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Alzubaidy, Hanin; Essack, Magbubah; Malas, Tareq B; Bokhari, Ameerah; Motwalli, Olaa; Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua; Jamhor, Suhaiza Ahmad; Mokhtar, Noor Azlin; Antunes, André; Simões, Marta Filipa; Alam, Intikhab; Bougouffa, Salim; Lafi, Feras F; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2016-02-01

    Mangroves are unique, and endangered, coastal ecosystems that play a vital role in the tropical and subtropical environments. A comprehensive description of the microbial communities in these ecosystems is currently lacking, and additional studies are required to have a complete understanding of the functioning and resilience of mangroves worldwide. In this work, we carried out a metagenomic study by comparing the microbial community of mangrove sediment with the rhizosphere microbiome of Avicennia marina, in northern Red Sea mangroves, along the coast of Saudi Arabia. Our results revealed that rhizosphere samples presented similar profiles at the taxonomic and functional levels and differentiated from the microbiome of bulk soil controls. Overall, samples showed predominance by Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, with high abundance of sulfate reducers and methanogens, although specific groups were selectively enriched in the rhizosphere. Functional analysis showed significant enrichment in 'metabolism of aromatic compounds', 'mobile genetic elements', 'potassium metabolism' and 'pathways that utilize osmolytes' in the rhizosphere microbiomes. To our knowledge, this is the first metagenomic study on the microbiome of mangroves in the Red Sea, and the first application of unbiased 454-pyrosequencing to study the rhizosphere microbiome associated with A. marina. Our results provide the first insights into the range of functions and microbial diversity in the rhizosphere and soil sediments of gray mangrove (A. marina) in the Red Sea.

  11. Genetic structure of eelgrass Zostera marina meadows in an embayment with restricted water flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz-Salazar, R.; Talbot, S.L.; Sage, G.K.; Ward, D.H.; Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro

    2006-01-01

    Genetic structure of the seagrass Zostera marina in a coastal lagoon with restricted water flow, and with heterogeneous water residence times and oceanographic characteristics, was assessed using 8 polymorphic microsatellite loci. Analyses of genetic differentiation (??) and Bayesian clustering suggested that the Z. marina population in San Quintin Bay (SQB) is genetically substructured, with at least 4 genetically different groups: (1) West Head, (2) Mouth, (3) East Arm, and (4) East Head. The greatest ?? value was observed between the most distant sites (?? = 0.095). The lowest values were found among sites closest to the mouth of the coastal lagoon (?? = 0.000 to 0.009). The maximum likelihood approach showed that the sites at the mouth have a mixed pattern of gene flow without a unidirectional pattern. In contrast, there was a clear pattern of asymmetrical gene flow from the mouth towards the West Head. These results suggested that the restriction of water flow at the heads, current pattern, and the distance between sites can reduce genetic flow and promote genetic differences within Z. marina meadows in small water embayments such as SQB. Though the population is genetically substructured and a 14 % decline in cover has been detected, this study did not show evidence of a recent genetic bottleneck. In contrast, mouth sites have experienced a recent expansion in their population size, and also perhaps a recent influx of rare alleles from genetically distinct immigrants. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  12. De novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome of seagrass Zostera marina using Illumina paired-end sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanna; Li, Hong; Sun, Peipei; Zhou, Yang; Mao, Yunxiang

    2014-01-01

    The seagrass Zostera marina is a monocotyledonous angiosperm belonging to a polyphyletic group of plants that can live submerged in marine habitats. Zostera marina L. is one of the most common seagrasses and is considered a cornerstone of marine plant molecular ecology research and comparative studies. However, the mechanisms underlying its adaptation to the marine environment still remain poorly understood due to limited transcriptomic and genomic data. Here we explored the transcriptome of Z. marina leaves under different environmental conditions using Illumina paired-end sequencing. Approximately 55 million sequencing reads were obtained, representing 58,457 transcripts that correspond to 24,216 unigenes. A total of 14,389 (59.41%) unigenes were annotated by blast searches against the NCBI non-redundant protein database. 45.18% and 46.91% of the unigenes had significant similarity with proteins in the Swiss-Prot database and Pfam database, respectively. Among these, 13,897 unigenes were assigned to 57 Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 4,745 unigenes were identified and mapped to 233 pathways via functional annotation against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database (KEGG). We compared the orthologous gene family of the Z. marina transcriptome to Oryza sativa and Pyropia yezoensis and 11,667 orthologous gene families are specific to Z. marina. Furthermore, we identified the photoreceptors sensing red/far-red light and blue light. Also, we identified a large number of genes that are involved in ion transporters and channels including Na+ efflux, K+ uptake, Cl- channels, and H+ pumping. Our study contains an extensive sequencing and gene-annotation analysis of Z. marina. This information represents a genetic resource for the discovery of genes related to light sensing and salt tolerance in this species. Our transcriptome can be further utilized in future studies on molecular adaptation to abiotic stress in Z. marina.

  13. De Novo Assembly and Characterization of the Transcriptome of Seagrass Zostera marina Using Illumina Paired-End Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fanna; Li, Hong; Sun, Peipei; Zhou, Yang; Mao, Yunxiang

    2014-01-01

    Background The seagrass Zostera marina is a monocotyledonous angiosperm belonging to a polyphyletic group of plants that can live submerged in marine habitats. Zostera marina L. is one of the most common seagrasses and is considered a cornerstone of marine plant molecular ecology research and comparative studies. However, the mechanisms underlying its adaptation to the marine environment still remain poorly understood due to limited transcriptomic and genomic data. Principal Findings Here we explored the transcriptome of Z. marina leaves under different environmental conditions using Illumina paired-end sequencing. Approximately 55 million sequencing reads were obtained, representing 58,457 transcripts that correspond to 24,216 unigenes. A total of 14,389 (59.41%) unigenes were annotated by blast searches against the NCBI non-redundant protein database. 45.18% and 46.91% of the unigenes had significant similarity with proteins in the Swiss-Prot database and Pfam database, respectively. Among these, 13,897 unigenes were assigned to 57 Gene Ontology (GO) terms and 4,745 unigenes were identified and mapped to 233 pathways via functional annotation against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database (KEGG). We compared the orthologous gene family of the Z. marina transcriptome to Oryza sativa and Pyropia yezoensis and 11,667 orthologous gene families are specific to Z. marina. Furthermore, we identified the photoreceptors sensing red/far-red light and blue light. Also, we identified a large number of genes that are involved in ion transporters and channels including Na+ efflux, K+ uptake, Cl− channels, and H+ pumping. Conclusions Our study contains an extensive sequencing and gene-annotation analysis of Z. marina. This information represents a genetic resource for the discovery of genes related to light sensing and salt tolerance in this species. Our transcriptome can be further utilized in future studies on molecular adaptation to abiotic stress in

  14. Energetics of Photosystem II charge recombination in Acaryochloris marina studied by thermoluminescence and flash-induced chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Cser, Krisztián; Deák, Zsuzsanna; Telfer, Alison; Barber, James; Vass, Imre

    2008-01-01

    We studied the charge recombination characteristics of Photosystem II (PSII) redox components in whole cells of the chlorophyll (Chl) d-dominated cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris marina, by flash-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and thermoluminescence measurements. Flash-induced chlorophyll fluorescence decay was retarded in the mus and ms time ranges and accelerated in the s time range in Acaryochloris marina relative to that in the Chl a-containing cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC 6803. In the presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethylurea, which blocks the Q(B) site, the relaxation of fluorescence decay arising from S(2)Q(A)(-) recombination was somewhat faster in Acaryochloris marina than in Synechocystis PCC 6803. Thermoluminescence intensity of the so called B band, arising from the recombination of the S(2)Q(B)(-) charge separated state, was enhanced significantly (2.5 fold) on the basis of equal amounts of PSII in Acaryochloris marina as compared with Synechocystis 6803. Our data show that the energetics of charge recombination is modified in Acaryochloris marina leading to a approximately 15 meV decrease of the free energy gap between the Q(A) and Q(B) acceptors. In addition, the total free energy gap between the ground state and the excited state of the reaction center chlorophyll is at least approximately 25-30 meV smaller in Acaryochloris marina, suggesting that the primary donor species cannot consist entirely of Chl a in Acaryochloris marina, and there is a contribution from Chl d as well.

  15. A tale of two seagrasses: Comparing the science and management of Zostera marina and Zostera japonica in the Pacific Northwest - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    On the Pacific coast of North America, at least two congeners of Zostera occur: native Z. marina, and introduced, Z. japonica. Z. marina is protected by State and Federal laws as essential fish habitat. Z. japonica is considered “invasive” and therefore, ecologicall...

  16. A tale of two seagrasses: Comparing the science and management of Zostera marina and Zostera japonica in the Pacific Northwest - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    On the Pacific coast of North America, at least two congeners of Zostera occur: native Z. marina, and introduced, Z. japonica. Z. marina is protected by State and Federal laws as essential fish habitat. Z. japonica is considered “invasive” and therefore, ecologicall...

  17. Description of Cobetia amphilecti sp. nov., Cobetia litoralis sp. nov. and Cobetia pacifica sp. nov., classification of Halomonas halodurans as a later heterotypic synonym of Cobetia marina and emended descriptions of the genus Cobetia and Cobetia marina.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Falsen, Enevold

    2013-01-01

    A group of five Gram-negative, aerobic, halotolerant, non-pigmented bacteria isolated from shallow sediment samples and invertebrate specimens collected from the Gulf of Alaska and the Sea of Japan was subjected to taxonomic study. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the novel isolates were affiliated to the genus Cobetia, sharing the highest sequence similarity of 99.3-99.9 % with Cobetia marina DSM 4741(T). DNA-DNA hybridization experiments between and among the novel strains and C. marina DSM 4741(T) and Cobetia crustatorum JCM 15644(T) revealed that the five strains represent three separate genospecies, which could be differentiated in their morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. Halomonas halodurans NBRC 15607(T) was included in this study as it has recently been reported to exhibit high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to C. marina DSM 4741(T), and it showed a high DNA relatedness value of 96 % with C. marina DSM 4741(T), indicating that they belong to the same species. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic characterization, three novel species are proposed, named Cobetia amphilecti sp. nov. (type strain KMM 1561(T) = NRIC 0815(T) = CCUG 49560(T)), Cobetia litoralis sp. nov. (type strain KMM 3880(T) =NRIC 0814(T) =CCUG 49563(T)) and Cobetia pacifica sp. nov. (type strain KMM 3879(T) = NRIC 0813(T) = CCUG 49562(T)). It is also proposed that Halomonas halodurans is a later heterotypic synonym of Cobetia marina, and emended descriptions of the genus Cobetia and the species Cobetia marina are provided.

  18. Constitution and energetics of photosystem I and photosystem II in the chlorophyll d-dominated cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Mimuro, Mamoru

    2011-01-01

    This mini review presents current topics of discussion about photosystem (PS) I and PS II of photosynthesis in the Acaryochloris marina. A. marina is a photosynthetic cyanobacterium in which chlorophyll (Chl) d is the major antenna pigment (>95%). However, Chl a is always present in a few percent. Chl d absorbs light with a wavelength up to 30 nm red-shifted from Chl a. Therefore, the chlorophyll species of the special pair in PS II has been a matter of debate because if Chl d was the special pair component, the overall energetics must be different in A. marina. The history of this field indicates that a purified sample is necessary for the reliable identification and characterization of the special pair. In view of the spectroscopic data and the redox potential of pheophytin, we discuss the nature of special pair constituents and the localization of the enigmatic Chl a.

  19. Evaluation of Protective Efficacy of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh Leaves against Complete Freund᾽s Adjuvant-induced Arthritis in Wistar

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Gandomani, Mahdi; Forouzandeh Malati, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Aviecennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the Southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as treatment of rheumatism arthritis among the inhabitants of Southern parts of Iran. The Avicennia marina hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its protective efficacy was investigated using measurement of ankle diameter, total WBC and RBC count, ESR, and Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in the complete Freund᾽s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritic rat. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and hemoglobin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in HEA treated rats. A. marina at 400 mg/Kg significantly decreases the serum pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as normalizes ankle diameter of CFA rats. A. marina (400 mg/Kg) significantly normalizes changes observed in arthritic rats to near normal conditions, indicates that A. marina has promising protective efficacy against arthritic rats. PMID:25276195

  20. Evaluation of Protective Efficacy of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh Leaves against Complete Freund᾽s Adjuvant-induced Arthritis in Wistar.

    PubMed

    Zamani Gandomani, Mahdi; Forouzandeh Malati, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Aviecennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is an endemic plant that widely distributed in the Southern parts of Iran. This plant has been used as treatment of rheumatism arthritis among the inhabitants of Southern parts of Iran. The Avicennia marina hydroalcoholic extract was prepared and its protective efficacy was investigated using measurement of ankle diameter, total WBC and RBC count, ESR, and Pro-inflammatory cytokines levels in the complete Freund᾽s adjuvant (CFA)-induced arthritic rat. The increment in ESR and total WBC, reduction in RBC count and hemoglobin levels observed in the arthritic animals were also found to be significantly restored in HEA treated rats. A. marina at 400 mg/Kg significantly decreases the serum pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as normalizes ankle diameter of CFA rats. A. marina (400 mg/Kg) significantly normalizes changes observed in arthritic rats to near normal conditions, indicates that A. marina has promising protective efficacy against arthritic rats.

  1. Light-Promoted Rhodopsin Expression and Starvation Survival in the Marine Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of microbial rhodopsins in marine proteobacteria changed the dogma that photosynthesis is the only pathway to use the solar energy for biological utilization in the marine environment. Although homologs of these rhodopsins have been identified in dinoflagellates, the diversity of the encoding genes and their physiological roles remain unexplored. As an initial step toward addressing the gap, we conducted high-throughput transcriptome sequencing on Oxyrrhis marina to retrieve rhodopsin transcripts, rapid amplification of cDNA ends to isolate full-length cDNAs of dominant representatives, and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR to investigate their expression under varying conditions. Our phylogenetic analyses showed that O. marina contained both the proton-pumping type (PR) and sensory type (SR) rhodopsins, and the transcriptome data showed that the PR type dominated over the SR type. We compared rhodopsin gene expression for cultures kept under light: dark cycle and continuous darkness in a time course of 24 days without feeding. Although both types of rhodopsin were expressed under the two conditions, the expression levels of PR were much higher than SR, consistent with the transcriptomic data. Furthermore, relative to cultures kept in the dark, rhodopsin expression levels and cell survival rate were both higher in cultures grown in the light. This is the first report of light-dependent promotion of starvation survival and concomitant promotion of PR expression in a eukaryote. While direct evidence needs to come from functional test on rhodopsins in vitro or gene knockout/knockdown experiments, our results suggest that the proton-pumping rhodopsin might be responsible for the light-enhanced survival of O. marina, as previously demonstrated in bacteria. PMID:25506945

  2. [Vitamin B12-independent strains of Methylophaga marina isolated from Red Sea algae].

    PubMed

    Li, Ts D; Doronina, N V; Ivanova, E G; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2007-01-01

    Two strains (KM3 and KM5) of halophilic methylobacteria isolated from Red Sea algae do not require vitamin B12 for growth and can use methanol, methylamine, dimethylamine, trimethylamine, dimethyl sulfide, and fructose as sources of carbon and energy. The cells of these strains are gram-negative motile monotrichous (strain KM3) or peritrichous (strain KM5) rods. The strains are strictly aerobic and require Na+ ions but not growth factors for growth. They are oxidase- and catalase-positive and reduce nitrates to nitrites. Both strains can grow in a temperature range of 4 to 37 degrees C (with optimal growth at 29-34 degrees C), at pH between 5.5 and 8.5 (with optimal growth at pH 7.5-8.0), and in a range of salt concentrations between 0.5 and 15% NaCl (with optimal growth at 5-9% NaCl). The phospholipids of these strains are dominated by phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol and also include phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and cardiolipin. The dominant fatty acids are C(16:1omega7c) and C(16:0). The major ubiquinone is Q8. The cells accumulate ectoin, glutamate, and sucrose as intracellular osmoprotectants. The strains implement the 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate-dependent variant of the ribulose monophosphate pathway. The G+C content of the DNA is 44.4-44.7 mol %. Analysis of the 16S rRNA genes showed that both strains belong to Gammaproteobacteria and have a high degree of homology (99.4%) to Methylophaga marina ATCC 35842T . Based on the data of polyphasic taxonomy, strains KM3 and KM5 are identified as new strains M. marina KM3 (VKM B-2386) and M. marina KM5 (VKM B-2387). The ability of these strains to produce auxins (indole-3-acetic acid) suggests their metabolic association with marine algae.

  3. Influence of light, temperature and salinity on dissolved organic carbon exudation rates in Zostera marina L.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Marine angiosperms, seagrasses, are sentinel species of marine ecosystem health and function. Seagrass carbon budgets provide insight on the minimum requirements needed to maintain this valuable resource. Carbon budgets are a balance between C fixation, growth, storage and loss rates, most of which are well characterized. However, relatively few measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) leaf exudation or rhizodeposition rates exist for most seagrass species. Here I evaluate how eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) DOC exudation is affected by a single factor manipulation (light, temperature or salinity). Eelgrass plants were hydroponically exposed to treatments in experimental chambers (separate leaf and rhizome/root compartments) with artificial seawater medium. Regression analysis of changes in the DOC concentration through time was used to calculate DOC exudation rates. Results Exudation rates were similar across all treatments in all experiments. For all experiments, pooled leaf DOC exudation ranged between 0.032 and 0.069 mg C gdw-1 h-1, while rhizodeposition ranged between 0.024 and 0.045 mg C gdw-1 h-1. These rates are consistent with previously published values and provide first-order estimates for mechanistic models. Conclusions Zostera marina carbon losses from either leaf exudation or rhizodeposition account for a small proportion of gross primary production (1.2-4.6%) and appear to be insensitive to short-term (e.g., hours to days) environmental variations in chamber experiments. Based on these preliminary experiments, I suggest that Z. marina DOC exudation may be a passive process and not an active transport process. PMID:22938529

  4. Biology of the Marine Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhiling; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2013-10-21

    Heterotrophic dinoflagellates are prevalent protists in marine environments, which play an important role in the carbon cycling and energy flow in the marine planktonic community. Oxyrrhismarina (Dinophyceae), a widespread heterotrophic dinoflagellate, is a model species used for a broad range of ecological, biogeographic, and evolutionary studies. Despite the increasing research effort on this species, there lacks a synthesis of the existing data and a coherent picture of this organism. Here we reviewed the literature to provide an overview of what is known regarding the biology of O. marina, and identify areas where further studies are needed. As an early branch of the dinoflagellate lineage, O. marina shares similarity with typical dinoflagellates in permanent condensed chromosomes, less abundant nucleosome proteins compared to other eukaryotes, multiple gene copies, the occurrence of trans-splicing in nucleus-encoded mRNAs, highly fragmented mitochondrial genome, and disuse of ATG as a start codon for mitochondrial genes. On the other hand, O. marina also exhibits some distinct cytological features (e.g., different flagellar structure, absence of girdle and sulcus or pustules, use of intranuclear spindle in mitosis, presence of nuclear plaque, and absence of birefringent periodic banded chromosomal structure) and genetic features (e.g., a single histone-like DNA-associated protein, cob-cox3 gene fusion, 5' oligo-U cap in the mitochondrial transcripts of protein-coding genes, the absence of mRNA editing, the presence of stop codon in the fused cob-cox3 mRNA produced by post-transcriptional oligoadenylation, and vestigial plastid genes). The best-studied biology of this dinoflagellate is probably the prey and predators types, which include a wide range of organisms. On the other hand, the abundance of this species in the natural waters and its controlling factors, genome organization and gene expression regulation that underlie the unusual cytological and

  5. Antiproliferative activity and chemical composition of the venom from the Amazonian toad Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Quispe, Cristina; Arana, Gabriel Vargas; Theoduloz, Cristina; Urra, Félix A; Cárdenas, César

    2016-10-01

    Little is known on the composition of Peruvian Amazon toad venoms. The large toad Rhinella marina is common in the cleared tropical forests of the Iquitos region and is regarded as poisonous. The venom from two different populations of R. marina was collected in the Departamento de Loreto, Perú. The samples were assessed for antiproliferative effect and composition. Some 29 compounds were identified or tentatively identified from the venom by spectroscopic and spectrometric means. The main free bufadienolide was marinobufagin 7 while marinobufotoxin 15 and bufalitoxin 9 were the main bufadienolide argininyl diacid derivatives. The alkaloids dehydrobufotenin 28 and bufotenidin 29 were present in both venoms. The main difference in the venoms was the relative ratio of argininyl diacids from bufadienolides to free bufadienolides. The argininyl diacids included derivatives from bufalin, marinobufagin, telocinobufagin, hellebrigenin, resibufogenin and bufotalinin. Four compounds, including undecadienoyl aginine 6 and three argininyl diacids from bufadienolides were tentatively identified for the first time in the samples. The venom showed a strong antiproliferative effect towards MRC-5 normal human lung fibroblasts (0.063-0.247 μg/mL), AGS human gastric adenocarcinoma cells (0.076-0.272 μg/mL), SK-MES-1 human lung cancer cells (0.154-0.296 μg/mL), J82 human bladder carcinoma cells (0.169-0.212 μg/mL), and HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia (0.071-0.283 μg/mL). The antiproliferative effect is mediated by ROS production and cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). This is the first report on the composition of R. marina venom from the Peruvian Amazon pointing out the need to include different venom samples to get a better picture from the activity and composition of South American toad defense substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Photosystem Trap Energies and Spectrally-Dependent Energy-Storage Efficiencies in the Chl d-Utilizing Cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris Marina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Mauzerall, David

    2012-01-01

    Acaryochloris marina is the only species known to utilize chlorophyll (Chl) d as a principal photopigment. The peak absorption wavelength of Chl d is redshifted approx. 40 nm in vivo relative to Chl a, enabling this cyanobacterium to perform oxygenic phototrophy in niche environments enhanced in far-red light. We present measurements of the in vivo energy-storage (E-S) efficiency of photosynthesis in A. marina, obtained using pulsed photoacoustics (PA) over a 90-nm range of excitation wavelengths in the red and far-red. Together with modeling results, these measurements provide the first direct observation of the trap energies of PSI and PSII, and also the photosystem-specific contributions to the total E-S efficiency. We find the maximum observed efficiency in A. marina (40+/-1% at 735 nm) is higher than in the Chl a cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis (35+/-1% at 690 nm). The efficiency at peak absorption wavelength is also higher in A. marina (36+/-1% at 710 nm vs. 31+/-1% at 670 nm). In both species, the trap efficiencies are approx. 40% (PSI) and approx. 30% (PSII). The PSI trap in A. marina is found to lie at 740+/-5 nm, in agreement with the value inferred from spectroscopic methods. The best fit of the model to the PA data identifies the PSII trap at 723+/-3 nm, supporting the view that the primary electron-donor is Chl d, probably at the accessory (ChlD1) site. A decrease in efficiency beyond the trap wavelength, consistent with uphill energy transfer, is clearly observed and fit by the model. These results demonstrate that the E-S efficiency in A. marina is not thermodynamically limited, suggesting that oxygenic photosynthesis is viable in even redder light environments.

  7. Biofilm Growth and Near-Infrared Radiation-Driven Photosynthesis of the Chlorophyll d-Containing Cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, Lars; Schrameyer, Verena; Qvortrup, Klaus; Lundin, Luisa; Sørensen, Søren J.; Larkum, Anthony W. D.

    2012-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina is the only known phototroph harboring chlorophyll (Chl) d. It is easy to cultivate it in a planktonic growth mode, and A. marina cultures have been subject to detailed biochemical and biophysical characterization. In natural situations, A. marina is mainly found associated with surfaces, but this growth mode has not been studied yet. Here, we show that the A. marina type strain MBIC11017 inoculated into alginate beads forms dense biofilm-like cell clusters, as in natural A. marina biofilms, characterized by strong O2 concentration gradients that change with irradiance. Biofilm growth under both visible radiation (VIS, 400 to 700 nm) and near-infrared radiation (NIR, ∼700 to 730 nm) yielded maximal cell-specific growth rates of 0.38 per day and 0.64 per day, respectively. The population doubling times were 1.09 and 1.82 days for NIR and visible light, respectively. The photosynthesis versus irradiance curves showed saturation at a photon irradiance of Ek (saturating irradiance) >250 μmol photons m−2 s−1 for blue light but no clear saturation at 365 μmol photons m−2 s−1 for NIR. The maximal gross photosynthesis rates in the aggregates were ∼1,272 μmol O2 mg Chl d−1 h−1 (NIR) and ∼1,128 μmol O2 mg Chl d−1 h−1 (VIS). The photosynthetic efficiency (α) values were higher in NIR-irradiated cells [(268 ± 0.29) × 10−6 m2 mg Chl d−1 (mean ± standard deviation)] than under blue light [(231 ± 0.22) × 10−6 m2 mg Chl d−1]. A. marina is well adapted to a biofilm growth mode under both visible and NIR irradiance and under O2 conditions ranging from anoxia to hyperoxia, explaining its presence in natural niches with similar environmental conditions. PMID:22467501

  8. Notable alkaline tolerance of Kocuria marina isolate from blood of a pediatric patient with continuous intravenous epoprostenol therapy.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Ayaka; Kubota, Noriko; Hidaka, Eiko; Shimabukuro, Atsuya; Yasukochi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2015-09-01

    This study was the first to describe the hitherto deficiently evaluated alkaline tolerance of Kocuria marina isolate from a pediatric patient with continuous intravenous epoprostenol dosing therapy. Our isolate from blood of a 7-year-old Japanese boy was finally identified as K. marina by the morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties together with the comparative sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA genes. The K. marina isolate, the causative agent of catheter-related blood-stream infection, was not only revealed to be salt tolerant (NaCl 15%), but also demonstrated to be stably survived with no apparent decrease of cell counts for long periods (120 h) in an alkaline environment (pH 8, 9, 10, and 11) at 35 °C. Its remarkable tolerance to the stresses of high alkalinity compared with a clinical Staphylococcus aureus strain should provide consistent interpretation that the environment of high alkalinity (pH 10.2-10.8) measures should be insufficient to inactivate almost all the causative agents including K. marina strains in the solution of epoprostenol (pH 10.4) (Flolan(®), GlaxoSmithKline, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan.). To the best of our knowledge, the first description of the property of being tolerant to high alkalinity that the K. marina isolate exhibited was noteworthy and a useful piece of information. In conclusion, we believe that the present study should be a notification regarding the potential risk of catheter-related blood-stream infections due to K. marina, suggestive of an alkalophile, especially in patients receiving continuous intravenous epoprostenol dosing therapy. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. An assessment of site suitability for marina construction in Istanbul, Turkey, using GIS and AHP multicriteria decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Gumusay, Mustafa Umit; Koseoglu, Gokalp; Bakirman, Tolga

    2016-12-01

    Marinas play a key role in sea transportation and tourism. The problem of an insufficient marina capacity has revealed in terms of sea traffic due to the demographic structure and increasing tourism potential of Istanbul which is the biggest metropolitan city of Turkey and has around 600-km-long coastline. Therefore, the study area is mainly focused on the Marmara Sea shoreline of Istanbul. Rather than traditional methods, a rapid and cost-effective solution which considers natural and urban environment conditions is essential to satisfy the need for a marina site selection. Thanks to the latest improvements in geographic information systems, it is convenient to perform location selection analysis of marinas taking advantages of geology, land use, demography and accessibility data sets. The goal of this study is to define the areas that are appropriate for building marinas, with the use of topographic and demographic data in a present shoreline applying analytical hierarchy process multicriteria decision-making method. In this study, erosion, landslide, tsunami, land use, geologically hazardous areas, transfer lines, sea traffic data, neighbourhood scale population, age patterns and house income data have been used. Analytical hierarchy process method is used to give a weight to each data set, and a grading system has been developed for the area selection of marinas. The result maps of the analysis that show study area as classified into four categories from good to not suitable are presented. It is possible to create a decision support system for upper scale plans that enable authorities to perform analysis accurately, cost and time effectively using the proposed methodology that integrates multiple data sets with different scales and types.

  10. Heavy metal contamination in sediments and mangroves from the coast of Red Sea: Avicennia marina as potential metal bioaccumulator.

    PubMed

    Usman, Adel R A; Alkredaa, Raed S; Al-Wabel, M I

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the concentrations and pollution status of heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb, Zn and Cr) in the mangrove surface sediments from the Farasan Island, Coast of Red Sea, Saudi Arabia. The ability of mangroves (Avicennia marina) to accumulate and translocate heavy metal within their different compartments was also investigated. Five sampling sites were chosen for collection of sediments and different compartments (leaf, branch and root) of A. marina. The results showed that the maximum and average concentrations of Cd, Cu and Pb in the studied area exceeded their world average concentration of shale. Additionally, only the maximum concentration of Zn exceeded its world average shale concentration. Based on the quality guidelines of sediment (SQGs), the collected sediment samples were in moderate to heavy rate for Cu, non-polluted to heavy rate for Pb and Zn, and non-polluted to moderate rate for Cr and Ni. The average metal concentrations of A. marina in the studied area were observed in the order Cu (256.0-356.6mgkg(-1))>Zn (29.5-36.8mgkg(-1))>Cr (8.15-14.9mgkg(-1))>Ni (1.37-4.02mgkg(-1))>Cd (not detectable-1.04mgkg(-1))>Pb (not detectable). Based on bio-concentration factors (BCF), their most obtained values were considered too high (>1), suggesting that A. marina can be considered as a high-efficient plant for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. Among all metals, Cu and Cr were highly bio-accumulated in different parts of A. marina. In terms of heavy metal contamination control via phyto-extraction, our findings suggest also that A. marina may be classified as potential accumulator for Cu in aboveground parts, as indicated by higher metal accumulation in the leaves combined with bio-concentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor (TF) values >1.

  11. Biofilm growth and near-infrared radiation-driven photosynthesis of the chlorophyll d-containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Lars; Schrameyer, Verena; Qvortrup, Klaus; Lundin, Luisa; Sørensen, Søren J; Larkum, Anthony W D; Kühl, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina is the only known phototroph harboring chlorophyll (Chl) d. It is easy to cultivate it in a planktonic growth mode, and A. marina cultures have been subject to detailed biochemical and biophysical characterization. In natural situations, A. marina is mainly found associated with surfaces, but this growth mode has not been studied yet. Here, we show that the A. marina type strain MBIC11017 inoculated into alginate beads forms dense biofilm-like cell clusters, as in natural A. marina biofilms, characterized by strong O(2) concentration gradients that change with irradiance. Biofilm growth under both visible radiation (VIS, 400 to 700 nm) and near-infrared radiation (NIR, ∼700 to 730 nm) yielded maximal cell-specific growth rates of 0.38 per day and 0.64 per day, respectively. The population doubling times were 1.09 and 1.82 days for NIR and visible light, respectively. The photosynthesis versus irradiance curves showed saturation at a photon irradiance of E(k) (saturating irradiance) >250 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) for blue light but no clear saturation at 365 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) for NIR. The maximal gross photosynthesis rates in the aggregates were ∼1,272 μmol O(2) mg Chl d(-1) h(-1) (NIR) and ∼1,128 μmol O(2) mg Chl d(-1) h(-1) (VIS). The photosynthetic efficiency (α) values were higher in NIR-irradiated cells [(268 ± 0.29) × 10(-6) m(2) mg Chl d(-1) (mean ± standard deviation)] than under blue light [(231 ± 0.22) × 10(-6) m(2) mg Chl d(-1)]. A. marina is well adapted to a biofilm growth mode under both visible and NIR irradiance and under O(2) conditions ranging from anoxia to hyperoxia, explaining its presence in natural niches with similar environmental conditions.

  12. Nutrient and caloric dynamics in Avicennia marina leaves at different developmental and decay stages in Zhangjiang River Estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Chao; Wei, Shu-Dong; Zeng, Qi; Zhang, Li-Hua; Tam, Nora Fung-yee; Lin, Yi-Ming

    2010-03-01

    Avicennia marina is a typical mangrove species in the subtropical coastlines of China. The main objective of this study was to assess nutrient and caloric dynamics in A. marina leaves at different developmental and decay stages. Decomposition studies using litter bags suggested that the time required for the loss of half of the initial dry weight ( t50) was 19 days. The extracts of A. marina leaves contained non-tannin phenolics and tannin phenolics (hydrolysable tannin), but no condensed tannin. Non-tannin phenolics and tannin phenolics contents did not differ significantly from each other at various developmental stages, but decreased rapidly during leaf decomposition. Avicennia marina leaves had high N levels, and both N and P concentrations decreased significantly during senescence. During decomposition, N concentration of the leaf litter increased gradually but the phosphorus concentration showed a decrease in the first week, and both N and P remained the same towards the end of the experiment. The gross caloric value (GCV) of mature leaves was significantly higher than those of young and senescent leaves, while ash-free caloric value (AFCV) did not change significantly during leaf development and senescence. During leaf decomposition, both GCV and AFCV increased gradually and remained the same at late stages. In subtropical Zhangjiang River Estuary, high N levels and lack of condensed tannins in A. marina leaves were responsible for the fast rate of decay. Non-tannin phenolics and tannin phenolics had no great effect on rate of decay. Nitrogen resorption during leaf senescence, and high litter decomposition followed by nitrogen immobilization are the important nutrient conservation strategy for A. marina.

  13. Photosystem Trap Energies and Spectrally-Dependent Energy-Storage Efficiencies in the Chl d-Utilizing Cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris Marina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Mauzerall, David

    2012-01-01

    Acaryochloris marina is the only species known to utilize chlorophyll (Chl) d as a principal photopigment. The peak absorption wavelength of Chl d is redshifted approx. 40 nm in vivo relative to Chl a, enabling this cyanobacterium to perform oxygenic phototrophy in niche environments enhanced in far-red light. We present measurements of the in vivo energy-storage (E-S) efficiency of photosynthesis in A. marina, obtained using pulsed photoacoustics (PA) over a 90-nm range of excitation wavelengths in the red and far-red. Together with modeling results, these measurements provide the first direct observation of the trap energies of PSI and PSII, and also the photosystem-specific contributions to the total E-S efficiency. We find the maximum observed efficiency in A. marina (40+/-1% at 735 nm) is higher than in the Chl a cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis (35+/-1% at 690 nm). The efficiency at peak absorption wavelength is also higher in A. marina (36+/-1% at 710 nm vs. 31+/-1% at 670 nm). In both species, the trap efficiencies are approx. 40% (PSI) and approx. 30% (PSII). The PSI trap in A. marina is found to lie at 740+/-5 nm, in agreement with the value inferred from spectroscopic methods. The best fit of the model to the PA data identifies the PSII trap at 723+/-3 nm, supporting the view that the primary electron-donor is Chl d, probably at the accessory (ChlD1) site. A decrease in efficiency beyond the trap wavelength, consistent with uphill energy transfer, is clearly observed and fit by the model. These results demonstrate that the E-S efficiency in A. marina is not thermodynamically limited, suggesting that oxygenic photosynthesis is viable in even redder light environments.

  14. Two Unrelated 8-Vinyl Reductases Ensure Production of Mature Chlorophylls in Acaryochloris marina

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyu E.; Hitchcock, Andrew; Jackson, Philip J.; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Dickman, Mark J.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The major photopigment of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina is chlorophyll d, while its direct biosynthetic precursor, chlorophyll a, is also present in the cell. These pigments, along with the majority of chlorophylls utilized by oxygenic phototrophs, carry an ethyl group at the C-8 position of the molecule, having undergone reduction of a vinyl group during biosynthesis. Two unrelated classes of 8-vinyl reductase involved in the biosynthesis of chlorophylls are known to exist, BciA and BciB. The genome of Acaryochloris marina contains open reading frames (ORFs) encoding proteins displaying high sequence similarity to BciA or BciB, although they are annotated as genes involved in transcriptional control (nmrA) and methanogenesis (frhB), respectively. These genes were introduced into an 8-vinyl chlorophyll a-producing ΔbciB strain of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, and both were shown to restore synthesis of the pigment with an ethyl group at C-8, demonstrating their activities as 8-vinyl reductases. We propose that nmrA and frhB be reassigned as bciA and bciB, respectively; transcript and proteomic analysis of Acaryochloris marina reveal that both bciA and bciB are expressed and their encoded proteins are present in the cell, possibly in order to ensure that all synthesized chlorophyll pigment carries an ethyl group at C-8. Potential reasons for the presence of two 8-vinyl reductases in this strain, which is unique for cyanobacteria, are discussed. IMPORTANCE The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina is the best-studied phototrophic organism that uses chlorophyll d for photosynthesis. Unique among cyanobacteria sequenced to date, its genome contains ORFs encoding two unrelated enzymes that catalyze the reduction of the C-8 vinyl group of a precursor molecule to an ethyl group. Carrying a reduced C-8 group may be of particular importance to organisms containing chlorophyll d. Plant genomes also contain orthologs of both of these genes; thus, the

  15. Burial of Zostera marina seeds in sediment inhabited by three polychaetes: Laboratory and field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delefosse, M.; Kristensen, E.

    2012-07-01

    The large number of seeds produced by eelgrass, Zostera marina, provides this plant with a potential to disperse widely and colonise new areas. After dispersal, seeds must be buried into sediment for assuring long-term survival, successful germination and safe seedling development. Seeds may be buried passively by sedimentation or actively through sediment reworking by benthic fauna. We evaluated the effect of three polychaetes on the burial rate and depth of eelgrass seeds. Burial was first measured in controlled laboratory experiments using different densities of Nereis (Hediste) diversicolor (400-3200 ind m- 2), Arenicola marina (20-80 ind m- 2), and the invasive Marenzelleria viridis (400-1600 ind m- 2). The obtained results were subsequently compared with burial rates of seed mimics in experimental field plots (1 m2) dominated by the respective polychaetes. High recovery of seeds in the laboratory (97-100%) suggested that none of these polychaetes species feed on eelgrass seeds. N. diversicolor transported seeds rapidly (< 1 day) into its burrow, where they remained buried at a median depth of 0.5 cm. A. marina and M. viridis buried seeds by depositing their faeces on top of the sediment. At their highest abundance, A. marina and M. viridis buried seeds to a median depth of 6.7 cm and 0.5 cm, respectively, after a month. The burial efficiency and depth of these species were, in contrast to N. diversicolor, dependent on animal abundance. Only 2% of seed mimics casted in the field plots were recovered, suggesting that physical dispersion by waves and currents was considerably important for horizontal distribution. However, polychaete affected significantly the vertical distribution of seeds. Overall the effects of these three polychaetes indicate that benthic macroinvertebrates may significantly impact eelgrass seed bank at the ecosystem scale. Some species have a positive effect by burying seeds to shallow depths and thereby reducing seed predation and

  16. Foleyellides rhinellae sp. nov. (Nematoda, Onchocercidae) a new filaria parasitizing Rhinella marina (Anura, Bufonidae) in Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-Prieto, Luis; Ruiz-Torres, Nallely; Osorio-Sarabia, David; Merlo-Serna, Aldo

    2014-09-01

    A new nematode species, Foleyellides rhinellae sp. nov. (Onchocercidae), is described from specimens found in the body cavity of the cane toad, Rhinella marina (Linnaeus) (Anura, Bufonidae), in the Laguna de Coyuca, Guerrero, in the Pacific slope of Mexico. The new species differs from the other nine species of Foleyellides by infecting bufonid anurans and by the number and arrangement of caudal papillae. Other distinguishing feature of the new species is the size of the left spicule (0.16-0.23 long), the smallest recorded among the species included in the genus. Foleyellides rhinellae sp. nov. is the second known species of the genus recorded from amphibians of Mexico.

  17. Morphological characterization of Eustrongylides sp. larvae (Nematoda, Dioctophymatoidea) parasite of Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from Eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Melo, Caroline do Socorro Barros; Nascimento, Luciana de Cássia Silva do; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos

    2016-06-07

    Absctract Eustrongylides spp. nematodes have birds as final hosts and uses other vertebrates as intermediate/paratenic host (fish, amphibians and reptiles) and have zoonotic potential. In amphibians, the larvae may be located in the subcutaneous tissues, liver and mesentery, between the muscle fibres, especially in the lower limbs. Rhinella marina, which is widely observed in Brazil, has exhibited complex diversity in its helminth fauna, reflecting the unique habitat of the Amazon biome. For the first time, this study describes the morphological aspects of third-stage larvae of Eustrongylides sp. in Rhinella marina from Santa Cruz do Ararí, Marajó Archipelago, Eastern Amazonia, using light and scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Morphological characterization of Eustrongylides sp. larvae (Nematoda, Dioctophymatoidea) parasite of Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from Eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Melo, Caroline do Socorro Barros; Nascimento, Luciana de Cássia Silva do; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos

    2016-06-07

    Absctract Eustrongylides spp. nematodes have birds as final hosts and uses other vertebrates as intermediate/paratenic host (fish, amphibians and reptiles) and have zoonotic potential. In amphibians, the larvae may be located in the subcutaneous tissues, liver and mesentery, between the muscle fibres, especially in the lower limbs. Rhinella marina, which is widely observed in Brazil, has exhibited complex diversity in its helminth fauna, reflecting the unique habitat of the Amazon biome. For the first time, this study describes the morphological aspects of third-stage larvae of Eustrongylides sp. in Rhinella marina from Santa Cruz do Ararí, Marajó Archipelago, Eastern Amazonia, using light and scanning electron microscopy.

  19. The energy production of juvenile Arenicola marina (Polychaeta) under anoxic and hypoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiedek, Doris; Schöttler, Udo

    1990-06-01

    The mode of anaerobic energy production of juvenile Arenicola marina (0-generation) was investigated under experimental conditions and in the biotope. Under experimental anaerobic conditions, juvenile A. marina produce energy by the pathways known from the adults and other euryoxic invertebrates with succinate and the volatile fatty acids, acetate and propionate, as main end products. However, the juvenile lugworms are less resistent to anoxia than the adults. The reasons for this might be their small glycogen stores and their limited ability to reduce the metabolic rate. Nevertheless, on the tidal flats the juveniles settle particularly in the area next to the high tide line, which offers such extreme conditions that adult lugworms cannot live there. This different behaviour can be explained by the dissimilar ability to use oxygen at very low partial pressures. Juveniles maintain an aerobic energy metabolism even at a PWO 2 of 15 Torr at which adults are forced to produce energy exclusively by the less effective anaerobic mode. In the field, no indications of an anaerobic energy metabolism were detected in juveniles even after an exposure of 8 hours.

  20. Light- and Electron-microscopical Study of Belonocystis marina sp. nov. (Eukaryota: incertae sedis).

    PubMed

    Klimov, Vladimir I; Zlatogursky, Vasily V

    2016-11-01

    BelonocystisRainer, 1968 is an enigmatic protist genus, which currently lacks any supergroup affiliation. The spherical cells of this organism move on the substratum using fine non-branching pseudopodia. The cell surface is surrounded with a spiky covering. Belonocystis marina sp. nov. was studied using light- and electron microscopy. It was clearly shown that the surface structures of Belonocystis were scales, not a capsule. The new species could be distinguished by the morphology of the scales, which had a bulbous base with three "skirts" (circular latticed structures) and a spike consisting of many twisted fibrils. Each scale was associated with a short cytoplasmic outgrowth. The organic nature of these scales was confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Large multinucleated stages were discovered in the life-cycle of this organism. A survey of the cell ultrastructure revealed all the common eukaryotic organelles, including mitochondria with tubular cristae. No microtubules were detected in ultrathin sections of pseudopodia. Examination of food vacuole contents confirmed that this organism was bacterivorous. The finding of Belonocystis marina is the first record of the genus in a marine habitat. Many similarities in the scale structure and fine structure of the cell between Belonocystis and Luffisphaera were discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from a psychrophilic bacterium, Psychromonas marina.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Ryo; Tsubouchi, Kango; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2017-07-01

    The gene encoding NADP(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH; EC 1.1.1.42) of a psychrophilic bacterium, Psychromonas marina, was cloned and sequenced. The open reading frame of the gene encoding IDH of P. marina (PmIDH) was 2229 bp in length and corresponded to a polypeptide composed of 742 amino acids. The molecular mass of IDH was calculated as 80,426 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence of PmIDH exhibited high degrees of homology with the monomeric IDH from other bacteria such as Colwellia maris (62% identity) and Azotobacter vinelandii (AvIDH) (64%). His-tagged PmIDH overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells was purified and characterized. The optimum temperature of PmIDH activity was about 35 °C; however, the enzyme lost 74% of the activity after incubation for 10 min at 30 °C, indicating that this enzyme is thermolabile. Chimeric enzymes produced through domain swapping between PmIDH and mesophilic AvIDH were constructed and their optimum temperatures and thermostability were determined. The results suggest that regions 2 and 3, especially region 3, of the two IDHs are involved in their catalytic activities and optimum temperature and thermostability for activity.

  2. Transcriptomic resilience to global warming in the seagrass Zostera marina, a marine foundation species.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Susanne U; Gu, Jenny; Bergmann, Nina; Winters, Gidon; Klostermeier, Ulrich C; Rosenstiel, Philip; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2011-11-29

    Large-scale transcription profiling via direct cDNA sequencing provides important insights as to how foundation species cope with increasing climatic extremes predicted under global warming. Species distributed along a thermal cline, such as the ecologically important seagrass Zostera marina, provide an opportunity to assess temperature effects on gene expression as a function of their long-term adaptation to heat stress. We exposed a southern and northern European population of Zostera marina from contrasting thermal environments to a realistic heat wave in a common-stress garden. In a fully crossed experiment, eight cDNA libraries, each comprising ~125 000 reads, were obtained during and after a simulated heat wave, along with nonstressed control treatments. Although gene-expression patterns during stress were similar in both populations and were dominated by classical heat-shock proteins, transcription profiles diverged after the heat wave. Gene-expression patterns in southern genotypes returned to control values immediately, but genotypes from the northern site failed to recover and revealed the induction of genes involved in protein degradation, indicating failed metabolic compensation to high sea-surface temperature. We conclude that the return of gene-expression patterns during recovery provides critical information on thermal adaptation in aquatic habitats under climatic stress. As a unifying concept for ecological genomics, we propose transcriptomic resilience, analogous to ecological resilience, as an important measure to predict the tolerance of individuals and hence the fate of local populations in the face of global warming.

  3. Photoacclimatory Responses of Zostera marina in the Intertidal and Subtidal Zones.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Rul; Kim, Sangil; Kim, Young Kyun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2016-01-01

    Photoacclimatory responses of the seagrass Zostera marina in the intertidal and subtidal zones were investigated by measuring chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic pigments, leaf δ13C values, and shoot morphology in two bay systems. Intertidal plants had higher carotenoid concentrations than subtidal plants to avoid photodamage under excess light conditions during the day. The maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax) and minimum saturation irradiance (Ek) of the intertidal plants were higher than those of the subtidal plants, whereas photosynthetic efficiency (α) and maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were higher in subtidal plants. The intertidal plants also had significantly greater Stern-Volmer non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) than that of the subtidal plants. These results suggest that the subtidal plants photoacclimated to use limited light more efficiently, and the intertidal plants exhibited photosynthetic responses to minimize photodamage at excess irradiance. The δ13C values of leaf tissues were more negative in the intertidal plants than those in the subtidal plants, suggesting that the intertidal plants used atmospheric or dissolved CO2 for photosynthesis during emersion. Effective quantum yield (ΔF/Fm´) in the intertidal plants decreased more slowly after emersion than that in the subtidal plants, indicating higher desiccation tolerance of the intertidal plants. The intertidal plants also recovered more rapidly from desiccation damage than the subtidal plants, suggesting photosynthetic adaptation to desiccation stress. The photosynthetic plasticity of Z. marina in response to variable environmental conditions most likely allows this species to occur in the intertidal and subtidal zones.

  4. Genome sequence of the ocean sediment bacterium Saccharomonospora marina type strain (XMU15T)

    SciTech Connect

    Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lu, Megan; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Pitluck, Sam; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Potter, Gabriele; Land, Miriam L; Ivanova, N; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Detter, J. Chris; Li, Wen-Jun; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomonospora marina Liu et al. 2010 is a member to the genomically so far poorly characterized genus Saccharomonospora in the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Members of the genus Sacharomonospora are of interest because they originate from diverse habitats, such as leaf litter, manure, compost, surface of peat, moist, over-heated grain, and ocean sediment, where they might play a role in the primary degradation of plant material by attacking hemicellulose. Organisms belonging to the genus are usually Gram-positive staining, non-acid fast, and classify among the actinomycetes. Next to S. viridis and S. azurea, S. marina is the third member in the genus Saccharomonospora for with a completely sequenced (permanent draft status) type strain genome will be published. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. The 5,965,593 bp long chromosome with its 5,727 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE funded Community Sequencing Program (CSP) 2010 at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  5. Phenology and Growth dynamics of Avicennia marina in the Central Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Almahasheer, Hanan; Duarte, Carlos M.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2016-01-01

    The formation of nodes, stem elongation and the phenology of stunted Avicennia marina was examined in the Central Red Sea, where Avicennia marina is at the limit of its distribution range and submitted to extremely arid conditions with salinity above 38 psu and water temperature as high as 35° C. The annual node production was rather uniform among locations averaging 9.59 node y−1, which resulted in a plastocron interval, the interval in between production of two consecutive nodes along a stem, of 38 days. However, the internodal length varied significantly between locations, resulting in growth differences possibly reflecting the environmental conditions of locations. The reproductive cycle lasted for approximately 12 months, and was characterized by peak flowering and propagule development in November and January. These phenological observations provide a starting point for research and restoration programs on the ecology of mangroves in the Central Red Sea, while the plastochrone index reported here would allow calculations of the growth and production of the species from simple morphological measurements. PMID:27892956

  6. Sediment-quality assessment using the polychaete Arenicola marina: contamination, bioavailability, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Gómez, Julia; Viguri, Javier R; Luque, Angel; Vale, Carlos; Martín-Díaz, M Laura; DelValls, T Angel

    2011-11-01

    The sediment quality of Cádiz Bay, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (LPGC) Port, Santander Bay, Algeciras Bay, and Huelva Estuary (Spain) was evaluated by analysing a battery of biochemical biomarkers-activities of biotranformation enzymes ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase [EROD], dibenzylflourescein dealkylase [DBF], and glutathione S-transferase [GST]; activity of antioxidant enzyme glutathione reductase [GR]; and lipid peroxidation [LPO]-in the polychaete Arenicola marina after laboratory sediment exposure. Huelva Estuary polychaetes showed significantly (p < 0.05) enhanced LPO, GST, and EROD activities compared with control lugworms related to metals and presumably polychlorinated biphenyls. EROD activity significant (p < 0.05) induction was associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons after Santander Bay sediment exposure. Nickel appeared to significantly (p < 0.05) induce GR activity and LPO in LPGC Port sediment-exposed organisms. DBF activity significantly (p < 0.05) increased in polychaetes exposed to sediments from sewage-contaminated areas. A. marina was sensitive at the biochemical level. Integration of sediment characterization and biomarker results allowed the identification of polluted sites as well as the cause of possible sediment toxicity.

