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Sample records for marine biotechnology culture

  1. International Marine Biotechnology Culture Collection (IMBCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Zaborsky, O.R.; Baker, K.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a premier culture collection of tropical marine microorganisms able to generate hydrogen from water or organic substances. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms will serve as the biological reservoir or {open_quotes}library{close_quotes} for other DOE Hydrogen Program contractors, the biohydrogen research community and industry. This project consists of several tasks: (a) transfer of the Mitsui-Miami strains to Hawaii`s International Marine Biotechnology Culture Collection (IMBCC) housed at the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI); (b) maintain and distribute Mitsui-Miami strains; (c) characterize key strains by traditional and advanced biotechnological techniques; (d) expand Hawaii`s IMBCC; and (e) establish and operate an information resource (database). The project was initiated only late in the summer of 1995 but progress has been made on all tasks. Of the 161 cyanobacterial strains imported, 147 survived storage and importation and 145 are viable. with most exhibiting growth. Of the 406 strains of other photosynthetic bacteria imported, 392 survived storage and importation and 353 are viable, with many exhibiting growth. This project is linked to cooperative efforts being supported by the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) through its Marine Biotechnology Institute (MBI) and Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (RITE).

  2. Fish Growth in Marine Culture Systems: A Challenge for Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lyndon

    1999-07-01

    : Aquaculture production is constrained largely by the growth efficiency of the species being produced. Nutritional approaches have played an important part in improving this situation, but, it is argued, the room for further improvement using such established techniques is limited. Alternative ways of improving fish production by utilizing recent biotechnological advances are explored and assessed as to their potential for commercialization in the near future. Transgenic technologies promise a revolution in aquaculture, but it is considered that consumer resistance may delay the use of transgenic fish for food production. An alternative approach could be the breeding of transgenic fodder plants without the amino acid deficiencies of existing alternatives to fish meal in aquaculture diets. The use of probiotics could reduce antibiotic use on fish farms while they might also provide the basis for "smart" diets, tailored to specific purposes by the inclusion of microorganisms. The selection and genetic engineering of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria could also pave the way for fully enclosed, recirculating marine culture systems, which would allow control of the environmental variables that currently restrain marine fish culture.

  3. Biotechnology of marine fungi.

    PubMed

    Damare, Samir; Singh, Purnima; Raghukumar, Seshagiri

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are the most widely used eukaryotes in industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Their biotechnological uses include the production of enzymes, vitamins, polysaccharides, pigments, lipids and others. Marine fungi are a still relatively unexplored group in biotechnology. Taxonomic and habitat diversity form the basis for exploration of marine fungal biotechnology. This review covers what is known of the potential applications of obligate and marine-derived fungi obtained from coastal to the oceanic and shallow water to the deep-sea habitats. Recent studies indicate that marine fungi are potential candidates for novel enzymes, bioremediation, biosurfactants, polysaccharides, polyunsaturated fatty acids and secondary metabolites. Future studies that focus on culturing rare and novel marine fungi, combined with knowledge of their physiology and biochemistry will provide a firm basis for marine mycotechnology.

  4. Linking marine biology and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    de Nys, Rocky; Steinberg, Peter D

    2002-06-01

    Studies of biological systems in which there is a direct link between the challenges faced by marine organisms and biotechnologies enable us to rationally search for active natural compounds and other novel biotechnologies. This approach is proving successful in developing new methods for the prevention of marine biofouling and for the identification of new lead compounds for the development of ultraviolet sunscreens.

  5. Downstream processing in marine biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Muffler, Kai; Ulber, Roland

    2005-01-01

    Downstream processing is one of the most underestimated steps in bioprocesses and this is not only the case in marine biotechnology. However, it is well known, especially in the pharmaceutical industry, that downstreaming is the most expensive and unfortunately the most ineffective part of a bioprocess. Thus, one might assume that new developments are widely described in the literature. Unfortunately this is not the case. Only a few working groups focus on new and more effective procedures to separate products from marine organisms. A major characteristic of marine biotechnology is the wide variety of products. Due to this variety a broad spectrum of separation techniques must be applied. In this chapter we will give an overview of existing general techniques for downstream processing which are suitable for marine bioprocesses, with some examples focussing on special products such as proteins (enzymes), polysaccharides, polyunsaturated fatty acids and other low molecular weight products. The application of a new membrane adsorber is described as well as the use of solvent extraction in marine biotechnology.

  6. Realizing the promises of marine biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Luiten, Esther E M; Akkerman, Ida; Koulman, Albert; Kamermans, Pauline; Reith, Hans; Barbosa, Maria J; Sipkema, Detmer; Wijffels, René H

    2003-07-01

    High-quality research in the field of marine biotechnology is one of the key-factors for successful innovation in exploiting the vast diversity of marine life. However, fascinating scientific research with promising results and claims on promising potential applications (e.g. for pharmaceuticals, nutritional supplements, (feed-)products for aquaculture and bioremediation solutions) is not the only factor to realise the commercial applications of marine biotechnology. What else is needed to exploit the promising potential of marine biotechnology and to create new industrial possibilities? In the study project 'Ocean Farming-Sustainable exploitation of marine organisms', we explore the possibilities of marine organisms to fulfill needs, such as safe and healthy food, industrial (raw) materials and renewable energy in a sustainable way. One of the three design groups is envisioning the future of strong land-based 'marine' market chains. Marine biotechnology is one of the foci of attention in this design group. This article provides a model of future-oriented thinking in which a variety of experts actively participate.

  7. What to do in marine biotechnology?

    PubMed

    Tramper, Johannes; Battershill, Chris; Brandenburg, Willem; Burgess, Grant; Hill, Russell; Luiten, Esther; Müller, Werner; Osinga, Ronald; Rorrer, Gregory; Tredici, Mario; Uriz, Maria; Wright, Phillip; Wijffels, René

    2003-07-01

    During the symposium "Marine Biotechnology: Basics and Applications", held 25 February-1 March, 2003 in Matalascañas, Spain, a special brainstorm session was organized. Two questions were addressed: 1, "What is the most desirable development in marine biotechnology"?; 2, "What is the most spectacular development in this field in your 'wildest' dreams"? The outcome of this session is reported in this paper. From the more than 250 ideas generated, concern for the environment and human health emerged as the most significant issues.

  8. The Carolina conference on marine biotechnology: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes proceedings of a Carolina Conference on Marine Biotechnology held March 24-26, 1985, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This report consists of the responders' summary of each topic discussed. The topics presented were General Prospects for Marine Biotechnology, Bioactive Substances from Marine Organisms, Fundamental Processes in Marine Organisms as Guides for Biotechnology Development, Genetic Manipulation of Potential Use to Mariculture, Organisms Interactions with Marine Surfaces: Marine Glues, and Biomolecular Engineering Materials Applications.

  9. Enzymatic Processes in Marine Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Trincone, Antonio

    2017-03-25

    In previous review articles the attention of the biocatalytically oriented scientific community towards the marine environment as a source of biocatalysts focused on the habitat-related properties of marine enzymes. Updates have already appeared in the literature, including marine examples of oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases, isomerases, ligases, and lyases ready for food and pharmaceutical applications. Here a new approach for searching the literature and presenting a more refined analysis is adopted with respect to previous surveys, centering the attention on the enzymatic process rather than on a single novel activity. Fields of applications are easily individuated: (i) the biorefinery value-chain, where the provision of biomass is one of the most important aspects, with aquaculture as the prominent sector; (ii) the food industry, where the interest in the marine domain is similarly developed to deal with the enzymatic procedures adopted in food manipulation; (iii) the selective and easy extraction/modification of structurally complex marine molecules, where enzymatic treatments are a recognized tool to improve efficiency and selectivity; and (iv) marine biomarkers and derived applications (bioremediation) in pollution monitoring are also included in that these studies could be of high significance for the appreciation of marine bioprocesses.

  10. Enzymatic Processes in Marine Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Trincone, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    In previous review articles the attention of the biocatalytically oriented scientific community towards the marine environment as a source of biocatalysts focused on the habitat-related properties of marine enzymes. Updates have already appeared in the literature, including marine examples of oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases, isomerases, ligases, and lyases ready for food and pharmaceutical applications. Here a new approach for searching the literature and presenting a more refined analysis is adopted with respect to previous surveys, centering the attention on the enzymatic process rather than on a single novel activity. Fields of applications are easily individuated: (i) the biorefinery value-chain, where the provision of biomass is one of the most important aspects, with aquaculture as the prominent sector; (ii) the food industry, where the interest in the marine domain is similarly developed to deal with the enzymatic procedures adopted in food manipulation; (iii) the selective and easy extraction/modification of structurally complex marine molecules, where enzymatic treatments are a recognized tool to improve efficiency and selectivity; and (iv) marine biomarkers and derived applications (bioremediation) in pollution monitoring are also included in that these studies could be of high significance for the appreciation of marine bioprocesses. PMID:28346336

  11. Marine biotechnology for production of food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Rosalee S; Morrissey, Michael T

    2007-01-01

    The marine world represents a largely untapped reservoir of bioactive ingredients that can be applied to numerous aspects of food processing, storage, and fortification. Due to the wide range of environments they survive in, marine organisms have developed unique properties and bioactive compounds that, in some cases, are unparalleled by their terrestrial counterparts. Enzymes extracted from fish and marine microorganisms can provide numerous advantages over traditional enzymes used in food processing due to their ability to function at extremes of temperature and pH. Fish proteins such as collagens and their gelatin derivatives operate at relatively low temperatures and can be used in heat-sensitive processes such as gelling and clarifying. Polysaccharides derived from algae, including algins, carrageenans, and agar, are widely used for their ability to form gels and act as thickeners and stabilizers in a variety of foods. Besides applications in food processing, a number of marine-derived compounds, such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and photosynthetic pigments, are important to the nutraceutical industry. These bioactive ingredients provide a myriad of health benefits, including reduction of coronary heart disease, anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory activity. Despite the vast possibilities for the use of marine organisms in the food industry, tools of biotechnology are required for successful cultivation and isolation of these unique bioactive compounds. In this chapter, recent developments and upcoming areas of research that utilize advances in biotechnology in the production of food ingredients from marine sources are introduced and discussed.

  12. Marine biotechnology advances towards applications in new functional foods.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Ana C; Rodrigues, Dina; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Gomes, Ana M P; Duarte, Armando C

    2012-01-01

    The marine ecosystem is still an untapped reservoir of biologically active compounds, which have considerable potential to supply food ingredients towards development of new functional foods. With the goal of increasing the availability and chemical diversity of functional marine ingredients, much research has been developed using biotechnological tools to discover and produce new compounds. This review summarizes the advances in biotechnological tools for production of functional ingredients, including enzymes, for the food industry. Tools involving biotechnological processes (bioreactors, fermentations, bioprocessing) and those involving genetic research designated as molecular biotechnology are discussed highlighting how they can be used in the controlled manipulation and utilization of marine organisms as sources of food ingredients, as well as discussing the most relevant shortcomings towards applications in new functional foods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Marine biotechnology in education: a competitive approach.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Rouke; Wijffels, René H

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the development of a practical, which is taught to third year biotechnology students. We wanted to motivate the students by making them responsible for a research project. Competition was added as a stimulus for interaction between the students. A virtual company called CaroTech employed the students for 2 weeks. They worked in groups of two persons and each group was responsible for a 0.8 l flat panel photobioreactor. They had to produce as much beta-carotene as possible using the marine alga strain Dunaliella salina in this photobioreactor. On the first day, students developed a strategy to obtain optimal algal growth rate. They putted this plan into practice the second day and while cultivating the organism, they developed a second strategy how and when to stress the alga to initiate beta-carotene production. At the end of the ninth day, the total amount of beta-carotene was measured. To stimulate competition, the group that produced the most beta-carotene obtained half a point bonus on the final practical mark. On the tenth day, each group presented their results and an evaluation of their chosen strategies to the CaroTech board. Most groups were successful in growing algae. In the second phase some groups failed to stress the alga. The best group produced more than two times beta-carotene than the runner-up. The students were motivated by being responsible for their own results and the competitive approach. All students liked the practical and indicated that they learned a lot by following this practical.

  14. Culture collections and the biotechnology deal.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Martin; Dasen, Gottfried; Wermelinger, Tobias; Landert, Silvano; Frasson, David

    2010-01-01

    Culture collections provide starting material for life science research, development and production. Especially in biotechnology, well characterised and pure microbial strains are essential for reproducible and safe bioprocesses. Culture collections also play a role as repositories of biological material for future applications and help to preserve biological diversity. In addition, they also maintain the know-how needed for more complex identification methods and help to develop new techniques. To enable culture collections to achieve higher quality standards, new certification guidelines for biological resource centres are currently being developed.

  15. New and emerging analytical techniques for marine biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Burgess, J Grant

    2012-02-01

    Marine biotechnology is the industrial, medical or environmental application of biological resources from the sea. Since the marine environment is the most biologically and chemically diverse habitat on the planet, marine biotechnology has, in recent years delivered a growing number of major therapeutic products, industrial and environmental applications and analytical tools. These range from the use of a snail toxin to develop a pain control drug, metabolites from a sea squirt to develop an anti-cancer therapeutic, and marine enzymes to remove bacterial biofilms. In addition, well known and broadly used analytical techniques are derived from marine molecules or enzymes, including green fluorescence protein gene tagging methods and heat resistant polymerases used in the polymerase chain reaction. Advances in bacterial identification, metabolic profiling and physical handling of cells are being revolutionised by techniques such as mass spectrometric analysis of bacterial proteins. Advances in instrumentation and a combination of these physical advances with progress in proteomics and bioinformatics are accelerating our ability to harness biology for commercial gain. Single cell Raman spectroscopy and microfluidics are two emerging techniques which are also discussed elsewhere in this issue. In this review, we provide a brief survey and update of the most powerful and rapidly growing analytical techniques as used in marine biotechnology, together with some promising examples of less well known earlier stage methods which may make a bigger impact in the future. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Policy to support marine biotechnology-based solutions to global challenges.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Rachael J; Guy, Ken; Philp, Jim C

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in science and technology are igniting new interest in marine biotechnology. Governments are recognizing the potential of marine biotechnology to provide solutions to grand global challenges of population health, food, and energy security and sustainable industry. This paper examines some of the challenges to and policy options for the development of marine biotechnology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Marine-derived fungi: diversity of enzymes and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Bonugli-Santos, Rafaella C; Dos Santos Vasconcelos, Maria R; Passarini, Michel R Z; Vieira, Gabriela A L; Lopes, Viviane C P; Mainardi, Pedro H; Dos Santos, Juliana A; de Azevedo Duarte, Lidia; Otero, Igor V R; da Silva Yoshida, Aline M; Feitosa, Valker A; Pessoa, Adalberto; Sette, Lara D

    2015-01-01

    The ocean is considered to be a great reservoir of biodiversity. Microbial communities in marine environments are ecologically relevant as intermediaries of energy, and play an important role in nutrient regeneration cycles as decomposers of dead and decaying organic matter. In this sense, marine-derived fungi can be considered as a source of enzymes of industrial and/or environmental interest. Fungal strains isolated from different substrates, such as invertebrates, decaying wood, seawater, sediments, and mangrove detritus, have been reported to be producers of hydrolytic and/or oxidative enzymes, with alginate lyase, amylase, cellulase, chitinase, glucosidase, inulinase, keratinase, ligninase, lipase, nuclease, phytase, protease, and xylanase being among the enzymes produced by fungi of marine origin. These enzymes present temperature and pH optima ranging from 35 to 70(∘)C, and 3.0 to 11.0, respectively. High-level production in bioreactors is mainly performed using submerged-state fermentation. Certain marine-derived fungal strains present enzymes with alkaline and cold-activity characteristics, and salinity is considered an important condition in screening and production processes. The adaptability of marine-derived fungi to oceanic conditions can be considered an attractive point in the field of fungal marine biotechnology. In this review, we focus on the advances in discovering enzymes from marine-derived fungi and their biotechnological relevance.

  18. Marine-derived fungi: diversity of enzymes and biotechnological applications

    PubMed Central

    Bonugli-Santos, Rafaella C.; dos Santos Vasconcelos, Maria R.; Passarini, Michel R. Z.; Vieira, Gabriela A. L.; Lopes, Viviane C. P.; Mainardi, Pedro H.; dos Santos, Juliana A.; de Azevedo Duarte, Lidia; Otero, Igor V. R.; da Silva Yoshida, Aline M.; Feitosa, Valker A.; Pessoa, Adalberto; Sette, Lara D.

    2015-01-01

    The ocean is considered to be a great reservoir of biodiversity. Microbial communities in marine environments are ecologically relevant as intermediaries of energy, and play an important role in nutrient regeneration cycles as decomposers of dead and decaying organic matter. In this sense, marine-derived fungi can be considered as a source of enzymes of industrial and/or environmental interest. Fungal strains isolated from different substrates, such as invertebrates, decaying wood, seawater, sediments, and mangrove detritus, have been reported to be producers of hydrolytic and/or oxidative enzymes, with alginate lyase, amylase, cellulase, chitinase, glucosidase, inulinase, keratinase, ligninase, lipase, nuclease, phytase, protease, and xylanase being among the enzymes produced by fungi of marine origin. These enzymes present temperature and pH optima ranging from 35 to 70∘C, and 3.0 to 11.0, respectively. High-level production in bioreactors is mainly performed using submerged-state fermentation. Certain marine-derived fungal strains present enzymes with alkaline and cold-activity characteristics, and salinity is considered an important condition in screening and production processes. The adaptability of marine-derived fungi to oceanic conditions can be considered an attractive point in the field of fungal marine biotechnology. In this review, we focus on the advances in discovering enzymes from marine-derived fungi and their biotechnological relevance. PMID:25914680

  19. Recent Advances in Marine Enzymes for Biotechnological Processes.

    PubMed

    Lima, R N; Porto, A L M

    In the last decade, new trends in the food and pharmaceutical industries have increased concern for the quality and safety of products. The use of biocatalytic processes using marine enzymes has become an important and useful natural product for biotechnological applications. Bioprocesses using biocatalysts like marine enzymes (fungi, bacteria, plants, animals, algae, etc.) offer hyperthermostability, salt tolerance, barophilicity, cold adaptability, chemoselectivity, regioselectivity, and stereoselectivity. Currently, enzymatic methods are used to produce a large variety of products that humans consume, and the specific nature of the enzymes including processing under mild pH and temperature conditions result in fewer unwanted side-effects and by-products. This offers high selectivity in industrial processes. The marine habitat has been become increasingly studied because it represents a huge source potential biocatalysts. Enzymes include oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases, isomerases, ligases, and lyases that can be used in food and pharmaceutical applications. Finally, recent advances in biotechnological processes using enzymes of marine organisms (bacterial, fungi, algal, and sponges) are described and also our work on marine organisms from South America, especially marine-derived fungi and bacteria involved in biotransformations and biodegradation of organic compounds.

  20. Development of marine biotechnology as a resource for novel proteases and their role in modern biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Homaei, Ahmad; Lavajoo, Fatemeh; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2016-07-01

    Marine environment consists of the largest sources diversified genetic pool of material with an enormous potential for a wide variety of enzymes including proteases. A protease hydrolyzes the peptide bond and most of proteases possess many industrial applications. Marine proteases differ considerably from those found in internal or external organs of invertebrates and vertebrates. In common with all enzymes, external factors such as temperature, pH and type of media are important for the activity, catalytic efficiency, stability and proper functioning of proteases. In this review valuable characteristics of proteases in marine organisms and their applications are gathered from a wide literature survey. Considering their biochemical significance and their increasing importance in biotechnology, a thorough understanding of marine proteases functioning could be of prime importance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Medium (TCM) is the bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures are grown. With its two syringe ports, it is much like a bag used to administer intravenous fluid, except it allows gas exchange needed for life. The TCM contains cell culture medium, and when frozen cells are flown to the ISS, they are thawed and introduced to the TCM through the syringe ports. In the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI) experiment, several mixing procedures are being assessed to determine which method achieves the most uniform mixing of growing cells and culture medium.

  2. Marine Extremophiles: A Source of Hydrolases for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications. PMID:25854643

  3. Marine extremophiles: a source of hydrolases for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Dalmaso, Gabriel Zamith Leal; Ferreira, Davis; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz

    2015-04-03

    The marine environment covers almost three quarters of the planet and is where evolution took its first steps. Extremophile microorganisms are found in several extreme marine environments, such as hydrothermal vents, hot springs, salty lakes and deep-sea floors. The ability of these microorganisms to support extremes of temperature, salinity and pressure demonstrates their great potential for biotechnological processes. Hydrolases including amylases, cellulases, peptidases and lipases from hyperthermophiles, psychrophiles, halophiles and piezophiles have been investigated for these reasons. Extremozymes are adapted to work in harsh physical-chemical conditions and their use in various industrial applications such as the biofuel, pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and food industries has increased. The understanding of the specific factors that confer the ability to withstand extreme habitats on such enzymes has become a priority for their biotechnological use. The most studied marine extremophiles are prokaryotes and in this review, we present the most studied archaea and bacteria extremophiles and their hydrolases, and discuss their use for industrial applications.

  4. Biotechnologies for Marine Oil Spill Cleanup: Indissoluble Ties with Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Francesca; Scoma, Alberto; Michoud, Grégoire; Aulenta, Federico; Boon, Nico; Borin, Sara; Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2017-09-01

    The ubiquitous exploitation of petroleum hydrocarbons (HCs) has been accompanied by accidental spills and chronic pollution in marine ecosystems, including the deep ocean. Physicochemical technologies are available for oil spill cleanup, but HCs must ultimately be mineralized by microorganisms. How environmental factors drive the assembly and activity of HC-degrading microbial communities remains unknown, limiting our capacity to integrate microorganism-based cleanup strategies with current physicochemical remediation technologies. In this review, we summarize recent findings about microbial physiology, metabolism and ecology and describe how microbes can be exploited to create improved biotechnological solutions to clean up marine surface and deep waters, sediments and beaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Marine Algae: a Source of Biomass for Biotechnological Applications.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Dagmar B; Connan, Solène

    2015-01-01

    Biomass derived from marine microalgae and macroalgae is globally recognized as a source of valuable chemical constituents with applications in the agri-horticultural sector (including animal feeds and health and plant stimulants), as human food and food ingredients as well as in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and pharmaceutical industries. Algal biomass supply of sufficient quality and quantity however remains a concern with increasing environmental pressures conflicting with the growing demand. Recent attempts in supplying consistent, safe and environmentally acceptable biomass through cultivation of (macro- and micro-) algal biomass have concentrated on characterizing natural variability in bioactives, and optimizing cultivated materials through strain selection and hybridization, as well as breeding and, more recently, genetic improvements of biomass. Biotechnological tools including metabolomics, transcriptomics, and genomics have recently been extended to algae but, in comparison to microbial or plant biomass, still remain underdeveloped. Current progress in algal biotechnology is driven by an increased demand for new sources of biomass due to several global challenges, new discoveries and technologies available as well as an increased global awareness of the many applications of algae. Algal diversity and complexity provides significant potential provided that shortages in suitable and safe biomass can be met, and consumer demands are matched by commercial investment in product development.

  6. Tissue culture-mediated biotechnological intervention in pomegranate: a review.

    PubMed

    Naik, Soumendra K; Chand, Pradeep K

    2011-05-01

    The past 30 years have witnessed a series of systematic biotechnological advances made in pomegranate. These encompass optimization and establishment of in vitro culture techniques including micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, synthetic seed production, plant regeneration via callus-mediated shoot organogenesis, adventitious shoot regeneration, anther culture, tetraploid induction and genetic transformation. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive account on the tissue culture-mediated biotechnological interventions made in pomegranate aimed at complementing conventional programmes for improvement of this nutraceutically important fruit crop.

  7. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Module (TCM) is the stationary bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures grow. However, for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI), color polystyrene beads are used to measure the effectiveness of various mixing procedures. The beads are similar in size and density to human lymphoid cells. Uniform mixing is a crucial component of CBOSS experiments involving the immune response of human lymphoid cell suspensions. The goal is to develop procedures that are both convenient for the flight crew and are optimal in providing uniform and reproducible mixing of all components, including cells. The average bead density in a well mixed TCM will be uniform, with no bubbles, and it will be measured using the absorption of light. In this photograph, beads are trapped in the injection port, with bubbles forming shortly after injection.

  8. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-05

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Module (TCM) is the stationary bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures grow. However, for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI), color polystyrene beads are used to measure the effectiveness of various mixing procedures. The beads are similar in size and density to human lymphoid cells. Uniform mixing is a crucial component of CBOSS experiments involving the immune response of human lymphoid cell suspensions. The goal is to develop procedures that are both convenient for the flight crew and are optimal in providing uniform and reproducible mixing of all components, including cells. The average bead density in a well mixed TCM will be uniform, with no bubbles, and it will be measured using the absorption of light. In this photograph, a TCM is shown after mixing protocols, and bubbles of various sizes can be seen.

  9. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-07-21

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics.

  10. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics. PMID:27455283

  11. Biotechnology and aquaculture: the role of cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Bols, N C

    1991-01-01

    Cell culturing complements recombinant DNA technology in the application of biotechnology to aquaculture. Cell cultures can be prepared from the three main groups of multicellular organisms in aquaculture: fish, shellfish, and seaweeds. These cultures can contribute indirectly to the successful farming of these organisms by providing basic insights into how their growth, reproduction, and health can be understood and manipulated. Finally, they can be a direct source of diverse biochemical products for use in aquaculture, medicine and the food industry.

  12. The role of environmental biotechnology in exploring, exploiting, monitoring, preserving, protecting and decontaminating the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Kalogerakis, Nicolas; Arff, Johanne; Banat, Ibrahim M; Broch, Ole Jacob; Daffonchio, Daniele; Edvardsen, Torgeir; Eguiraun, Harkaitz; Giuliano, Laura; Handå, Aleksander; López-de-Ipiña, Karmele; Marigomez, Ionan; Martinez, Iciar; Øie, Gunvor; Rojo, Fernando; Skjermo, Jorunn; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio

    2015-01-25

    In light of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) and the EU Thematic Strategy on the Sustainable Use of Natural Resources, environmental biotechnology could make significant contributions in the exploitation of marine resources and addressing key marine environmental problems. In this paper 14 propositions are presented focusing on (i) the contamination of the marine environment, and more particularly how to optimize the use of biotechnology-related tools and strategies for predicting and monitoring contamination and developing mitigation measures; (ii) the exploitation of the marine biological and genetic resources to progress with the sustainable, eco-compatible use of the maritime space (issues are very diversified and include, for example, waste treatment and recycling, anti-biofouling agents; bio-plastics); (iii) environmental/marine biotechnology as a driver for a sustainable economic growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The ARS Culture Collection and Developments in Biotechnology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ARS Culture Collection (NRRL) has played a prominent role in the development of biotechnology since its founding in 1940 when the Northern Regional Research Laboratory opened. Early discoveries included selection of production strains for penicillin, dextran blood extender, xanthan gum and the v...

  14. Biotechnology education as social and cultural production/reproduction of the biotechnology community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrée, Maria

    2014-03-01

    This paper is a commentary to a paper by Anne Solli, Frank Bach and Björn Åkerman on how students at a technical university learn to argue as biotechnologists. Solli and her colleagues report from an ethnographic study performed during the first semester of a 5-year program in biotechnology at a technical university in Sweden. Their study demonstrates how students begin to acquire `the right way' of approaching the controversial issue of producing and consuming genetically modified organisms. In my response I discuss the ethnographic account of this particular educational practice in terms of social and cultural production/reproduction of a biotechnology community and how the participants (students and teaching professors) deal with the dialectic of individual and collective transformation. In the perspective of the biotechnology community, the work done by the teaching professor becomes a way of ensuring the future of the biotechnology community in terms of what values and objectives are held highly in the community of practice.

  15. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-07

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Module (TCM) is the stationary bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures grow. However, for the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support Systems-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI), color polystyrene beads are used to measure the effectiveness of various mixing procedures. Uniform mixing is a crucial component of CBOSS experiments involving the immune response of human lymphoid cell suspensions. In this picture, the beads are trapped in the injection port shortly after injection. Swirls of beads indicate, event to the naked eye, the contents of the TCM are not fully mixed. The beads are similar in size and density to human lymphoid cells. The goal is to develop procedures that are both convenient for the flight crew and are optimal in providing uniform and reproducible mixing of all components, including cells. The average bead density in a well mixed TCM will be uniform, with no bubbles, and it will be measured using the absorption of light

  16. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-02

    Diagram depicts the importance of cell-cell communication as central to the understanding of cancer growth and progression, the focus of the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05) investigation. Microgravity studies will allow us to unravel the signaling and communication between these cells with the host and potential development of therapies for the treatment of cancer metastasis. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  17. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-05-15

    This prostate cancer construct was grown during NASA-sponsored bioreactor studies on Earth. Cells are attached to a biodegradable plastic lattice that gives them a head start in growth. Prostate tumor cells are to be grown in a NASA-sponsored Bioreactor experiment aboard the STS-107 Research-1 mission in 2002. Dr. Leland Chung of the University of Virginia is the principal investigator. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: NASA and the University of Virginia.

  18. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-02

    Leland W. K. Chung (left), Director, Molecular Urology Therapeutics Program at the Winship Cancer Institute at Emory University, is principal investigator for the NASA bioreactor demonstration system (BDS-05). With him is Dr. Jun Shu, an assistant professor of Orthopedics Surgery from Kuming Medical University China. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The Bioreactor is rotated to provide gentle mixing of fresh and spent nutrient without inducing shear forces that would damage the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Credit: Emory University.

  19. Potential of sponges and microalgae for marine biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wijffels, René H

    2008-01-01

    Marine organisms can be used to produce several novel products that have applications in new medical technologies, in food and feed ingredients and as biofuels. In this paper two examples are described: the development of marine drugs from sponges and the use of microalgae to produce bulk chemicals and biofuels. Many sponges produce bioactive compounds with important potential applications as medical drugs. Recent developments in metagenomics, in the culturing of associated microorganisms from sponges and in the development of sponge cell-lines have the potential to solve the issue of supply, which is the main limitation for sponge exploitation. For the production of microalgal products at larger scales and the production of biofuels, major technological breakthroughs need to be realized to increase the product yield.

  20. Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vranken, Nancy S., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    The field of biotechnology, and specifically recombinant DNA technology, is transforming the way that many feel about the nature and purposes of biology. This newsletter annual supplement contains several articles addressing the topic of biotechnology and the importance that the topic should be given in science classes. James D. Watson's article,…

  1. Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vranken, Nancy S., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    The field of biotechnology, and specifically recombinant DNA technology, is transforming the way that many feel about the nature and purposes of biology. This newsletter annual supplement contains several articles addressing the topic of biotechnology and the importance that the topic should be given in science classes. James D. Watson's article,…

  2. Banks of cell cultures for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Radaeva, I F; Bogryantseva, M P; Nechaeva, E A

    2012-08-01

    Seeding and working cell banks were created and stored in cell culture collection. The banks were certified in accordance with international and national requirements. Cultures of 293, MT-4, L-68, FECH-16-1, FECH-16-2, 4647, MDCK, CHO TK(-), and CHO pE cells were recommended by Medical Immunobiological Preparation Committee for the use in the production of medical immunobiological preparations. The stock is sufficient enough for supplying standard cell material for the production of medical immunobiological preparations over few decades.

  3. Soluble microbial products and their implications in mixed culture biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Rittmann, Bruce E; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-09-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMP) are soluble organic compounds released during normal biomass metabolism in mixed culture biotechnology. In this review, we give the up-to-date status on several essential SMP issues: mechanisms of SMP formation, differentiation between utilization-associated products (UAP) and biomass-associated products (BAP), biodegradability of the SMP components, how formation of SMP by autotrophs controls effluent quality and supports a substantial population of heterotrophs, mathematical modeling that includes SMP, and improving effluent quality by controlling SMP. We also present two timely examples that highlight our current understanding and give an indication of how SMP affects the performance of modern mixed culture biotechnology: membrane fouling of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) and the dynamics of SMP in anaerobic systems.

  4. Characterization and Applications of Marine Microbial Enzymes in Biotechnology and Probiotics for Animal Health.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T H; Nguyen, V D

    Marine microorganisms have been recognized as potential sources of novel enzymes because they are relatively more stable than the corresponding enzymes derived from plants and animals. Enzymes from marine microorganisms also differ from homologous enzymes in terrestrial microorganisms based on salinity, pressure, temperature, and lighting conditions. Marine microbial enzymes can be used in diverse industrial applications. This chapter will focus on the biotechnological applications of marine enzymes and also their use as a tool of marine probiotics to improve host digestion (food digestion, food absorption, and mucus utilization) and cleave molecular signals involved in quorum sensing in pathogens to control disease in aquaculture. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Challenge of Ecophysiological Biodiversity for Biotechnological Applications of Marine Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Barra, Lucia; Chandrasekaran, Raghu; Corato, Federico; Brunet, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we aim to explore the potential of microalgal biodiversity and ecology for biotechnological use. A deeper exploration of the biodiversity richness and ecophysiological properties of microalgae is crucial for enhancing their use for applicative purposes. After describing the actual biotechnological use of microalgae, we consider the multiple faces of taxonomical, morphological, functional and ecophysiological biodiversity of these organisms, and investigate how these properties could better serve the biotechnological field. Lastly, we propose new approaches to enhancing microalgal growth, photosynthesis, and synthesis of valuable products used in biotechnological fields, mainly focusing on culture conditions, especially light manipulations and genetic modifications. PMID:24663117

  6. The first GCC Marine Biotechnology Symposium: Emerging Opportunities and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Stephen; Delghandi, Madjid; Dobretsov, Sergey; Al-Oufi, Hamed; Al-Habsi, Saoud; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-06-01

    With its diverse, living marine resources and rapidly growing educational and research infrastructure, the Sultanate of Oman is well-positioned to take advantage of the commercial opportunities presented by marine biotechnology. In recognition of potential development, an international symposium, Marine Biotechnology-Emerging Opportunities and Future Perspectives, was held in Muscat, November 12-13, 2013. Three keynote addresses were given, 23 oral presentations made, and a poster exhibition held. The final session reviewed national and regional issues, and the delegates agreed informally on a number of future actions. The potential for future development of marine biotechnology was recognized by all delegates, and following the symposium, they were surveyed for their views on how best to sustain and develop new activities. One hundred percent of respondents found the meeting useful and would support future symposia in the region. Fifty-one percent of Omani respondents recognized major organizational challenges and obstacles to the development of marine biotechnology compared with 23 % of overseas respondents. The need for greater collaboration between research institutions within the GCC region was recognized by 98 % of all respondents. The presentations and survey outcomes are reviewed in this paper.

  7. Biotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    consumer confidence in the food regulatory system, providing consumers greater choice about what they eat and build confidence in GM products.92 The...Gruere, “Mandatory Labeling of Genetically Modified Foods : Does it Really Provide Consumer Choice ?” AgBio Forum 6 no. 1&2 (2003), <http... Food and Biotechnology, “Is Labeling GM Foods an Effective Means of Facilitating Choices for Consumers?” AgBiotech Buzz: Labeling GM Foods , 2 issue 8

  8. Biotechnology and the birth of a third culture.

    PubMed

    Binetti, P

    2004-01-01

    Biotechnology represents such an important challenge for present day culture that one can speak of a biotechnological revolution in many other scientific fields as well, such as biology, clinical medicine, pharmacology, and genetic engineering. It also significantly affects political and economic choices to such a degree that they call for a new kind of attention from jurisprudence which has to regulate an ever changing world. Many important queries arise particularly at a bioethical level, issues that will also affect future generations. Scientific progress has unexpectedly widened the biological knowledge of human kind. Thanks to the contribution of continuously more refined and advanced technology, it has nurtured the hope of solving all problems and of overcoming all limits. The scientist's intellectual curiosity, encompassing these new resources, is spurred on by the desire for knowledge and understanding. However sometimes he loses sight of the repercussions and of the possible uses his achievements may have. Only a profound personal education, integrated with the scientist's technical and scientific expertise, will allow science to knock down some barriers, advancing constantly but without losing respect for man's dignity. However the separation between scientific and ethical expertise can only raise new barriers and create limits to the freedom of science which will appear just restrictive, while a kind of medieval obscurantism will be opposed to ethical rigour.

  9. Biotechnological Applications of Marine Enzymes From Algae, Bacteria, Fungi, and Sponges.

    PubMed

    Parte, S; Sirisha, V L; D'Souza, J S

    2017-01-01

    Diversity is the hallmark of all life forms that inhabit the soil, air, water, and land. All these habitats pose their unique inherent challenges so as to breed the "fittest" creatures. Similarly, the biodiversity from the marine ecosystem has evolved unique properties due to challenging environment. These challenges include permafrost regions to hydrothermal vents, oceanic trenches to abyssal plains, fluctuating saline conditions, pH, temperature, light, atmospheric pressure, and the availability of nutrients. Oceans occupy 75% of the earth's surface and harbor most ancient and diverse forms of organisms (algae, bacteria, fungi, sponges, etc.), serving as an excellent source of natural bioactive molecules, novel therapeutic compounds, and enzymes. In this chapter, we introduce enzyme technology, its current state of the art, unique enzyme properties, and the biocatalytic potential of marine algal, bacterial, fungal, and sponge enzymes that have indeed boosted the Marine Biotechnology Industry. Researchers began exploring marine enzymes, and today they are preferred over the chemical catalysts for biotechnological applications and functions, encompassing various sectors, namely, domestic, industrial, commercial, and healthcare. Next, we summarize the plausible pros and cons: the challenges encountered in the process of discovery of the potent compounds and bioactive metabolites such as biocatalysts/enzymes of biomedical, therapeutic, biotechnological, and industrial significance. The field of Marine Enzyme Technology has recently assumed importance, and if it receives further boost, it could successfully substitute other chemical sources of enzymes useful for industrial and commercial purposes and may prove as a beneficial and ecofriendly option. With appropriate directions and encouragement, marine enzyme technology can sustain the rising demand for enzyme production while maintaining the ecological balance, provided any undesired exploitation of the marine

  10. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-08-04

    In August 2001, principal investigator Jeanne Becker sent human ovarian tumor cells to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the STS-105 mission. The tumor cells were cultured in microgravity for a 14 day growth period and were analyzed for changes in the rate of cell growth and synthesis of associated proteins. In addition, they were evaluated for the expression of several proteins that are the products of oncogenes, which cause the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. This photo, which was taken by astronaut Frank Culbertson who conducted the experiment for Dr. Becker, shows two cell culture bags containing LN1 ovarian carcinoma cell cultures.

  11. Culturing larvae of marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Strathmann, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of marine invertebrates cultured in the laboratory experience conditions that they do not encounter in nature, but development and survival to metamorphic competence can be obtained in such cultures. This protocol emphasizes simple methods suitable for a wide variety of larvae. Culturing larvae requires seawater of adequate quality and temperature within the tolerated range. Beyond that, feeding larvae require appropriate food, but a few kinds of algae and animals are sufficient as food for diverse larvae. Nontoxic materials include glass, many plastics, hot-melt glue, and some solvents, once evaporated. Cleaners that do not leave toxic residues after rinsing include dilute hydrochloric or acetic acid, sodium hypochlorite (commercial bleach), and ethanol. Materials that can leave toxic residues, such as formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde, detergents, and hand lotions, should be avoided, especially with batch cultures that lack continuously renewed water. Reverse filtration can be used to change water gently at varying frequencies, depending on temperature and the kinds of food that are provided. Bacterial growth can be limited by antibiotics, but antibiotics are often unnecessary. Survival and growth are increased by low concentrations of larvae and stirring of large or dense cultures. One method of stirring large numbers of containers is a rack of motor-driven paddles. Most of the methods and materials are inexpensive and portable. If necessary, a room within a few hours of the sea could be temporarily equipped for larval culture.

  12. Marine microbial biodiversity, bioinformatics and biotechnology (M2B3) data reporting and service standards

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Contextual data collected concurrently with molecular samples are critical to the use of metagenomics in the fields of marine biodiversity, bioinformatics and biotechnology. We present here Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics and Biotechnology (M2B3) standards for “Reporting” and “Serving” data. The M2B3 Reporting Standard (1) describes minimal mandatory and recommended contextual information for a marine microbial sample obtained in the epipelagic zone, (2) includes meaningful information for researchers in the oceanographic, biodiversity and molecular disciplines, and (3) can easily be adopted by any marine laboratory with minimum sampling resources. The M2B3 Service Standard defines a software interface through which these data can be discovered and explored in data repositories. The M2B3 Standards were developed by the European project Micro B3, funded under 7th Framework Programme “Ocean of Tomorrow”, and were first used with the Ocean Sampling Day initiative. We believe that these standards have value in broader marine science. PMID:26203332

  13. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    Salmonella typhimurium appears green in on human intestinal tissue (stained red) cultured in a NASA rotating wall bioreactor. Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  14. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-07-15

    Within five days, bioreactor cultivated human colon cancer cells (shown) grown in Microgravity on the STS-70 mission in 1995, had grown 30 times the volume of the control specimens on Earth. The samples grown in space had a higher level of cellular organization and specialization. Because they more closely resemble tumors found in the body, microgravity grown cell cultures are ideal for research purposes.

  15. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  16. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    Dr. Cheryl Nickerson (right) of Tulane University is studying the effects of simulated low-g on a well-known pathogen, Salmonella typhimurium, a bacterium that causes two to four million cases of gastrointestinal illness in the United States each year. While most healthy people recover readily, S. typhimurium can kill people with weakened immune systems. Thus, a simple case of food poisoning could disrupt a space mission. Using the NASA rotating-wall bioreactor, Nickerson cultured S. typhimurium in modeled microgravity. Mice infected with the bacterium died an average of three days faster than the control mice, indicating that S. typhimurium's virulence was enhanced by the bioreactor. Earlier research showed that 3 percent of the genes were altered by exposure to the bioreactor. Nickerson's work earned her a 2001 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

  17. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  18. Collection, Isolation and Culture of Marine Algae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Daniel E.

    1984-01-01

    Methods of collecting, isolating, and culturing microscopic and macroscopic marine algae are described. Three different culture media list of chemicals needed and procedures for preparing Erdschreiber's and Provasoli's E. S. media. (BC)

  19. Biotechnology Education as Social and Cultural Production/Reproduction of the Biotechnology Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrée, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a commentary to a paper by Anne Solli, Frank Bach and Björn Åkerman on how students at a technical university learn to argue as biotechnologists. Solli and her colleagues report from an ethnographic study performed during the first semester of a 5-year program in biotechnology at a technical university in Sweden. Their study…

  20. Biotechnology Education as Social and Cultural Production/Reproduction of the Biotechnology Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrée, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a commentary to a paper by Anne Solli, Frank Bach and Björn Åkerman on how students at a technical university learn to argue as biotechnologists. Solli and her colleagues report from an ethnographic study performed during the first semester of a 5-year program in biotechnology at a technical university in Sweden. Their study…

  1. Current developments in marine microbiology: high-pressure biotechnology and the genetic engineering of piezophiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Xuegong; Bartlett, Douglas H; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-06-01

    A key aspect of marine environments is elevated pressure; for example, ∼70% of the ocean is at a pressure of at least 38MPa. Many types of Bacteria and Archaea reside under these high pressures, which drive oceanic biogeochemical cycles and catalyze reactions among rocks, sediments and fluids. Most marine prokaryotes are classified as piezotolerant or as (obligate)-piezophiles with few cultivated relatives. The biochemistry and physiology of these organisms are largely unknown. Recently, high-pressure cultivation technology has been combined with omics and DNA recombination methodologies to examine the physiology of piezophilic marine microorganisms. We are now beginning to understand the adaptive mechanisms of these organisms, along with their ecological functions and evolutionary processes. This knowledge is leading to the further development of high-pressure-based biotechnology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ecological roles and biotechnological applications of marine and intertidal microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Sayani; Sana, Barindra; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    This review is a retrospective of ecological effects of bioactivities produced by biofilms of surface-dwelling marine/intertidal microbes as well as of the industrial and environmental biotechnologies developed exploiting the knowledge of biofilm formation. Some examples of significant interest pertaining to the ecological aspects of biofilm-forming species belonging to the Roseobacter clade include autochthonous bacteria from turbot larvae-rearing units with potential application as a probiotic as well as production of tropodithietic acid and indigoidine. Species of the Pseudoalteromonas genus are important examples of successful surface colonizers through elaboration of the AlpP protein and antimicrobial agents possessing broad-spectrum antagonistic activity against medical and environmental isolates. Further examples of significance comprise antiprotozoan activity of Pseudoalteromonas tunicata elicited by violacein, inhibition of fungal colonization, antifouling activities, inhibition of algal spore germination, and 2-n-pentyl-4-quinolinol production. Nitrous oxide, an important greenhouse gas, emanates from surface-attached microbial activity of marine animals. Marine and intertidal biofilms have been applied in the biotechnological production of violacein, phenylnannolones, and exopolysaccharides from marine and tropical intertidal environments. More examples of importance encompass production of protease, cellulase, and xylanase, melanin, and riboflavin. Antifouling activity of Bacillus sp. and application of anammox bacterial biofilms in bioremediation are described. Marine biofilms have been used as anodes and cathodes in microbial fuel cells. Some of the reaction vessels for biofilm cultivation reviewed are roller bottle, rotating disc bioreactor, polymethylmethacrylate conico-cylindrical flask, fixed bed reactor, artificial microbial mats, packed-bed bioreactors, and the Tanaka photobioreactor.

  3. Bioethics, biotechnology and culture: a voice from the margins.

    PubMed

    Tangwa, Godfrey B

    2004-12-01

    In this paper I argue for the universality of morality as against and in spite of the plurality and inevitable relativity of human cultures. Universalisability is the litmus test of moral authenticity whereas culture tends to impose an egocentric predicament. I argue equally for the equality of cultures qua cultures and of the importance of different cultural perspectives, given the limitations of each and every particular culture, in a balanced and wholesome appreciation of moral issues, particularly issues of cross-cultural relevance. I then try to anchor my reflections on a few topical ethical issues of cross-cultural relevance which have been the subject of controversy in recent times.

  4. [Three-dimensional cell cultures. Applications in basic science and biotechnology].

    PubMed

    Kitel, Radosław; Czarnecka, Joanna; Rusin, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    The tissue culture technique is widely used in biochemical and molecular studies, offering accessibility to biological material, high reproducibility of results and high throughput format, comparing with organ cultures. However, traditional, two-dimensional cultures (2D cultures) poorly represent the microenvironment of a tissue, and they are gradually replaced with 3D cultures, that enable formation of intercellular contacts, signaling pathways and gene expression characteristic for tissue in vivo. This paper presents the biology of three-dimensional cultures (spheroids), their applications in basic science and biotechnology and methods of spheroids formation.

  5. Marine biotechnologies and synthetic biology, new issues for a fair and equitable profit-sharing commercial use.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jean-François; Tardieu-Guigues, Elisabeth

    2014-10-01

    The sea will be a source of economic development in the next years. Today the research works in marine biotechnologies supply new products and processes. The introduction in the laboratories of a new technology, synthesis biology, is going to increase the possibilities of creation of new products. Exploitation of product stemming from marine biodiversity has to be made with regard to various rights among which industrial property law, maritime law and the Convention on BioDiversity. All participants involved in the promotion of research in marine biotechnology must address the fair and equitable sharing of any commercial exploitation. Carrying out work involving synthetic biology has increased the number of unanswered questions about how operators should manage in order to avoid any threat of being sued for infringements of IP rights or for alleged bio-piracy. This paper, by no means exhaustive in the field, analyzes some of the issues raised on the modification to the landscape in marine biotechnology by the advent of synthetic biology. Such issues indicate how important the collaboration between researchers, industrialists, lawyers is for allowing proper use of marine biotech.

  6. Food biotechnology's challenge to cultural integrity and individual consent.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P B

    1997-01-01

    Consumer response to genetically altered foods has been mixed in the United States. While transgenic crops have entered the food supply with little comment, other foods, such as the bioengineered tomato, have caused considerable controversy. Objections to genetically engineered food are varied, ranging from the religious to the aesthetic. One need not endorse these concerns to conclude that food biotechnology violates procedural protections of consumer sovereignty and religious liberty. Consumer sovereignty, a principle especially valued in this country, requires that information be made available so each individual or group may make food choices based on their own values. And as yet, there is no policy provision for informing consumers about the degree to which food has been genetically engineered.

  7. Marine Diterpenes: Molecular Modeling of Thrombin Inhibitors with Potential Biotechnological Application as an Antithrombotic

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rebeca Cristina Costa; Lourenço, André Luiz; Terra, Luciana; Abreu, Paula Alvarez; Laneuville Teixeira, Valéria; Castro, Helena Carla

    2017-01-01

    Thrombosis related diseases are among the main causes of death and incapacity in the world. Despite the existence of antithrombotic agents available for therapy, they still present adverse effects like hemorrhagic risks which justify the search for new options. Recently, pachydictyol A, isopachydictyol A, and dichotomanol, three diterpenes isolated from Brazilian marine brown alga Dictyota menstrualis were identified as potent antithrombotic molecules through inhibition of thrombin, a key enzyme of coagulation cascade and a platelet agonist. Due to the biotechnological potential of these marine metabolites, in this work we evaluated their binding mode to thrombin in silico and identified structural features related to the activity in order to characterize their molecular mechanism. According to our theoretical studies including structure-activity relationship and molecular docking analysis, the highest dipole moment, polar surface area, and lowest electronic density of dichotomanol are probably involved in its higher inhibition percentage towards thrombin catalytic activity compared to pachydictyol A and isopachydictyol A. Interestingly, the molecular docking studies also revealed a good shape complementarity of pachydictyol A and isopachydictyol A and interactions with important residues and regions (e.g., H57, S195, W215, G216, and loop-60), which probably justify their thrombin inhibitor effects demonstrated in vitro. Finally, this study explored the structural features and binding mode of these three diterpenes in thrombin which reinforced their potential to be further explored and may help in the design of new antithrombotic agents. PMID:28335516

  8. Marine Diterpenes: Molecular Modeling of Thrombin Inhibitors with Potential Biotechnological Application as an Antithrombotic.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rebeca Cristina Costa; Lourenço, André Luiz; Terra, Luciana; Abreu, Paula Alvarez; Laneuville Teixeira, Valéria; Castro, Helena Carla

    2017-03-20

    Thrombosis related diseases are among the main causes of death and incapacity in the world. Despite the existence of antithrombotic agents available for therapy, they still present adverse effects like hemorrhagic risks which justify the search for new options. Recently, pachydictyol A, isopachydictyol A, and dichotomanol, three diterpenes isolated from Brazilian marine brown alga Dictyota menstrualis were identified as potent antithrombotic molecules through inhibition of thrombin, a key enzyme of coagulation cascade and a platelet agonist. Due to the biotechnological potential of these marine metabolites, in this work we evaluated their binding mode to thrombin in silico and identified structural features related to the activity in order to characterize their molecular mechanism. According to our theoretical studies including structure-activity relationship and molecular docking analysis, the highest dipole moment, polar surface area, and lowest electronic density of dichotomanol are probably involved in its higher inhibition percentage towards thrombin catalytic activity compared to pachydictyol A and isopachydictyol A. Interestingly, the molecular docking studies also revealed a good shape complementarity of pachydictyol A and isopachydictyol A and interactions with important residues and regions (e.g., H57, S195, W215, G216, and loop-60), which probably justify their thrombin inhibitor effects demonstrated in vitro. Finally, this study explored the structural features and binding mode of these three diterpenes in thrombin which reinforced their potential to be further explored and may help in the design of new antithrombotic agents.

  9. Fluorescent proteins and their use in marine biosciences, biotechnology, and proteomics.

    PubMed

    Mocz, Gabor

    2007-01-01

    This review explores the field of fluorescent proteins (FPs) from the perspective of their marine origins and their applications in marine biotechnology and proteomics. FPs occur in hydrozoan, anthozoan, and copepodan species, and possibly in other metazoan niches as well. Many FPs exhibit unique photophysical and photochemical properties that are the source of exciting research opportunities and technological development. Wild-type FPs can be enhanced by mutagenetic modifications leading to variants with optimized fluorescence and new functionalities. Paradoxically, the benefits from ocean-derived FPs have been realized, first and foremost, for terrestrial organisms. In recent years, however, FPs have also made inroads into aquatic biosciences, primarily as genetically encoded fluorescent fusion tags for optical marking and tracking of proteins, organelles, and cells. Examples of FPs and applications summarized here testify to growing utilization of FP-based platform technologies in basic and applied biology of aquatic organisms. Hydra, sea squirt, zebrafish, striped bass, rainbow trout, salmonids, and various mussels are only a few of numerous instances where FPs have been used to address questions relevant to evolutionary and developmental research and aquaculture.

  10. Ion channels in key marine invertebrates; their diversity and potential for applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Euan R; Piscopo, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Of the intra-membrane proteins, the class that comprises voltage and ligand-gated ion channels represents the major substrate whereby signals pass between and within cells in all organisms. It has been presumed that vertebrate and particularly mammalian ion channels represent the apex of evolutionary complexity and diversity and much effort has been focused on understanding their function. However, the recent availability of cheap high throughput genome sequencing has massively broadened and deepened the quality of information across phylogeny and is radically changing this view. Here we review current knowledge on such channels in key marine invertebrates where physiological evidence is backed up by molecular sequences and expression/functional studies. As marine invertebrates represent a much greater range of phyla than terrestrial vertebrates and invertebrates together, we argue that these animals represent a highly divergent, though relatively underused source of channel novelty. As ion channels are exquisitely selective sensors for voltage and ligands, their potential and actual applications in biotechnology are manifold.

  11. Turning Russian specialized microbial culture collections into resource centers for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ivshina, Irena B; Kuyukina, Maria S

    2013-11-01

    Specialized nonmedical microbial culture collections contain unique bioresources that could be useful for biotechnology companies. Cooperation between collections and companies has suffered from shortcomings in infrastructure and legislation, hindering access to holdings. These challenges may be overcome by the transformation of collections into national bioresource centers and integration into international microbial resource networks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Production of isoprene by marine phytoplankton cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.M.; Oram, D.E.; Penkett, S.A.

    1994-11-15

    The authors report experiments which demonstrate the production of light volatile hydrocarbons, including isoprene, by different marine phytoplankton cultures. This indicates that the ocean is a potential source of natural releases of isoprene to the atmosphere. Laboratory results do not allow extrapolation to atmospheric release rates.

  13. Future of biotechnology-based control of disease in marine invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Mialhe, E; Bachere, E; Boulo, V; Cadoret, J P; Rousseau, C; Cedeño, V; Saraiva, E; Carrera, L; Calderon, J; Colwell, R R

    1995-12-01

    Infectious disease is the single most devastating problem in mollusc and shrimp aquaculture. Pathogens causing the greatest problems have been identified as viruses, prokaryotes, and protozoans. Two approaches employing methods of biotechnology have been proposed to prevent, manage, and control mollusc and shrimp diseases. The first is development of a diagnostic scheme for detection and identification of pathogens, using molecular probes. This offers the opportunity for prophylactic measures to be taken. Molecular probes have been prepared for the major pathogens of molluscs, but in the case of shrimp pathogens, only a few are available. Monoclonal antibodies have also been prepared and are used in immunodiagnosis, e.g., immunofluorescence detection. Such diagnostic tools are relatively new to aquaculture, but have enormous potential. A second approach to the control of disease in marine invertebrates, notably shrimp, involves use of genetically transformed strains resistant to specific pathogens. Pathogen-resistant transgenic animals have been developed, but such research has only just begun for molluscs and shrimp. Transfection methods applied to mollusc and shrimp embryos have been successful, with preliminary data showing efficiency of heterologous promoters in controlling expression of reporter genes. Other transformation systems also show promise, including transposable elements and densoviruses.

  14. Marine Biotoxins: Laboratory Culture and Molecular Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-18

    The methodology used to determine the population densities of dinoflagellates growing attached to macroalgae is as described previously. Briefly...growing attached to macroalgae collected at Kahala Beach. Oahu. has been monitored from September. 1988 to August. 1989. The results of this survey...prospects for the cultivation of marine algae. In: Cultures and Collections of algae. JM. So&. El. Physiol. pp. 63- 75. -17- B. Ciguatoxin Isolation

  15. Partial Support for U.S. Participants in the International Marine Biotechnology Conference 2005, in Newfoundland, Canada, June 7-12, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Feng

    2006-09-30

    This proposal requests inter-agency support for U.S. scientists to attend the IMBC2005. This meeting is the premier international Marine Biotechnology meeting and emphasizes the use of molecular approaches in studying the protection and enhancement of global marine resources. The scientific programs of IMBC2005 include Marine Microbiology, Genomics and Proteomics, Extremophiles, Bioremediation, Cell and Molecular Biology, Bioactives, Transgenics, Aquaculture, Seafood Safety, and Biodiversity. For more information, please refer to http://www.imbc2005.org/welcome_e.html. The objectives of this proposal are to: 1. Facilitate attendance by a broad range of U.S. scientists, technologists, and students at the MBC2005 2. Ensure that U.S. scientists are exposed to the latest global advances in Marine Biotechnology 3. Encourage collaboration between U.S. and other scientists in the important and rapidly developing field of Marine Biotechnology.

  16. Tissue culture and associated biotechnological interventions for the improvement of coconut (Cocos nucifera L.): a review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quang Thien; Bandupriya, H D Dharshani; López-Villalobos, Arturo; Sisunandar, S; Foale, Mike; Adkins, Steve W

    2015-11-01

    The present review discusses not only advances in coconut tissue culture and associated biotechnological interventions but also future research directions toward the resilience of this important palm crop. Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) is commonly known as the 'tree of life'. Every component of the palm can be used to produce items of value and many can be converted into industrial products. Coconut cultivation faces a number of acute problems that reduce its productivity and competitiveness. These problems include various biotic and abiotic challenges as well as an unstable market for its traditional oil-based products. Around 10 million small-holder farmers cultivate coconut palms worldwide on c. 12 million hectares of land, and many more people own a few coconut palms that contribute to their livelihoods. Inefficiency in the production of seedlings for replanting remains an issue; however, tissue culture and other biotechnological interventions are expected to provide pragmatic solutions. Over the past 60 years, much research has been directed towards developing and improving protocols for (i) embryo culture; (ii) clonal propagation via somatic embryogenesis; (iii) homozygote production via anther culture; (iv) germplasm conservation via cryopreservation; and (v) genetic transformation. Recently other advances have revealed possible new ways to improve these protocols. Although effective embryo culture and cryopreservation are now possible, the limited frequency of conversion of somatic embryos to ex vitro seedlings still prevents the large-scale clonal propagation of coconut. This review illustrates how our knowledge of tissue culture and associated biotechnological interventions in coconut has so far developed. Further improvement of protocols and their application to a wider range of germplasm will continue to open up new horizons for the collection, conservation, breeding and productivity of coconut.

  17. Microbial Diversity in Sulfate-Reducing Marine Sediment Enrichment Cultures Associated with Anaerobic Biotransformation of Coastal Stockpiled Phosphogypsum (Sfax, Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Zouch, Hana; Karray, Fatma; Armougom, Fabrice; Chifflet, Sandrine; Hirschler-Réa, Agnès; Kharrat, Hanen; Kamoun, Lotfi; Ben Hania, Wajdi; Ollivier, Bernard; Sayadi, Sami; Quéméneur, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic biotechnology using sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a promising alternative for reducing long-term stockpiling of phosphogypsum (PG), an acidic (pH ~3) by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industries containing high amounts of sulfate. The main objective of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the diversity and ability of anaerobic marine microorganisms to convert sulfate from PG into sulfide, in order to look for marine SRB of biotechnological interest. A series of sulfate-reducing enrichment cultures were performed using different electron donors (i.e., acetate, formate, or lactate) and sulfate sources (i.e., sodium sulfate or PG) as electron acceptors. Significant sulfide production was observed from enrichment cultures inoculated with marine sediments, collected near the effluent discharge point of a Tunisian fertilizer industry (Sfax, Tunisia). Sulfate sources impacted sulfide production rates from marine sediments as well as the diversity of SRB species belonging to Deltaproteobacteria. When PG was used as sulfate source, Desulfovibrio species dominated microbial communities of marine sediments, while Desulfobacter species were mainly detected using sodium sulfate. Sulfide production was also affected depending on the electron donor used, with the highest production obtained using formate. In contrast, low sulfide production (acetate-containing cultures) was associated with an increase in the population of Firmicutes. These results suggested that marine Desulfovibrio species, to be further isolated, are potential candidates for bioremediation of PG by immobilizing metals and metalloids thanks to sulfide production by these SRB.

  18. Large-Scale Biotechnological Production of the Antileukemic Marine Natural Product Sorbicillactone A

    PubMed Central

    Bringmann, Gerhard; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Lang, Gerhard; Schmitt, Stefanie; Stöhr, Rüdiger; Wiese, Jutta; Nagel, Kerstin; Imhoff, Johannes F.

    2007-01-01

    In the search for novel bioactive compounds from sponge-derived microorganisms, we have recently identified two structurally and biosynthetically unprecedented fungal metabolites, the novel-type alkaloids sorbicillactone A and sorbicillactone B. Sorbicillactone A is active against leukemia cells without showing notable cytotoxicity. Therefore, we have developed an efficient process for its biotechnological production and isolation on a large scale supplying sufficient material for the ongoing preclinical investigations and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies. PMID:18463724

  19. Impact of culture conditions on the chlorophyll content of microalgae for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    da Silva Ferreira, Veronica; Sant'Anna, Celso

    2017-01-01

    Chlorophyll is a commercially important natural green pigment responsible for the absorption of light energy and its conversion into chemical energy via photosynthesis in plants and algae. This bioactive compound is widely used in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. Chlorophyll has been consumed for health benefits as a nutraceutical agent with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antimutagenic, and antimicrobial properties. Microalgae are photosynthesizing microorganisms which can be extracted for several high-value bioproducts in the biotechnology industry. These microorganisms are highly efficient at adapting to physicochemical variations in the local environment. This allows optimization of culture conditions for inducing microalgal growth and biomass production as well as for changing their biochemical composition. The modulation of microalgal culture under controlled conditions has been proposed to maximize chlorophyll accumulation. Strategies reported in the literature to promote the chlorophyll content in microalgae include variation in light intensity, culture agitation, and changes in temperature and nutrient availability. These factors affect chlorophyll concentration in a species-specific manner; therefore, optimization of culture conditions has become an essential requirement. This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge on the effects of key environmental factors on microalgal chlorophyll accumulation, focusing on small-scale laboratory experiments.

  20. Applied microbiology and biotechnology in the conservation of stone cultural heritage materials.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P

    2006-11-01

    The contribution of applied microbiology and biotechnology for the preservation and restoration of culturally relevant stoneworks has been used only to a minor extent. Until recently it only involved the identification of the living organisms accountable for the deterioration of those materials by classic phenotypic identification methods. This seems to be changing, given the amount of work recently published that focuses in the introduction of molecular-based techniques for the detection of microorganisms in historic stone. Such techniques complement and expand the information up till now gathered by conventional identification methods. Along with this, efforts are being made to develop and implement bio-based methodologies that may actively contribute to the bioremediation of weathered historic stoneworks. The present mini-review aims to provide an overview of recent findings on these matters.

  1. Biotechnological production of caffeic acid derivatives from cell and organ cultures of Echinacea species.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Kim, Yun-Soo; Park, So-Young; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2014-09-01

    Caffeic acid derivatives (CADs) are a group of bioactive compounds which are produced in Echinacea species especially Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, and Echinacea pallida. Echinacea is a popular herbal medicine used in the treatment of common cold and it is also a prominent dietary supplement used throughout the world. Caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid), caftaric acid (2-O-caffeoyltartaric acid), cichoric acid (2, 3-O-dicaffeoyltartaric acid), cynarin, and echinacoside are some of the important CADs which have varied pharmacological activities. The concentrations of these bioactive compounds are species specific and also they vary considerably with the cultivated Echinacea species due to geographical location, stage of development, time of harvest, and growth conditions. Due to these reasons, plant cell and organ cultures have become attractive alternative for the production of biomass and caffeic acid derivatives. Adventitious and hairy roots have been induced in E. pupurea and E. angustifolia, and suspension cultures have been established from flask to bioreactor scale for the production of biomass and CADs. Tremendous progress has been made in this area; various bioprocess methods and strategies have been developed for constant high-quality productivity of biomass and secondary products. This review is aimed to discuss biotechnological methods and approaches employed for the sustainable production of CADs.

  2. Modeling of plant in vitro cultures: overview and estimation of biotechnological processes.

    PubMed

    Maschke, Rüdiger W; Geipel, Katja; Bley, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell and tissue cultivations are of growing interest for the production of structurally complex and expensive plant-derived products, especially in pharmaceutical production. Problems with up-scaling, low yields, and high-priced process conditions result in an increased demand for models to provide comprehension, simulation, and optimization of production processes. In the last 25 years, many models have evolved in plant biotechnology; the majority of them are specialized models for a few selected products or nutritional conditions. In this article we review, delineate, and discuss the concepts and characteristics of the most commonly used models. Therefore, the authors focus on models for plant suspension and submerged hairy root cultures. The article includes a short overview of modeling and mathematics and integrated parameters, as well as the application scope for each model. The review is meant to help researchers better understand and utilize the numerous models published for plant cultures, and to select the most suitable model for their purposes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. In vitro co-cultures of Pinus pinaster with Bursaphelenchus xylophilus: a biotechnological approach to study pine wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Faria, Jorge M S; Sena, Inês; Vieira da Silva, Inês; Ribeiro, Bruno; Barbosa, Pedro; Ascensão, Lia; Bennett, Richard N; Mota, Manuel; Figueiredo, A Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Co-cultures of Pinus pinaster with Bursaphelenchus xylophilus were established as a biotechnological tool to evaluate the effect of nematotoxics addition in a host/parasite culture system. The pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD), was detected for the first time in Europe in 1999 spreading throughout the pine forests in Portugal and recently in Spain. Plant in vitro cultures may be a useful experimental system to investigate the plant/nematode relationships in loco, thus avoiding the difficulties of field assays. In this study, Pinus pinaster in vitro cultures were established and compared to in vivo 1 year-old plantlets by analyzing shoot structure and volatiles production. In vitro co-cultures were established with the PWN and the effect of the phytoparasite on in vitro shoot structure, water content and volatiles production was evaluated. In vitro shoots showed similar structure and volatiles production to in vivo maritime pine plantlets. The first macroscopic symptoms of PWD were observed about 4 weeks after in vitro co-culture establishment. Nematode population in the culture medium increased and PWNs were detected in gaps of the callus tissue and in cavities developed from the degradation of cambial cells. In terms of volatiles main components, plantlets, P. pinaster cultures, and P. pinaster with B. xylophilus co-cultures were all β- and α-pinene rich. Co-cultures may be an easy-to-handle biotechnological approach to study this pathology, envisioning the understanding of and finding ways to restrain this highly devastating nematode.

  4. Marine Biotoxins: Laboratory Culture and Molecular Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-11

    refrigeration equipment in these rooms is operational, we cannot begin any extensive cultivation of G. toxicus as the heat produced by banks of fluorescent...experiments conducted to date have involved the isolation and culture of single dinoflagellc~tes collected ’orm the surface of benthic macroalgae . As...filtered (1.4 um) seawater was used in the preparation of all culture media. The methods used to isolate epiphytic dinoflagellates from macroalgae are

  5. Development of a novel technique for axenic isolation and culture of thraustochytrids from New Zealand marine environments.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, S L; Maas, E W

    2012-02-01

    To maintain axenic cultures of commercially important thraustochytrids, a novel procedure was developed for the isolation of zoospores and sporangium from heterotrophic seawater samples and axenic culture on solid media. Thraustochytrid cultures were isolated from Whangapoua Harbour in North East New Zealand and subjected to two antibiotic and antifungal treatment regimes designed to eliminate bacteria and fungi. Antibiotic trial 1 was designed to determine the appropriate combination of antibiotics (including streptomycin/penicillin, ampicillin, rifampicin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, gentamicin and the antifungal agent nystatin). Antibiotic trial 2 determined the optimal dosing frequency and concentration of the antibiotics, and antifungal found to be the most promising in trial 1. Axenic cultures were then spread plated onto nutrient agar containing the optimal antibiotic cocktail, and pure thraustochytrid colonies were purified on solid media using standard microbiological techniques. Removal of bacteria and fungi was best accomplished using a mixture of three antibiotics and one antifungal; rifampicin (300 mg l(-1)), streptomycin/penicillin (25 mg l(-1)) and nystatin (10 mg l(-1)) were incorporated in seawater samples and incorporated into cultures every 24 h for a minimum of 2 days. The axenic isolation and culture of marine thraustochytrids from a marine habitat in New Zealand have significant implications for the biotechnological development of these potentially valuable protists. This method has global significance as it is reasonable to assume it could be used throughout the world to obtain axenic thraustochytrid cultures. © 2011The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. A rational approach to improving the biotechnological production of taxanes in plant cell cultures of Taxus spp.

    PubMed

    Cusido, Rosa M; Onrubia, Miriam; Sabater-Jara, Ana B; Moyano, Elisabet; Bonfill, Mercedes; Goossens, Alain; Angeles Pedreño, M; Palazon, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Taxol is a complex diterpene alkaloid scarcely produced in nature and with a high anticancer activity. Biotechnological systems for taxol production based on cell cultures of Taxus spp. have been developed, but the growing commercial demand for taxol and its precursors requires the optimization of these procedures. In order to increase the biotechnological production of taxol and related taxanes in Taxus spp. cell cultures, it is necessary not only to take an empirical approach that strives to optimize in-put factors (cell line selection, culture conditions, elicitation, up-scaling, etc.) and out-put factors (growth, production, yields, etc.), but also to carry out molecular biological studies. The latter can provide valuable insight into how the enhancement of taxane biosynthesis and accumulation affects metabolic profiles and gene expression in Taxus spp. cell cultures. Several rational approaches have focused on studying the transcriptomic profiles of key genes in the taxol biosynthetic pathway in Taxus spp. cell cultures treated with elicitors such as methyl jasmonate, coronatine and cyclodextrins in relation with the taxane pattern, production and excretion to the culture medium. These studies have provided new insights into the taxol biosynthetic pathway and its regulation. Additionally, identifying genes with low levels of expression even in the presence of elicitors, together with metabolomics studies, has shed light on the limiting steps in taxol biosynthesis and could help define suitable metabolic targets for engineering with the main aim of obtaining highly productive Taxus cultured cells. In this review, we have summarized the latest endeavors to enhance the molecular understanding of the action mechanism of elicitors in Taxus spp. cell cultures. Developments in the ongoing search for new and more effective elicitation treatments and the application of metabolic engineering to design new transgenic cell lines of Taxus with an improved capacity for

  7. Creating a Culturally Prepared Marine Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    documentation you will see it referenced as the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, LDS Church and as the Mormon Church , with its members being...develop cultural depth as a warfighting enabler2 the following model is presented based on the Church of Jesus Chris of Latter-day Saints’ (LDS) 3...2000. 79-81. 3 The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is commonly known by several names. In this essay and the supporting

  8. Optimization of polyhydroxybutyrate production by marine Bacillus megaterium MSBN04 under solid state culture.

    PubMed

    Sathiyanarayanan, G; Kiran, G Seghal; Selvin, Joseph; Saibaba, G

    2013-09-01

    A marine sponge-associated bacterium Bacillus megaterium MSBN04 was used for the production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) under solid state culture (SSC). A central composite design (CCD) was employed to optimize the production medium and to find out the interactive effects of four independent variables, viz. tapioca industry waste, palm jaggery, horse gram flour and trace element solution on PHB production. The maximum yield of PHB 8.637 mg g(-1) of substrate (tapioca industry waste) was achieved from biomass 15.203 mg g(-1) of substrate, using statistically optimized medium. The horse gram flour (nitrogen source) and trace element solution were found to be critical control factors for PHB synthesis. The (1)H NMR analysis revealed that the polymer was a PHB monomer. PHB obtained from this study having high molecular weight (6.7×10(5) Da) with low polydispersity index (PDI) value (1.71) and produced PHB was used to synthesize PHB polymeric nanoparticles using solvent displacement approach. Therefore, B. megaterium MSBN04 is an ideal candidate that can be exploited biotechnologically for the commercial production of PHB under solid state culture.

  9. Antibacterial activity of marine culturable bacteria collected from a global sampling of ocean surface waters and surface swabs of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Bruhn, Jesper Bartholin

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to isolate marine culturable bacteria with antibacterial activity and hence a potential biotechnological use. Seawater samples (244) and 309 swab samples from biotic or abiotic surfaces were collected on a global Danish marine research expedition (Galathea 3). Total cell counts at the seawater surface were 5 x 10(5) to 10(6) cells/ml, of which 0.1-0.2% were culturable on dilute marine agar (20 degrees C). Three percent of the colonies cultured from seawater inhibited Vibrio anguillarum, whereas a significantly higher proportion (13%) of colonies from inert or biotic surfaces was inhibitory. It was not possible to relate a specific kind of eukaryotic surface or a specific geographic location to a general high occurrence of antagonistic bacteria. Five hundred and nineteen strains representing all samples and geographic locations were identified on the basis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequence homology and belonged to three major groups: Vibrionaceae (309 strains), Pseudoalteromonas spp. (128 strains), and the Roseobacter clade (29 strains). Of the latter, 25 strains were identified as Ruegeria mobilis or pelagia. When re-testing against V. anguillarum, only 409 (79%) retained some level of inhibitory activity. Many strains, especially Pseudoalteromonas spp. and Ruegeria spp., also inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. The most pronounced antibacterial strains were pigmented Pseudoalteromonas strains and Ruegeria spp. The inhibitory, pigmented Pseudoalteromonas were predominantly isolated in warmer waters from swabs of live or inert surfaces. Ruegeria strains were isolated from all ocean areas except for Arctic and Antarctic waters and inhibitory activity caused by production of tropodithietic acid.

  10. Metabolic engineering of apoptosis in cultured animal cells: implications for the biotechnology industry.

    PubMed

    Vives, Joaquim; Juanola, Sandra; Cairó, Jordi Joan; Gòdia, Francesc

    2003-04-01

    Animal cells have been widely used to obtain a wide range of products for human and animal healthcare applications. However, the extreme sensitivity of these cells in respect to changes experienced in their environment is evidenced by the activation of a gene-encoded program known as apoptosis, resulting in their death and destruction. From the bioprocess angle, losses in cell viability bring lower productivities and higher risks of product degradation. Consequently, many research efforts have been devoted to the development of apoptosis protective mechanisms, including the metabolic engineering of apoptosis pathways, that has proven effective in diminishing programmed cell death in a variety of biotechnological relevant cell lines. This review is focused especially in the encouraging initial results obtained with the over-expression of cloned anti-apoptosis genes, from both endogenous and viral origin interfering at mitochondrial and initiator caspases levels.

  11. Electromagnetic Biostimulation of Living Cultures for Biotechnology, Biofuel and Bioenergy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Ryan W.; Zavalin, Andrey; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C.

    2009-01-01

    The surge of interest in bioenergy has been marked with increasing efforts in research and development to identify new sources of biomass and to incorporate cutting-edge biotechnology to improve efficiency and increase yields. It is evident that various microorganisms will play an integral role in the development of this newly emerging industry, such as yeast for ethanol and Escherichia coli for fine chemical fermentation. However, it appears that microalgae have become the most promising prospect for biomass production due to their ability to grow fast, produce large quantities of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, thrive in poor quality waters, sequester and recycle carbon dioxide from industrial flue gases and remove pollutants from industrial, agricultural and municipal wastewaters. In an attempt to better understand and manipulate microorganisms for optimum production capacity, many researchers have investigated alternative methods for stimulating their growth and metabolic behavior. One such novel approach is the use of electromagnetic fields for the stimulation of growth and metabolic cascades and controlling biochemical pathways. An effort has been made in this review to consolidate the information on the current status of biostimulation research to enhance microbial growth and metabolism using electromagnetic fields. It summarizes information on the biostimulatory effects on growth and other biological processes to obtain insight regarding factors and dosages that lead to the stimulation and also what kind of processes have been reportedly affected. Diverse mechanistic theories and explanations for biological effects of electromagnetic fields on intra and extracellular environment have been discussed. The foundations of biophysical interactions such as bioelectromagnetic and biophotonic communication and organization within living systems are expounded with special consideration for spatiotemporal aspects of electromagnetic topology, leading to the

  12. Electromagnetic biostimulation of living cultures for biotechnology, biofuel and bioenergy applications.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Ryan W; Zavalin, Andrey; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C

    2009-11-20

    The surge of interest in bioenergy has been marked with increasing efforts in research and development to identify new sources of biomass and to incorporate cutting-edge biotechnology to improve efficiency and increase yields. It is evident that various microorganisms will play an integral role in the development of this newly emerging industry, such as yeast for ethanol and Escherichia coli for fine chemical fermentation. However, it appears that microalgae have become the most promising prospect for biomass production due to their ability to grow fast, produce large quantities of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, thrive in poor quality waters, sequester and recycle carbon dioxide from industrial flue gases and remove pollutants from industrial, agricultural and municipal wastewaters. In an attempt to better understand and manipulate microorganisms for optimum production capacity, many researchers have investigated alternative methods for stimulating their growth and metabolic behavior. One such novel approach is the use of electromagnetic fields for the stimulation of growth and metabolic cascades and controlling biochemical pathways. An effort has been made in this review to consolidate the information on the current status of biostimulation research to enhance microbial growth and metabolism using electromagnetic fields. It summarizes information on the biostimulatory effects on growth and other biological processes to obtain insight regarding factors and dosages that lead to the stimulation and also what kind of processes have been reportedly affected. Diverse mechanistic theories and explanations for biological effects of electromagnetic fields on intra and extracellular environment have been discussed. The foundations of biophysical interactions such as bioelectromagnetic and biophotonic communication and organization within living systems are expounded with special consideration for spatiotemporal aspects of electromagnetic topology, leading to the

  13. Pichia pastoris production of a prolyl 4-hydroxylase derived from Chondrosia reniformis sponge: A new biotechnological tool for the recombinant production of marine collagen.

    PubMed

    Pozzolini, Marina; Scarfì, Sonia; Mussino, Francesca; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Benatti, Umberto; Giovine, Marco

    2015-08-20

    Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H) is a α2β2 tetramer catalyzing the post-translational hydroxylation of prolines in collagen. Its recombinant production is mainly pursued to realize biotechnological tools able to generate animal contaminant-free hydroxylated collagen. One promising candidate for biomedical applications is the collagen extracted from the marine sponge Chondrosia reniformis, because of its biocompatibility and because is devoid of the health risks associated with bovine and porcine collagens. Here we report on the production and selection, by enzymatic and biomolecular analyses, of a triple transformed Pichia pastoris strain expressing a stable P4H tetramer derived from C. reniformis sponge and a hydroxylated non fibrillar procollagen polypeptide from the same animal. The percentage of recombinant procollagen hydroxylated prolines inside the transformed yeast was of 36.3% analyzed by mass spectrometry indicating that the recombinant enzyme is active on its natural substrate inside the yeast cell host. Furthermore, the recombinant sponge P4H has the ability to hydroxylate its natural substrate in both X and Y positions in the Xaa-Yaa-Gly collagenous triplets. In conclusion this Pichia system seems ideal for high-level production of hydroxylated sponge- or marine-derived collagen polypeptides as well as of conotoxins or other marine proteins of high pharmacological interest needing this particular post-translational modification.

  14. Culturing marine bacteria - an essential prerequisite for biodiscovery.

    PubMed

    Joint, Ian; Mühling, Martin; Querellou, Joël

    2010-09-01

    The potential for using marine microbes for biodiscovery is severely limited by the lack of laboratory cultures. It is a long-standing observation that standard microbiological techniques only isolate a very small proportion of the wide diversity of microbes that are known in natural environments from DNA sequences. A number of explanations are reviewed. The process of establishing laboratory cultures may destroy any cell-to-cell communication that occurs between organisms in the natural environment and that are vital for growth. Bacteria probably grow as consortia in the sea and reliance on other bacteria for essential nutrients and substrates is not possible with standard microbiological approaches. Such interactions should be considered when designing programmes for the isolation of marine microbes. The benefits of novel technologies for manipulating cells are reviewed, including single cell encapsulation in gel micro-droplets. Although novel technologies offer benefits for bringing previously uncultured microbes into laboratory culture, many useful bacteria can still be isolated using variations of plating techniques. Results are summarized for a study to culture bacteria from a long-term observatory station in the English Channel. Bacterial biodiversity in this assemblage has recently been characterized using high-throughput sequencing techniques. Although Alphaproteobacteria dominated the natural bacterial assemblage throughout the year, Gammaproteobacteria were the most frequent group isolated by plating techniques. The use of different gelling agents and the addition of ammonium to seawater-based agar did lead to the isolation of a higher proportion of Alphaproteobacteria. Variation in medium composition was also able to increase the recovery of other groups of particular interest for biodiscovery, such as Actinobacteria. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Culturing marine bacteria – an essential prerequisite for biodiscovery

    PubMed Central

    Joint, Ian; Mühling, Martin; Querellou, Joël

    2010-01-01

    Summary The potential for using marine microbes for biodiscovery is severely limited by the lack of laboratory cultures. It is a long‐standing observation that standard microbiological techniques only isolate a very small proportion of the wide diversity of microbes that are known in natural environments from DNA sequences. A number of explanations are reviewed. The process of establishing laboratory cultures may destroy any cell‐to‐cell communication that occurs between organisms in the natural environment and that are vital for growth. Bacteria probably grow as consortia in the sea and reliance on other bacteria for essential nutrients and substrates is not possible with standard microbiological approaches. Such interactions should be considered when designing programmes for the isolation of marine microbes. The benefits of novel technologies for manipulating cells are reviewed, including single cell encapsulation in gel micro‐droplets. Although novel technologies offer benefits for bringing previously uncultured microbes into laboratory culture, many useful bacteria can still be isolated using variations of plating techniques. Results are summarized for a study to culture bacteria from a long‐term observatory station in the English Channel. Bacterial biodiversity in this assemblage has recently been characterized using high‐throughput sequencing techniques. Although Alphaproteobacteria dominated the natural bacterial assemblage throughout the year, Gammaproteobacteria were the most frequent group isolated by plating techniques. The use of different gelling agents and the addition of ammonium to seawater‐based agar did lead to the isolation of a higher proportion of Alphaproteobacteria. Variation in medium composition was also able to increase the recovery of other groups of particular interest for biodiscovery, such as Actinobacteria. PMID:21255353

  16. Culture-dependent and independent approaches for identifying novel halogenases encoded by Crambe crambe (marine sponge) microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Başak; de Jaeger, Lenny; Smidt, Hauke; Sipkema, Detmer

    2013-01-01

    Sponges harbour microbial communities that contribute to the genetic and metabolic potential of their host. Among metabolites produced by sponge-associated microbial communities, halogenated compounds are of special interest because of their biotechnological potential. In this study, we have examined the diversity of the cultivable fraction of the marine demosponge Crambe crambe microbiota. Application of complementary cultivation methods yielded 107 bacterial isolates, some of which may be sponge-specific based on their phylogenetic analysis. Among these, Psychrobacter sp. was found to contain a putative halogenase gene. In addition to the culture-dependent approach for discovering halogenase genes, a cDNA library was constructed to determine the diversity of halogenase genes expressed in situ by the C. crambe microbiota. To this end, seventeen putative tryptophan halogenase cDNA sequences were identified, most of which were only remotely related to known halogenase genes, indicating the potential for novel bioactive compounds being produced by the C. crambe microbiota. PMID:24071658

  17. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Discusses small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method for introducing cell culture techniques to high school participants. Teaches cell culture practices and introduces advance imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Clarifies and illuminates the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships. (Author/KHR)

  18. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    Discusses small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method for introducing cell culture techniques to high school participants. Teaches cell culture practices and introduces advance imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Clarifies and illuminates the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships. (Author/KHR)

  19. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss "small-group apprenticeships (SGAs)" as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments…

  20. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss "small-group apprenticeships (SGAs)" as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments…

  1. Prospects for the use of plant cell cultures in food biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kevin M; Deroles, Simon C

    2014-04-01

    Plant cell cultures can offer continuous production systems for high-value food and health ingredients, independent of geographical or environmental variations and constraints. Yet despite many improvements in culture technologies, cell line selection, and bioreactor design, there are few commercial successes. This is principally due to the culture yield and market price of food products not being sufficient to cover the plant cell culture production costs. A better understanding of the underpinning biological mechanisms that control the target metabolite biosynthetic pathways may allow the metabolic engineering of cell lines to provide for economically competitive product yields. However, uncertainty around the regulatory and public acceptance of products derived from engineered cell cultures presents a barrier to the uptake of the technology by food product companies.

  2. Biotechnological enhancement of capsaicin biosynthesis in cell suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures were initiated from hypocotyl derived callus to induce capsaicin biosynthesis in suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). Efficient capsaicin production with high growth index (GI) was obtained by exposing cells to salicylic acid (SA) and calcium channel modulators in suspension cultures. The time course of capsaicin formation is related to the cell growth profile in a batch culture. Cells cultivated in the standard medium (SM) initially showed low level of capsaicin yield during active growth. When the cells approached stationary phase, cell growth and cell viability decreased whereas capsaicin production increased continuously. In the fed-batch cultures, the highest capsaicin yield (567.4 ± 8.1 μgg(1) fresh weight) (f.wt) was obtained by feeding the cells with 1 mM SA. However, SA feeding during cultivation repressed the cell growth. Enhanced cell growth (3.1 ± 0.1 GI/culture) and capsaicin yield (534 ± 7.8 μgg(-1)f.wt) were obtained when the cells were fed with calcium ionophore A23187 (0.5 mM) on day 25 as compared to the control. Addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil hydrochloride (100 mM) inhibited cell growth and capsaicin production in Naga King Chili suspension cell cultures.

  3. 16S rDNA sequence analysis of culturable marine biofilm forming bacteria from a ship's hull.

    PubMed

    Inbakandan, D; Murthy, P Sriyutha; Venkatesan, R; Khan, S Ajmal

    2010-11-01

    Marine bacteria from the hull of a ship in the form of biofilms or microfouling were isolated, cultured, and identified by phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA sequences. With an average length of 946 bp, all the 16 sequences were classified using the Ribosomal database project (RDP) and were submitted to the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA sequences indicated that the 16 strains belonged to the Firmicutes (IK-MB6 Exiguobacterium aurantiacum, IK-MB7 Exiguobacterium arabatum, IK-MB8 Exiguobacterium arabatum, IK-MB9 Jeotgalibacillus alimentarius, IK-MB10 Bacillus megaterium, IK-MB11 Bacillus pumilus, IK-MB12 Bacillus pumilus, IK-MB13 Bacillus pumilus, IK-MB14 Bacillus megaterium), High GC, Gram-positive bacteria (IK-MB2 Micrococcus luteus, IK-MB5 Micrococcus luteus, IK-MB16 Arthrobacter mysorens), G-Proteobacteria (IK-MB3 Halomonas aquamarina, IK-MB15 Halotalea alkalilenta), CFB group bacteria (IK-MB1 Myroides odoratimimus), and Enterobacteria (IK-MB4 Proteus mirabilis). Among the 16 strains, representatives of the Firmicutes were dominant (56.25%) compared to the high GC, Gram-positive bacteria (18.75%), G-Proteobacteria (12.5%), CFB group bacteria (6.25%), and Enterobacteria (6.25%). Analysis revealed that majority of marine species found in marine biofilm are of anthropogenic origin.

  4. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by mixed culture: recent trends and biotechnological importance.

    PubMed

    Salehizadeh, H; Van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2004-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are the polymers of hydroxyalkanoates that accumulate as carbon/energy or reducing-power storage material in various microorganisms. PHAs have been attracting considerable attention as biodegradable substitutes for conventional polymers. To reduce their production cost, a great deal of effort has been devoted to developing better bacterial strains and more efficient fermentation/recovery processes. The use of mixed cultures and cheap substrates can reduce the production cost of PHA. Accumulation of PHA by mixed cultures occurs under transient conditions mainly caused by intermittent feeding and variation in the electron donor/acceptor presence. The maximum capacity for PHA storage and the PHA production rate are dependent on the substrate and the operating conditions used. This work reviews the development of PHA research. Aspects discussed include metabolism and various mechanisms for PHA production by mixed cultures; kinetics of PHA accumulation and conversion; effects of carbon source and temperature on PHA production using mixed cultures; PHA production process design; and characteristics of PHA produced by mixed cultures.

  5. Phenotypic plasticity in heterotrophic marine microbial communities in continuous cultures

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Rivers, Adam R; Moran, Mary Ann; Obernosterer, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity (PP) is the development of alternate phenotypes of a given taxon as an adaptation to environmental conditions. Methodological limitations have restricted the quantification of PP to the measurement of a few traits in single organisms. We used metatranscriptomic libraries to overcome these challenges and estimate PP using the expressed genes of multiple heterotrophic organisms as a proxy for traits in a microbial community. The metatranscriptomes captured the expression response of natural marine bacterial communities grown on differing carbon resource regimes in continuous cultures. We found that taxa with different magnitudes of PP coexisted in the same cultures, and that members of the order Rhodobacterales had the highest levels of PP. In agreement with previous studies, our results suggest that continuous culturing may have specifically selected for taxa featuring a rather high range of PP. On average, PP and abundance changes within a taxon contributed equally to the organism's change in functional gene abundance, implying that both PP and abundance mediated observed differences in community function. However, not all functional changes due to PP were directly reflected in the bulk community functional response: gene expression changes in individual taxa due to PP were partly masked by counterbalanced expression of the same gene in other taxa. This observation demonstrates that PP had a stabilizing effect on a community's functional response to environmental change. PMID:25397947

  6. Cyanobacterial genomics for ecology and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Hess, Wolfgang R

    2011-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are the only prokaryotes that directly convert solar energy and CO(2) into organic matter by oxygenic photosynthesis, explaining their relevance for primary production in many ecosystems and the increasing interest for biotechnology. At present, there are more than 60 cyanobacteria for which a total genome sequence is publicly available. These cyanobacteria belong to different lifestyles and origins, coming from marine and freshwater aquatic environments, as well as terrestrial and symbiotic habitats. Genome sizes vary by a factor of six, from 1.44 Mb to 9.05 Mb, with the number of reported genes ranging from 1241 to 8462. Several studies have demonstrated how these sequences could be used to successfully infer important ecological, physiological and biotechnologically relevant characteristics. However, sequences of cyanobacterial origin also comprise a significant portion of certain metagenomes. Moreover, genome analysis has been employed for culture-independent approaches and for resequencing mutant strains, a very recent tool in cyanobacterial research.

  7. A New Isolation and Evaluation Method for Marine-Derived Yeast spp. with Potential Applications in Industrial Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Tucker, Greg A; Du, Chenyu

    2016-11-28

    Yeasts that are present in marine environments have evolved to survive hostile environments that are characterized by high exogenous salt content, high concentrations of inhibitory compounds, and low soluble carbon and nitrogen levels. Therefore, yeasts isolated from marine environments could have interesting characteristics for industrial applications. However, the application of marine yeast in research or industry is currently very limited owing to the lack of a suitable isolation method. Current methods for isolation suffer from fungal interference and/or low number of yeast isolates. In this paper, an efficient and non-laborious isolation method has been developed and successfully isolated large numbers of yeasts without bacterial or fungal growth. The new method includes a three-cycle enrichment step followed by an isolation step and a confirmation step. Using this method, 116 marine yeast strains were isolated from 14 marine samples collected in the UK, Egypt, and the USA. These strains were further evaluated for the utilization of fermentable sugars (glucose, xylose, mannitol, and galactose) using a phenotypic microarray assay. Seventeen strains with higher sugar utilization capacity than the reference terrestrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 2592 were selected for identification by sequencing of the ITS and D1/D2 domains. These strains belonged to six species: S. cerevisiae, Candida tropicalis, Candida viswanathii, Wickerhamomyces anomalus, Candida glabrata, and Pichia kudriavzevii. The ability of these strains for improved sugar utilization using seawater-based media was confirmed and, therefore, they could potentially be utilized in fermentations using marine biomass in seawater media, particularly for the production of bioethanol and other biochemical products.

  8. Proteomics meets blue biotechnology: a wealth of novelties and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Erica M; Durighello, Emie; Pible, Olivier; Nogales, Balbina; Beltrametti, Fabrizio; Bosch, Rafael; Christie-Oleza, Joseph A; Armengaud, Jean

    2014-10-01

    Blue biotechnology, in which aquatic environments provide the inspiration for various products such as food additives, aquaculture, biosensors, green chemistry, bioenergy, and pharmaceuticals, holds enormous promise. Large-scale efforts to sequence aquatic genomes and metagenomes, as well as campaigns to isolate new organisms and culture-based screenings, are helping to push the boundaries of known organisms. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can complement 16S gene sequencing in the effort to discover new organisms of potential relevance to blue biotechnology by facilitating the rapid screening of microbial isolates and by providing in depth profiles of the proteomes and metaproteomes of marine organisms, both model cultivable isolates and, more recently, exotic non-cultivable species and communities. Proteomics has already contributed to blue biotechnology by identifying aquatic proteins with potential applications to food fermentation, the textile industry, and biomedical drug development. In this review, we discuss historical developments in blue biotechnology, the current limitations to the known marine biosphere, and the ways in which mass spectrometry can expand that knowledge. We further speculate about directions that research in blue biotechnology will take given current and near-future technological advancements in mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. How can measurement, monitoring, modeling and control advance cell culture in industrial biotechnology?

    PubMed

    Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Carinhas, Nuno; Glassey, Jarka; Hesse, Friedemann; Merten, Otto-Wilhelm; Micheletti, Martina; Noll, Thomas; Oliveira, Rui; Reichl, Udo; Staby, Arne; Teixeira, Ana P; Weichert, Henry; Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik

    2012-12-01

    This report highlights the potential of measurement, monitoring, modeling and control (M(3) C) methodologies in animal and human cell culture technology. In particular, state-of-the-art of M(3) C technologies and their industrial relevance of existing technology are addressed. It is a summary of an expert panel discussion between biotechnologists and biochemical engineers with both academic and industrial backgrounds. The latest ascents in M(3) C are discussed from a cell culture perspective for industrial process development and production needs. The report concludes with a set of recommendations for targeting M(3) C research toward the industrial interests. These include issues of importance for biotherapeutics production, miniaturization of measurement techniques and modeling methods. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Improvement of tissue culture, genetic transformation, and applications of biotechnology to Brassica.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Seyed Ali; Orbovic, Vladimir; Moradpour, Mahdi; Abdul Aziz, Maheran; Karan, Ratna; Wallace, Simon; Parajuli, Saroj

    2017-04-01

    Development of in vitro plant regeneration method from Brassica explants via organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis is influenced by many factors such as culture environment, culture medium composition, explant sources, and genotypes which are reviewed in this study. An efficient in vitro regeneration system to allow genetic transformation of Brassica is a crucial tool for improving its economical value. Methods to optimize transformation protocols for the efficient introduction of desirable traits, and a comparative analysis of these methods are also reviewed. Hence, binary vectors, selectable marker genes, minimum inhibitory concentration of selection agents, reporter marker genes, preculture media, Agrobacterium concentration and regeneration ability of putative transformants for improvement of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Brassica are discussed.

  11. [Biotechnological grounds for the regulation of the component composition of cephalosporins in cultures of Acremonium chrysogenum].

    PubMed

    Iunkerova, L I; Bartoshevich, Iu E; Iudina, O D; Novak, M I; Belianina, V F; Egorov, V L

    1988-04-01

    The dynamics of cephalosporine C and desacetylcephalosporine C alterations in cultures of Acremonium chrysogenum 309A under different conditions was studied. It was shown expedient to determine the fermantation period by the data of HPLC. Genetic predisposition of the strain used to production of both cephalosporine C and desacetylcephalosporine C is discussed. With changing the cultivation procedure, medium active acidity and cultivation time it is possible to change the biosynthesis pathway.

  12. Biotechnology apprenticeship for secondary-level students: teaching advanced cell culture techniques for research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer R; Kotur, Mark S; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments using both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry during the 1-month summer apprenticeship. In addition to effectively and efficiently teaching cell biology laboratory techniques, this course design provided an opportunity for research training, career exploration, and mentoring. Students participated in active research projects, working with a skilled interdisciplinary team of researchers in a large research institution with access to state-of-the-art instrumentation. The instructors, composed of graduate students, laboratory managers, and principal investigators, worked well together to present a real and worthwhile research experience. The students enjoyed learning cell culture techniques while contributing to active research projects. The institution's researchers were equally enthusiastic to instruct and serve as mentors. In this article, we clarify and illuminate the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships to the institution and the students by presenting the results and experiences of seven middle and high school participants and their instructors.