  7. The genome of the seagrass Zostera marina reveals angiosperm adaptation to the sea.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jeanine L; Rouzé, Pierre; Verhelst, Bram; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Bayer, Till; Collen, Jonas; Dattolo, Emanuela; De Paoli, Emanuele; Dittami, Simon; Maumus, Florian; Michel, Gurvan; Kersting, Anna; Lauritano, Chiara; Lohaus, Rolf; Töpel, Mats; Tonon, Thierry; Vanneste, Kevin; Amirebrahimi, Mojgan; Brakel, Janina; Boström, Christoffer; Chovatia, Mansi; Grimwood, Jane; Jenkins, Jerry W; Jueterbock, Alexander; Mraz, Amy; Stam, Wytze T; Tice, Hope; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Green, Pamela J; Pearson, Gareth A; Procaccini, Gabriele; Duarte, Carlos M; Schmutz, Jeremy; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Van de Peer, Yves

    2016-02-18

    Seagrasses colonized the sea on at least three independent occasions to form the basis of one of the most productive and widespread coastal ecosystems on the planet. Here we report the genome of Zostera marina (L.), the first, to our knowledge, marine angiosperm to be fully sequenced. This reveals unique insights into the genomic losses and gains involved in achieving the structural and physiological adaptations required for its marine lifestyle, arguably the most severe habitat shift ever accomplished by flowering plants. Key angiosperm innovations that were lost include the entire repertoire of stomatal genes, genes involved in the synthesis of terpenoids and ethylene signalling, and genes for ultraviolet protection and phytochromes for far-red sensing. Seagrasses have also regained functions enabling them to adjust to full salinity. Their cell walls contain all of the polysaccharides typical of land plants, but also contain polyanionic, low-methylated pectins and sulfated galactans, a feature shared with the cell walls of all macroalgae and that is important for ion homoeostasis, nutrient uptake and O2/CO2 exchange through leaf epidermal cells. The Z. marina genome resource will markedly advance a wide range of functional ecological studies from adaptation of marine ecosystems under climate warming, to unravelling the mechanisms of osmoregulation under high salinities that may further inform our understanding of the evolution of salt tolerance in crop plants.

  8. Adenosine deaminase production by an endophytic bacterium (Lysinibacillus sp.) from Avicennia marina.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, Kandasamy; Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Sivasankaran, Muthu

    2014-06-01

    The present study was carried out with the following objectives: (1) to isolate the endophytic bacilli strains from the leaves of mangrove plant Avicennia marina, (2) to screen the potential strains for the production of adenosine deaminase, (3) to statistically optimize the factors that influence the enzyme activity in the potent strain, and (4) to identify the potent strain using 16S rRNA sequence and construct its phylogenetic tree. The bacterial strains isolated from the fresh leaves of a mangrove A. marina were assessed for adenosine deaminase activity by plating method. Optimization of reaction process was carried out using response surface methodology of central composite design. The potent strain was identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogeny. Of five endophytic strains, EMLK1 showed a significant deaminase activity over other four strains. The conditions for maximum activity of the isolated adenosine deaminase are described. The potent strain EMLK1 was identified as Lysinibacillus sp. (JQ710723) being the first report as a mangrove endophyte. Mangrove-derived endophytic bacillus strain Lysinibacillus sp. EMLK1 is proved to be a promising source for the production of adenosine deaminase and this enzyme deserves further studies for purification and its application in disease diagnosis.

  9. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles from mangrove plant (Avicennia marina) extract and their potential mosquito larvicidal property.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan; Srinivasan, Muthukumarasamy; Mohanraj, Jeyaraj

    2016-09-01

    To identify the larvicidal activities of silver nanoparticles synthesised with Avicennia marina leaf extract against the larvae of Aedes aegypti and Anopheleus stephensi, in vitro larvicidal activities such as LC50 and LC90 were assessed. Further, characterisation such as UV and FTIR analysis were carried out for the synthesised silver nanoparticles. The LC50 value of the synthesised silver nanoparticles was identified as 4.374 and 7.406 mg/L for An. stephensi and Ae. aegypti larvae respectively. Further, the LC90 values are also identified as 4.928 and 9.865 mg/L for An. stephensi and Ae. aegypti species respectively. The synthesised silver nanoparticles have maximum absorption at 420 nm with the average size of 60-95 nm. The FTIR data showed prominent peaks in (3940.57, 3929.00, 3803.63, 3712.97, 2918.30, 2231.64, 1610.50, 1377.17, 1257.59, 1041.59, 1041.56, 775.38, 667.37 and 503.21) different ranges. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles with leaf aqueous extract of A. marina provides potential source for the larvicidal activity against mosquito borne diseases. The present study proved the mosquitocidal properties of silver nanoparticles synthesised from mangroves of Vellar estuary. This is an ideal eco-friendly approach for the vector control programs.

  10. Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) Versus Rhabdias paraensis (Nematoda: Rhabdiasidae): Expanding the View on a Natural Infection.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos; da Silva, Djane Clarys Baia; Feitosa, Lucas Aristóteles das Neves; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; de Vasconcelos Melo, Francisco Tiago

    2016-06-01

    Amphibian and reptile lungs are frequently infected with Rhabdias parasites, and this condition ultimately leads to reduced survival, performance, and growth because of granulomatous inflammation, nodule formation, and nematodal pneumonia onset. Here we investigate the histopathological features of naturally infected Rhinella marina by the lung nematode Rhabdias paraensis. A total of 10 host animals were captured in peridomiciliar areas in the eastern Brazilian Amazon, and anatomic-histological analyses were performed on both the infected and non-infected lungs of these amphibians. Helminths were usually found within the secondary and primary septa of infected lungs whereas parasites were not detected within vessels or adhering to tissues. In addition, we observed discrete erythrocytes, diapedesis foci, few granulocytes and erythrocytes in the interseptal spaces, discrete cell infiltration, and a small number of melanomacrophages, and no granulomas or cysts were observed. New aspects related to changes in tissue and helminth-host interactions are discussed for the relationship of R. paraensis × Rhi. marina from the Amazon region.

  11. Phenology and Growth dynamics of Avicennia marina in the Central Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Almahasheer, Hanan; Duarte, Carlos M; Irigoien, Xabier

    2016-11-28

    The formation of nodes, stem elongation and the phenology of stunted Avicennia marina was examined in the Central Red Sea, where Avicennia marina is at the limit of its distribution range and submitted to extremely arid conditions with salinity above 38 psu and water temperature as high as 35° C. The annual node production was rather uniform among locations averaging 9.59 node y(-1), which resulted in a plastocron interval, the interval in between production of two consecutive nodes along a stem, of 38 days. However, the internodal length varied significantly between locations, resulting in growth differences possibly reflecting the environmental conditions of locations. The reproductive cycle lasted for approximately 12 months, and was characterized by peak flowering and propagule development in November and January. These phenological observations provide a starting point for research and restoration programs on the ecology of mangroves in the Central Red Sea, while the plastochrone index reported here would allow calculations of the growth and production of the species from simple morphological measurements.

  12. Inhibitory Activity of Avicennia marina, a Medicinal Plant in Persian Folk Medicine, against HIV and HSV.

    PubMed

    Namazi, Rahele; Zabihollahi, Rezvan; Behbahani, Mandana; Rezaei, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Avicennia marina (Avicenniaceae) is a species of mangrove tree used for treatment of small pox lesions in Persian folk medicine. The antiviral activity of methanol, ethanol, water, chloroform and n-hexane extracts was evaluated against HIV-1 and HSV. Methanol extract had the highest antiviral activity and the most polar fraction of this extract (fraction D) inhibited HSV with TI and SI values of 57.1 and 133; however, it showed mild activity against HIV with SI value of 6.25 (fraction 3). The anti-HSV activity of active fraction was confirmed using FLASH-PCR. Phytochemical investigation revealed that fraction D encompasses flavonoids compounds. The time-of-addition study demonstrated that fraction D disturbs viral replication after penetrating to the cell. A. marina was endowed with fragments by which found to be able to inhibit replication of HSV after entry but did not show significant potency against HIV-1. This promotes further investigation in anti-HSV drug discovery.

  13. A biliverdin-binding cyanobacteriochrome from the chlorophyll d–bearing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina

    PubMed Central

    Narikawa, Rei; Nakajima, Takahiro; Aono, Yuki; Fushimi, Keiji; Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Itoh, Shigeru; Sato, Moritoshi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are linear tetrapyrrole-binding photoreceptors in cyanobacteria that absorb visible and near-ultraviolet light. CBCRs are divided into two types based on the type of chromophore they contain: phycocyanobilin (PCB) or phycoviolobilin (PVB). PCB-binding CBCRs reversibly photoconvert at relatively long wavelengths, i.e., the blue-to-red region, whereas PVB-binding CBCRs reversibly photoconvert at shorter wavelengths, i.e., the near-ultraviolet to green region. Notably, prior to this report, CBCRs containing biliverdin (BV), which absorbs at longer wavelengths than do PCB and PVB, have not been found. Herein, we report that the typical red/green CBCR AM1_1557 from the chlorophyll d–bearing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina can bind BV almost comparable to PCB. This BV-bound holoprotein reversibly photoconverts between a far red light–absorbing form (Pfr, λmax = 697 nm) and an orange light–absorbing form (Po, λmax = 622 nm). At room temperature, Pfr fluoresces with a maximum at 730 nm. These spectral features are red-shifted by 48~77 nm compared with those of the PCB-bound domain. Because the absorbance of chlorophyll d is red-shifted compared with that of chlorophyll a, the BV-bound AM1_1557 may be a physiologically relevant feature of A. marina and is potentially useful as an optogenetic switch and/or fluorescence imager. PMID:25609645

  14. Impact of tail-nipping on mortality, growth and reproduction of Arenicola marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, Magda J. N.; Van Der Veer, Henk W.; Karczmarski, Leszek

    The impact of predation by amputation of regenerating body parts (tail tips) of the lugworm Arenicola marina on species mortality, growth and reproduction has been studied under laboratory conditions by the artificial removal of tail tips at different frequencies. The loss of body weight by amputation was not compensated for by an increased growth. Within a wide range of amputation frequencies, total growth (body growth + amount of tail tip amputated) and reproduction of the lugworm were not affected. Also, both egg development and amount of energy stored in reproduction remained the same. Only at the highest frequency of amputation (once a week) did total growth decrease in the course of time, resulting even in a loss of body weight. The amount of energy stored in reproduction was also significantly less at the highest rate of amputation. Lugworms appeared to be unable to sustain this high level of amputation and the anaerobic sediment conditions in the cuvettes suggest a reduced pumping activity and food intake. Mortality in this group was also higher than in the other groups. The consequences of tail-nipping by flatfish for A. marina in the field situation are discussed.

  15. Phenology and Growth dynamics of Avicennia marina in the Central Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almahasheer, Hanan; Duarte, Carlos M.; Irigoien, Xabier

    2016-11-01

    The formation of nodes, stem elongation and the phenology of stunted Avicennia marina was examined in the Central Red Sea, where Avicennia marina is at the limit of its distribution range and submitted to extremely arid conditions with salinity above 38 psu and water temperature as high as 35° C. The annual node production was rather uniform among locations averaging 9.59 node y‑1, which resulted in a plastocron interval, the interval in between production of two consecutive nodes along a stem, of 38 days. However, the internodal length varied significantly between locations, resulting in growth differences possibly reflecting the environmental conditions of locations. The reproductive cycle lasted for approximately 12 months, and was characterized by peak flowering and propagule development in November and January. These phenological observations provide a starting point for research and restoration programs on the ecology of mangroves in the Central Red Sea, while the plastochrone index reported here would allow calculations of the growth and production of the species from simple morphological measurements.

  16. Microplastics are taken up by mussels (Mytilus edulis) and lugworms (Arenicola marina) living in natural habitats.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Claessens, Michiel; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-04-01

    We studied the uptake of microplastics under field conditions. At six locations along the French-Belgian-Dutch coastline we collected two species of marine invertebrates representing different feeding strategies: the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (filter feeder) and the lugworm Arenicola marina (deposit feeder). Additional laboratory experiments were performed to assess possible (adverse) effects of ingestion and translocation of microplastics on the energy metabolism (cellular energy allocation) of these species. Microplastics were present in all organisms collected in the field: on average 0.2 ± 0.3 microplastics g(-1) (M. edulis) and 1.2 ± 2.8 particles g(-1) (A. marina). In a proof of principle laboratory experiment, mussels and lugworms exposed to high concentrations of polystyrene microspheres (110 particles mL(-1) seawater and 110 particles g(-1) sediment, respectively) showed no significant adverse effect on the organisms' overall energy budget. The results are discussed in the context of possible risks as a result of the possible transfer of adsorbed contaminants.

  17. Effects of barium and cadmium on the population development of the marine nematode Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina.

    PubMed

    Lira, V F; Santos, G A P; Derycke, S; Larrazabal, M E L; Fonsêca-Genevois, V G; Moens, T

    2011-10-01

    Offshore oil and gas drilling often involves the use of fluids containing barium and traces of other heavy metals. These may affect the environment, but information on their toxicity to benthic biota remains scant. Here, we present results of a 10-day bioassay with the marine nematode Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina at different loads of barium (0-10 ,000 ppm nominal concentrations) and cadmium (0-12 ppm) in the range of concentrations reported from drilling-impacted sediments. Barium did not affect the fitness and population development of R. (P.) marina at concentrations up to 300 ppm, but did cause a decrease in population abundance and an increase in development time from concentrations of 400-2000 ppm onwards. Increased mortality occurred at 4800 ppm Ba. For cadmium, LOEC and EC₅₀ values for total population abundance were 2.95 and 8.82 ppm, respectively. Cd concentrations as low as 2.40 to 2.68 caused a decrease in the abundance of adult nematodes, indicating that assays covering more generations would likely demonstrate yet more pronounced population-level effects. Our results indicate that oil and gas drilling activities may potentially have important implications for the meiobenthos through the toxicity of barium and associated metals like cadmium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding the Ecoydrology of Mangroves: A Simple SPAC Model for Avicennia Marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perri, Saverio; Viola, Francesco; Valerio Noto, Leonardo; Molini, Annalisa

    2015-04-01

    Mangroves represent one of the most carbon-rich ecosystems in the Tropics, noticeably impacting ecosystem services and the economy of these regions. Whether the ability of mangroves to exclude and tolerate salt has been extensively investigated in the literature - both from the structural and functional point of view - their eco-hydrological characteristics remains largely understudied, despite the crucial link with productivity, efficient carbon storage and fluxes. In this contribution we develop a "first-order" Soil Plant Atmosphere Continuum model for Avicennia Marina, a mangrove able to adapt to hyper-arid intertidal zones and characterized by complex morphological and eco-physiological traits. Among mangroves, Avicennia marina is one of the most tolerant to salinity and arid climatic conditions. Our model, based on a simple macroscopic approach, takes into account the specific characteristics of the mangrove ecosystem and in particular, the salinity of the water in the soil and the levels of salt stress to which the plant may be subjected. Mangrove transpiration is hence obtained by solving the plant and leaf water balance and the leaf energy balance, taking explicitly into account the role of osmotic water potential and salinity in governing plant resistance to water fluxes. The SPAC model of Avicennia is hence tested against experimental data obtained from the literature, showing the reliability and effectiveness of this minimalist model in reproducing observed transpiration fluxes. Finally, sensitivity analysis is used to assess whether uncertainty on the adopted parameters could lead to significant errors in the transpiration assessment.

  19. Endotoxin structures in the psychrophiles Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis contain distinctive acyl features.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Charles R; Alpuche, Giancarlo M; Landis, Corinne A; Sandman, Benjamin C

    2014-07-09

    Lipid A is the essential component of endotoxin (Gram-negative lipopolysaccharide), a potent immunostimulatory compound. As the outer surface of the outer membrane, the details of lipid A structure are crucial not only to bacterial pathogenesis but also to membrane integrity. This work characterizes the structure of lipid A in two psychrophiles, Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis, and also two mesophiles to which they are related using MALDI-TOF MS and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS. P. marina lipid A is strikingly similar to that of Escherichia coli in organization and total acyl size, but incorporates an unusual doubly unsaturated tetradecadienoyl acyl residue. P. cryohalolentis also shows structural organization similar to a closely related mesophile, Acinetobacter baumannii, however it has generally shorter acyl constituents and shows many acyl variants differing by single methylene (-CH2-) units, a characteristic it shares with the one previously reported psychrotolerant lipid A structure. This work is the first detailed structural characterization of lipid A from an obligate psychrophile and the second from a psychrotolerant species. It reveals distinctive structural features of psychrophilic lipid A in comparison to that of related mesophiles which suggest constitutive adaptations to maintain outer membrane fluidity in cold environments.

  20. Polystyrene influences bacterial assemblages in Arenicola marina-populated aquatic environments in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kesy, Katharina; Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Müller, Felix; Labrenz, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    Plastic is ubiquitous in global oceans and constitutes a newly available habitat for surface-associated bacterial assemblages. Microplastics (plastic particles <5 mm) are especially susceptible to ingestion by marine organisms, as the size of these particles makes them available also to lower trophic levels. Because many marine invertebrates harbour potential pathogens in their guts, we investigated whether bacterial assemblages on polystyrene are selectively modified during their passage through the gut of the lugworm Arenicola marina and are subsequently able to develop pathogenic biofilms. We also examined whether polystyrene acts as a vector for gut biofilm assemblages after subsequent incubation of the egested particles in seawater. Our results showed that after passage through the digestive tract of A. marina, the bacterial assemblages on polystyrene particles and reference glass beads became more similar, harbouring common sediment bacteria. By contrast, only in the presence of polystyrene the potential symbiont Amphritea atlantica was enriched in the investigated biofilms, faeces, and water. Thus, especially in areas of high polystyrene contamination, this polymer may impact the bacterial composition of different habitats, with as yet unknown consequences for the respective ecosystems.

  1. Effects of microplastic on fitness and PCB bioaccumulation by the lugworm Arenicola marina (L.).

    PubMed

    Besseling, Ellen; Wegner, Anna; Foekema, Edwin M; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine J; Koelmans, Albert A

    2013-01-02

    It has been speculated that marine microplastics may cause negative effects on benthic marine organisms and increase bioaccumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Here, we provide the first controlled study of plastic effects on benthic organisms including transfer of POPs. The effects of polystyrene (PS) microplastic on survival, activity, and bodyweight, as well as the transfer of 19 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), were assessed in bioassays with Arenicola marina (L.). PS was pre-equilibrated in natively contaminated sediment. A positive relation was observed between microplastic concentration in the sediment and both uptake of plastic particles and weight loss by A. marina. Furthermore, a reduction in feeding activity was observed at a PS dose of 7.4% dry weight. A low PS dose of 0.074% increased bioaccumulation of PCBs by a factor of 1.1-3.6, an effect that was significant for ΣPCBs and several individual congeners. At higher doses, bioaccumulation decreased compared to the low dose, which however, was only significant for PCB105. PS had statistically significant effects on the organisms' fitness and bioaccumulation, but the magnitude of the effects was not high. This may be different for sites with different plastic concentrations, or plastics with a higher affinity for POPs.

  2. Monitoring of the booster biocide dichlofluanid in water and marine sediment of Greek marinas.

    PubMed

    Hamwijk, C; Schouten, A; Foekema, E M; Ravensberg, J C; Collombon, M T; Schmidt, K; Kugler, M

    2005-09-01

    Dichlofluanid (N-dichlorofluoromethylthio-N'-dimethyl-N-phenylsulphamide) is used as booster biocide in antifouling paints. The occurrence of dichlofluanid and its metabolite DMSA (N'-dimethyl-N-phenyl-sulphamide) was monitored in seawater and marine sediment from three Greek marinas. Seawater and sediment samples were collected at three representative positions and one suspected hotspot in each marina and shipped to the laboratory for chemical analysis. As part of the project, an analytical method had been developed and validated. Furthermore, some additional experiments were carried out to investigate the potential contribution of paint particle bound dichlofluanid on the total concentration in the sediment. As expected, given its known high hydrolytic degradation rate, no detectable concentrations of dichlofluanid were measured in any of the seawater samples. DMSA was detected in seawater samples at very low concentrations varying from <3 ng l(-1) (LOD) to 36 ng l(-1). During method validation, it had already been demonstrated that dichlofluanid is unstable in sediment and can therefore only be determined as its metabolite DMSA. In a separate experiment, in which marine sediment was spiked with artificial paint particles containing dichlofluanid and then analysed according to the validated method, it was demonstrated that if there is any dichlofluanid originating from paint particles, this would be determined as DMSA. No DMSA was detected in any of the sediment samples. It could therefore be concluded that there were no significant concentrations of dichlofluanid in the sediment samples.

  3. Easy visualization of the protist Oxyrrhis marina grazing on a live fluorescently labelled heterotrophic nanoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cereceda, Mercedes; Williams, Richard A J; Novarino, Gianfranco

    2008-07-01

    Planktonic heterotrophic flagellates are ubiquitous eukaryotic microorganisms that play a crucial role in carbon and nutrient fluxes through pelagic food webs. Here we illustrate for the first time a grazing model of planktonic dinoflagellate, Oxyrrhis marina, on the heterotrophic nanoflagellate Goniomonas amphinema, using the DNA-binding fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342. A solution of 1 microg/mL of the fluorochrome allowed viability of the prey for at least 48 hours, provided low fluorescence quenching, and labelled the flagellate without masking the cytoplasm. After 2 hours of contact between the fluorescent prey and the predator, O. marina population had preyed on live G. amphinema at an ingestion rate of 2.2 prey Oxyrrhis (-1) h(-1). Results show that this model is a time-effective and inexpensive approach for the direct observation of heterotrophic flagellate grazing. The fact that prey remain alive while predation occurs, as well as the low rate of quenching, could be of help in studying the fate of real-time trophic interactions between protists in microbial webs.

  4. Paraoerskovia marina gen. nov., sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Harayama, Shigeaki; Tamura, Tomohiko; Ando, Katsuhiko; Takagi, Motoki; Kazuo, Shin-ya

    2009-08-01

    A Gram-positive-staining, facultatively anaerobic bacterial strain, CTT-37T, was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from Tottori city, located on the shore of the Sea of Japan. A 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison indicated that the isolate represents a novel clade that clusters with members of the families Cellulomonadaceae and Sanguibacteraceae. Strain CTT-37T shared maximum 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.4% with Oerskovia paurometabola DSM 14281T and 96.2% with Oerskovia enterophila DSM 43852T. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain CTT-37T and O. enterophila JCM 7350T was 10-12%. The following chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain CTT-37T were markedly different from those of strains in the genus Oerskovia. The cell wall contained L-serine in the peptidoglycan interpeptide bridge. The predominant menaquinone was MK-9 (H4); other quinones detected were MK-9 and MK-9(H2). The only polar lipid was phosphatidylglycerol and the G+C content of the DNA was 70 mol%. Differences in phenotypic characteristics and large phylogenetic distances between strain CTT-37T and all members of the genus Oerskovia supported the classification of CTT-37T within a new genus and species, for which the name Paraoerskovia marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Paraoerskovia marina is CTT-37T (=NBRC 104352T=DSM 21750T).

  5. Evaluation of antiherpetic activity of crude extract and fractions of Avicenna marina, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana; Zadeh, Mehrnaz Shanehsaz; Mohabatkar, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    This study was carried out to check antiherpetic substances of crude methanol leaf extract of Avicenna marina and its column chromatographic fractions. Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is a harmful pathogen especially in highly susceptible individuals. The antiherpetic activity of crude methanol extract and sub-fractions was performed in different concentrations (20, 2, 0.2, and 0.02μg/ml) by use of plaque-forming unit (PFU) assay and real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The most active fraction analyzed by NMR contained luteolin 7-O-methylether 3'-O-beta-d-glucoside (LMEG). The other active fraction was detected by HPLC as luteolin. The apparent effective concentrations for 50% plaque reduction (EC50) of crude methanol extract, LMEG, luteolin and ACV were 10, 5, 16.6 and 2.97μg/ml, respectively. The three extracts showed no cytotoxic effect on Vero cell line at concentrations of 32μg/ml or below. According to the consequences of time-of-addition studies, antiherpetic compound LMEG exerted an inhibitory effect on the early stage of HSV-2 infection during which it was added. In conclusion, LMEG isolated from A. marina could probably inhibit HSV attachment to the cell membrane and its entry into the cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Characterisation of esterases as potential biomarkers of pesticide exposure in the lugworm Arenicola marina (Annelida: Polychaeta).

    PubMed

    Hannam, Marie L; Hagger, Josephine A; Jones, Malcolm B; Galloway, Tamara S

    2008-03-01

    Here, we identify and characterise cholinesterase (ChE) and carboxylesterase (CbE) activities in the body tissues of the sediment dwelling worm Arenicola marina. Exposure to the organophosphorus pesticide azamethiphos yielded an in vitro IC50 of 5 microg l(-1) for propionylcholinesterase (PChE). PChE was significantly inhibited in vivo after a 10 day exposure to 100 microg l(-1) azamethiphos, equivalent to the recommended aquatic application rate (ANOVA; F=2.75, P=0.033). To determine sensitivity to environmental conditions, A. marina were exposed for 10 days to field collected sediments. PChE activity was significantly lower in worms exposed to sediments from an estuary classified to be at high risk from point source pollution by the UK Environment Agency (ANOVA; F=15.33, P<0.001). Whilst causality cannot be directly attributed from these latter exposures, they provide an important illustration of the potential utility of esterase activity as a biomarker of environmental quality in this ecologically relevant sentinel species.

  7. Fungi and Bacteria in or on Leaves of Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) from Chesapeake Bay †

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Steven Y.

    1981-01-01

    Samples of green and brown leaves of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) were incubated in seawater without an additional carbon source. Parallel leaf samples were used for acridine orange bacterial counting and water-soluble aniline blue estimation of fungal biovolume. The incubations produced no evidence that there is an eelgrass counterpart for the chytridialean symbiont which is very common in turtlegrass (Thalassia testudinum König). Sterile mycelium (i.e., living mycelium without identifiable propagules) was the most prevalent fungal form on incubated samples from submerged sites, whereas Dendryphiella salina and Sigmoidea sp. (marina?) were prevalent on brown leaves from the wrack line. Attempts to assay fungal biovolume in field samples indicated that the sterile mycelium observed after incubation represented the outgrowth of formerly dormant propagules or weakly established microcolonies. It was calculated that fungal biomass could not account for more than 0.5% of leaf mass, and it was probably much smaller than this, for no fungal structures were observed even in concentrated leaf homogenates. Bacterial densities fell within the range reported for other particulate substrates. A speculative estimate of bacterial productivity was 1.4× the standing stock per day. PMID:16345773

  8. Reclassification of Koreibacter algae as a later heterotypic synonym of Paraoerskovia marina and emended descriptions of the genus Paraoerskovia Khan et al. 2009 and of Paraoerskovia marina Khan et al. 2009.

    PubMed

    Schumann, P; Pukall, R; Spröer, C; Stackebrandt, E

    2013-01-01

    16S rRNA gene sequences deposited for the type strains of Paraoerskovia marina (CTT-37(T); GenBank accession no. AB445007) and Koreibacter algae (DSW-2(T); FM995611) show a similarity of 100 %. Consequently, the type strains were subjected to a polyphasic recharacterization under direct comparison in order to clarify their taxonomic position. PvuII RiboPrint patterns and quantitative ratios of cellular fatty acids revealed strain-specific differences between P. marina DSM 21750(T) ( = CTT-37(T)) and K. algae DSM 22126(T) ( = DSW-2(T)). The percentage of DNA-DNA binding of 94 % indicated that the two type strains belong to the same genomospecies. Agreement in the peptidoglycan structure and polar lipid pattern, highly similar fatty acid profiles and MALDI-TOF mass spectra, the ability to produce acid from the same carbon sources, corresponding enzymic activities and DNA G+C contents of 70.8 ± 0.3 mol%, in addition to the consistent characteristics reported in the original descriptions, support the view that the two strains should be affiliated to the same species. According to Rules 38 and 42 of the Bacteriological Code, Koreibacter algae should be reclassified as later heterotypic synonym of Paraoerskovia marina, and the descriptions of the genus Paraoerskovia Khan et al. 2009 and of Paraoerskovia marina Khan et al. 2009 are emended accordingly.

  9. A tale of two seagrasses: Comparing the science and management of Zostera marina and Zostera japonica in the Pacific Northwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    On the Pacific coast of North America, at least two congeners of Zostera occur: native Zostera marina, and introduced, Z. japonica. Z. japonica is considered “invasive” and therefore, ecologically and economically harmful by some, while others consider it benign or perhaps benef...

  10. WATER QUALITY AT FIVE MARINAS IN LAKE TEXOMA AS RELATED TO METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in five marinas was monitored between June 1999 and November 2000 in Lake Texoma located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas. MTBE is a commonly used gasoline additive and a suspected carcinogen. Lake water was collected at locations i...

  11. APPARENT LACK OF VESICULAR-ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA (VAM) IN SEAGRASSES ZOSTERA MARINA L. AND THALASSIA TESTUDIUM BANKS EX KONIG

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined two populations of Zostera marina L. and one of Thalassia testudinum Banks ex Konig for presence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM). None of these plants showed any VAM colonization. In addition, we were unable to find any literature references on the presence o...

  12. Fine-scale spatial distribution of the common lugworm Arenicola marina, and effects of intertidal clam fishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldina, Inna; Beninger, Peter G.

    2014-04-01

    Despite its ubiquity and its role as an ecosystem engineer on temperate intertidal mudflats, little is known of the spatial ecology of the lugworm Arenicola marina. We estimated lugworm densities and analyzed the spatial distribution of A. marina on a French Atlantic mudflat subjected to long-term clam digging activities, and compared these to a nearby pristine reference mudflat, using a combination of geostatistical techniques: point-pattern analysis, autocorrelation, and wavelet analysis. Lugworm densities were an order of magnitude greater at the reference site. Although A. marina showed an aggregative spatial distribution at both sites, the characteristics and intensity of aggregation differed markedly between sites. The reference site showed an inhibition process (regular distribution) at distances <7.5 cm, whereas the impacted site showed a random distribution at this scale. At distances from 15 cm to several tens of meters, the spatial distribution of A. marina was clearly aggregated at both sites; however, the autocorrelation strength was much weaker at the impacted site. In addition, the non-impacted site presented multi-scale spatial distribution, which was not evident at the impacted site. The differences observed between the spatial distributions of the fishing-impacted vs. the non-impacted site reflect similar findings for other components of these two mudflat ecosystems, suggesting common community-level responses to prolonged mechanical perturbation: a decrease in naturally-occurring aggregation. This change may have consequences for basic biological characteristics such as reproduction, recruitment, growth, and feeding.

  13. Combined toxicity of cadmium and copper in Avicennia marina seedlings and the regulation of exogenous jasmonic acid.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhongzheng; Li, Xiuzhen; Chen, Jun; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee

    2015-03-01

    Seedlings of Avicennia marina were exposed to single and combined metal treatments of cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu) in a factorial design, and the combined toxicity of Cu and Cd was tested. The effects of the exogenous jasmonic acid (JA) on chlorophyll concentration, lipid peroxidation, Cd and Cu uptake, antioxidative capacity, endogenous JA concentration, and type-2 metallothionein gene (AmMT2) expression in seedlings of A. marina exposed to combined metal treatments were also investigated. A binary mixture of low-dose Cd (9 µmolL(-1)) and high-dose Cu (900 µmolL(-1)) showed toxicity to the seedlings, indicated by the significant augmentation in leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduction in leaf chlorophylls. The toxicity of the combined metals was significantly alleviated by the addition of exogenous JA at 1 µmolL(-1), and the chlorophyll and MDA contents were found to be restored to levels comparable to those of the control. Compare to treatment with Cd and Cu only, 1 and 10 µmolL(-1) JA significantly enhanced the ascorbate peroxidase activity, and 10 µmolL(-1) JA significantly decreased the uptake of Cd in A. marina leaves. The relative expression of leaf AmMT2 gene was also significantly enhanced by 1 and 10 µmolL(-1) JA, which helped reduce Cd toxicity in A. marina seedlings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sediment Properties as Important Predictors of Carbon Storage in Zostera marina Meadows: A Comparison of Four European Areas

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Martin; Deyanova, Diana; Gütschow, Silvia; Asplund, Maria E.; Lyimo, Liberatus D.; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Santos, Rui; Björk, Mats; Gullström, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Seagrass ecosystems are important natural carbon sinks but their efficiency varies greatly depending on species composition and environmental conditions. What causes this variation is not fully known and could have important implications for management and protection of the seagrass habitat to continue to act as a natural carbon sink. Here, we assessed sedimentary organic carbon in Zostera marina meadows (and adjacent unvegetated sediment) in four distinct areas of Europe (Gullmar Fjord on the Swedish Skagerrak coast, Askö in the Baltic Sea, Sozopol in the Black Sea and Ria Formosa in southern Portugal) down to ~35 cm depth. We also tested how sedimentary organic carbon in Z. marina meadows relates to different sediment characteristics, a range of seagrass-associated variables and water depth. The seagrass carbon storage varied greatly among areas, with an average organic carbon content ranging from 2.79 ± 0.50% in the Gullmar Fjord to 0.17 ± 0.02% in the area of Sozopol. We found that a high proportion of fine grain size, high porosity and low density of the sediment is strongly related to high carbon content in Z. marina sediment. We suggest that sediment properties should be included as an important factor when evaluating high priority areas in management of Z. marina generated carbon sinks. PMID:27936111

  15. WATER QUALITY AT FIVE MARINAS IN LAKE TEXOMA AS RELATED TO METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occurrence of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in five marinas was monitored between June 1999 and November 2000 in Lake Texoma located on the border of Oklahoma and Texas. MTBE is a commonly used gasoline additive and a suspected carcinogen. Lake water was collected at locations i...

  16. EFFECTS OF RECREATIONAL CLAM HARVESTING ON EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) AND ASSOCIATED INFAUNAL INVERTEBRATES: IN SITU MANIPULATIVE EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of recreational clam harvesting on eelgrass (Zostera marina) was experimentally tested by raking or digging for clams in experimental 1-m2 plots located in a Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR) eelgrass meadow. After three monthly treatments, eelgrass measures of biomass, prima...

  17. A tale of two seagrasses: Comparing the science and management of Zostera marina and Zostera japonica in the Pacific Northwest

    EPA Science Inventory

    On the Pacific coast of North America, at least two congeners of Zostera occur: native Zostera marina, and introduced, Z. japonica. Z. japonica is considered “invasive” and therefore, ecologically and economically harmful by some, while others consider it benign or perhaps benef...

  18. EFFECTS OF RECREATIONAL CLAM HARVESTING ON EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) AND ASSOCIATED INFAUNAL INVERTEBRATES: IN SITU MANIPULATIVE EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of recreational clam harvesting on eelgrass (Zostera marina) was experimentally tested by raking or digging for clams in experimental 1-m2 plots located in a Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR) eelgrass meadow. After three monthly treatments, eelgrass measures of biomass, prima...

  19. Zostera marina (eelgrass) growth and survival along a gradient ofnutrients and turbidity in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, K.A.; Neckles, H.A.; Orth, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    Survival of transplanted Zostera marina L. (eelgrass), Z. marina growth,and environmental conditions were studied concurrently at a number of sitesin a southwestern tributary of the Chesapeake Bay to elucidate the factorslimiting macrophyte distribution in this region. Consistent differences insurvival of the transplants were observed, with no long-term survival at anyof the sites that were formerly vegetated with this species but thatcurrently remain unvegetated. Therefore, the current distribution of Z.marina likely represents the extent of suitable environmental conditions inthe region, and the lack of recovery into historically vegetated sites is notsolely due to lack of propagules. Poor long-term survival was related toseasonally high levels of water column light attenuation. Fall transplantsdied by the end of summer following exposure to levels of high springturbidity (K(d) > 3.0). Accumulation of an epiphyte matrix during the latespring (0.36 to 1.14 g g-1 dry wt) may also have contributed to thisstress. Differences in water column nutrient levels among sites during thefall and winter (10 to 15 ??M dissolved inorganic nitrogen and 1 ??Mdissolved inorganic phosphates) had no observable effect on epiphyteaccumulation or macrophyte growth. Salinity effects were minor and there wereno symptoms of disease. Although summertime conditions resulted indepressions in growth, they did not alone limit long-term survival. It issuggested that water quality conditions enhancing adequate seagrass growthduring the spring may be key to long-term Z. marina survival and successfulrecolonization in this region.

  20. An effective seed protection method for planting Zostera marina (eelgrass) seeds: Implications for their large-scale restoration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pei-Dong; Fang, Chao; Liu, Jie; Xu, Qiang; Li, Wen-Tao; Liu, Yan-Shan

    2015-06-15

    We describe an innovative method of planting Zostera marina (eelgrass) seeds in which hessian bags filled with high-silted sediments are used as a seed protecting device. Here, we evaluated the effectiveness of the method through a field seed-sowing experiment over a three year period. The suitable seed planting density required by the seeds of Z. marina in this method was also investigated. In the spring following seed distribution, seedling establishment rate of Z. marina subjected to different seed densities of 200-500seedsbag(-1) ranged from 16% to 26%. New eelgrass patches from seed were fully developed and well maintained after 2-3years following distribution. The seed planting density of 400seedsbag(-1) may be the most suitable for the establishment of new eelgrass patches. Our results demonstrate that seed-based restoration can be an effective restoration tool and the technique presented should be considered for future large-scale Z. marina restoration projects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Feeding by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina on the red-tide raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo: a potential biological method to control red tides using mass-cultured grazers.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, Jae Seong; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Seong Taek; Kim, Tae Hoon; Park, Myung Gil; Lee, Chang Hoon; Seong, Kyeong Ah; Kang, Nam Seon; Shim, Jae Hyung

    2003-01-01

    As part of the development of a method to control the outbreak and persistence of red tides using mass-cultured heterotrophic protist grazers, we measured the growth and ingestion rates of cultured Oxyrrhis marina (a heterotrophic dinoflagellate) on cultured Heterosigma akashiwo (a raphidophyte) in bottles in the laboratory and in mesocosms (ca. 60 liter) in nature, and those of the cultured grazer on natural populations of the red-tide organism in mesocosms set up in nature. In the bottle incubation, specific growth rates of O. marina increased rapidly with increasing concentration of cultured prey up to ca. 950 ng C ml(-1) (equivalent to 9,500 cells ml(-1)), but were saturated at higher concentrations. Maximum specific growth rate (mumax), KGR (prey concentration sustaining 0.5 mumax) and threshold prey concentration of O. marina on H. akashiwo were 1.43 d(-1), 104 ng C ml(-1), and 8.0 ng C ml(-1), respectively. Maximum ingestion and clearance rates of O. marina were 1.27 ng C grazer(-1) d(-1) and 0.3 microl grazer(-1) h(-1), respectively. Cultured O. marina grew well effectively reducing cultured and natural populations of H. akashiwo down to a very low concentration within 3 d in the mesocosms. The growth and ingestion rates of cultured O. marina on natural populations of H. akashiwo in the mesocosms were 39% and 40%, respectively, of those calculated based on the results from the bottle incubation in the laboratory, while growth and ingestion rates of cultured O. marina on cultured H. akashiwo in the mesocosms were 55% and 36%, respectively. Calculated grazing impact by O. marina on natural populations of H. akashiwo suggests that O. marina cultured on a large scale could be used for controlling red tides by H. akashiwo near aquaculture farms that are located in small ponds, lagoons, semi-enclosed bays, and large land-aqua tanks to which fresh seawater should be frequently supplied.

  2. The transcriptome of the novel dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Alveolata: Dinophyceae): response to salinity examined by 454 sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Chris D; Mello, Luciane V; Samatar, Najma; Martin, Laura E; Montagnes, David J S; Watts, Phillip C

    2011-10-20

    The heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina is increasingly studied in experimental, ecological and evolutionary contexts. Its basal phylogenetic position within the dinoflagellates make O. marina useful for understanding the origin of numerous unusual features of the dinoflagellate lineage; its broad distribution has lent O. marina to the study of protist biogeography; and nutritive flexibility and eurytopy have made it a common lab rat for the investigation of physiological responses of marine heterotrophic flagellates. Nevertheless, genome-scale resources for O. marina are scarce. Here we present a 454-based transcriptome survey for this organism. In addition, we assess sequence read abundance, as a proxy for gene expression, in response to salinity, an environmental factor potentially important in determining O. marina spatial distributions. Sequencing generated ~57 Mbp of data which assembled into 7, 398 contigs. Approximately 24% of contigs were nominally identified by BLAST. A further clustering of contigs (at ≥ 90% identity) revealed 164 transcript variant clusters, the largest of which (Phosphoribosylaminoimidazole-succinocarboxamide synthase) was composed of 28 variants displaying predominately synonymous variation. In a genomic context, a sample of 5 different genes were demonstrated to occur as tandem repeats, separated by short (~200-340 bp) inter-genic regions. For HSP90 several intergenic variants were detected suggesting a potentially complex genomic arrangement. In response to salinity, analysis of 454 read abundance highlighted 9 and 20 genes over or under expressed at 50 PSU, respectively. However, 454 read abundance and subsequent qPCR validation did not correlate well - suggesting that measures of gene expression via ad hoc analysis of sequence read abundance require careful interpretation. Here we indicate that tandem gene arrangements and the occurrence of multiple transcribed gene variants are common and indicate potentially complex

  3. Rhizobial strains isolated from nodules of Medicago marina in southwest Spain are abiotic-stress tolerant and symbiotically diverse.

    PubMed

    Alías-Villegas, Cynthia; Cubo, M Teresa; Lara-Dampier, Victoria; Bellogín, Ramón A; Camacho, María; Temprano, Francisco; Espuny, M Rosario

    2015-10-01

    The isolation and characterisation of nitrogen-fixing root nodule bacteria from Medicago marina, a tolerant legume species, were studied in two areas from southwest Spain. A total of 30 out of 82 isolates with distinct ERIC-PCR fingerprints were analysed on the basis of molecular (PCR-RFLP of the 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer region (IGS) with two endonucleases, analysis of the 16S rDNA and symbiotic nodC gene sequences, plasmid profiles and SDS-PAGE of LPS, including the partial sequence of the housekeeping gene glnII and the symbiotic gene nodA of some representatives), physiological (utilisation of sole carbon sources, tolerance to antibiotics, NaCl, heavy metals, temperature and pH) and symbiotic parameters (efficacy on M. marina, M. minima, M. murex, M. orbicularis, M. polymorpha, M. sativa and M. truncatula). All the bacteria isolated from M. marina nodules belonged to Ensifer meliloti, except for one strain that belonged to E. medicae. To determine the nodulation range of M. marina, 10 different Ensifer species were tested for their ability to nodulate on this plant. E. kummerowiae CCBAU 71714 and the E. medicae control strain M19.1 were the only Ensifer species tested that developed nitrogen-fixing nodules on this plant. Most of the M. marina-nodulating strains showed tolerance to stress factors and all of them shared the presence of a gene similar to cadA, a gene that encodes for a PIB-type ATPase, which is a transporter belonging to the large superfamily of ATP-driven pumps involved in the transport of metals across cell membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationships Between Seed Germinability of Spergularia marina (Caryophyllaceae) and the Formation of Zonal Communities in an Inland Salt Marsh

    PubMed Central

    CARTER, CHRISTY T.; UNGAR, IRWIN A.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims The formation of zonal communities may be attributed to differences in germination across the community and to timing of germination of seeds present in the seed bank. Our goals were two‐fold: (1) to assess the annual germination pattern of Spergularia marina; and (2) to determine whether germination of S. marina differed across zonal communities. • Methods Fresh seeds were buried in an experimental garden in polyester bags. Bags were harvested monthly for 1 year and exposed to differing 12 h/12 h temperature regimes (5/15 °C, 5/25 °C, 15/25 °C and 20/35 °C) with a 12 h dark/12 h light photoperiod. Replicate seeds were exposed to 24 h dark. Seeds were also placed in different zonal communities to assess germinability in the field. • Key Results Spergularia marina has a primary physiological dormancy. Conditional dormancy occurs from December to May and non‐dormancy from June to November. Field germination initiates in the spring when temperatures are cool and salinity is low due to flooding, and ceases in the summer when temperatures exceed germination requirements. Spergularia marina has a light requirement for germination. • Conclusions If seeds become buried in the field or are light inhibited by Phragmites australis, they will remain dormant until they receive an adequate amount of light for germination. Since S. marina can germinate across all zones in a salt‐marsh community, the formation of zonal communities is not determined at the germination stage, but at some later stage of development. PMID:14672911

  5. Genome-wide transcriptomic responses of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Nanozostera noltii under a simulated heatwave confirm functional types.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Susanne U; Gu, Jenny; Winters, Gidon; Huylmans, Ann-Kathrin; Wienpahl, Isabell; Sparwel, Maximiliane; Coyer, James A; Olsen, Jeanine L; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Genome-wide transcription analysis between related species occurring in overlapping ranges can provide insights into the molecular basis underlying different ecological niches. The co-occurring seagrass species, Zostera marina and Nanozostera noltii, are found in marine coastal environments throughout the northern hemisphere. Z. marina is often dominant in subtidal environments and subjected to fewer temperature extremes compared to the predominately intertidal and more stress-tolerant N. noltii. We exposed plants of both species to a realistic heat wave scenario in a common-stress-garden experiment. Using RNA-seq (~7million reads/library), four Z. marina and four N. noltii libraries were compared representing northern (Denmark) and southern (Italy) locations within the co-occurring range of the species' European distribution. A total of 8977 expressed genes were identified, of which 78 were directly related to heat stress. As predicted, both species were negatively affected by the heat wave, but showed markedly different molecular responses. In Z. marina the heat response was similar across locations in response to the heatwave at 26°C, with a complex response in functions related to protein folding, synthesis of ribosomal chloroplast proteins, proteins involved in cell wall modification and heat shock proteins (HSPs). In N. noltii the heat response markedly differed between locations, while HSP genes were not induced in either population. Our results suggest that as coastal seawater temperatures increase, Z. marina will disappear along its southern most ranges, whereas N. noltii will continue to move north. As a consequence, sub- and intertidal habitat partitioning may weaken in more northern regions because the higher thermal tolerance of N. noltii provides a competitive advantage in both habitats. Although previous studies have focused on HSPs, the present study clearly demonstrates that a broader examination of stress related genes is necessary.

  6. Mangrove distribution and mosquito control: transport of Avicennia marina propagules by mosquito-control runnels in southeast Queensland saltmarshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfuss, M. J.; Connolly, R. M.; Dale, P. E. R.

    2003-03-01

    The saltmarsh-mangrove interface generally constitutes the landward boundary for the grey mangrove Avicennia marina var. australasica, the most widespread species on southeast Queensland shores. A. marina produces buoyant propagules, which are dispersed by tidal waters, only infrequently transported to saltmarsh by the highest spring tides. We predicted that runnelling, a form of habitat modification for mosquito control, transports and deposits mangrove propagules to saltmarsh because the runnels carry low-amplitude tides that would not normally inundate higher regions of the marsh. To test this, groups of marked A. marina propagules were released at three runnelled saltmarshes in southeast Queensland during high-amplitude, flooding and low-amplitude, non-flooding tidal events. The distance propagules were transported from their original starting positions on the saltmarsh-mangrove interface was measured and analysed to detect differences among groups at different distances from runnels. Groups of propagules released within 10 m of a runnel were always transported significantly further from the starting position and further up the saltmarsh shore after both flooding and non-flooding tides than any other groups. In addition, the pattern of stranding on saltmarsh for significantly different groups was closely associated with the path of runnel construction so that propagules were located either in the runnel or in depressions linked to the runnel that had been isolated mosquito-breeding pools prior to runnelling. Observations of A. marina plants at other runnelled sites suggest that propagules transported by runnels can establish and develop to maturity, at least in depressions and runnels, in saltmarsh. The fact that runnels transport propagules to regions of the saltmarsh beyond their normal limits of dispersion suggests a possible advantage for landward extension of the intertidal distribution of A. marina at runnelled sites and should be considered in saltmarsh

  7. Assessment of biotic response to heavy metal contamination in Avicennia marina mangrove ecosystems in Sydney Estuary, Australia.

    PubMed

    Nath, Bibhash; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu; Birch, Gavin

    2014-09-01

    Mangrove forests act as a natural filter of land-derived wastewaters along industrialized tropical and sub-tropical coastlines and assist in maintaining a healthy living condition for marine ecosystems. Currently, these intertidal communities are under serious threat from heavy metal contamination induced by human activity associated with rapid urbanization and industrialization. Studies on the biotic responses of these plants to heavy metal contamination are of great significance in estuary management and maintaining coastal ecosystem health. The main objective of the present investigation was to assess the biotic response in Avicennia marina ecosystems to heavy metal contamination through the determination of metal concentrations in leaves, fine nutritive roots and underlying sediments collected in fifteen locations across Sydney Estuary (Australia). Metal concentrations (especially Cu, Pb and Zn) in the underlying sediments of A. marina were enriched to a level (based on Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines) at which adverse biological effects to flora could occasionally occur. Metals accumulated in fine nutritive roots greater than underlying sediments, however, only minor translocation of these metals to A. marina leaves was observed (mean translocation factors, TFs, for all elements <0.13, except for Mn). Translocation factors of essential elements (i.e., common plant micro-nutrients, Cu, Ni, Mn and Zn) were greater than non-essential elements (As, Cd, Co, Cr and Pb), suggesting that A. marina mangroves of this estuary selectively excluded non-essential elements, while regulating essential elements and limiting toxicity to plants. This study supports the notion that A. marina mangroves act as a phytostabilizer in this highly modified estuary thereby protecting the aquatic ecosystem from point or non-point sources of heavy metal contamination.

  8. Frugivory by insects on mangrove propagules: effects on the early life history of Avicennia marina.

    PubMed

    Minchinton, Todd E; Dalby-Ball, Mia

    2001-10-01

    This study investigates how herbivory by larval insects on fruit of the mangrove Avicennia marina affects the subsequent establishment, growth, and survivorship of its seedlings. Research was done in a temperate mangrove forest in Australia where the larvae of two species of insects were the dominant frugivores: the mangrove fruit fly Euphranta marina and the mangrove plume moth Cenoloba obliteralis. Larvae consumed the cotyledons of fruit, but not their embryonic axes. Damage to the cotyledons of fruit while on the tree was obvious in abscised propagules and the cotyledons of seedlings, indicating that larvae within fruit continue to consume the cotyledons and develop while the propagule disperses and the seedling establishes. We found that 53% of fruit, 69% of abscised propagules, and 80% of the cotyledons of seedlings had been attacked by larval insects. The degree of damage to the cotyledons was positively related to the densities of larvae within the fruit and the number of emergence or exit holes in the surface of the cotyledons. Consequently, the number of exit holes could be used as a proxy for the amount of damage to the cotyledons. An experiment in which we placed propagules with different levels of damage (zero, one, two, or three exit holes) on the forest floor revealed that frugivory did not influence the establishment of seedlings. In another experiment, we monitored the performance of newly established seedlings with cotyledons that had zero exit holes, one or more exit holes, or where we had removed their cotyledons. In both experiments, the growth of seedlings as measured by their heights and number of leaves was negatively related to the degree of frugivory. Consumption of the cotyledons by larvae apparently reduces the energy reserves available for the initial growth of seedlings. The early mortality of seedlings in both experiments was minimal and appeared to be independent of differences in size due to frugivory. Experimentally removing the

  9. Comparing the performance of species distribution models of Zostera marina: Implications for conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, Mireia; van Katwijk, Marieke M.; de Jong, Dick J.; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Schipper, Aafke M.; Chust, Guillem; Benito, Blas M.; Garmendia, Joxe M.; Borja, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    Intertidal seagrasses show high variability in their extent and location, with local extinctions and (re-)colonizations being inherent in their population dynamics. Suitable habitats are identified usually using Species Distribution Models (SDM), based upon the overall distribution of the species; thus, accounting solely for spatial variability. To include temporal effects caused by large interannual variability, we constructed SDMs for different combinations and fusions of yearly distribution data. The main objectives were to: (i) assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of an intertidal seagrass bed of Zostera marina; (ii) select the most accurate SDM techniques to model different temporal distribution data subsets of the species; (iii) assess the relative importance of the environmental variables for each data subset; and (iv) evaluate the accuracy of the models to predict species conservation areas, addressing implications for management. To address these objectives, a time series of 14-year distribution data of Zostera marina in the Ems estuary (The Netherlands) was used to build different data subsets: (1) total presence area; (2) a conservative estimate of the total presence area, defined as the area which had been occupied during at least 4 years; (3) core area, defined as the area which had been occupied during at least 2/3 of the total period; and (4-6) three random selections of monitoring years. On average, colonized and disappeared areas of the species in the Ems estuary showed remarkably similar transition probabilities of 12.7% and 12.9%, respectively. SDMs based upon machine-learning methods (Boosted Regression Trees and Random Forest) outperformed regression-based methods. Current velocity and wave exposure were the most important variables predicting the species presence for widely distributed data. Depth and sea floor slope were relevant to predict conservative presence area and core area. It is concluded that, the fusion of the spatial distribution

  10. Performance and economics of the PV hybrid power system at Dangling Rope Marina, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Andrew L.

    1999-03-01

    The National Park Service has operated a large photovoltaic (PV) hybrid power system at the Dangling Rope Marina since August 1996. Performance and economic analyses for this system based on its first year of operation have been published elsewhere [1,2]. Now, as the system enters its third year of operation, recent changes to the site electrical load and impending additions to the PV array raise new interest in this site as the subject of analysis and evaluation. In 1998, energy conservation measures reduced the site electrical load by 10-12%. At the same time, funding has been allocated to expand the PV array by 40% in 1999. This paper analyzes the effects that these changes will have on the site's fuel use and 20-year life cycle cost.

  11. Proteomic profile of Ortleppascaris sp.: A helminth parasite of Rhinella marina in the Amazonian region.

    PubMed

    E Silva, Jefferson Pereira; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2014-08-01

    Ortleppascaris sp. is a helminth that, in its larval stage, infects the liver parenchyma of the amphibian Rhinella marina, resulting in severe physiological and pathological changes. This study used a proteomic approach to determine the overall profile of proteins expressed in a somatic extract from the nematodes to investigate the relationship between the parasite and its host. A total of 60 abundant proteins were selected from the two-dimensional electrophoresis, identified by peptide mass fingerprinting, and grouped based on their Gene Ontology by the biological processes in which they are potentially involved. Important helminthic derivatives, such as the immunoreactive As37 antigen, guanylyl cyclases, proteolytic enzymes, and other proteins conserved among different parasites, were identified through homology. This study represents a new approach to helminth-related proteomic studies using an amphibian animal model. Furthermore, this study identified protein markers that are important to the host-parasite relationship and the viability, development, infectivity, and virulence of helminths.

  12. Proteomic profile of Ortleppascaris sp.: A helminth parasite of Rhinella marina in the Amazonian region

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Jefferson Pereira; Furtado, Adriano Penha; dos Santos, Jeannie Nascimento

    2014-01-01

    Ortleppascaris sp. is a helminth that, in its larval stage, infects the liver parenchyma of the amphibian Rhinella marina, resulting in severe physiological and pathological changes. This study used a proteomic approach to determine the overall profile of proteins expressed in a somatic extract from the nematodes to investigate the relationship between the parasite and its host. A total of 60 abundant proteins were selected from the two-dimensional electrophoresis, identified by peptide mass fingerprinting, and grouped based on their Gene Ontology by the biological processes in which they are potentially involved. Important helminthic derivatives, such as the immunoreactive As37 antigen, guanylyl cyclases, proteolytic enzymes, and other proteins conserved among different parasites, were identified through homology. This study represents a new approach to helminth-related proteomic studies using an amphibian animal model. Furthermore, this study identified protein markers that are important to the host–parasite relationship and the viability, development, infectivity, and virulence of helminths. PMID:25161903

  13. Release and Consumption of DMSP from Emiliania Huxleyi during grazing by Oxyrrhis Marina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Gordon V.; Sherr, Evelyn B.; Sherr, Barry F.

    1994-01-01

    Degradation and release to solution of intracellular dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) from Emiliania huxleyi 370 was observed during grazing by the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina in 24 h bottle incubations. Between 30 and 70% of the lost algal DMSP was metabolized by the grazers without production of dimethylsulfide (DMS) when grazer densities were 150 to 450/ml. The rest was released to solution and about 30% was converted to DMS by bacteria associated with the grazer culture. These experiments demonstrate that grazing by herbivorous protists may be an important sink for DMSP in marine waters, removing a potential source of DMS. Microzooplankton grazing may also indirectly increase the production of DMS by transferring algal DMSP to the dissolved pool, making it available for bacterial metabolism.

  14. Kocuria marina BS-15 a biosurfactant producing halophilic bacteria isolated from solar salt works in India

    PubMed Central

    Sarafin, Yesurethinam; Donio, Mariathasan Birdilla Selva; Velmurugan, Subramanian; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2014-01-01

    Biosurfactant screening was made among the eight halophilic bacterial genera isolated from Kovalam solar salt works in Kanyakumari of India. After initial screening, Kocuria sp. (Km), Kurthia sp. (Ku) and Halococcus sp. (Hc) were found to have positive biosurfactant activity. Biosurfactant derived from Kocuria sp. emulsified more than 50% of the crude oil, coconut oil, sunflower oil, olive oil and kerosene when compared to the other strains. Further, Kocuria marina BS-15 derived biosurfactant was purified and characterized by TLC, FTIR and GC–MS analysis. The TLC analysis revealed that, the purified biosurfactants belong to the lipopeptide group. The IR spectrum results revealed that functional groups are R2C 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 111111111111 000000000000 000000000000 000000000000 NN, alkenes and N–H. The GC–MS analysis confirmed the compound as Nonanoic acid and Cyclopropane with the retention time of 12.78 and 24.65, respectively. PMID:25473358

  15. Sediment accumulation and mercury (Hg) flux in Avicennia marina forest of Deep Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruili; Chai, Minwei; Guo, Meixian; Qiu, Guo Yu

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the rate of sediment accumulation and mercury (Hg) flux in Avicennia marina forest of Deep Bay, China, sediment cores were analyzed. The results showed that Hg concentrations were much higher at all depths compared to the background level. A high correlation between Hg and total organic carbon (TOC) indicated their similar anthropogenic origin. Sedimentation rate was estimated to be 1.38 cm a-1 by 210Pb geochronology. The increase in the mass sediment accumulation rates was rapid (range: 0.5-0.94 g cm-2 a-1), and the Hg fluxes ranged between 76 and 116 ng cm-2 a-1 during the last three decades. The reduction in both Hg concentrations and flux during the last decade may be due to the adoption of contamination control policies. Our results support the notion that the Hg fluxes determined from the sediment cores reveal the effects of anthropogenic influences from the areas around Deep Bay.

  16. Photovoltaic DER System Could Save USPS $25,000 per Year in Marina del Rey, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2002-11-01

    In numerous projects, government agencies are demonstrating the economic and environmental value of using distributed energy resources (DER) to provide reliable electricity for Federal facilities. These projects also show how renewable DER systems such as photovoltaics (PV) can be effectively integrated into utility power grids to provide added power during peak demand periods in populous regions and states. This four-page case study describes a recent project in which the United States Postal Service (USPS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), a national laboratory, the local utility, and a private company to install a PV DER system at the USPS Marina Processing and Distribution Center in Inglewood, California. This system is expected to shave 10% off the facility's 1.2-megawatt peak power demand and save more $25,000 per year in utility costs.

  17. Pyrosequencing-Based Seasonal Observation of Prokaryotic Diversity in Pneumatophore-Associated Soil of Avicennia marina.

    PubMed

    Sanka Loganathachetti, Dinesh; Sadaiappan, Balamurugan; Poosakkannu, Anbu; Muthuraman, Sundararaman

    2016-01-01

    Pneumatophores are aerial roots developing from the main roots of mangrove plants away from the gravity. The below ground pneumatophore-associated soil prokaryotic community of Avicennia marina was studied by amplicon pyrosequencing (39,378 reads) during monsoon and summer seasons. Apart from the most dominant phylum Proteobacteria in both seasons, the second most were Acidobacteria (summer) and Cyanobacteria/Chloroplast (monsoon). Similarly, Acidobacteria_Gp10 and Cyanobacteria were the second most abundant at class level during summer and monsoon, respectively. Archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota was the most abundant followed by Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. The classes detected in our study were Thermoprotei, Halobacteria, and Methanomicrobia. The highest richness and diversity were observed during summer for bacteria, whereas the same phenomena for archaea in monsoon at 97% sequence similarity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to catalog the prokaryotic diversity of pnueumatophore-associated soil.

  18. Mebamamides A and B, Cyclic Lipopeptides Isolated from the Green Alga Derbesia marina.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Arihiro; Ohno, Osamu; Sumimoto, Shinpei; Matsubara, Teruhiko; Shimada, Satoshi; Sato, Toshinori; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2015-04-24

    Mebamamides A and B, new lipopeptides with four d-amino acid residues and a 3,8-dihydroxy-9-methyldecanoic acid residue, were isolated from the green alga Derbesia marina. Their gross structures were elucidated by spectroscopic and ESI-ITMS analyses. The absolute configurations except for the two leucines were revealed based on chiral-phase HPLC analyses of the acid hydrolysate and a modified Mosher's method. A distinction between D-Leu and L-Leu in the sequence was established by the application of a dansyl-Edman method to the partial acid hydrolysate. Mebamamide A did not exhibit any growth inhibitory activity against HeLa and HL60 cells at 10 μM, and mebamamide B did not exhibit any growth inhibitory activity against those cells at 100 μM. Additionally, it was suggested that mebamamide B induced the differentiation of HL60 cells into macrophage-like cells at 100 μM.

  19. Experimental assessment of critical anthropogenic sediment burial in eelgrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Munkes, Britta; Schubert, Philipp R; Karez, Rolf; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2015-11-15

    Seagrass meadows, one of the world's most important and productive coastal habitats, are threatened by a range of anthropogenic actions. Burial of seagrass plants due to coastal activities is one important anthropogenic pressure leading to the decline of local populations. In our study, we assessed the response of eelgrass Zostera marina to sediment burial from physiological, morphological, and population parameters. In a full factorial field experiment, burial level (5-20cm) and burial duration (4-16weeks) were manipulated. Negative effects were visible even at the lowest burial level (5cm) and shortest duration (4weeks), with increasing effects over time and burial level. Buried seagrasses showed higher shoot mortality, delayed growth and flowering and lower carbohydrate storage. The observed effects will likely have an impact on next year's survival of buried plants. Our results have implications for the management of this important coastal plant.

  20. The marine bacteria Cobetia marina DSMZ 4741 synthesizes an unexpected K-antigen-like exopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Lelchat, Florian; Cérantola, Stéphane; Brandily, Christophe; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia; Baudoux, Anne-Claire; Ojima, Takao; Boisset, Claire

    2015-06-25

    We have studied the exopolysaccharide produced by Cobetia marina DSMZ 4741, a marine bacterium isolated from coastal seawater. This strain is able to produce a polysaccharide in presence of carbon sources as glucose, mannitol and alginate. The maximum production occurs in aerobic condition, during the end of the exponential phase. The polymer is a non-viscous, acidic heteropolysaccharide of 270kDa constituted of a repeating unit of: This kind of chemical structure is generally related to K-antigen polysaccharide of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. This is the first time this type of EPS is described from a marine bacterium. Moreover the polysaccharide exhibits a pyruvate substitution on its 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KDO) residue never encountered before. The discovery of such an unexpected EPS with high biotechnological potential is a new incentive for a better exploration of bioactive marine resources.

  1. Screening of antifouling biocides around a pleasure boat marina in the Baltic Sea after legal restrictions.

    PubMed

    Kylin, Henrik; Haglund, Kurt

    2010-10-01

    Copper, zinc, and Irgarol 1051 concentrations were determined around a pleasure boat marina in the Stockholm Archipelago. Copper concentrations in water were twice as high (6.62 μg L⁻¹) in 2004 as 1992-1993, zinc concentrations six times higher (20.0 μg L⁻¹). Concentrations in bladder wrack (Fucus vesiculosus) had also risen. Irgarol concentrations in water were similar (~0.17 μg L⁻¹) in 1996 and 2004, while concentrations in bladder wrack halved from 1993 to 2004. The peak concentrations of copper and Irgarol in water have shifted indicating that the main source in the 1990 s were local boats, but in 2004 visiting boats.

  2. Benthic assemblages, biodiversity and invasiveness in marinas and commercial harbours: an investigation using a bioindicator group.

    PubMed

    Megina, Cesar; González-Duarte, Manuel M; López-González, Pablo J

    2016-01-01

    Fouling communities on artificial marine structures are generally different from benthic communities in natural rocky habitats. However, they may also differ among different types of artificial structures. Two artificial structures in direct contact with arriving vessels were compared: floating pontoons within recreational marinas, and sea-walls within commercial harbours. Natural rocky habitats were used as a reference, and the genus Eudendrium (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa) was chosen as a bioindicator. The assemblages were different among the three types of habitat studied, with different species characterising each habitat. The probability of finding an invasive Eudendrium species was significantly higher on pontoons. Diversity was the lowest on pontoons, but it was not significantly different between sea-walls and natural rocks. In general, a barrier to the spread of exotic species exists between harbours and natural rocky habitats. Floating pontoons seem to be a less suitable habitat for native fauna and a key element in marine biological invasions.

  3. Performance and economics of the PV hybrid power system at Dangling Rope Marina, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.L.

    1999-03-01

    The National Park Service has operated a large photovoltaic (PV) hybrid power system at the Dangling Rope Marina since August 1996. Performance and economic analyses for this system based on its first year of operation have been published elsewhere [1,2]. Now, as the system enters its third year of operation, recent changes to the site electrical load and impending additions to the PV array raise new interest in this site as the subject of analysis and evaluation. In 1998, energy conservation measures reduced the site electrical load by 10{endash}12{percent}. At the same time, funding has been allocated to expand the PV array by 40{percent} in 1999. This paper analyzes the effects that these changes will have on the site{close_quote}s fuel use and 20-year life cycle cost. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Exploiting intraspecific competitive mechanisms to control invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Crossland, Michael R.; Haramura, Takashi; Salim, Angela A.; Capon, Robert J.; Shine, Richard

    2012-01-01

    If invasive species use chemical weapons to suppress the viability of conspecifics, we may be able to exploit those species-specific chemical cues for selective control of the invader. Cane toads (Rhinella marina) are spreading through tropical Australia, with negative effects on native species. The tadpoles of cane toads eliminate intraspecific competitors by locating and consuming newly laid eggs. Our laboratory trials show that tadpoles find those eggs by searching for the powerful bufadienolide toxins (especially, bufogenins) that toads use to deter predators. Using those toxins as bait, funnel-traps placed in natural waterbodies achieved near-complete eradication of cane toad tadpoles with minimal collateral damage (because most native (non-target) species are repelled by the toads' toxins). More generally, communication systems that have evolved for intraspecific conflict provide novel opportunities for invasive-species control. PMID:22696528

  5. Cerium Binding Activity of Pectins Isolated from the Seagrasses Zostera marina and Phyllospadix iwatensis

    PubMed Central

    Khotimchenko, Yuri; Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Khotimchenko, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Cerium binding activity of three different water soluble pectin compounds of different origin was studied in a batch sorption system. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were adopted to describe the binding reactions between metal ions and pectin molecules. The Langmuir model provided the best fit. Within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0, the largest amount of the cerium ions was bound by pectin isolated from the seagrass Phylospadix iwatensis in comparison to pectin extracted from the seagrass Zostera marina and pectin obtained from citrus peel (commercial grade). The Langmuir constants were also highest for the pectin samples isolated from the seagrass P. iwatensis. The results obtained from this study suggest that pectin is a prospective source for the development of radioisotope-removing pharmaceuticals. PMID:22690146

  6. Invader immunology: invasion history alters immune system function in cane toads (Rhinella marina) in tropical Australia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gregory P; Phillips, Benjamin L; Dubey, Sylvain; Shine, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Because an individual's investment into the immune system may modify its dispersal rate, immune function may evolve rapidly in an invader. We collected cane toads (Rhinella marina) from sites spanning their 75-year invasion history in Australia, bred them, and raised their progeny in standard conditions. Evolved shifts in immune function should manifest as differences in immune responses among the progeny of parents collected in different locations. Parental location did not affect the offspring's cell-mediated immune response or stress response, but blood from the offspring of invasion-front toads had more neutrophils, and was more effective at phagocytosis and killing bacteria. These latter measures of immune function are negatively correlated with rate of dispersal in free-ranging toads. Our results suggest that the invasion of tropical Australia by cane toads has resulted in rapid genetically based compensatory shifts in the aspects of immune responses that are most compromised by the rigours of long-distance dispersal.

  7. Distribution and characteristics of marine litter on the Marina beach, Chennai, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapal, R.

    2013-05-01

    The types, quantities, and distribution of marine litter found on the beach of the Marina, Chennai, India were surveyed during 2010-2011 season wise. Litter items were sorted into material and usage categories. The counts and weights of the litter were counted and measured. The plastic-type litter (63.4 kg) is the most dominant material category followed by polythene (10.6 kg), metal (5.3 kg) and glass (15.2 kg). Cloth (66.0 kg) is the dominant usage category followed by rubber (45.7 kg) and wood (70.0 kg). Based on the typological results three dominant litter sources were identified viz., land-based, vessel-based and fishery-based sources. t test help recognize dominant litter sources.t; t;

  8. Characterisation of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I in the Australian Cane Toad, Rhinella marina

    PubMed Central

    Lillie, Mette; Shine, Richard; Belov, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I is a highly variable gene family that encodes cell-surface receptors vital for recognition of intracellular pathogens and initiation of immune responses. The MHC class I has yet to be characterised in bufonid toads (Order: Anura; Suborder: Neobatrachia; Family: Bufonidae), a large and diverse family of anurans. Here we describe the characterisation of a classical MHC class I gene in the Australian cane toad, Rhinella marina. From 25 individuals sampled from the Australian population, we found only 3 alleles at this classical class I locus. We also found large number of class I alpha 1 alleles, implying an expansion of class I loci in this species. The low classical class I genetic diversity is likely the result of repeated bottleneck events, which arose as a result of the cane toad's complex history of introductions as a biocontrol agent and its subsequent invasion across Australia. PMID:25093458

  9. Size matters: insights from an allometric approach to evaluate control methods for invasive Australian Rhinella marina.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Lynne E; Salice, Christopher J

    2013-10-01

    Invasive species are costly and difficult to control. In order to gain a mechanistic understanding of potential control measures, individual-based models uniquely parameterized to reflect the salient life-history characteristics of invasive species are useful. Using invasive Australian Rhinella marina as a case study, we constructed a cohort- and individual-based population simulation that incorporates growth and body size of terrestrial stages. We used this allometric approach to examine the efficacy of nontraditional control methods (i.e., tadpole alarm chemicals and native meat ants) that may have indirect effects on population dynamics mediated by effects on body size. We compared population estimates resulting from these control methods with traditional hand removal. We also conducted a sensitivity analysis to investigate the effect that model parameters, specifically those associated with growth and body size, had on adult population estimates. Incremental increases in hand removal of adults and juveniles caused nonlinear decreases in adult population estimates, suggesting less return with increased investment in hand-removal efforts. Applying tadpole alarm chemicals or meat ants decreased adult population estimates on the same level as removing 15-25% of adults and juveniles by hand. The combined application of tadpole alarm chemicals and meat ants resulted in approximately 80% decrease in adult abundance, the largest of any applied control method. In further support of the nontraditional control methods, which greatly affected the metamorph stage, our model was most sensitive to changes in metamorph survival, juvenile survival, metamorph growth rate, and adult survival. Our results highlight the use and insights that can be gained from individual-based models that incorporate growth and body size and the potential success that nontraditional control methods could have in controlling established, invasive Rhinella marina populations.

  10. Mortality rate estimation for eelgrass Zostera marina (Potamogetonaceae) using projections from Leslie matrices.

    PubMed

    Flores Uzeta, Olga; Solana Arellano, Elena; Echavarría Heras, Héctor

    2008-09-01

    The main goal of this study is to provide estimations of mean mortality rate of vegetative shoots of the seagrass Zostera marina in a meadow near Ensenada Baja California, using a technique that minimizes destructive sampling. Using cohorts and Leslie matrices, three life tables were constructed, each representing a season within the period of monthly sampling (April 1999 to April 2000). Ages for the cohorts were established in terms of Plastochrone Interval (PI). The matrices were projected through time to estimate the mean total number of individuals at time t, n(t) as well as mortality. We found no statistical differences between observed and predicted mean values for these variables (t = -0.11, p = 0.92 for n(t) and t = 0.69, p = 0.5 for mean rate of mortality). We found high correlation coefficient values between observed and projected values for monthly number of individuals (r = 0.70, p = 0.007) and monthly mortality rates (r = 0.81, p = 0.001). If at a certain time t a sudden environmental change occurs, and as long as the perturbation does not provoke the killing of all the individuals of a given age i for 0 < or = i < or = x - 1, there will be a prevailing number of individuals of age or stage x at a time t+1. This nondestructive technique reduces the number of field visits and samples needed for the demographic analysis of Z. marina, and therefore decreases the disturbance caused by researches to the ecosystem.

  11. Photoacclimatory Responses of Zostera marina in the Intertidal and Subtidal Zones

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Rul; Kim, Sangil; Kim, Young Kyun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2016-01-01

    Photoacclimatory responses of the seagrass Zostera marina in the intertidal and subtidal zones were investigated by measuring chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, photosynthetic pigments, leaf δ13C values, and shoot morphology in two bay systems. Intertidal plants had higher carotenoid concentrations than subtidal plants to avoid photodamage under excess light conditions during the day. The maximum relative electron transport rate (rETRmax) and minimum saturation irradiance (Ek) of the intertidal plants were higher than those of the subtidal plants, whereas photosynthetic efficiency (α) and maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) were higher in subtidal plants. The intertidal plants also had significantly greater Stern–Volmer non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) than that of the subtidal plants. These results suggest that the subtidal plants photoacclimated to use limited light more efficiently, and the intertidal plants exhibited photosynthetic responses to minimize photodamage at excess irradiance. The δ13C values of leaf tissues were more negative in the intertidal plants than those in the subtidal plants, suggesting that the intertidal plants used atmospheric or dissolved CO2 for photosynthesis during emersion. Effective quantum yield (ΔF/Fm´) in the intertidal plants decreased more slowly after emersion than that in the subtidal plants, indicating higher desiccation tolerance of the intertidal plants. The intertidal plants also recovered more rapidly from desiccation damage than the subtidal plants, suggesting photosynthetic adaptation to desiccation stress. The photosynthetic plasticity of Z. marina in response to variable environmental conditions most likely allows this species to occur in the intertidal and subtidal zones. PMID:27227327

  12. Antibacterial potential of biosynthesised silver nanoparticles using Avicennia marina mangrove plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesigan, M.; Anand, M.; Ravikumar, S.; Maruthupandy, M.; Syed Ali, M.; Vijayakumar, V.; Kumaraguru, A. K.

    2012-06-01

    The present study was aimed to identify the antibacterial potential of biosynthesised silver nanoparticles using different plant parts (leaves, bark and root) of Avicenna marina mangrove plant. Of the selected three different parts, the leaf extract showed the maximum synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The in vitro antibacterial assay (100 μg disk-1 concentration) showed the results of maximum zone of inhibition with the E. coli (18.40 ± 0.97 mm), and minimum (10.87 ± 1.33 mm) zone of inhibition with S. aureus but the concentrations of MIC and MBC values ranged between 6.25 and 50.0 μg ml-1 between the selected bacterial strains. The FTIR results of most potent leaf extract-synthesized silver nanoparticles showed the prominent peaks (620.967; 1,061.02; 1,116.58; 1,187.94; 1,280.50; 1,353.79; 1,384.64; 1,598.50; 1,629.56; 2,854.14 and 2,927.42) in different ranges. Further, the results of XRD analysis showed the 2 θ intense values (38.11 and 70.57) within the ranges of Bragg's reflection. In addition, the AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (71-110 nm), particle roughness (11.8 nm), maximum height of the particle roughness (111.8 nm), and average maximum height of the particle roughness (57.5 nm). It can be concluded from the present findings that, the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles from the leaf extract of A. marina can be used as potential antibacterial agents.

  13. Occurrence, fate, and fluxes of perfluorochemicals (PFCs) in an urban catchment: Marina Reservoir, Singapore.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Viet Tung; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong; Reinhard, Martin; Liu, Changhui

    2012-01-01

    A study was carried out to characterize the occurrence, sources and sinks of perfluorochemicals (PFCs) in the Marina Catchment and Reservoir, Singapore. Salinity depth profiles indicated the reservoir was stratified with lower layers consisting of sea water (salinity ranging from 32 to 35 g L(-1)) and a brackish surface layer containing approximately 14-65% seawater. The PFC mixture detected in catchment waters contained perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs), particularly perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorohexanoate (PFHpA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and PFC transformation products. PFC concentrations in storm runoff were generally higher than those in dry weather flow of canals and rivers. PFC concentration profiles measured during storm events indicated 'first flush' behavior, probably because storm water is leaching PFC compounds from non-point sources present in the catchment area. Storm runoff carries high concentrations of suspended solids (SS), which suggests that PFC transport is via SS. In Marina Bay, PFCs are deposited in the sediments along with the SS. In sediments, the total PFC concentration was 4,700 ng kg(-1), approximately 200 times higher than in the bottom water layers. Total perfluoroalkyl sulfonates (PFSAs), particularly PFOS and 6:2 fluoro telomer sulfonate (6:2 FtS) were dominant PFCs in the sediments. PFC sorption by sediments varied with perfluorocarbon chain length, type of functional group and sediment characteristics. A first approximation analysis based on SS transport suggested that the annual PFC input into the reservoir was approximately 35 ± 12 kg y(-1). Contributions of SS, dry weather flow of river/canals, and rainfall were approximately 70, 25 and 5%, respectively. This information will be useful for improving strategies to protect the reservoir from PFC contamination.

  14. DESICCATION INDEX: A MEASURE OF DAMAGE CAUSED BY ADVERSE AERIAL EXPOSURE ON INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) IN AN OREGON (USA) ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) blade necrosis resulting from intertidal aerial exposure is describe. A desiccation index was developed to quantitatively assess this damage. This index was then used to evaluate the extent of desiccation damage across intertidal bathymetric slopes (st...

  15. DESICCATION INDEX: A MEASURE OF DAMAGE CAUSED BY ADVERSE AERIAL EXPOSURE ON INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA) IN AN OREGON (USA) ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) blade necrosis resulting from intertidal aerial exposure is describe. A desiccation index was developed to quantitatively assess this damage. This index was then used to evaluate the extent of desiccation damage across intertidal bathymetric slopes (st...

  16. Polyphenol-rich Avicennia marina leaf extracts induce apoptosis in human breast and liver cancer cells and in a nude mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Lu, Chung-Kuang; Tu, Ming-Chin; Chang, Jia-Hua; Chen, Yen-Ju; Tu, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hsiu-Chen

    2016-06-14

    Avicennia marina is the most abundant and common mangrove species and has been used as a traditional medicine for skin diseases, rheumatism, ulcers, and smallpox. However, its anticancer activities and polyphenol contents remain poorly characterized. Thus, here we investigated anticancer activities of secondary A. marina metabolites that were purified by sequential soxhlet extraction in water, ethanol, methanol, and ethyl acetate (EtOAc). Experiments were performed in three human breast cancer cell lines (AU565, MDA-MB-231, and BT483), two human liver cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7), and one normal cell line (NIH3T3). The chemotherapeutic potential of A. marina extracts was evaluated in a xenograft mouse model. The present data show that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves have the highest phenolic and flavonoid contents and anticancer activities and, following column chromatography, the EtOAc fractions F2-5, F3-2-9, and F3-2-10 showed higher cytotoxic effects than the other fractions. 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR profiles indicated that the F3-2-10 fraction contained avicennones D and E. EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves also suppressed xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in nude mice, suggesting that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves may provide a useful treatment for breast cancer.

  17. Marine Isolates of Trimastix marina Form a Plesiomorphic Deep-branching Lineage within Preaxostyla, Separate from Other Known Trimastigids (Paratrimastix n. gen.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianqian; Táborský, Petr; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Pánek, Tomáš; Čepička, Ivan; Simpson, Alastair G B

    2015-09-01

    Trimastigids are free-living, anaerobic protists that are closely related to the symbiotic oxymonads, forming together the taxon Preaxostyla (Excavata: Metamonada). We isolated fourteen new strains morphologically corresponding to two species assigned to Trimastix (until now the only genus of trimastigids), Trimastix marina and Trimastix pyriformis. Unexpectedly, marine strains of Trimastix marina branch separately from freshwater strains of this morphospecies in SSU rRNA gene trees, and instead form the sister group of all other Preaxostyla. This position is confirmed by three-gene phylogenies. Ultrastructural examination of a marine isolate of Trimastix marina demonstrates a combination of trimastigid-like features (e.g. preaxostyle-like I fibre) and ancestral characters (e.g. absence of thickened flagellar vane margins), consistent with inclusion of marine T. marina within Preaxostyla, but also supporting its distinctiveness from 'freshwater T. marina' and its deep-branching position within Preaxostyla. Since these results indicate paraphyly of Trimastix as currently understood, we transfer the other better-studied trimastigids to Paratrimastix n. gen. and Paratrimastigidae n. fam. The freshwater form previously identified as T. marina is described as Paratrimastix eleionoma n. sp., and Trimastix pyriformis becomes Paratrimastix pyriformis n. comb. Because of its phylogenetic position, 'true' Trimastix is potentially important for understanding the evolution of mitochondrion-related organelles in metamonads.

  18. Polyphenol-rich Avicennia marina leaf extracts induce apoptosis in human breast and liver cancer cells and in a nude mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ming-Chin; Chang, Jia-Hua; Chen, Yen-Ju; Tu, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Hsiu-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Avicennia marina is the most abundant and common mangrove species and has been used as a traditional medicine for skin diseases, rheumatism, ulcers, and smallpox. However, its anticancer activities and polyphenol contents remain poorly characterized. Thus, here we investigated anticancer activities of secondary A. marina metabolites that were purified by sequential soxhlet extraction in water, ethanol, methanol, and ethyl acetate (EtOAc). Experiments were performed in three human breast cancer cell lines (AU565, MDA-MB-231, and BT483), two human liver cancer cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7), and one normal cell line (NIH3T3). The chemotherapeutic potential of A. marina extracts was evaluated in a xenograft mouse model. The present data show that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves have the highest phenolic and flavonoid contents and anticancer activities and, following column chromatography, the EtOAc fractions F2-5, F3-2-9, and F3-2-10 showed higher cytotoxic effects than the other fractions. 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR profiles indicated that the F3-2-10 fraction contained avicennones D and E. EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves also suppressed xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumor growth in nude mice, suggesting that EtOAc extracts of A. marina leaves may provide a useful treatment for breast cancer. PMID:27078842

  19. The role of marinas and recreational boating in the occurrence and distribution of exotic caprellids (Crustacea: Amphipoda) in the Western Mediterranean: Mallorca Island as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Macarena; Vázquez-Luis, Maite; Guerra-García, José M.

    2013-10-01

    In the Mediterranean Sea, the number of alien marine crustacean species has increased over the past two decades. However, knowledge about small alien marine crustaceans, like caprellid amphipods, is still very scarce. To understand the role of marinas and recreational boating in the early step of the invasion process by non-indigenous caprellids, we studied the recreational boating pressure and the spatial distribution of caprellid species in Mallorca Island. We collected caprellids from 14 marinas and 9 exposed intertidal rocky shores between November 2011 and April 2012 and we analyzed the differences in habitat use of native and exotic caprellids. Eight caprellid species, six native and two exotic, were found. Alien caprellids were only present in marinas, reaching high densities of population. The analysis of recreational boating pressure reveals that Palma-Migjorn is the area that is subject to the highest potential risk of introduction of exotic species via ship fouling. In the secondary dispersal of alien caprellids, the study reflects that recreational boating seems effective as a secondary vector in the transport of exotic species from marinas to marinas but not from marinas to natural and exposed areas. An illustrated key of caprellids from Balearic Island is provided to differentiate native and non-indigenous species.

  20. Rhabdias paraensis sp. nov.: a parasite of the lungs of Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from Brazilian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jeannie Nascimento dos; Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Nascimento, Luciana de Cássia Silva do; Nascimento, Daisy Esther Batista do; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Furtado, Adriano Penha

    2011-06-01

    The nematode parasites of Rhinella marina include species of the genus Rhabdias (Rhabdiasidae: Rhabditoidea). The present study describes Rhabdias paraensis sp. nov., which parasitizes the lungs of R. marina in Brazilian Amazonia. Of the more than 70 known species of this genus, 18 are parasites of bufonids, of which, eight are Neotropical. The new species described here is similar to Rhabdias alabialis in the absence of lips is different by the presence of conspicuous cephalic papillae. We describe details of the four rows of pores, which are distributed equally along the whole of the length of the body and connected with hypodermal cells, using histology and scanning electron microscopy. Other histological aspects of the internal structure of this nematode are also described.

  1. [Marina de Vasconcellos and the social sciences in Rio de Janeiro: a study of the social circles].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Adelia Maria Miglievich

    2008-06-01

    An investigation of the career of one of the "founding mothers" of the social sciences in Rio de Janeiro, Marina de Vasconcellos, successor of Arthur Ramos, is one way of understanding how anthropology was established in Rio de Janeiro. Conflicts and alliances, continuities and discontinuities, lie behind the pioneering Brazilian Society of Anthropology and Ethnology and the Institute of Social Sciences, both at Faculdade Nacional de Filosofia. Marina de Vasconcellos' professional life bore the marks of the clash between different schools of thought regarding anthropology at a time when university courses were being introduced. As a professor, she was committed to educating new professionals, and in 1968, she was steadfast in the struggle for university autonomy. The study leads to a reflection upon the criteria for success in academia, countering the view that this depends entirely on the publication of books and articles.

  2. High-quality-draft genome sequence of the yellow-pigmented flavobacterium Joostella marina type strain (En5(T)).

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, Erko; Chertkov, Olga; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Han, Cliff; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Tapia, Roxanne; Goodwin, Lynne A; Bruce, David; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Pagani, Ioanna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Rohde, Manfred; Tindall, Brian J; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Detter, John C; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2013-04-15

    At present, Joostella marina Quan et al. 2008 is the sole species with a validly published name in the genus Joostella, family Flavobacteriacae, phylum Bacteriodetes. It is a yellow-pigmented, aerobic, marine organism about which little has been reported other than the chemotaxonomic features required for initial taxonomic description. The genome of J. marina strain En5(T) complements a list of 16 Flavobacteriaceae strains for which complete genomes and draft genomes are currently available. Here we describe the features of this bacterium, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first member of the genus Joostella for which a complete genome sequence becomes available. The 4,508,243 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,944 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes is part of the G enomic E ncyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Susceptibility of seagrass to oil spills: A case study with eelgrass, Zostera marina in San Francisco Bay, USA.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Mark; Piniak, Gregory A; Cosentino-Manning, Natalie

    2017-02-15

    Existing literature illustrates inconsistent responses of seagrasses to oil exposure, both in the field and in the laboratory. Here, we add a new study that combined morphometric, demographic and photophysiology assessments to determine the potential oiling impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) from the 2007 Cosco Busan event in San Francisco Bay. Shoot densities, reproductive status, and rhizome elongation of Z. marina were examined at sites with pre-spill data, and eelgrass photosynthetic efficiency was measured post-spill. Shoot densities and percent elongation of rhizome internodes formed after the oil spill varied but with no consistent relationship to adjacent shoreline cleanup assessment team (SCAT) oiling categories. Similarly, differences in seagrass photosynthetic efficiency were not consistent with SCAT oiling categories. While thresholds for negative impacts on seagrass in general remain to be defined, conclusive oiling indicators for degree and duration of exposure would be important considerations and need examination under controlled study.

  4. Assessment of trace metal bioaccumulation by Avicennia marina (Forsk.) in the last remaining mangrove stands in Manila Bay, the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Ana Veronica S; Salmo, Severino G

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) were evaluated in the sediments, roots and leaves of a mangrove species (Avicennia marina) in Las Piñas-Parañaque Critical Habitat and Ecotourism Area (LPPCHEA), Manila Bay. The concentrations showed a general pattern of Zn > Pb > Cu > Cd in sediments, Cu > Pb > Zn > Cd in roots and Cu > Zn > Pb > Cd in leaves. The trace metal concentrations in both sediments and plant tissues were below contamination threshold levels. Based on computed bioaccumulation indices, A. marina could be used for the phytostabilization and phytoextraction of Cu and Cd. The LPPCHEA mangrove ecosystem is an ecologically important ecosystem that will limit the spread of trace metals to the surrounding environment.

  5. Geohydrology of deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site at Marina, Monterey County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanson, Randall T.; Everett, Rhett; Newhouse, Mark W.; Crawford, Steven M.; Pimentel, M. Isabel; Smith, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    In 2000, a deep-aquifer system monitoring-well site (DMW1) was completed at Marina, California to provide basic geologic and hydrologic information about the deep-aquifer system in the coastal region of the Salinas Valley. The monitoring-well site contains four wells in a single borehole; one completed from 930 to 950 feet below land surface (bls) in the Paso Robles Formation (DMW1-4); one 1,040 to 1,060 feet below land surface in the upper Purisima Formation (DMW1-3); one from 1,410 to 1,430 feet below land surface in the middle Purisima Formation (DMW1-2); and one from 1,820 to 1,860 feet below land surface in the lower Purisima Formation (DMW1-1). The monitoring site is installed between the coast and several deep-aquifer system supply wells in the Marina Coast Water District, and the completion depths are within the zones screened in those supply wells. Sediments below a depth of 955 feet at DMW1 are Pliocene age, whereas the sediments encountered at the water-supply wells are Pleistocene age at an equivalent depth. Water levels are below sea level in DMW1 and the Marina Water District deep-aquifer system supply wells, which indicate that the potential for seawater intrusion exists in the deep-aquifer system. If the aquifers at DMW1 are hydraulically connected with the submarine outcrops in Monterey Bay, then the water levels at the DMW1 site are 8 to 27 feet below the level necessary to prevent seawater intrusion. Numerous thick fine-grained interbeds and confining units in the aquifer systems retard the vertical movement of fresh and saline ground water between aquifers and restrict the movement of seawater to narrow water-bearing zones in the upper-aquifer system.Hydraulic testing of the DMW1 and the Marina Water District supply wells indicates that the tested zones within the deep-aquifer system are transmissive water-bearing units with hydraulic conductivities ranging from 2 to 14.5 feet per day. The hydraulic properties of the supply wells and monitoring

  6. Growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinity: development and function of shoot hydraulic systems require saline conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hoa T.; Stanton, Daniel E.; Schmitz, Nele; Farquhar, Graham D.; Ball, Marilyn C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Halophytic eudicots are characterized by enhanced growth under saline conditions. This study combines physiological and anatomical analyses to identify processes underlying growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinities ranging from fresh- to seawater conditions. Methods Following pre-exhaustion of cotyledonary reserves under optimal conditions (i.e. 50 % seawater), seedlings of A. marina were grown hydroponically in dilutions of seawater amended with nutrients. Whole-plant growth characteristics were analysed in relation to dry mass accumulation and its allocation to different plant parts. Gas exchange characteristics and stable carbon isotopic composition of leaves were measured to evaluate water use in relation to carbon gain. Stem and leaf hydraulic anatomy were measured in relation to plant water use and growth. Key Results Avicennia marina seedlings failed to grow in 0–5 % seawater, whereas maximal growth occurred in 50–75 % seawater. Relative growth rates were affected by changes in leaf area ratio (LAR) and net assimilation rate (NAR) along the salinity gradient, with NAR generally being more important. Gas exchange characteristics followed the same trends as plant growth, with assimilation rates and stomatal conductance being greatest in leaves grown in 50–75 % seawater. However, water use efficiency was maintained nearly constant across all salinities, consistent with carbon isotopic signatures. Anatomical studies revealed variation in rates of development and composition of hydraulic tissues that were consistent with salinity-dependent patterns in water use and growth, including a structural explanation for low stomatal conductance and growth under low salinity. Conclusions The results identified stem and leaf transport systems as central to understanding the integrated growth responses to variation in salinity from fresh- to seawater conditions. Avicennia marina was revealed as an obligate halophyte

  7. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine.

    PubMed

    Castro, Daniel B A; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M E; Silva, Bárbara P da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R B; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G; Lacerda, Gileno V Jr; Nery, Mariana B P; Gomes, Milene B; Souza, Salatiel S de; Silva, Thiago M da; Rodrigues, Viviane D; Paulino, Luciana C; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F C; Ottoboni, Laura M M

    2015-09-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest.

  8. High-quality draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6, an actinobacterium isolated from a copper mine

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Daniel B.A.; Pereira, Letícia Bianca; Silva, Marcus Vinícius M. e; Silva, Bárbara P. da; Palermo, Bruna Rafaella Z.; Carlos, Camila; Belgini, Daiane R.B.; Limache, Elmer Erasmo G.; Lacerda, Gileno V. Jr; Nery, Mariana B.P.; Gomes, Milene B.; Souza, Salatiel S. de; Silva, Thiago M. da; Rodrigues, Viviane D.; Paulino, Luciana C.; Vicentini, Renato; Ferraz, Lúcio F.C.; Ottoboni, Laura M.M.

    2015-01-01

    An actinobacterial strain, designated SO9-6, was isolated from a copper iron sulfide mineral. The organism is Gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic, and coccoid. Chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic properties were consistent with its classification in the genus Kocuria. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria marina SO9-6 under accession JROM00000000 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/725823918), which provides insights for heavy metal bioremediation and production of compounds of biotechnological interest. PMID:26484219

  9. Growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinity: development and function of shoot hydraulic systems require saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa T; Stanton, Daniel E; Schmitz, Nele; Farquhar, Graham D; Ball, Marilyn C

    2015-02-01

    Halophytic eudicots are characterized by enhanced growth under saline conditions. This study combines physiological and anatomical analyses to identify processes underlying growth responses of the mangrove Avicennia marina to salinities ranging from fresh- to seawater conditions. Following pre-exhaustion of cotyledonary reserves under optimal conditions (i.e. 50% seawater), seedlings of A. marina were grown hydroponically in dilutions of seawater amended with nutrients. Whole-plant growth characteristics were analysed in relation to dry mass accumulation and its allocation to different plant parts. Gas exchange characteristics and stable carbon isotopic composition of leaves were measured to evaluate water use in relation to carbon gain. Stem and leaf hydraulic anatomy were measured in relation to plant water use and growth. Avicennia marina seedlings failed to grow in 0-5% seawater, whereas maximal growth occurred in 50-75% seawater. Relative growth rates were affected by changes in leaf area ratio (LAR) and net assimilation rate (NAR) along the salinity gradient, with NAR generally being more important. Gas exchange characteristics followed the same trends as plant growth, with assimilation rates and stomatal conductance being greatest in leaves grown in 50-75% seawater. However, water use efficiency was maintained nearly constant across all salinities, consistent with carbon isotopic signatures. Anatomical studies revealed variation in rates of development and composition of hydraulic tissues that were consistent with salinity-dependent patterns in water use and growth, including a structural explanation for low stomatal conductance and growth under low salinity. The results identified stem and leaf transport systems as central to understanding the integrated growth responses to variation in salinity from fresh- to seawater conditions. Avicennia marina was revealed as an obligate halophyte, requiring saline conditions for development of the transport systems

  10. Structure, Aboveground Biomass, and Soil Characterization of Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park, Abu Dhabi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsumaiti, Tareefa Saad Sultan

    Mangrove forests are national treasures of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and other arid countries with limited forested areas. Mangroves form a crucial part of the coastal ecosystem and provide numerous benefits to society, economy, and especially the environment. Mangrove trees, specifically Avicennia marina, are studied in their native habitat in order to characterize their population structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties. This study focused on Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park in Abu Dhabi, which was the first mangrove protected area to be designated in UAE. In situ measurements were collected to estimate Avicennia marina status, mortality rate (%), height (m), crown spread (m), stem number, diameter at breast height (cm), basal area (m), and aboveground biomass (t ha-1 ). Small-footprint aerial light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data acquired by UAE were processed to characterize mangrove canopy height and aboveground biomass density. This included extraction of LIDAR-derived height percentile statistics, segmentation of the forest into structurally homogenous units, and development of regression relationships between in situ reference and remote sensing data using a machine learning approach. An in situ soil survey was conducted to examine the soils' physical and chemical properties, fertility status, and organic matter. The data of soil survey were used to create soil maps to evaluate key characteristics of soils, and their influence on Avicennia marina in Eastern Mangrove Lagoon National Park. The results of this study provide new insights into Avicennia marina canopy population, structure, aboveground biomass, and soil properties in Abu Dhabi, as data in such arid environments is lacking. This valuable information can help in managing and preserving this unique ecosystem.

  11. Massisteria marina has a sister: Massisteria voersi sp. nov., a rare species isolated from coastal waters of the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Mylnikov, Alexander P; Weber, Felix; Jürgens, Klaus; Wylezich, Claudia

    2015-08-01

    For many years, the genus Massisteria (Cercozoa, Leucodictyida) comprised only one species, M. marina. This small species has a biphasic life cycle and feeds through filose, radiating pseudopodia. It has a distinct swimming form and is regularly detected in association with detritus aggregates. However, environmental sequences closely related to this species indicate a larger species richness than hitherto described for the genus Massisteria. Here we provide the first report of Massisteria voersi sp. nov., investigated with microscopic and molecular methods. Several strains of this new species were isolated from brackish water at a Baltic Sea coastal monitoring station. Their characteristics are typical of the genus. Massisteria voersi differs from M. marina by smaller cell size (2.3-3 μm vs. 2.5-9 μm) and absent fused motile cells. Additionally, in contrast to M. marina, the new species lacks a paranuclear body and its kinetosomes are arranged in parallel. Both species are quite distantly related regarding their 18S rRNA gene sequences. The sparse availability of environmental sequences closely related to M. voersi as well as our preliminary results from fluorescence in situ hybridization studies suggest that this new species is a representative of low-abundance populations comprising the so-called "rare biosphere." Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of conventional and biodegradable microplastics on a marine ecosystem engineer (Arenicola marina) and sediment nutrient cycling.

    PubMed

    Green, Dannielle Senga; Boots, Bas; Sigwart, Julia; Jiang, Shan; Rocha, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Effects of microplastic pollution on benthic organisms and ecosystem services provided by sedimentary habitats are largely unknown. An outdoor mesocosm experiment was done to realistically assess the effects of three different types of microplastic pollution (one biodegradable type; polylactic acid and two conventional types; polyethylene and polyvinylchloride) at increasing concentrations (0.02, 0.2 and 2% of wet sediment weight) on the health and biological activity of lugworms, Arenicola marina (Linnaeus, 1758), and on nitrogen cycling and primary productivity of the sediment they inhabit. After 31 days, A. marina produced less casts in sediments containing microplastics. Metabolic rates of A. marina increased, while microalgal biomass decreased at high concentrations, compared to sediments with low concentrations or without microplastics. Responses were strongest to polyvinylchloride, emphasising that different materials may have differential effects. Each material needs to be carefully evaluated in order to assess their risks as microplastic pollution. Overall, both conventional and biodegradable microplastics in sandy sediments can affect the health and behaviour of lugworms and directly or indirectly reduce primary productivity of these habitats.

  13. Dietary supplementation of Avicennia marina extract on immune protection and disease resistance in Amphiprion sebae against Vibrio alginolyticus.

    PubMed

    Dhayanithi, Nagarajan Balachandran; Kumar, Thipramalai Thankappan Ajith; Arockiaraj, Jesu; Balasundaram, Chellam; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy

    2015-07-01

    The effect of Avicennia marina aqueous leaf extract on innate immune mechanisms such as total white blood cell counts (WBC), serum lysozyme activity, respiratory burst assay, alternative complement (ACH50) assay, phagocytic activity assay, disease resistance, gut bacteria, and survival rate of clownfish (Amphiprion sebae) against Vibrio alginolyticus is reported. Healthy fish challenged with V. alginolyticus (1 × 10(7) cells ml(-1)) were fed with diets supplemented (0, 1, 2, and 4%) with A. marina extract. The survival rate was 85% and 80% in infected fish fed with 4% and 8% supplementation diet; with 1% diet it was 70% while in the infected untreated group it was only 10%. The total gut bacteria flora was high in 8% and 4% supplementation diet groups with 2.8 × 10(5) and 4.7 × 10(4) cfu/g while it was 8.9 × 10(3) cfu/g in 1% diet group. The immunological parameters significantly increased on weeks 6 and 8 when infected fish were fed with 1% or 4% supplementation diet. This study reports that in clownfish challenged with V. alginolyticus, dietary administration of the 1% or 4% of A. marina extract improved the immune status and survival rate.

  14. Population structure of Zostera marina (eelgrass) on the western Atlantic coast is characterized by poor connectivity and inbreeding.

    PubMed

    Campanella, James J; Bologna, Paul A; Smalley, John V; Rosenzweig, Eric B; Smith, Stephanie M

    2010-01-01

    Zostera marina (eelgrass) can be found in the North Atlantic on the coast of Europe and on the east and west coasts of North America. Over the last 30 years, this once robust species has been reduced to sparse patchy populations due to disease and anthropogenic effects. In order to better understand the consequences of this devastation on the population genetics of the species, we have analyzed the population structure of western Atlantic Z. marina, employing microsatellite DNA polymorphisms. Although high fixation index values suggest moderate genetic differentiation among most of the Z. marina sites, population diversity was low. This lack of diversity was supported by a general dearth of observable heterozygotes in these sites; mean observed heterozygosity values (0.14-0.46) were lower than the mean expected heterozygosity values (0.57-0.81). Additionally, the mean F(IS) (coefficient of local inbreeding) values in these sites were positive, again indicating a surfeit of homozygotes. Allelic richness suggests that Chesapeake Bay has the greatest internal genetic diversity of the sites studied. Inbreeding seems prevalent in these American populations, suggesting possible reproductive fitness problems in the future. There is evidence of demographic bottlenecking and particularly low genetic diversity in Long Island. Northern Maine had the highest effective population size, suggesting a possible use in future restoration projects.

  15. Long-term exposure of polychaetes to caffeine: Biochemical alterations induced in Diopatra neapolitana and Arenicola marina.

    PubMed

    Pires, Adília; Almeida, Ângela; Calisto, Vânia; Schneider, Rudolf J; Esteves, Valdemar I; Wrona, Frederick J; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-07-01

    In the last decade studies have reported the presence of several pharmaceutical drugs in aquatic environments worldwide and an increasing effort has been done to understand the impacts induced on wildlife. Among the most abundant drugs in the environment is caffeine, which has been reported as an effective chemical anthropogenic marker. However, as for the majority of pharmaceuticals, scarce information is available on the adverse effects of caffeine on marine benthic organisms, namely polychaetes which are the most abundant group of organisms in several aquatic ecossystems. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the biochemical alterations induced by environmentally relevant concentrations of caffeine on the polychaete species Diopatra neapolitana and Arenicola marina. The results obtained demonstrated that after 28 days exposure oxidative stress was induced in both species, especially noticed in A. marina, resulting from the incapacity of antioxidant and biotransformation enzymes to prevent cells from lipid peroxidation. The present study further revealed that D. neapolitana used glycogen and proteins as energy to develop defense mechanisms while in A. marina these reserves were maintained independently on the exposure concentration, reinforcing the low capacity of this species to fight against oxidative stress.

  16. Texture and composition of the Rosa Marina beach sands (Adriatic coast, southern Italy): a sedimentological/ecological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Massimo; Tropeano, Marcello; Loon, A. J. (Tom) van; Acquafredda, Pasquale; Baldacconi, Rossella; Festa, Vincenzo; Lisco, Stefania; Mastronuzzi, Giuseppe; Moretti, Vincenzo; Scotti, Rosa

    2016-06-01

    Beach sands from the Rosa Marina locality (Adriatic coast, southern Italy) were analysed mainly microscopically in order to trace the source areas of their lithoclastic and bioclastic components. The main cropping out sedimentary units were also studied with the objective to identify the potential source areas of lithoclasts. This allowed to establish how the various rock units contribute to the formation of beach sands. The analysis of the bioclastic components allows to estimate the actual role of organisms regarding the supply of this material to the beach. Identification of taxa that are present in the beach sands as shell fragments or other remains was carried out at the genus or family level. Ecological investigation of the same beach and the recognition of sub-environments (mainly distinguished on the basis of the nature of the substrate and of the water depth) was the key topic that allowed to establish the actual source areas of bioclasts in the Rosa Marina beach sands. The sedimentological analysis (including a physical study of the beach and the calculation of some statistical parameters concerning the grain-size curves) shows that the Rosa Marina beach is nowadays subject to erosion.