  13. Biotechnology Apprenticeship for Secondary-Level Students: Teaching Advanced Cell Culture Techniques for Research

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jennifer R.; Kotur, Mark S.; Butt, Omar; Kulcarni, Sumant; Riley, Alyssa A.; Ferrell, Nick; Sullivan, Kathryn D.; Ferrari, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss small-group apprenticeships (SGAs) as a method to instruct cell culture techniques to high school participants. The study aimed to teach cell culture practices and to introduce advanced imaging techniques to solve various biomedical engineering problems. Participants designed and completed experiments using both flow cytometry and laser scanning cytometry during the 1-month summer apprenticeship. In addition to effectively and efficiently teaching cell biology laboratory techniques, this course design provided an opportunity for research training, career exploration, and mentoring. Students participated in active research projects, working with a skilled interdisciplinary team of researchers in a large research institution with access to state-of-the-art instrumentation. The instructors, composed of graduate students, laboratory managers, and principal investigators, worked well together to present a real and worthwhile research experience. The students enjoyed learning cell culture techniques while contributing to active research projects. The institution's researchers were equally enthusiastic to instruct and serve as mentors. In this article, we clarify and illuminate the value of small-group laboratory apprenticeships to the institution and the students by presenting the results and experiences of seven middle and high school participants and their instructors. PMID:12587031

  14. Biotechnological application of yeasts in food science: Starter cultures, probiotics and enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Arevalo-Villena, M; Briones-Perez, A; Corbo, M R; Sinigaglia, M; Bevilacqua, A

    2017-07-26

    This review is an account of experiences of two research teams (from Italy to Spain); the leading idea is the following: yeasts represent valuable sources in food science and microbiology and are a kind of food factories, because of the potentiality of whole cells or for their produced compounds. This review covers three major areas: the first section addresses the role of yeasts as starter cultures with a special focus on wine. The second section is an update on probiotic yeasts. Finally, the focus of the last section is on enzymes produced by yeasts, with a short description of the removal of mycotoxin. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Culture-Dependent and Culture-Independent Diversity within the Obligate Marine Actinomycete Genus Salinispora

    PubMed Central

    Mincer, Tracy J.; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Salinispora is the first obligate marine genus within the order Actinomycetales and a productive source of biologically active secondary metabolites. Despite a worldwide, tropical or subtropical distribution in marine sediments, only two Salinispora species have thus far been cultivated, suggesting limited species-level diversity. To further explore Salinispora diversity and distributions, the phylogenetic diversity of more than 350 strains isolated from sediments collected around the Bahamas was examined, including strains cultured using new enrichment methods. A culture-independent method, using a Salinispora-specific seminested PCR technique, was used to detect Salinispora from environmental DNA and estimate diversity. Overall, the 16S rRNA gene sequence diversity of cultured strains agreed well with that detected in the environmental clone libraries. Despite extensive effort, no new species level diversity was detected, and 97% of the 105 strains examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism belonged to one phylotype (S. arenicola). New intraspecific diversity was detected in the libraries, including an abundant new phylotype that has yet to be cultured, and a new depth record of 1,100 m was established for the genus. PCR-introduced error, primarily from Taq polymerase, significantly increased clone library sequence diversity and, if not masked from the analyses, would have led to an overestimation of total diversity. An environmental DNA extraction method specific for vegetative cells provided evidence for active actinomycete growth in marine sediments while indicating that a majority of sediment samples contained predominantly Salinispora spores at concentrations that could not be detected in environmental clone libraries. Challenges involved with the direct sequence-based detection of spore-forming microorganisms in environmental samples are discussed. PMID:16269737

  16. Biotechnological production of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator protein (reteplase) from transplastomic tobacco cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Diego; Abdoli-Nasab, Maryam; Jalali-Javaran, Mokhtar; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Cusidó, Rosa M; Corchete, Purificación; Palazon, Javier

    2017-09-01

    Transplastomic plants are a system of choice for the mass production of biopharmaceuticals due to the polyploidy of the plastid genome and the low risk of pollen-mediated outcrossing because of maternal inheritance. However, as field-grown plants, they can suffer contamination by agrochemicals and fertilizers, as well as fluctuations in yield due to climatic changes and infections. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), a protein used to treat heart attacks, converts plasminogen into plasmine, which digests fibrin and induces the dissolution of fibrin clots. Recently, we obtained transplastomic tobacco plants carrying the K2S gene encoding truncated human tPA (reteplase) with improved biological activity, and confirmed the presence of the target protein in the transgenic plant leaves. Considering the advantages of plant cell cultures for biopharmaceutical production, we established a cell line derived from the K2S tobacco plants. The active form of reteplase was quantified in cultures grown in light or darkness, with production 3-fold higher in light. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Construction Biotechnology: a new area of biotechnological research and applications.

    PubMed

    Stabnikov, Viktor; Ivanov, Volodymyr; Chu, Jian

    2015-09-01

    A new scientific and engineering discipline, Construction Biotechnology, is developing exponentially during the last decade. The major directions of this discipline are selection of microorganisms and development of the microbially-mediated construction processes and biotechnologies for the production of construction biomaterials. The products of construction biotechnologies are low cost, sustainable, and environmentally friendly microbial biocements and biogrouts for the construction ground improvement. The microbial polysaccharides are used as admixtures for cement. Microbially produced biodegradable bioplastics can be used for the temporarily constructions. The bioagents that are used in construction biotechnologies are either pure or enrichment cultures of microorganisms or activated indigenous microorganisms of soil. The applications of microorganisms in the construction processes are bioaggregation, biocementation, bioclogging, and biodesaturation of soil. The biotechnologically produced construction materials and the microbially-mediated construction technologies have a lot of advantages in comparison with the conventional construction materials and processes. Proper practical implementations of construction biotechnologies could give significant economic and environmental benefits.

  18. Fermentation Products of Solvent Tolerant Marine Bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and Its Biotechnological Applications in Salicylic Acid Bioconversion

    PubMed Central

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N.; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3–8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9–12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment. PMID:24391802

  19. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3-8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment.

  20. Biotechnology Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    principles of biotechnology to improve their daily lives by fermenting fruit, making bread using yeast, and making yogurt from milk. Biotechnology has...license additional egg-based influenza vaccine manufacturers to increase domestic vaccine manufacturing capacity and accelerate efforts to develop...of suppliers. The US government is the primary or sole buyer of certain vaccines. Not long ago the dwindling number of manufacturers and continuing

  1. An Overview of NASA Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    Biotechnology research at NASA has comprised three separate areas; cell science and tissue culture, separations methods, and macromolecular crystal growth. This presentation will primarily focus on the macromolecular crystal growth.

  2. An Overview of NASA Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc L.

    1997-01-01

    Biotechnology research at NASA has comprised three separate areas; cell science and tissue culture, separations methods, and macromolecular crystal growth. This presentation will primarily focus on the macromolecular crystal growth.

  3. Dictionary of biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Coombs, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Biotechnology draws upon a number of scientific and technological disciplines - chemistry and chemical engineering, biochemistry and biochemical engineering, biology, microbiology, genetics and agriculture and immunology. Those working in this field are unlikely to have a background or training in more than one or two, yet still need to understand the language of the others. This book explains terms, procedures and processes encountered in biotechnology. Some of the subject areas covered are: fermentation; brewing, vaccine production; plant tissue culture; antibiotic production; production and use of enzymes; biomass; byproduct recovery and effluent treatment.

  4. Agave biotechnology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Nava-Cruz, Naivy Y; Medina-Morales, Miguel A; Martinez, José L; Rodriguez, R; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2015-01-01

    Agaves are plants of importance both in Mexican culture and economy and in other Latin-American countries. Mexico is reported to be the place of Agave origin, where today, scientists are looking for different industrial applications without compromising its sustainability and preserving the environment. To make it possible, a deep knowledge of all aspects involved in production process, agro-ecological management and plant biochemistry and physiology is required. Agave biotechnology research has been focusing on bio-fuels, beverages, foods, fibers, saponins among others. In this review, we present the advances and challenges of Agave biotechnology.

  5. Production and Isolation of Amphibactin siderophores in Iron-stressed cultures of the marine bacteria Vibrio spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, C.; Boiteau, R.; Bundy, R.; Gauglitz, J.; Repeta, D.

    2016-02-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient for marine microbes. Low concentrations of dissolved iron limit production in much of the ocean, putting pressure on microbial communities to develop efficient iron acquisition strategies. One such strategy is the production of siderophores, high affinity iron binding ligands, to facilitate iron uptake to meet their physiological iron quota. Recently, our lab has shown that amphibactins, siderophores with lipid side chains, are present in iron-deficient regions of the ocean. However, little is known about which organisms can utilize amphibactin bound iron. Here we describe a method to isolate amphibactins from laboratory cultures in order to identify the conditional stability constants and uptake rates of purified amphibactin compounds. We searched the National Center for Biotechnology Information database to identify microbial genomes containing homologous to the known amphibactin biosynthesis genes. Several of these strains were screened with high performance reverse-phase liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESIMS) to confirm amphibactin production. We then optimized amphibactin production for the strain Vibrio cyclitrophicus 1F53 under different shaking speeds and iron concentrations, using a chrome azurol S (CAS) assay to screen for siderophore abundance. Maximum production was found after 38 hours of shaking at 150-rpm, and with the addition of 10nM of desferrioxamine B to induce iron limitation. Amphibactins were extracted from the media by solid phase extraction and purified by reverse phase HPLC. The conditional stability constants for several amphibactins were then measured in seawater using competitive ligand exchange absorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry with salicylaldoxime as the added ligand. Future work will determine the uptake rates of these compounds by natural communities of marine bacteria, and give insight on the bioavailability of amphibactins in the marine environment.

  6. Fungal diversity from various marine habitats deduced through culture-independent studies.

    PubMed

    Manohar, Cathrine Sumathi; Raghukumar, Chandralata

    2013-04-01

    Studies on the molecular diversity of the micro-eukaryotic community have shown that fungi occupy a central position in a large number of marine habitats. Environmental surveys using molecular tools have shown the presence of fungi from a large number of marine habitats such as deep-sea habitats, pelagic waters, coastal regions, hydrothermal vent ecosystem, anoxic habitats, and ice-cold regions. This is of interest to a variety of research disciplines like ecology, evolution, biogeochemistry, and biotechnology. In this review, we have summarized how molecular tools have helped to broaden our understanding of the fungal diversity in various marine habitats. Majority of the environmental phylotypes could be grouped as novel clades within Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Chytridiomycota or as basal fungal lineages. Deep-branching novel environmental clusters could be grouped within Ascomycota as the Pezizomycotina clone group, deep-sea fungal group-I, and soil clone group-I, within Basidiomycota as the hydrothermal and/or anaerobic fungal group, and within Chytridiomycota as Cryptomycota or the Rozella clade. However, a basal true marine environmental cluster is still to be identified as most of the clusters include representatives from terrestrial regions. The challenge for future research is to explore the true marine fungi using molecular techniques. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Marine mammal cell cultures: To obtain, to apply, and to preserve.

    PubMed

    Boroda, A V

    2017-08-01

    The world's oceans today have become a place for the disposal of toxic waste, which leads to the degradation of marine mammal habitats and populations. Marine mammal cell cultures have proven to be a multifunctional tool for studying the peculiarities of the cell physiology and biochemistry of these animals as well as the destructive effects of anthropogenic and natural toxicants. This review describes the sources of marine mammal live tissues and the methods required for establishing cell cultures, their use, and long-term storage. Approaches to conserving rare animal species by applying cell biology methodologies are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of biotechnology in India.

    PubMed

    Ghose, T K; Bisaria, V S

    2000-01-01

    India has embarked upon a very ambitious program in biotechnology with a view to harnessing its available human and unlimited biodiversity resources. It has mainly been a government sponsored effort with very little private industry participation in investment. The Department of Biotechnology (DBT) established under the Ministry of Science and Technology in 1986 was the major instrument of action to bring together most talents, material resources, and budgetary provisions. It began sponsoring research in molecular biology, agricultural and medical sciences, plant and animal tissue culture, biofertilizers and biopesticides, environment, human genetics, microbial technology, and bioprocess engineering, etc. The establishment of a number of world class bioscience research institutes and provision of large research grants to some existing universities helped in developing specialized centres of biotechnology. Besides DBT, the Department of Science & Technology (DST), also under the Ministry of S&T, sponsors research at universities working in the basic areas of life sciences. Ministry of Education's most pioneering effort was instrumental in the creation of Biochemical Engineering Research Centre at IIT Delhi with substantial assistance from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland to make available state-of-the-art infrastructure for education, training, and research in biochemical engineering and biotechnology in 1974. This initiative catalysed biotechnology training and research at many institutions a few years later. With a brief introduction, the major thrust areas of biotechnology development in India have been reviewed in this India Paper which include education and training, agricultural biotechnology, biofertilizers and biopesticides, tissue culture for tree and woody species, medicinal and aromatic plants, biodiversity conservation and environment, vaccine development, animal, aquaculture, seri and food biotechnology, microbial

  9. Biosorption of cesium by native and chemically modified biomass of marine algae: introduce the new biosorbents for biotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Jalali-Rad, R; Ghafourian, H; Asef, Y; Dalir, S T; Sahafipour, M H; Gharanjik, B M

    2004-12-10

    Biosorption batch experiments were conducted to determine the cesium binding ability of native biomass and chemically modified biosorbents derived from marine algae, namely ferrocyanide algal sorbents type 1 and type 2 (FASs1 and FASs2). The applicability of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms for representation of the experimental data was investigated. The cesium sorption performances of the various types of sorbents were compared using the maximum capacities (qmax values) obtained from fitting the Langmuir isotherm to the values calculated from the sorption experiments, which FASs type 1 and type 2 showed better sorption performances for cesium. FASs1 and FASs2 derived from formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde crosslinked Padina australis exhibited lower sorption capacities than those prepared from the non-crosslinked one. Most of the cesium ions were bound to FASs1, derived from Sargassum glaucescens and P. australis, in < 2 min and equilibrium reached within the first 30 min of contact. Biosorption of cesium by FASs1 derived from P. australis and Cystoseria indica was constantly occurred at a wide range of pH, between 1 and 10, and the highest removal took place at pH 4. The presence of sodium and potassium at 0.5 and 1mM did not inhibit cesium biosorption by algae biomass. The maximum cesium uptake was acquired using the large particles of FAS2 originated from S. glaucescens (2-4 mm). Desorption of cesium from the metal-laden FASs1 (from P. australis, S. glaucescens and Dictyota indica) was completely achieved applying 0.5 and 1 M NaOH and KOH, although the cesium sorption capacity of the biosorbents (from C. indica and S. glaucescens) decreased by 46-51% after 9 sorption-desorption cycles.

  10. Proceedings of papers presented at the 2nd international symposium on applications of biotechnology to tree culture, protection, and utilization.

    Treesearch

    Charles H. Michler; Michael R. Becwar; Daniel Cullen; Warren L. Nance; Ronald R. Sederoff; James M. Silvicek

    1994-01-01

    Contains 38 oral presentation abstracts, 34 poster abstracts, and 18 manuscripts on applications of biotechnology to tree research in the areas of stress resistance, protection, and wood utilization presented at an international conference in Bloomington, Minnesota, October 2-6, 1994.

  11. Biotechnology Works!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Spenciner, Loraine

    There have been few initiatives addressing the improvement of science education for students with disabilities. Funded by the National Science Foundation, Biotechnology Works is a summer institute in immunology and genetics for students with disabilities, high school science teachers, and high school counselors. During the 1998 summer session,…

  12. Biotechnology: Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Airozo, Diana; Warmbrodt, Robert D.

    Biotechnology is the latest in a series of technological innovations that have revolutionized the fields of agriculture and the health sciences; however, there are concerns with this technology. This document is designed to help foster dialogue with emphasis on education and the development of a public understanding of the principals involved in…

  13. Culturable rare Actinomycetes: diversity, isolation and marine natural product discovery.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Ramesh; Aalbersberg, William

    2013-11-01

    Rare Actinomycetes from underexplored marine environments are targeted in drug discovery studies due to the Actinomycetes' potentially huge resource of structurally diverse natural products with unusual biological activity. Of all marine bacteria, 10 % are Actinomycetes, which have proven an outstanding and fascinating resource for new and potent bioactive molecules. Past and present efforts in the isolation of rare Actinomycetes from underexplored diverse natural habitats have resulted in the isolation of about 220 rare Actinomycete genera of which more than 50 taxa have been reported to be the producers of 2,500 bioactive compounds. That amount represents greater than 25 % of the total Actinomycetes metabolites, demonstrating that selective isolation methods are being developed and extensively applied. Due to the high rediscovery rate of known compounds from Actinomycetes, a renewed interest in the development of new antimicrobial agents from rare and novel Actinomycetes is urgently required to combat the increasing number of multidrug-resistant human pathogens. To facilitate that discovery, this review updates all selective isolation media including pretreatment and enrichment methods for the isolation of marine rare Actinomycetes. In addition, this review demonstrates that discovering new compounds with novel scaffolds can be increased by intensive efforts in isolating and screening rare marine genera of Actinomycetes. Between 2007 and mid-2013, 80 new rare Actinomycete species were reported from marine habitats. They belong to 23 rare families, of which three are novel, and 20 novel genera. Of them, the family Micromonosporaceae is dominant as a producer of promising chemical diversity.

  14. Fulfilling the promise of biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Colwell, Rita R

    2002-11-01

    Genetic engineering has produced pharmaceuticals, disease-resistant plants, cloned animals and research and industrial products. While the comparably mature field of medical biotechnology now reveals its true potential, marine biotechnology is still in the realm of the future. As we explore the earth for new sources of natural chemicals, we now search the waters. Myriad organisms, most unknown to us, live there. Many produce compounds that can be commercialized, or the organisms themselves may be commercialized, through genetic engineering methods. For decades, scientists studied the ocean depths searching for unique molecules and organisms. But not until the early 1980s was there a synthesis uniting marine natural products, ecology, aquaculture and bioremediation research under the heading of marine biotechnology. As harvesting enough products from marine sources to produce sufficient amounts, even for study, is nearly impossible, we need to use genomics techniques to identify biologically active compounds. As we damage our oceanic ecosystems through pollution, overfishing and destructive fishing methods, opportunities to learn more about marine organisms and their commercial potential may be limited. Although governments and intergovernmental agencies are committed to funding and expanding oceanic research, more funding is needed to discover and study the ocean's vast, unplumbed resources.

  15. Oxidation of the antibacterial agent norfloxacin during sodium hypochlorite disinfection of marine culture water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Rong, Chuan; Song, Yanqun; Wang, Yinghui; Pei, Jiying; Tang, Xinying; Zhang, Ruijie; Yu, Kefu

    2017-09-01

    Chlorination disinfection and antibiotic addition are two universal processes of marine culture. The generation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is unavoidable. Antibiotic residue not only pollutes water but also acts as a precursor to the production of new DBPs. The fate of antibiotic norfloxacin (NOR) in chlorination disinfection was investigated. It was observed that NOR could be oxidized by disinfection agent sodium hypochlorite, but the oxidation rate varied considerably with the type of disinfected water. For fresh water, marine culture water and sea water, the reaction rate constant was 0.066 min(-1), 0.466 min(-1) and 1.241 min(-1), respectively. The difference was primarily attributed to the promotion role of bromide ions in seawater and marine culture water. Moreover, the bromide ions could result in the generation of brominated DBPs (Br-DBPs). The kinetics, products, reaction centers and mechanisms were investigated. The active site of NOR was found to be the N4 atom on piperazinyl in fresh water. During marine culture water and sea water disinfection, the carboxyl on NOR was oxidized and two Br-DBPs were formed. This was attributed to the lowering of the reaction's required activation energy when performed in the presence of bromide ions. The Br-DBPs were also confirmed in real shrimp pond brackish water. Quantitative structure activity relationships and the total organic halogen analysis showed that the DBPs in marine culture water possessed stronger toxicological properties than the DBPs in fresh water. The toxicity increase was attributed to the production of Br-DBPs in the disinfection process of marine culture water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ammonificins C and D, Hydroxyethylamine Chromene Derivatives from a Cultured Marine Hydrothermal Vent Bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans

    PubMed Central

    Andrianasolo, Eric H.; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans. PMID:23170085

  17. Ammonificins C and D, hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives from a cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans.

    PubMed

    Andrianasolo, Eric H; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans.

  18. Cell cultures from marine invertebrates: new insights for capturing endless stemness.

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Baruch

    2011-06-01

    Despite several decades of extensive research efforts, there is yet no single permanent cell line available from marine invertebrates as these cells stop dividing in vitro within 24-72 h after their isolation, starting cellular quiescence. This ubiquitous quiescent state should be modified in a way that at least some of the quiescent cells will become pluripotent, so they will have the ability to divide and become immortal. Following the above need, this essay introduces the rationale that the discipline of marine invertebrates' cell culture should gain from applying of two research routes, relevant to mammalian systems but less explored in the marine arena. The first is the use of adult stem cells (ASC) from marine organisms. Many marine invertebrate taxa maintain large pools of ASC in adulthood. Ample evidence attests that these cells from sponges, cnidarians, flatworms, crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms, and ascidians play important roles in maintenance, regeneration, and asexual cloning, actively proliferating in vivo, resembling the vertebrates' cancer stem cells features. The second route is to target resting somatic cell constituents, manipulating them in the same way as has recently been performed on mammalian induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. While "iPS cells" are the outcome of an experimental manipulation, ASC are natural and rather frequent in a number of marine invertebrates. Above two cell categories reveal that there are more than a few types of seeds (cells) waiting to be sowed in the right soil (in vitro environmental conditions) for acquiring stemness and immortality. This rationale carries the potential to revolutionize the discipline of marine invertebrate cell cultures. When cultured "correctly," ASC and "iPS cells" from marine invertebrates may stay in their primitive stage and proliferate without differentiating into cells lineages, harnessing the stem cell's inherent abilities of self-replication versus differentiated progenies, toward

  19. Investigation of Interspecies Interactions within Marine Micromonosporaceae Using an Improved Co-Culture Approach.

    PubMed

    Adnani, Navid; Vazquez-Rivera, Emmanuel; Adibhatla, Srikar N; Ellis, Gregory A; Braun, Doug R; Bugni, Tim S

    2015-09-24

    With respect to bacterial natural products, a significant outcome of the genomic era was that the biosynthetic potential in many microorganisms surpassed the number of compounds isolated under standard laboratory growth conditions, particularly among certain members in the phylum Actinobacteria. Our group, as well as others, investigated interspecies interactions, via co-culture, as a technique to coax bacteria to produce novel natural products. While co-culture provides new opportunities, challenges exist and questions surrounding these methods remain unanswered. In marine bacteria, for example, how prevalent are interspecies interactions and how commonly do interactions result in novel natural products? In an attempt to begin to answer basic questions surrounding co-culture of marine microorganisms, we have tested both antibiotic activity-based and LC/MS-based methods to evaluate Micromonosporaceae secondary metabolite production in co-culture. Overall, our investigation of 65 Micromonosporaceae led to the identification of 12 Micromonosporaceae across three genera that produced unique metabolites in co-culture. Our results suggest that interspecies interactions were prevalent between marine Micromonosporaceae and marine mycolic acid-containing bacteria. Furthermore, our approach highlights a sensitive and rapid method for investigating interspecies interactions in search of novel antibiotics, secondary metabolites, and genes.

  20. Investigation of Interspecies Interactions within Marine Micromonosporaceae Using an Improved Co-Culture Approach

    PubMed Central

    Adnani, Navid; Vazquez-Rivera, Emmanuel; Adibhatla, Srikar N.; Ellis, Gregory A.; Braun, Doug R.; Bugni, Tim S.

    2015-01-01

    With respect to bacterial natural products, a significant outcome of the genomic era was that the biosynthetic potential in many microorganisms surpassed the number of compounds isolated under standard laboratory growth conditions, particularly among certain members in the phylum Actinobacteria. Our group, as well as others, investigated interspecies interactions, via co-culture, as a technique to coax bacteria to produce novel natural products. While co-culture provides new opportunities, challenges exist and questions surrounding these methods remain unanswered. In marine bacteria, for example, how prevalent are interspecies interactions and how commonly do interactions result in novel natural products? In an attempt to begin to answer basic questions surrounding co-culture of marine microorganisms, we have tested both antibiotic activity-based and LC/MS-based methods to evaluate Micromonosporaceae secondary metabolite production in co-culture. Overall, our investigation of 65 Micromonosporaceae led to the identification of 12 Micromonosporaceae across three genera that produced unique metabolites in co-culture. Our results suggest that interspecies interactions were prevalent between marine Micromonosporaceae and marine mycolic acid-containing bacteria. Furthermore, our approach highlights a sensitive and rapid method for investigating interspecies interactions in search of novel antibiotics, secondary metabolites, and genes. PMID:26404321

  1. Response of Prochlorococcus ecotypes to co-culture with diverse marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sher, Daniel; Thompson, Jessie W; Kashtan, Nadav; Croal, Laura; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2011-07-01

    Interactions between microorganisms shape microbial ecosystems. Systematic studies of mixed microbes in co-culture have revealed widespread potential for growth inhibition among marine heterotrophic bacteria, but similar synoptic studies have not been done with autotroph/heterotroph pairs, nor have precise descriptions of the temporal evolution of interactions been attempted in a high-throughput system. Here, we describe patterns in the outcome of pair-wise co-cultures between two ecologically distinct, yet closely related, strains of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus and hundreds of heterotrophic marine bacteria. Co-culture with the collection of heterotrophic strains influenced the growth of Prochlorococcus strain MIT9313 much more than that of strain MED4, reflected both in the number of different types of interactions and in the magnitude of the effect of co-culture on various culture parameters. Enhancing interactions, where the presence of heterotrophic bacteria caused Prochlorococcus to grow faster and reach a higher final culture chlorophyll fluorescence, were much more common than antagonistic ones, and for a selected number of cases were shown to be mediated by diffusible compounds. In contrast, for one case at least, temporary inhibition of Prochlorococcus MIT9313 appeared to require close cellular proximity. Bacterial strains whose 16S gene sequences differed by 1-2% tended to have similar effects on MIT9313, suggesting that the patterns of inhibition and enhancement in co-culture observed here are due to phylogenetically cohesive traits of these heterotrophs.

  2. Mass culture strategy for bacterial yeast co-culture for degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in marine environment.

    PubMed

    Priya, Anchal; Mandal, Ajoy K; Ball, Andrew S; Manefield, Mike; Lal, Banwari; Sarma, Priyangshu M

    2015-11-15

    In the present study a metabolically versatile co-culture with two Bacilli and one yeast strain was developed using enrichment culture techniques. The developed co-culture had affinity to degrade both aliphatic and aromatic fractions of petroleum crude oil. Degradation kinetics was established for designing the fermentation protocol of the co-culture. The developed mass culture strategy led to achieve the reduction in surface tension (26dynescm(-1) from 69 dynescm(-1)) and degradation of 67% in bench scale experiments. The total crude oil degradation of 96% was achieved in 4000l of natural seawater after 28days without adding any nutrients. The survival of the augmented co-culture was maintained (10(9)cellsml(-1)) in contaminated marine environment. The mass culture protocol devised for the bioaugmentation was a key breakthrough that was subsequently used for pilot scale studies with 100l and 4000l of natural seawater for potential application in marine oil spills. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from marine sponge Haliclona sp.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shumei; Sun, Wei; Chen, Minjie; Dai, Shikun; Zhang, Long; Liu, Yonghong; Lee, Kyung Jin; Li, Xiang

    2007-11-01

    This study describes actinobacteria isolated from the marine sponge Haliclona sp. collected in shallow water of the South China Sea. A total of 54 actinobacteria were isolated using media selective for actinobacteria. Species diversity and natural product diversity of isolates from marine sponge Haliclona sp. were analysed. Twenty-four isolates were selected on the basis of their morphology on different media and assigned to the phylum Actinobacteria by a combination of 16S rRNA gene based restriction enzymes digestion and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The 16S rRNA genes of 24 isolates were digested by restriction enzymes TaqI and MspI and assigned to different groups according to their restriction enzyme pattern. The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the isolates belonged to the genera Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora and Verrucosispora; one other isolate was recovered that does not belong to known genera based on its unique 16S rRNA gene sequence. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterium classified as Verrucosispora sp. that has been isolated from a marine sponge. The majority of the strains tested belong to the genus Streptomyces and three isolates may be new species. All of the 24 isolates were screened for genes encoding polyketide synthases (PKS) and nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). PKS and NRPS sequences were detected in more than half of the isolates and the different "PKS-I-PKS-II-NRPS" combinations in different isolates belonging to the same species are indicators of their potential natural product diversity and divergent genetic evolution.

  4. Culturing Embryos and Larvae of Marine Molluscs and Protochordates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, R.; Turner, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a description for maintaining adult forms of molluscs and protochordates in order to obtain gametes for laboratory studies of animal development. The methods also include those for culturing embryonic larvae forms in vitro. (Author/SA)

  5. Culturing Embryos and Larvae of Marine Molluscs and Protochordates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healey, R.; Turner, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a description for maintaining adult forms of molluscs and protochordates in order to obtain gametes for laboratory studies of animal development. The methods also include those for culturing embryonic larvae forms in vitro. (Author/SA)

  6. Arsenoriboside degradation in marine systems: the use of bacteria culture incubation experiments as model systems.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Elliott G; Maher, William A; Foster, Simon D; Mikac, Katarina M; Krikowa, Frank; Florance, Anthea

    2014-01-01

    Arsenoribosides (as glycerol; phosphate; sulfate and sulfonate) persisted in all bacteria-inoculated cultures irrespective of the source of bacteria (seawater, macro-algae surface) or the culture media used (DIFCO Marine Broth 2216 or novel blended Hormosira banksii tissue-based). This is unlike observations from traditional macro-algae tissue decomposition studies or in nature. In addition known arsenoriboside degradation products such as dimethylarsenoethanol (DMAE), dimethylarsenate (DMA), methylarsenate (MA) and arsenate - As(V) were not detected in any cultures. Consequently, the use of bacterial culture incubation experiments to explain the fate of arsenoribosides in marine systems appears limited as the processes governing arsenoriboside degradation in these experiments appear to be different to those in macro-algae tissue decomposition studies or in nature.

  7. Geothermal waste treatment biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1991-05-01

    Technical feasibility of a biotechnology based on biochemical reactions for detoxification of geothermal brines has been demonstrated. Laboratory-scale studies have shown that the emerging biotechnology is versatile and is applicable to a variety of geothermal sludges and materials with similar geochemical properties. Materials suitable for treatment are those which may contain few or many metals in concentrations exceeding those allowed by regulatory agencies. Comparison of several possible types of bioreactors and processes have led to the conclusion that a number of variables have to be considered in the design and development of a biochemical plant for the detoxification of geothermal type sludges. These include reactor size, effects of agitation, mixed cultures, state of the biomass, pH and dissolved oxygen, concentration of residual sludge, residence time, and temperature. Under optimum conditions, high rates of metal removal can be achieved. Some recent studies, dealing with the process variables and their optimization, will be discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Biotechnology in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cloete, Thomas E; Nel, Louis H; Theron, Jacques

    2006-12-01

    Since adopting the National Biotechnology Strategy in 2001, the South African government has established several regional innovation centres and has put in place initiatives to encourage international partnerships that can spur internal development of life science ventures. This strategy seeks to capitalize on the high quality of research carried out in public research institutions and universities but is hampered, somewhat, by the lack of entrepreneurial culture among South African researchers due to, among other reasons, the expenses involved in registering foreign patents. Although private sector development is still relatively embryonic, start-ups are spinning out of universities and pre-existing companies. These represent a vital source of innovations for commercialization in the future, provided that the challenges facing the emerging South African biotechnology industry can be overcome.

  9. Biotechnological approaches for improvement and conservation of prunus species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biotechnology has contributed to improvement and conservation of Prunus species. Biotechnological approaches involving in vitro tissue culture, genetic transformation, molecular marker development and cryopreservation were applied to various Prunus species. This report provides an overview of biotec...

  10. Synthetic microbial ecosystems for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Pandhal, Jagroop; Noirel, Josselin

    2014-06-01

    Most highly controlled and specific applications of microorganisms in biotechnology involve pure cultures. Maintaining single strain cultures is important for industry as contaminants can reduce productivity and lead to longer "down-times" during sterilisation. However, microbes working together provide distinct advantages over pure cultures. They can undertake more metabolically complex tasks, improve efficiency and even expand applications to open systems. By combining rapidly advancing technologies with ecological theory, the use of microbial ecosystems in biotechnology will inevitably increase. This review provides insight into the use of synthetic microbial communities in biotechnology by applying the engineering paradigm of measure, model, manipulate and manufacture, and illustrate the emerging wider potential of the synthetic ecology field. Systems to improve biofuel production using microalgae are also discussed.

  11. Rational selection of alternative, environmentally compatible surfactants for biotechnological production of pharmaceuticals--a step toward green biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jürg Oliver; Shearer, Russel; Studer, Martin

    2014-09-01

    The biotechnological production of pharmaceutical active substances needs ancillary substances. Surfactants are used at the end of the cell culture as a protection against potential viral or bacterial contamination and to lyse the producing cells for isolation and purification of the products. To find a replacement for a surfactant that had raised environmental concern, environmentally relevant data for potential alternatives were searched for in the literature. Significant data gaps were filled with additional tests: biodegradability, algal growth inhibition, acute daphnid immobilization and chronic daphnid reproduction toxicity, acute fish toxicity, and activated sludge respiration inhibition. The results were used to model removal in the wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) serving 3 biotechnological production sites in the Roche Group. Predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) were calculated using realistic amounts of surfactants and site-specific wastewater fluxes, modeled removals for the WWTPs and dilution factors by the respective receiving waters. Predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) were derived for WWTPs and for both fresh and marine receiving waters as the treated wastewater of 1 production site is discharged into a coastal water. This resulted in a spreadsheet showing PECs, PNECs, and PEC ÷ PNEC risk characterization ratios for the WWTPs and receiving waters for all investigated surfactants and all 3 sites. This spreadsheet now serves as a selection support for the biotechnological developers. This risk-based prioritization of surfactants is a step toward green biotechnological production.

  12. Culturing bias in marine heterotrophic flagellates analyzed through seawater enrichment incubations.

    PubMed

    del Campo, Javier; Balagué, Vanessa; Forn, Irene; Lekunberri, Itziar; Massana, Ramon

    2013-10-01

    The diversity of heterotrophic flagellates is generally based on cultivated strains, on which ultrastructural, physiological, and molecular studies have been performed. However, the relevance of these cultured strains as models of the dominant heterotrophic flagellates in the marine planktonic environment is unclear. In fact, molecular surveys typically recover novel eukaryotic lineages that have refused cultivation so far. This study was designed to directly address the culturing bias in planktonic marine heterotrophic flagellates. Several microcosms were established adding increasing amounts and sources of organic matter to a confined natural microbial community pre-filtered by 3 μm. Growth dynamics were followed by epifluorescence microscopy and showed the expected higher yield of bacteria and heterotrophic flagellates at increased organic matter additions. Moreover, protist diversity analyzed by molecular tools showed a clear substitution in the community, which differed more and more from the initial sample as the organic matter increased. Within this gradient, there was also an increase of sequences related to cultured organisms as well as a decrease in diversity. Culturing bias is partly explained by the use of organic matter in the isolation process, which drives a shift in the community to conditions closer to laboratory cultures. An intensive culturing effort using alternative isolation methods is necessary to allow the access to the missing heterotrophic flagellates that constitute the abundant and active taxa in marine systems.

  13. Chromium uptake and adsorption in cultured marine phytoplankton - implications for the marine Cr cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, D.; Maldonado, M. T.; Jaccard, S.

    2015-12-01

    While chromium (Cr) is a known carcinogen and pervasive industrial contaminant, little is known about the processes that affect the distribution and speciation of Cr in uncontaminated seawater. Given the recent development and application of the stable Cr isotope system in the marine environment, a full account of the sources, sinks, and internal processes affecting the modern marine Cr cycle is prudent. Using the radioisotope 51Cr, we investigated the controls of cellular Cr accumulation in an array of marine phytoplankton grown in environmentally relevant Cr concentrations (1-10 nM). Given the affinity of Cr(III) for amorphous Fe-hydroxide mineral surfaces, and the formation of these mineral phases on the outside of phytoplankton cells, extracellular Cr was monitored in a model diatom species (Thalassiosira weissflogii) as extracellular Fe concentrations varied. Extracellular Cr in T. weissflogii increased with increasing extracellular Fe, demonstrating that Cr may be removed from seawater via extracellular adsorption to phytoplankton. Short-term Cr(VI) and Cr(III) uptake experiments performed with T. weissflogii demonstrated that Cr(III) both adsorbed to and was internalized by the cells ~20x faster than Cr(VI). This suggests that Cr(III) is the dominant oxidation state associated with phytoplankton cells. Cellular Cr:C ratios (<0.5 µmol Cr mol C-1) of the nine phytoplankton species surveyed were significantly lower than previously reported Cr:C ratios of sinking particulate organic matter (~500 µmol Cr mol C-1). Thus, Cr accumulates in sinking particles- likely as Cr(III) - as it travels to the seafloor. Given the large fractionation of stable Cr isotopes during Cr(VI) reduction, Cr associated with exported phytoplankton may be enriched in lighter Cr isotopes. These data will assist investigators using stable Cr isotopes to examine past and present Cr biogeochemical cycles.

  14. Environmental management of marine fish culture in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H W; Choi, K W; Arega, F

    2003-01-01

    Marine fish farming is an important commercial practice in Hong Kong. Marine fish farms located in eutrophic coastal waters often face the threat of severe dissolved oxygen depletion associated with algal blooms and red tides. On the other hand, mariculture activities also contribute to pollution. The sustainable management of mariculture requires proper siting of the fish farms and stocking density control. Both of these are related to the carrying capacity of the water body concerned, which is mainly governed by its flushing characteristics. A simple method to determine the carrying capacity of a fish farm has been developed by using three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic modelling and its effective coupling with a diagenetic water quality model. A systematic methodology using numerical tracer experiments has been developed to compute the tidal flushing in a fish farm. The flushing time is determined from the results of a numerical tracer experiment using robust 3D hydrodynamic and mass transport models. A unit tracer concentration is initially prescribed inside the region of interest and zero elsewhere; the subsequent mass transport and the mass removal process are then tracked. The fish farms are usually situated in well-sheltered shallow embayments and may not connect directly to the open water. It is found that it is necessary to define both "local" and "system-wide" flushing times to represent the effectiveness of the mass exchange with the surrounding water body and the open sea respectively. A diagenetic water quality model simulating the sediment-water-pollutant interaction is employed to address the response of the water column and the benthic layer to pollution discharges. With the flushing rate reliably computed, the carrying capacity of the fish farm can be determined in terms of key water quality parameters: chlorophyll-a, dissolved oxygen, organic nitrogen and potential lowest dissolved oxygen level on a day of negligible photosynthetic production. The

  15. Explant exenisation for tissue culture in marine macroalgae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuewu; Kloareg, Bernard

    1992-09-01

    Unialgal explants from Laminaria digitata, and from a variety of red algae, were obtained by hand removing the visible epiphytes, and stirring the tissue in the presence of glass beads. Two antibiotic mixtures were found to be efficient in removing the contaminating fungi and bacteria from the algae. The procedure proved suitable as a primary step in the tissue culture of the investigated species.

  16. Cultural impacts on public perceptions of agricultural biotechnology: A comparison of South Korea and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nader, Richard Harrison

    According to Millar (1996), the gulf between science and society is growing. Technologies are tools cultures develop to solve society's problems. The rapid dispersion of science and technology across cultural borders through trade, technology transfer and exchange, increasingly requires people in different cultures to make choices about accepting or rejecting artifacts of science and technology such as genetically modified (GM) foods, which originate primarily from the United States. These issues challenge policy makers and scientists to account for the affects of different cultural perspectives on controversial scientific issues. Given the controversy across cultures over acceptance or rejection of genetically modified (GM) foods, GM foods are an excellent example with which to begin to reveal how culture impacts public perceptions of the risk and benefits of science and technology in different societies. This research will: (1) Define public awareness and understanding of science, specifically GM foods; (2) Examine culture's impact on knowledge, including different cultural approaches to research; and (3) Compare recent findings of a bi-national public opinion survey on GM comparing in South Korea and the United States. The proposed research outlines two research questions: (1) How and in what ways do South Koreans and Americans differ in their opinions about GMOs? This question is important for gathering current points of contrast about how the two cultures may differ; and (2) What role does culture play on opinion formation about GM foods? Through grounded theory, the researcher will investigate how cultural differences help explain opinion on public perceptions of GM foods. Is it possible to identify common cultural factors that impact public perceptions of GM foods between South Koreans and Americans? The study will utilize both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Higher education is a major producer of new science and technology. The study is

  17. Culturable heterotrophic bacteria from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra: isolation and phylogenetic diversity of actinobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvin, Joseph; Gandhimathi, R.; Kiran, G. Seghal; Priya, S. Shanmugha; Ravji, T. Rajeetha; Hema, T. A.

    2009-09-01

    Culturable heterotrophic bacterial composition of marine sponge Dendrilla nigra was analysed using different enrichments. Five media compositions including without enrichment (control), enriched with sponge extract, with growth regulator (antibiotics), with autoinducers, and complete enrichment containing sponge extract, antibiotics, and autoinducers were developed. DNA hybridization assay was performed to explore host specific bacteria and ecotypes of culturable sponge-associated bacteria. Enrichment with selective inducers (AHLs and sponge extract) and regulators (antibiotics) considerably enhanced the cultivation potential of sponge-associated bacteria. It was found that Marinobacter (MSI032), Micromonospora (MSI033), Streptomyces (MSI051), and Pseudomonas (MSI057) were sponge-associated obligate symbionts. The present findings envisaged that “ Micromonospora-Saccharomonospora-Streptomyces” group was the major culturable actinobacteria in the marine sponge D. nigra. The DNA hybridization assay was a reliable method for the analysis of culturable bacterial community in marine sponges. Based on the culturable community structure, the sponge-associated bacteria can be grouped (ecotypes) as general symbionts, specific symbionts, habitat flora, and antagonists.

  18. Characterization of Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture and isolation of Fe (III)-reducing bacterium Enterobacter sp. L6 from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    To enrich the Fe (III)-reducing bacteria, sludge from marine sediment was inoculated into the medium using Fe (OH)3 as the sole electron acceptor. Efficiency of Fe (III) reduction and composition of Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture were analyzed. The results indicated that the Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture with the dominant bacteria relating to Clostridium and Enterobacter sp. had high Fe (III) reduction of (2.73 ± 0.13) mmol/L-Fe (II). A new Fe (III)-reducing bacterium was isolated from the Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture and identified as Enterobacter sp. L6 by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The Fe (III)-reducing ability of strain L6 under different culture conditions was investigated. The results indicated that strain L6 had high Fe (III)-reducing activity using glucose and pyruvate as carbon sources. Strain L6 could reduce Fe (III) at the range of NaCl concentrations tested and had the highest Fe (III) reduction of (4.63 ± 0.27) mmol/L Fe (II) at the NaCl concentration of 4 g/L. This strain L6 could reduce Fe (III) with unique properties in adaptability to salt variation, which indicated that it can be used as a model organism to study Fe (III)-reducing activity isolated from marine environment. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Editorial: Biotechnology Journal brings more than biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Jungbauer, Alois; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-09-01

    Biotechnology Journal always brings the state-of-the-art biotechnologies to our readers. Different from other topical issues, this issue of Biotechnology Journal is complied with a series of exiting reviews and research articles from spontaneous submissions, again, addressing society's actual problems and needs. The progress is a real testimony how biotechnology contributes to achievements in healthcare, better utilization of resources, and a bio-based economy. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Biotechnology's foreign policy.

    PubMed

    Feldbaum, Carl

    2002-01-01

    From its inception, biotechnology has been a uniquely international enterprise. An American and an Englishman working together elucidated the structure of DNA almost 50 years ago; more recently, the Human Genome Project linked researchers around the world, from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston to the Beijing Human Genome Center. Today our industry's researchers hail from African villages and Manhattan high rises; from Munich and Melbourne; from London, Ontario, and London, England; from Scotland and Nova Scotia--New Scotland; from Calcutta and Calgary. But in the beginning, the infrastructure that supported these efforts--intellectual property, venture capital, streamlined technology transfer--was less widely dispersed and the world's brightest biotech researchers clustered in only half a dozen scientific Meccas. Previous technological revolutions have spread around the world. Following in their footsteps, biotechnology's global diaspora seems inevitable, especially since governments are promoting it. But as our science and business emigrate from early strongholds in the United States, Canada and Europe across oceans and borders and into new cultures, international tensions over biotechnology continue to grow. In just the last few years, controversies have rolled over R&D spending priorities, genetic patents, bioprospecting, transgenic agriculture and drug pricing. My premise today is that our industry needs to formulate its first foreign policy, one which is cognizant of the miserable judgments and mistakes of other industries--and avoids them.

  1. Editorial: Biotechnology Journal's diverse coverage of biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wink, Michael

    2014-03-01

    This issue of Biotechnology Journal is a regular issue edited by Prof. Michael Wink. The issue covers all the major focus areas of the journal, including medical biotechnology, synthetic biology, and novel biotechnological methods. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Biotechnology touches the forest

    SciTech Connect

    Powledge, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    Both the United States and New Zealand are doing research in forest biotechnology and much of the interest is in speedy propagation from seed to mature tree. A number of propagation techniques are discussed, such as tissue culture, the culture of tissue from mature trees and somatic embryo genesis. Much of the tissue culture work has been done on radiata pine. Field testing results are considered. The aims and the advantages of forest biotechnology are discussed under the following headings. 1) Disease resistance: research is being carried out on a loblolly pine which would be resistant to fusiform rust. 2) Animal feed: some trees have been discovered to have lower lignin content and similar cellulose and hemicellulose to alfalfa. 3) Specialty chemicals: terpenes, in the tree resin, could be turned into hormones, drugs and other chemicals: the genetic system for the overall biosynthesis of terpenes has been studied. 4) Herbicide resistance. The resistance to glyphosate in poplars is being studied. In conclusion, further research into forest species, using molecular biology is considered essential.

  3. [Phylogenetic diversity of the culturable rare actinomycetes in marine sponge Hymeniacidon perlevis by improved isolation media].

    PubMed

    Xin, Yanjuan; Wu, Peichun; Deng, Maicun; Zhang, Wei

    2009-07-01

    Based on the molecular diversity information, seven actinomycete-selective culture media and isolation conditions were modified to isolate and cultivate diverse rare actinomycetes from Hymeniacidon perlevis. Modified, selective cultivation and enrichment media were used, with the addition of an elemental solution of simulating the elemental composition of marine sponge H. perlevis. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of 16S rDNA sequence was used to reveal the diversity of culturable rare actinomycetes. A total of 59 actinomycete strains were isolated from the marine sponge H. perlevis. A total of 27 representative actinomycetes were selected according to their morphological feature, color and pigments. They gave 15 different RFLP patterns after digesting their PCR products of 16s rDNA with Hha I. The results showed that these isolates belonged to 10 genera: Streptomyces, Nocardiopsis, Micromonospora, Cellulosimicrobium, Gordonia, Nocardia, Prauseria, Pseudonocardia , Saccharomonospora and Microbacterium. The modified isolation media and selective cultivation procedures are highly effective in the recovery of culturable actinomycetes from the marine sponge H. perlevis, resulting in the highest diversity of culturable rare actinomycetes from any sponges.

  4. Production of bioactive tryptamine derivatives by co-culture of marine Streptomyces with Bacillus mycoides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liyan; Hu, Zhifei; Ma, Zhongjun

    2015-01-01

    Tryptamine derivatives such as tryptamine and bacillamides were strong algicidal compounds promising in controlling harmful algae blooms, but their bioactivity and application researches were hindered by extremely low natural production rates. This study found an induced production of algicidal tryptamine derivatives by co-culture of marine Streptomyces with Bacillus mycoides, and optimised the culture method through changing important factors such as medium nutrition content, culture mode and pH value. The final established co-culture method used only 5 g yeast extracts and 5 g glycerol in 1 L 75% sea water, but got a yield of 14.9 mg/L N-acetyltryptamine, 2.8 mg/L N-propanoyltryptamine, 3.0 mg/L bacillamide A, 13.7 mg/L bacillamide B and 9.6 mg/L bacillamide C, which were all undetectable under normal culture conditions.

  5. The Development of Plant Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrey, John G.

    1985-01-01

    Examines major lines of thought leading to what is meant by plant biotechnology, namely, the application of existing techniques of plant organ, tissue, and cell culture, plant molecular biology, and genetic engineering to the improvement of plants and of plant productivity for the benefit of man. (JN)

  6. The Development of Plant Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torrey, John G.

    1985-01-01

    Examines major lines of thought leading to what is meant by plant biotechnology, namely, the application of existing techniques of plant organ, tissue, and cell culture, plant molecular biology, and genetic engineering to the improvement of plants and of plant productivity for the benefit of man. (JN)

  7. Diversity of Marine-Derived Fungal Cultures Exposed by DNA Barcodes: The Algorithm Matters

    PubMed Central

    Andreakis, Nikos; Høj, Lone; Kearns, Philip; Hall, Michael R.; Ericson, Gavin; Cobb, Rose E.; Gordon, Benjamin R.; Evans-Illidge, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Marine fungi are an understudied group of eukaryotic microorganisms characterized by unresolved genealogies and unstable classification. Whereas DNA barcoding via the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) provides a robust and rapid tool for fungal species delineation, accurate classification of fungi is often arduous given the large number of partial or unknown barcodes and misidentified isolates deposited in public databases. This situation is perpetuated by a paucity of cultivable fungal strains available for phylogenetic research linked to these data sets. We analyze ITS barcodes produced from a subsample (290) of 1781 cultured isolates of marine-derived fungi in the Bioresources Library located at the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS). Our analysis revealed high levels of under-explored fungal diversity. The majority of isolates were ascomycetes including representatives of the subclasses Eurotiomycetidae, Hypocreomycetidae, Sordariomycetidae, Pleosporomycetidae, Dothideomycetidae, Xylariomycetidae and Saccharomycetidae. The phylum Basidiomycota was represented by isolates affiliated with the genera Tritirachium and Tilletiopsis. BLAST searches revealed 26 unknown OTUs and 50 isolates corresponding to previously uncultured, unidentified fungal clones. This study makes a significant addition to the availability of barcoded, culturable marine-derived fungi for detailed future genomic and physiological studies. We also demonstrate the influence of commonly used alignment algorithms and genetic distance measures on the accuracy and comparability of estimating Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) by the automatic barcode gap finder (ABGD) method. Large scale biodiversity screening programs that combine datasets using algorithmic OTU delineation pipelines need to ensure compatible algorithms have been used because the algorithm matters. PMID:26308620

  8. Enrichment, Isolation, and Cultural Characteristics of Marine Strains of Clostridium botulinum Type C

    PubMed Central

    Segner, W. P.; Schmidt, C. F.; Boltz, J. K.

    1971-01-01

    Terrestrial strains of Clostridium botulinum type C, designated 468 and 571, were used to screen various media for growth and sporulation at 30 C. Of the various formulations tested, only egg meat medium fortified with 1% additions of yeast extract, ammonium sulfate, and glucose (FEM medium) gave good growth and satisfactory sporulation. FEM medium was used to recover four marine type C isolates from inshore sediments collected along the Atlantic, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Pacific coasts of the United States. The isolation techniques involved repeated transfer of cultures showing type C toxin in FEM medium and purification by a deep tube method. The medium used for purification was beef infusion-agar supplemented with 0.14% sodium bicarbonate and 0.1% l-cysteine hydrochloride. l-Cysteine was adopted in preference to sodium thioglycolate, because some lots of the latter were definitely inhibitory for growth. The addition of bicarbonate markedly increased viable spore counts of both the marine and terrestrial strains. Various cultural and biochemical characteristics of the marine and the terrestrial strains were compared. With the exception of some variations in their fermentation patterns, both groups showed similar characteristics. Of 23 fermentable compounds tested, the terrestrial strains attacked only glucose and mannose. The marine strains fermented glucose, mannose, galactose, and ribose actively; dextrin, inositol, maltose, and melibiose were weakly fermented. PMID:4944800

  9. Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and their culturability.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp.

  10. Actinobacteria Associated with the Marine Sponges Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp. and Their Culturability

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Takagi, Motoki; Shin-ya, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Actinobacteria associated with 3 marine sponges, Cinachyra sp., Petrosia sp., and Ulosa sp., were investigated. Analyses of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that actinobacterial diversity varied greatly and that Ulosa sp. was most diverse, while Cinachyra sp. was least diverse. Culture-based approaches failed to isolate actinobacteria from Petrosia sp. or Ulosa sp., but strains belonging to 10 different genera and 3 novel species were isolated from Cinachyra sp. PMID:22214828

  11. Biotechnology opportunities on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Jess; Henderson, Keith; Phillips, Robert W.; Dickey, Bernistine; Grounds, Phyllis

    1987-01-01

    Biotechnology applications which could be implemented on the Space Station are examined. The advances possible in biotechnology due to the favorable microgravity environment are discussed. The objectives of the Space Station Life Sciences Program are: (1) the study of human diseases, (2) biopolymer processing, and (3) the development of cryoprocessing and cryopreservation methods. The use of the microgravity environment for crystal growth, cell culturing, and the separation of biological materials is considered. The proposed Space Station research could provide benefits to the fields of medicine, pharmaceuticals, genetics, agriculture, and industrial waste management.

  12. Biotechnology opportunities on Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deming, Jess; Henderson, Keith; Phillips, Robert W.; Dickey, Bernistine; Grounds, Phyllis

    1987-01-01

    Biotechnology applications which could be implemented on the Space Station are examined. The advances possible in biotechnology due to the favorable microgravity environment are discussed. The objectives of the Space Station Life Sciences Program are: (1) the study of human diseases, (2) biopolymer processing, and (3) the development of cryoprocessing and cryopreservation methods. The use of the microgravity environment for crystal growth, cell culturing, and the separation of biological materials is considered. The proposed Space Station research could provide benefits to the fields of medicine, pharmaceuticals, genetics, agriculture, and industrial waste management.

  13. Biotechnology in the wood industry.

    PubMed

    Mai, C; Kües, U; Militz, H

    2004-02-01

    Wood is a natural, biodegradable and renewable raw material, used in construction and as a feedstock in the paper and wood product industries and in fuel production. Traditionally, biotechnology found little attention in the wood product industries, apart from in paper manufacture. Now, due to growing environmental concern and increasing scientific knowledge, legal restrictions to conventional processes have altered the situation. Biotechnological approaches in the area of wood protection aim at enhancing the treatability of wood with preservatives and replacing chemicals with biological control agents. The substitution of conventional chemical glues in the manufacturing of board materials is achieved through the application of fungal cultures and isolated fungal enzymes. Moreover, biotechnology plays an important role in the waste remediation of preservative-treated waste wood.

  14. Dereplication for biotechnology screening: PyMS analysis and PCR-RFLP-SSCP (PRS) profiling of 16S rRNA genes of marine and terrestrial actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Pedro F B; Torimura, Masaki; Kurane, Ryuichiro; Bull, Alan T

    2002-01-01

    The search for exploitable biology is a major task for biotechnology-based industries. In this context, discrimination between previously tested or recovered micro-organisms (dereplication) is imperative, in order to reduce screening costs by sorting large collections of isolates, which are then subjected to further detailed evaluation. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PyMS) is a whole-cell fingerprinting technique that enables the rapid and reproducible sorting of micro-organisms, uses small samples and has the advantage of being fully automated. In this study, we compare chemometric fingerprinting with a ribotyping fingerprinting method, in order to investigate the extent to which pyrogroups formed by PyMS analysis relate to genetic diversity, using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism-single-strand conformational polymorphism (PRS). A mixture of environmental strains of mycolic acid containing actinomycetes was used to mimic the selection of colonies from primary isolation plates. The congruence found between the clusters defined by the chemometric and molecular fingerprinting techniques was very high and demonstrated the effectiveness of PyMS as a rapid sorting and dereplicating procedure for putatively novel strains, criteria that are critical for biotechnological screens. Moreover, PyMS analysis revealed significant variation within pyrogroups that contained strains with the same genotypic (PRS) characteristics, thus emphasising its discriminatory capacity at the infraspecies level.

  15. Phylogenetic Diversity of Gram-Positive Bacteria Cultured from Marine Sediments▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gontang, Erin A.; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R.

    2007-01-01

    Major advances in our understanding of marine bacterial diversity have been gained through studies of bacterioplankton, the vast majority of which appear to be gram negative. Less effort has been devoted to studies of bacteria inhabiting marine sediments, yet there is evidence to suggest that gram-positive bacteria comprise a relatively large proportion of these communities. To further expand our understanding of the aerobic gram-positive bacteria present in tropical marine sediments, a culture-dependent approach was applied to sediments collected in the Republic of Palau from the intertidal zone to depths of 500 m. This investigation resulted in the isolation of 1,624 diverse gram-positive bacteria spanning 22 families, including many that appear to represent new taxa. Phylogenetic analysis of 189 representative isolates, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence data, indicated that 124 (65.6%) belonged to the class Actinobacteria while the remaining 65 (34.4%) were members of the class Bacilli. Using a sequence identity value of ≥98%, the 189 isolates grouped into 78 operational taxonomic units, of which 29 (37.2%) are likely to represent new taxa. The high degree of phylogenetic novelty observed during this study highlights the fact that a great deal remains to be learned about the diversity of gram-positive bacteria in marine sediments. PMID:17400789

  16. Production of volatile organic compounds in the culture of marine α-proteobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, M.; Abe, M.; Hashimoto, S.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) release halogens in the troposphere and in the stratosphere by photolysis and released halogens catalyze ozone depletion . In the ocean, macroalgae, phytoplankton, and bacteria are considered to be the main producers of VOCs. Recent investigations have shown that marine bacteria produce halomethanes such as chloromethane, bromomethane, and iodomethane. However, knowledge of aquatic VOC production, particularly through bacteria, is lacking. We studied the production of VOCs, including halomethanes, through the bacterium HKF-1. HKF-1 was isolated from brackish water in Sanaru Lake, Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. The bacterium belongs to the α-proteobacteria. Bacteria were incubated in marine broth 2216 (Difco) added with KI and KIO3 (each at 0.02 μmol/L) at 25°C. VOCs in the gas phase above the cultured samples was determined using a dynamic headspace (GESTEL DHS)—gas chromatograph (Agilent 6890N)—mass spectrometer (Agilent 5975C) at 0, 4, 7, 10 and 12 incubation days. In addition, the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was measured during the culture period. Measurement of VOCs showed that chloromethane, bromomethane, iodomethane, isoprene, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were produced in the culture of HKF-1. Dihalomethanes and trihalomethanes, such as dibromomethane, chloroiodomethane, bromoiodomethane, and tribromomethane, were not detected. Given that monohalomethanes and sulfur-containing VOCs were abundant in the culture, HKF-1 is one of the possible candidates as a producer of monohalomethane and sulfur-containing VOCs in marine environment, but not of di- or trihalomethanes.

  17. Marine sources of ice nucleating particles: results from phytoplankton cultures and samples collected at sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilbourn, E.; Thornton, D.; Brooks, S. D.; Graff, J.

    2016-12-01

    The role of marine aerosols as ice nucleating particles is currently poorly understood. Despite growing interest, there are remarkably few ice nucleation measurements on representative marine samples. Here we present results of heterogeneous ice nucleation from laboratory studies and in-situ air and sea water samples collected during NAAMES (North Atlantic Aerosol and Marine Ecosystems Study). Thalassiosira weissflogii (CCMP 1051) was grown under controlled conditions in batch cultures and the ice nucleating activity depended on the growth phase of the cultures. Immersion freezing temperatures of the lab-grown diatoms were determined daily using a custom ice nucleation apparatus cooled at a set rate. Our results show that the age of the culture had a significant impact on ice nucleation temperature, with samples in stationary phase causing nucleation at -19.9 °C, approximately nine degrees warmer than the freezing temperature during exponential growth phase. Field samples gathered during the NAAMES II cruise in May 2016 were also tested for ice nucleating ability. Two types of samples were gathered. Firstly, whole cells were fractionated by size from surface seawater using a BD Biosciences Influx Cell Sorter (BD BS ISD). Secondly, aerosols were generated using the SeaSweep and subsequently size-selected using a PIXE Cascade Impactor. Samples were tested for the presence of ice nucleating particles (INP) using the technique described above. There were significant differences in the freezing temperature of the different samples; of the three sample types the lab-grown cultures tested during stationary phase froze at the warmest temperatures, followed by the SeaSweep samples (-25.6 °C) and the size-fractionated cell samples (-31.3 °C). Differences in ice nucleation ability may be due to size differences between the INP, differences in chemical composition of the sample, or some combination of these two factors. Results will be presented and atmospheric implications

  18. Basic biotechnologies essential for the Japanese chemical industry in the 1990's and beyond. Bioreactors, large-scale mammalian cell culture, recombinant DNAs, functional protein systems, and bio-electronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the program is to induce private company laboratories to do research considered essential for the development of new technologies. One group of projects initially funded under the program was in the field of biotechnology. More specifically, the biotechnology projects were aimed at developing technologies for the chemical industry for the decade of the 1990's. Various projects dealt with bioreactors, large-scale cell culture, and recombinant DNA. These initial biotechnology projects have now been completed. The report reviews their accomplishments and assesses their possible impact on the Japanese chemical industry. A new project on functional protein complexes was added in 1989. Progress on the nine-year project is also reviewed. Finally, an assessment is provided of the biotechnology components of an unrelated group of projects being administered by the Research and Development Association for Future Electron Devices. The relevant components in the program involve bio-electronic devices and functional protein complexes. The objectives are to mimic biological systems for use in microsensors, information transmission and processing, artificial tissues and organs, robotics, and artificial intelligence.

  19. Diversity and antimicrobial potential of culturable heterotrophic bacteria associated with the endemic marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Rua, Cintia P J; Trindade-Silva, Amaro E; Appolinario, Luciana R; Venas, Tainá M; Garcia, Gizele D; Carvalho, Lucas S; Lima, Alinne; Kruger, Ricardo; Pereira, Renato C; Berlinck, Roberto G S; Valle, Rogério A B; Thompson, Cristiane C; Thompson, Fabiano

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges are the oldest Metazoa, very often presenting a complex microbial consortium. Such is the case of the marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis, endemic to Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. In this investigation we characterized the diversity of some of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria living in association with A. brasiliensis and determined their antimicrobial activity. The genera Endozoicomonas (N = 32), Bacillus (N = 26), Shewanella (N = 17), Pseudovibrio (N = 12), and Ruegeria (N = 8) were dominant among the recovered isolates, corresponding to 97% of all isolates. Approximately one third of the isolates living in association with A. brasiliensis produced antibiotics that inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that bacteria associated with this sponge play a role in its health.

  20. Diversity and antimicrobial potential of culturable heterotrophic bacteria associated with the endemic marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Rua, Cintia P.J.; Trindade-Silva, Amaro E.; Appolinario, Luciana R.; Venas, Tainá M.; Garcia, Gizele D.; Carvalho, Lucas S.; Lima, Alinne; Kruger, Ricardo; Pereira, Renato C.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S.; Valle, Rogério A.B.; Thompson, Cristiane C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine sponges are the oldest Metazoa, very often presenting a complex microbial consortium. Such is the case of the marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis, endemic to Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. In this investigation we characterized the diversity of some of the culturable heterotrophic bacteria living in association with A. brasiliensis and determined their antimicrobial activity. The genera Endozoicomonas (N = 32), Bacillus (N = 26), Shewanella (N = 17), Pseudovibrio (N = 12), and Ruegeria (N = 8) were dominant among the recovered isolates, corresponding to 97% of all isolates. Approximately one third of the isolates living in association with A. brasiliensis produced antibiotics that inhibited the growth of Bacillus subtilis, suggesting that bacteria associated with this sponge play a role in its health. PMID:25024903

  1. Extracellular enzyme activity in anaerobic bacterial cultures: evidence of pullulanase activity among mesophilic marine bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Arnosti, C; Repeta, D J

    1994-01-01

    The extracellular enzymatic activity of a mixed culture of anaerobic marine bacteria enriched on pullulan [alpha(1,6)-linked maltotriose units] was directly assessed with a combination of gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Hydrolysis products of pullulan were separated by GPC into three fractions with molecular weights of > or = 10,000, approximately 5,000, and < or = 1,200. NMR spectra of these fractions demonstrated that pullulan was rapidly and specifically hydrolyzed at alpha(1,6) linkages by pullulanase enzymes, most likely type II pullulanase. Although isolated pullulanase enzymes have been shown to hydrolyze pullulan completely to maltotriose (S. H. Brown, H. R. Costantino, and R. M. Kelly, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 56:1985-1991, 1990; M. Klingeberg, H. Hippe, and G. Antranikian, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 69:145-152, 1990; R. Koch, P. Zablowski, A. Spreinat, and G. Antranikian, FEMS Microbiol. Lett. 71:21-26, 1990), the smallest carbohydrate detected in the bacterial cultures consisted of two maltotriose units linked through one alpha(1,6) linkage. Either the final hydrolysis step was closely linked to substrate uptake, or specialized porins similar to maltoporin might permit direct transport of large oligosaccharides into the bacterial cell. This is the first report of pullulanase activity among mesophilic marine bacteria. The combination of GPC and NMR could easily be used to assess other types of extracellular enzyme activity in bacterial cultures. PMID:8161177

  2. Crop Biotechnology. Where Now?

    PubMed Central

    Miflin, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract Nature Biotechnology organized a conference in London on Agbiotech 99: Biotechnology and World Agriculture (November 14-16, 1999). The conference focused entirely on crop biotechnology and covered both societal and scientific aspects. Below is an account of the more important issues raised by the speakers and the audience. PMID:10806221

  3. Crop biotechnology. Where now?

    PubMed

    Miflin, B J

    2000-05-01

    Nature Biotechnology organized a conference in London on Agobiotech 99: Biotechnology and World Agriculture (November 14-16, 1999). The conference focused entirely on crop biotechnology and covered both societal and scientific aspects. Below is an account of the more important issues raised by the speakers and the audience.

  4. Is biotechnology the new alchemy?

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Georgiana

    2009-03-01

    In this article I examine similarities between the science and ethics of biotechnology on the one hand, and those of alchemy on the other, and show that the understanding of nature and naturalness upon which many contemporary ethical responses to biotechnology are predicated is, in fact, significantly similar to the understanding of nature that was the foundation of the practice of alchemy. In doing so I demonstrate that the ethical issues and social responses that are currently arising from advances in the field of biotechnology are interestingly similar to those that arose in reaction to the practice and prevalence of alchemy from its inception in Europe in the mid-twelfth century until at least the early modern period. I argue that a proper conception of the ethical issues and a sensible interpretation of the power and the promise of the science of biotechnology are most likely if we understand such attitudes to nature, and to the ethical issues surrounding technological and scientific developments, in terms of an historical and cultural continuum. That is, we should regard biotechnology as merely the latest in a string of technological and scientific developments rather than, as is often alleged, as something entirely new, requiring its own special ethical response. Finally, I suggest that examining the parallels between the ethical issues generated by alchemy and by biotechnology show us that such issues are best situated and discussed within a framework of virtue ethics, as it allows us to think seriously about the relationship between art and nature and the proper role of humans in relation to their technology.

  5. Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Methylate Mercury at Variable Rates in Pure Culture and in Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    King, Jeffrey K.; Kostka, Joel E.; Frischer, Marc E.; Saunders, F. Michael

    2000-01-01

    Differences in methylmercury (CH3Hg) production normalized to the sulfate reduction rate (SRR) in various species of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were quantified in pure cultures and in marine sediment slurries in order to determine if SRB strains which differ phylogenetically methylate mercury (Hg) at similar rates. Cultures representing five genera of the SRB (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfobulbus propionicus, Desulfococcus multivorans, Desulfobacter sp. strain BG-8, and Desulfobacterium sp. strain BG-33) were grown in a strictly anoxic, minimal medium that received a dose of inorganic Hg 120 h after inoculation. The mercury methylation rates (MMR) normalized per cell were up to 3 orders of magnitude higher in pure cultures of members of SRB groups capable of acetate utilization (e.g., the family Desulfobacteriaceae) than in pure cultures of members of groups that are not able to use acetate (e.g., the family Desulfovibrionaceae). Little or no Hg methylation was observed in cultures of Desulfobacterium or Desulfovibrio strains in the absence of sulfate, indicating that Hg methylation was coupled to respiration in these strains. Mercury methylation, sulfate reduction, and the identities of sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine sediment slurries were also studied. Sulfate-reducing consortia were identified by using group-specific oligonucleotide probes that targeted the 16S rRNA molecule. Acetate-amended slurries, which were dominated by members of the Desulfobacterium and Desulfobacter groups, exhibited a pronounced ability to methylate Hg when the MMR were normalized to the SRR, while lactate-amended and control slurries had normalized MMR that were not statistically different. Collectively, the results of pure-culture and amended-sediment experiments suggest that members of the family Desulfobacteriaceae have a greater potential to methylate Hg than members of the family Desulfovibrionaceae have when the MMR are normalized to the SRR. Hg methylation

  6. Biotechnology in reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Illmensee, Karl

    2002-01-01

    In this review I am summarizing the past and current progress in the field of pharmaceutical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and reproductive cloning in mammals. Several human gene products can be pharmaceutically explored in transgenic farm animals and employed for medical applications. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is utilizing modern molecular cloning techniques to detect genetic and chromosomal aberrations in early embryos originating from patients with inborn errors at risk for hereditary diseases or age-related risk for abnormal karyotype. Stem cell engineering from early human embryos is creating new and promising but also controversial applications for therapeutic and regenerative medicine. Potential risk factors for reproductive cloning are presented and discussed in the context of possible developmental malformations, frequently observed after embryo culture and cloning in farm animals. Future extension of biotechnology to human reproductive cloning is currently under worldwide dispute.

  7. The role of community engagement in the adoption of new agricultural biotechnologies by farmers: the case of the Africa harvest tissue-culture banana in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bandewar, Sunita V S; Wambugu, Florence; Richardson, Emma; Lavery, James V

    2017-03-13

    The tissue culture banana (TCB) is a biotechnological agricultural innovation that has been adopted widely in commercial banana production. In 2003, Africa Harvest Biotech Foundation International (AH) initiated a TCB program that was explicitly developed for smallholder farmers in Kenya to help them adopt the TCB as a scalable agricultural business opportunity. At the heart of the challenge of encouraging more widespread adoption of the TCB is the question: what is the best way to introduce the TCB technology, and all its attendant practices and opportunities, to smallholder farmers. In essence, a challenge of community or stakeholder engagement (CE). In this paper, we report the results of a case study of the CE strategies employed by AH to introduce TCB agricultural practices to small-hold farmers in Kenya, and their impact on the uptake of the TCB, and on the nature of the relationship between AH and the relevant community of farmers and other stakeholders. We identified six specific features of CE in the AH TCB project that were critical to its effectiveness: (1) adopting an empirical, "evidence-based" approach; (2) building on existing social networks; (3) facilitating farmer-to-farmer engagement; (4) focusing engagement on farmer groups; (5) strengthening relationships of trust through collaborative experiential learning; and (6) helping farmers to "learn the marketing game". We discuss the implications of AH's "values-based" approach to engagement, and how these guiding values functioned as "design constraints" for the key features of their CE strategy. And we highlight the importance of attention to the human dimensions of complex partnerships as a key determinant of successful CE. Our findings suggest new ways of conceptualizing the relationship between CE and the design and delivery of new technologies for global health and global development.

  8. The evolution of cultural adaptations: Fijian food taboos protect against dangerous marine toxins.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Joseph; Henrich, Natalie

    2010-12-22

    The application of evolutionary theory to understanding the origins of our species' capacities for social learning has generated key insights into cultural evolution. By focusing on how our psychology has evolved to adaptively extract beliefs and practices by observing others, theorists have hypothesized how social learning can, over generations, give rise to culturally evolved adaptations. While much field research documents the subtle ways in which culturally transmitted beliefs and practices adapt people to their local environments, and much experimental work reveals the predicted patterns of social learning, little research connects real-world adaptive cultural traits to the patterns of transmission predicted by these theories. Addressing this gap, we show how food taboos for pregnant and lactating women in Fiji selectively target the most toxic marine species, effectively reducing a woman's chances of fish poisoning by 30 per cent during pregnancy and 60 per cent during breastfeeding. We further analyse how these taboos are transmitted, showing support for cultural evolutionary models that combine familial transmission with selective learning from locally prestigious individuals. In addition, we explore how particular aspects of human cognitive processes increase the frequency of some non-adaptive taboos. This case demonstrates how evolutionary theory can be deployed to explain both adaptive and non-adaptive behavioural patterns.

  9. The evolution of cultural adaptations: Fijian food taboos protect against dangerous marine toxins

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Joseph; Henrich, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    The application of evolutionary theory to understanding the origins of our species' capacities for social learning has generated key insights into cultural evolution. By focusing on how our psychology has evolved to adaptively extract beliefs and practices by observing others, theorists have hypothesized how social learning can, over generations, give rise to culturally evolved adaptations. While much field research documents the subtle ways in which culturally transmitted beliefs and practices adapt people to their local environments, and much experimental work reveals the predicted patterns of social learning, little research connects real-world adaptive cultural traits to the patterns of transmission predicted by these theories. Addressing this gap, we show how food taboos for pregnant and lactating women in Fiji selectively target the most toxic marine species, effectively reducing a woman's chances of fish poisoning by 30 per cent during pregnancy and 60 per cent during breastfeeding. We further analyse how these taboos are transmitted, showing support for cultural evolutionary models that combine familial transmission with selective learning from locally prestigious individuals. In addition, we explore how particular aspects of human cognitive processes increase the frequency of some non-adaptive taboos. This case demonstrates how evolutionary theory can be deployed to explain both adaptive and non-adaptive behavioural patterns. PMID:20667878

  10. Biotechnology in Food Production and Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Dietrich; Sinskey, Anthony J.

    1985-09-01

    The food processing industry is the oldest and largest industry using biotechnological processes. Further development of food products and processes based on biotechnology depends upon the improvement of existing processes, such as fermentation, immobilized biocatalyst technology, and production of additives and processing aids, as well as the development of new opportunities for food biotechnology. Improvements are needed in the characterization, safety, and quality control of food materials, in processing methods, in waste conversion and utilization processes, and in currently used food microorganism and tissue culture systems. Also needed are fundamental studies of the structure-function relationship of food materials and of the cell physiology and biochemistry of raw materials.

  11. Technical bioenergetics and ecosystem biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Oleskin, A; Samuilov, V D

    1992-01-01

    The present work explores some possible practical uses of bioenergetic processes (fermentation, respiration and photosynthesis) in the microbial cell for the purpose of renewable fuel production. These considerations are based on ecosystem biotechnology which include the following main points: 1. Creation of closed energy-transducing ecosystems under laboratory conditions. 2. Production of renewable energy carriers with the help of microbial communities (e.g., mixed cultures of microorganism). 3. Investigation of the role of the individual microoganism in the population or community.

  12. Species-dependent silicon isotope fractionation in unialgal cultures of marine diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, J. N.; Varela, D. E.; Brzezinski, M. A.; Beucher, C.

    2011-12-01

    Variations in the natural abundance of stable isotopes of silicon (expressed as δ30Si in %) are a key tool for studying the marine silicon (Si) cycle in modern and ancient oceans. In particular, this tool can be used to track relative differences in silicic acid drawdown in surface waters by siliceous microplankton. Diatoms are siliceous phytoplankton that dominate the cycling of Si in the oceans. They represent a major source of primary production and are important in the transfer of Si, nitrogen, phosphorus, and atmospheric carbon to the deep sea. Previous investigations of Si isotope fractionation in diatom cultures have ruled out the influence of temperature (12-22°C) and shown that Si fractionation was invariant in different species of temperate diatoms (De La Rocha et al. 1997). However, the application of this proxy for marine paleo-silicon reconstructions has typically only been used in polar regions, such as the Southern Ocean, where high primary production rates give rise to diatom-rich sediments. Here, we present results on the fractionation of Si isotopes by four species of polar diatoms grown in semi-continuous cultures (Chaetoceros brevis, Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, Porosira glacialis, and Thalassiosira antarctica). To compare with previous studies (De La Rocha et al, 1997), we also tested Si isotope fractionation by two species of temperate diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana and Thalassiosira weissflogii). The temperate species yielded Si isotope fractionation (Δ30Si) values of -0.81 % (±0.12, SD, n=11) for T. pseudonana and -1.03% (±0.09, SD, n=3) for T. weissflogii, that are identical to the previously reported fractionation of -1.1 % (±0.4, SD, n=6) (De La Rocha et al. 1997). Similarly, our data for polar species F. kerguelensis, P. glacialis and T. antarctica suggest a fractionation of -0.7 to -1.1 %. Interestingly, our preliminary results from Chaetoceros brevis cultures show a Si isotope fractionation value of about -2.61 % (±0.05, SD

  13. New opportunities revealed by biotechnological explorations of extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Podar, Mircea; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2006-06-01

    Over the past few decades the extremes at which life thrives has continued to challenge our understanding of biochemistry, biology and evolution. As more new extremophiles are brought into laboratory culture, they have provided a multitude of potential applications for biotechnology. More recently, innovative culturing approaches, environmental genome sequencing and whole genome sequencing have provided new opportunities for the biotechnological exploration of extremophiles.

  14. Cultivation of Marine Sponges.

    PubMed

    Osinga; Tramper; Wijffels

    1999-11-01

    There is increasing interest in biotechnological production of marine sponge biomass owing to the discovery of many commercially important secondary metabolites in this group of animals. In this article, different approaches to producing sponge biomass are reviewed, and several factors that possibly influence culture success are evaluated. In situ sponge aquacultures, based on old methods for producing commercial bath sponges, are still the easiest and least expensive way to obtain sponge biomass in bulk. However, success of cultivation with this method strongly depends on the unpredictable and often suboptimal natural environment. Hence, a better-defined production system would be desirable. Some progress has been made with culturing sponges in semicontrolled systems, but these still use unfiltered natural seawater. Cultivation of sponges under completely controlled conditions has remained a problem. When designing an in vitro cultivation method, it is important to determine both qualitatively and quantitatively the nutritional demands of the species that is to be cultured. An adequate supply of food seems to be the key to successful sponge culture. Recently, some progress has been made with sponge cell cultures. The advantage of cell cultures is that they are completely controlled and can easily be manipulated for optimal production of the target metabolites. However, this technique is still in its infancy: a continuous cell line has yet to be established. Axenic cultures of sponge aggregates (primmorphs) may provide an alternative to cell culture. Some sponge metabolites are, in fact, produced by endosymbiotic bacteria or algae that live in the sponge tissue. Only a few of these endosymbionts have been cultivated so far. The biotechnology for the production of sponge metabolites needs further development. Research efforts should be continued to enable commercial exploitation of this valuable natural resource in the near future.

  15. Diseases of cultured marine fishes caused by Platyhelminthes (Monogenea, Digenea, Cestoda).

    PubMed

    Ogawa, K

    2015-01-01

    Mariculture is a rapidly developing industrial sector. Generally, fish are maintained in net cages with high density. Cage culture systems allow uncontrolled flow of sea water containing potentially infectious stages of fish parasites. In such culture conditions, prevention of such parasitic infections is difficult for parasites with life cycles that complete within culture sites, among which monogeneans and blood flukes are the most important platyhelminthes. Intense monogenean infections induce respiratory and osmo-regulatory dysfunctions. A variety of control measures have been developed, including freshwater bath treatment and chemotherapy. The potential to control monogenean infections through selective breeding, modified culture techniques to avoid infection, and general fish health management are discussed. It should be noted that mariculture conditions have provided some host-specific monogeneans with a chance to expand their host ranges. Blood flukes sometimes induce mass mortality among farmed fish. In-feed administration of praziquantel is the best solution to treat infected fish. Some cases are described that show how international trade in marine fish has resulted in the spread of hitherto unknown parasites into indigenous farmed and wild fish.

  16. Discrimination of Four Marine Biofilm-Forming Bacteria by LC-MS Metabolomics and Influence of Culture Parameters.

    PubMed

    Favre, Laurie; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Greff, Stéphane; Pérez, Thierry; Thomas, Olivier P; Martin, Jean-Charles; Culioli, Gérald

    2017-04-12

    Most marine bacteria can form biofilms, and they are the main components of biofilms observed on marine surfaces. Biofilms constitute a widespread life strategy, as growing in such structures offers many important biological benefits. The molecular compounds expressed in biofilms and, more generally, the metabolomes of marine bacteria remain poorly studied. In this context, a nontargeted LC-MS metabolomics approach of marine biofilm-forming bacterial strains was developed. Four marine bacteria, Persicivirga (Nonlabens) mediterranea TC4 and TC7, Pseudoalteromonas lipolytica TC8, and Shewanella sp. TC11, were used as model organisms. The main objective was to search for some strain-specific bacterial metabolites and to determine how culture parameters (culture medium, growth phase, and mode of culture) may affect the cellular metabolism of each strain and thus the global interstrain metabolic discrimination. LC-MS profiling and statistical partial least-squares discriminant analyses showed that the four strains could be differentiated at the species level whatever the medium, the growth phase, or the mode of culture (planktonic vs biofilm). A MS/MS molecular network was subsequently built and allowed the identification of putative bacterial biomarkers. TC8 was discriminated by a series of ornithine lipids, while the P. mediterranea strains produced hydroxylated ornithine and glycine lipids. Among the P. mediterranea strains, TC7 extracts were distinguished by the occurrence of diamine derivatives, such as putrescine amides.

  17. Environmentally compatible applications of biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, R.J.; Egan, M.

    1994-09-01

    Using living organisms to minimize harmful human impact on the environment is relatively recent thrust of biotechnology. Biotechnology developments are being employed as green technologies in a variety of applications that fall into the category of environmental biotechnology. The following aspects of biotechnology are discussed in this article: biosensors; bioremediation; bioleaching; natural plastics; clean fuels; pesticides; regulation of biotechnology products and processes. 58 refs.

  18. Diversity and Biosynthetic Potential of Culturable Actinomycetes Associated with Marine Sponges in the China Seas

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lijun; Ruan, Jisheng; Huang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The diversity and secondary metabolite potential of culturable actinomycetes associated with eight different marine sponges collected from the South China Sea and the Yellow sea were investigated. A total of 327 strains were isolated and 108 representative isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis. Ten families and 13 genera of Actinomycetales were detected, among which five genera represent first records isolated from marine sponges. Oligotrophic medium M5 (water agar) proved to be efficient for selective isolation, and “Micromonospora–Streptomyces” was proposed as the major distribution group of sponge-associated actinomycetes from the China Seas. Ten isolates are likely to represent novel species. Sponge Hymeniacidon perleve was found to contain the highest genus diversity (seven genera) of actinomycetes. Housekeeping gene phylogenetic analyses of the isolates indicated one ubiquitous Micromonospora species, one unique Streptomyces species and one unique Verrucosispora phylogroup. Of the isolates, 27.5% displayed antimicrobial activity, and 91% contained polyketide synthase and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes, indicating that these isolates had a high potential to produce secondary metabolites. The isolates from sponge Axinella sp. contained the highest presence of both antimicrobial activity and NRPS genes, while those from isolation medium DNBA showed the highest presence of antimicrobial activity and PKS I genes. PMID:22754340

  19. Diversity and biosynthetic potential of culturable actinomycetes associated with marine sponges in the China Seas.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lijun; Ruan, Jisheng; Huang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The diversity and secondary metabolite potential of culturable actinomycetes associated with eight different marine sponges collected from the South China Sea and the Yellow sea were investigated. A total of 327 strains were isolated and 108 representative isolates were selected for phylogenetic analysis. Ten families and 13 genera of Actinomycetales were detected, among which five genera represent first records isolated from marine sponges. Oligotrophic medium M5 (water agar) proved to be efficient for selective isolation, and "Micromonospora-Streptomyces" was proposed as the major distribution group of sponge-associated actinomycetes from the China Seas. Ten isolates are likely to represent novel species. Sponge Hymeniacidon perleve was found to contain the highest genus diversity (seven genera) of actinomycetes. Housekeeping gene phylogenetic analyses of the isolates indicated one ubiquitous Micromonospora species, one unique Streptomyces species and one unique Verrucosispora phylogroup. Of the isolates, 27.5% displayed antimicrobial activity, and 91% contained polyketide synthase and/or nonribosomal peptide synthetase genes, indicating that these isolates had a high potential to produce secondary metabolites. The isolates from sponge Axinella sp. contained the highest presence of both antimicrobial activity and NRPS genes, while those from isolation medium DNBA showed the highest presence of antimicrobial activity and PKS I genes.

  20. Biotechnology essay competition: biotechnology and sustainable food practices.

    PubMed

    Peng, Judy; Schoeb, Helena; Lee, Gina

    2013-06-01

    Biotechnology Journal announces our second biotechnology essay competition with the theme "biotechnology and sustainable food practices", open to all undergraduate students. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A new alkaliphilic cold-active esterase from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Rhodococcus sp.: functional and structural studies and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Concetta; Tedesco, Pietro; Ambrosino, Luca; Altermark, Bjørn; Willassen, Nils-Peder; de Pascale, Donatella

    2014-03-01

    The special features of cold-adapted lipolytic biocatalysts have made their use possible in several industrial applications. In fact, cold-active enzymes are known to be able to catalyze reactions at low temperatures, avoiding side reactions taking place at higher temperatures and preserving the integrity of products. A lipolytic gene was isolated from the Arctic marine bacterium Rhodococcus sp. AW25M09 and expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. The recombinant enzyme (hereafter called RhLip) showed interesting cold-active esterase activity. The refolded purified enzyme displayed optimal activity at 30 °C and was cold-active with retention of 50% activity at 10 °C. It is worth noting that the optimal pH was 11, and the low relative activity below pH 10 revealed that RhLip was an alkaliphilic esterase. The enzyme was active toward short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (C2-C6), displaying optimal activity with the butyrate (C4) ester. In addition, the enzyme revealed a good organic solvent and salt tolerance. These features make this an interesting enzyme for exploitation in some industrial applications.

  2. Cultural Competency Training in the United States Marine Corps: A Prescription for Success in the Long War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-13

    Dating and marriage •Role of children •Role of elders Clothing •Headwear •Clothing •Footwear Urban vs. Rural •Effect on culture Diet •Type...cultural norms for interacting with women and children . Marines learn about Iraqi expectations regarding interactions with women and children , how...the treatment of women affects the honor of Iraqi males and strategies for successfully interacting with Iraqi women and children in different

  3. Ornamental Marine Species Culture in the Coral Triangle: Seahorse Demonstration Project in the Spermonde Islands, Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Susan L.; Janetski, Noel; Abbott, Jessica; Blankenhorn, Sven; Cheng, Brian; Crafton, R. Eliot; Hameed, Sarah O.; Rapi, Saipul; Trockel, Dale

    2014-12-01

    Ornamental marine species (`OMS') provide valuable income for developing nations in the Indo-Pacific Coral Triangle, from which most of the specimens are exported. OMS culture can help diversify livelihoods in the region, in support of management and conservation efforts to reduce destructive fishing and collection practices that threaten coral reef and seagrass ecosystems. Adoption of OMS culture depends on demonstrating its success as a livelihood, yet few studies of OMS culture exist in the region. We present a case study of a land-based culture project for an endangered seahorse ( Hippocampus barbouri) in the Spermonde Islands, Sulawesi, Indonesia. The business model demonstrated that culturing can increase family income by seven times. A Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis indicated good collaboration among diverse stakeholders and opportunities for culturing non-endangered species and for offshoot projects, but complicated permitting was an issue as were threats of market flooding and production declines. The OMS international market is strong, Indonesian exporters expressed great interest in cultured product, and Indonesia is the largest exporting country for H. barbouri. Yet, a comparison of Indonesia ornamental marine fish exports to fish abundance in a single local market indicated that OMS culture cannot replace fishing livelihoods. Nevertheless, seahorse and other OMS culture can play a role in management and conservation by supplementing and diversifying the fishing and collecting livelihoods in the developing nations that provide the majority of the global OMS.

  4. Ornamental marine species culture in the coral triangle: seahorse demonstration project in the Spermonde Islands, Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Williams, Susan L; Janetski, Noel; Abbott, Jessica; Blankenhorn, Sven; Cheng, Brian; Crafton, R Eliot; Hameed, Sarah O; Rapi, Saipul; Trockel, Dale

    2014-12-01

    Ornamental marine species ('OMS') provide valuable income for developing nations in the Indo-Pacific Coral Triangle, from which most of the specimens are exported. OMS culture can help diversify livelihoods in the region, in support of management and conservation efforts to reduce destructive fishing and collection practices that threaten coral reef and seagrass ecosystems. Adoption of OMS culture depends on demonstrating its success as a livelihood, yet few studies of OMS culture exist in the region. We present a case study of a land-based culture project for an endangered seahorse (Hippocampus barbouri) in the Spermonde Islands, Sulawesi, Indonesia. The business model demonstrated that culturing can increase family income by seven times. A Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats (SWOT) analysis indicated good collaboration among diverse stakeholders and opportunities for culturing non-endangered species and for offshoot projects, but complicated permitting was an issue as were threats of market flooding and production declines. The OMS international market is strong, Indonesian exporters expressed great interest in cultured product, and Indonesia is the largest exporting country for H. barbouri. Yet, a comparison of Indonesia ornamental marine fish exports to fish abundance in a single local market indicated that OMS culture cannot replace fishing livelihoods. Nevertheless, seahorse and other OMS culture can play a role in management and conservation by supplementing and diversifying the fishing and collecting livelihoods in the developing nations that provide the majority of the global OMS.

  5. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production.

  6. Identification of a New Marine Bacterial Strain SD8 and Optimization of Its Culture Conditions for Producing Alkaline Protease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hongxia; Yang, Muyang; Wang, Liping; Xian, Cory J.

    2015-01-01

    While much attention has been given to marine microorganisms for production of enzymes, which in general are relatively more stable and active compared to those from plants and animals, studies on alkaline protease production from marine microorganisms have been very limited. In the present study, the alkaline protease producing marine bacterial strain SD8 isolated from sea muds in the Geziwo Qinhuangdao sea area of China was characterized and its optimal culture conditions were investigated. Strain SD8 was initially classified to belong to genus Pseudomonas by morphological, physiological and biochemical characterizations, and then through 16S rDNA sequence it was identified to be likely Pseudomonas hibiscicola. In addition, the culture mediums, carbon sources and culture conditions of strain SD8 were optimized for maximum production of alkaline protease. Optimum enzyme production (236U/mL when cultured bacteria being at 0.75 mg dry weight/mL fermentation broth) was obtained when the isolate at a 3% inoculum size was grown in LB medium at 20 mL medium/100mL Erlenmeyer flask for 48h culture at 30°C with an initial of pH 7.5. This was the first report of strain Pseudomonas hibiscicola secreting alkaline protease, and the data for its optimal cultural conditions for alkaline protease production has laid a foundation for future exploration for the potential use of SD8 strain for alkaline protease production. PMID:26716833

  7. Archaeology Meets Marine Ecology: The Antiquity of Maritime Cultures and Human Impacts on Marine Fisheries and Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlandson, Jon M.; Rick, Torben C.

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinary study of coastal archaeological sites provides a wealth of information on the ecology and evolution of ancient marine animal populations, the structure of past marine ecosystems, and the history of human impacts on coastal fisheries. In this paper, we review recent methodological developments in the archaeology and historical ecology of coastal regions around the world. Using two case studies, we examine (a) a deep history of anthropogenic effects on the marine ecosystems of California's Channel Islands through the past 12,000 years and (b) geographic variation in the effects of human fishing on Pacific Island peoples who spread through Oceania during the late Holocene. These case studies—the first focused on hunter-gatherers, the second on maritime horticulturalists—provide evidence for shifting baselines and timelines, documenting a much deeper anthropogenic influence on many coastal ecosystems and fisheries than considered by most ecologists, conservation biologists, and fisheries managers.

  8. Archaeology meets marine ecology: the antiquity of maritime cultures and human impacts on marine fisheries and ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, Jon M; Rick, Torben C

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinary study of coastal archaeological sites provides a wealth of information on the ecology and evolution of ancient marine animal populations, the structure of past marine ecosystems, and the history of human impacts on coastal fisheries. In this paper, we review recent methodological developments in the archaeology and historical ecology of coastal regions around the world. Using two case studies, we examine (a) a deep history of anthropogenic effects on the marine ecosystems of California's Channel Islands through the past 12,000 years and (b) geographic variation in the effects of human fishing on Pacific Island peoples who spread through Oceania during the late Holocene. These case studies--the first focused on hunter-gatherers, the second on maritime horticulturalists-provide evidence for shifting baselines and timelines, documenting a much deeper anthropogenic influence on many coastal ecosystems and fisheries than considered by most ecologists, conservation biologists, and fisheries managers.

  9. Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream…

  10. Ohio Biotechnology Competency Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob; Boudreau, Joyce

    This document, which lists the biotechnology competencies identified by representatives from biotechnology businesses and industries as well as secondary and post-secondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing college tech prep programs that will prepare students from secondary through…

  11. Biotechnology and Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Martin

    Even at this early date in the application of biotechnology to agriculture, it is clear that agriculture may provide the largest market for new or less expensive biotechnologically manufactured products. The chemical and pharmaceutical industries that hold important positions in agricultural inputs are consolidating their positions by purchasing…

  12. Biotechnology and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Biological Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Summarizes a Royal Society report on the educational implications of the growth of biotechnology (application of biological organisms, systems, or processes to manufacturing and service industries). Eighteen recommendations are made including the inclusion of biotechnological content into science curricula. (Author/JN)

  13. Biotechnology Laboratory Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert H.; Kompala, Dhinakar S.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a course entitled "Biotechnology Laboratory" which introduces a variety of laboratory methods associated with biotechnology. Describes the history, content, and seven experiments of the course. The seven experiments are selected from microbiology and molecular biology, kinetics and fermentation, and downstream…

  14. Selective microbial electrosynthesis of methane by a pure culture of a marine lithoautotrophic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Beese-Vasbender, Pascal F; Grote, Jan-Philipp; Garrelfs, Julia; Stratmann, Martin; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2015-04-01

    Reduction of carbon dioxide to methane by microorganisms attached to electrodes is a promising process in terms of renewable energy storage strategies. However the efficient and specific electrosynthesis of methane by methanogenic archaea on cathodes needs fundamental investigations of the electron transfer mechanisms at the microbe-electrode interface without the addition of artificial electron mediators. Using well-defined electrochemical techniques directly coupled to gas chromatography and surface analysis by scanning electron microscopy, it is shown that a pure culture of the marine lithoautotrophic Methanobacterium-like archaeon strain IM1 is capable to utilize electrons from graphite cathodes for a highly selective production of methane, without hydrogen serving as a cathode-generated electron carrier. Microbial electrosynthesis of methane with cultures of strain IM1 is achieved at a set potential of -0.4V vs. SHE and is characterized by a coulomb efficiency of 80%, with rates reaching 350 nmol d(-1) cm(-2) after 23 days of incubation. Moreover, potential step measurements reveal a biologically catalyzed hydrogen production at potentials more positive than abiotic hydrogen evolution on graphite, indicating that an excessive supply of electrons to strain IM1 results in proton reduction rather than in a further increase of methane production.

  15. In vitro culture technique for Cryptocaryon irritans, a parasitic ciliate of marine teleosts.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi; Akiyama, Kousuke; Nishida, Sayoko; Nakane, Motoyuki; Ogawa, Kazuo; Hirose, Hitomi

    2007-12-13

    A medium for the in vitro culture of Cryptocaryon irritans, which is an obligatorily parasitic ciliate of marine teleosts and causes 'white spot disease', was developed. The medium consisted of a layer of cultured fish cells (FHM), with an agarose gel layer covering the cell layer. The agarose gel contained 0.22% agarose, 10% fetal calf serum, 100 I.U. ml(-1) Penicillin G potassium and 100 microg ml(-1) streptomycin sulphate. Theronts of C. irritans transformed to trophonts and grew to 180 microm in mean length in the medium, although they gradually decreased in number. When trophonts fully developed in medium were transferred into seawater 4 d after inoculation, approximately 70% of them transformed to encysted tomonts and released theronts. When fish were challenged with theronts obtained from in vitro-raised parasites, approximately 40% of the theronts were recovered from fish, indicating comparative infectivity of in vitro-raised theronts to those of in vivo-raised theronts. This is the first report that C. irritans fully developed in vitro and its entire life cycle was completed without a host fish.

  16. Effects of culture medium compositions on antidiabetic activity and anticancer activity of marine endophitic bacteria isolated from sponge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maryani, Faiza; Mulyani, Hani; Artanti, Nina; Udin, Linar Zalinar; Dewi, Rizna Triana; Hanafi, Muhammad; Murniasih, Tutik

    2017-01-01

    High diversity of Indonesia marine spesies and their ability in producing secondary metabolite that can be used as a drug candidate cause this fascinating topic need to explore. Most of marine organisms explored to discover drug is macroorganism whereas microorganism (such as Indonesia marine bacteria) is very limited. Therefore, in this report, antidiabetic and anticancer activity of Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from Sponges's extract have been studied. Bacteria strain 8.9 which are collection of Research Center for Oseanography, Indonesian Institute of Sciences were from Barrang Lompo Island, Makasar, Indonesia. Bacteria were cultured in different culture medium compositions (such as: different pH, source of glucose and water) for 48 hours on a shaker, then they were extracted with ethyl asetate. Extracts of bacteria were tested by DPPH method (antioxidant activity), alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity method (antidiabetic activity), and Alamar Blue assay (anticancer activity) at 200 ppm. According to result, extract of bacteria in pH 8.0 exhibited the greatest antioxidant (19.27% inhibition), antidiabetic (63.95% inhibition) and anticancer activity of T47D cell line (44.62% cell viability) compared to other extracts. However, effect of addition of sugar sources (such as: glucose, sucrose, and soluble starch) and effect of addition of water/sea water exhibited less influence on their bioactivities. In conclusion, Indonesia marine bacteria isolated from sponge have potential a source of bioactive compound in drug discovery field.