  17. Annual variation of biomass and photosynthesis in Zostera marina L. along the Pacific Coast of Baja California, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro; Munoz-Salazar, R.; Ward, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Density, biomass, morphology, phenology and photosynthetic characteristics of Zostera marina were related to continuous measurements of in situ irradiance, attenuation coefficient and temperature at three coastal lagoons in Baja California, Mexico. In situ irradiance was approximately two-fold lower at San Quintin Bay (SQ) than at Ojo de Liebre Lagoon (OL) and San Ignacio Lagoon (SI). As a consequence of the greater irradiance plants at OL and SI were established 1 m deeper within the water column than those at SQ. At SQ, there was a four-fold variation in biomass of Z. marina caused by changes on shoot length and not shoot density, while at OL and SI biomass and shoot length did not fluctuate significantly throughout the year. Reproductive shoot density reached maximum values concomitantly with the greater irradiance during spring-summer, however, the density was approximately three-fold greater at SQ than at the southern coastal lagoons. While irradiance levels were two-fold greater at the southern lagoons, in general, photosynthetic characteristics were similar among all three lagoons. The hours of light saturated photosynthesis, calculated from their photosynthetic characteristics and irradiance measurements, suggest that photosynthesis of shoots from OL and SI are saturated for more than 6 h per day throughout the year, while shoots from SQ are likely light limited during approximately 15% of the year. Consequently, an increase in attenuation coefficient values in the water column will likely decrease light availability to Z. marina plants at SQ, potentially decreasing their survival.

  18. Anonymous nuclear loci in the white-faced storm-petrel Pelagodroma marina and their applicability to other Procellariiform seabirds.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica C; Duarte, Margarida A; Coelho, M Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Procellariiform seabirds are among the avian species with the fastest rates of extinction due to interactions with fisheries and introduction of alien predators to the breeding colonies. Conservation and management policies targeting populations of these species must include information on colony demographics and levels of isolation and genetic markers go a long way toward providing reliable estimates of these parameters. To this end, we report isolation and characterization of 14 anonymous nuclear loci, with average length of 657 bp, in the pelagic seabird White-faced Storm-petrel Pelagodroma marina, a species for which there is virtually no genetic information available. These loci, initially isolated from a genomic library built from P. marina, were further tested, for a range of conditions, in 7 other species representing all Procellariiform families. We found high levels of cross-species amplification success, varying between 79% and 86% in representatives of Diomedeidae, Procellariidae, Pelecanoididae, and other Hydrobatidae. We also sequenced 11 loci for 22 P. marina individuals and report higher levels of anonymous genetic variation (π = 0.002), with an average of 1 single nucleotide polymorphism every 100 bp surveyed, relative to the levels found on a typically variable intron in avian species. These markers will be a valuable tool in future population genetics and phylogenetic studies, particularly of nonmodel seabird species.

  19. Forest structure and litter production of naturally re-generated white mangrove Avicennia marina in sub-tropical estuarine coast.

    PubMed

    Abu Hena, M K; Sidik, B Japar; Idris, M H; Nesarul, M H; Aysha, A; Islam, M S; Nazmul, H

    2015-09-01

    The present work deals with plant structure, phenology, litter production and decomposition of mangrove Avicennia marina in the newly re-generated mangrove forest in sub-tropical coast. The natural generation in this accreted coastal land of mono-specific A. marina forest stand was prominent, with 45% seedlings and 32% saplings. Peak flowering and fruiting were noticed in May and August, respectively. Reproductive components contribute countable percent into the total litter production during the peak flowering (60%) and fruiting (86%) season. The percentage of leaf litter fall fluctuated throughout the year and contributed 13-99% (73% in average) of the total litter production of 11.53 tones ha(-1)'yr(-1). The total litter production differed with season and influenced by local climate, pore water salinity and phenology of the mangrove. The naturally generated young (7 years) A. marina with 1.8 m height produced more leaf litter as compared to similar tree height elsewhere. Decomposition rate was related to season, with higher litter loss during rainy season which could help cycling nutrients and support estuarine food web by supplying organic matter into the sub-tropical coastal environment.

  20. Bioaccumulation and distribution of metals in sediments and Avicenna marina tissues in the Hara Biosphere Reserve, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Mohsen; Pourkhabbaz, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohammadreza

    2012-10-01

    The metal pollution in Sediments and Avicenna marina tissues in the Hara Biosphere Reserve was monitored for Lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd), and Nickel (Ni) with atomic absorption spectrometer. The results showed that the mean concentration of Pb, Cd, and Ni in the water and sediments were much higher than the recommended threshold limits in the most stations, also the highest means of Pb, Cd, and Ni were observed in Avicenna roots and it were 25.26 ± 4.86, 2.17 ± 0.74, and 26.72 ± 6.17 (μg g(-1)) respectively. Calculating BCF (bioconcentration factor) index illustrates that A. marina accumulates Pb, Cd, and Ni 1.62, 1.52 and 0.73 times greater than sediment levels respectively, So it can show that A. marina may be employed as a biological indicator exposure of Cd, Pb, and Ni with temporal monitoring, also the factories were main sources of metals contamination in the Hara Biosphere Reserve.

  1. Influence of Zostera marina canopies on unidirectional flow, hydraulic roughness and sediment movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, A.; Thompson, C. E. L.; Amos, C. L.

    2010-09-01

    Seagrasses develop extensive or patchy underwater meadows in coastal areas around the world, forming complex, highly productive ecosystems. Seagrass canopies exert strong effects on water flow inside and around them, thereby affecting flow structure, sediment transport and benthic ecology. The influence of Zostera marina canopies on flow velocity, turbulence, hydraulic roughness and sediment movement was evaluated through laboratory experiments in 2 flumes and using live Z. marina and a mobile sand bed. Profiles of instantaneous velocities were measured and sediment movement was identified upstream, within and downstream of patches of different sizes and shoot density and at different free-stream velocities. Flow structure was characterised by time-averaged velocity, turbulence intensity and Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE). When velocity data were available above the canopy, they were fitted to the Law of the Wall and shear velocities and roughness lengths were calculated. When a seagrass canopy was present, three layers were distinguishable in the water column: (1) within canopy represented by low velocities and high turbulence; (2) transition zone around the height of the canopy, where velocities increased, turbulence decreased and TKE was high; and (3) above canopy where velocities were equal or higher than free-stream velocities and turbulence and TKE were lower than below. Shoot density and patch-width influenced this partitioning of the flow when the canopy was long enough (based on flume experiments, at least more than 1 m-long). The enhanced TKE observed at the canopy/water interface suggests that large-scale turbulence is generated at the canopy surface. These oscillations, likely to be related to the canopy undulations, are then broken down within the canopy and high-frequency turbulence takes place near the bed. This turbulence 'cascade' through the canopy may have an important impact on biogeochemical processes. The velocity above the canopy generally

  2. Ecophysiological differences between three mangrove seedlings (Kandelia obovata, Aegiceras corniculatum, and Avicennia marina) exposed to chilling stress.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ya-Lan; Wang, You-Shao; Fei, Jiao; Sun, Cui-Ci; Cheng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Although the cold-resistant ability of mangroves varies greatly with species, the physiological mechanism remains unclear. The chilling stress effects on morphological changes, photosynthetic pigments, reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and several antioxidants, were studied in leaves of three mangrove seedlings (Kandelia obovata, Aegiceras corniculatum and Avicennia marina). Results showed that both K. obovata and A. corniculatum exhibited lighter chilling damage, lower chilling injury rates and higher survival rates compared to A. marina. Reductions of chlorophylls (Chls) were observed in all the three mangroves, and the highest was detected in A. marina. Significant increases in content of ROS (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2; hydroxyl radicals, OH⋅) and MDA were observed in both A. marina and A. corniculatum, whereas chilling stressed K. obovata showed a decrease in H2O2 content, constant OH⋅ level and instantaneous increase of MDA. The contents of proline and water-soluble protein exhibited similar stress-time dependent increases in all mangroves, while A. corniculatum showed the highest increase of proline and relatively higher increase of water-soluble protein. The catalase activities significantly decreased with stress time in all mangroves, while K. obovata showed the least reduction. An increase in ascorbic acid (AsA) content and activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were also detected in all the three mangroves, while K. obovata showed the highest increases. These results indicate that chilling-tolerance of mangroves is associated with the efficiency of antioxidants, as confirmed by principal component analysis. The AsA, APX and POD in K. obovata may play more important role in control of oxidative stresses than those in the other two species. Furthermore, the higher cold-resistance of A. corniculatum compared to A. marina may be partly associated with its higher proline accumulation. The

  3. The MARINA model (Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs): Model description and results for China.

    PubMed

    Strokal, Maryna; Kroeze, Carolien; Wang, Mengru; Bai, Zhaohai; Ma, Lin

    2016-08-15

    Chinese agriculture has been developing fast towards industrial food production systems that discharge nutrient-rich wastewater into rivers. As a result, nutrient export by rivers has been increasing, resulting in coastal water pollution. We developed a Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs (MARINA) for China. The MARINA Nutrient Model quantifies river export of nutrients by source at the sub-basin scale as a function of human activities on land. MARINA is a downscaled version for China of the Global NEWS-2 (Nutrient Export from WaterSheds) model with an improved approach for nutrient losses from animal production and population. We use the model to quantify dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) export by six large rivers draining into the Bohai Gulf (Yellow, Hai, Liao), Yellow Sea (Yangtze, Huai) and South China Sea (Pearl) in 1970, 2000 and 2050. We addressed uncertainties in the MARINA Nutrient model. Between 1970 and 2000 river export of dissolved N and P increased by a factor of 2-8 depending on sea and nutrient form. Thus, the risk for coastal eutrophication increased. Direct losses of manure to rivers contribute to 60-78% of nutrient inputs to the Bohai Gulf and 20-74% of nutrient inputs to the other seas in 2000. Sewage is an important source of dissolved inorganic P, and synthetic fertilizers of dissolved inorganic N. Over half of the nutrients exported by the Yangtze and Pearl rivers originated from human activities in downstream and middlestream sub-basins. The Yellow River exported up to 70% of dissolved inorganic N and P from downstream sub-basins and of dissolved organic N and P from middlestream sub-basins. Rivers draining into the Bohai Gulf are drier, and thus transport fewer nutrients. For the future we calculate further increases in river export of nutrients. The MARINA Nutrient model quantifies the main sources of coastal water pollution for sub-basins. This information can contribute to formulation of

  4. Larger body size at metamorphosis enhances survival, growth and performance of young cane toads (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Guzmán, Elisa; Crossland, Michael R; Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Body size at metamorphosis is a key trait in species (such as many anurans) with biphasic life-histories. Experimental studies have shown that metamorph size is highly plastic, depending upon larval density and environmental conditions (e.g. temperature, food supply, water quality, chemical cues from conspecifics, predators and competitors). To test the hypothesis that this developmental plasticity is adaptive, or to determine if inducing plasticity can be used to control an invasive species, we need to know whether or not a metamorphosing anuran's body size influences its subsequent viability. For logistical reasons, there are few data on this topic under field conditions. We studied cane toads (Rhinella marina) within their invasive Australian range. Metamorph body size is highly plastic in this species, and our laboratory studies showed that larger metamorphs had better locomotor performance (both on land and in the water), and were more adept at catching and consuming prey. In mark-recapture trials in outdoor enclosures, larger body size enhanced metamorph survival and growth rate under some seasonal conditions. Larger metamorphs maintained their size advantage over smaller siblings for at least a month. Our data support the critical but rarely-tested assumption that all else being equal, larger body size at metamorphosis is likely to enhance an individual's long term viability. Thus, manipulations to reduce body size at metamorphosis in cane toads may help to reduce the ecological impact of this invasive species.

  5. Phylogeographic differentiation versus transcriptomic adaptation to warm temperatures in Zostera marina, a globally important seagrass.

    PubMed

    Jueterbock, A; Franssen, S U; Bergmann, N; Gu, J; Coyer, J A; Reusch, T B H; Bornberg-Bauer, E; Olsen, J L

    2016-11-01

    Populations distributed across a broad thermal cline are instrumental in addressing adaptation to increasing temperatures under global warming. Using a space-for-time substitution design, we tested for parallel adaptation to warm temperatures along two independent thermal clines in Zostera marina, the most widely distributed seagrass in the temperate Northern Hemisphere. A North-South pair of populations was sampled along the European and North American coasts and exposed to a simulated heatwave in a common-garden mesocosm. Transcriptomic responses under control, heat stress and recovery were recorded in 99 RNAseq libraries with ~13 000 uniquely annotated, expressed genes. We corrected for phylogenetic differentiation among populations to discriminate neutral from adaptive differentiation. The two southern populations recovered faster from heat stress and showed parallel transcriptomic differentiation, as compared with northern populations. Among 2389 differentially expressed genes, 21 exceeded neutral expectations and were likely involved in parallel adaptation to warm temperatures. However, the strongest differentiation following phylogenetic correction was between the three Atlantic populations and the Mediterranean population with 128 of 4711 differentially expressed genes exceeding neutral expectations. Although adaptation to warm temperatures is expected to reduce sensitivity to heatwaves, the continued resistance of seagrass to further anthropogenic stresses may be impaired by heat-induced downregulation of genes related to photosynthesis, pathogen defence and stress tolerance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Copper treatment during storage reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of Zostera marina seeds used for restoration.

    PubMed

    Govers, Laura L; van der Zee, Els M; Meffert, Johan P; van Rijswick, Patricia C J; Man In 't Veld, Willem A; Heusinkveld, Jannes H T; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2017-02-22

    Restoration is increasingly considered an essential tool to halt and reverse the rapid decline of vital coastal ecosystems dominated by habitat-forming foundation species such as seagrasses. However, two recently discovered pathogens of marine plants, Phytophthora gemini and Halophytophthora sp. Zostera, can seriously hamper restoration efforts by dramatically reducing seed germination. Here, we report on a novel method that strongly reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seeds. Seeds were stored in seawater with three different copper sulphate concentrations (0.0, 0.2, 2.0 ppm) crossed with three salinities (0.5, 10.0, 25.0 ppt). Next to reducing seed germination, infection significantly affected cotyledon colour: 90% of the germinated infected seeds displayed a brown cotyledon upon germination that did not continue development into the seedling stage, in contrast to only 13% of the germinated non-infected seeds. Copper successfully reduced infection up to 86% and the 0.2 ppm copper sulphate treatment was just as successful as the 2.0 ppm treatment. Infection was completely eliminated at low salinities, but green seed germination was also dramatically lowered by 10 times. We conclude that copper sulphate treatment is a suitable treatment for disinfecting Phytophthora or Halophytophthora infected eelgrass seeds, thereby potentially enhancing seed-based restoration success.

  7. Muricauda marina sp. nov., isolated from marine snow of Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Yang, Xiaoting; Wang, Yanan; Liu, Yuyang; Ren, Qiaomeng; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2017-07-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, long rod-shaped, non-motile, strictly aerobic bacterial strain, designated H19-56T, was isolated from a surface marine snow sample collected from the Yellow Sea near China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that H19-56T represented a member of the genus Muricauda and showed the highest sequence similarity to Muricauda ruestringensis B1T (96.9 %). H19-56T grew optimally at pH 8.0, 32 °C and in the presence of 3 % (w/v) NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 43.6 mol%. H19-56T contained MK-6 as the predominant respiratory quinone and had iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C15 : 1G as the major cellular fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and three unidentified lipids. On the basis of the results of the polyphasic analyses, this isolate was considered to represent a novel species of the genus Muricauda, for which the name Muricauda marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H19-56T (CGMCC 1.15774T=JCM 31456T=MCCC 1K03196T=KCTC 52374T).

  8. Genomic and proteomic characterization of two novel siphovirus infecting the sedentary facultative epibiont cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Millard, Andrew D; Wheatley, Peter J; Holmes, Antony B; Mohr, Remus; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Larkum, Anthony W D; Hess, Wolfgang R; Scanlan, David J; Clokie, Martha R J

    2015-11-01

    Acaryochloris marina is a symbiotic species of cyanobacteria that is capable of utilizing far-red light. We report the characterization of the phages A-HIS1 and A-HIS2, capable of infecting Acaryochloris. Morphological characterization of these phages places them in the family Siphoviridae. However, molecular characterization reveals that they do not show genetic similarity with any known siphoviruses. While the phages do show synteny between each other, the nucleotide identity between the phages is low at 45-67%, suggesting they diverged from each other some time ago. The greatest number of genes shared with another phage (a myovirus infecting marine Synechococcus) was four. Unlike most other cyanophages and in common with the Siphoviridae infecting Synechococcus, no photosynthesis-related genes were found in the genome. CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) spacers from the host Acaryochloris had partial matches to sequences found within the phages, which is the first time CRISPRs have been reported in a cyanobacterial/cyanophage system. The phages also encode a homologue of the proteobacterial RNase T. The potential function of RNase T in the mark-up or digestion of crRNA hints at a novel mechanism for evading the host CRISPR system. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A genetic perspective on rapid evolution in cane toads (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Rollins, Lee A; Richardson, Mark F; Shine, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The process of biological invasion exposes a species to novel pressures, in terms of both the environments it encounters and the evolutionary consequences of range expansion. Several invaders have been shown to exhibit rapid evolutionary changes in response to those pressures, thus providing robust opportunities to clarify the processes at work during rapid phenotypic transitions. The accelerating pace of invasion of cane toads (Rhinella marina) in tropical Australia during its 80-year history has been well characterized at the phenotypic level, including common-garden experiments that demonstrate heritability of several dispersal-relevant traits. Individuals from the invasion front (and their progeny) show distinctive changes in morphology, physiology and behaviour that, in combination, result in far more rapid dispersal than is true of conspecifics from long-colonized areas. The extensive body of work on cane toad ecology enables us to place into context studies of the genetic basis of these traits. Our analyses of differential gene expression from toads from both ends of this invasion-history transect reveal substantial upregulation of many genes, notably those involved in metabolism and cellular repair. Clearly, then, the dramatically rapid phenotypic evolution of cane toads in Australia has been accompanied by substantial shifts in gene expression, suggesting that this system is well suited to investigating the genetic underpinnings of invasiveness. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Factors affecting PAH residues in the lugworm Arenicola marina, a sediment feeding polychaete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaag, N. H. B. M.; Scholten, M. C. Th.; Van Straalen, N. M.

    1998-12-01

    Being a sediment feeder, the lugworm Arenicola marina could be a suitable candidate organism for the biomonitoring of sediment-bound contaminants in intertidal areas. Since lugworms are only rarely used in environmental monitoring, little is known about the natural variation in their body residue levels. In this study, we assessed the importance of seasonal fluctuations, spatial variation and sexual development to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) residues in lugworms. Over a period of 15 months, lugworms were sampled along a contamination gradient in the Western Scheldt estuary in the Netherlands. A clear seasonal pattern in the body residue levels of PAH was observed, with lowest levels in March and highest levels just prior to the spawning season in September. During the spawning season the body residue levels showed a marked decrease. Although this seasonal pattern is apparently related to the reproductive cycle of the lugworm, no clear differences in body residue levels were found between animals with or without developed gonads. The contamination gradient, present in the estuary, was clearly reflected in the body residue levels of PAH. The expected gradient of internal concentrations was, however, absent in October, when the spawning period was not yet finished. The variation in lugworm body residue levels was smaller than the fluctuations in sediment PAH levels. It can be concluded that the lugworm is a suitable organism for the biomonitoring of sediment-bound contaminants, provided that attention is paid to its reproductive cycle.

  11. A new species of Mesocoelium (Digenea: Mesocoeliidae) found in Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from Brazilian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Tássia F F; Melo, Francisco T V; Giese, Elane G; Furtado, Adriano P; Gonçalves, Evonnildo C; Santos, Jeannie N

    2013-04-01

    Mesocoelium lanfrediae sp. nov. (Digenea: Mesocoeliidae) inhabits the small intestine of Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) and is described here, with illustrations provided by light, scanning electron microscopy and molecular approachs. M. lanfrediae sp. nov. presents the typical characteristics of the genus, but is morphometrically and morphologically different from the species described previously. The main diagnostic characteristics of M. lanfrediae sp. nov. are (i) seven pairs of regularly-distributed spherical papillae on the oral sucker, (ii) ventral sucker outlined by four pairs of papillae distributed in a uniform pattern and interspersed with numerous spines, which are larger at the posterior margin and (iii) small, rounded tegumentary papillae around the opening of the oral sucker, which are morphologically different from those of the oral sucker itself, some of which are randomly disposed in the ventrolateral tegumentary region of the anterior third of the body. Addionally, based on SSU rDNA, a phylogenetic analysis including Brachycoeliidae and Mesocoeliidae taxa available on GenBank established the close relationship between M. lanfrediae sp. nov. and Mesocoelium sp.

  12. Ortleppascaris sp. and your host Rhinella marina: A proteomic view into a nematode–amphibian relationship

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jefferson Pereira e; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento dos

    2014-01-01

    The success of the helminth–host relationship depends on a biochemical molecular arsenal. Perhaps the proteome is the largest and most important set of this weaponry, in which the proteins have a crucial role in vital processes to the parasite/host relationship, from basic metabolism and energy production to complex immune responses. Nowadays, the bioproducts expressed by the parasites are under the “spotlight” of immunoassays and biochemical analysis in helminthology, especially in proteomic analysis, which has provided valuable information about the physiology of the infecting agent. Looking into this point of view, why not turn to the infected agent as well? This study characterised the proteomic profile of fluid-filled fibrous cysts of encapsulated Ortleppascaris sp. larvae in the hepatic parenchyma of their intermediate host, the amphibian Rhinella marina. The proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by MS with the aid of Peptide Mass Fingerprint. A total of 54 molecules were analysed in this system, revealing a complex protein profile with molecules related to basic metabolic processes of the parasite, energy production, oxi-reduction and oxidative stress processes as well as molecules related to the host response. This study contributes to proteomic studies of protein markers of the development, infectivity, virulence and co-existence of helminths and their hosts. PMID:25161910

  13. Ortleppascaris sp. and your host Rhinella marina: A proteomic view into a nematode-amphibian relationship.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jefferson Pereira E; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento Dos

    2014-08-01

    The success of the helminth-host relationship depends on a biochemical molecular arsenal. Perhaps the proteome is the largest and most important set of this weaponry, in which the proteins have a crucial role in vital processes to the parasite/host relationship, from basic metabolism and energy production to complex immune responses. Nowadays, the bioproducts expressed by the parasites are under the "spotlight" of immunoassays and biochemical analysis in helminthology, especially in proteomic analysis, which has provided valuable information about the physiology of the infecting agent. Looking into this point of view, why not turn to the infected agent as well? This study characterised the proteomic profile of fluid-filled fibrous cysts of encapsulated Ortleppascaris sp. larvae in the hepatic parenchyma of their intermediate host, the amphibian Rhinella marina. The proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by MS with the aid of Peptide Mass Fingerprint. A total of 54 molecules were analysed in this system, revealing a complex protein profile with molecules related to basic metabolic processes of the parasite, energy production, oxi-reduction and oxidative stress processes as well as molecules related to the host response. This study contributes to proteomic studies of protein markers of the development, infectivity, virulence and co-existence of helminths and their hosts.

  14. Granulosicoccus coccoides sp. nov., isolated from leaves of seagrass (Zostera marina).

    PubMed

    Kurilenko, Valerie V; Christen, Richard; Zhukova, Natalia V; Kalinovskaya, Nataliya I; Mikhailov, Valery V; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2010-04-01

    A non-pigmented, motile, Gram-negative bacterium, strain Z 271(T), was isolated from the surface of leaves of the seagrass Zostera marina which was collected in Troitza Bay (Sea of Japan, Pacific Ocean). The new isolate grew between 5 degrees C and 28 degrees C and was slightly halophilic, tolerating environments containing up to 5 % (w/v) NaCl. Strain Z 271(T) was able to degrade Tweens 20, 40 and 80 and partially degrade gelatin, but was unable to degrade casein. Phosphatidylethanolamine (36.9 %) and phosphatidylglycerol (63.1 %) were the predominant phospholipids. The major fatty acids included C(18 : 1)omega7c (43.7 %), C(16 : 1)omega7c (31.1 %) and C(16 : 0) (16.8 %). The main respiratory quinone was Q-8. The DNA-DNA relatedness value of strain Z 271(T) with Granulosicoccus antarcticus IMCC3135(T) was 35 %. The G+C content of the DNA of strain Z 271(T) was 60.2 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain Z 271(T) represents a novel species of the genus Granulosicoccus for which the name Granulosicoccus coccoides sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Z 271(T) (=KMM 6014(T)=CIP 109923(T)).

  15. Jejuia marina nov., isolated from gravel adjacent to Geommeolle beach on Udo Island, South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyangmi; Yang, Jae-Hyung; Cha, Hyung-Kee; Lee, Jae-Bong; Suh, Seok-Jong; Bae, Kyung Sook; Park, Doo-Sang

    2015-11-01

    A bacterial strain, JH03(T), was isolated from gravel adjacent to Geommeolle beach on Udo Island, South Korea. The cells were Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-motile and rod shaped. The ranges of temperature, pH and NaCl concentration for growth of the bacterium were 10-45 °C, pH 6.0-9.5 and 0.5-5.0 % (w/v), respectively. The major fatty acids of the bacterium were iso-C(15:0) (15.4 %), iso-C(15:1) G (14.1 %), iso-C(16:0) 3-OH (14.1 %), iso-C(17:0) 3-OH (11.5 %) and anteiso-C(15:0) (11.3 %). The major isoprenoid quinone was MK-6. The polar lipids included phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified amino lipids and three unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content was 34.2 mol%. The phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain JH03(T) was most closely related to Jejuia pallidilutea EM39(T) (96.5 % sequence similarity). Based on the polyphasic analysis, strain JH03(T) is a novel species of the genus Jejuia, for which the name Jejuia marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JH03(T) (= KCTC 42342(T) = JCM 30601(T)).

  16. Aerenchyma tissue development and gas-pathway structure in root of Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh.

    PubMed

    Purnobasuki, Hery; Suzuki, Mitsuo

    2005-08-01

    The aerenchyma differentiation in cable roots, pneumatophores, anchor roots, and feeding roots of the mangrove plant, Avicennia marina (Verbenaceae) was analyzed using a light microscope and scanning electron microscope. In all types, cortex cells were arranged in longitudinal columns extending from the endodermis to the epidermis. No cells in the cortex had intercellular spaces at the root tip (0-150 microm), and aerenchyma started developing at 200 microm from the root apex. The aerenchyma formation was due to cell separation (schizogeny) rather than cell lysis. The cell separation occurred between the longitudinal cell columns, forming long intercellular spaces along the root axis. During aerenchyma formation, the cortex cells enlarged longitudinally by 1.8-3.9 times and widened horizontally by 2.2-2.9 times. As a result, the aerenchyma had a pronounced tubular structure that was radially long, elliptical or oval in cross section and that ran parallel to the root axis. The tube had tapering ends, as did vessel elements, although there were no perforated plates. The interconnection between neighboring tubes was made by abundant small pores or canals that were schizogenous intercellular spaces between the wall cells. All aerenchyma tubes in the root were interconnected by these small pores serving as a gas pathway.

  17. Giant toads (Rhinella marina) living in agricultural areas have altered spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Krista A; Amato, Ciro M; Guillette, Louis J; St Mary, Colette M

    2017-08-04

    Across diverse taxa, germ cell development is controlled by an intricate cascade of processes that are tightly controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Endocrine disturbances, such as those induced by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can negatively affect spermatogenesis. Here, we investigate whether spermatogenesis is altered in the giant toad, Rhinella marina, living in agricultural areas where EDCs are used relative to suburban areas. We also ask if reductions in spermatogenesis were associated with developmental gonadal abnormalities (intersex) found in the same frogs. We found that toads in agricultural areas exhibited reduced spermatogenesis relative to non-agricultural animals, and that those reductions were not associated with gross gonadal abnormalities. All toads living in agricultural areas had reduced spermatogenesis relative to those living in non-agricultural areas regardless of whether they had gonadal abnormalities originating during development. Similarities in reproductive dysfunction among diverse taxa living in agricultural areas, including humans, suggest that many vertebrate taxa living in agricultural areas around the globe are likely experiencing some level of reproductive dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Excitation energy transfer in phycobiliproteins of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina investigated by spectral hole burning.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Jörg; Rätsep, Margus; Golub, Maksym; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Artene, Petrica; Eckert, Hann-Jörg

    2017-09-01

    The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina developed two types of antenna complexes, which contain chlorophyll-d (Chl d) and phycocyanobilin (PCB) as light-harvesting pigment molecules, respectively. The latter membrane-extrinsic complexes are denoted as phycobiliproteins (PBPs). Spectral hole burning was employed to study excitation energy transfer and electron-phonon coupling in PBPs. The data reveal a rich spectral substructure with a total of four low-energy electronic states whose absorption bands peak at 633, 644, 654, and at about 673 nm. The electronic states at ~633 and 644 nm can be tentatively attributed to phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC), respectively. The remaining low-energy electronic states including the terminal emitter at 673 nm may be associated with different isoforms of PC, APC, or the linker protein. Furthermore, the hole burning data reveal a large number of excited state vibrational frequencies, which are characteristic for the chromophore PCB. In summary, the results are in good agreement with the low-energy level structure of PBPs and electron-phonon coupling parameters reported by Gryliuk et al. (BBA 1837:1490-1499, 2014) based on difference fluorescence line-narrowing experiments.

  19. [Absorption and distribution of K, Na and Mg in Avicennia marina seedlings under cadmium stress].

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi-qiang; Chen, Chang-xu; Ma, Li; Zheng, Wen-jiao

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, mangrove seedlings Avicennia marina were treated with various contents of cadmium (0, 0.5, 5, 25, 50, 100, 150 mg · L(-1)). These seedlings were cultivated by man-made seawater with a salinity of 15 in sand for 90 days in a greenhouse. The absorption and distribution of elements contents (K, Na and Mg) under cadmium stress were investigated at 45th and 90th day, respectively. The results showed that the enrichment of cadmium in the different components of seedlings increased with the increasing cadmium stress level and exposure time. The cadmium contents in roots and cotyledons were relatively higher than in the other components, accounting for 66.9% and 16.3% of cadmium in the seedlings under the 150 mg · L(-1) cadmium stress, respectively. The fall of cotyledons could reduce the damage of cadmium stress to the whole seedlings. The Na contents increased in roots and stems and decreased in leaves and cotyledons after cadmium stress for 90 days. The K content decreased in roots and cotyledons, while had no significant change in stems and leaves. The Mg content in roots, stems, leaves and cotyledons of seedlings treated with cadmium for 90 days were lower than those of the control, and were negatively related to the cadmium content.

  20. Policy plans and management measures to restore eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, V. N.; de Jong, D. J.; van Katwijk, M. M.

    2000-07-01

    The Dutch Wadden Sea has been changed dramatically over the last centuries by human activities like land reclamation and different forms of fishery. This has, amongst other things, led to changes in the number of biological communities. One of the changes was the near extinction of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in the Dutch Wadden Sea. The deterioration of the area led to policy plans in the late 1980s that aimed at restoring the original natural communities of which the eelgrass community was one. This paper presents a restoration strategy which contains a selection procedure for suitable transplantation sites. The selection procedure is based on factors such as sediment composition, exposure time, current velocity and wave action. These were combined in a GIS-based map integrating these factors. One important action in the restoration process is to increase the number of freshwater discharge points to meet the requirements of the brackish water community in general and the growing conditions for eelgrass in particular.

  1. Conservation of eelgrass (Zostera marina) genetic diversity in a mesocosm-based restoration experiment.

    PubMed

    Ort, Brian S; Cohen, C Sarah; Boyer, Katharyn E; Reynolds, Laura K; Tam, Sheh May; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2014-01-01

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) forms the foundation of an important shallow coastal community in protected estuaries and bays. Widespread population declines have stimulated restoration efforts, but these have often overlooked the importance of maintaining the evolutionary potential of restored populations by minimizing the reduction in genetic diversity that typically accompanies restoration. In an experiment simulating a small-scale restoration, we tested the effectiveness of a buoy-deployed seeding technique to maintain genetic diversity comparable to the seed source populations. Seeds from three extant source populations in San Francisco Bay were introduced into eighteen flow-through baywater mesocosms. Following seedling establishment, we used seven polymorphic microsatellite loci to compare genetic diversity indices from 128 shoots to those found in the source populations. Importantly, allelic richness and expected heterozygosity were not significantly reduced in the mesocosms, which also preserved the strong population differentiation present among source populations. However, the inbreeding coefficient F IS was elevated in two of the three sets of mesocosms when they were grouped according to their source population. This is probably a Wahlund effect from confining all half-siblings within each spathe to a single mesocosm, elevating F IS when the mesocosms were considered together. The conservation of most alleles and preservation of expected heterozygosity suggests that this seeding technique is an improvement over whole-shoot transplantation in the conservation of genetic diversity in eelgrass restoration efforts.

  2. An oxidative and salinity stress induced peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase from Avicennia marina: molecular and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Kumaresan; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2008-01-01

    APX (EC, 1.11.1.11) has a key role in scavenging ROS and in protecting cells against their toxic effects in algae and higher plants. A cDNA encoding a peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase, Am-pAPX1, was isolated from salt stressed leaves of Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. by EST library screening and its expression in the context of various environmental stresses was investigated. Am-pAPX1 contains an ORF of 286 amino acids coding for a 31.4 kDa protein. The C-terminal region of the Am-pAPX1 ORF has a putative transmembrane domain and a peroxisomal targeting signal (RKKMK), suggesting peroxisomal localization. The peroxisomal localization of Am-pAPX1 was confirmed by stable transformation of the GFP-(Ala)(10)-Am-pAPX1 fusion in tobacco. RNA blot analysis revealed that Am-pAPX1 is expressed in response to salinity (NaCl) and oxidative stress (high intensity light, hydrogen peroxide application and excess iron). The isolated genomic clone of Am-pAPX1 was found to contain nine exons. A fragment of 1616bp corresponding to the 5' upstream region of Am-pAPX1 was isolated by TAIL-PCR. In silico analysis of this sequence reveals the presence of putative light and abiotic stress regulatory elements.

  3. Expression pattern of arenicins-the antimicrobial peptides of polychaete Arenicola marina.

    PubMed

    Maltseva, Arina L; Kotenko, Olga N; Kokryakov, Vladimir N; Starunov, Viktor V; Krasnodembskaya, Anna D

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses of invertebrate animals are mediated through innate mechanisms, among which production of antimicrobial peptides play an important role. Although evolutionary Polychaetes represent an interesting group closely related to a putative common ancestor of other coelomates, their immune mechanisms still remain scarcely investigated. Previously our group has identified arenicins-new antimicrobial peptides of the lugworm Arenicola marina, since then these peptides were thoroughly characterized in terms of their structure and inhibitory potential. In the present study we addressed the question of the physiological functions of arenicins in the lugworm body. Using molecular and immunocytochemical methods we demonstrated that arencins are expressed in the wide range of the lugworm tissues-coelomocytes, body wall, extravasal tissue and the gut. The expression of arenicins is constitutive and does not depend on stimulation of various infectious stimuli. Most intensively arenicins are produced by mature coelomocytes where they function as killing agents inside the phagolysosome. In the gut and the body wall epithelia arenicins are released from producing cells via secretion as they are found both inside the epithelial cells and in the contents of the cuticle. Collectively our study showed that arenicins are found in different body compartments responsible for providing a first line of defense against infections, which implies their important role as key components of both epithelial and systemic branches of host defense.

  4. Expression pattern of arenicins—the antimicrobial peptides of polychaete Arenicola marina

    PubMed Central

    Maltseva, Arina L.; Kotenko, Olga N.; Kokryakov, Vladimir N.; Starunov, Viktor V.; Krasnodembskaya, Anna D.

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses of invertebrate animals are mediated through innate mechanisms, among which production of antimicrobial peptides play an important role. Although evolutionary Polychaetes represent an interesting group closely related to a putative common ancestor of other coelomates, their immune mechanisms still remain scarcely investigated. Previously our group has identified arenicins—new antimicrobial peptides of the lugworm Arenicola marina, since then these peptides were thoroughly characterized in terms of their structure and inhibitory potential. In the present study we addressed the question of the physiological functions of arenicins in the lugworm body. Using molecular and immunocytochemical methods we demonstrated that arencins are expressed in the wide range of the lugworm tissues—coelomocytes, body wall, extravasal tissue and the gut. The expression of arenicins is constitutive and does not depend on stimulation of various infectious stimuli. Most intensively arenicins are produced by mature coelomocytes where they function as killing agents inside the phagolysosome. In the gut and the body wall epithelia arenicins are released from producing cells via secretion as they are found both inside the epithelial cells and in the contents of the cuticle. Collectively our study showed that arenicins are found in different body compartments responsible for providing a first line of defense against infections, which implies their important role as key components of both epithelial and systemic branches of host defense. PMID:25566093

  5. Helminth infracommunity of the cane toad Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae) within its native distribution range.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Torres, Nallely; García-Prieto, Luis; Lagunas-Calvo, Omar; Violante-González, Juan; Osorio-Sarabia, David

    2017-10-01

    During August 2010, a total of 66 cane toad Rhinella marina were collected in Laguna de Coyuca, Guerrero, Mexico and examined for the presence of helminths. Ninety-two percent were parasitized by 1 or more parasite species. A total of 4624 individuals were found, belonging to 8 helminth taxa (1 digenean, 1 cestode and 6 nematodes). Infracommunities harbored by this host species are highly variable (mean Jaccard similarity index 0.31±0.27); mean percent similarity index 0.26±0.32) and depauperate (mean richness 1.91±0.92; mean abundance 64.4±100.34); almost 50% of them were dominated by Rhabdias fuelleborni, a skin-penetrating nematode. Differences related to host gender and size were found, since males registered infracommunities with lower species richness and diversity than females. The reproductive condition of females (collected during the breeding season) might explain the results obtained; during this season, females invest less in resistance to infection in favor of investing resources in reproduction. However, confirmation of this statement can only be made by sampling in the dry season, when the toads do not reach their reproductive peak. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune Response Varies with Rate of Dispersal in Invasive Cane Toads (Rhinella marina)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gregory P.; Shine, Richard

    2014-01-01

    What level of immunocompetence should an animal maintain while undertaking long-distance dispersal? Immune function (surveillance and response) might be down-regulated during prolonged physical exertion due to energy depletion, and/or to avoid autoimmune reactions arising from damaged tissue. On the other hand, heightened immune vigilance might be favored if the organism encounters novel pathogens as it enters novel environments. We assessed the links between immune defense and long-distance movement in a population of invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Australia. Toads were radio-tracked for seven days to measure their activity levels and were then captured and subjected to a suite of immune assays. Toads that moved further showed decreased bacteria-killing ability in their plasma and decreased phagocytic activity in their whole blood, but a heightened skin-swelling response to phytohemagglutinin. Baseline and post-stress corticosterone levels were unrelated to distance moved. Thus, long-distance movement in cane toads is associated with a dampened response in some systems and enhanced response in another. This pattern suggests that sustained activity is accompanied by trade-offs among immune components rather than an overall down or up-regulation. The finding that high mobility is accompanied by modification of the immune system has important implications for animal invasions. PMID:24936876

  7. Assessing establishment success of Zostera marina transplants through measurements of shoot morphology and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Tao; Kim, Jong-Hyeob; Park, Jung-Im; Lee, Kun-Seop

    2010-07-01

    Since significant seagrass declines have been reported worldwide, numerous seagrass restoration projects through transplantation have been attempted in recent decades. In this study, Zostera marina shoots were transplanted into Jindong Bay on the southern coast of Korea in November 2006 to assess establishment success of the transplants to a new transplant environment. Shoot density, individual shoot weight, productivity, and morphological characteristics of transplants and reference plants in the vicinity of the planting site were monitored monthly for 13 months. Although shoot size of transplants was smaller than that of reference plants at the start of transplantation, individual shoot weight, leaf width, shoot height, and rhizome diameter of transplants increased rapidly, reaching even higher values than those of reference plants 5 months after transplantation. These results suggest that eelgrass transplants established morphologically 5 months after transplantation. Shoot productivity of transplants was lower than that of reference population during the first 5-6 months following transplantation, but became higher than that of reference population 6 months after transplantation. The higher transplant productivity was likely due to the lower shoot density at the transplant site than that at the reference population. Rapid changes in shoot morphology and growth of transplants indicated that eelgrass transplants had great morphological plasticity and established successfully in the new environment within 5-6 months. In addition to survival rates of transplants, monitoring of shoot morphology and growth appeared to be an effective approach for accurate assessment of the establishment success of eelgrass transplant.

  8. Temporal and spatial dynamics of ephemeral drift-algae in eelgrass, Zostera marina, beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Jonas Ribergaard; Pedersen, Morten Foldager; Olesen, Birgit; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Pedersen, Troels Møller

    2013-03-01

    Aggregations of unattached, filamentous macroalgae showed high temporal and spatial dynamics in two shallow and relatively sheltered eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds in Aarhus Bay and the Isefjord, Denmark. The changes in algal abundance were followed in permanent plots at 1-3 days intervals during three different periods of the growth season (May-September). Drift-algal assemblages were present within the 3000 m2 study areas in relatively high and constant abundance (>47% cover) throughout the study period. However, significant changes in average site cover did occur on short timescales (days) suggesting that variability in algal cover may be undetected in monthly assessments. The changes in cover were caused either by algal growth or by physical forces moving large aggregations of algae into or out of the study area. Within plots (1 m2) variability was even higher and algal cover changed regularly between observations (days). Hence, the algae were continuously rearranged within the eelgrass beds; also during periods with no change in average algal cover. The variability in cover of individual plots was negatively correlated to eelgrass cover, suggesting that algae were retained by the eelgrass leaves. This highly dynamic nature of filamentous macroalgal aggregations in eelgrass beds should be considered when evaluating implications of macroalgal blooms for seagrass growth and survival. A frequent relocation of drift-algae at small spatial scale may moderate the formation of poor oxygen conditions within mats and shorten the duration of exposure experienced by individual shoots.

  9. Effects of Bioadvection by Arenicola marina on Microphytobenthos in Permeable Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chennu, Arjun; Volkenborn, Nils; de Beer, Dirk; Wethey, David S.; Woodin, Sarah A.; Polerecky, Lubos

    2015-01-01

    We used hyperspectral imaging to study short-term effects of bioturbation by lugworms (Arenicola marina) on the surficial biomass of microphytobenthos (MPB) in permeable marine sediments. Within days to weeks after the addition of a lugworm to a homogenized and recomposed sediment, the average surficial MPB biomass and its spatial heterogeneity were, respectively, 150-250% and 280% higher than in sediments without lugworms. The surficial sediment area impacted by a single medium-sized lugworm (~4 g wet weight) over this time-scale was at least 340 cm2. While sediment reworking was the primary cause of the increased spatial heterogeneity, experiments with lugworm-mimics together with modeling showed that bioadvective porewater transport from depth to the sediment surface, as induced by the lugworm ventilating its burrow, was the main cause of the increased surficial MPB biomass. Although direct measurements of nutrient fluxes are lacking, our present data show that enhanced advective supply of nutrients from deeper sediment layers induced by faunal ventilation is an important mechanism that fuels high primary productivity at the surface of permeable sediments even though these systems are generally characterized by low standing stocks of nutrients and organic material. PMID:26230398

  10. Restoring Resiliency: Case Studies from Pacific Northwest Estuarine Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of many ecological restoration projects is to establish an ecosystem with fully developed structure and function that exhibits resistance to and resilience from disturbances. Coastal restoration projects in the Pacific Northwest provide opportunities to understand what is required to restore the resilience of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) populations. Factors influencing resilience observed in three case studies of eelgrass restoration include minimum viable population, adaptations of transplant populations, and natural and anthropogenic disturbances at restoration sites. The evaluation of resiliency depends on selecting appropriate monitoring metrics and the frequency and duration of monitoring. Eelgrass area, cover and shoot density provide useful and reliable metrics for quantifying resilience of restored meadows. Further, five years of monitoring of these metrics provides data that can reasonably predict the long-term viability of a planted plot. Eelgrass appears to be a resilient ecosystem in general, though one that data suggest may exhibit tipping points brought about by compounded environmental conditions outside of its tolerance ranges. Explicit inclusion of resilience in the planning and practice of habitat restoration may reduce uncertainties and improve the performance of restored systems by increasing buffering capacity, nurturing sources of renewal (e.g., seeds and rhizomes), and managing for habitat forming and maintaining processes (e.g., sediment dynamics) at multiple scales.

  11. Coating of Sulfonic Silica onto Magnetite from Marina Beach Iron sand, Semarang, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmiyawati, C.; Suyati, L.; Taslimah; Anggraeni, R. D.

    2017-02-01

    The mineral iron oxide is the main component of sand iron that are abundant in nature. Mineral iron oxide not yet widely applied into more useful products. The main component of iron ore is magnetite. Magnetite can be used as a basic ingredient in the manufacture of magnetite-modified silica adsorbent sulfonate. In this research, the adsorbent made from sulfonic functionalized silica-coated magnetic particle has been successfully produced, with the magnetite was obtained from iron sand at Marina Beach, Semarang Indonesia. This adsorbent was then used as a metal ion preconcentration media. From the research that it was found that the sulfonic has been bound to the silica marked by the emergence of element S on EDX. Whilst, the evidence that silica has coated on the magnetite could be seen from the SEM images which showed the morphology of sulfonic functionalized silica-coated magnetic particles were larger than the sulfonic functionalized silica without magnetite. From the DSC results showed that the addition of magnetite on sulfonic functionalized silica did not change the heat resistance of the sulfonic functionalized silica. Based on the XRD patterns show that magnetite sulfonate silica was formed.

  12. Multiple stressors threaten the imperiled coastal foundation species eelgrass (Zostera marina) in Chesapeake Bay, USA.

    PubMed

    Lefcheck, Jonathan S; Wilcox, David J; Murphy, Rebecca R; Marion, Scott R; Orth, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Interactions among global change stressors and their effects at large scales are often proposed, but seldom evaluated. This situation is primarily due to lack of comprehensive, sufficiently long-term, and spatially extensive datasets. Seagrasses, which provide nursery habitat, improve water quality, and constitute a globally important carbon sink, are among the most vulnerable habitats on the planet. Here, we unite 31 years of high-resolution aerial monitoring and water quality data to elucidate the patterns and drivers of eelgrass (Zostera marina) abundance in Chesapeake Bay, USA, one of the largest and most valuable estuaries in the world, with an unparalleled history of regulatory efforts. We show that eelgrass area has declined 29% in total since 1991, with wide-ranging and severe ecological and economic consequences. We go on to identify an interaction between decreasing water clarity and warming temperatures as the primary drivers of this trend. Declining clarity has gradually reduced eelgrass cover the past two decades, primarily in deeper beds where light is already limiting. In shallow beds, however, reduced visibility exacerbates the physiological stress of acute warming, leading to recent instances of decline approaching 80%. While degraded water quality has long been known to influence underwater grasses worldwide, we demonstrate a clear and rapidly emerging interaction with climate change. We highlight the urgent need to integrate a broader perspective into local water quality management, in the Chesapeake Bay and in the many other coastal systems facing similar stressors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Digestive bioavailability to a deposit feeder (Arenicola marina) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with anthropogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Voparil, Ian M; Burgess, Robert M; Mayer, Lawrence M; Tien, Rex; Cantwell, Mark G; Ryba, Stephen A

    2004-11-01

    Marine sediments around urban areas serve as catch basins for anthropogenic particles containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using incubations with gut fluids extracted from a deposit-feeding polychaete (Arenicola marina), we determined the digestive bioavailability of PAHs from fly ashes, coal dusts, diesel soots, tire tread materials, and urban particulates. We found that gut fluids solubilize significant concentrations of PAHs from two tire treads, two diesel soots, and the urban particulates. However, PAHs in fly ashes and coal dusts were not available to the digestive agents in gut fluid. Potential digestive exposure to PAHs is much greater than that predicted to be available from these materials using equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP). Amending an already-contaminated sediment with fly ash decreased phenanthrene solubilization by gut fluid. In contrast, addition of tire tread to the sediment resulted in increased solubilization of four PAHs by gut fluid. Therefore, addition of certain types of anthropogenic particles to sediments may result in an increase in bioavailable PAHs rather than a net decrease, as predicted by EqP. Difficulty in predicting the amount of change due to amendment may be due to interactions occurring among the mixture of compounds solubilized by gut fluid.

  14. Disturbance of benthic infauna by sediment-reworking activities of the lugworm Arenicola marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flach, E. C.

    The influence of the lugworm Arenicola marina on the abundance of other benthic species was studied in the westernmost part of the Wadden Sea. Small squares (1 m 2) within depopulated 144-m 2 plots were recolonized with various (naturally-occurring) lugworm densities (0-10-20-40-80 and 0-25-50-75-100 per m 2). These plots were sampled during the summer. Lugworms were found to have a strongly negative effect on the densities of C. volutator. At 0-density lugworms, the numbers of C. volutator were high. These were halved at 17 lugworms per m 2 ( i.e. the mean density on the tidal flats of the Dutch Wadden Sea), and were further reduced at higher lugworm densities ( e.g. 20% remained at 40 lugworms per m 2). Laboratory observations of Corophium behaviour in the presence of Arenicola suggest that sediment-reworking lugworms stimulate Corophium to emigrate. Effects of lugworms on other benthic species were also studied in the same way. Lugworms were found to have strongly negative effects on the juvenile densities of various worm and bivalve species ( Nereis diversicolor, Nephtys hombergii, Heteromastus filiformis, Scoloplos armiger, Pygospio elegans, Capitella capitata and Mya arenaria, Cerastoderma edule, Macoma balthica, Angulus tenuis, respectively).

  15. Single-step pathway for synthesis of glucosylglycerate in Persephonella marina.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Chantal; Empadinhas, Nuno; da Costa, Milton S

    2007-06-01

    A single-step pathway for the synthesis of the compatible solute glucosylglycerate (GG) is proposed based on the activity of a recombinant glucosylglycerate synthase (Ggs) from Persephonella marina. The corresponding gene encoded a putative glycosyltransferase that was part of an operon-like structure which also contained the genes for glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (GpgS) and glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate phosphatase (GpgP), the enzymes that lead to the synthesis of GG through the formation of glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate. The putative glucosyltransferase gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant product catalyzed the synthesis of GG in one step from ADP-glucose and d-glycerate, with K(m) values at 70 degrees C of 1.5 and 2.2 mM, respectively. This glucosylglycerate synthase (Ggs) was also able to use GDP- and UDP-glucose as donors to form GG, but the efficiencies were lower. Maximal activity was observed at temperatures between 80 and 85 degrees C, and Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) was required for catalysis. Ggs activity was maximal and remained nearly constant at pH values between 5.5 and pH 8.0, and the half-lives for inactivation were 74 h at 85 degrees C and 8 min at 100 degrees C. This is the first report of an enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of GG in one step and of the existence of two pathways for GG synthesis in the same organism.

  16. A new species of nematode (Molineidae) from Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) in Guerrero, México.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Torres, Nallely; García-Prieto, Luis; Osorio-Sarabia, David; Violante-González, Juan

    2013-06-01

    Oswaldocruzia lamotheargumedoi n. sp., inhabiting the intestine of the cane toad, Rhinella marina (L.), in Laguna de Coyuca, Guerrero, México, is described here. The new species differs from 10 congeners infecting bufonid hosts because it has a type I bursa. In contrast, 7 of these species have type II bursa and 3 more a type III bursa. The species most similar to the species described herein is Oswaldocruzia pipiens Walton, 1929 . These 2 species share traits such as body size, bursa type, presence of cervical alae, and dorsal ray morphology. Nevertheless, both species can be distinguished based on the number of synlophe ridges at mid-body (54-56 for O. lamotheargumedoi vs. 45-48 for O. pipiens) and by the presence of a chitinous support in the long, and well developed, cervical alae of O. pipiens. In the new species, these structures are short, poorly developed, and lack chitinous support. Previous records of species of Oswaldocruzia in México include Oswaldocruzia subauricularis (Rudolphi, 1819) Travassos, 1917 in the Neotropical Realm and O. pipiens in the Nearctic.