  17. Cryopreservation of the unicellular marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata.

    PubMed

    Poncet, Jean-Marc; Véron, Benoît

    2003-12-01

    In microalgal culture collections, as in many biological resource centres, cryoconservation is the most attractive method for the long-term, secure storage of living material. Nannochloropsis oculata, a marine unicellular alga, is of interest in the field of biotechnology due to its high lipid content. Of various cryoprotectants tested for their toxicity and for their ability to prevent cryoinjury, glycerol (final concentration 1.1 M) was the most efficient. When glycerol-treated cultures were submitted to a strictly regulated cooling rate (-3 degrees C min(-1)), they attained the control culture density within 13 d after thawing.

  18. Modern biotechnology in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Zhao; Zhao, Xue-Ming

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, with the booming economy, the Chinese government has increased its financial input to biotechnology research, which has led to remarkable achievements by China in modern biotechnology. As one of the key parts of modern biotechnology, industrial biotechnology will be crucial for China's sustainable development in this century. This review presents an overview of Chinese industrial biotechnology in last 10 years. Modern biotechnology had been classified into metabolic engineering and systems biology framework. Metabolic engineering is a field of broad fundamental and practical concept so we integrated the related technology achievements into the real practices of many metabolic engineering cases, such as biobased products production, environmental control and others. Now metabolic engineering is developing towards the systems level. Chinese researchers have also embraced this concept and have contributed invaluable things in genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and related bioinformatics. A series of advanced laboratories or centers were established which will represent Chinese modern biotechnology development in the near future. At the end of this review, metabolic network research advances have also been mentioned.

  19. Modern Biotechnology in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qing-Zhao; Zhao, Xue-Ming

    In recent years, with the booming economy, the Chinese government has increased its financial input to biotechnology research, which has led to remarkable achievements by China in modern biotechnology. As one of the key parts of modern biotechnology, industrial biotechnology will be crucial for China's sustainable development in this century. This review presents an overview of Chinese industrial biotechnology in last 10 years. Modern biotechnology had been classified into metabolic engineering and systems biology framework. Metabolic engineering is a field of broad fundamental and practical concept so we integrated the related technology achievements into the real practices of many metabolic engineering cases, such as biobased products production, environmental control and others. Now metabolic engineering is developing towards the systems level. Chinese researchers have also embraced this concept and have contributed invaluable things in genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and related bioinformatics. A series of advanced laboratories or centers were established which will represent Chinese modern biotechnology development in the near future. At the end of this review, metabolic network research advances have also been mentioned.

  20. Comparison of Marine Microalgae Culture Systems for Fuels Production and Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, Joseph C.; Polle, Juergen

    2006-05-30

    The dual problems of global fossil fuels supplies and global warming focus attention on the need to develop technologies that can provide large amounts of renewable fuels without contributing to global warming. The capture of power plant flue gas CO2 using microalgae cultures is one potential technology that could meet this objective. The central R&D issues are the design and operation of low-cost algal mass culture systems and the development of algal strains and cultivation techniques that can achieve very high biomass productivities. The major objective of this project was to develop mass culture techniques that could result in greatly increased biomass productivities, well above the about 50 metric tons per hectare per year (mt/ha/y) currently achievable. In this project, two marine microalgae species, the diatom Cyclotella sp.. and the green alga Tetraselmis sp., were cultivated on seawater in both open ponds and closed photo bioreactors, under a variety of different cultivation conditions. Simultaneous operation of the closed photo bioreactors and open ponds demonstrated similar productivities, under the same operating conditions. Thus the very expensive closed systems do not provide any major or inherent advantages in microalgae production over open ponds. Mutants of Cyclotella sp. were developed that exhibited reduced pigment content, which theoretically would result in greatly increased productivities when grown under full sunlight. However, in open ponds, these mutant strains exhibited similar productivities as the parental strains. The mutant strains all grew relatively slowly, suggesting that additional mutations masked whatever inherent potential for increased productivities may have resulted from the reduced pigment content. Research is still required to develop improved low pigment strains. When open pond cultures were exposed to intermittent sunlight, by partially covering the ponds with slats, solar conversion efficiencies increased

  1. Corporate intelligence in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Persidis

    1999-05-01

    'Know thy neighbor' is a critical component of today's biotechnology practice. The industry is extremely rich in science and business information, and the pace of change is dramatic. Successful participation in biotechnology will always depend on good technology, management and money. In addition, an ingredient that needs more attention is competitive information- gathering and analysis. Competitive intelligence can be defined as actionable information that requires the ability to filter and synthesize relevant knowledge for the benefit of the company. Why is this necessary? How can it be done well? What examples are there? These are good questions that are inevitably faced by all biotechnology practitioners, and some answers are provided herein.

  2. Marine pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, D J

    2000-02-01

    Marine organisms have provided a large proportion of the bioactive natural products reported over the last 20 years, but none of these compounds have reached the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review describes current progress in the development of a selection of new antiinflammatory and anticancer agents, discusses some difficulties encountered during the development process and suggests how these difficulties may be overcome in the near future through applications of recent advances in biotechnology.

  3. The Biotechnology Facility for International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas; Lundquist, Charles; Hurlbert, Katy; Tuxhorn, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    The primary mission of the Cellular Biotechnology Program is to advance microgravity as a tool in basic and applied cell biology. The microgravity environment can be used to study fundamental principles of cell biology and to achieve specific applications such as tissue engineering. The Biotechnology Facility (BTF) will provide a state-of-the-art facility to perform cellular biotechnology research onboard the International Space Station (ISS). The BTF will support continuous operation, which will allow performance of long-duration experiments and will significantly increase the on-orbit science throughput. With the BTF, dedicated ground support, and a community of investigators, the goals of the Cellular Biotechnology Program at Johnson Space Center are to: Support approximately 400 typical investigator experiments during the nominal design life of BTF (10 years). Support a steady increase in investigations per year, starting with stationary bioreactor experiments and adding rotating bioreactor experiments at a later date. Support at least 80% of all new cellular biotechnology investigations selected through the NASA Research Announcement (NRA) process. Modular components - to allow sequential and continuous experiment operations without cross-contamination Increased cold storage capability (+4 C, -80 C, -180 C). Storage of frozen cell culture inoculum - to allow sequential investigations. Storage of post-experiment samples - for return of high quality samples. Increased number of cell cultures per investigation, with replicates - to provide sufficient number of samples for data analysis and publication of results in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

  4. The relationship between Holocene cultural site distribution and marine terrace uplift on the coast fringing Coastal Range, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsiaochin; Chen, Wenshan

    2013-04-01

    According to the collision of Philippine Sea plate and Eurasia plate, a series of left-lateral active faults with reverse sense exists in the Longitudinal Valley of east Taiwan. The Holocene marine terraces along the east coast of the Coastal Range in Taiwan are well known for their very rapid uplift and record tectonic history of this active collision boundary. The Holocene marine terrace sequence resulting from successive sea level change and tectonic activation is subdivided into several steps where the highest and oldest terrace, back to ca 13,000yr BP, reaches up to ca 80 m above sea level, and the lower terraces are mostly erosional ones, overlain by less than 1m thick coral beds in situ. The uplift of the coast is very high, ranging from 5 to 10 m/ka. According to the fabrics of potsherds and geochronological data, the prehistoric cultures in eastern Taiwan could be classified into three stages: Fushan (ca 5000-3500yr BP), Peinan/Chilin (ca3500-2000yr BP), Kweishan (ca2000-1000 yr BP) and Jinpu (ca 1000-400yr BP) cultural assemblages respectively. A great difference exists between the various cultural stage, not only the pottery making techniques, but also the distributions of archaeological sites. Combined with the dynamic geomorphic evolution of marine terraces and the distribution of prehistoric culture sites on the east coast of the Coastal Range, a coastal migration trend could be established.

  5. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  6. Traditional Chinese Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Dong; Fan, Wen Lai; Mu, Xiao Qing; Chen, Jian

    The earliest industrial biotechnology originated in ancient China and developed into a vibrant industry in traditional Chinese liquor, rice wine, soy sauce, and vinegar. It is now a significant component of the Chinese economy valued annually at about 150 billion RMB. Although the production methods had existed and remained basically unchanged for centuries, modern developments in biotechnology and related fields in the last decades have greatly impacted on these industries and led to numerous technological innovations. In this chapter, the main biochemical processes and related technological innovations in traditional Chinese biotechnology are illustrated with recent advances in functional microbiology, microbial ecology, solid-state fermentation, enzymology, chemistry of impact flavor compounds, and improvements made to relevant traditional industrial facilities. Recent biotechnological advances in making Chinese liquor, rice wine, soy sauce, and vinegar are reviewed.

  7. Employment Prospects in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jerry D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Described is a survey of firms which hire biologists. Summarized are required knowledge, skills, qualifications, and attributes required of candidates; types of jobs being filled; and methods of finding qualified candidates. Careers in biotechnology areas are highlighted. (CW)

  8. Traditional Chinese biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Dong; Fan, Wen Lai; Mu, Xiao Qing; Chen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    The earliest industrial biotechnology originated in ancient China and developed into a vibrant industry in traditional Chinese liquor, rice wine, soy sauce, and vinegar. It is now a significant component of the Chinese economy valued annually at about 150 billion RMB. Although the production methods had existed and remained basically unchanged for centuries, modern developments in biotechnology and related fields in the last decades have greatly impacted on these industries and led to numerous technological innovations. In this chapter, the main biochemical processes and related technological innovations in traditional Chinese biotechnology are illustrated with recent advances in functional microbiology, microbial ecology, solid-state fermentation, enzymology, chemistry of impact flavor compounds, and improvements made to relevant traditional industrial facilities. Recent biotechnological advances in making Chinese liquor, rice wine, soy sauce, and vinegar are reviewed.

  9. Analytical Challenges in Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glajch, Joseph L.

    1986-01-01

    Highlights five major analytical areas (electrophoresis, immunoassay, chromatographic separations, protein and DNA sequencing, and molecular structures determination) and discusses how analytical chemistry could further improve these techniques and thereby have a major impact on biotechnology. (JN)

  10. Biotechnology at the Cutting Edge - Keasling

    SciTech Connect

    Keasling, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab ALD for Biosciences and CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute, appears in a video on biotechnology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The video is part of en exhibit titled "Science in American Life," which examines the relationship between science, technology, progress and culture through artifacts, historical photographs and multimedia technology.

  11. Biotechnology, fermentation, foods and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Wesley, P.

    1981-02-01

    This article reviews the future of biotechnology in the food industry - the continuing development of methods for controlled fermentation and enzyme reaction, combined with the projected culturing of new and useful organisms through gene-splicing. At present, the largest enzyme market in the food industry is for glucose isomerase to convert glucose to high-fructose corn syrup.

  12. Biotechnology at the Cutting Edge - Keasling

    ScienceCinema

    Keasling, Jay

    2016-07-12

    Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab ALD for Biosciences and CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute, appears in a video on biotechnology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The video is part of en exhibit titled "Science in American Life," which examines the relationship between science, technology, progress and culture through artifacts, historical photographs and multimedia technology.

  13. Public Germplasm Collections and Revolutions in Biotechnology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Public germplasm collections provided the biological material critical for launching the three most important revolutions in modern biotechnology: (i) An isolate of Penicillium chrysogenum, NRRL 1951, the basis for industrial production of penicillan, originated from the ARS Culture Collection in Pe...

  14. Improving biotechnology communication.

    PubMed

    Weitze, Marc-Denis; Pühler, Alfred

    2013-09-01

    Successful dialog between science and the public is vital for the development and introduction of new technologies. The National Academy of Science and Engineering in Germany has analysed experiences gained from controversies and communication strategies surrounding green genetic engineering and other fields of biotechnology, from a communications and social science viewpoint, as well as a historical perspective. From this, recommendations on how to communicate biotechnology in the future, with objectivity and balance, have been derived.

  15. Public perceptions of biotechnology.

    PubMed

    McHughen, Alan

    2007-09-01

    The very term 'Biotechnology' elicits a range of emotions, from wonder and awe to downright fear and hostility. This is especially true among non-scientists, particularly in respect of agricultural and food biotechnology. These emotions indicate just how poorly understood agricultural biotechnology is and the need for accurate, dispassionate information in the public sphere to allow a rational public debate on the actual, as opposed to the perceived, risks and benefits of agricultural biotechnology. This review considers first the current state of public knowledge on agricultural biotechnology, and then explores some of the popular misperceptions and logical inconsistencies in both Europe and North America. I then consider the problem of widespread scientific illiteracy, and the role of the popular media in instilling and perpetuating misperceptions. The impact of inappropriate efforts to provide 'balance' in a news story, and of belief systems and faith also impinges on public scientific illiteracy. Getting away from the abstract, we explore a more concrete example of the contrasting approach to agricultural biotechnology adoption between Europe and North America, in considering divergent approaches to enabling coexistence in farming practices. I then question who benefits from agricultural biotechnology. Is it only the big companies, or is it society at large--and the environment--also deriving some benefit? Finally, a crucial aspect in such a technologically complex issue, ordinary and intelligent non-scientifically trained consumers cannot be expected to learn the intricacies of the technology to enable a personal choice to support or reject biotechnology products. The only reasonable and pragmatic alternative is to place trust in someone to provide honest advice. But who, working in the public interest, is best suited to provide informed and accessible, but objective, advice to wary consumers?

  16. Toxicological effects of cypermethrin to marine phytoplankton in a co-culture system under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Yue, Wen-Jie

    2011-08-01

    The growth of three marine phytoplankton species Skeletonema costatum, Scrippsiella trochoidea and Chattonella marina and the response of the antioxidant defense system have been investigated on exposure to commercial cypermethrin for 96 h and 32 days in a co-culture system. Growth of the three species was generally comparable over 96 h with an inoculation of 1:3:6.5 (C. marina:S. trochoidea:S. costatum), with stimulation at 5 μg l(-1) and inhibition under higher concentrations (50, 100 μg l(-1)). However, when inoculating at ratios of 1:1:1 during a 32 day test, S. costatum became the most sensitive species and was significantly inhibited in all test groups under the dual stresses of cypermethrin and interspecies competition. The growth of C. marina was significantly inhibited at the concentrations higher than 5 μg l(-1), while the growth of S. trochoidea was significantly promoted at low concentrations. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities significantly increased during 6-12 h exposure periods in test treatments at low concentrations, and enhanced in the control as well due to interspecies competition. The lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde was enhanced at high concentrations, but did not increase in control and low concentration cultures with high SOD activities, indicating that algal cells activated the antioxidant enzymes promptly to protect the cells from lipid membrane damage. Results from this study suggested that cypermethrin pollution in maricultural sea waters might lead to a shift in phytoplankton community structure from diatom to harmful dinoflagellate species, and thus potentially stimulatory for harmful algal blooms.

  17. Fungal biodiversity to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Chambergo, Felipe S; Valencia, Estela Y

    2016-03-01

    Fungal habitats include soil, water, and extreme environments. With around 100,000 fungus species already described, it is estimated that 5.1 million fungus species exist on our planet, making fungi one of the largest and most diverse kingdoms of eukaryotes. Fungi show remarkable metabolic features due to a sophisticated genomic network and are important for the production of biotechnological compounds that greatly impact our society in many ways. In this review, we present the current state of knowledge on fungal biodiversity, with special emphasis on filamentous fungi and the most recent discoveries in the field of identification and production of biotechnological compounds. More than 250 fungus species have been studied to produce these biotechnological compounds. This review focuses on three of the branches generally accepted in biotechnological applications, which have been identified by a color code: red, green, and white for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and industrial biotechnology, respectively. We also discuss future prospects for the use of filamentous fungi in biotechnology application.

  18. Culturing and environmental DNA sequencing uncover hidden kinetoplastid biodiversity and a major marine clade within ancestrally freshwater Neobodo designis.

    PubMed

    von der Heyden, Sophie; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Bodonid flagellates (class Kinetoplastea) are abundant, free-living protozoa in freshwater, soil and marine habitats, with undersampled global biodiversity. To investigate overall bodonid diversity, kinetoplastid-specific PCR primers were used to amplify and sequence 18S rRNA genes from DNA extracted from 16 diverse environmental samples; of 39 different kinetoplastid sequences, 35 belong to the subclass Metakinetoplastina, where most group with the genus Neobodo or the species Bodo saltans, whilst four group with the subclass Prokinetoplastina (Ichthyobodo). To study divergence between freshwater and marine members of the genus Neobodo, 26 new Neobodo designis strains were cultured and their 18S rRNA genes were sequenced. It is shown that the morphospecies N. designis is a remarkably ancient species complex with a major marine clade nested among older freshwater clades, suggesting that these lineages were constrained physiologically from moving between these environments for most of their long history. Other major bodonid clades show less-deep separation between marine and freshwater strains, but have extensive genetic diversity within all lineages and an apparently biogeographically distinct distribution of B. saltans subclades. Clade-specific 18S rRNA gene primers were used for two N. designis subclades to test their global distribution and genetic diversity. The non-overlap between environmental DNA sequences and those from cultures suggests that there are hundreds, possibly thousands, of different rRNA gene sequences of free-living bodonids globally.

  19. Language and Culture Training: Opportunities Exist to Improve Visibility and Sustainment of Knowledge and Skills in Army and Marine Corps General Purpose Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Language Strategy (Dec. 27, 2010); and Marine Corps Order 7220.52E, Foreign Language Proficiency Pay ( FLPP ) Program (June 6, 2006). 8See, for...070-11, Army Culture and Foreign Language Strategy (Dec. 27, 2010) and Marine Corps Order 7220.52E, Foreign Language Proficiency Pay ( FLPP ) Program...DOD Language Testing Program (Jan. 26, 2009), and Marine Corps Order 7220.52E, Foreign Language Proficiency Pay ( FLPP ) Program (June 6, 2006

  20. A comparative study on the phylogenetic diversity of culturable actinobacteria isolated from five marine sponge species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Yan; Jin, Meifang; Yu, Xingju

    2008-03-01

    A cultivation-based approach was employed to compare the culturable actinobacterial diversity associated with five marine sponge species (Craniella australiensis, Halichondria rugosa, Reniochalina sp., Sponge sp., and Stelletta tenuis). The phylogenetic affiliation of the actinobacterial isolates was assessed by 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis. A total of 181 actinobacterial strains were isolated using five different culture media (denoted as M1-M5). The type of medium exhibited significant effects on the number of actinobacteria recovered, with the highest number of isolates on M3 (63 isolates) and the lowest on M1 (12 isolates). The genera isolated were also different, with the recovery of three genera on M2 and M3, and only a single genus on M1. The number of actinobacteria isolated from the five sponge species was significantly different, with a count of 83, 36, 30, 17, and 15 isolates from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, Sponge sp., Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis, respectively. M3 was the best isolation medium for recovery of actinobacteria from S. tenuis, H. rugosa, and Sponge sp., while no specific medium preference was observed for the recovery of actinobacteria from Reniochalina sp., and C. australiensis. The RFLP fingerprinting of 16S rDNA genes digested with HhaI revealed six different patterns, in which 16 representative 16S rDNAs were fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that 12 strains belong to the group Streptomyces, three strains belong to Pseudonocardia, and one strain belongs to Nocardia. Two strains C14 (from C. australiensis) and N13 (from Sponge sp.) have only 96.26% and 96.27% similarity to earlier published sequences, and are therefore potential candidates for new species. The highest diversity of three actinobacteria genera was obtained from Sponge sp., though the number of isolates was low. Two genera of actinobacteria, Streptomyces, and Pseudonocardia, were isolated from both S. tenuis and C. australiensis. Only the genus of Streptomyces

  1. Effect of marine coral prostanoids, clavulones, on spontaneous beating rate of cultured myocardial cells from fetal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Honda, A; Hong, S; Yamada, Y; Mori, Y

    1991-06-01

    We examined effects of newly discovered marine coral prostanoids, clavulones, isolated from the Japanese stolonifer Clavularia viridis, on the spontaneous beating rate of cultured myocardial cells from fetal mouse hearts. Clavulone caused positive chronotropic action at 2-5 min after addition of clavulone (0.45 microM) to the reaction media of cardiac cells. This effect induced by clavulone was clearly different from the positive inotropic effects of ouabain (10 microM) and Bay K 8644 (0.1 microM) as judged by photoelectric recordings of beating. These results suggest a new biological action of clavulone that has positive chronotropic action on the cultured mouse myocyte preparation.

  2. Evaluation of antibiotics as a methodological procedure to inhibit free-living and biofilm bacteria in marine zooplankton culture.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Vanessa O; Macedo, Alexandre J; Muxagata, Erik

    2016-01-01

    There is a problem with keeping culture medium completely or partially free from bacteria. The use of prokaryotic metabolic inhibitors, such as antibiotics, is suggested as an alternative solution, although such substances should not harm non-target organisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments in inhibiting free-living and biofilm bacteria and their half-life in artificial marine environment using the copepod Acartia tonsa as bioindicador of non-harmful antibiotic combinations. Regarding to results, the application of 0.025 g L-1 penicillin G potassium + 0.08 g L-1 streptomycin sulphate + 0.04 g L-1 neomycin sulphate showed great potential for use in marine cultures and scientific experiments without lethal effects to non-target organisms. The effect of this combination starts within the first six hours of exposure and reduces up to 93 % the bacterial density, but the half-life is short, requiring replacement. No adverse changes in water quality were observed within 168 hours of exposure. As a conclusion, we can infer that this treatment was an effective procedure for zooplankton cultures and scientific experiments with the aim of measuring the role of free-living and biofilm in the marine community.

  3. Marine Diatom Plasmids and their Biotechnological Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-27

    plasmid is homologous to the Tn21-type transposable elements. The element carries an open reading frame encoding a DNA invertase gene. Sequence comparisons...of regions upstream and downstream of the invertase gene indicate that the diatom plasmid is most similar to the Staphylococcus aureus transposon...the highly prokaryotic nature (i.e., codon usage bias, promoter sequences, etc.) of the invertase gene we have sequenced, we have tentatively

  4. Selected Chitinase Genes in Cultured and Uncultured Marine Bacteria in the α- and γ-Subclasses of the Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Matthew T.; Wood, Daniel N.; Yu, Liying; Kirchman, David L.

    2000-01-01

    PCR primers were patterned after chitinase genes in four γ-proteobacteria in the families Alteromonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae (group I chitinases) and used to explore the occurrence and diversity of these chitinase genes in cultured and uncultured marine bacteria. The PCR results from 104 bacterial strains indicated that this type of chitinase gene occurs in two major groups of marine bacteria, α- and γ-proteobacteria, but not the Cytophaga-Flavobacter group. Group I chitinase genes also occur in some viruses infecting arthropods. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that similar group I chitinase genes occur in taxonomically related bacteria. However, the overall phylogeny of chitinase genes did not correspond to the phylogeny of 16S rRNA genes, possibly due to lateral transfer of chitinase genes between groups of bacteria, but other mechanisms, such as gene duplication, cannot be ruled out. Clone libraries of chitinase gene fragments amplified from coastal Pacific Ocean and estuarine Delaware Bay bacterioplankton revealed similarities and differences between cultured and uncultured bacteria. We had hypothesized that cultured and uncultured chitin-degrading bacteria would be very different, but in fact, clones having nucleotide sequences identical to those of chitinase genes of cultured α-proteobacteria dominated both libraries. The other clones were similar but not identical to genes in cultured γ-proteobacteria, including vibrios and alteromonads. Our results suggest that a closer examination of chitin degradation by α-proteobacteria will lead to a better understanding of chitin degradation in the ocean. PMID:10698791

  5. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    PubMed Central

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus. Special attention is paid to the fundamentals of biochemistry and accumulation of citric acid. Technologies employed at industrial scale such as surface or submerged cultures, mainly employing Aspergillus niger, and processes carried out with Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as the technology for recovering the product are also described. Finally, this review summarizes the use of orange peels and other by-products as feedstocks for the bioproduction of citric acid. PMID:24031566

  6. Biotechnology takes root in the third world

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, A.

    1990-05-25

    Biotechnology offers the hope of increasing crop yields in the highland of communist Viet Nam. Thirty Vietnamese families have been culturing potato seedlings for planting. Their potato progeny earn the families $100 to $120 a month, a considerable sum in rural Viet Nam. Some of the farmers are starting to use the same techniques to propagate other vegetables in vitro. This is proof that biotechnology can be beneficial in developing nations. Now agriculture in countries from Indonesia to Ecuador is gaining from biotechnology, thereby helping them compete in the international marketplace. Third World leaders want their own biotech centers and to set their own research agendas, rather than relying on the First World to decide what genetically engineered crops would be most useful for them.

  7. Applications of Protein Hydrolysates in Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Holmes, Chris; Demain, Arnold L.

    By definition, protein hydrolysates are the products that are obtained after the hydrolysis of proteins and this can be achieved by enzymes, acid or alkali. This broad definition encompasses all the products of protein hydrolysis - peptides, amino acids and minerals present in the protein and acid/alkali used to adjust pH (Pasupuleti 2006). Protein hydrolysates contain variable side chains depending on the enzymes used. These side chains could be carboxyl, amino, imidazole, sulfhydryl, etc. and they may exert specific physiological roles in animal, microbial, insect and plant cells. This introductory chapter reviews the applications of protein hydrolysates in biotechnology. The word biotechnology is so broad and for the purpose of this book, we define it as a set of technologies such as cell culture technology, bioprocessing technology that includes fermentations, genetic engineering technology, microbiology, and so on. This chapter provides introduction and leads to other chapters on manufacturing and applications of protein hydrolysates in biotechnology.

  8. Comparison of n-eicosane and phenanthrene removal by pure and mixed cultures of two marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Syakti, A D; Acquaviva, M; Gilewicz, M; Doumenq, P; Bertrand, J C

    2004-10-01

    The biotransformation activities of two hydrocarbonoclastic marine bacteria, Corynebacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. 2MPII, on n-eicosane and phenanthrene were investigated. During a 56-day experiment, in pure and mixed cultures, Corynebacterium sp. and Sphingomonas sp. 2MPII removed about 70% of the initial n-eicosane and phenanthrene concentrations (1 and 0.4 g L(-1), respectively). In pure cultures, culturable cell abundances increased over time, from 0.8 to 8.6 x 10(-11) CFU L(-1) (Corynebacterium sp.) and from 2.1 to 16 x 10(-11) CFU L(-1) (Sphingomonas sp. 2MPII ) but remained barely constant in mixed cultures. We defined a biotransformation index based on the number of culturable cells rather than the culture protein content, with the biotransformation cell yield (BCY) expressed in grams hydrocarbon CFU(-1) per day to better characterize hydrocarbon removal in pure and mixed cultures. The BCY was markedly higher in mixed than in pure cultures, increasing by a factor of 2-10.7 and 2.3-4.7 for n-eicosane and phenanthrene removal, respectively.

  9. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  10. Commercialization of animal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Faber, D C; Molina, J A; Ohlrichs, C L; Vander Zwaag, D F; Ferré, L B

    2003-01-01

    Commercialization of animal biotechnology is a wide-ranging topic for discussion. In this paper, we will attempt to review embryo transfer (ET) and related technologies that relate to food-producing mammals. A brief review of the history of advances in biotechnology will provide a glimpse to present and future applications. Commercialization of animal biotechnology is presently taking two pathways. The first application involves the use of animals for biomedical purposes. Very few companies have developed all of the core competencies and intellectual properties to complete the bridge from lab bench to product. The second pathway of application is for the production of animals used for food. Artificial insemination (AI), embryo transfer, in vitro fertilization (IVF), cloning, transgenics, and genomics all are components of the toolbox for present and future applications. Individually, these are powerful tools capable of providing significant improvements in productivity. Combinations of these technologies coupled with information systems and data analysis, will provide even more significant change in the next decade. Any strategies for the commercial application of animal biotechnology must include a careful review of regulatory and social concerns. Careful review of industry infrastructure is also important. Our colleagues in plant biotechnology have helped highlight some of these pitfalls and provide us with a retrospective review. In summary, today we have core competencies that provide a wealth of opportunities for the members of this society, commercial companies, producers, and the general population. Successful commercialization will benefit all of the above stakeholders. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. [Biotechnology's macroeconomic impact].

    PubMed

    Dones Tacero, Milagros; Pérez García, Julián; San Román, Antonio Pulido

    2008-12-01

    This paper tries to yield an economic valuation of biotechnological activities in terms of aggregated production and employment. This valuation goes beyond direct estimation and includes the indirect effects derived from sectorial linkages between biotechnological activities and the rest of economic system. To deal with the proposed target several sources of data have been used, including official data from National Statistical Office (INE) such us national accounts, input-output tables, and innovation surveys, as well as, firms' level balance sheets and income statements and also specific information about research projects compiled by Genoma Spain Foundation. Methodological approach is based on the estimation of a new input-output table which includes the biotechnological activities as a specific branch. This table offers both the direct impact of these activities and the main parameters to obtain the induced effects over the rest of the economic system. According to the most updated available figures, biotechnological activities would have directly generated almost 1,600 millions of euros in 2005, and they would be employed more than 9,000 workers. But if we take into account the full linkages with the rest of the system, the macroeconomic impact of Biotechnological activities would reach around 5,000 millions euros in production terms (0.6% of total GDP) and would be responsible, directly or indirectly, of more than 44,000 employments.

  12. Genetic diversity in cultured and wild marine cyanomyoviruses reveals phosphorus stress as a strong selective agent.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Libusha; Ding, Huiming; Huang, Katherine H; Osburne, Marcia S; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2013-09-01

    Viruses that infect marine cyanobacteria-cyanophages-often carry genes with orthologs in their cyanobacterial hosts, and the frequency of these genes can vary with habitat. To explore habitat-influenced genomic diversity more deeply, we used the genomes of 28 cultured cyanomyoviruses as references to identify phage genes in three ocean habitats. Only about 6-11% of genes were consistently observed in the wild, revealing high gene-content variability in these populations. Numerous shared phage/host genes differed in relative frequency between environments, including genes related to phosphorous acquisition, photorespiration, photosynthesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, possibly reflecting environmental selection for these genes in cyanomyovirus genomes. The strongest emergent signal was related to phosphorous availability; a higher fraction of genomes from relatively low-phosphorus environments-the Sargasso and Mediterranean Sea-contained host-like phosphorus assimilation genes compared with those from the N. Pacific Gyre. These genes are known to be upregulated when the host is phosphorous starved, a response mediated by pho box motifs in phage genomes that bind a host regulatory protein. Eleven cyanomyoviruses have predicted pho boxes upstream of the phosphate-acquisition genes pstS and phoA; eight of these have a conserved cyanophage-specific gene (PhCOG173) between the pho box and pstS. PhCOG173 is also found upstream of other shared phage/host genes, suggesting a unique regulatory role. Pho boxes are found upstream of high light-inducible (hli) genes in cyanomyoviruses, suggesting that this motif may have a broader role than regulating phosphorous-stress responses in infected hosts or that these hlis are involved in the phosphorous-stress response.

  13. Biological N2O Fixation in the Eastern South Pacific Ocean and Marine Cyanobacterial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Farías, Laura; Faúndez, Juan; Fernández, Camila; Cornejo, Marcela; Sanhueza, Sandra; Carrasco, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of nitrous oxide (N2O) in the global radiative balance and atmospheric ozone chemistry, its sources and sinks within the Earth’s system are still poorly understood. In the ocean, N2O is produced by microbiological processes such as nitrification and partial denitrification, which account for about a third of global emissions. Conversely, complete denitrification (the dissimilative reduction of N2O to N2) under suboxic/anoxic conditions is the only known pathway accountable for N2O consumption in the ocean. In this work, it is demonstrated that the biological assimilation of N2O could be a significant pathway capable of directly transforming this gas into particulate organic nitrogen (PON). N2O is shown to be biologically fixed within the subtropical and tropical waters of the eastern South Pacific Ocean, under a wide range of oceanographic conditions and at rates ranging from 2 pmol N L−1 d− to 14.8 nmol N L−1 d−1 (mean ± SE of 0.522±1.06 nmol N L−1 d−1, n = 93). Additional assays revealed that cultured cyanobacterial strains of Trichodesmium (H-9 and IMS 101), and Crocosphaera (W-8501) have the capacity to directly fix N2O under laboratory conditions; suggesting that marine photoautotrophic diazotrophs could be using N2O as a substrate. This metabolic capacity however was absent in Synechococcus (RCC 1029). The findings presented here indicate that assimilative N2O fixation takes place under extreme environmental conditions (i.e., light, nutrient, oxygen) where both autotrophic (including cyanobacteria) and heterotrophic microbes appear to be involved. This process could provide a globally significant sink for atmospheric N2O which in turn affects the oceanic N2O inventory and may also represent a yet unexplored global oceanic source of fixed N. PMID:23717516

  14. Tidal flushing time of marine fish culture zones in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jing-Qiao; Wong, Ken T. M.; Lee, Joseph H. W.; Choi, K. W.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate determination of flushing time is crucial for maintaining sustainable production in fish culture zones (FCZs), as it represents the physical self-purification capability via tidal exchange with clean water in the outer sea. However, owing to the temporal and spatial complexity of the coastal flushing process, existing methods for determining flushing time may not be generally applicable. In this paper, a systematic method for determining the flushing time in FCZs is presented, in which bathymetry, runoff, tidal range and stratification are properly accounted for. We determine the flushing time via numerical tracer experiments, using robust 3D hydrodynamic and mass transport models. For FCZs located in sheltered and land-locked tidal inlets, the system boundary can be naturally defined at the connection with the open sea. For FCZs located in open waters, hydrodynamic tracking is first used to assess the extent of tidal excursion and thus delimit the initial boundary between clean water and polluted water. This general method is applied to all designated marine FCZs in Hong Kong for both the dry and wet seasons, including 20 sheltered FCZs (in semi-enclosed waters of Tolo Harbour, Mirs Bay, and Port Shelter) and 6 FCZs in open waters. Our results show that flushing time is the longest in inner Port Shelter (about 40 days in dry season), and the shortest for the FCZs in open waters (less than one week in dry season). In addition, the flushing time in dry season is commonly longer than that in wet season: 20%˜40% for most well-sheltered FCZs; 2.6˜4 times for the others. Our results indicate a positive correlation between the flushing time and distance to open boundary, supporting the view that the flushing time of a FCZ is closely related to its location. This study provides a solid basis for mariculture management such as the determination of carrying capacity of FCZs.

  15. Advances in reproductive biotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, K. K.; Kavya, K. M.; Jerome, A.; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, reproductive biotechnologies have emerged and started to replace the conventional techniques. It is noteworthy that for sustained livestock productivity, it is imperative to start using these techniques for facing the increasing challenges for productivity, reproduction and health with impending environment conditions. These recent biotechniques, both in male and female, have revolutionized and opened avenues for studying and manipulating the reproductive process both in vitro and in vivo in various livestock species for improving tis efficiency. This review attempts to highlight pros and cons, on the recent developments in reproductive biotechnologies, both in male and female in livestock species. PMID:27182135

  16. Culturable diversity and antimicrobial activity of Actinobacteria from marine sediments in Valparaíso bay, Chile.

    PubMed

    Claverías, Fernanda P; Undabarrena, Agustina; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Marine-derived Actinobacteria are a source of a broad variety of secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities, such as antibiotics and antitumorals; many of which have been developed for clinical use. Rare Actinobacteria represent an untapped source of new bioactive compounds that have been scarcely recognized. In this study, rare Actinobacteria from marine sediments were isolated from the Valparaíso bay, Chile, and their potential to produce antibacterial compounds was evaluated. Different culture conditions and selective media that select the growth of Actinobacteria were used leading to the isolation of 68 bacterial strains. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences led to identifying isolates that belong to the phylum Actinobacteria with genetic affiliations to 17 genera: Aeromicrobium, Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Flaviflexus, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Janibacter, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Ornithinimicrobium, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tessaracoccus. Also, one isolate could not be consistently classified and formed a novel phylogenetic branch related to the Nocardiopsaceae family. The antimicrobial activity of these isolates was evaluated, demonstrating the capability of specific novel isolates to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, this study shows a rich biodiversity of culturable Actinobacteria, associated to marine sediments from Valparaíso bay, highlighting novel rare Actinobacteria, and their potential for the production of biologically active compounds.

  17. Culturable diversity and antimicrobial activity of Actinobacteria from marine sediments in Valparaíso bay, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Claverías, Fernanda P.; Undabarrena, Agustina; González, Myriam; Seeger, Michael; Cámara, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Marine-derived Actinobacteria are a source of a broad variety of secondary metabolites with diverse biological activities, such as antibiotics and antitumorals; many of which have been developed for clinical use. Rare Actinobacteria represent an untapped source of new bioactive compounds that have been scarcely recognized. In this study, rare Actinobacteria from marine sediments were isolated from the Valparaíso bay, Chile, and their potential to produce antibacterial compounds was evaluated. Different culture conditions and selective media that select the growth of Actinobacteria were used leading to the isolation of 68 bacterial strains. Comparative analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences led to identifying isolates that belong to the phylum Actinobacteria with genetic affiliations to 17 genera: Aeromicrobium, Agrococcus, Arthrobacter, Brachybacterium, Corynebacterium, Dietzia, Flaviflexus, Gordonia, Isoptericola, Janibacter, Microbacterium, Mycobacterium, Ornithinimicrobium, Pseudonocardia, Rhodococcus, Streptomyces, and Tessaracoccus. Also, one isolate could not be consistently classified and formed a novel phylogenetic branch related to the Nocardiopsaceae family. The antimicrobial activity of these isolates was evaluated, demonstrating the capability of specific novel isolates to inhibit the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, this study shows a rich biodiversity of culturable Actinobacteria, associated to marine sediments from Valparaíso bay, highlighting novel rare Actinobacteria, and their potential for the production of biologically active compounds. PMID:26284034

  18. Optimization of culturing condition and medium composition for the production of alginate lyase by a marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaoting; Lin, Hong; Kim, Sang Moo

    2008-02-01

    Carbohydrases secreted by marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34 with strong Laminaria cell wall degrading ability were screened, and among them alginate lyase was found to be dominant. The effects of medium composition and culturing condition on the production of alginate lyase by marine Vibrio sp. YKW-34 in flask were investigated in this study. In the culture medium of marine broth, no alginate lyase was produced. The activity of the alginate lyase, after being induced, reached 5 UmL-1. The best inoculum volume and inoculum age were 10% and 12 h, respectively. The optimal temperature for alginate lyase production was 25°C. The fermentation medium was composed of 0.5% of Laminaria powder and 0.2% of KNO3 with an initial acidity of pH 8.0. Alginate could induce alginate lyase production but not as efficiently as Laminaria powder did. The addition of fucoidan, cellulose and glucose had negative effect on the alginate lyase production. Other kinds of nitrogen sources, such as yeast extract, beef extract and peptone, had positive effect on the growth of the microorganism and negative effect on alginate lyase production. In addition, the time course of alginate lyase production under the optimized condition was described. The optimal harvest time was 48 h.

  19. Growth rates and rRNA content of four marine bacteria in pure cultures and in the Delaware estuary.

    PubMed

    Lankiewicz, Thomas S; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L

    2016-04-01

    Interpretation of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) to 16S rRNA gene ratios (rRNA:rDNA) is based on a limited number of studies with rapidly growing copiotrophic bacteria. The most abundant bacteria in the ocean are oligotrophs, which probably grow more slowly than those bacteria whose rRNA:rDNA versus growth rate relationships are known. To examine whether rRNA:rDNA varies differently in oligotrophic marine bacteria than in copiotrophic bacteria, we used quantitative PCR and reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR to measure rRNA:rDNA in two marine copiotrophs and in two marine oligotrophs, including Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique HTCC1062, a coastal isolate of SAR11, the most abundant bacterial clade in the ocean. The rRNA:rDNA ratios for the two copiotrophs were similar to those expected on the basis of an analysis of previously studied copiotrophic bacteria, while the ratios for the two oligotrophs were substantially lower than predicted even given their slow growth rates. The rRNA:rDNA ratios determined along a transect in the Delaware estuary suggested that SAR11 bacteria grow at rates close to the growth rate in culture, while rates of the two copiotrophs were far below those observed in laboratory cultures. Our results have implications for interpreting rRNA:rDNA from natural communities, understanding growth strategies and comparing regulatory mechanisms in copiotrophs and oligotrophs.

  20. Disclosing Biology Teachers' Beliefs about Biotechnology and Biotechnology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Maria Joao; Costa, Patricio; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Teachers have been shown to frequently avoid addressing biotechnology topics. Aiming to understand the extent to which teachers' scarce engagement in biotechnology teaching is influenced by their beliefs and/or by extrinsic constraints, such as practical limitations, this study evaluates biology teachers' beliefs about biotechnology and…

  1. Disclosing Biology Teachers' Beliefs about Biotechnology and Biotechnology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Maria Joao; Costa, Patricio; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Teachers have been shown to frequently avoid addressing biotechnology topics. Aiming to understand the extent to which teachers' scarce engagement in biotechnology teaching is influenced by their beliefs and/or by extrinsic constraints, such as practical limitations, this study evaluates biology teachers' beliefs about biotechnology and…

  2. Projector Center. What Is Biotechnology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Bill; Case, Christine L.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a menu designed to illustrate some classical examples of fermentation. This may be used to discuss biotechnology from a technological perspective. Other examples of biotechnology used in the foods industry are described. (CW)

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT OF BIOTECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last two decades have shown remarkable advances in the field of biotechnology. We hav processes using biotechnology to produce materials from commodity chemicals to pharmaceuticals. The application to agriculture gas shown the introduction of transgenic crops with pesticidal ...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT OF BIOTECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last two decades have shown remarkable advances in the field of biotechnology. We hav processes using biotechnology to produce materials from commodity chemicals to pharmaceuticals. The application to agriculture gas shown the introduction of transgenic crops with pesticidal ...

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT OF BIOTECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last two decades have shown remarkable advances in the field of biotechnology. We have processes using biotechnology to produce materials from commodity chemicals to pharmaceuticals. The application to agriculture has shown the introduction of transgenic crops with pesticidal...

  6. Projector Center. What Is Biotechnology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belzer, Bill; Case, Christine L.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a menu designed to illustrate some classical examples of fermentation. This may be used to discuss biotechnology from a technological perspective. Other examples of biotechnology used in the foods industry are described. (CW)

  7. Grassroots Strategies for Confronting Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassanein, Neva

    1993-01-01

    Describes strategies used by the Biotechnology Working Group during their efforts to influence state and local policy concerning biotechnology issues. Strategies address methods for framing the issue, educating self and others, recruiting allies, and developing citizen pressure. (MDH)

  8. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK MANAGEMENT OF BIOTECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The last two decades have shown remarkable advances in the field of biotechnology. We have processes using biotechnology to produce materials from commodity chemicals to pharmaceuticals. The application to agriculture has shown the introduction of transgenic crops with pesticidal...

  9. A culturally appropriate program that works: Native Americans in Marine and Space Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergun, J. R.

    2001-05-01

    For more than ten years, the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University has carried out the Native Americans in Marine and Space Sciences (NAMSS) Program. Its long-term goal is to increase the number of American Indian and Native Alaskan undergraduates in science who complete degrees, continue to graduate school and enter the professional scientific work force. Ninety-eight percent of NAMSS students have earned BS degrees and almost forty percent have continued in graduate school. These are impressive results considering the high national drop-out rate for Native American studentsaround 70% according to the Chronicle of Higher Education (26 May 1993, page A29). Most often, Native students wishing to earn degrees in science find few programs that fit with their traditional sense of place and community. Most programs are narrowly focused and do not support or nurture Native views of interrelationship of all things. While Western science's recent ecological systems thinking approach more closely resembles the traditional Native view, Traditional Ecological Knowledge is often perceived as anecdotal or storytelling and not real science. This is a problem for Native students who are strongly underrepresented in the U.S. scientific community as a whole and nearly absent from the marine sciences. Undergraduates from this group are without scientific career models or mentors from their ethnic group and experience difficulty establishing contacts with majority scientists. They have limited access to opportunities to explore career possibilities in the sciences through research participation. Once on campus they have difficulty establishing a sense of belonging in the University community and do not have an organized way to enter into the scientific activities that initially attracted them. Representation of Native Americans in the ranks of U.S. scientists will not be increased without special efforts to retain them as undergraduates and to recruit

  10. Biotechnology, Ethics and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimons, Peter John

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental differences between current and past knowledge in the field of biotechnology mean that we now have at our disposal the means to irreversibly change what is meant by "human nature". This paper explores some of the ethical issues that accompany the (as yet tentative) attempt to increase scientific control over the human genetic code in…

  11. TSCA Biotechnology Notifications Status

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Notifications Table lists only those submissions received under the Biotechnology Regulation, beginning in 1998. From the Table, you can link to a brief summary of select submission and, in many cases, to a fact sheet on the decision reached by OPPT.

  12. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  13. Biotechnology of trees: Chestnut

    Treesearch

    C.D. Nelson; W.A. Powell; S.A. Merkle; J.E. Carlson; F.V. Hebard; N Islam-Faridi; M.E. Staton; L. Georgi

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology has been practiced on chestnuts (Castanea spp.) for many decades, including vegetative propagation, controlled crossing followed by testing and selection, genetic and cytogenetic mapping, genetic modifi cation, and gene and genome sequencing. Vegetative propagation methods have ranged from grafting and rooting to somatic embryogenesis, often in...

  14. State responses to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Harris, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews biotechnology legislation in the 50 states for 11 policy areas spanning 1990-2010, an era of immense growth in biotechnology, genetic knowledge, and significant policy development. Policies regarding health insurance, life insurance, long-term care insurance, DNA data bank collection, biotech research protection, biotech promotion and support, employment discrimination, genetic counselor licensing, human cloning, and genetic privacy each represent major policy responses arising from biotechnology and coinciding with key areas of state regulation (insurance, criminal justice, economic development, labor law, health and safety, privacy, and property rights). This analysis seeks to answer three questions regarding biotechnology legislation at the state level: who is acting (policy adoption), when is policy adopted (policy timing), and what is policy doing (policy content). Theoretical concerns examine state ideology (conservative or liberal), policy type (economic or moral), and the role of external events (federal law, news events, etc.) on state policy adoption. Findings suggest ideological patterns in adoption, timing, and content of biotech policy. Findings also suggest economic policies tend to be more uniform in content than moral policies, and findings also document a clear link between federal policy development, external events, and state policy response.

  15. Biotechnology in weed control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biotechnology can be used to enhance the management of weeds in several ways. Crops have been made resistant to herbicides by inserting transgenes that impart herbicide resistance into the plant genome. Glyphosate and glufosinate-resistant crops are commercialized in North America and crops made res...

  16. BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In accordance with EPA's mission to minimize risks to human health and to safeguard ecological integrity, the EPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) is committed to assessing and mitigating any risk posed by biotechnology-derived crops. Consequently, ...

  17. BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In accordance with EPA's mission to minimize risks to human health and to safeguard ecological integrity, the EPA Office of Prevention, Pesticides, and Toxic Substances (OPPTS) is committed to assessing and mitigating any risk posed by biotechnology-derived crops. Consequently, ...

  18. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  19. Biotechnology and derived products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microorganisms able to infect and kill insect pests, metabolites from plants and microorganisms, and transgenic crops are biotechnologically derived products that are being promoted for use to control insect pests in lieu of chemical insecticides. Products based on these technologies effectively co...

  20. Transgenic mammals and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Westphal, H

    1989-02-01

    Biotechnology has begun to realize the enormous potential of transgenic technology: mice with human genes that produce human proteins of therapeutic value in their milk, pigs that express bovine genes that help them gain weight and lose backfat, animals with engineered gene defects that mimic human genetic diseases.

  1. Biotechnology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program quide presents the biotechnology curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The general information section contains the following: purpose and objectives; program description, including admissions, typical job titles, and accreditation and certification; and curriculum model, including standard curriculum sequence and lists of…

  2. Popular misconceptions: agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    McHughen, Alan; Wager, Robert

    2010-12-31

    Agricultural biotechnology, especially genetic engineering or genetic modification (GM), is a topic of considerable controversy worldwide. The public debate is fraught with polarized views and opinions, some are held with religious zeal. Unfortunately, it is also marked with much ignorance and misinformation. Here we explore some popular misconceptions encountered in the public debate.

  3. Biotechnology, Ethics and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimons, Peter John

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental differences between current and past knowledge in the field of biotechnology mean that we now have at our disposal the means to irreversibly change what is meant by "human nature". This paper explores some of the ethical issues that accompany the (as yet tentative) attempt to increase scientific control over the human genetic code in…

  4. Applied biotechnology in nematology.

    PubMed

    Caswell-Chen, E P; Williamson, V M; Westerdahl, B B

    1993-12-01

    During the past two decades, rapid advances in biotechnology and molecular biology have affected the understanding and treatment of human and plant diseases. The human and Caenorhabditis elegans genome-sequencing projects promise further techniques and results useful to applied nematology. Of course, biotechnology is not a panacea for nematological problems, but it provides many powerful tools that have potential use in applied biology and nematode management. The tools will facilitate research on a range of previously intractable problems in nematology, from identification of species and pathotypes to the development of resistant cultivars that have been inaccessible because of technical limitations. However, to those unfamiliar or not directly involved with the new technologies and their extensive terminology, the benefits of the advances in biotechnology may not be readily discerned. The sustainable agriculture of the future will require ecology-based management, and successful integrated nematode management will depend on combinations of control tactics to reduce nematode numbers. In this review we discuss how biotechnology may influence nematode management, define terminology relative to potential applications, and present current and future avenues of research in applied nematology, including species identification, race and pathotype identification, development of resistant cultivars, definition of nematode-host interactions, nematode population dynamics, establishment of optimal rotations, the ecology of biological control and development of useful biological control agents, and the design of novel nematicides.

  5. Abiraterone. Cougar Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Madan, Ravi A; Arlen, Philip M

    2006-01-01

    Abiraterone is an oral, selective, steroidal inhibitor of cytochrome P450(17alpha) being developed by Cougar Biotechnology Inc for the potential treatment of prostate cancer. Phase I clinical trials of abiraterone have been conducted and the design of phase I/II clinical trials is being finalized.

  6. The Challenge in Teaching Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, F.; Aubusson, P.

    2004-01-01

    Agriculture, industry and medicine are being altered by new biotechnologies. Biotechnology education is important because today's students and citizens will make decisions about the development and application of these new molecular biologies. This article reports an investigation of the teaching of biotechnology in an Australian state, New South…

  7. The Challenge in Teaching Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, F.; Aubusson, P.

    2004-01-01

    Agriculture, industry and medicine are being altered by new biotechnologies. Biotechnology education is important because today's students and citizens will make decisions about the development and application of these new molecular biologies. This article reports an investigation of the teaching of biotechnology in an Australian state, New South…

  8. The Ohio Science Workbook: Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reames, Spencer E., Comp.

    Because of the daily impact of biotechnology, it is important that students have some knowledge and experience with biotechnology in order to enable them to deal with the issues that arise as a result of its implementation. The purpose of this workbook is to assist in the efforts to expose students to the concepts of biotechnology through hands-on…

  9. Marine enzymes.

    PubMed

    Debashish, Ghosh; Malay, Saha; Barindra, Sana; Joydeep, Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    Marine enzyme biotechnology can offer novel biocatalysts with properties like high salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity, cold adaptivity, and ease in large-scale cultivation. This review deals with the research and development work done on the occurrence, molecular biology, and bioprocessing of marine enzymes during the last decade. Exotic locations have been accessed for the search of novel enzymes. Scientists have isolated proteases and carbohydrases from deep sea hydrothermal vents. Cold active metabolic enzymes from psychrophilic marine microorganisms have received considerable research attention. Marine symbiont microorganisms growing in association with animals and plants were shown to produce enzymes of commercial interest. Microorganisms isolated from sediment and seawater have been the most widely studied, proteases, carbohydrases, and peroxidases being noteworthy. Enzymes from marine animals and plants were primarily studied for their metabolic roles, though proteases and peroxidases have found industrial applications. Novel techniques in molecular biology applied to assess the diversity of chitinases, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia-metabolizing, and pollutant-degrading enzymes are discussed. Genes encoding chitinases, proteases, and carbohydrases from microbial and animal sources have been cloned and characterized. Research on the bioprocessing of marine-derived enzymes, however, has been scanty, focusing mainly on the application of solid-state fermentation to the production of enzymes from microbial sources.

  10. Coral-Associated Actinobacteria: Diversity, Abundance, and Biotechnological Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Huda M.; Kalendar, Aisha A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with three types of coral thriving in a thermally stressed coral reef system north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different culturable actinobacterial communities have been found to be associated with different coral hosts. Differences in the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria were detected between the mucus and tissue of the same coral host. In addition, temporal and spatial variations in the abundance and diversity of the cultivable actinobacterial communities were detected. In total, 19 different actinobacterial genera, namely Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Renibacterium, Nocardia, Microbacterium, Dietzia, Cellulomonas, Ornithinimicrobium, Rhodococcus, Agrococcus, Kineococcus, Dermacoccus, Devriesea, Kocuria, Marmoricola, and Arthrobacter, were isolated from the coral tissue and mucus samples. Furthermore, 82 isolates related to Micromonospora, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces showed antimicrobial activities against representative Gram-positive and/or Gram-negative bacteria. Even though Brevibacterium and Kocuria were the most dominant actinobacterial isolates, they failed to show any antimicrobial activity, whereas less dominant genera, such as Streptomyces, did show antimicrobial activity. Focusing on the diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria may help to understand how corals thrive under harsh environmental conditions and may lead to the discovery of novel antimicrobial metabolites with potential biotechnological applications. PMID:26973601

  11. Coral-Associated Actinobacteria: Diversity, Abundance, and Biotechnological Potentials.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Huda M; Kalendar, Aisha A

    2016-01-01

    Marine Actinobacteria, particularly coral-associated Actinobacteria, have attracted attention recently. In this study, the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria associated with three types of coral thriving in a thermally stressed coral reef system north of the Arabian Gulf were investigated. Coscinaraea columna, Platygyra daedalea and Porites harrisoni have been found to harbor equivalent numbers of culturable Actinobacteria in their tissues but not in their mucus. However, different culturable actinobacterial communities have been found to be associated with different coral hosts. Differences in the abundance and diversity of Actinobacteria were detected between the mucus and tissue of the same coral host. In addition, temporal and spatial variations in the abundance and diversity of the cultivable actinobacterial communities were detected. In total, 19 different actinobacterial genera, namely Micrococcus, Brachybacterium, Brevibacterium, Streptomyces, Micromonospora, Renibacterium, Nocardia, Microbacterium, Dietzia, Cellulomonas, Ornithinimicrobium, Rhodococcus, Agrococcus, Kineococcus, Dermacoccus, Devriesea, Kocuria, Marmoricola, and Arthrobacter, were isolated from the coral tissue and mucus samples. Furthermore, 82 isolates related to Micromonospora, Brachybacterium, Nocardia, Micrococcus, Arthrobacter, Rhodococcus, and Streptomyces showed antimicrobial activities against representative Gram-positive and/or Gram-negative bacteria. Even though Brevibacterium and Kocuria were the most dominant actinobacterial isolates, they failed to show any antimicrobial activity, whereas less dominant genera, such as Streptomyces, did show antimicrobial activity. Focusing on the diversity of coral-associated Actinobacteria may help to understand how corals thrive under harsh environmental conditions and may lead to the discovery of novel antimicrobial metabolites with potential biotechnological applications.

  12. How can developing countries harness biotechnology to improve health?

    PubMed Central

    Daar, Abdallah S; Berndtson, Kathryn; Persad, Deepa L; Singer, Peter A

    2007-01-01

    Background The benefits of genomics and biotechnology are concentrated primarily in the industrialized world, while their potential to combat neglected diseases in the developing world has been largely untapped. Without building developing world biotechnology capacity to address local health needs, this disparity will only intensify. To assess the potential of genomics to address health needs in the developing world, the McLaughlin-Rotman Centre for Global Health, along with local partners, organized five courses on Genomics and Public Health Policy in the developing world. The overall objective of the courses was to collectively explore how to best harness genomics to improve health in each region. This article presents and analyzes the recommendations from all five courses. Discussion In this paper we analyze recommendations from 232 developing world experts from 58 countries who sought to answer how best to harness biotechnology to improve health in their regions. We divide their recommendations into four categories: science; finance; ethics, society and culture; and politics. Summary The Courses' recommendations can be summarized across the four categories listed above: Science - Collaborate through national, regional, and international networks - Survey and build capacity based on proven models through education, training, and needs assessments Finance - Develop regulatory and intellectual property frameworks for commercialization of biotechnology - Enhance funding and affordability of biotechnology - Improve the academic-industry interface and the role of small and medium enterprise Ethics, Society, Culture - Develop public engagement strategies to inform and educate the public about developments in genomics and biotechnology - Develop capacity to address ethical, social and cultural issues - Improve accessibility and equity Politics - Strengthen understanding, leadership and support at the political level for biotechnology - Develop policies outlining

  13. Tauramamide, a lipopeptide antibiotic produced in culture by Brevibacillus laterosporus isolated from a marine habitat: structure elucidation and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Desjardine, Kelsey; Pereira, Alban; Wright, Helen; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Kelly, Michael; Andersen, Raymond J

    2007-12-01

    Tauramamide (1), a new lipopeptide antibiotic, is produced by cultures of the marine bacterial isolate Brevibacillus laterosporus PNG276 obtained from Papua New Guinea. Tauramamide was isolated as its methyl and ethyl esters 2 and 3, whose structures were elucidated by analysis of NMR, MS, and chemical degradation data. A total synthesis of tauramamide (1) and tauramamide ethyl ester (3) confirmed the structure proposed from spectroscopic analysis and provided the natural product for antimicrobial testing. Tauramamide (1) and ethyl ester 3 show potent and relatively selective inhibition of pathogenic Enterococcus sp.

  14. Lichens as natural sources of biotechnologically relevant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Marcelino T; Parrot, Delphine; Berg, Gabriele; Grube, Martin; Tomasi, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    The search for microorganisms from novel sources and in particular microbial symbioses represents a promising approach in biotechnology. In this context, lichens have increasingly become a subject of research in microbial biotechnology, particularly after the recognition that a diverse community of bacteria other than cyanobacteria is an additional partner to the traditionally recognized algae-fungus mutualism. Here, we review recent studies using culture-dependent as well as culture-independent approaches showing that lichens can harbor diverse bacterial families known for the production of compounds of biotechnological interest and that several microorganisms isolated from lichens, in particular Actinobacteria and Cyanobacteria, can produce a number of bioactive compounds, many of them with biotechnological potential.

  15. Use of statistics in plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Compton, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Statistics and experimental design are important tools for the plant biotechnologist and should be used when planning and conducting experiments as well as during the analysis and interpretation of results. This chapter provides some basic concepts important to the statistical analysis of data obtained from plant tissue culture or biotechnology experiments, and illustrates the application of common statistical procedures to analyze binomial, count, and continuous data for experiments with different treatment factors as well as identifying trends of dosage treatment factors.

  16. The culturable mycobiota of Flabellia petiolata: First survey of marine fungi associated to a Mediterranean green alga.

    PubMed

    Gnavi, Giorgio; Garzoli, Laura; Poli, Anna; Prigione, Valeria; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Varese, Giovanna Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Algae-inhabiting marine fungi represent a taxonomically and ecologically interesting group of microorganisms still largely neglected, especially in temperate regions. The aim of this study was to isolate and to identify the culturable mycobiota associated with Flabellia petiolata, a green alga frequently retrieved in the Mediterranean basin. Twenty algal thalli were collected from two different sampling sites in the Mediterranean Sea (Elba Island, Italy). A polyphasic approach showed the presence of a relevant alga-associated mycobiota with 64 taxa identified. The fungal isolates belonged mainly to Ascomycota (61 taxa), while only three Basidiomycota were detected. The phylogenetic position of sterile mycelia and cryptic taxa, inferred on the basis of LSU partial region, highlighted the presence of putative new phylogenetic lineages within Dothideomycetes and Sordariomycetes. This work represents the first quali-quantitative analysis of the culturable mycobiota associated to a green alga in the Mediterranean Sea.

  17. The culturable mycobiota of Flabellia petiolata: First survey of marine fungi associated to a Mediterranean green alga

    PubMed Central

    Garzoli, Laura; Poli, Anna; Prigione, Valeria; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Varese, Giovanna Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Algae-inhabiting marine fungi represent a taxonomically and ecologically interesting group of microorganisms still largely neglected, especially in temperate regions. The aim of this study was to isolate and to identify the culturable mycobiota associated with Flabellia petiolata, a green alga frequently retrieved in the Mediterranean basin. Twenty algal thalli were collected from two different sampling sites in the Mediterranean Sea (Elba Island, Italy). A polyphasic approach showed the presence of a relevant alga-associated mycobiota with 64 taxa identified. The fungal isolates belonged mainly to Ascomycota (61 taxa), while only three Basidiomycota were detected. The phylogenetic position of sterile mycelia and cryptic taxa, inferred on the basis of LSU partial region, highlighted the presence of putative new phylogenetic lineages within Dothideomycetes and Sordariomycetes. This work represents the first quali-quantitative analysis of the culturable mycobiota associated to a green alga in the Mediterranean Sea. PMID:28426712

  18. Electron shuttles in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuya; Manefield, Mike; Lee, Matthew; Kouzuma, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Electron-shuttling compounds (electron shuttles [ESs], or redox mediators) are essential components in intracellular electron transfer, while microbes also utilize self-produced and naturally present ESs for extracellular electron transfer. These compounds assist in microbial energy metabolism by facilitating electron transfer between microbes, from electron-donating substances to microbes, and/or from microbes to electron-accepting substances. Artificially supplemented ESs can create new routes of electron flow in the microbial energy metabolism, thereby opening up new possibilities for the application of microbes to biotechnology processes. Typical examples of such processes include halogenated-organics bioremediation, azo-dye decolorization, and microbial fuel cells. Herein we suggest that ESs can be applied widely to create new microbial biotechnology processes.

  19. Chemogenomics and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Wuster, Arthur; Madan Babu, M

    2008-05-01

    A robust knowledge of the interactions between small molecules and specific proteins aids the development of new biotechnological tools and the identification of new drug targets, and can lead to specific biological insights. Such knowledge can be obtained through chemogenomic screens. In these screens, each small molecule from a chemical library is applied to each cell type from a library of cells, and the resulting phenotypes are recorded. Chemogenomic screens have recently become very common and will continue to generate large amounts of data. The interpretation of this data will occupy biologists and chemists alike for some time to come. This review discusses methods for the acquisition and interpretation of chemogenomic data, in addition to possible applications of chemogenomics in biotechnology.

  20. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aromatic-Hydrocarbon-Degrading Marine Bacterium Found Associated with Laboratory Cultures of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Green, David H.; Nichols, Peter D.; Whitman, William B.; Semple, Kirk T.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1 ω7c, and C18:1 ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  1. In vitro cultures of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. (Chinese magnolia vine)--a potential biotechnological rich source of therapeutically important phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Agnieszka; Ekiert, Halina

    2012-04-01

    The contents of free phenolic acids and cinnamic acid were determined using an HPLC method in methanolic extracts from biomass of Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill. (Chinese magnolia vine) at different stages of organogenesis, cultured in vitro on a few variants of Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium, containing different concentrations of plant growth regulators 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) (from 0.1 to 3.0 mg/l) and in extracts from overground parts of plants growing in vivo. Six of 12 analysed compounds were detected in all extracts: chlorogenic, p-coumaric, p-hydroxybenzoic, protocatechuic, salicylic and syringic acids. Total contents of the examined metabolites in biomass of shoot-differentiating callus culture cultivated on six MS medium variants were dependent on concentrations of growth regulators in the media and ranged from 14.90 to 60.05 mg/100 g d.w. Total contents of the compounds in biomass extracts from undifferentiating callus culture maintained only on two of six MS medium variants were higher and amounted to 74.54 and 78.24 mg/100 g d.w. Maximum total contents of phenolic acids in both types of in vitro cultures were greater than in fruits (55.73 mg/100 g d.w.) and leaves (4.55 mg/100 g d.w.) of plants gowning in vivo. Chlorogenic acid and salicylic acid were the main compounds identified in biomass extracts of shoot-differentiating callus cultures (max 22.60 and 21.17 mg/100 g d.w., respectively), while chlorogenic acid (max 38.43 mg/100 g d.w.) and protocatechuic acid (max 20.95 mg/100 g d.w.) prevailed in the extracts from undifferentiating callus cultures. Other compounds dominated in fruits, namely p-coumaric acid (23.36 mg/100 g d.w.) and syringic acid (14.96 mg/100 g d.w.). This is the first report on biochemical potential of cells from S. chinensis in vitro cultures to produce the biologically active phenolic acids. These are the first results on the analysis of this group of metabolites in overground parts of

  2. New pharmaceuticals from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Fenical, W

    1997-09-01

    Definitions of 'marine biotechnology' often refer to the vast potential of the oceans to lead to new cures for human and animal disease; the exploitation of natural drugs has always been the most basic form of biotechnology. Although only initiated in the late 1970s, natural drug discovery from the world's oceans has been accelerated by the chemical uniqueness of marine organisms and by the need to develop drugs for contemporary, difficult to cure, diseases. Current research activities, while primarily within the academic laboratories, have generated convincing evidence that marine drug discovery has an exceedingly bright future.

  3. Inland marine fish culture in low-salinity recirculating aquaculture systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Expansion of marine aquaculture is challenged by the high cost and limited availability of coastal land and water resources, effluent concerns, high production costs, restricted growing seasons, lack of quality seedstock, and inadequate regulatory and permitting processes. Many of these constraints...

  4. Improved enrichment culture technique for methane-oxidizing bacteria from marine ecosystems: the effect of adhesion material and gas composition.

    PubMed

    Vekeman, Bram; Dumolin, Charles; De Vos, Paul; Heylen, Kim

    2017-02-01

    Cultivation of microbial representatives of specific functional guilds from environmental samples depends largely on the suitability of the applied growth conditions. Especially the cultivation of marine methanotrophs has received little attention, resulting in only a limited number of ex situ cultures available. In this study we investigated the effect of adhesion material and headspace composition on the methane oxidation activity in methanotrophic enrichments obtained from marine sediment. Addition of sterilized natural sediment or alternatively the addition of acid-washed silicon dioxide significantly increased methane oxidation. This positive effect was attributed to bacterial adhesion on the particles via extracellular compounds, with a minimum amount of particles required for effect. As a result, the particles were immobilized, thus creating a stratified environment in which a limited diffusive gas gradients could build up and various microniches were formed. Such diffusive gas gradient might necessitate high headspace concentrations of CH4 and CO2 for sufficient concentrations to reach the methane-oxidizing bacteria in the enrichment culture technique. Therefore, high concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide, in addition to the addition of adhesion material, were tested and indeed further stimulated methane oxidation. Use of adhesion material in combination with high concentrations of methane and carbon dioxide might thus facilitate the cultivation and subsequent enrichment of environmentally important members of this functional guild. The exact mechanism of the observed positive effects on methane oxidation and the differential effect on methanotrophic diversity still needs to be explored.

  5. Diversity of cold-active protease-producing bacteria from arctic terrestrial and marine environments revealed by enrichment culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hye; Cho, Kyeung Hee; Lee, Yung Mi; Yim, Joung Han; Lee, Hong Kum; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2010-08-01

    A new approach for enrichment culture was applied to obtain cold-active protease-producing bacteria for marine and terrestrial samples from Svalbard, Norway. The method was developed for the enrichment of bacteria by long-term incubation at low temperatures in semi-solid agar medium containing meat pieces as the main source of carbon and energy. ZoBell and 0.1x nutrient broth were added for marine and terrestrial microorganisms, respectively, to supply basal elements for growth. One to three types of colonies were observed from each enrichment culture, indicating that specific bacterial species were enriched during the experimental conditions. Among 89 bacterial isolates, protease activity was observed from 48 isolates in the screening media containing skim milk. Good growth was observed at 4 degrees C and 10 degrees C while none of the isolates could grow at 37 degrees C. At low temperatures, enzyme activity was equal to or higher than activity at higher temperatures. Bacterial isolates were included in the genera Pseudoalteromonas (33 isolates), Arthrobacter (24 isolates), Pseudomonas (16 isolates), Psychrobacter (6 isolates), Sphingobacterium (6 isolates), Flavobacterium (2 isolates), Sporosarcina (1 isolate), and Stenotrophomonas (1 isolate). Protease activity was observed from Pseudoalteromonas (33 isolates), Pseudomonas (10 isolates), Arthrobacter (4 isolates), and Flavobacterium (1 isolate).

  6. Isolation and characterization of a marine magnetotactic spirillum axenic culture QH-2 from an intertidal zone of the China Sea.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kailing; Pan, Hongmiao; Li, Jinhua; Yu-Zhang, Kui; Zhang, Sheng-Da; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Zhou, Ke; Yue, Haidong; Pan, Yongxin; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2010-05-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats. Because of their fastidious requirements for growth conditions, only very few axenic MTB cultures have been obtained worldwide. In this study, we report a novel marine magnetotactic spirillum axenic culture, designated as QH-2, isolated from the China Sea. It was able to grow in semi-solid or liquid chemically defined medium. The cells were amphitrichously flagellated and contained one single magnetosome chain with an average number of 16 magnetosomes per cell. Phosphate and lipid granules were also observed in the cells. Both rock magnetism and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy characterizations indicated that the magnetosomes in QH-2 were single-domain magnetites (Fe(3)O(4)). QH-2 cells swam mostly in a straight line at a velocity of 20-50 microm/s and occasionally changed to a helical motion. Unlike other magnetotactic spirilla, QH-2 cells responded to light illumination. As a consequence of illumination, the cells changed the direction in which they swam from parallel to the magnetic field to antiparallel. This response appears to be similar to the effect of an increase in [O(2)]. Analysis of the QH-2 16S rRNA sequence showed that it had greater than 11% sequence divergence from freshwater magnetotactic spirilla. Thus, the marine QH-2 strain seems to be both phylogenetically and magnetotactically distinct from the freshwater Magnetospirillum spp. studied previously. (c) 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Bryostatins: Biological context and biotechnological prospects

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-Silva, Amaro E.; Lim-Fong, Grace E.; Sharp, Koty H.; Haygood, Margo G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Bryostatins are a family of protein kinase C modulators that have potential applications in biomedicine. Found in miniscule quantities in a small marine invertebrate, lack of supply has hampered their development. In recent years, bryostatins have been shown to have potent bioactivity in the central nervous system, an uncultivated marine bacterial symbiont has been shown to be the likely natural source of the bryostatins, the bryostatin biosynthetic genes have been identified and characterized, and bryostatin analogues with promising biological activity have been developed and tested. Challenges in development of bryostatins for biomedical and biotechnological application include the cultivation of the bacterial symbiont and heterologous expression of bryostatin biosynthesis genes. Continued exploration of the biology and the symbiotic origin of the bryostatins presents promising opportunities for discovery of additional bryostatins, and new functions for bryostatins. PMID:20971628

  8. Isolation of Typical Marine Bacteria by Dilution Culture: Growth, Maintenance, and Characteristics of Isolates under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Schut, Frits; de Vries, Egbert J.; Gottschal, Jan C.; Robertson, Betsy R.; Harder, Wim; Prins, Rudolf A.; Button, Don K.

    1993-01-01

    Marine bacteria in Resurrection Bay near Seward, Alaska, and in the central North Sea off the Dutch coast were cultured in filtered autoclaved seawater following dilution to extinction. The populations present before dilution varied from 0.11 × 109 to 1.07 × 109 cells per liter. The mean cell volume varied between 0.042 and 0.074 μm3, and the mean apparent DNA content of the cells ranged from 2.5 to 4.7 fg of DNA per cell. All three parameters were determined by high-resolution flow cytometry. All 37 strains that were obtained from very high dilutions of Resurrection Bay and North Sea samples represented facultatively oligotrophic bacteria. However, 15 of these isolates were eventually obtained from dilution cultures that could initially be cultured only on very low-nutrient media and that could initially not form visible colonies on any of the agar media tested, indicating that these cultures contained obligately oligotrophic bacteria. It was concluded that the cells in these 15 dilution cultures had adapted to growth under laboratory conditions after several months of nutrient deprivation prior to isolation. From the North Sea experiment, it was concluded that the contribution of facultative oligotrophs and eutrophs to the total population was less than 1% and that while more than half of the population behaved as obligately oligotrophic bacteria upon first cultivation in the dilution culture media, around 50% could not be cultured at all. During one of the Resurrection Bay experiments, 53% of the dilution cultures obtained from samples diluted more than 2.5 × 105 times consisted of such obligate oligotrophs. These cultures invariably harbored a small rod-shaped bacterium with a mean cell volume of 0.05 to 0.06 μm3 and an apparent DNA content of 1 to 1.5 fg per cell. This cell type had the dimensions of ultramicrobacteria. Isolates of these ultramicrobacterial cultures that were eventually obtained on relatively high-nutrient agar plates were, with respect

  9. Biotechnology worldwide and the 'European Biotechnology Thematic Network' Association (EBTNA).

    PubMed

    Bruschi, F; Dundar, M; Gahan, P B; Gartland, K; Szente, M; Viola-Magni, M P; Akbarova, Y

    2011-09-01

    The European Biotechnology Congress 2011 held under the auspices of the European Biotechnology Thematic Network Association (EBTNA) in conjunction with the Turkish Medical Genetics Association brings together a broad spectrum of biotechnologists from around the world. The subsequent abstracts indicate the manner in which biotechnology has permeated all aspects of research from the basic sciences through to small and medium enterprises and major industries. The brief statements before the presentation of the abstracts aim to introduce not only Biotechnology in general and its importance around the world, but also the European Biotechnology Thematic Network Association and its aims especially within the framework of education and ethics in biotechnology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. "Othering" agricultural biotechnology: Slovenian media representation of agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zajc, Jožica; Erjavec, Karmen

    2014-08-01

    While studies on media representations of agricultural biotechnology mostly analyse media texts, this work is intended to fill a research gap with an analysis of journalistic interpretations of media representations. The purpose of this project was to determine how news media represent agricultural biotechnology and how journalists interpret their own representations. A content and critical discourse analysis of news texts published in the Slovenian media over two years and in-depth interviews with their authors were conducted. News texts results suggest that most of the news posts were "othering" biotechnology and biotechnologists: biotechnology as a science and individual scientists are represented as "they," who are socially irresponsible, ignorant, arrogant, and "our" enemies who produce unnatural processes and work for biotechnology companies, whose greed is destroying people, animals, and the environment. Most journalists consider these representations to be objective because they have published the biotechnologists' opinions, despite their own negative attitudes towards biotechnology.

  11. Teachers' Concerns About Biotechnology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Sadler, Troy D.; Koroly, Mary Jo

    2013-04-01

    The impacts of biotechnology are found in nearly all sectors of society from health care and food products to environmental issues and energy sources. Despite the significance of biotechnology within the sciences, it has not become a prominent trend in science education. In this study, we seek to more fully identify biology teachers' concerns about biotechnology instruction and their reported practices. Consistent with the Stages of Concern framework as modified by Hord et al., we investigated teachers' awareness, informational, personal, management, consequences, collaboration, and refocusing concerns about biotechnology teaching by employing a qualitative design that allowed for the emergence of teachers' ideas. Twenty high school life science teachers attending a biotechnology institute were interviewed using an interview protocol specifically designed to target various Stages of Concern. Although the Stages of Concern framework guided the development of interview questions in order to target a wide range of concerns, data analysis employed a grounded theory approach wherein patterns emerged from teachers' own words and were constantly compared with each other to generate larger themes. Our results have potential to provide guidance for professional development providers and curriculum developers committed to supporting initial implementation of biotechnology education. Recommendations include supporting teacher development of biotechnology content knowledge; promoting strategies for obtaining, storing and managing biotechnology equipment and materials; providing opportunities for peer teaching as a means of building teacher confidence; and highlighting career opportunities in biotechnology and the intersections of biotechnology and everyday life.

  12. Recent Major Advances of Biotechnology and Sustainable Aquaculture in China.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-08-01

    Global aquaculture production has increased continuously over the last five decades, and particularly in China. Its aquaculture has become the fastest growing and most efficient agri-sector, with production accounting for more than 70% of the world's aquaculture output. In the new century, with serious challenges regarding population, resources and the environment, China has been working to develop high-quality, effective, healthy, and sustainable blue agriculture through the application of modern biotechnology. Sound knowledge related to the biology and ecology of aquatic organisms has laid a solid foundation and provided the innovation and technology for rapid development of the aquaculture industry. Marine biotechnology, which is enabling solutions for ocean productivity and sustainability, has been promoted since the last decades of the 20th Century in China. In this article, priority areas of research, mainly genetic breeding, omics studies, novel production systems, biosecurity, bioprocesses and biorefinery, as well as the major progress of marine biotechnology R&D in China are reviewed. Current innovative achievements in China are not enough and the level and frequency of academic advancements must be improved. International cooperation and assistance remain crucial for the success of marine biotechnology.

  13. Recent Major Advances of Biotechnology and Sustainable Aquaculture in China

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    Background: Global aquaculture production has increased continuously over the last five decades, and particularly in China. Its aquaculture has become the fastest growing and most efficient agri-sector, with production accounting for more than 70% of the world’s aquaculture output. In the new century, with serious challenges regarding population, resources and the environment, China has been working to develop high-quality, effective, healthy, and sustainable blue agriculture through the application of modern biotechnology. Sound knowledge related to the biology and ecology of aquatic organisms has laid a solid foundation and provided the innovation and technology for rapid development of the aquaculture industry. Marine biotechnology, which is enabling solutions for ocean productivity and sustainability, has been promoted since the last decades of the 20th Century in China. Objective: In this article, priority areas of research, mainly genetic breeding, omics studies, novel production systems, biosecurity, bioprocesses and biorefinery, as well as the major progress of marine biotechnology R&D in China are reviewed. Conclusion: Current innovative achievements in China are not enough and the level and frequency of academic advancements must be improved. International cooperation and assistance remain crucial for the success of marine biotechnology. PMID:28553577

  14. Marine actinobacteria: perspectives, challenges, future directions.

    PubMed

    Bull, Alan T; Stach, James E M; Ward, Alan C; Goodfellow, Michael

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the current state of research on the biology and biotechnology of marine actinobacteria. The topics covered include the abundance, diversity, novelty and biogeographic distribution of marine actinobacteria, ecosystem function, bioprospecting, and a new approach to the exploration of actinobacterial taxonomic space. An agenda for future marine actinobacterial research is suggested based upon consideration of the above issues.

  15. Marine actinobacteria: perspectives, challenges, future directions.

    PubMed

    Bull, Alan T; Stach, James E M; Ward, Alan C; Goodfellow, Micheal

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we evaluate the current state of research on the biology biotechnology of marine actinobacteria. The topics covered include the abundance, diversity, novelty and biogeographic distribution of marine actinobacteria, ecosystem function, bioprospecting, and a new approach to the exploration of actinobacterial taxonomic space. An agenda for future marine actinobacterial research is suggested based upon consideration of the above issues.

  16. US Department of Agriculture's biotechnology research efforts: biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The biotechnology research projects being funded in whole or in part by USDA were surveyed. A questionnaire was sent to each state agricultural experiment station and each college of veterinary medicine to obtain information on funding and staffing levels; research objectives and results of USDA-supported biotechnology research; and whether genetically engineered organisms were expected to be released into the environment. ARS and OGPS officials agreed to provide us with similar information on biotechnology projects funded by ARS and OGPS. 5 tabs.

  17. Exploring the diversity and metabolic potential of actinomycetes from temperate marine sediments from Newfoundland, Canada.

    PubMed

    Duncan, K R; Haltli, B; Gill, K A; Correa, H; Berrué, F; Kerr, R G

    2015-01-01

    Marine sediments from Newfoundland, Canada were explored for biotechnologically promising Actinobacteria using culture-independent and culture-dependent approaches. Culture-independent pyrosequencing analyses uncovered significant actinobacterial diversity (H'-2.45 to 3.76), although the taxonomic diversity of biotechnologically important actinomycetes could not be fully elucidated due to limited sampling depth. Assessment of culturable actinomycete diversity resulted in the isolation of 360 actinomycetes representing 59 operational taxonomic units, the majority of which (94 %) were Streptomyces. The biotechnological potential of actinomycetes from NL sediments was assessed by bioactivity and metabolomics-based screening of 32 representative isolates. Bioactivity was exhibited by 41 % of isolates, while 11 % exhibited unique chemical signatures in metabolomics screening. Chemical analysis of two isolates resulted in the isolation of the cytotoxic metabolite 1-isopentadecanoyl-3β-D-glucopyranosyl-X-glycerol from Actinoalloteichus sp. 2L868 and sungsanpin from Streptomyces sp. 8LB7. These results demonstrate the potential for the discovery of novel bioactive metabolites from actinomycetes isolated from Atlantic Canadian marine sediments.

  18. Influence of strong monsoon winds on the water quality around a marine cage-culture zone in a shallow and semi-enclosed bay in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan-Chao Angelo; Huang, Shou-Chung; Meng, Pei-Jie; Hsieh, Hernyi Justin; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2012-04-01

    Influences of marine cage culture and monsoonal disturbances, northeasterly (NE) and southwesterly (SW) monsoons on the proximal marine environment were investigated across a gradient of sites in a semi-enclosed bay, Magong Bay (Penghu Islands, Taiwan). Elevated levels of ammonia produced by the cages were the main pollutant and distinguished the cage-culture and intermediary zones (1000 m away from the cages) from the reference zone in the NE monsoon, indicating currents produced by the strong monsoon may have extended the spread of nutrient-enriched waters without necessarily flushing such effluents outside Magong Bay. Moreover, the levels of chlorophyll-a, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity were distinguishable between two seasons, suggesting that resuspension caused by the NE monsoon winds may also influence the water quality across this bay. It indicated that the impacts of marine cage culture vary as a function of distance, and also in response to seasonal movements of water driven by local climatic occurrences.

  19. Surface shear rheological studies of marine phytoplankton cultures-Nitzschia closterium, Thalassiosira rotula, Thalassiosira punctigera and Phaeocystis sp.

    PubMed

    Kuhnhenn, Verena; Krägel, Jürgen; Horstmann, Ulrich; Miller, Reinhard

    2006-01-15

    The study of interfacial properties in the marine environment is important for the understanding of air-sea gas exchange processes, especially with respect to the behaviour of entrained air bubbles. Seawater contains surfactant material, much of which is thought to origin from the exudation of dissolved organic material (DOM) by phytoplankton. This study aims at investigating the influence of different phytoplankton species on the surface shear viscosity of an air-water interface. Measurements of surface shear viscosity were carried out with the ISR1 interfacial shear rheometer. Surface shear viscosities of stock cultures of Phaeocystis sp., Thalassiosira rotula, Thalassiosira punctigera and Nitzschia closterium as well as of F/2 nutrient medium and seawater were measured. The surface shear viscosity of N. closterium was investigated during different stages of its growth as well as for an unfiltered stock culture sample and its filtrate. Results reveal that the influence of phytoplankton on the surface shear viscosity is species specific. An increase in surface shear viscosity occurred for the N. closterium stock culture only. The remaining cultures showed similar behaviour to F/2 nutrient medium. The increase of surface shear viscosity during the growth of N. closterium occurred mainly during the exponential growth phase. The increases in surface shear viscosity depend on the presence of phytoplankton cells in the sample. The formation of compact mechanical structures at the air-water interface originating from the aggregation of DOM released by N. closterium as a cause for the observed increases in surface shear viscosity is discussed.

  20. Development of Marine Science and Technology in Africa. Working Group of Experts Sponsored by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco). Unesco Reports in Marine Sciences, No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    Beginning in the late 1970's, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) increased their efforts to formulate and implement African development programs. Reported in this document is a meeting on marine resource technology which was jointly convened by…

  1. Fueling industrial biotechnology growth with bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Otero, José Manuel; Panagiotou, Gianni; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2007-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology is the conversion of biomass via biocatalysis, microbial fermentation, or cell culture to produce chemicals, materials, and/or energy. Industrial biotechnology processes aim to be cost-competitive, environmentally favorable, and self-sustaining compared to their petrochemical equivalents. Common to all processes for the production of energy, commodity, added value, or fine chemicals is that raw materials comprise the most significant cost fraction, particularly as operating efficiencies increase through practice and improving technologies. Today, crude petroleum represents the dominant raw material for the energy and chemical sectors worldwide. Within the last 5 years petroleum prices, stability, and supply have increased, decreased, and been threatened, respectively, driving a renewed interest across academic, government, and corporate centers to utilize biomass as an alternative raw material. Specifically, bio-based ethanol as an alternative biofuel has emerged as the single largest biotechnology commodity, with close to 46 billion L produced worldwide in 2005. Bioethanol is a leading example of how systems biology tools have significantly enhanced metabolic engineering, inverse metabolic engineering, and protein and enzyme engineering strategies. This enhancement stems from method development for measurement, analysis, and data integration of functional genomics, including the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and fluxome. This review will show that future industrial biotechnology process development will benefit tremendously from the precedent set by bioethanol - that enabling technologies (e.g., systems biology tools) coupled with favorable economic and socio-political driving forces do yield profitable, sustainable, and environmentally responsible processes. Biofuel will continue to be the keystone of any industrial biotechnology-based economy whereby biorefineries leverage common raw materials and unit operations to integrate

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF CULTURES OF THE MARINE SPONGE HYMENIACIDON PERLEVE FOR GENOTOXICITY ASSESSMENT USING THE ALKALINE COMET ASSAY.

    PubMed

    Akpiri, Rachael U; Konya, Roseline S; Hodges, Nikolas J

    2017-07-10

    Sponges are a potential alternative model species to bivalves in pollution biomonitoring and environmental risk assessment in the aquatic ecosystem. Here, a novel in vivo exposure sponge culture model was developed from field collected and cryopreserved sponge (Hymeniacidon perleve) cells to investigate the genotoxic effects of environmentally relevant metals in the laboratory. Sponge cell aggregates were cultured and exposed to non-cytotoxic concentrations (0-0.4 mg/L) of cadmium chloride, nickel chloride, and sodium dichromate as quantified by the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and DNA-strand breaks assessed by the comet assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was quantified by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate in sponge cell aggregates exposed to the same concentrations of Cd, Cr, and Ni. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.05) concentration-dependent increase in the level of DNA strand breaks and ROS formation in all of the metals investigated. To thebest of our knowledge we have utilised for the first time the alkaline comet assay to detect DNA-strand breaks in marine sponge cells, and demonstrated that exposure to non-cytotoxic concentrations of Cd, Cr, and Ni for 12 h results in a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage and levels of ROS production. In conclusion, we have developed a novel in vivo model based on culture of cryopreserved sponge cells that is compatible with the alkaline comet assay. Genotoxicity in marine sponges measured by the comet assay technique may be a useful tool for biomonitoring research and risk assessment in aquatic ecosystems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. [Diversity and bioactivities of culturable marine actinobacteria isolated from mangrove sediment in Indian Ocean].

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Zhang, Daofeng; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Xiaomei; Tang, Shukun; Xu, Lihua; Li, Wenjun

    2012-10-04

    In order to explore the diversity, antimicrobial activity and enzyme-producing activity of marine actinobacteria isolated from mangrove sediments in Indian Ocean. Eight sediments collected from mangrove sediments in Indian Ocean were treated by the plate dilution method and spread on 24 isolation media only containing sole carbon source for energy. Marine actinobacteria were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The antimicrobial activity and enzyme-producing activity of isolated strains were further detected by spot planting method. In total 139 representative strains were selected from 521 isolates, and they were further sequenced and performed phylogenetic analysis based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. There were 35 strains identified as potential novel species. Antimicrobial activity was detected in Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus niger. Enzyme-producing activity for protease cellulase, amylase and esterase were 36.5%, 26.5%, 22.4% and 15.9%, respectively. Diverse marine actinobacteria were discovered in mangrove sediment in Indian Ocean, which have antimicrobial and enzyme activity.

  4. Industrial biotechnology: tools and applications.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weng Lin; Zhao, Huimin

    2009-12-01

    Industrial biotechnology involves the use of enzymes and microorganisms to produce value-added chemicals from renewable sources. Because of its association with reduced energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and waste generation, industrial biotechnology is a rapidly growing field. Here we highlight a variety of important tools for industrial biotechnology, including protein engineering, metabolic engineering, synthetic biology, systems biology, and downstream processing. In addition, we show how these tools have been successfully applied in several case studies, including the production of 1, 3-propanediol, lactic acid, and biofuels. It is expected that industrial biotechnology will be increasingly adopted by chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and agricultural industries.

  5. Plant biotechnology in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jikun; Rozelle, Scott; Pray, Carl; Wang, Qinfang

    2002-01-25

    A survey of China's plant biotechnologists shows that China is developing the largest plant biotechnology capacity outside of North America. The list of genetically modified plant technologies in trials, including rice, wheat, potatoes, and peanuts, is impressive and differs from those being worked on in other countries. Poor farmers in China are cultivating more area of genetically modified plants than are small farmers in any other developing country. A survey of agricultural producers in China demonstrates that Bacillus thuringiensis cotton adoption increases production efficiency and improves farmer health.

  6. Farm animal biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bulfield, G

    2000-01-01

    As we enter a new millennium, the research with the greatest likely impact on both the biological sciences and the biotechnology industry will be the sequencing of the human and other genomes. Widespread interest in farm animal genomics as a method for identifying genes controlling commercially important traits started only a decade ago. Although the genomics of farm animals was relatively late to arrive on the scene compared with the genomics of crop plants, it has the advantage of being able to access the enormous amount of human genome information.

  7. Understanding public perceptions of biotechnology through the "Integrative Worldview Framework".

    PubMed

    De Witt, Annick; Osseweijer, Patricia; Pierce, Robin

    2015-07-03

    Biotechnological innovations prompt a range of societal responses that demand understanding. Research has shown such responses are shaped by individuals' cultural worldviews. We aim to demonstrate how the Integrative Worldview Framework (IWF) can be used for analyzing perceptions of biotechnology, by reviewing (1) research on public perceptions of biotechnology and (2) analyses of the stakeholder-debate on the bio-based economy, using the Integrative Worldview Framework (IWF) as analytical lens. This framework operationalizes the concept of worldview and distinguishes between traditional, modern, and postmodern worldviews, among others. Applied to these literatures, this framework illuminates how these worldviews underlie major societal responses, thereby providing a unifying understanding of the literature on perceptions of biotechnology. We conclude the IWF has relevance for informing research on perceptions of socio-technical changes, generating insight into the paradigmatic gaps in social science, and facilitating reflexive and inclusive policy-making and debates on these timely issues. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Biotechnology-a sustainable alternative for chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Gavrilescu, Maria; Chisti, Yusuf

    2005-11-01

    This review outlines the current and emerging applications of biotechnology, particularly in the production and processing of chemicals, for sustainable development. Biotechnology is "the application of scientific and engineering principles to the processing of materials by biological agents". Some of the defining technologies of modern biotechnology include genetic engineering; culture of recombinant microorganisms, cells of animals and plants; metabolic engineering; hybridoma technology; bioelectronics; nanobiotechnology; protein engineering; transgenic animals and plants; tissue and organ engineering; immunological assays; genomics and proteomics; bioseparations and bioreactor technologies. Environmental and economic benefits that biotechnology can offer in manufacturing, monitoring and waste management are highlighted. These benefits include the following: greatly reduced dependence on nonrenewable fuels and other resources; reduced potential for pollution of industrial processes and products; ability to safely destroy accumulated pollutants for remediation of the environment; improved economics of production; and sustainable production of existing and novel products.

  9. Characterization of a Culturable Alphaproteobacterial Symbiont Common to Many Marine Sponges and Evidence for Vertical Transmission via Sponge Larvae†

    PubMed Central

    Enticknap, Julie J.; Kelly, Michelle; Peraud, Olivier; Hill, Russell T.

    2006-01-01

    A closely related group of alphaproteobacteria were found to be present in seven genera of marine sponges from several locations and were shown to be transferred between sponge generations through the larvae in one of these sponges. Isolates of the alphaproteobacterium were cultured from the sponges Axinella corrugata, Mycale laxissima, Monanchora unguifera, and Niphates digitalis from Key Largo, Florida; Didiscus oxeata and Monanchora unguifera from Discovery Bay, Jamaica; an Acanthostronglyophora sp. from Manado, Indonesia; and Microciona prolifera from the Cheasapeake Bay in Maryland. Isolates were very similar to each other on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence (>99% identity) and are closely related to Pseudovibrio denitrificans. The bacterium was never isolated from surrounding water samples and was cultured from larvae of M. laxissima, indicating that it is a vertically transmitted symbiont in this sponge. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with probes specific to the alphaproteobacterium confirmed the presence of this bacterium in the M. laxissima larvae. The alphaproteobacterium was densely associated with the larvae rather than being evenly distributed throughout the mesohyl. This is the first report of the successful culture of a bacterial symbiont of a sponge that is transferred through the gametes. PMID:16672523

  10. Characterization of a culturable alphaproteobacterial symbiont common to many marine sponges and evidence for vertical transmission via sponge larvae.

    PubMed

    Enticknap, Julie J; Kelly, Michelle; Peraud, Olivier; Hill, Russell T

    2006-05-01

    A closely related group of alphaproteobacteria were found to be present in seven genera of marine sponges from several locations and were shown to be transferred between sponge generations through the larvae in one of these sponges. Isolates of the alphaproteobacterium were cultured from the sponges Axinella corrugata, Mycale laxissima, Monanchora unguifera, and Niphates digitalis from Key Largo, Florida; Didiscus oxeata and Monanchora unguifera from Discovery Bay, Jamaica; an Acanthostronglyophora sp. from Manado, Indonesia; and Microciona prolifera from the Cheasapeake Bay in Maryland. Isolates were very similar to each other on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence (>99% identity) and are closely related to Pseudovibrio denitrificans. The bacterium was never isolated from surrounding water samples and was cultured from larvae of M. laxissima, indicating that it is a vertically transmitted symbiont in this sponge. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with probes specific to the alphaproteobacterium confirmed the presence of this bacterium in the M. laxissima larvae. The alphaproteobacterium was densely associated with the larvae rather than being evenly distributed throughout the mesohyl. This is the first report of the successful culture of a bacterial symbiont of a sponge that is transferred through the gametes.

  11. Biotechnology Towards Energy Crops.

    PubMed

    Margaritopoulou, Theoni; Roka, Loukia; Alexopoulou, Efi; Christou, Myrsini; Rigas, Stamatis; Haralampidis, Kosmas; Milioni, Dimitra

    2016-03-01

    New crops are gradually establishing along with cultivation systems to reduce reliance on depleting fossil fuel reserves and sustain better adaptation to climate change. These biological assets could be efficiently exploited as bioenergy feedstocks. Bioenergy crops are versatile renewable sources with the potential to alternatively contribute on a daily basis towards the coverage of modern society's energy demands. Biotechnology may facilitate the breeding of elite energy crop genotypes, better suited for bio-processing and subsequent use that will improve efficiency, further reduce costs, and enhance the environmental benefits of biofuels. Innovative molecular techniques may improve a broad range of important features including biomass yield, product quality and resistance to biotic factors like pests or microbial diseases or environmental cues such as drought, salinity, freezing injury or heat shock. The current review intends to assess the capacity of biotechnological applications to develop a beneficial bioenergy pipeline extending from feedstock development to sustainable biofuel production and provide examples of the current state of the art on future energy crops.

  12. Anaerobic degradation of naphthalene by a pure culture of a novel type of marine sulphate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Galushko, A; Minz, D; Schink, B; Widdel, F

    1999-10-01

    Incubation of marine sediment in anoxic, sulphate-rich medium in the presence of naphthalene resulted in the enrichment of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Pure cultures with short, oval cells (1.3 by 1.3-1.9 microm) were isolated that grew with naphthalene as the only organic carbon source and electron donor for sulphate reduction to sulphide. One strain, NaphS2, was characterized. It affiliated with completely oxidizing sulphate-reducing bacteria of the delta-subclass of the Proteobacteria, as revealed by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. 2-Naphthoate, benzoate, pyruvate and acetate were used in addition to naphthalene. Quantification of substrate consumption, sulphide formation and formed cell mass revealed that naphthalene was completely oxidized with sulphate as the electron acceptor.