  17. A new species of Mesocoelium (Digenea: Mesocoeliidae) found in Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) from Brazilian Amazonia

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Tássia FF; Melo, Francisco TV; Giese, Elane G; Furtado, Adriano P; Gonçalves, Evonnildo C; Santos, Jeannie N

    2013-01-01

    Mesocoelium lanfrediaesp. nov. (Digenea: Mesocoeliidae) inhabits the small intestine of Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae) and is described here, with illustrations provided by light, scanning electron microscopy and molecular approachs. M. lanfrediae sp. nov. presents the typical characteristics of the genus, but is morphometrically and morphologically different from the species described previously. The main diagnostic characteristics of M. lanfrediae sp. nov. are (i) seven pairs of regularly-distributed spherical papillae on the oral sucker, (ii) ventral sucker outlined by four pairs of papillae distributed in a uniform pattern and interspersed with numerous spines, which are larger at the posterior margin and (iii) small, rounded tegumentary papillae around the opening of the oral sucker, which are morphologically different from those of the oral sucker itself, some of which are randomly disposed in the ventrolateral tegumentary region of the anterior third of the body. Addionally, based on SSU rDNA, a phylogenetic analysis including Brachycoeliidae and Mesocoeliidae taxa available on GenBank established the close relationship between M. lanfrediae sp. nov. and Mesocoelium sp. PMID:23579798

  18. Copper treatment during storage reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of Zostera marina seeds used for restoration

    PubMed Central

    Govers, Laura L.; van der Zee, Els M.; Meffert, Johan P.; van Rijswick, Patricia C. J.; Man in ‘t Veld, Willem A.; Heusinkveld, Jannes H. T.; van der Heide, Tjisse

    2017-01-01

    Restoration is increasingly considered an essential tool to halt and reverse the rapid decline of vital coastal ecosystems dominated by habitat-forming foundation species such as seagrasses. However, two recently discovered pathogens of marine plants, Phytophthora gemini and Halophytophthora sp. Zostera, can seriously hamper restoration efforts by dramatically reducing seed germination. Here, we report on a novel method that strongly reduces Phytophthora and Halophytophthora infection of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seeds. Seeds were stored in seawater with three different copper sulphate concentrations (0.0, 0.2, 2.0 ppm) crossed with three salinities (0.5, 10.0, 25.0 ppt). Next to reducing seed germination, infection significantly affected cotyledon colour: 90% of the germinated infected seeds displayed a brown cotyledon upon germination that did not continue development into the seedling stage, in contrast to only 13% of the germinated non-infected seeds. Copper successfully reduced infection up to 86% and the 0.2 ppm copper sulphate treatment was just as successful as the 2.0 ppm treatment. Infection was completely eliminated at low salinities, but green seed germination was also dramatically lowered by 10 times. We conclude that copper sulphate treatment is a suitable treatment for disinfecting Phytophthora or Halophytophthora infected eelgrass seeds, thereby potentially enhancing seed-based restoration success. PMID:28225072

  19. The Complex Transcriptional Response of Acaryochloris marina to Different Oxygen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A.; Lin, Yuankui; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ancient oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes produced oxygen as a waste product, but existed for a long time under an oxygen-free (anoxic) atmosphere, before an oxic atmosphere emerged. The change in oxygen levels in the atmosphere influenced the chemistry and structure of many enzymes that contained prosthetic groups that were inactivated by oxygen. In the genome of Acaryochloris marina, multiple gene copies exist for proteins that are normally encoded by a single gene copy in other cyanobacteria. Using high throughput RNA sequencing to profile transcriptome responses from cells grown under microoxic and hyperoxic conditions, we detected 8446 transcripts out of the 8462 annotated genes in the Cyanobase database. Two-thirds of the 50 most abundant transcripts are key proteins in photosynthesis. Microoxic conditions negatively affected the levels of expression of genes encoding photosynthetic complexes, with the exception of some subunits. In addition to the known regulation of the multiple copies of psbA, we detected a similar transcriptional pattern for psbJ and psbU, which might play a key role in the altered components of photosystem II. Furthermore, regulation of genes encoding proteins important for reactive oxygen species-scavenging is discussed at genome level, including, for the first time, specific small RNAs having possible regulatory roles under varying oxygen levels. PMID:27974439

  20. Solution structure and excitation energy transfer in phycobiliproteins of Acaryochloris marina investigated by small angle scattering.

    PubMed

    Golub, M; Combet, S; Wieland, D C F; Soloviov, D; Kuklin, A; Lokstein, H; Schmitt, F-J; Olliges, R; Hecht, M; Eckert, H-J; Pieper, J

    2017-04-01

    The structure of phycobiliproteins of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina was investigated in buffer solution at physiological temperatures, i.e. under the same conditions applied in spectroscopic experiments, using small angle neutron scattering. The scattering data of intact phycobiliproteins in buffer solution containing phosphate can be well described using a cylindrical shape with a length of about 225Å and a diameter of approximately 100Å. This finding is qualitatively consistent with earlier electron microscopy studies reporting a rod-like shape of the phycobiliproteins with a length of about 250 (M. Chen et al., FEBS Letters 583, 2009, 2535) or 300Å (J. Marquart et al., FEBS Letters 410, 1997, 428). In contrast, phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer lacking phosphate revealed a splitting of the rods into cylindrical subunits with a height of 28Å only, but also a pronounced sample aggregation. Complementary small angle neutron and X-ray scattering experiments on phycocyanin suggest that the cylindrical subunits may represent either trimeric phycocyanin or trimeric allophycocyanin. Our findings are in agreement with the assumption that a phycobiliprotein rod with a total height of about 225Å can accommodate seven trimeric phycocyanin subunits and one trimeric allophycocyanin subunit, each of which having a height of about 28Å. The structural information obtained by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering can be used to interpret variations in the low-energy region of the 4.5K absorption spectra of phycobiliproteins dissolved in buffer solutions containing and lacking phosphate, respectively.

  1. An ultrastructural study of spermatogenesis and sperm morula breakdown in Arenicola marina (L.) (Annelida: Polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacey, A. A.; Bentley, M. G.

    1992-06-01

    Spermatogenesis in the lugworm Arenicola marina, in common with other members of Arenicolidae, occurs in the coelomic fluid and results in the formation of discs of mature spermatozoa known as a morulae. Within a morula, individual spermatozoa are connected by a common mass of cytoplasm called the cytophore and therefore make up a syncitium. Immediately prior to spawning, and in response to an endocrine substance known as “Sperm Maturation Factor” (SMF), the structure of the sperm morulae breaks down and free spermatozoa are liberated. These are subsequently spawned from the body cavity. The investigation described here uses transmission electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructural changes, which accompany spermatogenesis and the breakdown of sperm morulae in response to SMF in vitro. The study demonstrates that the cytophore appears to have a key role both during spermatogenesis and during sperm morula breakdown. The ultrastructure of sperm morulae and of mature spermatozoa is described. The structure of spermatozoa is shown to be primitive with a single flagellum which appears to be coiled at its distal end. The phagocytosis of free spermatozoa by coelomocytes is also described and it is suggested that these may play a role in the resorption of unspawned gametes in vivo.

  2. The ichthyotoxic alga Chattonella marina induces Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase, and CFTR proteins expression in fish gill chloride cells in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Janet Y.M.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Au, Doris W.T. . E-mail: bhdwtau@cityu.edu.hk

    2007-02-02

    Our previous studies demonstrated that the ichthyotoxic Chattonella marina stimulated proliferation of branchial chloride cell (CC) and induced osmotic distress akin to hyperactive elimination of ions in fish (Rhabdosargus sarba). To ascertain the in vivo effects of C. marina on key CC ion transporters, the localization and expression of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase (NKA) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) proteins in response to C. marina exposure were investigated, using a quantitative immunocytochemical approach. The polarized distributions of NKA ({alpha} subunit) and CFTR proteins in branchial CCs of R. sarba remained unchanged under C. marina exposure. However, significant inductions of these two ion-transporters were detected in CCs of fish after 6 h exposure. By real-time PCR, no significant changes in gill NKA and CFTR mRNA expressions were detected, suggesting a post-transcriptional pathway is likely involved in regulating the ion transporters abundance. This study is the first to demonstrate the in vivo effects of harmful algal toxin on NKA and CFTR protein expressions in gill transepithelial cells. Taken together, an augmentation of branchial CCs together with hyper-stimulation of NKA and CFTR in CCs attribute to the rapid development of osmotic distress in C. marina susceptible fish.

  3. Metal bioaccumulation and physiological condition of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) reared in two shellfish basins and a marina in Normandy (northwest France).

    PubMed

    Séguin, A; Caplat, C; Serpentini, A; Lebel, J M; Menet-Nedelec, F; Costil, K

    2016-05-15

    A 5-month experiment combining a geochemical survey of metals with a bioaccumulation study in batches of Crassostrea gigas was conducted in two shellfish farming areas and a marina in Normandy (France). Various endpoints at different levels of biological organization were studied. ROCCH data showed differences in biota contamination between the two shellfish areas but the present study revealed only slight differences in metallic contamination and biomarkers. By contrast, significantly different values were recorded in the marina in comparison with the two other sites. Indeed, higher levels of Cd, Cu and Zn were measured in the oysters from the marina, and these oysters also showed a poorer physiological condition (e.g., condition index, histopathological alterations and neutral lipid content). For coastal monitoring, the multi-biomarker approach coupled with an assessment of metallic contamination in biota appeared to be suitable for discriminating spatial differences in environmental quality after only a few months of exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-Term Field Study Reveals Subtle Effects of the Invasive Alga Sargassum muticum upon the Epibiota of Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    DeAmicis, Stacey; Foggo, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can alter coastal ecosystems both directly, e.g. through competition for substratum and nutrients, and indirectly. Indirect effects may be mediated by creation of dissimilar or inimical habitats, changes in predator and/or prey assemblages, alterations in associated biota, and perturbations of water movement and thermal regimes. Previous studies have shown that invasive algae can modify native habitat architecture, disrupt intricately linked food webs and alter epibiotic assemblages. In the UK, the seagrass Zostera marina supports a diverse epibiotic assemblage, influencing key factors such as sediment dynamics, depositional regime and trophic linkages. Increasing encroachment of the invasive alga Sargassum muticum into seagrass meadows changes the physical and chemical characteristics of the local environment and creates the potential for changes in the epibionts associated with the seagrass blades, threatening the integrity of the seagrass ecosystem. We investigated the effects of S. muticum invasion upon the epibiota of Z. marina in a drowned river valley in SW England seasonally from spring to autumn over four years in an in-situ manipulative experiment, comparing permanent quadrats with and without artificially introduced S. muticum. Epibiota were weighed, identified to the most detailed operational taxonomic unit (OTU) possible, and unitary organisms were enumerated. Multivariate PERMANOVA+ analysis revealed significant differences in epibiont assemblages between Sargassum treatments. Linear mixed effects models indicated that differences in epibiota assemblage composition were not reflected as significant differences in mean biomass per sample, or number of epibiont OTUs per sample. We conclude that S. muticum invasion into Z. marina meadows may significantly alter the species composition and abundance distribution of epibiotic assemblages found on the blades of the seagrass. Thus S. muticum invasion could have more wide-reaching effects on

  5. High genetic diversity and fine-scale spatial structure in the marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) uncovered by microsatellite loci.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Chris D; Montagnes, David J S; Martin, Laura E; Watts, Phillip C

    2010-12-23

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1-6 and 7-23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (H(e)) of 0.00-0.30 and 0.81-0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional F(ST) values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01-0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms.

  6. High Genetic Diversity and Fine-Scale Spatial Structure in the Marine Flagellate Oxyrrhis marina (Dinophyceae) Uncovered by Microsatellite Loci

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Chris D.; Montagnes, David J. S.; Martin, Laura E.; Watts, Phillip C.

    2010-01-01

    Free-living marine protists are often assumed to be broadly distributed and genetically homogeneous on large spatial scales. However, an increasing application of highly polymorphic genetic markers (e.g., microsatellites) has provided evidence for high genetic diversity and population structuring on small spatial scales in many free-living protists. Here we characterise a panel of new microsatellite markers for the common marine flagellate Oxyrrhis marina. Nine microsatellite loci were used to assess genotypic diversity at two spatial scales by genotyping 200 isolates of O. marina from 6 broad geographic regions around Great Britain and Ireland; in one region, a single 2 km shore line was sampled intensively to assess fine-scale genetic diversity. Microsatellite loci resolved between 1–6 and 7–23 distinct alleles per region in the least and most variable loci respectively, with corresponding variation in expected heterozygosities (He) of 0.00–0.30 and 0.81–0.93. Across the dataset, genotypic diversity was high with 183 genotypes detected from 200 isolates. Bayesian analysis of population structure supported two model populations. One population was distributed across all sampled regions; the other was confined to the intensively sampled shore, and thus two distinct populations co-occurred at this site. Whilst model-based analysis inferred a single UK-wide population, pairwise regional FST values indicated weak to moderate population sub-division (0.01–0.12), but no clear correlation between spatial and genetic distance was evident. Data presented in this study highlight extensive genetic diversity for O. marina; however, it remains a substantial challenge to uncover the mechanisms that drive genetic diversity in free-living microorganisms. PMID:21203414

  7. Annual variations of biomass and photosynthesis in Zostera marina at its southern end of distribution in the North Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro; Munoz-Salazar, R.; Ward, D.H.

    2003-01-01

    Density, biomass, morphology, phenology and photosynthetic characteristics of Zostera marina were related to continuous measurements of in situ irradiance, attenuation coefficient and temperature at three coastal lagoons in Baja California, Mexico. In situ irradiance was approximately two-fold lower at San Quintin Bay (SQ) than at Ojo de Liebre Lagoon (OL) and San Ignacio Lagoon (SI). As a consequence of the greater irradiance, plants at OL and SI were established 1 m deeper within the water column than those at SQ. At SQ, there was a four-fold variation in biomass of Z. marina caused by changes on shoot length and not shoot density, while at OL and SI biomass and shoot length did not fluctuate significantly throughout the year. Reproductive shoot density reached maximum values concomitantly with the greatest irradiance during spring-summer, however, the density was approximately three-fold greater at SQ than at the southern coastal lagoons. While irradiance levels were two-fold greater at the southern lagoons, in general, photosynthetic characteristics were similar among all three lagoons. The hours of light saturated photosynthesis, calculated from their photosynthetic characteristics and irradiance measurements, suggest that photosynthesis of shoots from OL and SI are saturated for more than 6 h per day throughout the year, while shoots from SQ are likely light limited during approximately 15% of the year. Consequently, an increase in attenuation coefficient values in the water column will likely decrease light availability to Z. marina plants at SQ, potentially decreasing their survival. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of EST data of the marine protist Oxyrrhis marina, an emerging model for alveolate biology and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The alveolates include a large number of important lineages of protists and algae, among which are three major eukaryotic groups: ciliates, apicomplexans and dinoflagellates. Collectively alveolates are present in virtually every environment and include a vast diversity of cell shapes, molecular and cellular features and feeding modes including lifestyles such as phototrophy, phagotrophy/predation and intracellular parasitism, in addition to a variety of symbiotic associations. Oxyrrhis marina is a well-known model for heterotrophic protist biology, and is now emerging as a useful organism to explore the many changes that occurred during the origin and diversification of dinoflagellates by virtue of its phylogenetic position at the base of the dinoflagellate tree. Results We have generated and analysed expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from the alveolate Oxyrrhis marina in order to shed light on the evolution of a number of dinoflagellate characteristics, especially regarding the emergence of highly unusual genomic features. We found that O. marina harbours extensive gene redundancy, indicating high rates of gene duplication and transcription from multiple genomic loci. In addition, we observed a correlation between expression level and copy number in several genes, suggesting that copy number may contribute to determining transcript levels for some genes. Finally, we analyze the genes and predicted products of the recently discovered Dinoflagellate Viral Nuclear Protein, and several cases of horizontally acquired genes. Conclusion The dataset presented here has proven very valuable for studying this important group of protists. Our analysis indicates that gene redundancy is a pervasive feature of dinoflagellate genomes, thus the mechanisms involved in its generation must have arisen early in the evolution of the group. PMID:24512041

  9. Long-Term Field Study Reveals Subtle Effects of the Invasive Alga Sargassum muticum upon the Epibiota of Zostera marina

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species can alter coastal ecosystems both directly, e.g. through competition for substratum and nutrients, and indirectly. Indirect effects may be mediated by creation of dissimilar or inimical habitats, changes in predator and/or prey assemblages, alterations in associated biota, and perturbations of water movement and thermal regimes. Previous studies have shown that invasive algae can modify native habitat architecture, disrupt intricately linked food webs and alter epibiotic assemblages. In the UK, the seagrass Zostera marina supports a diverse epibiotic assemblage, influencing key factors such as sediment dynamics, depositional regime and trophic linkages. Increasing encroachment of the invasive alga Sargassum muticum into seagrass meadows changes the physical and chemical characteristics of the local environment and creates the potential for changes in the epibionts associated with the seagrass blades, threatening the integrity of the seagrass ecosystem. We investigated the effects of S. muticum invasion upon the epibiota of Z. marina in a drowned river valley in SW England seasonally from spring to autumn over four years in an in-situ manipulative experiment, comparing permanent quadrats with and without artificially introduced S. muticum. Epibiota were weighed, identified to the most detailed operational taxonomic unit (OTU) possible, and unitary organisms were enumerated. Multivariate PERMANOVA+ analysis revealed significant differences in epibiont assemblages between Sargassum treatments. Linear mixed effects models indicated that differences in epibiota assemblage composition were not reflected as significant differences in mean biomass per sample, or number of epibiont OTUs per sample. We conclude that S. muticum invasion into Z. marina meadows may significantly alter the species composition and abundance distribution of epibiotic assemblages found on the blades of the seagrass. Thus S. muticum invasion could have more wide-reaching effects on

  10. Artificially produced [7-formyl]-chlorophyll d functions as an antenna pigment in the photosystem II isolated from the chlorophyllide a oxygenase-expressing Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tohru; Akimoto, Seiji; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Watabe, Kazuyuki; Kindo, Hayato; Tomo, Tatsuya; Tamiaki, Hitoshi; Mimuro, Mamoru

    2012-08-01

    Acaryochloris marina, a chlorophyll (Chl) d-dominated cyanobacterium, is a model organism for studying photosynthesis driven by far-red light using Chl d. Furthermore, studies on A. marina may provide insights into understanding how the oxygenic photosynthetic organisms adapt after the acquisition of new Chl. To solve the reaction mechanism of its unique photosynthesis, photosystem (PS) II complexes were isolated from A. marina and analyzed. However, the lack of a molecular genetic method for A. marina prevented us from conducting further studies. We recently developed a transformation system for A. marina and we introduced a chlorophyllide a oxygenase gene into A. marina. The resultant transformant accumulated [7-formyl]-Chl d, which has never been found in nature. In the current study, we isolated PS II complexes that contained [7-formyl]-Chl d. The pigment composition of the [7-formyl]-Chl d-containing PS II complexes was 1.96±0.04 Chl a, 53.21±1.00 Chl d, and 5.48±0.33 [7-formyl]-Chl d per two pheophytin a molecules. In contrast, the composition of the control PS II complexes was 2.01±0.06 Chl a and 62.96±2.49 Chl d. The steady-state fluorescence and excitation spectra of the PS II complexes revealed that energy transfer occurred from [7-formyl]-Chl d to the major Chl d species; however, the electron transfer was not affected by the presence of [7-formyl]-Chl d. These findings demonstrate that artificially produced [7-formyl]-Chl d molecules that are incorporated into PS II replace part of the Chl d molecules and function as the antenna. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of hyper-branched rolling circle amplification (HRCA) and HRCA-based strip test for the detection of Chattonella marina.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chunyun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Changlu; Zhou, Jin; Chen, Guofu

    2017-06-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are global threats to marine ecosystems, fisheries, and human health. Therefore, developing effective and accurate methods for identifying causative algae and monitoring seawater quality is urgent. However, traditional, microscopy-based methods are complex, inaccurate, and time-consuming. Here, we present a novel method for effective and sensitive detection of Chattonella marina using hyper-branched rolling circle amplification (HRCA) and HRCA-based strip test (HBST). The large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) D1-D2 region of C. marina was firstly sequenced to design a species-specific padlock probe (PLP). The HRCA reaction with two amplification primers and further HBST for C. marina was established. The optimized reaction conditions for HRCA were PLP concentration, 20 pM; ligation temperature, 65 °C; ligation time, 60 min; amplification temperature, 61 °C; and amplification time, 60 min. The developed HBST detection procedure involved HRCA reaction, test strip preparation, hybridization, coloration, and judgment of hybridization by the naked eye. Specificity and sensitivity of the established methods were validated. Moreover, the results showed that the established detection methods were specific and sensitive to C. marina. The detection limits of HRCA and HBST assays were 10 copies and 1 copy μL(-1) of plasmid with LSU rDNA of C. marina, which are of two and three respective magnitude orders higher than conventional PCR. Finally, the protocols were applied to the simulated field samples and the results showed that the developed HBST assay had higher detection sensitivity than HRCA and PCR. In conclusion, the methods presented in this study are promising for sensitive, intuitive, and specific detection of C. marina in field monitoring natural samples and may provide a good detection model for other harmful algae in the future.

  12. The identification of IsiA proteins binding chlorophyll d in the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Ke; Yin, Yan-Chao; Zhang, Lu-Dan; Zhang, Zhong-Chun; Dai, Guo-Zheng; Chen, Min; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2017-04-04

    The bioavailable iron in many aquatic ecosystems is extremely low, and limits the growth and photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton. In response to iron limitation, a group of chlorophyll-binding proteins known as iron stress-induced proteins are induced and serve as accessory light-harvesting components for photosystems under iron limitation. In the present study, we investigated physiological features of Acaryochloris marina in response to iron-deficient conditions. The growth doubling time under iron-deficient conditions was prolonged to ~3.4 days compared with 1.9 days under normal culture conditions, accompanied with dramatically decreased chlorophyll content. The isolation of chlorophyll-binding protein complexes using sucrose density gradient centrifugation shows six main green bands and three main fluorescence components of 712, 728, and 748 nm from the iron-deficient culture. The fluorescence components of 712 and 728 nm co-exist in the samples collected from iron-deficient and iron-replete cultures and are attributed to Chl d-binding accessory chlorophyll-binding antenna proteins and also from photosystem II. A new chlorophyll-binding protein complex with its main fluorescence peak at 748 nm was observed and enriched in the heaviest fraction from the samples collected from the iron-deficient culture only. Combining western blotting analysis using antibodies of CP47 (PSII), PsaC (PSI) and IsiA and proteomic analysis on an excised protein band at ~37 kDa, the heaviest fraction (-F6) isolated from iron-deficient culture contained Chl d-bound PSI-IsiA supercomplexes. The PSII-antenna supercomplexes isolated from iron-replete conditions showed two fluorescence peaks of 712 and 728 nm, which can be assigned as 6-transmembrane helix chlorophyll-binding antenna and photosystem II fluorescence, respectively, which is supported by protein analysis of the fractions (F5 and F6).

  13. Understanding Aquaporin Transport System in Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.), an Aquatic Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Shivaraj, S. M.; Deshmukh, Rupesh; Bhat, Javaid A.; Sonah, Humira; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2017-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are a class of integral membrane proteins involved in the transport of water and many other small solutes. The AQPs have been extensively studied in many land species obtaining water and nutrients from the soil, but their distribution and evolution have never been investigated in aquatic plant species, where solute assimilation is mostly through the leaves. In this regard, identification of AQPs in the genome of Zostera marina L. (eelgrass), an aquatic ecological model species could reveal important differences underlying solute uptake between land and aquatic species. In the present study, genome-wide analysis led to the identification of 25 AQPs belonging to four subfamilies, plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs), tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs), nodulin 26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs), small basic intrinsic proteins (SIPs) in eelgrass. As in other monocots, the XIP subfamily was found to be absent from the eelgrass genome. Further classification of subfamilies revealed a unique distribution pattern, namely the loss of the NIP2 (NIP-III) subgroup, which is known for silicon (Si) transport activity and ubiquitously present in monocot species. This finding has great importance, since the eelgrass population stability in natural niche is reported to be associated with Si concentrations in water. In addition, analysis of available RNA-seq data showed evidence of expression in 24 out of the 25 AQPs across four different tissues such as root, vegetative tissue, male flower and female flower. In contrast to land plants, higher expression of PIPs was observed in shoot compared to root tissues. This is likely explained by the unique plant architecture of eelgrass where most of the nutrients and water are absorbed by shoot rather than root tissues. Similarly, higher expression of the TIP1 and TIP5 families was observed specifically in male flowers suggesting a role in pollen maturation. This genome-wide analysis of AQP distribution, evolution

  14. Recombinant production and characterization of a highly active alkaline phosphatase from marine bacterium Cobetia marina.

    PubMed

    Golotin, Vasily; Balabanova, Larissa; Likhatskaya, Galina; Rasskazov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The psychrophilic marine bacterium, Cobetia marina, recovered from the mantle tissue of the marine mussel, Crenomytilus grayanus, which contained a gene encoding alkaline phosphatase (AP) with apparent biotechnology advantages. The enzyme was found to be more efficient than its counterparts and showed k cat value 10- to 100-fold higher than those of all known commercial APs. The enzyme did not require the presence of exogenous divalent cations and dimeric state of its molecule for activity. The recombinant enzyme (CmAP) production and purification were optimized with a final recovery of 2 mg of the homogenous protein from 1 L of the transgenic Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)/Pho40 cells culture. CmAP displayed a half-life of 16 min at 45 °C and 27 min at 40 °C in the presence of 2 mM EDTA, thus suggesting its relative thermostability in comparison with the known cold-adapted analogues. A high concentration of EDTA in the incubation mixture did not appreciably inhibit CmAP. The enzyme was stable in a wide range of pH (6.0-11.0). CmAP exhibited its highest activity at the reaction temperature of 40-50 °C and pH 9.5-10.3. The structural features of CmAP could be the reason for the increase in its stability and catalytic turnover. We have modeled the CmAP 3D structure on the base of the high-quality experimental structure of the close homologue Vibrio sp. AP (VAP) and mutated essential residues predicted to break Mg(2+) bonds in CmAP. It seems probable that the intrinsically tight binding of catalytic and structural metal ions together with the flexibility of intermolecular and intramolecular links in CmAP could be attributed to the adapted mutualistic lifestyle in oceanic waters.

  15. Temporal stability in patterns of genetic diversity and structure of a marine foundation species (Zostera marina).

    PubMed

    Reynolds, L K; Stachowicz, J J; Hughes, A R; Kamel, S J; Ort, B S; Grosberg, R K

    2017-04-01

    Genetic diversity and population structure reflect complex interactions among a diverse set of processes that may vary temporally, limiting their potential to predict ecological and evolutionary outcomes. Yet, the stability of these patterns is rarely tested. We resampled eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows from published studies to determine variability in genetic diversity and structure within and between meadows over 5-12 years. The meadows sampled (San Francisco, Tomales and Bodega Bays in California and the Virginia coastal bays) represent a range of life histories (annual vs perennial), age (well-established vs restored) and environments (rural vs urbanized). In all of these systems, neither diversity nor differentiation (FST) changed over time. Differences among tidal heights within Bodega Bay were also remarkably consistent, with the high intertidal being more diverse than the subtidal, and tidal height differentiation being modest but significant at both time points. Historical studies used only a few microsatellite loci; therefore, our temporal comparisons were based on 4-5 loci. However, analysis of the current data using a set of 12 loci show that 4-5 loci are sufficient to describe diversity and differentiation patterns in this system. This temporal consistency was not because of the resampling of large clones, underscoring the feasibility and relevance of understanding drivers of the differences. Because seagrasses are declining at rapid rates, restoration and conservation are increasingly a coastal management priority. Our results argue that surveys of eelgrass genetic structure and diversity at decadal scales can provide accurate depictions of populations, increasing the utility of published genetic data for restoration and designing networks of reserves.

  16. Separate origins of group I introns in two mitochondrial genes of the katablepharid Leucocryptos marina.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yuki; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Inagaki, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are descendants of the endosymbiotic α-proteobacterium most likely engulfed by the ancestral eukaryotic cells, and the proto-mitochondrial genome should have been severely streamlined in terms of both genome size and gene repertoire. In addition, mitochondrial (mt) sequence data indicated that frequent intron gain/loss events contributed to shaping the modern mt genome organizations, resulting in the homologous introns being shared between two distantly related mt genomes. Unfortunately, the bulk of mt sequence data currently available are of phylogenetically restricted lineages, i.e., metazoans, fungi, and land plants, and are insufficient to elucidate the entire picture of intron evolution in mt genomes. In this work, we sequenced a 12 kbp-fragment of the mt genome of the katablepharid Leucocryptos marina. Among nine protein-coding genes included in the mt genome fragment, the genes encoding cytochrome b and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (cob and cox1) were interrupted by group I introns. We further identified that the cob and cox1 introns host open reading frames for homing endonucleases (HEs) belonging to distantly related superfamilies. Phylogenetic analyses recovered an affinity between the HE in the Leucocryptos cob intron and two green algal HEs, and that between the HE in the Leucocryptos cox1 intron and a fungal HE, suggesting that the Leucocryptos cob and cox1 introns possess distinct evolutionary origins. Although the current intron (and intronic HE) data are insufficient to infer how the homologous introns were distributed to distantly related mt genomes, the results presented here successfully expanded the evolutionary dynamism of group I introns in mt genomes.

  17. Saccharomonospora marina sp. nov., isolated from an ocean sediment of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zui; Li, Yan; Zheng, Liu-Qiang; Huang, Yao-Jian; Li, Wen-Jun

    2010-08-01

    A novel, aerobic, Gram-positive actinomycete strain, designated XMU15T, was isolated from an ocean sediment collected from Zhaoan Bay in the East China Sea and was subjected to a polyphasic approach to determine its taxonomic position. The isolate grew optimally at 28 degrees C and at pH 7.0 in the presence of 3% (w/v) NaCl on ISP medium 2. Gelatin liquefaction, milk coagulation and nitrate reduction were positive. Cellulose and starch hydrolysis, hydrogen sulfide and melanin production, and catalase, urease and oxidase activities were negative. The predominant menaquinone of the isolate was MK-9 (H4), and meso-diaminopimelic acid was the diagnostic amino acid in the cell wall. The phospholipids of the isolate comprised diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, and a minor amount of phosphatidylethanolamine. The major fatty acids of the strain were iso-C16:0 (26.36%), C17:1omega6c (16.80%), C15:0 (16.2%), C16:0 (8.90%), C17:1omega8c (7.69%) and iso-C16:1 H (5.95%). The DNA G+C content of the genomic DNA was 68.1 mol%. A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolate fell within the evolutionary radiation encompassed by the genus Saccharomonospora and showed the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (96.7%) to Saccharomonospora xinjiangensis DSM 44391T. Based on the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phenotypic and genotypic characterization, strain XMU15T (=KCTC 19701T =CCTCC AA 209048T) represents a novel species of the genus Saccharomonospora, for which the name Saccharomonospora marina sp. nov. is proposed.

  18. Light intensity dependent photosynthetic electron transport in eelgrass (Zostera marina L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao Qi; Zhang, Quan Sheng; Zhang, Di; Sheng, Zi Tong

    2017-04-01

    Responses of electron transport to three levels of irradiation (20, 200, and 1200 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) PAR; exposures called LL, ML and HL, respectively) were investigated in eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) utilizing the chlorophyll a fluorescence technique. Exposure to ML and HL reduced the maximum quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) (Fv/Fm) and the maximum slope decrease of MR/MRO (VPSI), indicating the occurrence of photoinhibition of both PSII and photosystem I (PSI). A comparatively slow recovery rate of Fv/Fm due to longer half-life recovery time of PSII and 40% lower descending amplitude compared to other higher plants implied the poor resilience of the PSII. Comparatively, PSI demonstrated high resilience and cyclic electron transport (CEF) around PSI maintained high activity. With sustained exposure, the amplitudes of the kinetic components (L1 and L2), the probability of electron transfer from PSII to plastoquinone pool (ψET2o), and the connectivity among PSII units decreased, accompanied by an enhancement of energy dissipation. Principle component analysis revealed that both VPSI and Fv/Fm contributed to the same component, which was consistent with high connectivity between PSII and PSI, suggesting close coordination between both photosystems. Such coordination was likely beneficial for the adaption of high light. Exposure to LL significantly increased the activity of both PSI and CEF, which could lead to increased light harvesting. Moreover, smooth electron transport as indicated by the enhancement of L1, L2, ψET2o and the probability of electron transport to the final PSI acceptor sides, could contribute to an increase in light utilization efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence of additional excitation energy transfer pathways in the phycobiliprotein antenna system of Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Nganou, A C; David, L; Adir, N; Pouhe, D; Deen, M J; Mkandawire, M

    2015-02-01

    To improve the energy conversion efficiency of solar organic cells, the clue may lie in the development of devices inspired by an efficient light harvesting mechanism of some aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms that are adapted to low light intensity. Consequently, we investigated the pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) from successive light harvesting pigments to the low energy level inside the phycobiliprotein antenna system of Acaryochloris marina, a cyanobacterium, using a time resolved absorption difference spectroscopy with a resolution time of 200 fs. The objective was to understand the actual biochemical process and pathways that determine the EET mechanism. Anisotropy of the EET pathway was calculated from the absorption change trace in order to determine the contribution of excitonic coupling. The results reveal a new electron energy relaxation pathway of 14 ps inside the phycocyanin component, which runs from phycocyanin to the terminal emitter. The bleaching of the 660 nm band suggests a broader absorption of the terminal emitter between 660 nm and 675 nm. Further, there are trimer depolarization kinetics of 450 fs and 500 fs in high and low ionic strength, respectively, which arise from the relaxation of the β84 and α84 in adjacent monomers of phycocyanin. Under conditions of low ionic strength buffer solution, the evolution of the kinetic amplitude during the depolarization of the trimer is suggestive of trimer conservation within the phycocyanin hexamer. The anisotropy values were 0.38 and 0.40 in high and in low ionic strength, respectively, indicating that there is no excitonic delocalization in the high energy level of phycocyanin hexamers.

  20. Reclassification of Agrobacterium ferrugineum LMG 128 as Hoeflea marina gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Peix, Alvaro; Rivas, Raúl; Trujillo, Martha E; Vancanneyt, Marc; Velázquez, Encarna; Willems, Anne

    2005-05-01

    Members of the species Agrobacterium ferrugineum were isolated from marine environments. The type strain of this species (= LMG 22047(T) = ATCC 25652(T)) was recently reclassified in the new genus Pseudorhodobacter, in the order 'Rhodobacterales' of the class 'Alphaproteobacteria'. Strain LMG 128 (= ATCC 25654) was also initially classified as belonging to the species Agrobacterium ferrugineum; however, the nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequence of this strain indicated that it does not belong within the genus Agrobacterium or within the genus Pseudorhodobacter. The closest related organism, with 95.5 % 16S rRNA gene similarity, was Aquamicrobium defluvii from the family 'Phyllobacteriaceae' in the order 'Rhizobiales'. The remaining genera from this order had 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities that were lower than 95.1 % with respect to strain LMG 128. These phylogenetic distances suggested that strain LMG 128 belonged to a different genus. The major fatty acid present in strain LMG 128 was mono-unsaturated straight chain 18 : 1omega7c. The G + C content of the DNA was 53.1 mol%. Strain LMG 128 grew at 4 degrees C but not at 40 degrees C, and tolerated up to 5 % NaCl. The pH range for growth was 6-8. It produced urease and beta-galactosidase, and hydrolysed aesculin. Denitrification was negative. Growth was observed with many carbohydrates as the only carbon source. The data from this polyphasic study indicate that this strain belongs to a new genus of the family 'Phyllobacteriaceae', and therefore it is proposed that strain LMG 128(T) should be reclassified as representing a novel species within the new genus Hoeflea gen. nov., for which the name Hoeflea marina sp. nov. is proposed.

  1. [Analysis of the patients who missed their appointments at the neurology clinic of the Marina Alta].

    PubMed

    Morera-Guitart, J; Mas-Server, M A; Más-Sesé, G

    To analyze the frequency, reasons and characteristics of patients who missed their appointments (NP) at the Neurology Clinic (CEN). To compare the characteristics of the NP with the patients who did not miss their appointment. Suggest measures to reduce avoidable causes of NP. During the period 1/10/99 to 30/4/2000 the cases of NP were prospectively recorded and compared with a sample of patients who attended the CEN during the same period. We analyze the data on age, sex, distance of home from CEN, diagnosis, type of consultation and date of last consultation. The NP were contacted by phone and asked why they had not gone for their appointments. The reasons given were then classified as avoidable or unavoidable. Of the 1,842 consultations scheduled, 19% were NP. When the NP and the patients who did attend were compared we found statistically significant differences regarding the distance home/CEN. According to the diagnosis, the NP had more 'symptoms/signs' and other MIA, whilst those who attended the clinic had more 'neuropathies' and 'awaiting diagnosis'. The commonest avoidable reasons (55.8%) for NP were forgetting, administrative error and communication failure, and for unavoidable reasons (44.2%) physical disability, other priorities and improvement. There is a large proportion of NP in the CEN of the Marina Alta. The distance from home to CEN (over 25 km) was the main factor affecting the rate of NP. Since 56% of the NP were due to avoidable causes, strategies could be designed to reduce this percentage. In the NP group, the main causes were forgetting, administrative errors and communication failure.

  2. Rubrivirga marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Rhodothermaceae isolated from deep seawater.

    PubMed

    Park, Sanghwa; Song, Jaeho; Yoshizawa, Susumu; Choi, Ahyoung; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Kogure, Kazuhiro

    2013-06-01

    Two aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, pale-red-pigmented and rod-shaped bacterial strains, designated SAORIC-26 and SAORIC-28(T), were isolated from seawater (3000 m depth) from the Pacific Ocean. Phylogenetic analysis based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the novel isolates could be affiliated with the family Rhodothermaceae of the class Cytophagia. Strains SAORIC-26 and SAORIC-28(T) shared 99.7% pairwise sequence similarity with each other and showed less than 92.6% similarity with other cultivated members of the class Cytophagia. The strains were found to be non-motile, oxidase-positive, catalase-negative and able to hydrolyse gelatin and aesculin. The DNA G+C contents were determined to be 64.8-65.8 mol% and MK-7 was the predominant menaquinone. Summed feature 9 (iso-C17:1ω9c and/or C16:0 10-methyl), summed feature 3 (C16:1ω6c and/or C16:1ω7c) and iso-C15:0 were found to be the major cellular fatty acids. On the basis of this taxonomic study using a polyphasic approach, it was concluded that strains SAORIC-26 and SAORIC-28(T) represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Rhodothermaceae, for which the name Rubrivirga marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species of is SAORIC-28(T) (=KCTC 23867(T)=NBRC 108816(T)). An additional strain of the species is SAORIC-26.

  3. Distribution, structure and function of Nordic eelgrass (Zostera marina) ecosystems: implications for coastal management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Boström, Christoffer; Baden, Susanne; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Dromph, Karsten; Fredriksen, Stein; Gustafsson, Camilla; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Möller, Tiia; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Olesen, Birgit; Olsen, Jeanine; Pihl, Leif; Rinde, Eli

    2014-06-01

    This paper focuses on the marine foundation eelgrass species, Zostera marina, along a gradient from the northern Baltic Sea to the north-east Atlantic. This vast region supports a minimum of 1480 km(2) eelgrass (maximum >2100 km(2)), which corresponds to more than four times the previously quantified area of eelgrass in Western Europe.Eelgrass meadows in the low salinity Baltic Sea support the highest diversity (4-6 spp.) of angiosperms overall, but eelgrass productivity is low (<2 g dw m(-2) d(-1)) and meadows are isolated and genetically impoverished. Higher salinity areas support monospecific meadows, with higher productivity (3-10 g dw m(-2) d(-1)) and greater genetic connectivity. The salinity gradient further imposes functional differences in biodiversity and food webs, in particular a decline in number, but increase in biomass of mesograzers in the Baltic.Significant declines in eelgrass depth limits and areal cover are documented, particularly in regions experiencing high human pressure. The failure of eelgrass to re-establish itself in affected areas, despite nutrient reductions and improved water quality, signals complex recovery trajectories and calls for much greater conservation effort to protect existing meadows.The knowledge base for Nordic eelgrass meadows is broad and sufficient to establish monitoring objectives across nine national borders. Nevertheless, ensuring awareness of their vulnerability remains challenging. Given the areal extent of Nordic eelgrass systems and the ecosystem services they provide, it is crucial to further develop incentives for protecting them. © 2014 The Authors. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Zostera marina seed burial can be enhanced by Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum: A microcosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jun; Li, Wen-Tao; Liu, Jianying; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhang, Peidong

    2017-06-01

    Seagrass seed bank plays a key role in the regeneration of new vegetation when seagrasses are removed by the natural or man-made disaster. Various factors may affect the development of sediment seed bank. We conducted a microcosm experiment to test the effects of burrowing and feeding activities of Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum on the burial of Zostera marina seeds in sediments. The effects of lasting time (3-hour, 1-day, 3-day, 7-day, 14-day and 28-day), clam density (0, 2, 4 and 8 clams with shell length of 3 cm in each microcosm) and clam size (shell length of 2, 3 and 4 cm at 4-clam density) on seed burial were examined in plastic microcosm cores (30 cm high × 10 in inner diameter) in a 28-day period. Results showed that the seed burial depth significantly increased with time, the density and the size of clams. No seeds were buried in the sediment in the cores without clams during the whole experiment period. For the 3-cm clams, about 91.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment at the end of the experiment in the high-density treatment (8 clams at each core); while in the medium and low-density treatments (4 and 2 clams in each core, respectively), about 76.93% and 60.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment, respectively. For the size treatments, large (4 cm) clams buried 89.56% of the seeds at the end of the experiment, much more than those of medium (3 cm, 76.93%) and small (2 cm, 61.50%) size clams. During the whole experiment period, nearly all of the buried seeds were at a depth of from 0 cm to 5 cm. These results suggested that Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum may play an important positive role in seagrass seed bank dynamics in the field.

  5. Mitochondrial function in seasonal acclimatization versus latitudinal adaptation to cold in the lugworm Arenicola marina (L.).

    PubMed

    Sommer, A M; Pörtner, H O

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies in marine ectotherms from a latitudinal cline have led to the hypothesis that eurythermal adaptation to low mean annual temperatures is energetically costly. To obtain more information on the trade-offs and with that the constraints of thermal adaptation, mitochondrial functions were studied in subpolar lugworms (Arenicola marina L.) adapted to summer cold at the White Sea and were compared with those in boreal specimens from the North Sea, either acclimatized to summer temperatures or to winter cold. During summer, a comparison of mitochondria from subpolar and boreal worms revealed higher succinate oxidation rates and reduced Arrhenius activation energies (Ea) in state 3 respiration at low temperatures, as well as higher proton leakage rates in subpolar lugworms. These differences reflect a higher aerobic capacity in subpolar worms, which is required to maintain motor activity at low but variable environmental temperatures--however, at the expense of an elevated metabolic rate. The lower activity of citrate synthase (CS) found in subpolar worms may indicate a shift in metabolic control within mitochondria. In contrast, acclimatization of boreal lugworms to winter conditions elicited elevated mitochondrial CS activities in parallel with enhanced mitochondrial respiration rates. With falling acclimation temperatures, the significant Arrhenius break temperature in state 3 respiration (11 degrees C) became insignificant (5 degrees C) or even disappeared (0 degrees C) at lower levels of Arrhenius activation energies in the cold, similar to a phenomenon known from hibernating vertebrates. The efficiency of aerobic energy production in winter mitochondria rose as proton leakage in relation to state 3 decreased with cold acclimation, indicated by higher respiratory control ratio values and increased adenosine diphosphate/oxygen (ADP/O) ratios. These transitions indicate reduced metabolic flexibility, possibly paralleled by a loss in aerobic scope and

  6. North Atlantic phylogeography and large-scale population differentiation of the seagrass Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jeanine L; Stam, Wytze T; Coyer, James A; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Billingham, Martin; Boström, Christoffer; Calvert, Elizabeth; Christie, Hartvig; Granger, Stephen; la Lumière, Richard; Milchakova, Nataliya; Oudot-Le Secq, Marie-Pierre; Procaccini, Gabriele; Sanjabi, Bahram; Serrao, Ester; Veldsink, Jan; Widdicombe, Stephen; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2004-07-01

    As the most widespread seagrass in temperate waters of the Northern Hemisphere, Zostera marina provides a unique opportunity to investigate the extent to which the historical legacy of the last glacial maximum (LGM18 000-10 000 years bp) is detectable in modern population genetic structure. We used sequences from the nuclear rDNA-internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and chloroplast matK-intron, and nine microsatellite loci to survey 49 populations (> 2000 individuals) from throughout the species' range. Minimal sequence variation between Pacific and Atlantic populations combined with biogeographical groupings derived from the microsatellite data, suggest that the trans-Arctic connection is currently open. The east Pacific and west Atlantic are more connected than either is to the east Atlantic. Allelic richness was almost two-fold higher in the Pacific. Populations from putative Atlantic refugia now represent the southern edges of the distribution and are not genetically diverse. Unexpectedly, the highest allelic diversity was observed in the North Sea-Wadden Sea-southwest Baltic region. Except for the Mediterranean and Black Seas, significant isolation-by-distance was found from ~150 to 5000 km. A transition from weak to strong isolation-by-distance occurred at ~150 km among northern European populations suggesting this scale as the natural limit for dispersal within the metapopulation. Links between historical and contemporary processes are discussed in terms of the projected effects of climate change on coastal marine plants. The identification of a high genetic diversity hotspot in Northern Europe provides a basis for restoration decisions.

  7. On the profile evolution of three artificial pebble beaches at Marina di Pisa, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoni, Duccio; Sarti, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the profiles of three artificial coarse-grained beaches located at Marina di Pisa (Tuscany, Italy) were monitored from April 2008 to May 2009 in order to define the response of the beaches to major storms that occurred during the study. Two beaches are similar, the third differs in length and in the level of protection, being less than half the length of the others and devoid of an offshore submerged breakwater. The work was achieved by means of accurate topographic surveys intended to reconstruct the beach profile from the backshore up to the foreshore-upper shoreface transition (step). The surveys were performed with an RTK-GPS instrument, which provided extremely precise recording of the beach. The most significant features of the beaches were tracked during each survey; in particular, the landward foot of the storm berm, the crest of the storm berm, the coastline, and the step crest were monitored. Five cross-shore transects were traced on each beach. Along these transects, any meaningful slope change was recorded to obtain accurate sections of the beach. The field datasets were processed with AutoCAD software to compare the beach profile evolution during the year-long research. The results showed a comparable evolution of the twin beaches: the resulting storm berm retreat of about 15 to 19 m is a remarkable feature considering the coarse grain size and the offshore protection. Due to the absence of the breakwater, the third beach was characterized by even higher values of recession (over 20 m), and showed hints of wave reflection-related processes after the huge, steep storm berm had been formed and grown after the high energy events. These processes were not as evident on the twin beaches. These results underline the different response of three similar protection schemes, and the importance that frequent monitoring of the beach morphology holds when it comes to coastal management issues.

  8. Zostera marina seed burial can be enhanced by Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum: A microcosm study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chang-Jun; Li, Wen-Tao; Liu, Jianying; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhang, Peidong

    2017-03-01

    Seagrass seed bank plays a key role in the regeneration of new vegetation when seagrasses are removed by the natural or man-made disaster. Various factors may affect the development of sediment seed bank. We conducted a microcosm experiment to test the effects of burrowing and feeding activities of Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum on the burial of Zostera marina seeds in sediments. The effects of lasting time (3-hour, 1-day, 3-day, 7-day, 14-day and 28-day), clam density (0, 2, 4 and 8 clams with shell length of 3 cm in each microcosm) and clam size (shell length of 2, 3 and 4 cm at 4-clam density) on seed burial were examined in plastic microcosm cores (30 cm high × 10 in inner diameter) in a 28-day period. Results showed that the seed burial depth significantly increased with time, the density and the size of clams. No seeds were buried in the sediment in the cores without clams during the whole experiment period. For the 3-cm clams, about 91.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment at the end of the experiment in the high-density treatment (8 clams at each core); while in the medium and low-density treatments (4 and 2 clams in each core, respectively), about 76.93% and 60.61% of the seeds were buried in the sediment, respectively. For the size treatments, large (4 cm) clams buried 89.56% of the seeds at the end of the experiment, much more than those of medium (3 cm, 76.93%) and small (2 cm, 61.50%) size clams. During the whole experiment period, nearly all of the buried seeds were at a depth of from 0 cm to 5 cm. These results suggested that Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum may play an important positive role in seagrass seed bank dynamics in the field.

  9. Zooshikella marina sp. nov. a cycloprodigiosin- and prodigiosin-producing marine bacterium isolated from beach sand.

    PubMed

    Ramaprasad, E V V; Bharti, Dave; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2015-12-01

    A red-pigmented bacterium producing a metallic green sheen, designated strain JC333T, was isolated from a sand sample collected from Shivrajpur-Kachigad beach, Gujarat, India. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain JC333T showed highest sequence similarity to Zooshikella ganghwensis JC2044T (99.24 %) and less than 91.94 % similarity with other members of the class Gammaproteobacteria. DNA-DNA hybridizations between JC333T and Z. ganghwensis JC2044T showed low relatedness values of 19 ± 1.3 % (reciprocal 21 ± 2.2 %). The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q9) and the polar lipid profile was composed of the major components diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified aminophospholipid and an unidentified lipid. The presence of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and C12 : 0 as major fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain JC333T to the genus Zooshikella. Prodigiosin, cycloprodigiosin and eight other prodigiosin analogues were the pigments of JC333T. Characterization based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, physiological parameters, pigment analysis, ubiquinone, and polar lipid and fatty acid compositions revealed that JC333T represents a novel species of the genus Zooshikella, for which the name Zooshikella marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC333T ( = KCTC 42659T = LMG 28823T).

  10. Loktanella marina sp. nov., isolated from seawater of Yellow Sea in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Taek; Park, Sooyeon; Lee, Jung-Sook; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2016-04-15

    A Gram-stain-negative, coccoid- or short-rods-shaped and non-motile bacterial strain, designated MDM-7T was isolated from seawater of Yellow Sea, South Korea, and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Strain MDM-7T grew optimally at pH 7.0-8.0, at 30 °C and in the presence of 2-3 % (w/v) NaCl. Neighbour-joining phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain MDM-7T fell within the clade comprising the Loktanella species, clustering with the type strains of Loktanella vestfoldensis and Loktanella agnita, with which it exhibited 96.1 % and 95.6 % sequence similarity values, respectively. The 16S rRNA gene sequences similarity values between strain MDM-7T and the type strains of other Loktanella species were 93.1-95.0 %. The DNA G+C content of strain MDM-7T was determined to be 62.6 mol%. Strain MDM-7T contained Q-10 as the predominant ubiquinone and summed feature 8 (C18:1 ω7c and /or C18:1 ω6c) as the major fatty acid. The major polar lipids are diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and an unidentified aminolipid. Differential phenotypic properties, together with the phylogenetic distinctiveness, demonstrated that strain MDM-7T is distinguishable from other Loktanella species. On the basis of the data presented, strain MDM-7T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Loktanella, for which the name Loktanella marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is MDM-7T (= KCTC 42722T = CECT 8899T).