  13. Diversity and bioprospecting of culturable actinomycetes from marine sediment of the Yellow Sea, China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Qiao-Xia; Pan, Zhao-Long; Zhao, Na; Feng, Zhi-Xiang; Wang, Yong

    2015-03-01

    Marine actinomycetes are a potential source of a wide variety of bioactive natural products. In this work, seven pretreatments, three selective isolation media, and five artificial seawater concentrations were used to isolate actinomycetes from the sediments collected from Yellow Sea, China. Statistical analysis showed that only the isolation medium strongly affected the total and bioactive numbers of actinomycete isolates. A total of 613 actinobacterial strains were isolated and screened for antimicrobial activities; 154 isolates showed activity against at least one of nine test drug-resistant microorganisms. Eighty-nine representatives with strong antimicrobial activity were identified phylogenetically based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which were assigned to five different actinomycete genera Streptomyces, Kocuria, Saccharomonospora, Micromonospora, and Nocardiopsis. Using PCR-based screening for six biosynthetic genes of secondary metabolites, all 45 isolates with acute activity have at least one biosynthetic gene, 28.8 % of which possess more than three biosynthetic genes. As a case, strain SMA-1 was selected for antimicrobial natural product discovery. Three diketopiperazine dimers including a new compound iso-naseseazine B (1) and two known compounds naseseazine B (2) and aspergilazine A (3) were isolated by bioassay-guided separation. These results suggested that actinomycetes from marine sediments are a potential resource of novel secondary metabolites and drugs.

  14. On Teaching Biotechnology in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dan C.; Kemp, Michael C.; Hall, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    One study surveyed 187 Kentucky teachers (36% agriculture, 32% science, 32% technology education); they rated importance of content organizers, topics, transferable skills, and delivery methods for biotechnology. A second study received responses from 70 of 150 teachers; 45 thought science teachers or an integrated team should teach biotechnology;…

  15. A Sourcebook of Biotechnology Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Alison M., Ed.; Matheson, Robert H., III, Ed.

    This book contains 22 lessons using hands-on activities designed to present some aspect of biotechnology in a usable form that teachers can adapt for their classrooms. The introductory section serves as a resource that introduces the teacher and student to the history of biotechnology. The activities are divided into five units that group lessons…

  16. The Challenge in Teaching Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, F.; Aubusson, P.

    2004-08-01

    Agriculture, industry and medicine are being altered by new biotechnologies. Biotechnology education is important because todays students and citizens will make decisions about the development and application of these new molecular biologies. This article reports an investigation of the teaching of biotechnology in an Australian state, New South Wales (NSW). In NSW few students were electing to answer examination questions related to biotechnology, suggesting that few students were studying the topic. This study looks at why electives relating to biotechnology are chosen or not chosen by students and teachers, with the intention of developing a greater understanding of the requirements for provision of a successful unit of study in this subject. Data was obtained through a survey of secondary science teachers, interviews with teachers and two case studies of the teaching of a biotechnology unit. Teachers reported a range of obstacles to the teaching of biotechnology including the difficulty of the subject matter and a lack of practical work that was suited to the content of the teaching unit. If biotechnology is worth learning in school science, then further research is needed to identify ways to promote the effective teaching of this topic, which teachers regard as important for, and interesting to, students but which most teachers choose not to teach.

  17. A Case for Teaching Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaros, Edward; Embree, Caleb

    2016-01-01

    Biotechnology is an innovative field that is consistently growing in popularity. It is important that students are taught about this technology at an early age, so they are motivated to join the field, or at least motivated to become informed citizens and consumers (Gonzalez, et al, 2013). An increase in biotechnology knowledge can result in an…

  18. Teachers' Concerns about Biotechnology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Sadler, Troy D.; Koroly, Mary Jo

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of biotechnology are found in nearly all sectors of society from health care and food products to environmental issues and energy sources. Despite the significance of biotechnology within the sciences, it has not become a prominent trend in science education. In this study, we seek to more fully identify biology teachers' concerns…

  19. A Case for Teaching Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazaros, Edward; Embree, Caleb

    2016-01-01

    Biotechnology is an innovative field that is consistently growing in popularity. It is important that students are taught about this technology at an early age, so they are motivated to join the field, or at least motivated to become informed citizens and consumers (Gonzalez, et al, 2013). An increase in biotechnology knowledge can result in an…

  20. Teachers' Concerns about Biotechnology Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Sadler, Troy D.; Koroly, Mary Jo

    2013-01-01

    The impacts of biotechnology are found in nearly all sectors of society from health care and food products to environmental issues and energy sources. Despite the significance of biotechnology within the sciences, it has not become a prominent trend in science education. In this study, we seek to more fully identify biology teachers' concerns…

  1. Preface: Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book was assembled with the intent of bringing together current advances and in-depth reviews of biocatalysis and agricultural biotechnology with emphasis on bio-based products and agricultural biotechnology. Recent energy and food crises point out the importance of bio-based products from ren...

  2. Biotechnology Outlines for Classroom Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paolella, Mary Jane

    1991-01-01

    Presents a course outline for the study of biotechnology at the high school or college level. The outline includes definitions, a history, and the vocabulary of biotechnology. Presents a science experiment to analyze the effects of restriction enzymes on DNA. (MDH)

  3. A Sourcebook of Biotechnology Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Alison M., Ed.; Matheson, Robert H., III, Ed.

    This book contains 22 lessons using hands-on activities designed to present some aspect of biotechnology in a usable form that teachers can adapt for their classrooms. The introductory section serves as a resource that introduces the teacher and student to the history of biotechnology. The activities are divided into five units that group lessons…

  4. Biotechnology: from university to industry

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    This study examines the birth of the biotechnology industry in the US. It is argued that biotechnology may have important implications for the future of American capitalism. The study is contextualized theoretically through the use of the idea of the capitalism experiences waves of innovations at certain historical periods. Finally, the idea of a new regime of accumulation based on information technologies is explored and biotechnology's potential position in the information society is explored. The first section of the study examines the role of the university in biotechnology. The various objectives of administrators and professors are explored as is the role of corporate gift giving in transforming the university into an institution more useful for capitalist accumulation. The second section examines the corporate role in biotechnology: both from the viewpoint of the small venture capital-financed biotechnology firms and the large multinational oil, chemical, and pharmaceutical companies that have made a number of important investments in biotechnology. The last chapter describes the unique effects that biotechnology will have upon the US agricultural sector.

  5. On Teaching Biotechnology in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Dan C.; Kemp, Michael C.; Hall, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    One study surveyed 187 Kentucky teachers (36% agriculture, 32% science, 32% technology education); they rated importance of content organizers, topics, transferable skills, and delivery methods for biotechnology. A second study received responses from 70 of 150 teachers; 45 thought science teachers or an integrated team should teach biotechnology;…

  6. CHANGES IN CHLOROPHYLL A FLOURESCENCE AND PIGMENT RATIOS DURING DIFFERENT GROWTH PHASES OF A UNICELLULAR MARINE CHAETOCEROS (BACILLAROPHYCEAE) IN BATCH CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interpretations of chlorophyll a fluorescence data are based largely on application with green algae and higher plants. This study evaluated the interpretation of fluorescence data for a unicellular marine diatom. Chaetoceros sp. was grown in 4-liter batch cultures on a 16:8, L:D...

  7. CHANGES IN CHLOROPHYLL A FLOURESCENCE AND PIGMENT RATIOS DURING DIFFERENT GROWTH PHASES OF A UNICELLULAR MARINE CHAETOCEROS (BACILLAROPHYCEAE) IN BATCH CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interpretations of chlorophyll a fluorescence data are based largely on application with green algae and higher plants. This study evaluated the interpretation of fluorescence data for a unicellular marine diatom. Chaetoceros sp. was grown in 4-liter batch cultures on a 16:8, L:D...

  8. Diversity and biosynthetic potential of culturable microbes associated with toxic marine animals.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rocky; Kalaitzis, John A; Wood, Susanna A; Neilan, Brett A

    2013-08-02

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a neurotoxin that has been reported from taxonomically diverse organisms across 14 different phyla. The biogenic origin of tetrodotoxin is still disputed, however, TTX biosynthesis by host-associated bacteria has been reported. An investigation into the culturable microbial populations from the TTX-associated blue-ringed octopus Hapalochlaena sp. and sea slug Pleurobranchaea maculata revealed a surprisingly high microbial diversity. Although TTX was not detected among the cultured isolates, PCR screening identifiedsome natural product biosynthesis genes putatively involved in its assembly. This study is the first to report on the microbial diversity of culturable communities from H. maculosa and P. maculata and common natural product biosynthesis genes from their microbiota. We also reassess the production of TTX reported from three bacterial strains isolated from the TTX-containing gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus.

  9. Diversity and Biosynthetic Potential of Culturable Microbes Associated with Toxic Marine Animals

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Rocky; Kalaitzis, John A.; Wood, Susanna A.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) is a neurotoxin that has been reported from taxonomically diverse organisms across 14 different phyla. The biogenic origin of tetrodotoxin is still disputed, however, TTX biosynthesis by host-associated bacteria has been reported. An investigation into the culturable microbial populations from the TTX-associated blue-ringed octopus Hapalochlaena sp. and sea slug Pleurobranchaea maculata revealed a surprisingly high microbial diversity. Although TTX was not detected among the cultured isolates, PCR screening identifiedsome natural product biosynthesis genes putatively involved in its assembly. This study is the first to report on the microbial diversity of culturable communities from H. maculosa and P. maculata and common natural product biosynthesis genes from their microbiota. We also reassess the production of TTX reported from three bacterial strains isolated from the TTX-containing gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus. PMID:23917066

  10. Marine culturable yeasts in deep-sea hydrothermal vents: species richness and association with fauna.

    PubMed

    Burgaud, Gaëtan; Arzur, Danielle; Durand, Lucile; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne; Barbier, Georges

    2010-07-01

    Investigations of the diversity of culturable yeasts at deep-sea hydrothermal sites have suggested possible interactions with endemic fauna. Samples were collected during various oceanographic cruises at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, South Pacific Basins and East Pacific Rise. Cultures of 32 isolates, mostly associated with animals, were collected. Phylogenetic analyses of 26S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the yeasts belonged to Ascomycota and Basidiomycota phyla, with the identification of several genera: Rhodotorula, Rhodosporidium, Candida, Debaryomyces and Cryptococcus. Those genera are usually isolated from deep-sea environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report of yeasts associated with deep-sea hydrothermal animals.

  11. Deep ocean environmental biotechnology

    PubMed

    Deming

    1998-06-01

    Major recent advances in deep-sea biotechnology have come in the form of continuing discoveries of novel microorganisms, unexpected genetic diversity, and new natural products of potential relevance to human health or environmental bioremediation. Continuing explorations of submarine hydrothermal vent environments have yielded new hyperthermophiles (maximal growth at 90 degreesC or greater) and more evidence that elevated hydrostatic pressure stabilizes cells and enzymes at high temperature. Vent samples have also yielded new mesophiles (optimal growth near 30 degreesC) that produce heparin-like exopolysaccharides or express extraordinary tolerance (removal by precipitation) of heavy metals. From the cold deep sea have come new findings of unexpected microbial diversity and the promise of industrially useful enzymes or secondary metabolites. New classes of predictive models are emerging to guide future exploration of microbial diversity in the deep ocean.

  12. Biotechnological Applications of Transglutaminases

    PubMed Central

    Rachel, Natalie M.; Pelletier, Joelle N.

    2013-01-01

    In nature, transglutaminases catalyze the formation of amide bonds between proteins to form insoluble protein aggregates. This specific function has long been exploited in the food and textile industries as a protein cross-linking agent to alter the texture of meat, wool, and leather. In recent years, biotechnological applications of transglutaminases have come to light in areas ranging from material sciences to medicine. There has also been a substantial effort to further investigate the fundamentals of transglutaminases, as many of their characteristics that remain poorly understood. Those studies also work towards the goal of developing transglutaminases as more efficient catalysts. Progress in this area includes structural information and novel chemical and biological assays. Here, we review recent achievements in this area in order to illustrate the versatility of transglutaminases. PMID:24970194

  13. European Union research and innovation perspectives on biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Cichocka, Danuta; Claxton, John; Economidis, Ioannis; Högel, Jens; Venturi, Piero; Aguilar, Alfredo

    2011-12-20

    "Food, Agriculture and Fisheries and Biotechnology" is one of 10 thematic areas in the Cooperation programme of the European Union's 7th Framework Programme for Research, Technological Development and Demonstration Activities (FP7). With a budget of nearly €2 billion for the period 2007-2013, its objective is to foster the development of a European Knowledge-Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) by bringing together science, industry and other stakeholders that produce, manage or otherwise exploit biological resources. Biotechnology plays an important role in addressing social, environmental and economic challenges and it is recognised as a key enabling technology in the transition to a green, low carbon and resource-efficient economy. Biotechnologies for non-health applications have received a considerable attention in FP7 and to date 61 projects on industrial, marine, plant, environmental and emerging biotechnologies have been supported with a contribution of €262.8 million from the European Commission (EC). This article presents an outlook of the research, technological development and demonstration activities in biotechnology currently supported in FP7 within the Cooperation programme, including a brief overview of the policy context.

  14. Digital and analog gene circuits for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Roquet, Nathaniel; Lu, Timothy K

    2014-05-01

    Biotechnology offers the promise of valuable chemical production via microbial processing of renewable and inexpensive substrates. Thus far, static metabolic engineering strategies have enabled this field to advance industrial applications. However, the industrial scaling of statically engineered microbes inevitably creates inefficiencies due to variable conditions present in large-scale microbial cultures. Synthetic gene circuits that dynamically sense and regulate different molecules can resolve this issue by enabling cells to continuously adapt to variable conditions. These circuits also have the potential to enable next-generation production programs capable of autonomous transitioning between steps in a bioprocess. Here, we review the design and application of two main classes of dynamic gene circuits, digital and analog, for biotechnology. Within the context of these classes, we also discuss the potential benefits of digital-analog interconversion, memory, and multi-signal integration. Though synthetic gene circuits have largely been applied for cellular computation to date, we envision that utilizing them in biotechnology will enhance the efficiency and scope of biochemical production with living cells.

  15. Digital and Analog Gene Circuits for Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Roquet, Nathaniel; Lu, Timothy K.

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology offers the promise of valuable chemical production via microbial processing of renewable and inexpensive substrates. Thus far, static metabolic engineering strategies have enabled this field to advance industrial applications. However, the industrial scaling of statically engineered microbes inevitably creates inefficiencies due to variable conditions present in large-scale microbial cultures. Synthetic gene circuits that dynamically sense and regulate different molecules can resolve this issue by enabling cells to continuously adapt to variable conditions. These circuits also have the potential to enable next-generation production programs capable of autonomous transitioning between steps in a bioprocess. Here, we review the design and application of two main classes of dynamic gene circuits, digital and analog, for biotechnology. Within the context of these classes, we also discuss the potential benefits of digital-analog interconversion, memory, and multi-signal integration. Though synthetic gene circuits have largely been applied for cellular computation to date, we envision that utilizing them in biotechnology will enhance the efficiency and scope of biochemical production with living cells. PMID:24677719

  16. Bisthiodiketopiperazines and Acorane Sesquiterpenes Produced by the Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium adametzioides AS-53 on Different Culture Media.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Xiao-Ming; Meng, Ling-Hong; Jiang, Wen-Li; Xu, Gang-Ming; Huang, Cai-Guo; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2015-06-26

    Chemical investigation of the marine-sponge-derived fungus Penicillium adametzioides AS-53 resulted in the identification of two new bisthiodiketopiperazine derivatives, adametizines A (1) and B (2), from cultivation in a liquid potato-dextrose broth (PDB) culture medium, whereas two new acorane sesquiterpenes, adametacorenols A (3) and B (4), were isolated from a rice solid culture medium. The structures of these compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 1 was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis, and that of 3 was determined by modified Mosher's method. Compound 1 exhibited lethality against brine shrimp (Artemia salina) with an LD50 value of 4.8 μM and inhibitory activities against Staphyloccocus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophilia, Vibrio spp. V. harveyi and V. parahaemolyticus, and Gaeumannomyces graminis with minimum inhibitory concentration values of 8, 8, 32, 8, and 16 μg/mL, respectively. Chlorination at C-7 significantly increased the brine shrimp lethality and antimicrobial activity of the bisthiodiketopiperazines.

  17. Identification of Candida tropicalis BH-6 and synergistic effect with Pantoea agglomerans BH-18 on hydrogen production in marine culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Daling; Ma, Yingchao; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua

    2015-03-01

    A marine yeast was isolated from mangrove sludge and named Candida tropicalis BH-6. The optimum temperature and the initial pH value for growth of the isolated strain were 37 °C and 5.0, respectively. The strain had high salt tolerance and could survive at NaCl concentrations of 0-6 %. Additionally, the yield of hydrogen production by C. tropicalis BH-6 was only 66.30 ml/l. However, when the yeast was mixed with Pantoea agglomerans BH-18, hydrogen production increased significantly to a maximum of 1707.5 ml/l, which was 36.94 and 247.54 % higher than the monoculture of P. agglomerans BH-18 and C. tropicalis BH-6, respectively. Taken together, these results revealed that in mixed culture, the yeast strain isolated from the same ecosystem as P. agglomerans BH-18 likely consumed the organic acids produced by fermentation, thus eliminating the factor inhibiting hydrogen production by P. agglomerans BH-18. As a result, the yield of hydrogen production during mixed culture increased significantly.

  18. Rapid and qualitative fluorescence-based method for the assessment of PHA production in marine bacteria during batch culture.

    PubMed

    Elain, Anne; Le Fellic, Magali; Corre, Yves-Marie; Le Grand, Adélaïde; Le Tilly, Véronique; Audic, Jean-Luc; Bruzaud, Stéphane

    2015-10-01

    The expansion of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) into the biodegradable polymers market is mainly prevented by their production process which is still complicated with a low efficiency, resulting in relatively expensive products. In this study, we developed a method that used the lipophilic fluorescent probe Nile Red (1 mg l(-1) solution in DMSO) directly into the culture broth to stain the PHA inclusions inside bacterial cells followed by detection of the emitted fluorescence by both microscopic and spectrometric techniques. Epifluorescence microscopy provides a rapid tool to distinguish producing from non-producing bacterial species and the relative fluorescence intensity (FI) determined at the maximum of emission spectra in the wavelength region of 560-710 nm (λ(ex): 543 nm), allows a fast assessment of the cultural conditions that may enhance PHA production yield. During two-step cultivation in 500-ml flasks with glucose as the sole carbon source, the method aimed to select bacterial strains efficient for PHA synthesis among a marine collection. Subsequently, the NR assay was used to determine the C0/N0 ratio of the producing media that may improve the polymer yield as well as to follow the time course of fermentation. Characterization by GC-MS and DSC confirmed the production of the P(3-HB) homopolymer.

  19. Geochemical partitioning of trace metals in the potential culture-bed of the Marine Bivalve, Anadara granosa

    SciTech Connect

    Maah, M.J.; Mat, I.; Johari, A.

    1995-02-01

    The relative distribution of trace metals in coastal sediment geochemical phases has received considerable attention as a mean of assessing the degree of trace metal pollution. Metals in the non-residual fraction (exchangeable, carbonate, easily reducible, moderately reducible and organic phases) have been demonstrated to be strongly correlated with tissue-metal concentrations in various benthic organisms. Among these phases, the oxides of manganese (easily reducible phase) and iron (moderately reducible phase) and organic matter have been emphasized as important scavengers of available trace metals. Therefore, these phases are undoubtedly among the criteria that should be considered explicitly when assessing the potential bioavailability of metals. The marine bivalve Anadara granosa is commercially cultured in the tidal mudflats along the western coast of the Peninsular Malaysia. The purpose of this study was to provide an assessment of the geochemical partitioning of trace metals in the sediments collected from a culture-bed of A. granosa. The selected area is thought to receive minimal or restricted impacts of trace metal pollution. The present investigation is of significance as a baseline of information for comparative studies with other aquaculture areas in the region. 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. [Lymphocyte culture and partial karyotype of the marine turtle Caretta caretta (Testudines: Cheloniidae) in Santa Marta, Colombian Caribbean].

    PubMed

    López, Ellie Ann; Hernández-Fernández, Javier; Bernal-Villegas, Jaime

    2008-09-01

    Over the past few years an important reduction in the number of nesting marine turtle Caretta caretta individuals has been registered in the Colombian Caribbean, raising the question of a possible extinction in the medium-term. A conservation plan is needed. We studied the culture requirements for C. caretta lymphocytes and preliminary karyotype analysis for cytogenetic identification, immunological study and toxicology without the need to kill individuals. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 47 individuals in Santa Marta, Colombia and tests were made until optimal conditions were established for lymphocyte culture. The karyotype had 56 chromosomes, 32 macrochromosomes and 24 micro-chromosomes. An ideogram showed that C. caretta has four groups of chromosomes. Sexual chromosomes were not observed. These results do not coincide with the karyotype described from the Pacific (Japan). The present study is the first to include a complete description of the chromosome morphology of turtles from the Atlantic Ocean. It is possible that one of the adaptive strategies of this species is genetic interchange with other species of the family, producing viable hybrids. Individuals in this study might be viable hybrids of C. caretta and further molecular studies are needed.

  1. Research on marine actinobacteria in India.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, K; Sahu, Maloy Kumar; Thangaradjou, T; Kannan, L

    2007-09-01

    Marine actinobacteriology is one of the major emerging areas of research in tropics. Marine actinobacteria occur on the sediments and in water and also other biomass (mangrove) and substrates (animal). These organisms are gaining importance not only for their taxonomic and ecological perspectives, but also for their unique metabolites and enzymes. Many earlier studies on these organisms were confined only to the temperate regions. In tropical environment, investigations on them have gained importance only in the last two decades. So far, from the Indian peninsula, 41 species of actinobacteria belonging to 8 genera have been recorded. The genus, Streptomyces of marine origin has been more frequently recorded. Of 9 maritime states of India, only 4 have been extensively covered for the study of marine actinobacteria. Most of the studies conducted pertain to isolation, identification and maintenance of these organisms in different culture media. Further, attention has been focused on studying their antagonistic properties against different pathogens. Their biotechnological potentials are yet to be fully explored.

  2. Microbial resource research infrastructure (MIRRI): infrastructure to foster academic research and biotechnological innovation.

    PubMed

    Schüngel, Manuela; Stackebrandt, Erko

    2015-01-01

    The coordinated collaboration between public culture collections within the MIRRI infrastructure will support research and development in the field of academic as well as industrial biotechnology. Researchers working with microorganisms using the envisioned MIRRI portal will have facilitated access to microbial resources, associated data and expertise. By addressing the users' specific needs MIRRI will provide the basis for biotechnological innovation in Europe.

  3. Comparison of lipid content and Fatty Acid composition in the edible meat of wild and cultured freshwater and marine fish and shrimps from china.

    PubMed

    Li, Guipu; Sinclair, Andrew J; Li, Duo

    2011-03-09

    The lipid content and fatty acid composition in the edible meat of twenty-nine species of wild and cultured freshwater and marine fish and shrimps were investigated. Both the lipid content and fatty acid composition of the species were specified due to their unique food habits and trophic levels. Most of the marine fish demonstrated higher lipid content than the freshwater fish, whereas shrimps had the lowest lipid content. All the marine fish and shrimps had much higher total n-3 PUFA than n-6 PUFA, while most of the freshwater fish and shrimps demonstrated much lower total n-3 PUFA than n-6 PUFA. This may be the biggest difference in fatty acid composition between marine and freshwater species. The cultured freshwater fish demonstrated higher percentages of total PUFA, total n-3 PUFA, and EPA + DHA than the wild freshwater fish. Two freshwater fish, including bighead carp and silver carp, are comparable to the marine fish as sources of n-3 PUFA.

  4. A perspective on the biotechnological potential of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Raja, R; Hemaiswarya, S; Kumar, N Ashok; Sridhar, S; Rengasamy, R

    2008-01-01

    Microalgae are the untapped resource with more than 25,000 species of which only 15 are in use. In recent years, microalgal culture technology is a business oriented line owing to their different practical applications. Innovative processes and products have been introduced in microalgal biotechnology to produce vitamins, proteins, cosmetics, and health foods. For most of these applications, the market is still developing and the biotechnological use of microalgae will extend into new areas. With the development of sophisticated culture and screening techniques, microalgal biotechnology can meet the challenging demands of both the food and pharmaceutical industries. Genetic improvement should also play an important role in the future development of algal industries. Based on the preliminary research, several therapeutic benefits have been claimed for commercially produced microalgae including AIDS, cancer, and Cerebro vascular diseases. In near future, algal biomass will serve as a renewable energy source through commercial production of hydrocarbon by Botryococcus throughout the world.

  5. Sustainable production of biologically active molecules of marine based origin.

    PubMed

    Murray, Patrick M; Moane, Siobhan; Collins, Catherine; Beletskaya, Tanya; Thomas, Olivier P; Duarte, Alysson W F; Nobre, Fernando S; Owoyemi, Ifeloju O; Pagnocca, Fernando C; Sette, L D; McHugh, Edward; Causse, Eric; Pérez-López, Paula; Feijoo, Gumersindo; Moreira, Ma T; Rubiolo, Juan; Leirós, Marta; Botana, Luis M; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Horta, André; Pedrosa, Rui; Jeffryes, Clayton; Agathos, Spiros N; Allewaert, Celine; Verween, Annick; Vyverman, Wim; Laptev, Ivan; Sineoky, Sergei; Bisio, Angela; Manconi, Renata; Ledda, Fabio; Marchi, Mario; Pronzato, Roberto; Walsh, Daniel J

    2013-09-25

    The marine environment offers both economic and scientific potential which are relatively untapped from a biotechnological point of view. These environments whilst harsh are ironically fragile and dependent on a harmonious life form balance. Exploitation of natural resources by exhaustive wild harvesting has obvious negative environmental consequences. From a European industry perspective marine organisms are a largely underutilised resource. This is not due to lack of interest but due to a lack of choice the industry faces for cost competitive, sustainable and environmentally conscientious product alternatives. Knowledge of the biotechnological potential of marine organisms together with the development of sustainable systems for their cultivation, processing and utilisation are essential. In 2010, the European Commission recognised this need and funded a collaborative RTD/SME project under the Framework 7-Knowledge Based Bio-Economy (KBBE) Theme 2 Programme 'Sustainable culture of marine microorganisms, algae and/or invertebrates for high value added products'. The scope of that project entitled 'Sustainable Production of Biologically Active Molecules of Marine Based Origin' (BAMMBO) is outlined. Although the Union is a global leader in many technologies, it faces increasing competition from traditional rivals and emerging economies alike and must therefore improve its innovation performance. For this reason innovation is placed at the heart of a European Horizon 2020 Strategy wherein the challenge is to connect economic performance to eco performance. This article provides a synopsis of the research activities of the BAMMBO project as they fit within the wider scope of sustainable environmentally conscientious marine resource exploitation for high-value biomolecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Response to polychlorinated biphenyls of marine phytoplankton isolates cultured under natural conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, C D; Rowland, R G; O'Connors, H B; Wurster, C F

    1977-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) at a concentration of 10 mug/liter substantially but temporarily suppressed the growth rate and photosynthesis of two species of Thalassiosira recently isolated from Long Island Sound and grown in dialysis membrane bags suspended in the tidal channel of an estuarine marsh. Inhibition of carbon fixation was apparently due to reduced levels of chlorophyll a per PCB-treated cell, but no significant loss of function per unit of existing chlorophyll a was observed. Cell concentrations in all size classes (3.2- to 18.6-mum-equivalent spherical diameters) were markedly lower in PCB-treated cultures, with toal biomass equaling only 30% of that in control cultures throughout the experiment. PMID:413482

  7. Downstream processing in the biotechnology industry.

    PubMed

    Kalyanpur, Manohar

    2002-09-01

    The biotechnology industry today employs recombinant bacteria, mammalian cells, and transgenic animals for the production of high-value therapeutic proteins. This article reviews the techniques employed in this industry for the recovery of these products. The methods reviewed extend from the centrifugation and membrane filtration for the initial clarification of crude culture media to the final purification of the products by a variety of membrane-based and chromatographic methods. The subject of process validation including validation of the removal of bacterial and viral contaminants from the final products is also discussed with special reference to the latest regulatory guidelines.

  8. Large scale MALDI-TOF MS based taxa identification to identify novel pigment producers in a marine bacterial culture collection.

    PubMed

    Stafsnes, Marit H; Dybwad, Marius; Brunsvik, Anders; Bruheim, Per

    2013-03-01

    A challenge in the rational exploitation of microbial culture collections is to avoid superfluous testing of replicas. MALDI-TOF MS has been shown to be an efficient dereplication tool as it can be used to discriminate between bacterial isolates at the species level. A bacterial culture collection of more than 10,000 heterotrophic marine bacterial isolates from sea-water surface layers of the Norwegian Trondheimsfjord and neighbouring coastal areas has been established. A sub-collection of pigmented isolates was earlier screened for novel carotenoids with UVA-Blue light absorbing properties. This was a comprehensive analytical task and it was observed that a significant number of extracts with identical pigment profile were recovered. Hence, this study was undertaken to explore the use of MALDI-TOF MS as a dereplication tool to quickly characterize the bacterial collection. Furthermore, LC-DAD-MS analysis of pigment profiles was performed to check if pigment profile diversity was maintained among isolates kept after the potential MALDI-TOF MS selection step. Four hundred isolates comprising both pigmented and non-pigmented isolates were used for this study. The resulting MALDI-TOF MS dendrogram clearly identified a diversity of different taxa and these were supported by the pigment profile clustering, thus linking the pigment production as species-specific properties. Although one exception was found, it can be concluded that MALDI-TOF MS dereplication is a promising pre-screening tool for more efficient screening of microbial culture collection containing pigments with potential novel properties.

  9. Susceptibility of cultured juveniles of several marine fish to the sevenband grouper nervous necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Kuriyama, I; Nakai, T; Miyazaki, T

    2003-02-01

    Piscine nodaviruses (betanodaviruses) have been tentatively divided into four genotypes (SJNNV, RGNNV, TPNNV and BFNNV) and it is suggested that host specificity is different among these genotypes. In the present study, a betanodavirus [sevenband grouper nervous necrosis virus (SGNNV)] belonging to the redspotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) genotype, to which most betanodaviruses from warm water fish are identified, was evaluated for its pathogenicity to hatchery-reared juveniles of several marine fish species. When challenged with the virus by a bath method (10(5.1) TCID50 mL(-1)), sevenband grouper, Epinephelus septemfasciatus, Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, and tiger puffer, Takifugu rubripes, displayed behavioural abnormalities and mortalities with distinct histopathological signs of viral nervous necrosis and heavily immunostained cells were observed in the central nervous tissues and retina. Bath-challenged rock fish, Sebastiscus marmoratus, and a hybrid of sevenband grouper and kelp grouper, E. moara, did not display any behavioural abnormality or mortality during the experimental period, although many fish showed slight signs of viral infection in nerve cells. Kelp grouper and red sea bream, Pagrus major, showed no behavioural abnormality, mortality or immunohistopathological changes after the virus challenge. These results are, in part, consistent with the natural host range of RGNNV, indicating the complexity in the host specificity of betanodaviruses.

  10. Biodiesel production from marine cyanobacteria cultured in plate and tubular photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Selvan, B Karpanai; Revathi, M; Piriya, P Sobana; Vasan, P Thirumalai; Prabhu, D Immuanual Gilwax; Vennison, S John

    2013-03-01

    Carbon (neutral) based renewable liquid biofuels are alternative to petroleum derived transport fuels that contribute to global warming and are of a limited availability. Microalgae based biofuels are considered as promising source of energy. Lyngbya sp. and Synechococcus sp. were studied for the possibility of biodiesel production in different media such as ASNIII, sea water enrichment medium and BG11. The sea water enrichment medium was found superior in enhancing the growth rate of these microalgae. Nitrogen depletion has less effect in total chlorophyll a content, at the same time the lipid content was increased in both Lyngbya sp. and Synechococcus sp. by 1.4 and 1.2 % respectively. Increase in salinity from 0.5-1.0 M also showed an increase in the lipid content to 2.0 and 0.8 % in these strains; but a salinity of 1.5 M has a total inhibitory effect in the growth. The total biomass yield was comparatively higher in tubular LED photobioreactor than the fluorescent flat plated photobioreactor. Lipid extraction was obtained maximum at 60 degrees C in 1:10 sample: solvent ratio. GC-MS analysis of biodiesel showed high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA; 4.86 %) than saturated fatty acid (SFA; 4.10 %). Biodiesel production was found maximum in Synechococcus sp. than Lyngbya sp. The viscosity of the biodiesel was closely related to conventional diesel. The results strongly suggest that marine microalgae could be used as a renewable energy source for biodiesel production.

  11. Bioactive Marine Drugs and Marine Biomaterials for Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Clara; Valentão, Patrícia; Ferreres, Federico; Andrade, Paula B.

    2014-01-01

    Marine invertebrates produce a plethora of bioactive compounds, which serve as inspiration for marine biotechnology, particularly in drug discovery programs and biomaterials development. This review aims to summarize the potential of drugs derived from marine invertebrates in the field of neuroscience. Therefore, some examples of neuroprotective drugs and neurotoxins will be discussed. Their role in neuroscience research and development of new therapies targeting the central nervous system will be addressed, with particular focus on neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In addition, the neuronal growth promoted by marine drugs, as well as the recent advances in neural tissue engineering, will be highlighted. PMID:24798925

  12. Biochemical Engineering and Industrial Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moo-Young, Murray

    1986-01-01

    Describes the biochemical engineering and industrial biotechnology programs of the University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada). Provides descriptions of graduate courses, along with a sample of current research activities. Includes a discussion of the programs' mechanisms for technology transfer. (TW)

  13. Biotechnology Innovations In Developing Nations

    PubMed Central

    Korenblit, Jason

    2006-01-01

    Biotechnology breakthroughs are coming from developing countries like China and India that are seeking a competitive edge in the world market. But will private investors step up to make it happen? Here are some reasons why they should. PMID:23424337

  14. Biotechnology as an intellectual property.

    PubMed

    Adler, R G

    1984-04-27

    Recent advances in biotechnology have created many public policy and legal issues, one of the most significant of which is the treatment of biotechnological industrial products, particularly under the patent system. Patents represent one of several types of intellectual property; their ownership confers the right to exclude others from benefitting from the tangible products of a proprietary subject matter. Intellectual property law and its protections will play a major role in the rate at which biotechnology develops in the United States. In this article biotechnological intellectual property issues are reviewed in the context of their underlying legal requirements. The implications of other factors, such as international competition, research funding, and gene ownership, are also considered.

  15. Biotechnology: Economic and Behavioral Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhan, William F.; Beardsley, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews factors related to effects of biotechnology on the discipline of pharmacy administration including needs assessment, diffusion of technology, cost benefit analysis, marketing, cost containment, patient education and compliance, ethics, and health professions training. (DB)

  16. Biochemical Engineering and Industrial Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moo-Young, Murray

    1986-01-01

    Describes the biochemical engineering and industrial biotechnology programs of the University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada). Provides descriptions of graduate courses, along with a sample of current research activities. Includes a discussion of the programs' mechanisms for technology transfer. (TW)

  17. Agricultural biotechnology in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Dookun, A

    2001-01-01

    After a slow start many developing countries are now investing in agricultural biotechnology. Although these countries face several constraints, efforts are being made to promote biotechnology that requires high investment with long term returns. A number of donor agencies are providing incentives to stimulate biotechnology in the developing countries. There is however a major debate towards the development of biotechnology, especially genetically modified organisms, in the developing countries and there is a need for them to address biosafety issues and proper monitoring systems. The concern of intellectual property rights is a major issue in the developing countries in order to have access to the technologies that are often owned by multinational corporations in the industrialized countries.

  18. Effect of Religious Belief on Informal Reasoning about Biotechnology Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Timothy; Dawson, Vaille; Koul, Rekha

    2017-01-01

    The advances of modern biotechnology provide teachers with a number of opportunities to explore socioscientific issues, and in doing so to enhance students' reasoning skills. Although some attempt has been made to understand cultural differences in students' informal reasoning across international and regional boundaries, there is limited research…

  19. Yields, photosynthetic efficiencies, and proximate chemical composition of dense cultures of marine microalgae. A subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.H.; Seibert, D.L.R.; Alden, M.; Eldridge, P.; Neori, A.

    1983-07-01

    The yields, photosynthetic efficiencies, and proximate composition of several microalgae were compared in dense cultures grown at light intensities up to 70% sunlight. Yields ranged from 3.4 to 21.7 g dry weight/m/sup 2/ day. The highest yield was obtained with Phaeodactylum; the lowest in Botryococcus cultures. The same species had the highest and lowest efficiencies of utilization of photosynthetically active radiation. In nitrogen-sufficient cells of all but one species, most of the dry weight consisted of protein. Lipid content of all species was 20 to 29%, and carbohydrate content 11 to 23%. Lipid content increased somewhat in N-deficient Phaeodactylum and Isochrysis cells, but decreased in deficient Monallanthus cells. Because the overall dry weight yield was reduced by deficiency, lipid yields did not increase. However, since the carbohydrate content increased to about 65% in N-deficient Dunaliella and Tetraselmis cells, the carbohydrate yield increased. In Phaeodactylum the optimum light intensity was about 40% of full sunlight. Most experimets with this alga included a CUSO/sub 4/ filter to decrease infrared irradiance. When this filter was removed, the yield increased because more red light in the photosynthetically active spectral range was included. These results should prove useful to workers attempting to maximize yields and efficiencies, but additional studies are needed. 69 references, 27 figures, 18 tables.

  20. Environmental biotechnology for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, W

    2002-03-14

    In the post-industrial society, waste management is integrated in the concepts of responsibility, reliability and continuity. Therefore industry and public office are obliged to implement the concepts of structured environmental management systems more and more strictly. The endpoints are dependent on the type of wastes and on the priorities set by society. They will with time evolve towards more restriction of all kinds of emissions. This will require increasing inputs of labour, information technology and energy into waste treatment and overall waste management. Particularly for aqueous and gaseous wastes that are not contained, continuously improving treatment with maximum re-use and minimum dissipation in the ecosphere will be the trend of the future. Moreover, the public in general and the individual citizen in particular will request to have (bio)assays to monitor regularly and autonomously the quality of his environment. Such advanced waste management requires considerable energy input. It thus may come in conflict with current concerns about CO2-emissions and the Kyoto agreements. Innovative approaches to combine waste management and the International Climate Change Partnership (ICCP) directives, for instance by implementing biological carbon sequestration, are therefore warranted. Biotechnology has a major role to play particularly in terms of advanced treatment down to ng/l-levels and in terms of validating the quality of the environment by means of powerful and intelligent bio-monitoring devices.

  1. New Directions in Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The macromolecule crystallization program within NASA is undergoing considerable pressure, particularly budgetary pressure. While it has shown some successes, they have not lived up to the expectations of others, and technological advances may rapidly overtake the natural advantages offered by crystallization in microgravity. Concomitant with the microgravity effort has been a research program to study the macromolecule crystallization process. It was believed that a better understanding of the process would lead to growth of improved crystals for X-ray diffraction studies. The results of the various research efforts have been impressive in improving our understanding of macromolecule crystallization, but have not led to any improved structures. Macromolecule crystallization for structure determination is "one of", the job being unique for every protein and finished once a structure is obtained. However, the knowledge gained is not lost, but instead lays the foundation for developments in new areas of biotechnology and nanotechnology. In this it is highly analogous to studies into small molecule crystallization, the results of which have led to our present day microelectronics-based society. We are conducting preliminary experiments into areas such as designed macromolecule crystals, macromolecule-inorganic hybrid structures, and macromolecule-based nanotechnology. In addition, our protein crystallization studies are now being directed more towards industrial and new approaches to membrane protein crystallization.

  2. New Directions in Biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The macromolecule crystallization program within NASA is undergoing considerable pressure, particularly budgetary pressure. While it has shown some successes, they have not lived up to the expectations of others, and technological advances may rapidly overtake the natural advantages offered by crystallization in microgravity. Concomitant with the microgravity effort has been a research program to study the macromolecule crystallization process. It was believed that a better understanding of the process would lead to growth of improved crystals for X-ray diffraction studies. The results of the various research efforts have been impressive in improving our understanding of macromolecule crystallization, but have not led to any improved structures. Macromolecule crystallization for structure determination is "one of", the job being unique for every protein and finished once a structure is obtained. However, the knowledge gained is not lost, but instead lays the foundation for developments in new areas of biotechnology and nanotechnology. In this it is highly analogous to studies into small molecule crystallization, the results of which have led to our present day microelectronics-based society. We are conducting preliminary experiments into areas such as designed macromolecule crystals, macromolecule-inorganic hybrid structures, and macromolecule-based nanotechnology. In addition, our protein crystallization studies are now being directed more towards industrial and new approaches to membrane protein crystallization.

  3. Biotechnology of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Schwechheimer, Susanne Katharina; Park, Enoch Y; Revuelta, José Luis; Becker, Judith; Wittmann, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) production has shifted from chemical synthesis to exclusive biotechnological synthesis in less than 15 years. The underlying extraordinary achievement in metabolic engineering and bioprocess engineering is reviewed in this article with regard to the two most important industrial producers Bacillus subtilis and Ashbya gossypii. The respective biosynthetic routes and modifications are discussed, and also the regulation of riboflavin synthesis. As the terminal biosynthesis of riboflavin starts from the two precursors, ribulose 5-phosphate and guanosine triphosphate (GTP), both strains have been optimized for an improved flux through the pentose phosphate pathway as well as the purine biosynthetic pathway. Specific targets for improvement of A. gossypii were the increase of the glycine pool and the increase of carbon flow through the glyoxylic shunt. In B. subtilis, research interest, amongst others, has focused on gluconeogenesis and overexpression of the rib operon. In addition, insight into large-scale production of vitamin B2 is given, as well as future prospects and possible developments.

  4. Novel biocatalysts for white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Drepper, Thomas; Eggert, Thorsten; Hummel, Werner; Leggewie, Christian; Pohl, Martina; Rosenau, Frank; Wilhelm, Susanne; Jaeger, Karl-Erich

    2006-01-01

    White Biotechnology uses microorganisms and enzymes to manufacture a large variety of chemical products. Therefore, the demand for new and useful biocatalysts is steadily and rapidly increasing. We have developed methods for the isolation of new enzyme genes, constructed novel expression systems, and optimized existing enzymes for biotechnological applications by methods of directed evolution. Furthermore, we have isolated and characterized biocatalysts relevant for the preparation of enantiopure compounds.

  5. Green biotechnology and European competitiveness.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, J

    2001-04-01

    Europe has led many aspects of gene research and yet it has been unable to translate these discoveries into a globally dominant industrial sector. There are valid societal, political and financial reasons for its reluctance to deploy agricultural biotechnology but this reluctance might have unintended consequences. It will be hard to de-commoditize agriculture and improve farmer's lives. Research in medical biotechnology and the global environment might suffer. Europe could damage its overall economy and its global competitive standing.

  6. Exploring marine resources for bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Paula; DʼAuria, M Valeria; Muller, Christian D; Tammela, Päivi; Vuorela, Heikki; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari

    2014-09-01

    Biodiversity in the seas is only partly explored, although marine organisms are excellent sources for many industrial products. Through close co-operation between industrial and academic partners, it is possible to successfully collect, isolate and classify marine organisms, such as bacteria, fungi, micro- and macroalgae, cyanobacteria, and marine invertebrates from the oceans and seas globally. Extracts and purified compounds of these organisms can be studied for several therapeutically and industrially significant biological activities, including anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, and anticoagulant activities by applying a wide variety of screening tools, as well as for ion channel/receptor modulation and plant growth regulation. Chromatographic isolation of bioactive compounds will be followed by structural determination. Sustainable cultivation methods for promising organisms and biotechnological processes for selected compounds can be developed, as well as biosensors for monitoring the target compounds. The (semi)synthetic modification of marine-based bioactive compounds produces their new derivatives, structural analogs and mimetics that could serve as hit or lead compounds and be used to expand compound libraries based on marine natural products. The research innovations can be targeted for industrial product development in order to improve the growth and productivity of marine biotechnology. Marine research aims at a better understanding of environmentally conscious sourcing of marine biotechnology products and increased public awareness of marine biodiversity. Marine research is expected to offer novel marine-based lead compounds for industries and strengthen their product portfolios related to pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, cosmetic, agrochemical, food processing, material and biosensor applications.

  7. Detection and quantification of cultured marine Alexandrium species by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) throughout the world has increased and poses a large threat to human health, fishery resources and tourism industries. The genus Alexandrium includes a number of toxic species associated with HABs. Therefore, it is very important to rapidly detect and monitor the harmful algae, such as Alexandrium genus. In this study, a standard curve of plasmid containing 18S rDNA-28S rDNA region from Alexandrium catenella was constructed and 5.8S rDNA sequence served as the primer of the real-time PCR. Cultured A. catenella, Alexandrium affine, Alexandrium lusitanicum and Alexandrium minutum samples were analyzed by real-time PCR using the same set of primers simultaneously. Using microscopy cells counts, 5.8S rDNA copies per cell and total DNA per cell were estimated. This assay method is promising for rapid detection of large number of Alexandrium samples.

  8. Connecting Biotechnology and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, John; Glasson, George

    2003-01-01

    Points out the importance of socioscientific aspects of laboratory activities for the development of understanding of different cultures' contributions to science. Describes a lesson on gene splicing using the 5E Learning Model. (YDS)

  9. Sterol patterns of cultured zooxanthellae isolated from marine invertebrates: Synthesis of gorgosterol and 23-desmethylgorgosterol by aposymbiotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Nancy W.; Kokke, W. C. M. C.; Fenical, William; Djerassi, Carl

    1982-01-01

    Quantitative sterol compositions of cultured zooxanthellae isolated from various Pacific and Atlantic invertebrate hosts: Zoanthus sociatus (a zoanthid), Oculina diffusa (a scleractian coral), Tridacna gigas (a giant clam), Melibe pilosa (a nudibranch), and Aiptasia pulchella (a sea anemone) are reported. The results clearly demonstrate large differences in sterol patterns of zooxanthellae and that there is no obvious relationship between the taxonomic affiliation of the host and the sterol pattern of its isolated symbiont. The sterols of the zooxanthellae of O. diffusa (Cnidaria) and T. gigas (Mollusca) are qualitatively equivalent. Based on the structures of the two major free sterols synthesized by each alga, the zooxanthellae from different hosts were separated into three distinct groups. It was also found that an aposymbiotic alga can synthesize the unique marine sterols gorgosterol and 23-desmethylgorgosterol. Most of the sterols were identified by using mass spectroscopy and 360-MHz proton magnetic resonance. Spectroscopic data are reported for four novel sterols—(23,24R)-dimethyl-5α-cholest-(22E)-en-3β-o l, 23-methyl-5α-cholest-22E-en-3β-ol, cholesta-5,14-dien-3β-ol, and 4α-methyl-5α-cholesta-8(14)-24-dien-3β-ol. PMID:16593195

  10. Zooplankton community structure of the sea surface microlayer near nuclear power plants and marine fish culture zones in Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Feng; Wang, Zhao-Ding; Pan, Ming-Xiang; Jiao, Nian-Zhi

    2002-06-01

    The authors' surveys in May June 1999 (two cruises) at six sampling stations near nuclear power plants (NPP) and marine fish culture zones in Daya Bay, Guangdong, revealed species composition, densities and body-size of the sea surface microlayer (SM) zooplankton (>35 μm). Results showed that protozoans and copepod nauplii were the predominant components, accounting for 65.40% to 95.56% of total zooplankton in abundance. The size-frequency distributions showed that the frequency of micro-zooplankton (0.02 0.2 mm) reached 0.8235. The SM zooplankton community structure revealed in the present study was quite different from that revealed by investigations in the 1980s in Daya Bay. Difference of sampling method has important influence on the obtained zooplankton community structure. SM zooplankton consisted of micro- and mesozooplankton (0.2 2.0 mm), with micro-zooplankton being predominant. Some possible cause-effect relations between the zooplankton community structure and mariculture, nuclear power plants cooling systems and sampling method are discussed.

  11. Species specificity in the magnitude and duration of the acute stress response in Mediterranean marine fish in culture.