  11. Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture and captivity in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Cockrem, John F; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture have recently been shown for the first time in amphibians, and in the present study urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture and to confinement in captivity were measured in adult cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Queensland, Australia. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge was used to provide a biological validation for urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Urinary corticosterone metabolite increased 1-2 days after ACTH but not saline injection and then returned to initial values, indicating that the RIA could detect changes in corticosterone secretion in toads. Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to short-term capture and restraint in plastic bags were first apparent 2h after capture of wild toads. Toads held communally in captivity for 5 days had elevated urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations. Mean corticosterone concentrations declined significantly after a further 7 days in individual housing chambers. There was no sex difference in urinary corticosterone metabolite responses of toads to ACTH challenge, short-term capture or captivity. The relative amount of variation in the mean corticosterone responses was quantified by calculating coefficients of variation (CV) for each mean corticosterone response. Mean corticosterone at 0 min was more variable for captive toads than wild toads. Furthermore, initial corticosterone concentrations (0 min) were more variable than concentrations during the ACTH challenge, short-term capture and captivity. There was little change in the amount of variation of mean corticosterone levels between male and female toads with increasing time in captivity (12-29 days). This study has shown individual corticosterone responses of amphibians for the first-time, and has provided a novel method for quantifying the relative amount of variation in amphibian corticosterone responses. Copyright © 2011

  12. Distribution, structure and function of Nordic eelgrass (Zostera marina) ecosystems: implications for coastal management and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Christoffer; Baden, Susanne; Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Dromph, Karsten; Fredriksen, Stein; Gustafsson, Camilla; Krause-Jensen, Dorte; Möller, Tiia; Nielsen, Søren Laurentius; Olesen, Birgit; Olsen, Jeanine; Pihl, Leif; Rinde, Eli

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the marine foundation eelgrass species, Zostera marina, along a gradient from the northern Baltic Sea to the north-east Atlantic. This vast region supports a minimum of 1480 km2 eelgrass (maximum >2100 km2), which corresponds to more than four times the previously quantified area of eelgrass in Western Europe.Eelgrass meadows in the low salinity Baltic Sea support the highest diversity (4–6 spp.) of angiosperms overall, but eelgrass productivity is low (<2 g dw m-2 d-1) and meadows are isolated and genetically impoverished. Higher salinity areas support monospecific meadows, with higher productivity (3–10 g dw m-2 d-1) and greater genetic connectivity. The salinity gradient further imposes functional differences in biodiversity and food webs, in particular a decline in number, but increase in biomass of mesograzers in the Baltic.Significant declines in eelgrass depth limits and areal cover are documented, particularly in regions experiencing high human pressure. The failure of eelgrass to re-establish itself in affected areas, despite nutrient reductions and improved water quality, signals complex recovery trajectories and calls for much greater conservation effort to protect existing meadows.The knowledge base for Nordic eelgrass meadows is broad and sufficient to establish monitoring objectives across nine national borders. Nevertheless, ensuring awareness of their vulnerability remains challenging. Given the areal extent of Nordic eelgrass systems and the ecosystem services they provide, it is crucial to further develop incentives for protecting them. © 2014 The Authors. Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26167100

  13. The uptake and distribution of copper in the lugworm, Arenicola marina (annelida, polychaeta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everaarts, J. M.

    The uptake and distribution of copper in the polychaetous worm Arenicola marina (L.) have been studied both under experimental conditions and in a natural environmental situation, by analyzing the whole body and three body-compartments; body-wall, intestine and blood. No relationship between the copper concentrations in various fractions of the sediment and any of the body-compartments could be found. Under experimental conditions, the copper concentrations in the blood were higher than in the intestine and the body-wall. Uptake of dissolved copper occurred directly from the water. Copper uptake also occurs via sediment at high copper concentrations of the silt fraction of the habitat sediment. The data obtained from the field showed small differences in copper concentrations between blood, intestine and body-wall. The copper concentrations in the blood varied from 1 to 4 μ·cm -3, in the inetestine from 2 to 6μg·g -1, and in the body-wall from 1 to 3 μg·g -1 wet weight. A significant correlation existed between blood cooper concentration and body weight: small (young) individuals had higher copper concentrations in their blood than larger (older) ones. This means that young animals will encounter more stress at similar environmental copper levels than older animals. The concentration in the different body-compartments appears to be dependent on the season the samples were taken. The copper concentration in the intestine and the body decreased from April to November, whereas the blood copper concentration increased.

  14. The effect of colliery waste on the feeding of the lugworm Arenicola marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyslop, Brian T.; Davies, Mark S.

    1999-09-01

    Sandy shores in northeast England that are heavily contaminated by colliery waste (essentially coal particles) have lower species richnesses and diversities than less contaminated shores. Analyses of the sediment utilised putatively as food, the gut contents, and the faecal casts of lugworms Arenicola marina (L.) (Annelida: Polychaeta) from a heavily contaminated site (Newbiggin) and a site lightly contaminated (Seahouses) were performed to determine the effect of colliery waste on the feeding of this deposit-feeder, which has been reported to decline in abundance at contaminated sites. Colliery-waste content of sediment was 10 to 18 times greater at Newbiggin than at Seahouses. At Newbiggin the sediment contained significantly higher levels of colliery waste than did the gut contents or faeces, which were not significantly different from each other. At Seahouses the colliery-waste contents of sediment, gut, and faeces were not significantly different. Particle-size distributions in sediment, gut, and faeces from lugworms at Seahouses were similar, while at Newbiggin the sediment contained a greater proportion of larger particles (>250 μm) than did the gut contents or the faeces. These results suggest that lugworms at heavily contaminated sites are selective feeders, rejecting coal particles perhaps on the basis of particle size. We did not detect selectivity in animals at the less contaminated site. Lugworms from Seahouses, however, avoided burrowing into sediment containing colliery waste both when the waste was on the surface and buried. Lugworms from Newbiggin avoided burrowing into colliery waste only when it was buried. These data suggest a chemosensory response to colliery waste.

  15. Isolation and characterization of purple non-sulfur bacteria, Afifella marina, producing large amount of carotenoids from mangrove microhabitats.

    PubMed

    Kar Soon, Tan; Al-Azad, Sujjat; Ransangan, Julian

    2014-08-01

    This study determined the effect of light intensity and photoperiod on the dry cell weight and total amount of carotenoids in four isolates of purple non-sulfur bacteria obtained from shaded and exposed microhabitats of a mangrove ecosystem in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia. The initial isolation of the bacteria was carried out using synthetic 112 medium under anaerobic conditions (2.5 klx) at 30 ± 2°C. On the basis of colony appearance, cell morphology, gram staining, motility test, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing analyses, all four bacteria were identified as Afifella marina. One of the bacterial isolates, designated as Af. marina strain ME, which was extracted from an exposed mud habitat within the mangrove ecosystem, showed the highest yield in dry cell weight (4.32± 0.03 g/l) as well as total carotenoids (0.783 ± 0.002 mg/g dry cell weight). These values were significantly higher than those for dry cell weight (3.77 ± 0.02g/l ) and total carotenoid content (0.706 ± 0.008 mg/g) produced by the isolates from shaded habitats. Further analysis of the effect of 10 levels of light intensity on the growth characteristics of Af. marina strain ME showed that the optimum production of dry cell weight and total carotenoids was achieved at different light intensities and incubation periods. The bacterium produced the highest dry cell weight of 4.98 g/l at 3 klx in 72 h incubation, but the carotenoid production of 0.783 mg/g was achieved at 2.5 klx in 48 h incubation. Subsequent analysis of the effect of photoperiod on the production of dry cell weight and total carotenoids at optimum light intensities (3 and 2.5 klx, respectively) revealed that 18 and 24 h were the optimum photoperiods for the production of dry cell weight and total carotenoids, respectively. The unique growth characteristics of the Af. marina strain ME can be exploited for biotechnology applications.

  16. Two new species of Oswaldocruzia (Nematoda: Trichostrongylina: Molineoidea) parasites of the cane toad Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Anura) from Peru.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    Two new species of Oswaldocruzia, O. manuensis sp. nov., and O. urubambaensis sp. nov. are described and illustrated from Peru, these are parasites of the cane toad Rhinella marina. O. manuensis is characterized by having cervical alae which are not well developed, ridges without chitinous supports, caudal bursa type II and branches of fork of dissimilar length. O. urubambaensis is characterized by a caudal bursa of type I, ridges with chitinous supports, a thin cephalic vesicle and origin of rays 9 in tip of the dorsal trunk.

  17. Hybridization and massive mtDNA unidirectional introgression between the closely related Neotropical toads Rhinella marina and R. schneideri inferred from mtDNA and nuclear markers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The classical perspective that interspecific hybridization in animals is rare has been changing due to a growing list of empirical examples showing the occurrence of gene flow between closely related species. Using sequence data from cyt b mitochondrial gene and three intron nuclear genes (RPL9, c-myc, and RPL3) we investigated patterns of nucleotide polymorphism and divergence between two closely related toad species R. marina and R. schneideri. By comparing levels of differentiation at nuclear and mtDNA levels we were able to describe patterns of introgression and infer the history of hybridization between these species. Results All nuclear loci are essentially concordant in revealing two well differentiated groups of haplotypes, corresponding to the morphologically-defined species R. marina and R. schneideri. Mitochondrial DNA analysis also revealed two well-differentiated groups of haplotypes but, in stark contrast with the nuclear genealogies, all R. schneideri sequences are clustered with sequences of R. marina from the right Amazon bank (RAB), while R. marina sequences from the left Amazon bank (LAB) are monophyletic. An Isolation-with-Migration (IM) analysis using nuclear data showed that R. marina and R. schneideri diverged at ≈ 1.69 Myr (early Pleistocene), while R. marina populations from LAB and RAB diverged at ≈ 0.33 Myr (middle Pleistocene). This time of divergence is not consistent with the split between LAB and RAB populations obtained with mtDNA data (≈ 1.59 Myr), which is notably similar to the estimate obtained with nuclear genes between R. marina and R. schneideri. Coalescent simulations of mtDNA phylogeny under the speciation history inferred from nuclear genes rejected the hypothesis of incomplete lineage sorting to explain the conflicting signal between mtDNA and nuclear-based phylogenies. Conclusions The cytonuclear discordance seems to reflect the occurrence of interspecific hybridization between these two closely related

  18. Cloning of TPS gene from eelgrass species Zostera marina and its functional identification by genetic transformation in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Li, Qiuying; Weng, Manli; Wang, Xiuliang; Guo, Baotai; Wang, Li; Wang, Wei; Duan, Delin; Wang, Bin

    2013-12-01

    The full-length cDNA sequence (2613 bp) of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) gene of eelgrass Zostera marina (ZmTPS) was identified and cloned. Z. marina is a kind of seed-plant growing in sea water during its whole life history. The open reading frame (ORF) region of ZmTPS gene encodes a protein of 870 amino acid residues and a stop codon. The corresponding genomic DNA sequence is 3770 bp in length, which contains 3 exons and 2 introns. The ZmTPS gene was transformed into rice variety ZH11 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method. After antibiotic screening, molecular characterization, salt-tolerance and trehalose content determinations, two transgenic lines resistant to 150 mM NaCL solutions were screened. Our study results indicated that the ZmTPS gene was integrated into the genomic DNA of the two transgenic rice lines and could be expressed well. Moreover, the detection of the transformed ZmTPS gene in the progenies of the two transgenic lines was performed from T1 to T4 generations; and results suggested that the transformed ZmTPS gene can be transmitted from parent to the progeny in transgenic rice. © 2013.

  19. Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic, facultatively anaerobic planctomycete isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Slobodkina, Galina B; Panteleeva, Angela N; Beskorovaynaya, Darya A; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Slobodkin, Alexander I

    2016-02-01

    A novel thermophilic planctomycete (strain SVX8T) was isolated from a shallow submarine hydrothermal vent, Vulcano Island, Italy. The temperature range for growth was 30-68 °C, with an optimum at 55 °C. The pH range for growth was 5.0-9.0, with an optimum at pH 7.0-8.0. Growth was observed at NaCl concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 4.5 % (w/v) with an optimum at 2.5-3.5 % (w/v). The isolate grew anaerobically using a number of mono-, di- and polysaccharides as electron donors and nitrate or elemental sulfur as electron acceptors or by fermentation. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite; sulfur was reduced to sulfide. Strain SVX8T did not grow at atmospheric concentration of oxygen but grew microaerobically (up to 2 % oxygen in the gas phase). The G+C content of the DNA of strain SVX8T was 58.5 mol%. Based on phylogenetic position and phenotypic features, the new isolate is considered to represent a novel species belonging to a new genus in the order Planctomycetales, for which the name Thermostilla marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Thermostilla marina is SVX8T ( = JCM 19992T = VKM B-2881T). Strain SVX8T is the first thermophilic planctomycete isolated from a marine environment.

  20. Population-specificity of heat stress gene induction in northern and southern eelgrass Zostera marina populations under simulated global warming.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Nina; Winters, Gidon; Rauch, Gisep; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Gu, Jenny; Nelle, Peter; Fricke, Birgit; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2010-07-01

    Summer heat waves have already resulted in mortality of coastal communities, including ecologically important seagrass meadows. Gene expression studies from controlled experiments can provide important insight as to how species/genotypes react to extreme events that will increase under global warming. In a common stress garden, we exposed three populations of eelgrass, Zostera marina, to extreme sea surface temperatures, simulating the 2003-European heat wave. Populations came from locations widely differing in their thermal regime, two northern European locations [Ebeltoft (Kattegat), Doverodde (Limfjord, Baltic Sea)], and one southern population from Gabicce Mare (Adriatic Sea), allowing to test for population specificity in the response to a realistic heat stress event. Eelgrass survival and growth as well as the expression of 12 stress associated candidate genes were assessed during and after the heat wave. Contrary to expectations, all populations suffered equally from 3 weeks of heat stress in terms of shoot loss. In contrast, populations markedly differed in multivariate measures of gene expression. While the gene expression profiles converged to pre-stress values directly after the heat wave, stress correlated genes were upregulated again 4 weeks later, in line with the observed delay in shoot loss. Target genes had to be selected based on functional knowledge in terrestrial plants, nevertheless, 10/12 genes were induced relative to the control treatment at least once during the heat wave in the fully marine plant Z. marina. This study underlines the importance of realistic stress and recovery scenarios in studying the impact of predicted climate change.

  1. Sodium-dependent nitrate transport at the plasma membrane of leaf cells of the marine higher plant Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, M J; Jaime, M P; Ramos, A; Sanders, D; Fernández, J A

    2000-03-01

    NO(3)(-) is present at micromolar concentrations in seawater and must be absorbed by marine plants against a steep electrochemical potential difference across the plasma membrane. We studied NO(3)(-) transport in the marine angiosperm Zostera marina L. to address the question of how NO(3)(-) uptake is energized. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated that micromolar concentrations of NO(3)(-) induced depolarizations of the plasma membrane of leaf cells. Depolarizations showed saturation kinetics (K(m) = 2.31 +/- 0.78 microM NO(3)(-)) and were enhanced in alkaline conditions. The addition of NO(3)(-) did not affect the membrane potential in the absence of Na(+), but depolarizations were restored when Na(+) was resupplied. NO(3)(-)-induced depolarizations at increasing Na(+) concentrations showed saturation kinetics (K(m) = 0.72 +/- 0.18 mM Na(+)). Monensin, an ionophore that dissipates the Na(+) electrochemical potential, inhibited NO(3)(-)-evoked depolarizations by 85%, and NO(3)(-) uptake (measured by depletion from the external medium) was stimulated by Na(+) ions and by light. Our results strongly suggest that NO(3)(-) uptake in Z. marina is mediated by a high-affinity Na(+)-symport system, which is described here (for the first time to our knowledge) in an angiosperm. Coupling the uptake of NO(3)(-) to that of Na(+) enables the steep inwardly-directed electrochemical potential for Na(+) to drive net accumulation of NO(3)(-) within leaf cells.

  2. Characterization of a New Trioxilin and a Sulfoquinovosyl Diacylglycerol with Anti-Inflammatory Properties from the Dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun Young; Yang, A. Reum; Park, Jaeyeon; Moon, Seung Joo; Jeong, Eun Ju; Rho, Jung-Rae

    2017-01-01

    Two new compounds—a trioxilin and a sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol (SQDG)—were isolated from the methanolic extract of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Oxyrrhis marina cultivated by feeding on dried yeasts. The trioxilin was identified as (4Z,8E,13Z,16Z,19Z) -7(S),10(S),11(S)-trihydroxydocosapentaenoic acid (1), and the SQDG was identified as (2S)-1-O-hexadecanosy-2-O-docosahexaenoyl-3-O-(6-sulfo-α-d-quinovopyranosyl)-glycerol (2) by a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra, mass analyses, and chemical reactions. The two compounds were associated with docosahexaenoic acid, which is a major component of O. marina. The two isolated compounds showed significant nitric oxide inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells. Compound 2 showed no cytotoxicity against hepatocarcinoma (HepG2), neuroblastoma (Neuro-2a), and colon cancer (HCT-116) cells, while weak cytotoxicity was observed for compound 1 against Neuro-2a cells. PMID:28264430

  3. Diversity and N-acyl-homoserine lactone production by Gammaproteobacteria associated with Avicennia marina rhizosphere of South Indian mangroves.

    PubMed

    Viswanath, Ganga; Jegan, Sekar; Baskaran, Viswanathan; Kathiravan, Raju; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam

    2015-07-01

    The diversity of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-producing rhizosphere bacterial community associated with Avicennia marina in the mangrove ecosystems of South India was investigated. Approximately 800 rhizobacteria were isolated from A. marina, and they were screened for the production of AHL using two biosensors, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4). Among the total isolates screened, 7% of the rhizobacteria showed positive induction for AHL signals. The BOX-PCR profile of 56 positive isolates represented 11 distinct genotypic groups. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA sequences of 16 representatives showed that the isolates belonged to the class Gammaproteobacteria, which represented six different genera: Pseudomonas, Aeromonas, Vibrio, Photobacterium, Serratia and Halomonas. The study also identified three AHL-producing species, namely, Photobacterium halotolerans MSSRF QS48, Vibrio xiamenensis MSSRF QS47 and Pseudomonas sp. MSSRF QS1 that had not been reported previously. AHL profiling by TLC detected short chains C4, C6 and C8-HSL, and long chains C10 and C12-HSL with both unsubstituted and substituted side chains among the 16 representative AHL positives. This is the first report concerning the diversity of AHL-producing Gammaproteobacteria from mangrove ecosystems exhibiting diverse AHL profiles.

  4. The Structure of Genetic Diversity in Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) along the North Pacific and Bering Sea Coasts of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Sandra L; Sage, George K; Rearick, Jolene R; Fowler, Meg C; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Baibak, Bethany; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro; Ward, David H

    2016-01-01

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) populations occupying coastal waters of Alaska are separated by a peninsula and island archipelago into two Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). From populations in both LMEs, we characterize genetic diversity, population structure, and polarity in gene flow using nuclear microsatellite fragment and chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. An inverse relationship between genetic diversity and latitude was observed (heterozygosity: R2 = 0.738, P < 0.001; allelic richness: R2 = 0.327, P = 0.047), as was significant genetic partitioning across most sampling sites (θ = 0.302, P < 0.0001). Variance in allele frequency was significantly partitioned by region only in cases when a population geographically in the Gulf of Alaska LME (Kinzarof Lagoon) was instead included with populations in the Eastern Bering Sea LME (θp = 0.128-0.172; P < 0.003), suggesting gene flow between the two LMEs in this region. Gene flow among locales was rarely symmetrical, with notable exceptions generally following net coastal ocean current direction. Genetic data failed to support recent proposals that multiple Zostera species (i.e. Z. japonica and Z. angustifolia) are codistributed with Z. marina in Alaska. Comparative analyses also failed to support the hypothesis that eelgrass populations in the North Atlantic derived from eelgrass retained in northeastern Pacific Last Glacial Maximum refugia. These data suggest northeastern Pacific populations are derived from populations expanding northward from temperate populations following climate amelioration at the terminus of the last Pleistocene glaciation.

  5. Range-edge genetic diversity: locally poor extant southern patches maintain a regionally diverse hotspot in the seagrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Diekmann, Onno E; Serrão, Ester A

    2012-04-01

    Refugial populations at the rear edge are predicted to contain higher genetic diversity than those resulting from expansion, such as in post-glacial recolonizations. However, peripheral populations are also predicted to have decreased diversity compared to the centre of a species' distribution. We aim to test these predictions by comparing genetic diversity in populations at the limits of distribution of the seagrass Zostera marina, with populations in the species' previously described central diversity 'hotspot'. Zostera marina populations show decreased allelic richness, heterozygosity and genotypic richness in both the 'rear' edge and the 'leading' edge compared to the diversity 'hotspot' in the North Sea/Baltic region. However, when populations are pooled, genetic diversity at the southern range is as high as in the North Sea/Baltic region while the 'leading edge' remains low in genetic diversity. The decreased genetic diversity in these southern Iberian populations compared to more central populations is possibly the effect of drift because of small effective population size, as a result of reduced habitat, low sexual reproduction and low gene flow. However, when considering the whole southern edge of distribution rather than per population, diversity is as high as in the central 'hotspot' in the North Sea/Baltic region. We conclude that diversity patterns assessed per population can mask the real regional richness that is typical of rear edge populations, which have played a key role in the species biogeographical history and as marginal diversity hotspots have very high conservation value.

  6. Phylogeny of Heterokonta: Incisomonas marina, a uniciliate gliding opalozoan related to Solenicola (Nanomonadea), and evidence that Actinophryida evolved from raphidophytes.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Scoble, Josephine Margaret

    2013-08-01

    Environmental rDNA sequencing has revealed many novel heterokont clades of unknown morphology. We describe a new marine heterotrophic heterokont flagellate, Incisomonas marina, which most unusually lacks an anterior cilium. It glides and swims with its cilium trailing behind, but is predominantly sedentary on the substratum, with or without a cilium. 18S rDNA sequence phylogeny groups Incisomonas strongly within clade MAST-3; with others it forms a robust sister clade to Solenicola, here grouped with it as new order Uniciliatida, placed within new class Nanomonadea encompassing MAST-3. Our comprehensive maximum likelihood heterokont phylogeny shows Nanomonadea as sister to MAST-12 plus Opalinata within Opalozoa, and that Actinophryida are not Opalozoa (previously suggested by distance trees), but highly modified raphidomonads, arguably related to Heliorapha (formerly Ciliophrys) azurina gen., comb. n. We discuss evolution of Actinophryida from photosynthetic raphidophytes. Clades MAST-4,6-11 form one early-branching bigyran clade. Olisthodiscus weakly groups with Hypogyristea not Raphidomonadea. Phylogenetic analysis shows that MAST-13 is all Bicosoeca. Some gliding uniciliates similar to Incisomonas marina seem to have been misclassified: therefore we establish Incisomonas devorata comb. n. for Rigidomastix devoratum, revise the genus Rigidomastix, transfer Clautriavia parva to Kiitoksia. We make 17 new familes (13 heterokont (three algal), two cercozoan, two amoebozoan).

  7. The Structure of Genetic Diversity in Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) along the North Pacific and Bering Sea Coasts of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, Sandra; Sage, Kevin; Rearick, Jolene; Fowler, Megan C.; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Baibak, Bethany; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Cabello-Pasini, Alehandro; Ward, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) populations occupying coastal waters of Alaska are separated by a peninsula and island archipelago into two Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). From populations in both LMEs, we characterize genetic diversity, population structure, and polarity in gene flow using nuclear microsatellite fragment and chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. An inverse relationship between genetic diversity and latitude was observed (heterozygosity: R2 = 0.738, P < 0.001; allelic richness: R2 = 0.327, P = 0.047), as was significant genetic partitioning across most sampling sites (θ = 0.302, P < 0.0001). Variance in allele frequency was significantly partitioned by region only in cases when a population geographically in the Gulf of Alaska LME (Kinzarof Lagoon) was instead included with populations in the Eastern Bering Sea LME (θp = 0.128–0.172; P < 0.003), suggesting gene flow between the two LMEs in this region. Gene flow among locales was rarely symmetrical, with notable exceptions generally following net coastal ocean current direction. Genetic data failed to support recent proposals that multiple Zostera species (i.e. Z. japonica and Z. angustifolia) are codistributed with Z. marina in Alaska. Comparative analyses also failed to support the hypothesis that eelgrass populations in the North Atlantic derived from eelgrass retained in northeastern Pacific Last Glacial Maximum refugia. These data suggest northeastern Pacific populations are derived from populations expanding northward from temperate populations following climate amelioration at the terminus of the last Pleistocene glaciation.

  8. A salt-inducible chloroplastic monodehydroascorbate reductase from halophyte Avicennia marina confers salt stress tolerance on transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, Kumaresan; George, Suja; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2010-10-01

    Plant growth and productivity are adversely affected by various abiotic stress factors. In our previous study, we used Avicennia marina, a halophytic mangrove, as a model plant system for isolating genes functioning in salt stress tolerance. A large scale random EST sequencing from a salt stressed leaf tissue cDNA library of one month old A. marina plants resulted in identification of a clone showing maximum homology to Monodehydroascorbate reductase (Am-MDAR). MDAR plays a key role in regeneration of ascorbate from monodehydroascorbate for ROS scavenging. In this paper, we report the cellular localization and the ability to confer salt stress tolerance in transgenic tobacco of this salt inducible Am-MDAR. A transit peptide at the N-terminal region of Am-MDAR suggested that it encodes a chloroplastic isoform. The chloroplastic localization was confirmed by stable transformation and expression of the Am-MDAR-GFP fusion protein in tobacco. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing Am-MDAR survived better under conditions of salt stress compared to untransformed control plants. Assays of enzymes involved in ascorbate-glutathione cycle revealed an enhanced activity of MDAR and ascorbate peroxidase whereas the activity of dehyroascorbate reductase was reduced under salt stressed and unstressed conditions in Am-MDAR transgenic lines. The transgenic lines showed an enhanced redox state of ascorbate and reduced levels of malondialdehyde indicating its enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress. The results of our studies could be used as a starting point for genetic engineering of economically important plants tolerant to salt stress.

  9. Survey of helminths, ectoparasites, and chytrid fungus of an introduced population of cane toads, Rhinella marina (Anura: Bufonidae), from Grenada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, Michael C.; Zieger, Ulrike; Groszkowski, Andrew; Gallardo, Bruce; Sages, Patti; Reavis, Roslyn; Faircloth, Leslie; Jacobson, Krystin; Lonce, Nicholas; Pinckney, Rhonda D.; Cole, Rebecca Ann

    2014-01-01

    One hundred specimens of Rhinella marina, (Anura: Bufonidae) collected in St. George's parish, Grenada, from September 2010 to August 2011, were examined for the presence of ectoparasites and helminths. Ninety-five (95%) were parasitized by 1 or more parasite species. Nine species of parasites were found: 1 digenean, 2 acanthocephalans, 4 nematodes, 1 arthropod and 1 pentastome. The endoparasites represented 98.9% of the total number of parasite specimens collected. Grenada represents a new locality record for Mesocoelium monas, Raillietiella frenatus, Pseudoacanthacephalus sp., Aplectana sp., Physocephalus sp., Acanthacephala cystacanth, and Physalopteridae larvae. The digenean M. monas occurred with the highest prevalence of 82%, contrasting many studies of R. marina where nematodes dominate the parasite infracommunity. Female toads were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of Amblyomma dissimile than male toads. Only 2 parasites exhibited a significant difference between wet and dry season with Parapharyngodon grenadensis prevalence highest in the wet season and A. dissimile prevalence highest during the dry season. Additionally, A. dissimilewas significantly more abundant during the dry season.

  10. Aureispira marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a gliding, arachidonic acid-containing bacterium isolated from the southern coastline of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shoichi; Arunpairojana, Vullapa; Suwannachart, Chatrudee; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit; Yokota, Akira

    2006-12-01

    Three strains of gliding bacteria, 24(T), 62 and 71, isolated from a marine sponge and algae from the southern coastline of Thailand, were studied using a polyphasic approach to clarify their taxonomic positions. A phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the three isolates formed a distinct lineage within the family 'Saprospiraceae' of the phylum Bacteroidetes and were related to members of the genus Saprospira. The G+C contents of the isolates were in the range 38-39 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-7. The predominant cellular fatty acids were 20 : 4omega6c (arachidonic acid), 16 : 0 and iso-17 : 0. On the basis of morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics, together with DNA-DNA hybridization data and 16S rRNA gene sequences, the isolates represent a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Aureispira marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aureispira marina is 24(T) (=IAM 15389(T)=TISTR 1719(T)).

  11. Effect of lycopene from Chlorella marina on high cholesterol-induced oxidative damage and inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Renju, G L; Kurup, G Muraleedhara; Saritha Kumari, C H

    2014-02-01

    Even though the role of all-trans lycopene from tomato in controlling atherosclerosis was reported, but no report is available on the cis-isomer of lycopene obtained from an easily available source green algae Chlorella marina. So in this study, Sprague Dawley rats fed with high-cholesterol diet were given standard drug lovastatin; algal lycopene (AL) (cis/all-trans 40:60) and tomato all-trans lycopene (TL) and the following parameters were studied. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, triglycerides were decreased significantly and the high-density lipoprotein levels were increased on treatment with AL. The activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were found to be increased, whereas thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were decreased in AL when compared to the drug and TL-treated rats. The activities of inflammatory marker enzymes like cyclooxygenase, 15-lipoxygenase in monocytes and myeloperoxidase, C-reactive protein and ceruloplasmin levels in serum were found to be decreased on treatment with AL. Histopathological studies revealed that lycopene from this alga could reduce fatty liver and aortic plaque when compared to the drug and TL. Algal lycopene showed very significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect in high-cholesterol fed rats. Therefore, AL from C. marina would be recommended for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

  12. The neighborhood matters: effects of neighbor number and sibling (or kin) competition on floral traits in Spergularia marina (Caryophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Delesalle, Véronique A; Mazer, Susan J

    2002-12-01

    Effects of abiotic factors on the expression of floral and gender traits have been well documented in wild plant species; by contrast, little is known of the effect(s) on an individual's floral phenotype of the genetic composition of its neighboring conspecifics. Here we report the results of a greenhouse experiment conducted to detect the effects of genetic attributes of an individual's local environment on the expression of floral traits in the selfing annual, Spergularia marina (Caryophyllaceae). First, to test the hypothesis that negative effects of intraspecific competition are stronger when an individual competes with genetically similar individuals than when it competes with unrelated genotypes, we evaluated the effects of the number of nearest-neighbor kin (vs. unrelated individuals) on floral traits. Plants adjacent to two kin produced significantly fewer stamens per flower than plants adjacent to one or no siblings, indicating that kin competition reduced allocation to male function. Second, to test the hypothesis that the genetic diversity of a neighborhood influences the phenotype of a focal plant, we determined whether the number of maternal families represented among an individual's nearest neighbors influences its phenotype. The number of maternal families surrounding a focal plant did not affect floral trait expression. These results suggest that in S. marina, male function is more sensitive than female function to the genetic environment and that as an individual's genetic similarity to its neighbors increases, so do the negative effects of competition for limited resources.

  13. Liver histopathology in the cane toad, Rhinella marina (Amphibia: Bufonidae), induced by Ortleppascaris sp. larvae (Nematoda: Ascarididae).

    PubMed

    Silva, Jefferson P E; da Silva, Djane C B; Melo, Francisco T V; Giese, Elane G; Furtado, Adriano P; Santos, Jeannie N

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to parasites is considered to be an important factor in the development of many diseases and histopathologies which are the result of the parasite-host interaction. The present study evaluated the impact of natural infection by larvae of Ortleppascaris sp. (Nematoda: Ascaridida) in the liver of the cane toad Rhinella marina (Linnaeus, 1758). Larvae were encysted in nodules delimited by collagenous fibers and fibroblasts or freely within the hepatic parenchyma, provoking a clear response from the host. The histological examination of the liver revealed viable larvae in a number of different developmental stages, as well as cysts filled with amorphous material and cell residues and surrounded by dense fibrotic tissue. The infection of the liver by these larvae induces a significant increase in the area occupied by melanomacrophages and a reduction or deficit in the vascularization of the liver, hypertrophy of the hepatocytes, vacuolar bodies, and cytoplasmatic granules. Focal concentrations of inflammatory infiltrates were observed enclosing the unencapsulated early-stage larvae. These results indicate that infection by Ortleppascaris sp. induces severe physiological problems and histopathological lesions in the liver of R. marina .

  14. Photosynthetic Utilization of Bicarbonate in Zostera marina Is Reduced by Inhibitors of Mitochondrial ATPase and Electron Transport1

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Herman; Axelsson, Lennart

    2008-01-01

    When Zostera marina was irradiated after a period of darkness, initiation of photosynthetic O2 evolution occurred in two phases. During a lag phase, lasting 4 to 5 min, photosynthesis was supported by a diffusive entry of CO2. Photosynthesis then rapidly increased to its full rate. Tris buffer, at a concentration of 50 mm, completely inhibited this increase without affecting CO2-supported photosynthesis during the lag phase. These results verify that the increase in photosynthesis after the lag phase depended on an activation of bicarbonate (HCO3−) utilization through acid zones generated by proton pumps located to the outer cell membrane. In similar experiments, 6.25 μm of the mitochondrial ATPase blocker oligomycin inhibited photosynthetic HCO3− utilization by more than 60%. Antimycin A, a selective blocker of mitochondrial electron transport, caused a similar inhibition of HCO3− utilization. Measurements at elevated CO2 concentrations verified that neither oligomycin nor antimycin interfered with linear photosynthetic electron transport or with CO2 fixation. Thus, a major part of the ATP used for the generation of acid zones involved in HCO3− utilization in Z. marina was derived from mitochondrial respiration. PMID:18434609

  15. The Structure of Genetic Diversity in Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) along the North Pacific and Bering Sea Coasts of Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Sandra L.; Sage, George K; Rearick, Jolene R.; Fowler, Meg C.; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Baibak, Bethany; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy; Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro; Ward, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Eelgrass (Zostera marina) populations occupying coastal waters of Alaska are separated by a peninsula and island archipelago into two Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). From populations in both LMEs, we characterize genetic diversity, population structure, and polarity in gene flow using nuclear microsatellite fragment and chloroplast and nuclear sequence data. An inverse relationship between genetic diversity and latitude was observed (heterozygosity: R2 = 0.738, P < 0.001; allelic richness: R2 = 0.327, P = 0.047), as was significant genetic partitioning across most sampling sites (θ = 0.302, P < 0.0001). Variance in allele frequency was significantly partitioned by region only in cases when a population geographically in the Gulf of Alaska LME (Kinzarof Lagoon) was instead included with populations in the Eastern Bering Sea LME (θp = 0.128–0.172; P < 0.003), suggesting gene flow between the two LMEs in this region. Gene flow among locales was rarely symmetrical, with notable exceptions generally following net coastal ocean current direction. Genetic data failed to support recent proposals that multiple Zostera species (i.e. Z. japonica and Z. angustifolia) are codistributed with Z. marina in Alaska. Comparative analyses also failed to support the hypothesis that eelgrass populations in the North Atlantic derived from eelgrass retained in northeastern Pacific Last Glacial Maximum refugia. These data suggest northeastern Pacific populations are derived from populations expanding northward from temperate populations following climate amelioration at the terminus of the last Pleistocene glaciation. PMID:27104836

  16. Salinity and temperature significantly influence seed germination, seedling establishment, and seedling growth of eelgrass Zostera marina L.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaochun; Wang, Pengmei; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Xiaomei; Gu, Ruiting

    2016-01-01

    Globally, seagrass beds have been recognized as critical yet declining coastal habitats. To mitigate seagrass losses, seagrass restorations have been conducted in worldwide over the past two decades. Seed utilization is considered to be an important approach in seagrass restoration efforts. In this study, we investigated the effects of salinity and temperature on seed germination, seedling establishment, and seedling growth of eelgrass Zostera marina L. (Swan Lake, northern China). We initially tested the effects of salinity (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40 ppt) and water temperature (5, 10, 15, and 20 °C) on seed germination to identify optimal levels. To identify levels of salinity that could potentially limit survival and growth, and, consequently, the spatial distribution of seedlings in temperate estuaries, we then examined the effect of freshwater and other salinity levels (10, 20, and 30 ppt) on seedling growth and establishment to confirm suitable conditions for seedling development. Finally, we examined the effect of transferring germinated seeds from freshwater or low salinity levels (1, 5, and 15 ppt) to natural seawater (32 ppt) on seedling establishment rate (SER) at 15 °C. In our research, we found that: (1) Mature seeds had a considerably lower moisture content than immature seeds; therefore, moisture content may be a potential indicator of Z. marina seed maturity; (2) Seed germination significantly increased at low salinity (p < 0.001) and high temperature (p < 0.001). Salinity had a much stronger influence on seed germination than temperature. Maximum seed germination (88.67 ± 5.77%) was recorded in freshwater at 15 °C; (3) Freshwater and low salinity levels (< 20 ppt) increased germination but had a strong negative effect on seedling morphology (number of leaves per seedling reduced from 2 to 0, and maximum seedling leaf length reduced from 4.48 to 0 cm) and growth (seedling biomass reduced by 46.15–66.67% and maximum seedling length

  17. In-situ Phytoremediation of PAH and PCB Contaminated Marine Sediments with Eelgrass (Zostera marina)

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Fortman, Timothy J.; Thom, Ronald M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2009-10-01

    In view of the fact that there are presently no cost-effective in-situ treatment technologies for contaminated sediments, a 60 week long phytoremediation feasibility study was conducted in seawater-supplied outdoor ponds to determine whether eelgrass (Zostera marina) is capable of removing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from submerged marine sediments. It was determined that all PAHs and PCBs, independent of the number of aromatic rings and degree of chlorination, respectively, were removed to a much larger extent in planted sediments compared to unplanted controls. After 60 weeks of treatment, the concentration of total PAHs decreased by 73% in planted sediments but only 25% in unplanted controls. Similarly, total PCBs declined by 60% in the presence of plants while none were removed in the unplanted sediment. Overall, PAH and PCB biodegradation was greatest in the sediment layer that contained most of the eelgrass roots. Abiotic desorption tests conducted at week 32 confirmed that the phytoremediation process was not controlled by mass-transfer or bioavailability limitations since all PAHs and PCBs desorbed rapidly and to a large extent from the sediment. PAHs were detected in both roots and shoots, with root and shoot bioaccumulation factors for total PAHs amounting to approximately 3 and 1, respectively, after 60 weeks of phytoremediation treatment. Similarly, the root bioccumulation factor for total PCBs was around 4, while no PCBs were detected in the eelgrass leaves at the end of the experiment. The total mass fraction of PAHs and PCBs absorbed and translocated by plant biomass during the 60 week period was insignificant, amounting to less than 0.5% of the total mass of PAHs and PCBs which was initially present in the sediment. Finally, the number of total heterotrophic bacteria and hydrocarbon degraders was slightly but not statistically significantly greater in planted sediments than in unplanted controls

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of the Solvent-Partitioned Fractions from Spergularia marina in LPS-Stimulated RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chang-Suk

    2014-12-01

    As a part of ongoing research to elucidate and characterize antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutraceuticals, solvent-partitioned fractions from Spergularia marina were tested for their ability to scavenge radicals and suppress inflammation. The results of the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay indicate that solvent-partitioned fractions from S. marina scavenged intracellular radicals in H2O2-stimulated mouse macrophages. The tested fractions decreased the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of inflammation mediators, namely, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin (IL)-6, by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse macrophages, indicating that S. marina decreases inflammation. Among all tested fractions [i.e., H2O, n-buthanol (n-BuOH), 85% aqueous methanol (aq. MeOH), and n-hexane], the 85% aq. MeOH fraction showed the strongest antioxidant and anti-inflammatory response. The 85% aq. MeOH fraction scavenged 80% of the free radicals produced by H2O2-induced control cells. In addition, NO production was 98% lower in 85% aq. MeOH fraction-treated cells compared to LPS-induced control cells. The mRNA expression of iNOS and IL-6 was also suppressed in 85% aq. MeOH fraction-treated cells. The results of the current study suggest that the phenolic compound components of S. marina are responsible for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects.

  19. COMPARISON OF ANNUAL PRODUCTION ECOLOGY OF NATIVE EELGRASS ZOSTERA MARINA AND THE NON-NATIVE DWARF EELGRASS Z. JAPONICA IN YAQUINA BAY, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    When non-native plant species invade a system they often change patterns of primary production. I evaluate the contribution of the seagrass Zostera marina and it's non-native congener Z. japonica to primary production in Yaquina Bay. Few measurements of Z. japonica production e...

  20. MAPPING INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA L.) IN THREE COASTAL ESTUARIES OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST USA USING FALSE-COLOUR NEAR-INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study describes a hybrid technique of digitally classifying aerial photography used for mapping the intertidal habitat of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in Pacific Northwest USA estuaries. The large tidal range (2-3 m) in this region exposes most of this seagrass community at ...

  1. Comparison of non-indigenous dwarf eelgrass (Zostera japonica) and native eelgrass (Z. marina) distributions in a northeast Pacific estuary: 1997-2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study addressed the following question: In a coastal estuary of the northeastern Pacific Ocean with a relatively large areal extent of the native eelgrass Zostera marina, is an expanding distribution of the non-indigenous dwarf eelgrass Z. japonica accompanied by a measurab...

  2. Phylogeography of the Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina species complex: evidence for long-distance dispersal, and for range expansions and restricted gene flow in the northeast Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Derycke, S; Remerie, T; Backeljau, T; Vierstraete, A; Vanfleteren, J; Vincx, M; Moens, T

    2008-07-01

    Pinpointing processes that structure the geographical distribution of genetic diversity of marine species and lead to speciation is challenging because of the lack of obvious dispersal barriers and the likelihood of substantial (passive) dispersal in oceans. In addition, cryptic radiations with sympatric distributions abound in marine species, challenging the allopatric speciation mechanism. Here, we present a phylogeographical study of the marine nematode species complex Rhabditis (Pellioditis) marina to investigate processes shaping genetic structure and speciation. Rhabditis (P.) marina lives on decaying macroalgae in the intertidal, and may therefore disperse over considerable distances. Rhabditis (P.) marina consists of several cryptic species sympatrically distributed at a local scale. Genetic variation in the COI gene was screened in 1362 specimens from 45 locations around the world. Two nuclear DNA genes (ITS and D2D3) were sequenced to infer phylogenetic species. We found evidence for ten sympatrically distributed cryptic species, seven of which show a strong genetic structuring. A historical signature showed evidence for restricted gene flow with occasional long-distance dispersal and range expansions pre-dating the last glacial maximum. Our data also point to a genetic break around the British Isles and a contact zone in the Southern Bight of the North Sea. We provide evidence for the transoceanic distribution of at least one cryptic species (PmIII) and discuss the dispersal capacity of marine nematodes. The allopatric distribution of some intraspecific phylogroups and of closely related cryptic species points to the potential for allopatric speciation in R. (P.) marina.

  3. Climate-linked mechanisms driving spatial and temporal variation in eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) growth and assemblage structure in Pacific Northwest estuaries, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Southard, Susan L.; Borde, Amy B.

    2014-11-01

    Using laboratory experiments on temperature and leaf metabolism, and field data sets from Washington, between 1991 and 2013, we developed lines of evidence showing that variations in water temperature, mean sea level, and desiccation stress appear to drive spatial and temporal variations in eelgrass (Zostera marina).

  4. Has the rapidly expanding invasive dwarf eelgrass Zostera japonica in Yaquina estuary, Oregon impacted the distribution of native eelgrass Zostera marina – a critical intertidal habitat? - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Native eelgrass, Zostera marina, occupies a significant portion of marine-dominated intertidal and near-subtidal sectors of many coastal estuaries. In recent decades an invasive congener, Z. japonica, has become established in many Pacific Northwest estuaries. We measured the h...

  5. Has the rapidly expanding invasive dwarf eelgrass Zostera japonica in Yaquina estuary, Oregon impacted the distribution of native eelgrass Zostera marina – a critical intertidal habitat?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Native eelgrass, Zostera marina, occupies a significant portion of marine-dominated intertidal and near-subtidal sectors of many coastal estuaries. In recent decades an invasive congener, Z. japonica, has become established in many Pacific Northwest estuaries. We measured the h...

  6. COMPARISON OF ANNUAL PRODUCTION ECOLOGY OF NATIVE EELGRASS ZOSTERA MARINA AND THE NON-NATIVE DWARF EELGRASS Z. JAPONICA IN YAQUINA BAY, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    When non-native plant species invade a system they often change patterns of primary production. I evaluate the contribution of the seagrass Zostera marina and it's non-native congener Z. japonica to primary production in Yaquina Bay. Few measurements of Z. japonica production e...

  7. MAPPING INTERTIDAL EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA L.) IN THREE COASTAL ESTUARIES OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST USA USING FALSE-COLOUR NEAR-INFRARED AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study describes a hybrid technique of digitally classifying aerial photography used for mapping the intertidal habitat of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in Pacific Northwest USA estuaries. The large tidal range (2-3 m) in this region exposes most of this seagrass community at ...

  8. Leaf water storage increases with salinity and aridity in the mangrove Avicennia marina: integration of leaf structure, osmotic adjustment, and access to multiple water sources.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoa T; Meir, Patrick; Sack, Lawren; Evans, John R; Oliveira, Rafael S; Ball, Marilyn C

    2017-04-05

    Leaf structure and water relations were studied in a temperate population of Avicennia marina subsp. australasica along a natural salinity gradient (28 to 49 parts per thousand (ppt)) and compared with two subspecies grown naturally in similar soil salinities to those of subsp. australasica but under different climates: subsp. eucalyptifolia (salinity 30 ppt, wet tropics) and subsp. marina (salinity 46 ppt, arid tropics). Leaf thickness, leaf dry mass per area, and water content increased with salinity and aridity. Turgor loss point declined with increase in soil salinity, driven mainly by differences in osmotic potential at full turgor. Nevertheless, a high modulus of elasticity (ε) contributed to maintenance of high cell hydration at turgor loss point. Despite similarity among leaves in leaf water storage capacitance, total leaf water storage increased with increasing salinity and aridity. The time that stored water alone could sustain an evaporation rate of 1 mmol m(-2) s(-1) ranged from 77 to 126 min from subspecies eucalyptifolia to ssp. marina, respectively. Achieving full leaf hydration or turgor would require water from sources other than the roots, emphasizing the importance of multiple water sources to growth and survival of Avicennia marina across gradients in salinity and aridity.

  9. The filtration activity of a serpulid polychaete population ( Ficopomatus enigmaticus (Fauvel) and its effects on water quality in a coastal marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, B. R.; Stuart, V.; de Villiers, M.

    1989-12-01

    An estimate of the total standing stock of Ficopomatus enigmaticus (Fauvel) in the Marina da Gama, Zandvlei, near Cape Town was made, and some aspects of the animals' filter-feeding behaviour investigated. Working on values of 5·23 g dry mass of worm (excluding tube) m -2 on the submerged aquatic plant Potamogeton pectinatus L., plus 84·9 g m -2 on the canal walls, the total standing stock of the serpulid was estimated at 2·88±2·24 t (1·4 t on Potamogeton; 1·48 t on canal walls). At the average particle concentrations of Marina water of 5·27 mg l -1, the clearnace rate of F. enigmaticus was 8·59 ml mg -1 worm h -1, resulting in an ingestion rate of 45·27 mg mg -1 worm h -1 of particles in the size range 2-16 μm. Clearance and ingestion rates both increased in direct proportion to food concentration. Using estimates of total standing stocks within the Marina, the F. enigmaticus population clears 2·47 × 10 7 l of water h -1 and consumes 1·3 × 10 8 mg of particles h -1 in the 2-16 μm size range. Thus, the entire volume of the Marina will be filtered in 26·1 h through the activities of this animal alone, illustrating its importance for the maintenance of water quality within this moderately polluted system.

  10. Effect of multiple stressors on eelgrass Zostera marina L. from the Pacific Northwest, USA: Manipulation of temperature and nutrients - November 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine eelgrass beds in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) are being exposed to a range of natural and anthropogenic stressors and climate change. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of temperature and nutrient quantity on Z. marina growth and physiology. Ma...

  11. DESICCATION IS A LIMITING FACTOR FOR EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA L.) DISTRIBUTION IN THE INTERTIDAL ZONE OF A NORTHEASTERN P{ACIFIC (USA) ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intertidal irradiance, temperature, and aerial exposure were measured for two years in intertidal Zostera marina beds located in Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR, USA). These physical data were correlated with plant growth and other metrics measured at intervals during the study. Pho...

  12. DESICCATION IS A LIMITING FACTOR FOR EELGRASS (ZOSTERA MARINA L.) DISTRIBUTION IN THE INTERTIDAL ZONE OF A NORTHEASTERN P{ACIFIC (USA) ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intertidal irradiance, temperature, and aerial exposure were measured for two years in intertidal Zostera marina beds located in Yaquina Bay (Newport, OR, USA). These physical data were correlated with plant growth and other metrics measured at intervals during the study. Pho...

  13. Comparison of non-indigenous dwarf eelgrass (Zostera japonica) and native eelgrass (Z. marina) distributions in a northeast Pacific estuary: 1997-2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study addressed the following question: In a coastal estuary of the northeastern Pacific Ocean with a relatively large areal extent of the native eelgrass Zostera marina, is an expanding distribution of the non-indigenous dwarf eelgrass Z. japonica accompanied by a measurab...

  14. Has the rapidly expanding invasive dwarf eelgrass Zostera japonica in Yaquina estuary, Oregon impacted the distribution of native eelgrass Zostera marina – a critical intertidal habitat?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Native eelgrass, Zostera marina, occupies a significant portion of marine-dominated intertidal and near-subtidal sectors of many coastal estuaries. In recent decades an invasive congener, Z. japonica, has become established in many Pacific Northwest estuaries. We measured the h...

  15. Has the rapidly expanding invasive dwarf eelgrass Zostera japonica in Yaquina estuary, Oregon impacted the distribution of native eelgrass Zostera marina – a critical intertidal habitat? - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Native eelgrass, Zostera marina, occupies a significant portion of marine-dominated intertidal and near-subtidal sectors of many coastal estuaries. In recent decades an invasive congener, Z. japonica, has become established in many Pacific Northwest estuaries. We measured the h...

  16. Effect of multiple stressors on eelgrass Zostera marina L. from the Pacific Northwest, USA: Manipulation of temperature and nutrients - November 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuarine eelgrass beds in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) are being exposed to a range of natural and anthropogenic stressors and climate change. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of temperature and nutrient quantity on Z. marina growth and physiology. Ma...

  17. Changes in the distribution of the grey mangrove Avicennia marina (Forsk.) using large scale aerial color infrared photographs: are the changes related to habitat modification for mosquito control?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Dale, P. E. R.; Chandica, A. L.; Breitfuss, M. J.

    2004-09-01

    Runnelling, a method of habitat modification used for mosquito management in intertidal saltmarshes in Australia, alters marsh hydrology. The objective of this research was to assess if runnelling had affected the distribution of the grey mangrove ( Avicennia marina (Forsk.)) at a study site in southeast Queensland. Since runnelling is carried out in diverse marshes a second aim was to assess differences in mangrove colonisation in the two main saltmarsh species in the area. These are marine couch [ Sporobolus virginicus (L.) Kunth.] and samphire [ Sarcocornia quinqueflora (Bunge ex Ung.-Stern.)]. Runnels at the study site were in an area dominated by Sporobolus. The mangrove area was measured by classifying digital color infrared (CIR) data obtained from aerial photographs acquired in 1982, which was 3 years before runnelling, and in 1987, 1991 and 1999, 2-14 years after. Changes in the spatial extent of A. marina were identified using difference images produced from post-classification change detection. The results showed that runnels did not significantly influence the distribution of A. marina at the study site. At a more detailed level differences in A. marina establishment in the Sporobolus and Sarcocornia areas were determined from counts of trees on the aerial photographs. There was a greater proportion of mangroves in Sarcocornia than Sporobolus and this increased over time. This may be related to differences in density between the plant species, to grapsid crab activity or to other edaphic conditions. There may be implications for runnelling in Sarcocornia marshes. The large increase observed in A. marina in the area generally is likely to be related to factors such as catchment modification or tidal/sea-level changes. It is concluded that runnelling has not led to mangrove establishment in the Sporobolus dominated saltmarsh.

  18. Quantitative PCR Reveals Strong Spatial and Temporal Variation of the Wasting Disease Pathogen, Labyrinthula zosterae in Northern European Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Beds

    PubMed Central

    Bockelmann, Anna-Christina; Tams, Verena; Ploog, Jana; Schubert, Philipp R.; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Seagrass beds are the foundation species of functionally important coastal ecosystems worldwide. The world’s largest losses of the widespread seagrass Zostera marina (eelgrass) have been reported as a consequence of wasting disease, an infection with the endophytic protist Labyrinthula zosterae. During one of the most extended epidemics in the marine realm, ∼90% of East and Western Atlantic eelgrass beds died-off between 1932 and 1934. Today, small outbreaks continue to be reported, but the current extent of L. zosterae in European meadows is completely unknown. In this study we quantify the abundance and prevalence of the wasting disease pathogen among 19 Z. marina populations in northern European coastal waters, using quantitative PCR (QPCR) with primers targeting a species specific portion of the internally transcribed spacer (ITS1) of L. zosterae. Spatially, we found marked variation among sites with abundances varying between 0 and 126 cells mg−1 Z. marina dry weight (mean: 5.7 L. zosterae cells mg−1 Z. marina dry weight ±1.9 SE) and prevalences ranged from 0–88.9%. Temporarily, abundances varied between 0 and 271 cells mg−1 Z. marina dry weight (mean: 8.5±2.6 SE), while prevalences ranged from zero in winter and early spring to 96% in summer. Field concentrations accessed via bulk DNA extraction and subsequent QPCR correlated well with prevalence data estimated via isolation and cultivation from live plant tissue. L. zosterae was not only detectable in black lesions, a sign of Labyrinthula-induced necrosis, but also occurred in green, apparently healthy tissue. We conclude that L. zosterae infection is common (84% infected populations) in (northern) European eelgrass populations with highest abundances during the summer months. In the light of global climate change and increasing rate of marine diseases our data provide a baseline for further studies on the causes of pathogenic outbreaks of L. zosterae. PMID:23658711

  19. Low absorption state of phycocyanin from Acaryochloris marina antenna system: on the interplay between ionic strength and excitonic coupling.

    PubMed

    Nganou, Collins

    2013-07-28

    This paper studies the excitonic factor in the excited state energy transfer of phycobilisome (PBS) by using a polarized time-resolved pump-probe and by changing the ionic strength of the cofactors' medium in the PBS of Acaryochloris marina (A. marina). As a result, the interplay between the surrounding medium and the closely excited adjacent cofactors is shown to be a negligible factor of the excitonic decay kinetics at 618 nm of the phycocyanin (PC), while it appears as a driving factor of an increase in excitonic delocalization at 630 nm. The obtained anisotropy values are consistent with the contribution of ionic strength in the excitonic mechanism in PBS. These values were 0.38 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 618 nm, and 0.52 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 630-635 nm. The anisotropy value of 0.52 in high phosphate is similar at 630 nm and 635 nm, which is consistent with an excitonic delocalization band at 635 nm. The 635 nm band is suggested to show the true low energy level of PC in A. marina PBS. The anisotropy decay kinetic at 630 nm suggests that the excited state population of PC is not all equilibrated in 3 ps because of the existence of the 10 ps decay kinetic component. The presence of the slow kinetic decay component in high, and low ionic strength, is consistent with a 10 and 14 ps energy transfer pathway, while the 450 fs kinetic decay component is consistent with the presence of an additional excitation energy transfer pathway between adjacent α84 and β84. Furthermore, the 450 fs decay kinetic is suggested to be trapped in the trimer, while the 400 fs decay kinetic rules out an excitonic flow from low energy level PC to allophycoyanin. This excitonic flow may occur between β84 in adjacent trimers, towards the low energy state of the PBS rod.

  20. Low absorption state of phycocyanin from Acaryochloris marina antenna system: On the interplay between ionic strength and excitonic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganou, Collins

    2013-07-01

    This paper studies the excitonic factor in the excited state energy transfer of phycobilisome (PBS) by using a polarized time-resolved pump-probe and by changing the ionic strength of the cofactors' medium in the PBS of Acaryochloris marina (A. marina). As a result, the interplay between the surrounding medium and the closely excited adjacent cofactors is shown to be a negligible factor of the excitonic decay kinetics at 618 nm of the phycocyanin (PC), while it appears as a driving factor of an increase in excitonic delocalization at 630 nm. The obtained anisotropy values are consistent with the contribution of ionic strength in the excitonic mechanism in PBS. These values were 0.38 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 618 nm, and 0.52 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 630-635 nm. The anisotropy value of 0.52 in high phosphate is similar at 630 nm and 635 nm, which is consistent with an excitonic delocalization band at 635 nm. The 635 nm band is suggested to show the true low energy level of PC in A. marina PBS. The anisotropy decay kinetic at 630 nm suggests that the excited state population of PC is not all equilibrated in 3 ps because of the existence of the 10 ps decay kinetic component. The presence of the slow kinetic decay component in high, and low ionic strength, is consistent with a 10 and 14 ps energy transfer pathway, while the 450 fs kinetic decay component is consistent with the presence of an additional excitation energy transfer pathway between adjacent α84 and β84. Furthermore, the 450 fs decay kinetic is suggested to be trapped in the trimer, while the 400 fs decay kinetic rules out an excitonic flow from low energy level PC to allophycoyanin. This excitonic flow may occur between β84 in adjacent trimers, towards the low energy state of the PBS rod.

  1. On observing high frequency dynamics in coastal regions: latest insights of the MARINA project.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblou, Laurent; Delebecque, Caroline; Vignudelli, Stefano; Jerome, Bouffard; Cipollini, Paolo; Morrow, Rosemary; Birol, Florence

    (ALtimeter-Based Investigations in COrsica, Capraia and Contiguous Areas) project and this leads to the X-TRACK software. Numerous studies have since illustrated the benefits of such software to the overall improvement of al-timeter product quality in the coastal systems. A key-task of MARgin Integrated Approach (MARINA) project funded by the French Space Agency CNES is to extend the potential of the software and its products to the high rate measurements provided in the altimetry prod-ucts. In this paper, high resolution, optimized coastal altimetry products from the X-TRACK processor and other datasets coming from PISTACH and COASTALT projects, respectively funded by CNES and European Space Agency ESA, have been compared to in situ observa-tions in the Straits of Bonifaccio, a pilot site in the area of Corsica and Sardinia islands in the NW Mediterranean Sea. The results of this study are illustrated, highlighting the potential and limitations of such data sets for monitoring coastal dynamics and toward integration into coastal hydrodynamical models.

  2. First report of exotic ticks (Amblyomma rotundatum) parasitizing invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) on the Island of Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Kelehear, Crystal; Hudson, Cameron M; Mertins, James W; Shine, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Our surveys of 1401 invasive cane toads (Rhinella marina) from the Hawaiian islands of Hawai'i, O'ahu, and Maui revealed the presence of an exotic tick, Amblyomma rotundatum. Immature and adult female ticks infested three wild adult toads at a single site in the vicinity of a zoo south of Hilo, Island of Hawai'i, Hawai'i, USA. We found no tick-infested toads on O'ahu or Maui. This tick infests cane toads in their native Neotropical range, but it was excluded from Hawai'i when the original founder toads were introduced over 80 years ago. The circumstances of our discovery suggest that A. rotundatum was independently and belatedly introduced to Hawai'i with imported zoo animals, and Hawai'i now joins Florida as the second U.S. state where this tick is established. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Distribution and community composition of lichens on mature mangroves (Avicennia marina subsp. australasica (Walp.) J.Everett) in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Christy L.; Er, Orhan A. H.; Winder, Linton

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove forests of a single trees species, Avicennia marina subsp. australasica are widespread in the upper North Island of New Zealand, but there is little available information on the diversity of epiphytes such as lichens within them. A survey of 200 trees from 20 mangrove sites recorded a total of 106 lichen species from 45 genera. Two of these species are considered to be ‘Threatened’, five ‘At Risk’ and 27 ‘Data Deficient’. Multiple regression indicated that tree diameter (DBH) and mean annual rain days positively influenced site species richness. Multidimensional scaling showed that sites from the same geographical region generally formed distinct clusters. Redundancy analysis indicated that mean annual wet days, latitude and DBH measurably influenced species composition. PMID:28666019

  4. Morphological and molecular characterization of Ortleppascaris sp. larvae, parasites of the cane toad Rhinella marina from eastern Amazonia.

    PubMed

    e Silva, Jefferson P; Melo, Francisco T V; Silva, Luciana C N; Gonçalves, Evonnildo C; Giese, Elane G; Furtado, Adriano P; Santos, Jeannie N

    2013-02-01

    This study presents a new record for the occurrence of larval Ortleppascaris sp.(Sprent, 1978). The nematodes were collected from inside fibrous cysts found in the livers of cane toads, Rhinella marina (Linnaeus, 1758), captured in eastern Brazilian Amazonia. This is the first record of Ortleppascaris sp. larvae in both Brazil and this amphibian host, increasing its distribution in South America as well as expanding the number of helminths known to infect this toad. The detailed description of Ortleppascaris sp. provides new taxonomic data for these larvae, as well as sequences of the internal transcribed spacers and small subunit DNA segments, and the cytochrome oxidase I gene, which will, in time, contribute to a better understanding of the phylogeny of this group of parasites.

  5. Effects of anaerobiosis on in vivo protein synthesis in the roots of a marine angiosperm zostera marina

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.D.; Alberte, R.S. )

    1989-04-01

    The roots of the temperate seagrass Zostera marina undergo daily periods of anaerobiosis at night. These diurnal periods of anoxia alter many metabolic processes in the roots including carbon and nitrogen metabolism, amino acid synthesis, and synthesis and levels of ATP, ADP and AMP. To further characterize the effects of anaerobiosis, we determined in vivo rates of protein synthesis by measuring the relative incorporation of {sup 35}S-MET in TCA precipitated protein samples. Results from these studies show that in vivo protein synthesis decreases continuously during 12 h of anaerobiosis and correlates with changes in ATP levels under similar conditions. Furthermore, polypeptide patterns obtained by SDS-PAGE and 2D-SDSPAGE indicate that anaerobiosis leads to differential protein synthesis in the roots.

  6. Accumulation of trace metals in grey mangrove Avicennia marina fine nutritive roots: the role of rhizosphere processes.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Punarbasu; Nath, Bibhash; Birch, Gavin

    2014-02-15

    Mangrove sediment has long been recognized as being important in restricting the mobility of contaminants in estuarine environments. To investigate the role of rhizosphere processes in the accumulation of trace metals in mangrove fine nutritive roots, the mangrove sediments and associated fine nutritive roots are collected from five major embayments of Sydney estuary (Australia) for geochemical studies. In this estuary Avicennia marina sediments are accumulating large quantities of trace metals due to presence of abundant fine sediment (<62.5 μm) and organic matter as well as anthropogenic input. Accumulation of trace metals in fine nutritive roots responds to total sediment chemistry mainly due to rhizosphere sediment geochemical processes resulting in a strong linear correlation between metal concentrations in fine nutritive roots vs. total and bio-available contents in sediments. Accumulation of trace metals in fine nutritive roots is almost always exceeds rhizosphere total sediment metal concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Isotopic signatures of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) as bioindicator of anthropogenic nutrient input in the western Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Philipp R; Karez, Rolf; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Dierking, Jan

    2013-07-15

    Eutrophication is a global environmental problem. Better management of this threat requires more accurate assessments of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) inputs to coastal systems than can be obtained with traditional measures. Recently, primary producer N isotopic signatures have emerged as useful proxy of such inputs. Here, we demonstrated for the first time the applicability of this method using the widespread eelgrass (Zostera marina) in the highly eutrophic Baltic Sea. Spatial availability of sewage N across a bay with one major sewage outflow predicted by eelgrass δ(15)N was high near and downstream of the outflow compared to upstream, but returned to upstream levels within 4 km downstream from the outfall. General conclusions were corroborated by traditional eutrophication measures, but in contrast to these measures were fully quantitative. Eelgrass N isotope ratios therefore show high potential for coastal screens of eutrophication in the Baltic Sea, and in other areas with eelgrass meadows.

  8. Diel and seasonal variation of a molluscan taxocoenosis associated with a Zostera marina bed in southern Spain (Alboran Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, Jose L.; Urra, Javier; Salas, Carmen

    2008-09-01

    The diel and seasonal variation of molluscs living in a Zostera marina bed (12-14 m depth) from southern Spain have been studied for one year using a small Agassiz trawl for collecting the samples (222 m2). The frequent and dominant species were very similar in both diurnal and nocturnal samples, including mainly gastropods such as Jujubinus striatus, Nassarius pygmaeus, Mitrella minor, Calliostoma planatum, Rissoa membranacea or Smaragdia viridis. Nevertheless, a significant increase of abundance of scavengers (e.g. Nassarius spp.) and carnivores (e.g. cephalopods) was registered in nocturnal samples. The abundance was maximal in spring and summer in diurnal and nocturnal samples and also in autumn for nocturnal ones, displaying significantly higher values in nocturnal samples. The species richness, diversity and evenness displayed a similar seasonal trend for diurnal and nocturnal samples, with maximum values during summer months. Monthly variation of the molluscan composition (species presence-absence data) was more acute than diel variation, according to the Cluster, MDS and ANOSIM results. Nevertheless, both monthly and diel changes in the structure (species abundance data) of the molluscan taxocoenosis were important throughout the year. Diel changes in the structure of the molluscan fauna are related to an increase of abundance of some species at nighttime due to vertical movements from the sediment to the shoots or along them (e.g. J. striatus, Nassarius spp.) or due to horizontal movements from adjacent habitats (e.g. cephalopods). Nevertheless, some species such as Rissoa spp. or Bittium spp. stay on the leaves of Z. marina during day as well as nighttime.

  9. Population genetic structure of eelgrass (Zostera marina) on the Korean coast: Current status and conservation implications for future management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hwan; Kang, Ji Hyoun; Jang, Ji Eun; Choi, Sun Kyeong; Kim, Min Ji; Park, Sang Rul; Lee, Hyuk Je

    2017-01-01

    Seagrasses provide numerous ecosystem services for coastal and estuarine environments, such as nursery functions, erosion protection, pollution filtration, and carbon sequestration. Zostera marina (common name "eelgrass") is one of the seagrass bed-forming species distributed widely in the northern hemisphere, including the Korean Peninsula. Recently, however, there has been a drastic decline in the population size of Z. marina worldwide, including Korea. We examined the current population genetic status of this species on the southern coast of Korea by estimating the levels of genetic diversity and genetic structure of 10 geographic populations using eight nuclear microsatellite markers. The level of genetic diversity was found to be significantly lower for populations on Jeju Island [mean allelic richness (AR) = 1.92, clonal diversity (R) = 0.51], which is located approximately 155 km off the southernmost region of the Korean Peninsula, than for those in the South Sea (mean AR = 2.69, R = 0.82), which is on the southern coast of the mainland. South Korean eelgrass populations were substantially genetically divergent from one another (FST = 0.061-0.573), suggesting that limited contemporary gene flow has been taking place among populations. We also found weak but detectable temporal variation in genetic structure within a site over 10 years. In additional depth comparisons, statistically significant genetic differentiation was observed between shallow (or middle) and deep zones in two of three sites tested. Depleted genetic diversity, small effective population sizes (Ne) and limited connectivity for populations on Jeju Island indicate that these populations may be vulnerable to local extinction under changing environmental conditions, especially given that Jeju Island is one of the fastest warming regions around the world. Overall, our work will inform conservation and restoration efforts, including transplantation for eelgrass populations at the southern tip of

  10. Patterns of Genetic Variability in Island Populations of the Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) from the Mouth of the Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Bessa-Silva, Adam Rick; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Sodré, Davidson; da Cunha, Divino Bruno; Hadad, Dante; Asp, Nils Edvin; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Sequeira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Amazonian coast has several unique geological characteristics resulting from the interaction between drainage pattern of the Amazon River and the Atlantic Ocean. It is one of the most extensive and sedimentologically dynamic regions of the world, with a large number of continental islands mostly formed less than 10,000 years ago. The natural distribution of the cane toad (Rhinella marina), one of the world’s most successful invasive species, in this complex Amazonian system provides an intriguing model for the investigation of the effects of isolation or the combined effects of isolation and habitat dynamic changes on patterns of genetic variability and population differentiation. We used nine fast-evolving microsatellite loci to contrast patterns of genetic variability in six coastal (three mainlands and three islands) populations of the cane toad near the mouth of the Amazon River. Results from Bayesian multilocus clustering approach and Discriminant Analyses of Principal Component were congruent in showing that each island population was genetically differentiated from the mainland populations. All FST values obtained from all pairwise comparisons were significant, ranging from 0.048 to 0.186. Estimates of both recent and historical gene flow were not significantly different from zero across all population pairs, except the two mainland populations inhabiting continuous habitats. Patterns of population differentiation, with a high level of population substructure and absence/restricted gene flow, suggested that island populations of R. marina are likely isolated since the Holocene sea-level rise. However, considering the similar levels of genetic variability found in both island and mainland populations, it is reliable to assume that they were also isolated for longer periods. Given the genetic uniqueness of each cane toad population, together with the high natural vulnerability of the coastal regions and intense human pressures, we suggest that these

  11. Population genetic structure of eelgrass (Zostera marina) on the Korean coast: Current status and conservation implications for future management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hwan; Kang, Ji Hyoun; Jang, Ji Eun; Choi, Sun Kyeong; Kim, Min Ji; Park, Sang Rul; Lee, Hyuk Je

    2017-01-01

    Seagrasses provide numerous ecosystem services for coastal and estuarine environments, such as nursery functions, erosion protection, pollution filtration, and carbon sequestration. Zostera marina (common name “eelgrass”) is one of the seagrass bed-forming species distributed widely in the northern hemisphere, including the Korean Peninsula. Recently, however, there has been a drastic decline in the population size of Z. marina worldwide, including Korea. We examined the current population genetic status of this species on the southern coast of Korea by estimating the levels of genetic diversity and genetic structure of 10 geographic populations using eight nuclear microsatellite markers. The level of genetic diversity was found to be significantly lower for populations on Jeju Island [mean allelic richness (AR) = 1.92, clonal diversity (R) = 0.51], which is located approximately 155 km off the southernmost region of the Korean Peninsula, than for those in the South Sea (mean AR = 2.69, R = 0.82), which is on the southern coast of the mainland. South Korean eelgrass populations were substantially genetically divergent from one another (FST = 0.061–0.573), suggesting that limited contemporary gene flow has been taking place among populations. We also found weak but detectable temporal variation in genetic structure within a site over 10 years. In additional depth comparisons, statistically significant genetic differentiation was observed between shallow (or middle) and deep zones in two of three sites tested. Depleted genetic diversity, small effective population sizes (Ne) and limited connectivity for populations on Jeju Island indicate that these populations may be vulnerable to local extinction under changing environmental conditions, especially given that Jeju Island is one of the fastest warming regions around the world. Overall, our work will inform conservation and restoration efforts, including transplantation for eelgrass populations at the southern

  12. The MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy: A Flexible Strategy for Efficient Information Collection and Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bos, Peter M J; Gottardo, Stefania; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J; van Tongeren, Martie; Semenzin, Elena; Fernandes, Teresa F; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Hunt, Neil; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Landsiedel, Robert; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; van Kesteren, Petra C E; Oomen, Agnes G

    2015-11-27

    An engineered nanomaterial (ENM) may actually consist of a population of primary particles, aggregates and agglomerates of various sizes. Furthermore, their physico-chemical characteristics may change during the various life-cycle stages. It will probably not be feasible to test all varieties of all ENMs for possible health and environmental risks. There is therefore a need to further develop the approaches for risk assessment of ENMs. Within the EU FP7 project Managing Risks of Nanoparticles (MARINA) a two-phase risk assessment strategy has been developed. In Phase 1 (Problem framing) a base set of information is considered, relevant exposure scenarios (RESs) are identified and the scope for Phase 2 (Risk assessment) is established. The relevance of an RES is indicated by information on exposure, fate/kinetics and/or hazard; these three domains are included as separate pillars that contain specific tools. Phase 2 consists of an iterative process of risk characterization, identification of data needs and integrated collection and evaluation of data on the three domains, until sufficient information is obtained to conclude on possible risks in a RES. Only data are generated that are considered to be needed for the purpose of risk assessment. A fourth pillar, risk characterization, is defined and it contains risk assessment tools. This strategy describes a flexible and efficient approach for data collection and risk assessment which is essential to ensure safety of ENMs. Further developments are needed to provide guidance and make the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy operational. Case studies will be needed to refine the strategy.

  13. A combination of dynamic light scattering and polarized resonance Raman scattering applied in the study of Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Jernshøj, K D; Hassing, S; Olsen, L F

    2013-08-14

    Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) is considered to be a promising candidate as a blood substitute. To entangle some of the properties of extracellular giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) of Arenicola Marina, we combined polarized resonance Raman scattering (532 nm excitation) with dynamic light scattering (DLS) (632.8 nm). An analysis of the depolarization ratio of selected a(2g) skeletal modes of the heme in native Hbl Hb and porcine Hb, shows that the distortion of the heme group away from its ideal fourfold symmetry is much smaller for heme groups bound in the Hbl Hb than for heme groups bound in porcine Hb. Using DLS, the average hydrodynamic diameter () of Hbl Hb was measured at pH = 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10. At pH = 5 to 7, the Hbl Hb was found in its native form with equal to 24.2 nm, while at pH = 8 and 9, a dissociation process starts to take place resulting in = 9 nm. At pH = 10, only large aggregates of fragmented Hbl Hb with larger than 1000 nm was detected, however, a comparison of the DLS results with the polarized resonance Raman scattering (RRS) revealed that the coupling between the fragments did not involve direct interaction between the heme groups, but also that the local heme environment seems to be comparable in the aggregates and in the native Hbl Hb. By comparing the unpolarized RRS results obtained for erythrocytes (RBC) with those for Hbl Hb, led us to the important conclusion that Hbl Hb is much easier photolyzed than porcine RBC.

  14. Patterns of Genetic Variability in Island Populations of the Cane Toad (Rhinella marina) from the Mouth of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Bessa-Silva, Adam Rick; Vallinoto, Marcelo; Sodré, Davidson; da Cunha, Divino Bruno; Hadad, Dante; Asp, Nils Edvin; Sampaio, Iracilda; Schneider, Horacio; Sequeira, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Amazonian coast has several unique geological characteristics resulting from the interaction between drainage pattern of the Amazon River and the Atlantic Ocean. It is one of the most extensive and sedimentologically dynamic regions of the world, with a large number of continental islands mostly formed less than 10,000 years ago. The natural distribution of the cane toad (Rhinella marina), one of the world's most successful invasive species, in this complex Amazonian system provides an intriguing model for the investigation of the effects of isolation or the combined effects of isolation and habitat dynamic changes on patterns of genetic variability and population differentiation. We used nine fast-evolving microsatellite loci to contrast patterns of genetic variability in six coastal (three mainlands and three islands) populations of the cane toad near the mouth of the Amazon River. Results from Bayesian multilocus clustering approach and Discriminant Analyses of Principal Component were congruent in showing that each island population was genetically differentiated from the mainland populations. All FST values obtained from all pairwise comparisons were significant, ranging from 0.048 to 0.186. Estimates of both recent and historical gene flow were not significantly different from zero across all population pairs, except the two mainland populations inhabiting continuous habitats. Patterns of population differentiation, with a high level of population substructure and absence/restricted gene flow, suggested that island populations of R. marina are likely isolated since the Holocene sea-level rise. However, considering the similar levels of genetic variability found in both island and mainland populations, it is reliable to assume that they were also isolated for longer periods. Given the genetic uniqueness of each cane toad population, together with the high natural vulnerability of the coastal regions and intense human pressures, we suggest that these

  15. Molecular mechanisms that underlie the sexual stimulant actions of Avicennia marina (Forssk.) Vierh. and Crocus sativus L.

    PubMed

    Al-Rehaily, Adnan Jathlan; Alhowiriny, Tawfeq Abdullah; El-Tahir, Kamal Eh; Al-Taweel, Areej Mohammad; Perveen, Shagufta

    2015-01-01

    The effects of extracts and sub-fractions of Avicennia marina, Crocus sativus and sildenafil on the sexual behavior of male rats and their effects on the intracavernosal pressure (I.CV), intracavernosal cyclic GMP and dihydrotestosterone plasma level were examined. The sexual behavior was followed for four hours using infra-red video cameras to quantify the effects on various male sexual behaviors. The results revealed that the active sub-fraction in case of A. marina was the hexane fraction of the chloroform extracts (C/H) whereas that of C. sativus was the hexane fraction of the alcoholic extract (A/H). (C/H), (A/H) and sildenafil significantly increased the total sexual stimulation index from 53.8±2.7 (control) to 406±7.8, 225±4 and 401±30.1, respectively (P<0.001, N=6). They significantly increased the index of successful mounting and ejaculation from 2.6±0.5 (control) to 40±2.7, 21±2.3 and 18±1.7, respectively (P<0.01, N=6). They significantly increased the cyclic GMP level from 0.94±0.07 (control) to 3.1±0.13, 1.59±0.11 and 3.66±0.19 ng/mg wet tissue, respectively (P<0.05, N=7). They did not affect dihydrotestosterone plasma level. (C/H), (A/H) and sildenafil increased the (I.CV) pressure by 4.8±0.3, 1.4±0.8 and 4.2±0.9 mmHg. The (C/H) seemed to be more active than sildenafil and twice active than (A/H). Both extracts and sildenafil acted via an increase in cyclic GMP.

  16. A combination of dynamic light scattering and polarized resonance Raman scattering applied in the study of Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jernshøj, K. D.; Hassing, S.; Olsen, L. F.

    2013-08-01

    Arenicola Marina extracellular hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) is considered to be a promising candidate as a blood substitute. To entangle some of the properties of extracellular giant hexagonal bilayer hemoglobin (Hbl Hb) of Arenicola Marina, we combined polarized resonance Raman scattering (532 nm excitation) with dynamic light scattering (DLS) (632.8 nm). An analysis of the depolarization ratio of selected a2g skeletal modes of the heme in native Hbl Hb and porcine Hb, shows that the distortion of the heme group away from its ideal fourfold symmetry is much smaller for heme groups bound in the Hbl Hb than for heme groups bound in porcine Hb. Using DLS, the average hydrodynamic diameter (⟨dh⟩) of Hbl Hb was measured at pH = 5, 7, 8, 9, and 10. At pH = 5 to 7, the Hbl Hb was found in its native form with ⟨dh⟩ equal to 24.2 nm, while at pH = 8 and 9, a dissociation process starts to take place resulting in ⟨dh⟩ = 9 nm. At pH = 10, only large aggregates of fragmented Hbl Hb with ⟨dh⟩ larger than 1000 nm was detected, however, a comparison of the DLS results with the polarized resonance Raman scattering (RRS) revealed that the coupling between the fragments did not involve direct interaction between the heme groups, but also that the local heme environment seems to be comparable in the aggregates and in the native Hbl Hb. By comparing the unpolarized RRS results obtained for erythrocytes (RBC) with those for Hbl Hb, led us to the important conclusion that Hbl Hb is much easier photolyzed than porcine RBC.

  17. The MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy: A Flexible Strategy for Efficient Information Collection and Risk Assessment of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Peter M. J.; Gottardo, Stefania; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.; van Tongeren, Martie; Semenzin, Elena; Fernandes, Teresa F.; Hristozov, Danail; Hund-Rinke, Kerstin; Hunt, Neil; Irfan, Muhammad-Adeel; Landsiedel, Robert; Peijnenburg, Willie J. G. M.; Sánchez Jiménez, Araceli; van Kesteren, Petra C. E.; Oomen, Agnes G.

    2015-01-01

    An engineered nanomaterial (ENM) may actually consist of a population of primary particles, aggregates and agglomerates of various sizes. Furthermore, their physico-chemical characteristics may change during the various life-cycle stages. It will probably not be feasible to test all varieties of all ENMs for possible health and environmental risks. There is therefore a need to further develop the approaches for risk assessment of ENMs. Within the EU FP7 project Managing Risks of Nanoparticles (MARINA) a two-phase risk assessment strategy has been developed. In Phase 1 (Problem framing) a base set of information is considered, relevant exposure scenarios (RESs) are identified and the scope for Phase 2 (Risk assessment) is established. The relevance of an RES is indicated by information on exposure, fate/kinetics and/or hazard; these three domains are included as separate pillars that contain specific tools. Phase 2 consists of an iterative process of risk characterization, identification of data needs and integrated collection and evaluation of data on the three domains, until sufficient information is obtained to conclude on possible risks in a RES. Only data are generated that are considered to be needed for the purpose of risk assessment. A fourth pillar, risk characterization, is defined and it contains risk assessment tools. This strategy describes a flexible and efficient approach for data collection and risk assessment which is essential to ensure safety of ENMs. Further developments are needed to provide guidance and make the MARINA Risk Assessment Strategy operational. Case studies will be needed to refine the strategy. PMID:26633430

  18. Lethal effects of ichthyotoxic raphidophytes, Chattonella marina, C. antiqua, and Heterosigma akashiwo, on post-embryonic stages of the Japanese pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata martensii.

    PubMed

    Basti, Leila; Nagai, Kiyohito; Go, Jiyoji; Okano, Sho; Oda, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Yuji; Nagai, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    The inimical effects of the ichthyotoxic harmful algal bloom (HAB)-forming raphidophytes Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella marina, and Chattonella antiqua on the early-life stages of the Japanese pearl oyster Pinctada fucata martensii were studied. Fertilized eggs and developing embryos were not affected following exposure to the harmful raphidophytes; however, all three algal species severely affected trochophores and D-larvae, early-stage D-larvae, and late-stage pre-settling larvae. Exposure to C. marina (5×10(2)cellsml(-1)), C. antiqua (10(3)cellsml(-1)), and H. akashiwo (5×10(3)cellsml(-1)) resulted in decreased success of metamorphosis to the trochophore stage. A complete inhibition of trochophore metamorphosis was observed following exposure to C. antiqua at 5×10(3)cellsml(-1) and C. marina at 8×10(3)cellsml(-1). In all experiments, more than 80% of newly formed trochophores were anomalous, and in the case of exposure to H. akashiwo at 10(5)cellsml(-1) more than 70% of D-larvae were anomalous. The activity rates of D-larvae (1-day-old) were significantly reduced following exposure to C. antiqua (8×10(3)cellsml(-1), 24h), C. marina (8×10(3)cellsml(-1), 24h), and H. akashiwo (10(4)cellsml(-1), 24h). The activity rates of pre-settling larvae (21-day-old) were also significantly reduced following exposure to C. antiqua (10(3)cellsml(-1), 24h),C. marina (8×10(3)cellsml(-1), 24h), and H. akashiwo (5×10(4)cellsml(-1), 24h). Significant mortalities of both larval stages were induced by all three raphidophytes, with higher mortality rates registered for pre-settling larvae than D-larvae, especially following exposure to C. marina (5×10(2)-8×10(3)cellsml(-1), 48-86h) and C. antiqua (10(3)-8×10(3)cellsml(-1), 72-86h). Contact between raphidophyte cells and newly metamorphosed trochophores and D-larvae, 1-day-old D-larvae, and 21-day-old larvae resulted in microscopic changes in the raphidophytes, and then, in the motile early-life stages of pearl oysters

  19. Modelling the growth kinetics of Kocuria marina DAGII as a function of single and binary substrate during batch production of β-Cryptoxanthin.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ruchira; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Dutta, Debjani

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, growth kinetics of Kocuria marina DAGII during batch production of β-Cryptoxanthin (β-CRX) was studied by considering the effect of glucose and maltose as a single and binary substrate. The importance of mixed substrate over single substrate has been emphasised in the present study. Different mathematical models namely, the Logistic model for cell growth, the Logistic mass balance equation for substrate consumption and the Luedeking-Piret model for β-CRX production were successfully implemented. Model-based analyses for the single substrate experiments suggested that the concentrations of glucose and maltose higher than 7.5 and 10.0 g/L, respectively, inhibited the growth and β-CRX production by K. marina DAGII. The Han and Levenspiel model and the Luong product inhibition model accurately described the cell growth in glucose and maltose substrate systems with a R (2) value of 0.9989 and 0.9998, respectively. The effect of glucose and maltose as binary substrate was further investigated. The binary substrate kinetics was well described using the sum-kinetics with interaction parameters model. The results of production kinetics revealed that the presence of binary substrate in the cultivation medium increased the biomass and β-CRX yield significantly. This study is a first time detailed investigation on kinetic behaviours of K. marina DAGII during β-CRX production. The parameters obtained in the study might be helpful for developing strategies for commercial production of β-CRX by K. marina DAGII.

  20. Effect of bacterial biofilms formed on fouling-release coatings from natural seawater and Cobetia marina, on the adhesion of two marine algae.

    PubMed

    Mieszkin, Sophie; Martin-Tanchereau, Pierre; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bacterial biofilms formed from natural seawater (NSW) enhance the settlement of spores of the green alga Ulva linza, while single-species biofilms may enhance or reduce settlement, or have no effect at all. However, the effect of biofilms on the adhesion strength of algae, and how that may be influenced by coating/surface properties, is not known. In this study, the effect of biofilms formed from natural seawater and the marine bacterium Cobetia marina, on the settlement and the adhesion strength of spores and sporelings of the macroalga U. linza and the diatom Navicula incerta, was evaluated on Intersleek(®) 700, Intersleek(®) 900, poly(dimethylsiloxane) and glass. The settlement and adhesion strength of these algae were strongly influenced by biofilms and their nature. Biofilms formed from NSW enhanced the settlement (attachment) of both algae on all the surfaces while the effect of biofilms formed from C. marina varied with the coating type. The adhesion strength of spores and sporelings of U. linza and diatoms was reduced on all the surfaces biofilmed with C. marina, while adhesion strength on biofilms formed from NSW was dependent on the alga (and on its stage of development in the case of U. linza), and coating type. The results illustrate the complexity of the relationships between fouling algae and bacterial biofilms and suggest the need for caution to avoid over-generalisation.

  1. Nanoparticle-based measurements of pH and O2 dynamics in the rhizosphere of Zostera marina L.: effects of temperature elevation and light-dark transitions.

    PubMed

    Elgetti Brodersen, Kasper; Koren, Klaus; Lichtenberg, Mads; Kühl, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Seagrasses can modulate the geochemical conditions in their immediate rhizosphere through the release of chemical compounds from their below-ground tissue. This is a vital chemical defence mechanism, whereby the plants detoxify the surrounding sediment. Using novel nanoparticle-based optical O2 and pH sensors incorporated in reduced and transparent artificial sediment, we investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of pH and O2 within the entire rhizosphere of Zostera marina L. during experimental manipulations of light and temperature. We combined such measurements with O2 microsensor measurements of the photosynthetic productivity and respiration of seagrass leaves. We found pronounced pH and O2 microheterogeneity within the immediate rhizosphere of Z. marina, with higher below-ground tissue oxidation capability and rhizoplane pH levels during both light exposure of the leaf canopy and elevated temperature, where the temperature-mediated stimuli of biogeochemical processes seemed to predominate. Low rhizosphere pH microenvironments appeared to correlate with plant-derived oxic microzones stimulating local sulphide oxidation and thus driving local proton generation, although the rhizoplane pH levels generally where much higher than the bulk sediment pH. Our data show that Z. marina can actively alter its rhizosphere pH microenvironment alleviating the local H2 S toxicity and enhancing nutrient availability in the adjacent sediment via geochemical speciation shift.

  2. Organic solutes in the deepest phylogenetic branches of the Bacteria: identification of α(1-6)glucosyl-α(1-2)glucosylglycerate in Persephonella marina.

    PubMed

    Lamosa, Pedro; Rodrigues, Marta V; Gonçalves, Luís G; Carr, Jean; Ventura, Rita; Maycock, Christopher; Raven, Neil D; Santos, Helena

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of organic solutes was investigated in the thermophilic bacteria Persephonella marina and Marinitoga piezophila, two representatives of the deepest lineages in the domain Bacteria. These organisms grow optimally at around 70 °C in medium containing 3 % NaCl. A new disaccharide, accumulating in Persephonella marina, was identified as α(1-6)glucosyl-α(1-2)glucosylglycerate (GGG), by nuclear magnetic resonance. This identification was validated by comparison with the spectra of the compound obtained by chemical synthesis. Besides GGG, the solute pool of Persephonella marina comprised β-glutamate, di-myo-inositol-1,3'-phosphate and 2-O-α-glucosylglycerate. In contrast, amino acids such as α-glutamate, proline and alanine were the dominant components of the solute pool of Marinitoga piezophila and sugar derivatives were absent. The ability of GGG to protect protein structure against heat denaturation was assessed using model proteins. A genomic search for the biosynthetic pathways of known ionic solutes in Aquificales and Thermotogales shows the inability of this analysis to predict the nature of compatible solutes and underlines the need for efficient cultivation techniques.

  3. Population genetic structure of annual and perennial populations of Zostera marina L. along the Pacific coast of Baja California and the Gulf of California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munoz-Salazar, R.; Talbot, S.L.; Sage, G.K.; Ward, D.H.; Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro

    2005-01-01

    The Baja California peninsula represents a biogeographical boundary contributing to regional differentiation among populations of marine animals. We investigated the genetic characteristics of perennial and annual populations of the marine angiosperm, Zostera marina, along the Pacific coast of Baja California and in the Gulf of California, respectively. Populations of Z. marina from five coastal lagoons along the Pacific coast and four sites in the Gulf of California were studied using nine microsatellite loci. Analyses of variance revealed significant interregional differentiation, but no subregional differentiation. Significant spatial differentiation, assessed using θ values, was observed among all populations within the two regions. Z. marina populations along the Pacific coast are separated by more than 220 km and had the greatest θ (0.13-0.28) values, suggesting restricted gene flow. In contrast, lower but still significant genetic differentiation was observed among populations within the Gulf of California (θ = 0.04-0.18), even though populations are separated by more than 250 km. This suggests higher levels of gene flow among Gulf of California populations relative to Pacific coast populations. Direction of gene flow was predominantly southward among Pacific coast populations, whereas no dominant polarity in the Gulf of California populations was observed. The test for isolation by distance (IBD) showed a significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances in Gulf of California populations, but not in Pacific coast populations, perhaps because of shifts in currents during El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events along the Pacific coast.

  4. Population genetic structure of annual and perennial populations of Zostera marina L. along the Pacific coast of Baja California and the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Talbot, Sandra L; Sage, George K; Ward, David H; Cabello-Pasini, Alejandro

    2005-03-01

    The Baja California peninsula represents a biogeographical boundary contributing to regional differentiation among populations of marine animals. We investigated the genetic characteristics of perennial and annual populations of the marine angiosperm, Zostera marina, along the Pacific coast of Baja California and in the Gulf of California, respectively. Populations of Z. marina from five coastal lagoons along the Pacific coast and four sites in the Gulf of California were studied using nine microsatellite loci. Analyses of variance revealed significant interregional differentiation, but no subregional differentiation. Significant spatial differentiation, assessed using theta(ST) values, was observed among all populations within the two regions. Z. marina populations along the Pacific coast are separated by more than 220 km and had the greatest theta(ST) (0.13-0.28) values, suggesting restricted gene flow. In contrast, lower but still significant genetic differentiation was observed among populations within the Gulf of California (theta(ST) = 0.04-0.18), even though populations are separated by more than 250 km. This suggests higher levels of gene flow among Gulf of California populations relative to Pacific coast populations. Direction of gene flow was predominantly southward among Pacific coast populations, whereas no dominant polarity in the Gulf of California populations was observed. The test for isolation by distance (IBD) showed a significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances in Gulf of California populations, but not in Pacific coast populations, perhaps because of shifts in currents during El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events along the Pacific coast.

  5. Glucosylglycerate biosynthesis in the deepest lineage of the Bacteria: characterization of the thermophilic proteins GpgS and GpgP from Persephonella marina.

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Empadinhas, Nuno; da Costa, Milton S

    2007-03-01

    The pathway for the synthesis of glucosylglycerate (GG) in the thermophilic bacterium Persephonella marina is proposed based on the activities of recombinant glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (GPG) synthase (GpgS) and glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate phosphatase (GpgP). The sequences of gpgS and gpgP from the cold-adapted bacterium Methanococcoides burtonii were used to identify the homologues in the genome of P. marina, which were separately cloned and overexpressed as His-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. The recombinant GpgS protein of P. marina, unlike the homologue from M. burtonii, which was specific for GDP-glucose, catalyzed the synthesis of GPG from UDP-glucose, GDP-glucose, ADP-glucose, and TDP-glucose (in order of decreasing efficiency) and from d-3-phosphoglycerate, with maximal activity at 90 degrees C. The recombinant GpgP protein, like the M. burtonii homologue, dephosphorylated GPG and mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (MPG) to GG and mannosylglycerate, respectively, yet at high temperatures the hydrolysis of GPG was more efficient than that of MPG. Gel filtration indicates that GpgS is a dimeric protein, while GpgP is monomeric. This is the first characterization of genes and enzymes for the synthesis of GG in a thermophile.

  6. Genome sequence of the Wenxinia marina type strain (DSM 24838T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from oilfield sediments

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Spring, Stefan; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially from coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34T together with the genome sequence and annotation of strain DSM 24838T and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838T was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197468

  7. Genome sequence of the Wenxinia marina type strain (DSM 24838(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from oilfield sediments.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Spring, Stefan; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Wenxinia marina Ying et al. 2007 is the type species of the genus Wenxinia, a representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae, isolated from oilfield sediments of the South China Sea. This family was shown to harbor the most abundant bacteria especially from coastal and polar waters, but was also found in microbial mats, sediments and attached to different kind of surfaces. Here we describe the features of W. marina strain HY34(T) together with the genome sequence and annotation of strain DSM 24838(T) and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 4,181,754 bp containing genome sequence encodes 4,047 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. The genome of W. marina DSM 24838(T) was sequenced as part of the activities of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Type Strains, Phase I: the one thousand microbial genomes (KMG) project funded by the DoE and the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

  8. COVE, MARINA, and the Future of On-Board Processing (OBP) Platforms for CubeSat Science Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingree, P.; Bekker, D. L.; Bryk, M.; DeLucca, J.; Franklin, B.; Hancock, B.; Klesh, A. T.; Meehan, C.; Meshkaty, N.; Nichols, J.; Peay, C.; Rider, D. M.; Werne, T.; Wu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The CubeSat On-board processing Validation Experiment (COVE), JPL's first CubeSat payload launched on October 28, 2011, features the Xilinx Virtex-5QV Single event Immune Reconfigurable FPGA (SIRF). The technology demonstration mission was to validate the SIRF device running an on-board processing (OBP) algorithm developed to reduce the data set by 2-orders of magnitude for the Multi-angle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (MSPI), an instrument under development at JPL (PI: D. Diner). COVE has a single data interface to the CubeSat flight computer that is used to transfer a static image taken from the CubeSat camera and store it to local memory where the FPGA then reads it to run the algorithm on it. In the next generation COVE design, called MARINA, developed for the GRIFEX CubeSat project, the OBP board is extended, using rigid-flex PCB technology, to provide an interface to a JPL-developed Read-Out Integrated Circuit (ROIC) hybridized to a detector developed by Raytheon. In this configuration the focal plane array (FPA) data can be streamed directly to the FPGA for data processing or for storage to local memory. The MARINA rigid-flex PCB design is integrated with a commercial camera lens to create a 1U instrument payload for integration with a CubeSat under development by the University of Michigan and planned for launch in 2014. In the GRIFEX technology demonstration, the limited on-board storage capacity is filled by high-rate FPA data in less than a second. The system is also limited by the CubeSat downlink data rate and several ground station passes are required to transmit this limited amount of data. While this system is sufficient to validate the ROIC technology on-orbit, the system cannot be operated in a way to perform continuous science observations due to the on-board storage and data downlink constraints. In order to advance the current platform to support sustained science observations, more on-board storage is needed. Radiation tolerant memory

  9. The Importance of Zostera marina to a Local Food Web Based on the Analysis of Compound Specific Isotopes in Maquoit Bay, Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doolittle, H. A.; Johnson, B. J.; Ambrose, W. G.; Locke, W.; Harris, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    Zostera marina (also known as eelgrass) is an important primary producer in near shore ecosystems in the Gulf of Maine, providing both habitat and nutrients for a variety of organisms (e.g., crustaceans, polychaetes, gastropods, and fish). The purpose of this study is to use compound specific δ13C analyses of essential amino acids to determine the degree to which organic matter derived from isotopically distinct primary producers (e.g., eelgrass, phytoplankton, and epiphytic algae) contribute to the diets of snails, shrimp, and fish in an eelgrass system in Casco Bay. Maquoit Bay, located in northwestern Casco Bay, in the Gulf of Maine, is a shallow estuarine system that is characterized by silt and clay sized sediments and the presence of extensive eelgrass beds. Amino acid concentrations and δ13C compositions were determined for a variety of sample-types collected in July-August, 2010, from three sites in the study area, including muscle tissue from Tautogolabrus adspersus (cunner), Gasterosteus aculeatus (3-spined stickleback), Nassarius obsoletus (snail), and Mysis spp. (shrimp), seston (i.e., phytoplankton), Z. marina, and epiphytic algae. TFAA amino acid derivatives of the total hydrolyzate were analyzed by GC-FID for amino acid concentration, and by GC-c-IRMS- for carbon isotope composition. Muscle tissue was dominated by glutamic and aspartic acids, and leucine, whereas Zostera marina was dominated by aspartic and glutamic acids, and proline. Phenylalanine and leucine in Z. marina are approximately 10 ‰ enriched in 13C relative to these same amino acids in the seston. The carbon isotope values of these essential amino acids are significantly more enriched in 13C for N. obsoletus than for T. adspersus, G. aculeatus, and Mysis spp. These data suggest that organic matter derived from Z. marina and/or epiphytic algae is more important in the diets of N. obsoletus, and organic matter derived from seston is more important for the diets of T. adspersus, G

  10. Toads on Lava: Spatial Ecology and Habitat Use of Invasive Cane Toads (Rhinella marina) in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Ward-Fear, Georgia; Greenlees, Matthew J; Shine, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Most ecological research on cane toads (Rhinella marina) has focused on invasive populations in Australia, ignoring other areas where toads have been introduced. We radio-tracked and spool-tracked 40 toads, from four populations on the island of Hawai'i. Toads moved extensively at night (mean 116 m, from spool-tracking) but returned to the same or a nearby retreat-site each day (from radio-tracking, mean distance between successive retreat sites 11 m; 0 m for 70% of records). Males followed straighter paths during nocturnal movements than did females. Because moist sites are scarce on the highly porous lava substrate, Hawai'ian toads depend on anthropogenic disturbance for shelter (e.g. beneath buildings), foraging (e.g. suburban lawns, golf courses) and breeding (artificial ponds). Foraging sites are further concentrated by a scarcity of flying insects (negating artificial lights as prey-attractors). Habitat use of toads shifted with time (at night, toads selected areas with less bare ground, canopy, understory and leaf-litter), and differed between sexes (females foraged in areas of bare ground with dense understory vegetation). Cane toads in Hawai'i thrive in scattered moist patches within a severely arid matrix, despite a scarcity of flying insects, testifying to the species' ability to exploit anthropogenic disturbance.

  11. Establishing a baseline for regional scale monitoring of eelgrass (Zostera marina) habitat on the lower Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogrefe, Kyle R.; Ward, David H.; Donnelly, Tyrone F.; Dau, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Seagrass meadows, one of the world’s most widespread and productive ecosystems, provide a wide range of services with real economic value. Worldwide declines in the distribution and abundance of seagrasses and increased threats to coastal ecosystems from climate change have prompted a need to acquire baseline data for monitoring and protecting these important habitats. We assessed the distribution and abundance of eelgrass (Zostera marina) along nearly 1200 km of shoreline on the lower Alaska Peninsula, a region of expansive eelgrass meadows whose status and trends are poorly understood. We demonstrate the effectiveness of a multi-scale approach by using Landsat satellite imagery to map the total areal extent of eelgrass while integrating field survey data to improve map accuracy and describe the physical and biological condition of the meadows. Innovative use of proven methods and processing tools was used to address challenges inherent to remote sensing in high latitude, coastal environments. Eelgrass was estimated to cover ~31,000 ha, 91% of submerged aquatic vegetation on the lower Alaska Peninsula, nearly doubling the known spatial extent of eelgrass in the region. Mapping accuracy was 80%–90% for eelgrass distribution at locations containing adequate field survey data for error analysis.

  12. Ocean acidification increases copper toxicity to the early life history stages of the polychaete Arenicola marina in artificial seawater.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anna L; Mangan, Stephanie; Ellis, Robert P; Lewis, Ceri

    2014-08-19

    The speciation and therefore bioavailability of the common pollutant copper is predicted to increase within the pH range anticipated under near-future ocean acidification (OA), hence the potential exists for copper toxicity to marine organisms to also increase. We investigated the impact of OA (seawater pH values of 7.77 (pCO2 1400 μatm) and 7.47 (pCO2 3000 μatm)) upon copper toxicity responses in early life history stages of the polychaete Arenicola marina and found both synergistic and additive toxicity effects of combined exposures depending on life history stage. The toxicity of copper on sperm DNA damage and early larval survivorship was synergistically increased under OA conditions. Larval survival was reduced by 24% when exposed to both OA and copper combined compared to single OA or copper exposures. Sperm motility was negatively affected by both OA and copper singularly with additive toxicity effects of the two stressors when combined. Fertilization success was also negatively affected by both OA and copper individually, but no additive effects when exposed as combined stressors were present for this stage. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that OA will act to increase the toxicity of copper to marine organisms, which has clear implications for coastal benthic ecosystems suffering chronic metal pollution as pCO2 levels rise and drive a reduction in seawater pH.

  13. Plant Growth Promoting of Endophytic Sporosarcina aquimarina SjAM16103 Isolated from the Pneumatophores of Avicennia marina L.

    PubMed Central

    Janarthine, S. Rylo Sona; Eganathan, P.

    2012-01-01

    Endophytic Sporosarcina aquimarina SjAM16103 was isolated from the inner tissues of pneumatophores of mangrove plant Avicennia marina along with Bacillus sp. and Enterobacter sp. Endophytic S. aquimarina SjAM16103 was Gram variable, and motile bacterium measured 0.6–0.9 μm wide by 1.7–2.0 μm long and light orange-brown coloured in 3-day cultures on tryptone broth at 26°C. Nucleotide sequence of this strain has been deposited in the GenBank under accession number GU930359. This endophytic bacterium produced 2.37 μMol/mL of indole acetic acid and siderophore as it metabolites. This strain could solubilize phosphate molecules and fixes atmospheric nitrogen. Endophytic S. aquimarina SjAM16103 was inoculated into four different plants under in vitro method to analyse its growth-promoting activity and role inside the host plants. The growth of endophytic S. aquimarina SjAM16103 inoculated explants were highly significant than the uninoculated control explants. Root hairs and early root development were observed in the endophytic S. aquimarina SjAM16103 inoculated explants. PMID:22811715

  14. The Effect of Microplastic on the Uptake of Chemicals by the Lugworm Arenicola marina (L.) under Environmentally Relevant Exposure Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that ingestion of microplastic increases exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic contaminants. To date, most laboratory studies investigated chemical transfer from ingested microplastic without taking other exposure pathways into account. Therefore, we studied the effect of polyethylene (PE) microplastic in sediment on PCB uptake by Arenicola marina as a model species, quantifying uptake fluxes from all natural exposure pathways. PCB concentrations in sediment, biota lipids (Clip) and porewater measured with passive samplers were used to derive lipid-normalized bioaccumulation metrics Clip, Biota sediment accumulation factor (BSAF), Bioaccumulation factor (BAF) and the Biota plastic accumulation factor (BPAF). Small effects of PE addition were detected suggesting slightly increased or decreased bioaccumulation. However, the differences decreased in magnitude dependent on the metric used to assess bioaccumulation, in the order: Clip > BSAF > BPAF > BAF, and were nonsignificant for BAF. The fact that BAF, that is, normalization of Clip on porewater concentration, largely removed all effects of PE, shows that PE did not act as a measurable vector of PCBs. Biodynamic model analysis confirmed that PE ingestion contributed marginally to bioaccumulation. This work confirmed model-based predictions on the limited relevance of microplastic for bioaccumulation under environmentally realistic conditions, and illustrated the importance of assessing exposure through all media in microplastic bioaccumulation studies. PMID:28682597

  15. Helkesimastix marina n. sp. (Cercozoa: Sainouroidea superfam. n.) a gliding zooflagellate of novel ultrastructure and unusual ciliary behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Lewis, Rhodri; Chao, Ema E; Oates, Brian; Bass, David

    2009-08-01

    Unlike Helkesimastix faecicola and H. major, Helkesimastix marina is marine, ingests bacteria, is probably also a cannibal, and differs in cell cycle ciliary behaviour. Daughter kinetids have mirror symmetry; pre-division cilia beat asymmetrically. We sequenced its 18S rDNA and studied its ultrastructure to clarify its taxonomy. Helkesimastix (Helkesimastigidae fam. n.) differs unexpectedly radically from cercomonads, lacking their complex microtubular ciliary roots, grouping not with them but with Sainouridae within Pansomonadida. Longitudinal cortical microtubules emanate from a dense apical centrosomal plate, where a striated rhizoplast attaches the nucleus, and two very short subparallel centrioles attach by dense fibres. The marginally more posterior centriole, attached to the centrosomal plate by a dense forked fibre, bears the long 9+2 gliding posterior cilium and a microtubular root; the left-side, nucleus-attached, left centriole bears an immotile ciliary stump with abnormal axoneme of nine disorganized mainly singlet microtubules, unlike the sainourid anterior papilla. Both transitional regions have a proximal lattice, the posterior centriole with slender hub. Sainouroidea superfam. n. (Sainouridae; Helkesimastigidae) have homologous cytoskeletal geometry. Dorsal Golgi dictyosome and posterior microbody are attached to the nuclear envelope, which has slender micro-invaginations and probably a cortical lattice. Bacteria are digested posteriorly in association with numerous mitochondria with flat cristae.

  16. "Marina-Trinkkur" and a few more modern-time hydrotherapeutic myths from the Kvarner region of NW Croatia.

    PubMed

    Muzur, Amir; Skrobonja, Ante; Prunk, Adriana; Frković, Vedran; Azman, Josip

    2006-09-30

    The present paper tries to address the rise and decay of the sea-water "cult" in regional health tourism in NW Croatia, concentrating upon and analysing more thoroughly the example of Marina, chemically processed sea water, an invention of Dr Géza Fodor, the Hungarian physician practicing in that part of Croatia. The original documents and archived items related to the topic were examined. Furthermore, we investigated numerous communal bulletins and medical authorities' records of respective time. Our research showed that the sea-water baths, introduced thanks to the influence of balneologists (like J. Glax), and "drinking cures" (advocated by M.-J. Ortel, for instance) were surprisingly popular not only among tourists of the time, but also among the physicians that used them extensively for therapeutical purposes. These baths and "drinking cures" enriched and completed the medical offer of the resorts regardless of their sometimes dubious effectiveness. This simple distilled sea-water preparation, advertised as a real panacea, demonstrates a paradigm that elucidates the mentality of physicians, merchants, and patients/consumers of the time.

  17. Toads on Lava: Spatial Ecology and Habitat Use of Invasive Cane Toads (Rhinella marina) in Hawai’i

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Fear, Georgia; Greenlees, Matthew J.; Shine, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Most ecological research on cane toads (Rhinella marina) has focused on invasive populations in Australia, ignoring other areas where toads have been introduced. We radio-tracked and spool-tracked 40 toads, from four populations on the island of Hawai’i. Toads moved extensively at night (mean 116 m, from spool-tracking) but returned to the same or a nearby retreat-site each day (from radio-tracking, mean distance between successive retreat sites 11 m; 0 m for 70% of records). Males followed straighter paths during nocturnal movements than did females. Because moist sites are scarce on the highly porous lava substrate, Hawai’ian toads depend on anthropogenic disturbance for shelter (e.g. beneath buildings), foraging (e.g. suburban lawns, golf courses) and breeding (artificial ponds). Foraging sites are further concentrated by a scarcity of flying insects (negating artificial lights as prey-attractors). Habitat use of toads shifted with time (at night, toads selected areas with less bare ground, canopy, understory and leaf-litter), and differed between sexes (females foraged in areas of bare ground with dense understory vegetation). Cane toads in Hawai’i thrive in scattered moist patches within a severely arid matrix, despite a scarcity of flying insects, testifying to the species’ ability to exploit anthropogenic disturbance. PMID:27027738

  18. Community structure and spatial variation of benthic invertebrates associated with Zostera marina (L.) beds in the northern Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boström, Christoffer; Bonsdorff, Erik

    1997-05-01

    The distribution and bed structure of eelgrass ( Zostera marina L.), and its importance for associated faunal communities in the coastal areas of the northern Baltic Sea are poorly known. The spatial distribution of the fauna associated with Zostera was studied at five localities in SW Finland in 1993-1994. Zostera was common on all localities, but the beds varied in terms of area (1-5 m diameter), density (50-500 shoots/m 2) and blade length (20-110 cm). A total of about 40 species or taxa were recorded. The zoobenthic infauna showed significant spatial differences, and total abundance and species diversity were significantly higher in the Zostera beds than in adjacent bare sand. The total abundance in Zostera ranged from 25 000 to 50 000 ind/m 2 and in sand from 2500 to 15 000 ind/m 2 The mean number of species in Zostera ranged from 5.9 to 8.8 spp ( H' = 1.76-2.54) and in sand from 2.2 to 5.5 spp ( H' = 1.67-2.31). The epifauna in Zostera was numerically dominated by grazing gastropods (Hydrobiidae) and copepods. The epifauna is an important community component, which contributes to the total diversity of the Zostera assemblage. These systems are among the most species-rich components of the shallow soft-bottom ecosystems in the northern Baltic Sea. The mechanisms structuring both the Zostera and the ambient sand-bottom habitats are presented.

  19. Factors Affecting Trophic Control of Community Structure and Ecosystem Functioning in Experimental Mesocosms of Seagrass (Zostera marina L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefcheck, J.; Duffy, J.

    2008-12-01

    Nutrient loading of coastal and estuarine waters threatens seagrass communities by promoting the growth of micro- and macroalgae, which then reduce the availability of light and nutrients. However, populations of invertebrate mesograzers are able to mitigate the negative impact of eutrophication through top-down control. We performed a factorial mesocosm experiment to examine the interactive relationships between light, nutrients, and mesograzer presence in structuring experimental ecosystems of eelgrass (Zostera marina). We found that mesograzer presence strongly reduced epiphytic algal biomass in every case, which remains consistent with previous mesocosm studies. We also observed a synergistic light-by-nutrient interaction that enhanced both epiphyte biomass and mesograzer abundance. The timing of this relationship is suggestive of weaker bottom-up control. Unlike previous studies, we found that light alone rarely affected either epiphyte biomass or mesograzer abundance. We believe that this result may be due to a combination of macroalgal shading and persistent grazing. Further processing of primary and secondary producer biomasses and elemental ratios, as well as the completion of feeding assays to gauge mesograzer feeding rates on different types of algae, will serve to reinforce these conclusions and to better define the relationship between these factors.

  20. Simulations of Energy Transfer Processes along the Rod Shaped PBP and Chl d Antenna of A.marina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, F.-J.; Fuesers, J.; Südmeyer, H.; Börner, J.; Jeyasangar, V.; Olliges, R.; Maksimov, E. G.; Grehn, M.; Theiss, C.; Paschenko, V. Z.; Eichler, H. J.; Renger, G.

    2010-11-01

    Time- and wavelength-correlated single photon counting and fs-absorption change measurements of the excitation dynamics were performed on phycobiliproteins (PBP) and whole cells of A.marina. The excited state population was simulated with a set of coupled linear differential equations. The overall energy transfer from PBP to the membrane intrinsic Chl d antenna was found to be limited by electronic excitation energy transfer (EET) along all coupled pigments in the PBP from the short wavelength phycocyanin (PC) molecules to the "terminal emitter" (TE) allophycocyanin (APC). Our results reveal that the EET step from TE in the PBP antenna to the first Chl d acceptor occurs with a time constant of 20-30 ps leading to a 70-80 ps time constant observed in the fluorescence decay which describes the overall (diffusive) EET from PBP to Chl d [1]. The overall EET is therefore limited by the diffusive EET along the PBP antenna. Based on a Förster type EET the distance between the TE in the PBP antenna and the first neighbour Chl d molecule is determined to be 2.7 nm for a 20 ps transfer step.

  1. Thiocapsa marina sp. nov., a novel, okenone-containing, purple sulfur bacterium isolated from brackish coastal and marine environments.

    PubMed

    Caumette, Pierre; Guyoneaud, Remy; Imhoff, Johannes F; Süling, Jörg; Gorlenko, Vladimir

    2004-07-01

    Four marine, phototrophic, purple sulfur bacteria (strains 5811T, 5812, BM-3 and BS-1) were isolated in pure culture from different brackish to marine sediments in the Mediterranean Sea, the White Sea and the Black Sea. Single cells of these strains were coccus-shaped, non-motile and did not contain gas vesicles. The colour of cell suspensions that were grown in the light was purple-red. Bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the okenone series were present as photosynthetic pigments. Photosynthetic membrane systems were of the vesicular type. Hydrogen sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and molecular hydrogen were used as electron donors during photolithotrophic growth under anoxic conditions; carbon dioxide was utilized as the carbon source. During growth on sulfide, elemental sulfur globules were stored inside the cells. In the presence of hydrogen sulfide, several organic substances could be photoassimilated. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed an affiliation of these four strains to the genus Thiocapsa. Both phylogenetic analysis and the results of DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that these strains formed a separate cluster within the genus Thiocapsa. Thus, according to phenotypic characteristics and mainly the carotenoid composition, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization data, it is proposed that these strains should be classified as a novel species, Thiocapsa marina sp. nov., with strain 5811T (=DSM 5653T=ATCC 43172T) as the type strain.

  2. Lanfrediella amphicirrus gen. nov. sp. nov. Nematotaeniidae (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea), a tapeworm parasite of Rhinella marina (Linnaeus, 1758) (Amphibia: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Melo, Francisco Tiago de Vasconcelos; Giese, Elane Guerreiro; Furtado, Adriano Penha; Soares, Maurílio José; Gonçalves, Evonnildo Costa; Vallinoto, Antonio Carlos Rosário; Santos, Jeannie Nascimento dos

    2011-09-01

    The family Nematotaeniidae, tapeworms commonly found in the small intestines of amphibians and reptiles, includes 27 recognised species distributed among four genera: Bitegmen Jones, Cylindrotaenia Jewell, Distoichometra Dickey and Nematotaenia Lühe. The taxonomy of these cestodes is poorly defined, due in part to the difficulties of observing many anatomical traits. This study presents and describes a new genus and species of nematotaeniid parasite found in cane toads (Rhinella marina) from eastern Brazilian Amazonia. The cestodes were collected during the necropsy of 20 hosts captured in the urban area of Belém, Pará. The specimens were fixed and processed for light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction. Samples were also collected for molecular analyses. The specimens presented a cylindrical body, two testes and paruterine organs. However, they could not be allocated to any of the four existing nematotaeniid genera due to the presence of two each of dorsal compact medullary testes, cirri, cirrus pouches, genital pores, ovaries and vitelline glands per mature segment. Lanfrediella amphicirrus gen. nov. sp. nov. is the first nematotaeniid studied using Historesin analysis, SEM and 3D reconstruction, and it is the second taxon for which molecular data have been deposited in GenBank.

  3. Spergularia marina Induces Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion in NCI-H716 Cells Through Bile Acid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong; Lee, Yu Mi; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Spergularia marina Griseb. (SM) is a halophyte that grows in mud flats. The aerial portions of SM have been eaten as vegetables and traditionally used to prevent chronic diseases in Korea. However, there has been no scientific report that demonstrates the pharmacological effects of SM. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is important for the maintenance of glucose and energy homeostasis through acting as a signal in peripheral and neural systems. To discover a functional food for regulating glucose and energy homeostasis, we evaluated the effect of an aqueous ethanolic extract (AEE) of SM on GLP-1 release from enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. In addition, we explored the Takeda G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (TGR5) agonist activity of AEE-SM in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells transiently transfected with human TGR5. As a result, treatment of NCI-H716 cells with AEE-SM increased GLP-1 secretion and intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner. Transfection of NCI-H716 cells with TGR5-specific small interference RNA inhibited AEE-SM-induced GLP-1 secretion and the increase in Ca2+ and cAMP levels. Moreover, AEE-SM showed that the TGR5 agonist activity in CHO-K1 cells transiently transfected with TGR5. The results suggest that AEE-SM might be a candidate for a functional food to regulate glucose and energy homeostasis. PMID:25260089

  4. Spectral properties of bacteriophytochrome AM1_5894 in the chlorophyll d-containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, Patrick C.; Duxbury, Zane; Mugerwa, Tendo T. Mukasa; Smith, Penelope M. C.; Willows, Robert D.; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Acaryochloris marina, a unicellular oxygenic photosynthetic cyanobacterium, has uniquely adapted to far-red light-enriched environments using red-shifted chlorophyll d. To understand red-light use in Acaryochloris, the genome of this cyanobacterium was searched for red/far-red light photoreceptors from the phytochrome family, resulting in identification of a putative bacteriophytochrome AM1_5894. AM1_5894 contains three standard domains of photosensory components as well as a putative C-terminal signal transduction component consisting of a histidine kinase and receiver domain. The photosensory domains of AM1_5894 autocatalytically assemble with biliverdin in a covalent fashion. This assembled AM1_5894 shows the typical photoreversible conversion of bacterial phytochromes with a ground-state red-light absorbing (Pr) form with λBV max[Pr] 705 nm, and a red-light inducible far-red light absorbing (Pfr) form with λBV max[Pfr] 758 nm. Surprisingly, AM1_5894 also autocatalytically assembles with phycocyanobilin, involving photoreversible conversion of λPCB max[Pr] 682 nm and λPCB max[Pfr] 734 nm, respectively. Our results suggest phycocyanobilin is also covalently bound to AM1_5894, while mutation of a cysteine residue (Cys11Ser) abolishes this covalent binding. The physiological function of AM1_5894 in cyanobacteria containing red-shifted chlorophylls is discussed. PMID:27282102

  5. Living up to its name? The effect of salinity on development, growth, and phenotype of the "marine" toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Wijethunga, Uditha; Greenlees, Matthew; Shine, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The highly permeable integument of amphibians renders them vulnerable to chemical characteristics of their environment, especially during the aquatic larval stage. As the cane toad (Rhinella marina, Bufonidae) invades southwards along the east coast of Australia, it is encountering waterbodies with highly variable conditions of temperature, pH, and salinity. Understanding the tolerance of toads to these conditions can clarify the likely further spread of the invader, as well as the adaptability of the species to novel environmental challenges. We measured salinity in waterbodies in the field and conducted laboratory trials to investigate the impacts of salinity on toad viability. Eggs and tadpoles from the southern invasion front tolerated the most saline conditions we found in potential spawning ponds during surveys [equivalent to 1200 ppm (3.5 % the salinity of seawater)]. Indeed, high-salinity treatments increased tadpole body sizes, accelerated metamorphosis, and improved locomotor ability of metamorphs (but did not affect metamorph morphology). At very low salinity [40 ppm (0.1 % seawater)], eggs hatched but larvae did not develop past Gosner stage 37. Our study shows that the egg and larval life stages of cane toads can tolerate wide variation in the salinity of natal ponds and that this aspect of waterbody chemistry is likely to facilitate rather than constrain continued southward expansion of the toad invasion front in eastern Australia.

  6. Identification of light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding protein genes of Zostera marina L. and their expression under different environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fanna; Zhou, Yang; Sun, Peipei; Cao, Min; Li, Hong; Mao, Yunxiang

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthesis includes the collection of light and the transfer of solar energy using light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding (LHC) proteins. In high plants, the LHC gene family includes LHCA and LHCB sub-families, which encode proteins constituting the light-harvesting complex of photosystems I and II. Zostera marina L. is a monocotyledonous angiosperm and inhabits submerged marine environments rather than land environments. We characterized the Lhca and Lhcb gene families of Z. marina from the expressed sequence tags (EST) database. In total, 13 unigenes were annotated as ZmLhc, 6 in Lhca family and 7 in ZmLhcb family. ZmLHCA and ZmLHCB contained the conservative LHC motifs and amino acid residues binding chlorophyll. The average similarity among mature ZmLHCA and ZmLHCB was 48.91% and 48.66%, respectively, which indicated a high degree of divergence within ZmLHChc gene family. The reconstructed phylogenetic tree showed that the tree topology and phylogenetic relationship were similar to those reported in other high plants, suggesting that the Lhc genes were highly conservative and the classification of ZmLhc genes was consistent with the evolutionary position of Z. marina. Real-time reverse transcription (RT) PCR analysis showed that different members of ZmLhca and ZmLhcb responded to a stress in different expression patterns. Salinity, temperature, light intensity and light quality may affect the expression of most ZmLhca and ZmLhcb genes. Inorganic carbon concentration and acidity had no obvious effect on ZmLhca and ZmLhcb gene expression, except for ZmLhca6.

  7. Physiological evidence for a sodium-dependent high-affinity phosphate and nitrate transport at the plasma membrane of leaf and root cells of Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    Rubio, L; Linares-Rueda, A; García-Sánchez, M J; Fernández, J A

    2005-02-01

    Zostera marina L. is an angiosperm that grows in a medium in which inorganic phosphate (P(i)) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)) are present in micromolar concentrations and must be absorbed against a steep electrochemical potential gradient. The operation of a Na(+)-dependent NO(3)(-) transport was previously demonstrated in leaf cells of this plant, suggesting that other Na(+)-coupled systems could mediate the uptake of anions. To address this question, P(i) transport was studied in leaves and roots of Z. marina, as well as NO(3)(-) uptake in roots. Electrophysiological studies demonstrated that micromolar concentrations of P(i) induced depolarizations of the plasma membrane of root cells. However, this effect was not observed in leaf cells. P(i)-induced depolarizations showed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (K(m)=1.5+/-0.6 microM P(i); D(max)=7.8+/-0.8 mV), and were not observed in the absence of Na(+). However, depolarizations were restored when Na(+) was resupplied. NO(3)(-) additions also evoked depolarizations of the plasma membrane of root cells only in the presence of Na(+). Both NO(3)(-)- and P(i)-induced depolarizations were accompanied by an increase in cytoplasmic Na(+) activity, detected by Na(+)-sensitive microelectrodes. P(i) net uptake (measured in depletion experiments) was stimulated by Na(+). These results strongly suggest that P(i) uptake in roots of Z. marina is mediated by a high-affinity Na(+)-dependent transport system. Both NO(3)(-) and P(i) transport systems exploit the steep inwardly directed electrochemical potential gradient for Na(+), considering the low cytoplasmic Na(+) activity (10.7+/-3.3 mM Na(+)) and the high external Na(+) concentration (500 mM Na(+)).

  8. The role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    Buapet, Pimchanok; Björk, Mats

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the role of O2 as an electron acceptor alternative to CO2 in photosynthesis of the common marine angiosperm Zostera marina L. Electron transport rates (ETRs) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of Z. marina were measured under saturating irradiance in synthetic seawater containing 2.2 mM DIC and no DIC with different O2 levels (air-equilibrated levels, 3 % of air equilibrium and restored air-equilibrated levels). Lowering O2 did not affect ETR when DIC was provided, while it caused a decrease in ETR and an increase in NPQ in DIC-free media, indicating that O2 acted as an alternative electron acceptor under low DIC. The ETR and NPQ as a function of irradiance were subsequently assessed in synthetic seawater containing (1) 2.2 mM DIC, air-equilibrated O2; (2) saturating CO2, no O2; and (3) no DIC, air-equilibrated O2. These treatments were combined with glycolaldehyde pre-incubation. Glycolaldehyde caused a marked decrease in ETR in DIC-free medium, indicating significant electron flow supported by photorespiration. Combining glycolaldehyde with O2 depletion completely suppressed ETR suggesting the operation of the Mehler reaction, a possibility supported by the photosynthesis-dependent superoxide production. However, no notable effect of suppressing the Mehler reaction on NPQ was observed. It is concluded that during DIC-limiting conditions, such as those frequently occurring in the habitats of Z. marina, captured light energy exceeds what is utilised for the assimilation of available carbon, and photorespiration is a major alternative electron acceptor, while the contribution of the Mehler reaction is minor.

  9. Understanding the mechanisms of antitropical divergence in the seabird White-faced Storm-petrel (Procellariiformes: Pelagodroma marina) using a multilocus approach.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mónica C; Matias, Rafael; Wanless, Ross M; Ryan, Peter G; Stephenson, Brent M; Bolton, Mark; Ferrand, Nuno; Coelho, M Manuela

    2015-06-01

    Analytical methods that apply coalescent theory to multilocus data have improved inferences of demographic parameters that are critical to understanding population divergence and speciation. In particular, at the early stages of speciation, it is important to implement models that accommodate conflicting gene trees, and benefit from the presence of shared polymorphisms. Here, we employ eleven nuclear loci and the mitochondrial control region to investigate the phylogeography and historical demography of the pelagic seabird White-faced Storm-petrel (Pelagodroma marina) by sampling subspecies across its antitropical distribution. Groups are all highly differentiated: global mitochondrial ΦST = 0.89 (P < 0.01) and global nuclear ΦST varies between 0.22 and 0.83 (all P < 0.01). The complete lineage sorting of the mitochondrial locus between hemispheres is corroborated by approximately half of the nuclear genealogies, suggesting a long-term antitropical divergence in isolation. Coalescent-based estimates of demographic parameters suggest that hemispheric divergence of P. marina occurred approximately 840 000 ya (95% HPD 582 000-1 170 000), in the absence of gene flow, and divergence within the Southern Hemisphere occurred 190 000 ya (95% HPD 96 000-600 000), both probably associated with the profound palaeo-oceanographic changes of the Pleistocene. A fledgling sampled in St Helena (tropical South Atlantic) suggests recent colonization from the Northern Hemisphere. Despite the great potential for long-distance dispersal, P. marina antitropical groups have been evolving as independent, allopatric lineages, and divergence is probably maintained by philopatry coupled with asynchronous reproductive phenology and local adaptation.

  10. Molecular cloning of class III chitinase gene from Avicennia marina and its expression analysis in response to cadmium and lead stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Wang, You-Shao; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-10-01

    Mangrove species have high tolerance to heavy metal pollution. Chitinases have been widely reported as defense proteins in response to heavy metal stress in terrestrial plants. In this study, a full-length cDNA sequence encoding an acidic and basic class III chitinase (AmCHI III) was cloned by using RT-PCR and RACE methods in Avicennia marina. AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaf of A. marina were investigated under Cd, Pb stresses on using real-time quantitative PCR. The deduced AmCHI III protein consists of 302 amino acids, including a signal putative peptide region, and a catalytic domain. Homology modeling of the catalytic domain revealed a typical molecular structure of class III plant chitinases. Results further demonstrated that the regulation of AmCHI III mRNA expression in leaves was strongly dependent on Cd, Pb stresses. AmCHI III mRNA expressions were significantly increased in response to Cd, Pb, and peaked at 7 days Cd-exposure, 7 days Pb-exposure, respectively. AmCHI III mRNA expression exhibited more sensitive to Pb stress than Cd stress. This work was the first time cloing chitinase from A. marina, and it brought evidence on chitinase gene involving in heavy metals (Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)) resistance or detoxification in plants. Further studies including the promoter and upstream regulation, gene over-expression and the response of mangrove chitinases to other stresses will shed more light on the role of chitinase in mangrove plants.

  11. Factors Influencing Spatial and Annual Variability in Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) Meadows in Willapa Bay, Washington, and Coos Bay, Oregon, Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Rumrill, Steven; Woodruff, Dana L.; Williams, Greg D.; Southard, John A.; Sargeant, Susan L.

    2003-08-01

    Environmental factors that influence annual variability and spatial differences in eelgrass meadows (Zostera marina L.) were examined within Willapa Bay, WA, and Coos Bay, OR, over a period of 4 years (1998-2001). A suite of eelgrass metrics were recorded annually at field sites that spanned the estuarine gradient from the marine-dominated to mesohaline regions. Growth of eelgrass plants was also monitored on a monthly basis within Sequim Bay, WA. Both the spatial cover and density of Z. marina were positively correlated with estuarine salinity and inversely correlated with temperature of the tideflat sediment. Experimental evidence verified that optimal eelgrass growth occurred at highest salinities and relatively low temperatures. Eelgrass density, biomass, and the incident of flowering plants all increased substantially in Willapa Bay, and less so in Coos Bay, over the duration of the study. Warmer winters and cooler summers associated with the transition from El Ni?o to La Ni?a ocean conditions during the study period were correlated with the increase in eelgrass abundance and flowering. Anthropogenic factors (e.g., disturbance and erosion by vessel wakes and recreational shellfishing activities) may have contributed to spatial variability. Our findings indicate that large-scale changes in climate and nearshore ocean conditions can exert a strong regional influence on eelgrass abundance, which can vary annually by as much as 700% in Willapa Bay. Lower levels of variability observed in Coos Bay may be due to the stronger and more direct influence of the nearshore Pacific Ocean. We conclude that climate variation may have profound effects on the abundance and distribution of eelgrass meadows throughout the Pacific Northwest, and we anticipate that ocean conditions will emerge as a primary driving force for living estuarine resources and ecological processes that are associated with Z. marina beds within the landscape of these estuarine tidal basins.

  12. Croceitalea marina sp. nov., isolated from marine particles of Yellow Sea, and emended description of the genera Croceitalea.

    PubMed

    Su, Ying; Yu, Min; Ren, Qiaomeng; Sun, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Xiaoting; Wang, Yanan; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2017-08-31

    A Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile, golden yellow-coloured and strictly aerobic bacterial strain, designated H01-35T, was isolated from a surface marine particles sample collected from the Yellow Sea in China. According to the phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, the strain H01-35T belonged to the genus Croceitalea and showed the highest sequence similarity to Croceitalea litorea CBA3205T (96.4 %). Strain H01-35T grew optimally at pH 8.0-9.0, 28 °C and in the presence of 3 % (w/v) NaCl. The DNA G+C content was 52.7 mol%. Strain H01-35T contained MK-6 as the predominant respiratory quinone and held iso-C15 : 1 G, iso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH as the major cellular fatty acids. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and five unidentified lipids. Exoenzymes for starch, gelatin and Tween 20 degradation were detected in Strain H01-35T but the strain was negative for sulfur and indole production. On the basis of the polyphasic analyses, this isolate was considered to represent a novel species in the genus Croceitalea, for which the name Croceitalea marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is H01-35T (MCCC 1K03229T=KCTC 52368T). The emendation of description of the genus Croceitalea is also given.

  13. Differences in benthic fauna and sediment among mangrove ( Avicennia marina var. australasica) stands of different ages in New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrisey, D. J.; Skilleter, G. A.; Ellis, J. I.; Burns, B. R.; Kemp, C. E.; Burt, K.

    2003-03-01

    Management of coastal environments requires understanding of ecological relationships among different habitats and their biotas. Changes in abundance and distribution of mangroves, like those of other coastal habitats, have generally been interpreted in terms of changes in biodiversity or fisheries resources within individual stands. In several parts of their range, anthropogenically increased inputs of sediment to estuaries have led to the spread of mangroves. There is, however, little information on the relative ecological properties, or conservational values, of stands of different ages. The faunal, floral and sedimentological properties of mangrove ( Avicennia marina var. australasica) stands of two different ages in New Zealand has been compared. Older (>60 years) and younger (3-12 years) stands showed clear separation on the basis of environmental characteristics and benthic macrofauna. Numbers of faunal taxa were generally larger at younger sites, and numbers of individuals of several taxa were also larger at these sites. The total number of individuals was not different between the two age-classes, largely due to the presence of large numbers of the surface-living gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum at the older sites. It is hypothesized that as mangrove stands mature, the focus of faunal diversity may shift from the benthos to animals living on the mangrove plants themselves, such as insects and spiders, though these were not included in the present study. Differences in the faunas were coincident with differences in the nature of the sediment. Sediments in older stands were more compacted and contained more organic matter and leaf litter. Measurement of leaf chemistry suggested that mangrove plants in the younger stands were able to take up more N and P than those in the older stands.

  14. A Patchy Growth via Successive and Simultaneous Cambia: Key to Success of the Most Widespread Mangrove Species Avicennia marina?

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Nele; Robert, Elisabeth M. R.; Verheyden, Anouk; Kairo, James Gitundu; Beeckman, Hans; Koedam, Nico

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Secondary growth via successive cambia has been intriguing researchers for decades. Insight into the mechanism of growth layer formation is, however, limited to the cellular level. The present study aims to clarify secondary growth via successive cambia in the mangrove species Avicennia marina on a macroscopic level, addressing the formation of the growth layer network as a whole. In addition, previously suggested effects of salinity on growth layer formation were reconsidered. Methods A 1-year cambial marking experiment was performed on 80 trees from eight sites in two mangrove forests in Kenya. Environmental (soil water salinity and nutrients, soil texture, inundation frequency) and tree characteristics (diameter, height, leaf area index) were recorded for each site. Both groups of variables were analysed in relation to annual number of growth layers, annual radial increment and average growth layer width of stem discs. Key Results Between trees of the same site, the number of growth layers formed during the 1-year study period varied from only part of a growth layer up to four growth layers, and was highly correlated to the corresponding radial increment (0–5 mm year–1), even along the different sides of asymmetric stem discs. The radial increment was unrelated to salinity, but the growth layer width decreased with increasing salinity and decreasing tree height. Conclusions A patchy growth mechanism was proposed, with an optimal growth at distinct moments in time at different positions around the stem circumference. This strategy creates the opportunity to form several growth layers simultaneously, as observed in 14 % of the studied trees, which may optimize tree growth under favourable conditions. Strong evidence was provided for a mainly endogenous trigger controlling cambium differentiation, with an additional influence of current environmental conditions in a trade-off between hydraulic efficiency and mechanical stability. PMID

  15. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea — A Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A.; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A.C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Covering a quarter of the world’s tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%–85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%–24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. PMID:26549842

  16. Seasonal dynamics of the lungworm, Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala, in recently colonised cane toad (Rhinella marina) populations in tropical Australia.

    PubMed

    Pizzatto, Lígia; Kelehear, Crystal; Shine, Richard

    2013-08-01

    The impact of parasites on host populations depend upon parasite prevalence and intensity. Understanding how infection dynamics change through time following a host population's initial exposure to the parasite is fundamental to host-parasite biology. We studied an invasive host (the cane toad, Rhinella marina) currently undergoing range expansion - a process through which this host's range is expanding faster than that of its lung parasites (the nematode, Rhabdias pseudosphaerocephala), such that hosts at the expanding range edge remain parasite-free for several years. It was predicted that parasite intensity and prevalence would be affected by host characteristics (e.g., size, sex), environmental conditions (e.g., seasons, habitat type), and time since parasite arrival in the newly established invading host population. Over 2,400 cane toads were sampled at 10 sites in recently established toad populations in the highly seasonal monsoonal tropics of northern Australia. The sampling spanned 14 consecutive 3 month seasons commencing in the early stages of lungworm establishment in those toad populations. Both parasite prevalence and intensity increased with host body size but were unaffected by host sex. Prevalence and intensity were highest during drier times of year and in drier habitats (i.e., sites lacking permanent waterbodies). These changes in parasite prevalence may reflect a trend for saturated soil to reduce parasite survival during the free-living infective stage, and to allow anuran hosts to disperse widely (thus reducing the transfer of directly transmitted parasites between hosts). Conversely, dry conditions induce toads to aggregate in moist dry-season refugia where conditions may be more conducive to direct transmission of infective parasitic larvae between hosts.

  17. Soil and Rhizosphere Associated Fungi in Gray Mangroves (Avicennia marina) from the Red Sea--A Metagenomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Antunes, André; Ottoni, Cristiane A; Amini, Mohammad Shoaib; Alam, Intikhab; Alzubaidy, Hanin; Mokhtar, Noor-Azlin; Archer, John A C; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-10-01

    Covering a quarter of the world's tropical coastlines and being one of the most threatened ecosystems, mangroves are among the major sources of terrestrial organic matter to oceans and harbor a wide microbial diversity. In order to protect, restore, and better understand these ecosystems, researchers have extensively studied their microbiology, yet few surveys have focused on their fungal communities. Our lack of knowledge is even more pronounced for specific fungal populations, such as the ones associated with the rhizosphere. Likewise, the Red Sea gray mangroves (Avicennia marina) remain poorly characterized, and understanding of their fungal communities still relies on cultivation-dependent methods. In this study, we analyzed metagenomic datasets from gray mangrove rhizosphere and bulk soil samples collected in the Red Sea coast, to obtain a snapshot of their fungal communities. Our data indicated that Ascomycota was the dominant phylum (76%-85%), while Basidiomycota was less abundant (14%-24%), yet present in higher numbers than usually reported for such environments. Fungal communities were more stable within the rhizosphere than within the bulk soil, both at class and genus level. This finding is consistent with the intrinsic patchiness in soil sediments and with the selection of specific microbial communities by plant roots. Our study indicates the presence of several species on this mycobiome that were not previously reported as mangrove-associated. In particular, we detected representatives of several commercially-used fungi, e.g., producers of secreted cellulases and anaerobic producers of cellulosomes. These results represent additional insights into the fungal community of the gray mangroves of the Red Sea, and show that they are significantly richer than previously reported. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Indirect effects of predators control herbivore richness and abundance in a benthic eelgrass (Zostera marina) mesograzer community.

    PubMed

    Amundrud, Sarah L; Srivastava, Diane S; O'Connor, Mary I

    2015-07-01

    Herbivore communities can be sensitive to changes in predator pressure (top-down effects) and resource availability (bottom-up effects) in a wide range of systems. However, it remains unclear whether such top-down and bottom-up effects reflect direct impacts of predators and/or resources on herbivores, or are indirect, reflecting altered interactions among herbivore species. We quantified direct and indirect effects of bottom-up and top-down processes on an eelgrass (Zostera marina) herbivore assemblage. In a field experiment, we factorially manipulated water column nutrients (with Osmocote(™) slow-release fertilizer) and predation pressure (with predator exclusion cages) and measured the effects on herbivore abundance, richness and beta diversity. We examined likely mechanisms of community responses by statistically exploring the response of individual herbivore species to trophic manipulations. Predators increased herbivore richness and total abundance, in both cases through indirect shifts in community composition. Increases in richness occurred through predator suppression of common gammarid amphipod species (Monocorophium acherusicum and Photis brevipes), permitting the inclusion of rarer gammarid species (Aoroides columbiae and Pontogeneia rostrata). Increased total herbivore abundance reflected increased abundance of a caprellid amphipod species (Caprella sp.), concurrent with declines in the abundance of other common species. Furthermore, predators decreased beta diversity by decreasing variability in Caprella sp. abundance among habitat patches. Osmocote(™) fertilization increased nutrient concentrations locally, but nutrients dissipated to background levels within 3 m of the fertilizer. Nutrient addition weakly affected the herbivore assemblage, not affecting richness and increasing total abundance by increasing one herbivore species (Caprella sp.). Nutrient addition did not affect beta diversity. We demonstrated that assemblage-level effects of

  19. Bioaccumulation of arsenic from water and sediment by a deposit-feeding polychaete (Arenicola marina): a biodynamic modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Casado-Martinez, M C; Smith, B D; Luoma, S N; Rainbow, P S

    2010-06-01

    Arsenic bioaccumulation in the deposit-feeding polychaete Arenicola marina has been investigated using biodynamic modelling. Radiotracer techniques were used to determine the rates of uptake of As as arsenate from water and sediment and its subsequent efflux in the laboratory. Lugworms accumulated As from solution linearly at concentrations of 2-20 microg l(-1), with a corresponding uptake rate constant of 0.1648+/-0.0135 l g(-1)d(-1). 7.8+/-0.8% (assimilation efficiency) of the As ingested bound to sediments was retained after egestion of unassimilated metal. Elimination of As followed a two-compartment model, with mean efflux rate constants (from the slow pool) very similar for As accumulated from solution and ingested sediments (0.0449+/-0.0034 and 0.0478+/-0.0225 d(-1), respectively) and a corresponding biological half-time of roughly 15 d. A biodynamic model was constructed and validated through the comparison of biodynamic model predictions against measured bioaccumulated concentrations in lugworms from five UK estuaries. The model accurately predicted bioaccumulated As concentrations in lugworms using mean values of relevant physiological parameters (uptake rate, efflux rate and growth rate constants), a site-specific ingestion rate (calculated according to mean worm size and sediment organic matter content and expressed as the rate of ingestion of the mass of fine sediment), a site-specific sediment concentration measured after HCl extraction, and a standard dissolved As concentration. This combination of parameters showed that sediment ingestion contributed 30-60% of the total As accumulated by lugworms at the studied sites, depending on the different geochemistry at each site. This study showed that it is difficult to predict accurately As bioaccumulation at sites with different chemistries, unless that chemistry is taken into account. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Behaviour of butyltin compounds in the sediment pore waters of a contaminated marina (Port Camargue, South of France).

    PubMed

    Briant, Nicolas; Bancon-Montigny, Chrystelle; Freydier, Rémi; Delpoux, Sophie; Elbaz-Poulichet, Françoise

    2016-05-01

    Despite the ban on tributyltin (TBT) in marine paints, harbour sediments are still highly contaminated by this antifouling agent. Concentrations of TBT and its dealkylated products dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT) were determined in the pore waters of Port Camargue, a large marina located on the French Mediterranean coast. Pore waters were sampled in the field using peepers deployed in summer 2012 and 2013 and in winter 2012-2013. The winter surveys were characterized by the presence of sulphides in pore waters from a depth of 5 cm, which was not the case in winter. In summer 2013, TBT was shown to be released into pore waters below the sediment-water interface (SWI) at concentrations of up to 70 ngSn L(-1). This release was also observed in sediment anaerobic incubations and was attributed to the mineralization of the sedimentary organic matter, possible stabilization of TBT by complexation with sulphides, and lower debutylation rates in anoxic than in oxic conditions. In summer 2012, a comparatively lower concentration of TBT (around 20 ngSn L(-1) below the SWI) was measured and the presence of methyltin species was detected. We hypothesize that the differences between the two surveys reflect different microbial activity. In winter 2012-2013, marked by Fe-reducing conditions in the sediments, TBT was released into solution at the SWI at concentrations of up to 40 ngSn L(-1). Sediments are thus a continuing source of TBT for the overlying waters despite the ban on its use for boats in France. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seed dispersal by northern diamondback terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) in lower Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Tulipani, Diane C; Lipcius, Romuald N

    2014-01-01

    The initial discovery in May 2009 of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seeds in fecal samples of wild-caught northern diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) was the first field evidence of eelgrass seed ingestion in this species. This finding suggested the potential of terrapins as seed dispersers in eelgrass beds, which we sampled for two additional years (2010 and 2011). Seeds were only found in feces of terrapins captured prior to June 8 in all three years, coinciding with eelgrass seed maturation and release. Numbers of seeds in terrapin feces varied annually and decreased greatly in 2011 after an eelgrass die off in late 2010. The condition of seeds in terrapin feces was viable-mature, germinated, damaged, or immature. Of terrapins captured during time of seed release, 97% were males and juvenile females, both of which had head widths <30 mm. The fraction of individuals with ingested seeds was 33% for males, 35% for small females, and only 6% for large (mature) females. Probability of seed ingestion decreased exponentially with increasing terrapin head width; only males and small females (head width <30 mm) were likely to be vectors of seed dispersal. The characteristic that diamondback terrapins have well-defined home ranges allowed us to estimate the number of terrapins potentially dispersing eelgrass seeds annually. In seagrass beds of the Goodwin Islands region (lower York River, Virginia), there were 559 to 799 terrapins, which could disperse between 1,341 and 1,677 eelgrass seeds annually. These would represent a small proportion of total seed production within a single seagrass bed. However, based on probable home range distances, terrapins can easily traverse eelgrass meadow boundaries, thereby dispersing seeds beyond the bed of origin. Given the relatively short dispersion distance of eelgrass seeds, the diamondback terrapin may be a major source of inter-bed seed dispersal and genetic diversity.

  2. Evidence of Eelgrass (Zostera marina) Seed Dispersal by Northern Diamondback Terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) in Lower Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Tulipani, Diane C.; Lipcius, Romuald N.

    2014-01-01

    The initial discovery in May 2009 of eelgrass (Zostera marina) seeds in fecal samples of wild-caught northern diamondback terrapins (Malaclemys terrapin terrapin) was the first field evidence of eelgrass seed ingestion in this species. This finding suggested the potential of terrapins as seed dispersers in eelgrass beds, which we sampled for two additional years (2010 and 2011). Seeds were only found in feces of terrapins captured prior to June 8 in all three years, coinciding with eelgrass seed maturation and release. Numbers of seeds in terrapin feces varied annually and decreased greatly in 2011 after an eelgrass die off in late 2010. The condition of seeds in terrapin feces was viable-mature, germinated, damaged, or immature. Of terrapins captured during time of seed release, 97% were males and juvenile females, both of which had head widths <30 mm. The fraction of individuals with ingested seeds was 33% for males, 35% for small females, and only 6% for large (mature) females. Probability of seed ingestion decreased exponentially with increasing terrapin head width; only males and small females (head width <30 mm) were likely to be vectors of seed dispersal. The characteristic that diamondback terrapins have well-defined home ranges allowed us to estimate the number of terrapins potentially dispersing eelgrass seeds annually. In seagrass beds of the Goodwin Islands region (lower York River, Virginia), there were 559 to 799 terrapins, which could disperse between 1,341 and 1,677 eelgrass seeds annually. These would represent a small proportion of total seed production within a single seagrass bed. However, based on probable home range distances, terrapins can easily traverse eelgrass meadow boundaries, thereby dispersing seeds beyond the bed of origin. Given the relatively short dispersion distance of eelgrass seeds, the diamondback terrapin may be a major source of inter-bed seed dispersal and genetic diversity. PMID:25072473

  3. Decline in eelgrass ( Zostera marina L.) in Long Island Sound near Millstone Point, Connecticut (USA) unrelated to thermal input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keser, Milan; Swenarton, John T.; Vozarik, Joseph M.; Foertch, James F.

    2003-02-01

    Eelgrass ( Zostera marina L.) shoot density, seed-bearing shoot abundance, shoot length, and standing stock biomass were monitored during summer months from 1985 to 2000 at three locations in eastern Long Island Sound (LIS) near Millstone Power Station (MPS), Waterford, Connecticut, USA. Short-term declines in eelgrass abundance were directly associated with fouling and overgrowth of eelgrass on two occasions; once by blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) and once by a bloom of green algae ( Cladophora spp.). Analysis of long-term trends indicated some degree of decline in most of the parameters examined at all three areas monitored. The spatial relationship of the long-term eelgrass declines suggests primary causal factors other than the power plant discharge or regional climate change. Two populations to the east of MPS and near the fringes of the thermal plume (<1.5 km from the MPS discharge to LIS) exhibited only slight declines over the 16-y study period and thermal input from MPS to these sites was minimal (<1 °C above ambient conditions). By comparison, heavy eelgrass losses were documented in the Niantic River, located >2 km from the power plant thermal plume. Die-offs of entire individual eelgrass study beds in the Niantic River were observed on five separate occasions during the study with no sign of recovery. While the causes were not determined, anthropogenic influences such as nutrient loading from surface run-off and groundwater sources may have contributed to observed declines. The Niantic River has a more restricted tidal inlet and is closer to sources of nutrient enrichment than Jordan Cove. Historically, eelgrass has ranged to far western reaches of LIS, but over the last century has become restricted to the easternmost third of the Connecticut coastline due to nutrient loading and eutrophication of the western portions. This study suggests that the west-to-east declining trend in eelgrass distribution in LIS may be further progressing.

  4. Desiccation risk drives the spatial ecology of an invasive anuran (Rhinella marina) in the Australian semi-desert.

    PubMed

    Tingley, Reid; Shine, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Some invasive species flourish in places that impose challenges very different from those faced in their native geographic ranges. Cane toads (Rhinella marina) are native to tropical and subtropical habitats of South and Central America, but have colonised extremely arid regions over the course of their Australian invasion. We radio-tracked 44 adult cane toads at a semi-arid invasion front to investigate how this invasive anuran has managed to expand its geographic range into arid areas that lie outside of its native climatic niche. As predicted from their low physiological control over rates of evaporative water loss, toads selected diurnal shelter sites that were consistently cooler and damper (and thus, conferred lower water loss rates) than nearby random sites. Desiccation risk also had a profound influence on rates of daily movement. Under wet conditions, toads that were far from water moved further between shelter sites than did conspecifics that remained close to water, presumably in an attempt to reach permanent water sources. However, this relationship was reversed under dry conditions, such that only toads that were close to permanent water bodies made substantial daily movements. Toads that were far from water bodies also travelled along straighter paths than did conspecifics that generally remained close to water. Thus, behavioural flexibility--in particular, an ability to exploit spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the availability of moist conditions--has allowed this invasive anuran to successfully colonize arid habitats in Australia. This finding illustrates that risk assessment protocols need to recognise that under some circumstances an introduced species may be able to thrive in conditions far removed from any that it experiences in its native range.

  5. Evaluation of anti-HIV-1 activity of a new iridoid glycoside isolated from Avicenna marina, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Behbahani, Mandana

    2014-11-01

    This study was carried out to check the efficacy of methanol seed extract of Avicenna marina and its column chromatographic fractions on Peripheral Blood Mono nuclear Cells (PBMCs) toxicity and HIV-1 replication. The anti-HIV-1 activities of crude methanol extract and its fractions were performed by use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and HIV-1 p24 antigen kit. A time of drug addiction approach was also done to identify target of anti-HIV compound. The activity of the extracts on CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 expression in lymphocytes population was performed by use of flow cytometry. The most active anti-HIV agent was detected by spectroscopic analysis as 2'-O-(4-methoxycinnamoyl) mussaenosidic acid. The apparent effective concentrations for 50% virus replication (EC50) of methanol extract and iridoid glycoside were 45 and 0.1 μg/ml respectively. The iridoid glycoside also did not have any observable effect on the proportion of CD4, CD3, CD19 and CD45 cells or on the intensity of their expressions on PBMCs. In addition, the expression level of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) on CD4(+) T cells were decreased in cells treated with this iridoid glycoside. The reduction of these two HIV coreceptors and the result of time of addition study demonstrated that this iridoid glycoside restricts HIV-1 replication on the early stage of HIV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries in the seagrass Zostera marina subjected to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Thorsten B H; Veron, Amelie S; Preuss, Christoph; Weiner, January; Wissler, Lothar; Beck, Alfred; Klages, Sven; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2008-01-01

    Global warming is associated with increasing stress and mortality on temperate seagrass beds, in particular during periods of high sea surface temperatures during summer months, adding to existing anthropogenic impacts, such as eutrophication and habitat destruction. We compare several expressed sequence tag (EST) in the ecologically important seagrass Zostera marina (eelgrass) to elucidate the molecular genetic basis of adaptation to environmental extremes. We compared the tentative unigene (TUG) frequencies of libraries derived from leaf and meristematic tissue from a control situation with two experimentally imposed temperature stress conditions and found that TUG composition is markedly different among these conditions (all P < 0.0001). Under heat stress, we find that 63 TUGs are differentially expressed (d.e.) at 25 degrees C compared with lower, no-stress condition temperatures (4 degrees C and 17 degrees C). Approximately one-third of d.e. eelgrass genes were characteristic for the stress response of the terrestrial plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. The changes in gene expression suggest complex photosynthetic adjustments among light-harvesting complexes, reaction center subunits of photosystem I and II, and components of the dark reaction. Heat shock encoding proteins and reactive oxygen scavengers also were identified, but their overall frequency was too low to perform statistical tests. In all conditions, the most abundant transcript (3-15%) was a putative metallothionein gene with unknown function. We also find evidence that heat stress may translate to enhanced infection by protists. A total of 210 TUGs contain one or more microsatellites as potential candidates for gene-linked genetic markers. Data are publicly available in a user-friendly database at http://www.uni-muenster.de/Evolution/ebb/Services/zostera .

  7. Wenyingzhuangia marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from a recirculating mariculture system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Liu, Liang-Zi; Liu, Hong-Can; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Qi, Fang-Jun; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2014-02-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic and heterotrophic bacterial strain, designed strain D1(T), was isolated from a recirculating mariculture system in Tianjin, China. Its taxonomic position was determined using a polyphasic approach. Cells of strain D1(T) were non-flagellated short rods, 0.3-0.5 µm wide and 0.5-1.0 µm long. Growth was observed at 15-30 °C (optimum, 25 °C), at pH 5.5-9.0 (optimum, pH 6.5-7.0) and in the presence of 1-8% (w/v) NaCl (optimum, 2-3 %). Cells contained carotenoid pigments but not flexirubin-type pigments. Strain D1(T) contained MK-6 as the sole menaquinone and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) as the sole phospholipid and four unidentified lipids. The major cellular fatty acids (>10%) were iso-C15 : 0 (23.2 %), iso-C17 : 0 3-OH (15.2%), C(16 : 1)ω7c/C(16 : 1)ω6c (14.3%), iso-C(15 : 0) 3-OH (13.5%) and iso-C15 : 1 G (10.8%). 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses indicated that strain D1(T) belonged to the family Flavobacteriaceae and showed closest phylogenetic relationship to the genus Lutibacter, with highest sequence similarity to Lutibacter aestuarii MA-My1(T) (92.2%). The DNA G+C content of strain D1(T) was 35.9 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain D1(T) was considered to represent a novel species in a new genus of the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Wenyingzhuangia marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the type species is D1(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12162(T) = JCM 18494(T)).

  8. Both chlorophylls a and d are essential for the photochemistry in photosystem II of the cyanobacteria, Acaryochloris marina.

    PubMed

    Schlodder, Eberhard; Cetin, Marianne; Eckert, Hann-Jörg; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Barber, James; Telfer, Alison

    2007-06-01

    We have measured the flash-induced absorbance difference spectrum attributed to the formation of the secondary radical pair, P(+)Q(-), between 270 nm and 1000 nm at 77 K in photosystem II of the chlorophyll d containing cyanobacterium, Acaryochloris marina. Despite the high level of chlorophyll d present, the flash-induced absorption difference spectrum of an approximately 2 ms decay component shows a number of features which are typical of the difference spectrum seen in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms containing no chlorophyll d. The spectral shape in the near-UV indicates that a plastoquinone is the secondary acceptor molecule (Q(A)). The strong C-550 change at 543 nm confirms previous reports that pheophytin a is the primary electron acceptor. The bleach at 435 nm and increase in absorption at 820 nm indicates that the positive charge is stabilized on a chlorophyll a molecule. In addition a strong electrochromic band shift, centred at 723 nm, has been observed. It is assigned to a shift of the Qy band of the neighbouring accessory chlorophyll d, Chl(D1). It seems highly likely that it accepts excitation energy from the chlorophyll d containing antenna. We therefore propose that primary charge separation is initiated from this chlorophyll d molecule and functions as