    PubMed

    Fanouraki, E; Mylonas, C C; Papandroulakis, N; Pavlidis, M

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the species-specific stress response for seven Mediterranean fishes in culture. Also, to evaluate the method of measuring free cortisol concentration in the rearing water as a non-invasive and reliable indicator of stress in marine species, of aquaculture importance. Gilthead sea bream, Sparus aurata (Sparidae); common dentex, Dentex dentex (Sparidae); common Pandora, Pagellus erythrinus (Sparidae); sharpsnout sea bream, Diplodus puntazzo (Sparidae); dusky grouper, Epinephelus marginatus (Serranidae); meagre, Argyrosomus regius (Sciaenidae) and European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax (Moronidae) were subjected to identical acute stress (5-6 min chasing and 1-1.5 min air exposure) under the same environmental conditions and samples were analyzed by the same procedures. Results indicated that there was a clear species-specificity in the magnitude, timing and duration of the stress response in terms of cortisol, glucose and lactate. European sea bass showed a very high response and dusky grouper and meagre a very low response, except plasma glucose concentrations of dusky grouper which was constantly high, while sharpsnout sea bream presented a protracted stress response, up to 8h. The present study confirmed that free cortisol release rate into the water can be used as a reliable stress indicator. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anticancer lignans--from discovery to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Ionkova, I

    2011-09-01

    Malignant diseases are the second mortality cause within the human population. Despite the serious progress in establishing and introduction of novel specifically targeted drugs the therapy of these diseases remains severe medical and social problem. Some of the most effective cancer treatments to date are natural products or compounds derived from plant products. Isolation of anticancer pharmaceuticals from plants is difficult due to their extremely low concentrations. The industry currently lacks sufficient methods for producing all of the desired plant-derived pharmaceutical molecules. Some substances can only be isolated from extremely rare plants. Plant cell cultures are an attractive alternative source to whole plant for the production of high-value secondary metabolites. The biotechnological method offers a quick and efficient method for producing these high-value medical compounds in cultivated cells. Due to the pharmaceutical importance and the low content in the plants the present review focuses on discovery and alternative production systems for anticancer lignans--aryltetralin and arylnaphthalene lignans. The aim is to focus on recent progress of in vitro production of anticancer lignans, together with structure elucidation, the methods of increasing the levels of desired substances in plant cell and tissue cultures in general. Experience of different authors, working worldwide on plant biotechnology, has been discussed to show positive results in experiments.

  13. (Workshop on Willow Breeding and Biotechnology Development Activities)

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, P.A.

    1988-10-12

    P.A. Layton attended a workshop on Willow Breeding and Biotechnology Development Activities,'' which was organized by the International Energy Agency/Bioenergy Agreement (IEA/BA) Task II. The traveler spent 1 d prior to the meeting to visit scientists and administrators of Shell Research Limited. Physiology and Biological Chemistry Division to discus their interest in biomass production research as well as their other research interests in tissue culture, biotechnology, and management of forests and agricultural crops that are pertinent to the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Biomass Production program.

  14. A survey of culturable aerobic and anaerobic marine bacteria in de novo biofilm formation on natural substrates in St. Andrews Bay, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Lucy; Garcia-Melgares, Manuel; Gmerek, Tomasz; Huddleston, W Ryan; Palmer, Alexander; Robertson, Andrew; Shapiro, Sarah; Unkles, Shiela E

    2011-10-01

    This study reports a novel study of marine biofilm formation comprising aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Samples of quartz and feldspar, minerals commonly found on the earth, were suspended 5 m deep in the North Sea off the east coast of St. Andrews, Scotland for 5 weeks. The assemblage of organisms attached to these stones was cultivated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in the laboratory. Bacteria isolated on Marine Agar 2216 were all Gram-negative and identified to genus level by sequencing the gene encoding 16S rRNA. Colwellia, Maribacter, Pseudoaltermonas and Shewanella were observed in aerobically-grown cultures while Vibrio was found to be present in both aerobic and anaerobic cultures. The obligate anaerobic bacterium Psychrilyobacter atlanticus, a recently defined genus, was identified as a close relative of isolates grown anaerobically. The results provide valuable information as to the main players that attach and form de novo biofilms on common minerals in sea water.

  15. Ergosterols from the Culture Broth of Marine Streptomyces anandii H41-59

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang-Mei; Li, Hong-Yu; Hu, Chen; Sheng, Hui-Fan; Zhang, Ying; Lin, Bi-Run; Zhou, Guang-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    An actinomycete strain, H41-59, isolated from sea sediment in a mangrove district, was identified as Streptomyces anandii on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis as well as the investigation of its morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. Three new ergosterols, ananstreps A–C (1–3), along with ten known ones (4–13), were isolated from the culture broth of this strain. The gross structures of these new compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive analysis of spectroscopic data, including HR-ESI-MS, and NMR. The cytotoxicities of these isolates against human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7, human glioblastoma cell line SF-268, and human lung cancer cell line NCI-H460 and their antibacterial activities in inhibiting the growth of Candida albicans and some other pathogenic microorganisms were tested. Compounds 3–8, 10 and 11 displayed cytotoxicity with IC50 values in a range from 13.0 to 27.8 μg/mL. However, all the tested compounds showed no activity on C. albicans and other bacteria at the test concentration of 1 mg/mL with the paper disc diffusion method. PMID:27153073

  16. Carbon isotope fractionation by marine phytoplankton in culture: The effects of CO[sub 2] concentration, pH, temperature, and species

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.; Arthur, M.A.; Pilson, M.E.Q.; Whitaker, D. )

    1994-03-01

    Carbon isotopes are fractionated during many biological and geological processes and often one can infer the nature of the conditions and processes by looking at the isotopic ratios. This study investigates how dissolved carbon dioxide concentrations, temperature, pH, and phytoplankton species affect the fractionation of carbon isotopes during the growth of marine phytoplankton using single species cultures. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Response surface methodology for optimising the culture conditions for eicosapentaenoic acid production by marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abd Elrazak, Ahmed; Ward, Alan C; Glassey, Jarka

    2013-05-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), are increasingly attracting scientific attention owing to their significant health-promoting role in the human body. However, the human body lacks the ability to produce them in vivo. The limitations associated with the current sources of ω-3 fatty acids from animal and plant sources have led to increased interest in microbial production. Bacterial isolate 717 was identified as a potential high EPA producer. As an important step in the process development of the microbial PUFA production, the culture conditions at the bioreactor scale were optimised for the isolate 717 using a response surface methodology exploring the significant effect of temperature, pH and dissolved oxygen and the interaction between them on the EPA production. This optimisation strategy led to a significant increase in the amount of EPA produced by the isolate under investigation, where the amount of EPA increased from 9 mg/g biomass (33 mg/l representing 7.6 % of the total fatty acids) to 45 mg/g (350 mg/l representing 25 % of the total fatty acids). To avoid additional costs associated with extreme cooling at large scale, a temperature shock experiment was carried out reducing the overall cooling time from the whole cultivation process to 4 h only prior to harvest. The ability of the organism to produce EPA under the complete absence of oxygen was tested revealing that oxygen is not critically required for the biosynthesis of EPA but the production improved in the presence of oxygen. The stability of the produced oil and the complete absence of heavy metals in the bacterial biomass are considered as an additional benefit of bacterial EPA compared to other sources of PUFA. To our knowledge this is the first report of a bacterial isolate producing EPA with such high yields making the large-scale manufacture much more economically viable.

  18. Microorganisms living on macroalgae: diversity, interactions, and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Martin, Marjolaine; Portetelle, Daniel; Michel, Gurvan; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2014-04-01

    Marine microorganisms play key roles in every marine ecological process, hence the growing interest in studying their populations and functions. Microbial communities on algae remain underexplored, however, despite their huge biodiversity and the fact that they differ markedly from those living freely in seawater. The study of this microbiota and of its relationships with algal hosts should provide crucial information for ecological investigations on algae and aquatic ecosystems. Furthermore, because these microorganisms interact with algae in multiple, complex ways, they constitute an interesting source of novel bioactive compounds with biotechnological potential, such as dehalogenases, antimicrobials, and alga-specific polysaccharidases (e.g., agarases, carrageenases, and alginate lyases). Here, to demonstrate the huge potential of alga-associated organisms and their metabolites in developing future biotechnological applications, we first describe the immense diversity and density of these microbial biofilms. We further describe their complex interactions with algae, leading to the production of specific bioactive compounds and hydrolytic enzymes of biotechnological interest. We end with a glance at their potential use in medical and industrial applications.

  19. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System Fluid Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Medium (TCM) is the bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures are grown. With its two syringe ports, it is much like a bag used to administer intravenous fluid, except it allows gas exchange needed for life. The TCM contains cell culture medium, and when frozen cells are flown to the ISS, they are thawed and introduced to the TCM through the syringe ports. In the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI) experiment, several mixing procedures are being assessed to determine which method achieves the most uniform mixing of growing cells and culture medium.

  20. Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System Fluid Dynamics Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Aboard the International Space Station (ISS), the Tissue Culture Medium (TCM) is the bioreactor vessel in which cell cultures are grown. With its two syringe ports, it is much like a bag used to administer intravenous fluid, except it allows gas exchange needed for life. The TCM contains cell culture medium, and when frozen cells are flown to the ISS, they are thawed and introduced to the TCM through the syringe ports. In the Cellular Biotechnology Operations Support System-Fluid Dynamics Investigation (CBOSS-FDI) experiment, several mixing procedures are being assessed to determine which method achieves the most uniform mixing of growing cells and culture medium.

  1. Development of biotechnology education in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Severcan; Ozan; Haris

    2000-01-01

    For sometime Turkish scientists have been actively involved in biotechnology related research. However, biotechnology educa-tion in Turkey is a relatively recent phenomenon. The subject has not been addressed at the undergraduate level in a serious way until recently. This is evident from the lack of undergraduate degree programmes in biotechnology at Turkish Universities. The Turkish scientific establishment is very much aware of the importance of biotechnology and has identified this subject as one of the priority areas. The Universities are taking positive steps towards enhancing Biotechnology education. This article focuses on the emergence, as well as the problems and prospects of Biotechnology education in Turkey.

  2. The development of biotechnology education in China*.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanwei; Lin, Juan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Zhonghai; Yin, Yizhou; Guo, Binhui; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2006-03-01

    From the middle of the 20th century, Chinese scientists have been actively involved in biotechnology. However, biotechnology education in China is a relatively recent phenomenon. This subject has not been addressed at the undergraduate level in a serious way until recently. In the last decade, biotechnology education developed rapidly and reached a new level in Chinese universities. The Chinese scientific establishment is very much aware of the importance of biotechnology and has identified this subject as one of the priority areas. Some universities are taking positive steps toward enhancing biotechnology education. This article focuses on the emergence, as well as the problems and prospects, of biotechnology education in China.

  3. The impact of industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the impact of industrial (or "white") biotechnology can have on our society and economy is discussed. An overview is given of industrial biotechnology and its applications in a number of product categories ranging from food ingredients, vitamins, bio-colorants, solvents, plastics and biofuels. The use of fossil resources is compared with renewable resources as the preferred feedstock for industrial biotechnology. A brief discussion is also given of the expected changes in society and technology, ranging from the shift in the supply of resources, the growing need for efficiency and sustainability of the production systems, changing consumer perception and behaviour and changing agricultural systems and practices. Many of these changes are expected to speed up the transition from a fossil-based to a bio-based economy and society.

  4. Current biotechnological developments in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Masschelein, C A; Callegari, J P; Laurent, M; Simon, J P; Taeymans, D

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, actions have been undertaken by the Belgian government to promote process innovation and technical diversification. Research programs are initiated and coordinated by the study committee for biotechnology setup within the Institute for Scientific Research in Industry and Agriculture (IRSIA). As a result of this action, the main areas where biotechnological processes are developed or commercially exploited include plant genetics, protein engineering, hybridoma technology, biopesticides, production by genetic engineering of vaccines and drugs, monoclonal detection of human and animal deseases, process reactors for aerobic and anaerobic wastewater treatment, and genetic modification of yeast and bacteria as a base for biomass and energy. Development research also includes new fermentation technologies principally based on immobilization of microorganisms, reactor design, and optimization of unit operations involved in downstream processing. Food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries are involved in genetic engineering and biotechnology and each of these sectors is overviewed in this paper.

  5. Scrutinizing the Scaffolds of Marine Biosynthetics from Different Source Organisms: Gram-Negative Cultured Bacterial Products Enter Center Stage

    PubMed Central

    Still, Patrick C.; Johnson, Tyler A.; Theodore, Christine M.; Loveridge, Steven T.; Crews, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Compounds from macro marine organisms are presumed to owe their biosynthetic origins to associated microbial symbionts, although few definitive examples exist. An upsurge in the recent literature from 2012 to 2013 has shown that four compounds previously reported from macro marine organisms are in fact biosynthesized by non-photosynthetic Gram-negative bacteria (NPGNB). Structural parallels between compounds isolated from macro marine organisms and NPGNB producers form the basis of this review. Although less attention has been given to investigating the chemistry of NPGNB sources, there exists a significant list of structural parallels between NPGNB and macro marine organism-derived compounds. Alternatively, of the thousands of compounds isolated from Gram-positive actinomycetes, few structural parallels with macro marine organisms are known. A summary of small molecules isolated from marine NPGNB sources is presented, including compounds isolated from marine myxobacteria. From this assemblage of structural parallels and diverse chemical structures, it is hypothesized that the potential for the discovery of inspirational molecules from NPGNB sources is vast and that the recent spike in the literature of macro marine compounds owing their biosynthetic origin to NPGNB producers represents a turning point in the field. PMID:24571234

  6. High production of nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) in a massive marine phytoplankton culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez-Leiva, L.; Tarifeño, E.; Cornejo, M.; Kiene, R.; Farías, L.

    2010-09-01

    The production of large amounts of algal biomass for different purposes such as aquaculture or biofuels, may cause impacts on the marine environment. One such impact is the production of radiatively active trace gases and aerosols with climate cooling (dimethyl sulfide DMS and its precursor DMSP) and warming (N2O and CH4) effects. Total and dissolved DMSP, N2O and CH4, together with other environmental variables were monitored daily for 46 days within a massive microalgae monoculture of Nannochloris (Chlorophyceae) in an open pond system. The growth of this green microalgae was stimulated by the addition of N- and P-rich salts, resulting in exponential growth (growth phase) during the first 17 days observed by cell abundance (1 × 106 to 4.4 × 106 cell mL-1) and Chl-a levels (from 1.4 to 96 mg Chl-a m-3) followed by a decrease in both Chl-a and cell abundance (senescence phase). Total DMSP (from 6.3 to 142 μmol m-3), dissolved DMSP i.e. 5.8 to 137 μmol m-3 and N2O (from 8 to 600 μmol m-3) abruptly peaked during the senescence phase, whereas CH4 steadily increased between 2 and 10 μmol m-3 during the growth phase. Different ratios between tracers and Chl-a during both phases reveal different biochemical processes involved in the cycling of these gases and tracers. Our results show that despite the consumption of large quantities of CO2 by the massive algal culture, a minor amount of DMS and huge amounts of greenhouse gases were produced, in particular N2O, which has a greater radiative effect per molecule than CO2. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical studies and for environmental management of aquaculture activities.

  7. Does the 14C method estimate net photosynthesis? Implications from batch and continuous culture studies of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward A.

    2013-12-01

    We carried out batch culture studies with seven species of marine phytoplankton and chemostat studies with two of the seven species to determine whether and to what extent 14C uptake approximated net photosynthesis. In two of seven cases, Isochrysis galbana and Dunaliella tertiolecta, cells uniformly labeled with 14C lost no activity when they were transferred to a 14C-free medium and allowed to grow in the light. In similar experiments with four other species, uniformly labeled cells lost activity when incubated in the light, but the loss rates were only a few percent per day. Thus these six species appear to respire primarily recently fixed carbon. In the case of the remaining species, Chlorella kessleri, loss rates of 14C in the light from uniformly labeled cells were about 29% per day, the apparent ratio of respiration to net photosynthesis being 0.4. Follow-up chemostat studies with I. galbana and C. kessleri grown under both light- and nitrate-limited conditions produced results consistent with the implications of the batch culture work: uptake of 14C by I. galbana after incubations of 24 h yielded estimates of photosynthetic carbon fixation equal to the product of the chemostat dilution rate and the concentration of organic carbon in the growth chamber. Similar experiments with C. kessleri produced 14C-based estimates of photosynthetic carbon fixation that exceeded the net rates of organic carbon production in the growth chamber by roughly 55%. Time-course studies with both species indicated that at high growth rates recently fixed carbon began to enter the respiratory substrate pool after a time lag of several hours, a result consistent with previous work with D. tertiolecta. The lag time appeared to be much shorter at low growth rates. The results with C. kessleri are similar to results previously reported for Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Amphidium carteri. Collectively these results suggest that 14C uptake by species with relatively high ratios of

  8. Chemical characterization of particulate air pollutants Case studies on indoor air quality, cultural heritage and the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horemans, Benjamin

    When attempting to discuss the effects of airborne particulate matter (PM), it is important to address both physical and chemical aspects of this pollutant. This work reports on the results of three separate case studies, each approaching a specific problem of air pollution by evaluating the chemical composition of PM. 1. In the US and Europe, office workers often complain about work-related health symptoms. These symptoms are collectively referred as the 'sick building syndrome'. This work could be considered as one of the largest data collections on particulate pollutants in Belgian offices. It helps to understand the sources as well as the behavior and fate of PM at our workplace environments. Especially the chemical information on PM makes the results unique, since it enables a better evaluation of the health risks connected to office dust. 2. The Alhambra and Generalife bring every year more than 3 million people to Granada in Southern Spain. Recently, the increasing urbanization of Granada and the immense pressure of mass tourism form a threat for this heritage. Despite the fact that atmospheric pollutants are known to he potentially aggressive for our cultural patrimony. this case study is the first to assess the effects of environmental aerosols on the Alhambra monument. The results of this study could help decision-makers at the Alhambra and the city of Granada with the formulation of preventive conservation measures. They show how local vehicular traffic is the main source for atmospheric pollution in and around the Alhambra monument. Targeted strategies are necessary in order to maximally preserve these monuments and their UNESCO world cultural heritage label. 3. Excessive input of nitrogen-containing atmospheric nutrients via dry and wet deposition can cause entrophication of marine regions, which is also a common, seasonal phenomenon along the coasts of the North Sea. This study is the first to give a complete quantitative description of the

  9. Intensity of Cold Water and its effects on marine culturing farms along the southeast coast of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Hwa; Shim, JeongHee; Choi, Yang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Woo; Shim, Jeong-Min

    2017-04-01

    To understand the characteristics and strength of the cold water that has caused damage to marine-culturing farms around Guryongpo, in the southeast coast of Korea, surface and water column temperatures were collected from temperature loggers deployed at a sea squirt farm during August-November 2007 and from a Real-time Information System for aquaculture environments operated by NIFS during July-August 2015 and 2016. During the study period, surface temperature at Guryongpo decreased sharply when south/southwestern winds prevailed (the 18-26th of August and 20-22nd of September 2007 and the 13-15th of July 2015) as a result of upwelling. However, the deep-water (20-30m) temperature increased during periods of strong north/northeasterly winds (the 5-7th and 16-18th of September 2007) as a result of downwelling. Among the cold water events that occurred at Guryongpo, the mass death of cultured fish followed strong cold water events (surface temperatures below 10℃) that were caused by more than two days of successive south/southeastern winds with maximum speeds higher than 5 m/s. A Cold Water Index (CWI) was defined and calculated using maximum wind speed and direction as measured daily at Pohang Meteorological Observatory. When the average CWI over two days (CWI2d) was higher than 100, mass fish mortality occurred. The four-day average CWI (CWI4d) showed a high negative correlation with surface temperature from July-August in the Guryongpo area (R2 = 0.5), suggesting that CWI is a good index for predicting strong cold water events and massive mortality. In October 2007, the sea temperature at a depth of 30 m showed a high fluctuation that ranged from 7-23℃, with frequency and spectrum coinciding with tidal levels at Ulsan, affected by the North Korean Cold Current. If temperature variations at the depth of fish cages also regularly fluctuate within this range, damage may be caused to the fish industry along the southeast coast of Korea.

  10. Management in biophotonics and biotechnologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meglinski, I. V.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2005-10-01

    Biophotonics, one of the most exciting and rapidly growing areas, offers vast potential for changing traditional approaches to meeting many critical needs in medicine, biology, pharmacy, food, health care and cosmetic industries. Follow the market trends we developed new MSc course Management in Biophotonics and Biotechnologies (MBB) that provide students of technical disciplines with the necessary training, education and problem-solving skills to produce professionals and managers who are better equipped to handle the challenges of modern science and business in biophotonics and biotechnology. A major advantage of the course is that it provides skills not currently available to graduates in other Master programs.

  11. The biotechnological potential of piezophiles.

    PubMed

    Abe, F; Horikoshi, K

    2001-03-01

    Microorganisms that prefer high-pressure conditions are termed piezophiles (previously termed barophiles). The molecular basis of piezophily is now being investigated extensively focusing on aspects of gene regulation and the function of certain proteins in deep-sea isolates. Little attention has been paid, however, to the potential biotechnological applications of piezophiles compared with other extremophiles. Based on the fundamental knowledge available, we will try to answer the following questions: How can we exploit the biotechnological potential of piezophiles? What can be understood by the application of high-pressure in biological systems?

  12. Evaluation of Brazilian biotechnology patent activity from 1975 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Dias, F; Delfim, F; Drummond, I; Carmo, A O; Barroca, T M; Horta, C C; Kalapothakis, E

    2012-08-01

    The analysis of patent activity is one methodology used for technological monitoring. In this paper, the activity of biotechnology-related patents in Brazil were analyzed through 30 International Patent Classification (IPC) codes published by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). We developed a program to analyse the dynamics of the major patent applicants, countries and IPC codes extracted from the Brazilian Patent Office (INPI) database. We also identified Brazilian patent applicants who tried to expand protection abroad via the Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT). We had access to all patents published online at the INPI from 1975 to July 2010, including 9,791 biotechnology patent applications in Brazil, and 163 PCTs published online at World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) from 1997 to December 2010. To our knowledge, there are no other online reports of biotechnology patents previous to the years analyzed here. Most of the biotechnology patents filed in the INPI (10.9%) concerned measuring or testing processes involving nucleic acids. The second and third places belonged to patents involving agro-technologies (recombinant DNA technology for plant cells and new flowering plants, i.e. angiosperms, or processes for obtaining them, and reproduction of flowering plants by tissue culture techniques). The majority of patents (87.2%) were filed by nonresidents, with USA being responsible for 51.7% of all biotechnology patents deposited in Brazil. Analyzing the resident applicants per region, we found a hub in the southeast region of Brazil. Among the resident applicants for biotechnology patents filed in the INPI, 43.5% were from São Paulo, 18.3% were from Rio de Janeiro, and 9.7% were from Minas Gerais. Pfizer, Novartis, and Sanofi were the largest applicants in Brazil, with 339, 288, and 245 biotechnology patents filed, respectively. For residents, the largest applicant was the governmental institution FIOCRUZ (Oswaldo Cruz

  13. The Catharanthus alkaloids: pharmacognosy and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    van Der Heijden, Robert; Jacobs, Denise I; Snoeijer, Wim; Hallard, Didier; Verpoorte, Robert

    2004-03-01

    The Catharanthus (or Vinca) alkaloids comprise a group of about 130 terpenoid indole alkaloids. Vinblastine is now marketed for more than 40 years as an anticancer drug and became a true lead compound for drug development. Due to the pharmaceutical importance and the low content in the plant of vinblastine and the related alkaloid vincristine, Catharanthus roseus became one of the best-studied medicinal plants. Consequently it developed as a model system for biotechnological studies on plant secondary metabolism. The aim of this review is to acquaint a broader audience with the recent progress in this research and with its exciting perspectives. The pharmacognostical aspects of the Catharanthus alkaloids cover botanical (including some historical), phytochemical and analytical data. An up-to-date view on the biosynthesis of the alkaloids is given. The pharmacological aspects of these alkaloids and their semi-synthetic derivatives are only discussed briefly. The biotechnological part focuses on alternative production systems for these alkaloids, for example by in vitro culture of C. roseus cells. Subsequently it will be discussed to what extent the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway can be manipulated genetically ("metabolic engineering"), aiming at higher production levels of the alkaloids. Another approach is to produce the alkaloids (or their precursors) in other organisms such as yeast. Despite the availability of only a limited number of biosynthetic genes, the research on C. roseus has already led to a broad scientific spin-off. It is clear that many interesting results can be expected when more genes become available.

  14. Biotechnologically produced secondary plant metabolites for cancer treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    Korkina, Liudmila; Kostyuk, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites of higher plants exert numerous effects on tumorigenesis, on tumor cells in vitro, tumors in experimental animals in vivo, interact with anti-cancer drugs, thus affecting positively or negatively their efficacy, and protect normal tissues of the host organism against adverse effects of anti-cancer therapies. The industrial development of pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products based on secondary plant metabolites is limited due to the following: (i) limited availability of their natural sources, (ii) concern about rare extinguishing plants, (iii) unavoidable contamination of plant extracts with environmental pollutants, (iv) seasonal variations in plant harvesting, (v) poor standardization of the final product due to variable conditions for plant growth, and (vi) difficulties of secondary metabolite extraction from the parts of grown plant. There is now steadily growing interest in the biotechnological approach to produce secondary metabolites using plant cell or plant tissue cultures. In the present review, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and their role(s) in plant physiology will be briefly discussed; the biotechnological approach to active substances production in the plant cell and plant tissue cultures will be described; examples and mechanisms of cancer preventive and anti-cancer action of some biotechnologically produced plant metabolites will be provided; and future perspectives for biotechnologically produced plant-derived substances in the combined protocols for cancer treatment will be suggested.

  15. Modernizing the Regulatory System for Biotechnology Products

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page describes the continuing effort to modernize the federal regulatory system for biotechnology products as well as clarify various roles of EPA, FDA and USDA in evaluating new biotechnology products.

  16. Survival and retention of the probiotic properties of Bacillus sp. strains under marine stress starvation conditions and their potential use as a probiotic in Artemia culture.

    PubMed

    Mahdhi, Abdelkarim; Esteban, Maria Ángeles; Hmila, Zeineb; Bekir, Karima; Kamoun, Fathi; Bakhrouf, Amina; Krifi, Boubaker

    2012-12-01

    The probiotic properties of Bacillus strains isolated from Artemia culture and the effect of marine stress on viability and survival were investigated, as well as the changes occurring in their properties. Analyses showed that these bacteria corresponded to the genus Bacillus sp. Antagonism and adherence assays revealed that Bacillus strains have an inhibitory effect against tested pathogenic bacteria and are fairly adherent. Normal and starved cells showed different enzymatic profiles. Challenge tests performed with Artemia larvae provided evidence that the tested Bacillus strains were neither pathogenic nor toxic to the host and conferred protection for Artemia culture against pathogens. The tested strains maintained their viability and their probiotic properties during the period of study. The results suggest that the tested strains have suffered changes allowing them to survive in seawater in the absence of nutrients and outside their natural host, identifying them as potential probiotic candidates for Artemia culture.

  17. Infusing Authentic Inquiry into Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanegan, Nikki L.; Bigler, Amber

    2009-01-01

    Societal benefit depends on the general public's understandings of biotechnology (Betsch in "World J Microbiol Biotechnol" 12:439-443, 1996; Dawson and Cowan in "Int J Sci Educ" 25(1):57-69, 2003; Schiller in "Business Review: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia" (Fourth Quarter), 2002; Smith and Emmeluth in "Am Biol Teach" 64(2):93-99, 2002). A…

  18. Biotechnology and Open University Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobstein, Clifford

    1985-01-01

    Discusses whether biotechnology commercial application will significantly inhibit the free flow of information traditional in academic environments. Background factors, crux of the concern, assessment, and current options are given. Although little evidence that industry-university collaboration has impaired academic molecular genetics exists,…

  19. Biotechnology Gains Brighten Resource Outlook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1979-01-01

    This report details recent advances in fermentation biotechnology as presented by speakers at the 27th International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Congress. Discussion centered around the use of bacteria, yeasts, and fungi as future sources of essential materials as food, fuel, and medicine. (BT)

  20. Biotechnology Gains Brighten Resource Outlook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1979-01-01

    This report details recent advances in fermentation biotechnology as presented by speakers at the 27th International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Congress. Discussion centered around the use of bacteria, yeasts, and fungi as future sources of essential materials as food, fuel, and medicine. (BT)

  1. Biotechnology Facility (BTF) for ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Engineering mockup shows the general arrangement of the plarned Biotechnology Facility inside an EXPRESS rack aboard the International Space Station. This layout includes a gas supply module (bottom left), control computer and laptop interface (bottom right), two rotating wall vessels (top right), and support systems.

  2. Biotechnology Facility (BTF) for ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Engineering mockup shows the general arrangement of the plarned Biotechnology Facility inside an EXPRESS rack aboard the International Space Station. This layout includes a gas supply module (bottom left), control computer and laptop interface (bottom right), two rotating wall vessels (top right), and support systems.

  3. The Future of Plant Biotechnology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant biotechnology has been wildly successful and has literally transformed plant agriculture. There are still undulating concerns about safety and sustainability that critics demand to be addressed. In that light, there are some biotechnoloogies that are being developed that might not only improve...

  4. Infusing Authentic Inquiry into Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanegan, Nikki L.; Bigler, Amber

    2009-01-01

    Societal benefit depends on the general public's understandings of biotechnology (Betsch in "World J Microbiol Biotechnol" 12:439-443, 1996; Dawson and Cowan in "Int J Sci Educ" 25(1):57-69, 2003; Schiller in "Business Review: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia" (Fourth Quarter), 2002; Smith and Emmeluth in "Am Biol Teach" 64(2):93-99, 2002). A…

  5. Biotechnology and Open University Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grobstein, Clifford

    1985-01-01

    Discusses whether biotechnology commercial application will significantly inhibit the free flow of information traditional in academic environments. Background factors, crux of the concern, assessment, and current options are given. Although little evidence that industry-university collaboration has impaired academic molecular genetics exists,…

  6. Western Australian School Students' Understanding of Biotechnology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Vaille; Schibeci, Renato

    2003-01-01

    Surveys (n=1116) 15-year-old students from 11 Western Australian schools to determine their understanding of and attitude towards recent advances in modern biotechnology. Discusses reasons for students' over-estimation of the use of biotechnology in society. Provides a rationale for the inclusion of biotechnology, a cutting edge science, in the…

  7. Synthesis of aromatic cytokinins for plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Plíhalová, Lucie; Vylíčilová, Hana; Doležal, Karel; Zahajská, Lenka; Zatloukal, Marek; Strnad, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Cytokinins represent an important group of plant growth regulators that can modulate several biotechnological processes owing to their ability to influence almost all stages of plant development and growth. In addition, the use of purine based cytokinins with aromatic substituent in C6 position of the purine moiety in tissue culture techniques is currently experiencing a surge in interest, made possible by the ongoing systematic synthesis and study of these compounds. This review article outlines progress in the synthesis of aromatic cytokinins, the in vitro and in vivo effects of these substances and insights gleaned from their synthesis. As the purine moiety in these compounds can be substituted at several positions, we examine each of the substitution possibilities in relation to the derivatives prepared so far. The discussion highlights the gradual simplification of their preparation in relation to their application in practice and summarizes the relevant organic chemistry literature and published patents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in biotechnology and genomics of switchgrass

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is a C4 perennial warm season grass indigenous to the North American tallgrass prairie. A number of its natural and agronomic traits, including adaptation to a wide geographical distribution, low nutrient requirements and production costs, high water use efficiency, high biomass potential, ease of harvesting, and potential for carbon storage, make it an attractive dedicated biomass crop for biofuel production. We believe that genetic improvements using biotechnology will be important to realize the potential of the biomass and biofuel-related uses of switchgrass. Tissue culture techniques aimed at rapid propagation of switchgrass and genetic transformation protocols have been developed. Rapid progress in genome sequencing and bioinformatics has provided efficient strategies to identify, tag, clone and manipulate many economically-important genes, including those related to higher biomass, saccharification efficiency, and lignin biosynthesis. Application of the best genetic tools should render improved switchgrass that will be more economically and environmentally sustainable as a lignocellulosic bioenergy feedstock. PMID:23663491

  9. Trophic flows, kelp culture and fisheries in the marine ecosystem of an artificial reef zone in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongxin; Zhang, Xiumei; Lozano-Montes, Hector M.; Loneragan, Neil R.

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluates the ecosystem structure and function of the nearshore reefs in the Lidao coastal ecosystem of northern China, a region of intensive kelp aquaculture, and fisheries enhancements, including the deployment of artificial reefs and release of cultured marine species. An Ecopath model, with 20 functional groups representing 81 species, was developed for a representative area in the region and Ecosim was used to explore two scenarios for alternative fishing practices and surrounding aquaculture activities. The mean trophic levels (TLs) of the functional groups ranged from 1.0 for the primary producers (phytoplankton, benthic algae and seagrass) and detritus to 4.14 for Type III fishes (fishes found in the water column above the artificial reefs, e.g., Scomberomorus niphonius). The mean transfer efficiency through the whole system was 11.7%, and the ecosystem had a relative low maturity, stability and disturbance resistance, indicating that it was at a developing stage. Nearly half of the total system biomass (48.9% of 620.20 t km-2 year-1), excluding detritus, was comprised of benthic finfish and invertebrates. The total yield from all fisheries (86.82 t/km2/year) was dominated by low trophic level herbivorous and detritivorous species, such as the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (TL = 2.1, 46.07%), other echinoderms (sea urchins Asterias amurensis and Strongylocentrotus nudus, TL = 2.1, 34.6%) and abalone Haliotis discus hannai (TL = 2.0, 18.4%), and as a consequence, the mean TL of the catch was low (2.1). The results from the Ecosim simulation of closing all fisheries for 20 years predicted an increase of about 100% in the relative biomass of the main exploited species, A. japonicus and H. discus hannai. The simulated removal of all kelp farms over 10 years resulted in a two fold increase in the relative biomass of Type III fishes and a 120% increase in their main prey (i.e. Small pelagic fish), while the relative biomass of A. japonicus and

  10. Recovery and phylogenetic diversity of culturable fungi associated with marine sponges Clathrina luteoculcitella and Holoxea sp. in the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bo; Yin, Ying; Zhang, Fengli; Li, Zhiyong

    2011-08-01

    Sponge-associated fungi represent an important source of marine natural products, but little is known about the fungal diversity and the relationship of sponge-fungal association, especially no research on the fungal diversity in the South China Sea sponge has been reported. In this study, a total of 111 cultivable fungi strains were isolated from two South China Sea sponges Clathrina luteoculcitella and Holoxea sp. using eight different media. Thirty-two independent representatives were selected for analysis of phylogenetic diversity according to ARDRA and morphological characteristics. The culturable fungal communities consisted of at least 17 genera within ten taxonomic orders of two phyla (nine orders of the phylum Ascomycota and one order of the phylum Basidiomycota) including some potential novel marine fungi. Particularly, eight genera of Apiospora, Botryosphaeria, Davidiella, Didymocrea, Lentomitella, Marasmius, Pestalotiopsis, and Rhizomucor were isolated from sponge for the first time. Sponge C. luteoculcitella has greater culturable fungal diversity than sponge Holoxea sp. Five genera of Aspergillus, Davidiella, Fusarium, Paecilomyces, and Penicillium were isolated from both sponges, while 12 genera of Apiospora, Botryosphaeria, Candida, Marasmius, Cladosporium, Didymocrea, Hypocrea, Lentomitella, Nigrospora, Pestalotiopsis, Rhizomucor, and Scopulariopsis were isolated from sponge C. luteoculcitella only. Order Eurotiales especially genera Penicillium, Aspergillus, and order Hypocreales represented the dominant culturable fungi in these two South China Sea sponges. Nigrospora oryzae strain PF18 isolated from sponge C. luteoculcitella showed a strong and broad spectrum antimicrobial activities suggesting the potential for antimicrobial compounds production.

  11. Biotechnological studies in the Far-Eastern Region of Russia.

    PubMed

    Stonik, Valentin A; Mikhailov, Valery V; Bulgakov, Victor P; Zhuravlev, Yuri N

    2007-07-01

    Achievements and problems in both the studies on natural bioactive compounds from the Far-Eastern higher plants and marine invertebrates and development of the corresponding biotechnologies concerning new drugs and food supplements, as well as pharmaceutical leads are discussed. Special emphasis is made on recent results from the Far-eastern Institutions belonging to the Russian Academy of Sciences, and their application in both medicine and the food industry, as well as on peculiarities of biological and chemical diversity in the North-Western part of Asia and adjoining seas.

  12. Current state of biotechnology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Munis; Akbarova, Yagut

    2011-09-01

    Biotechnology is an interdisciplinary branch of science that encompasses a wide range of subjects like genetics, virology, microbiology, immunology, engineering to develop vaccines, and so on and plays a vital role in health systems, crop and seed management, yield improvement, agriculture, soil management, ecology, animal farming, cellular process, bio statistics, and so on. This article is about activities in medical and pharmaceutical biotechnology, environmental biotechnology, agricultural biotechnology and nanobiotechnology carried out in Turkey. Turkey has made some progress in biotechnology projects for research and development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The costly benefits of opposing agricultural biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Apel, Andrew

    2010-11-30

    Rigorous application of a simple definition of what constitutes opposition to agricultural biotechnology readily encompasses a wide array of key players in national and international systems of food production, distribution and governance. Even though the sum of political and financial benefits of opposing agricultural biotechnology appears vastly to outweigh the benefits which accrue to providers of agricultural biotechnology, technology providers actually benefit from this opposition. If these barriers to biotechnology were removed, subsistence farmers still would not represent a lucrative market for improved seed. The sum of all interests involved ensures that subsistence farmers are systematically denied access to agricultural biotechnology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The developing world benefits from plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Maureen A

    2003-01-01

    This article presents the view that the developing world benefits from plant biotechnology. To support this view, evidence is presented showing that plant biotechnology has already had a beneficial impact on millions of farmers of the developing world who have chosen to grow Bt cotton, resulting in fewer pesticide sprayings and increased yields and profits. Leaders, scientists, and farmers in developing countries have expressed their need for plant biotechnology, and in some developing countries, ongoing projects are applying plant biotechnology to improve indigenous crops. Nutrition education efforts should evaluate crop biotechnology from the perspective of the developing world.

  15. Potential benefits of biotechnology in aquaculture: The case of growth hormones in French trout farming

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnieux, F.; Gloaguen, Y.; Rainelli, P.; Faure, A.; Fauconneau, B.; Le Bail, P.Y.; Maisse, G.; Prunet, P.

    1993-05-01

    Against the background of rapidly increasing fish demand and stagnant or declining marine harvest, aquaculture or fish farming has assumed a major role in France which is set to expand. Trout farming in particular has already displayed considerable growth and France is the leading producer in the EEC. Biotechnology holds the key to future changes in trout culture. One such technology, which trials show has potential to reduce production costs, is recombinant trout growth hormone (rtGH). This paper sets out to perform a preliminary ex ante assessment of the possible social benefits from the adoption of rtGH by French trout producers. Several scenarios, based on possible hypotheses of supply and demand growth, are considered. Scenarios assuming an association of the technology with diversification towards more highly processed trout products display the highest estimated welfare gains. A key factor which will determine the outcome of using rtGH is its acceptance by the public. There has already been strong adverse reaction in Europe to the use of genetically engineered growth hormones in meat production and to the use of bovine somatotropin to enhance milk yields. The possibility that there might be a similar response in the case of trout is examined by considering the possibility of a sharp drop in demand. Part 1 of the paper sets out the economic and technological background to biotechnological development of trout farming in France. Part 2 undertakes an ex ante assessment of potential changes in producer and consumer surplus from the adoption of rtGH applying alternative supply and demand shifts in the framework of partial equilibrium analysis. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. The rise (and decline?) of biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S

    2014-11-01

    Since the 1970s, biotechnology has been a key innovator in drug development. An analysis of FDA-approved therapeutics demonstrates pharmaceutical companies outpace biotechs in terms of new approvals but biotechnology companies are now responsible for earlier-stage activities (patents, INDs or clinical development). The number of biotechnology organizations that contributed to an FDA approval began declining in the 2000s and is at a level not seen since the 1980s. Whereas early biotechnology companies had a decade from first approval until acquisition, the average acquisition of a biotechnology company now occurs months before their first FDA approval. The number of hybrid organizations that arise when pharmaceutical companies acquire biotechnology is likewise declining, raising questions about the sustainability of biotechnology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Space and biotechnology: An industry profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Richard S.; Norton, David J.; Tom, Baldwin H.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a study conducted by the Center for Space and Advanced Technology (CSAT) for NASA-JSC are presented. The objectives were to determine the interests and attitudes of the U.S. biotechnology industry toward space biotechnology and to prepare a concise review of the current activities of the biotechnology industry. In order to accomplish these objectives, two primary actions were taken. First, a questionnaire was designed, reviewed, and distributed to U.S. biotechnology companies. Second, reviews of the various biotechnology fields were prepared in several aspects of the industry. For each review, leading figures in the field were asked to prepare a brief review pointing out key trends and current industry technical problems. The result is a readable narrative of the biotechnology industry which will provide space scientists and engineers valuable clues as to where the space environment can be explored to advance the U.S. biotechnology industry.

  18. Non-contact temperature measurements for biotechnology discipline working group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    In the biotechnology research areas, there is interest in measuring temperature changes over very small dimensions, such as the surface of a 10-micrometer diameter biological cell immersed in cell culture fluid. Non-interference measurements of other properties, such as chemical constituents and their concentrations, are also needed. Contacting probes for pH have recently been developed to penetrate a cell but questions have been raised about their accuracy and net value.

  19. Recent advances in plant biotechnology and genetic engineering for production of secondary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Sheludko, Y V

    2010-01-01

    For a long time people are using plants not only as crop cultures but also for obtaining of various chemicals. Currently plants remain one of the most important and essential sources of biologically active compounds in spite of progress in chemical or microbial synthesis. In our review we compare potentials and perspectives of modern genetic engineering approaches for pharmaceutical biotechnology and give examples of actual biotechnological systems used for production of several promising natural compounds: artemisinin, paclitaxel and scopolamine.

  20. Biotechnology Science Experiments on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity biotechnology experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. Four experiments investigated the growth of protein crystals, and three investigated cellular growth. Many hundreds of protein samples were processed using four different techniques. The objective of these experiments was to determine optimum conditions for the growth of very high quality single crystals to be used for structure determination. The Biotechnology System (BTS) was used to process the three cell growth investigations. The samples processed by these experiments were: bovine chondrocytes, human renal epithelial cells, and human breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. The objective was to determine the unique properties of cell aggregates produced in the microgravity environment.

  1. Microfluidic tools toward industrial biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline F; Pessoa, Amanda C S N; Bastos, Reinaldo G; de la Torre, Lucimara G

    2016-11-01

    Microfluidics is a technology that operates with small amounts of fluids and makes possible the investigation of cells, enzymes, and biomolecules and encapsulation of biocatalysts in a greater variety of conditions than permitted using conventional methods. This review discusses technological possibilities that can be applied in the field of industrial biotechnology, presenting the principal definitions and fundamental aspects of microfluidic parameters to better understand advanced approaches. Specifically, concentration gradient generators, droplet-based microfluidics, and microbioreactors are explored as useful tools that can contribute to industrial biotechnology. These tools present potential applications, inclusive as commercial platforms to optimizing in bioprocesses development as screening cells, encapsulating biocatalysts, and determining critical kinetic parameters. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1372-1389, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. New challenges in microalgae biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Federico; Romero-Campero, Francisco J; León, Rosa; Guerrero, Miguel G; Serrano, Aurelio

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic protists, also called microalgae, have been systematically studied for more than a century. However, only recently broad biotechnological applications have fostered a novel wave of research on their potentialities as sustainable resources of renewable energy as well as valuable industrial and agro-food products. At the recent VII European Congress of Protistology held in Seville, three outstanding examples of different research strategies on microalgae with biotechnological implications were presented, which suggested that integrative approaches will produce very significant advances in this field in the next future. In any case, intense research and the application of systems biology and genetic engineering techniques are absolutely essential to reach the full potential of microalgae as cell-factories of bio-based products and, therefore, could contribute significantly to solve the problems of biosustainability and energy shortage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Biotechnology Science Experiments on Mir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the microgravity biotechnology experiments carried out on the Shuttle/Mir program. Four experiments investigated the growth of protein crystals, and three investigated cellular growth. Many hundreds of protein samples were processed using four different techniques. The objective of these experiments was to determine optimum conditions for the growth of very high quality single crystals to be used for structure determination. The Biotechnology System (BTS) was used to process the three cell growth investigations. The samples processed by these experiments were: bovine chondrocytes, human renal epithelial cells, and human breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. The objective was to determine the unique properties of cell aggregates produced in the microgravity environment.

  4. Glucoamylases: structural and biotechnological aspects.

    PubMed

    Marín-Navarro, Julia; Polaina, Julio

    2011-03-01

    Glucoamylases, one of the main types of enzymes involved in starch hydrolysis, are exo-acting enzymes that release consecutive glucose units from the non-reducing ends of starch molecules. Glucoamylases are microbial enzymes, present in bacteria, archaea, and fungi but not in plants and animals. Structurally, they are classified in family 15 of glycoside hydrolases and characterised by the invariable presence of a catalytic domain with (α/α)₆-fold, often bound to a non-catalytic domain of diverse origin and function. Fungal glucoamylases are biotechnologically very important as they are used industrially in large amounts and have been extensively studied during the past 30 years. Prokaryotic glucoamylases are of biotechnological relevance for being generally thermophilic enzymes, active at elevated temperatures.

  5. The potential of using biotechnology to improve cassava: a review.

    PubMed

    Chavarriaga-Aguirre, Paul; Brand, Alejandro; Medina, Adriana; Prías, Mónica; Escobar, Roosevelt; Martinez, Juan; Díaz, Paula; López, Camilo; Roca, Willy M; Tohme, Joe

    2016-01-01

    The importance of cassava as the fourth largest source of calories in the world requires that contributions of biotechnology to improving this crop, advances and current challenges, be periodically reviewed. Plant biotechnology offers a wide range of opportunities that can help cassava become a better crop for a constantly changing world. We therefore review the state of knowledge on the current use of biotechnology applied to cassava cultivars and its implications for breeding the crop into the future. The history of the development of the first transgenic cassava plant serves as the basis to explore molecular aspects of somatic embryogenesis and friable embryogenic callus production. We analyze complex plant-pathogen interactions to profit from such knowledge to help cassava fight bacterial diseases and look at candidate genes possibly involved in resistance to viruses and whiteflies-the two most important traits of cassava. The review also covers the analyses of main achievements in transgenic-mediated nutritional improvement and mass production of healthy plants by tissue culture and synthetic seeds. Finally, the perspectives of using genome editing and the challenges associated to climate change for further improving the crop are discussed. During the last 30 yr, great advances have been made in cassava using biotechnology, but they need to scale out of the proof of concept to the fields of cassava growers.

  6. Type Culture Collections and Their Databases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial culture collections, also known as Biological Resource Centers, are primary suppliers of microbial cultures (germplasm) for medical, agricultural and biotechnological research and development. Many countries have one or more culture collections, which may specialize in certain microbial g...

  7. Unique actinomycetes from marine caves and coral reef sediments provide novel PKS and NRPS biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Tyler W; Slattery, Marc; Olson, Julie B

    2012-06-01

    In the ever-expanding search for novel bioactive molecules and enzymes, marine actinomycetes have proven to be a productive source. While open reef sediment and sponge-associated actinomycetes have been extensively examined, their marine cave counterparts remain unevaluated. Anchialine cave systems in the Bahamas offered an ideal setting to evaluate the occurrence and variation within sediment-associated actinomycete communities. While in close geographical proximity to open reef environments, these systems provide a specialized environmental niche devoid of light and direct exposure to nutrient input. In the present study, selective isolation techniques and molecular methods were used to test the hypothesis that variable distribution of actinomycetes and secondary metabolite gene clusters occur between open reef and marine cave systems. The results indicated that differences exist within the culturable sediment-associated actinomycete communities between marine caves and open reef systems, with members of the genus Streptomyces dominating cultures from open reef sediments and a more diverse suite of actinomycetes isolated from marine cave sediment samples. Within the cave isolates, members of the proposed genus Solwaraspora were the most represented. Based on PKS- and NRPS-gene-targeted PCR amplification and sequencing, geographic variation in the occurrence of these biosynthetic pathways was also observed. These findings indicate that marine cave systems are a lucrative source in the search for novel secondary metabolite producers with biotechnological applications and that environmental and geographic factors likely affect the occurrence of these biosynthetic pathways.

  8. Biotechnology, Industry Study, Spring 2009

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    direct costs include diagnostic testing, pesticides , herbicides, veterinary services and drugs, and the cost of destroying diseased livestock or...However, success in development of the first generation of biotechnology products for food and the envir m F In December 2008, United Nations...crop damage due to pests such as the European corn borer increase the eagerness of European farmers to use genetically engineered crops designed to

  9. Applications of quorum sensing in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Many unicellular microorganisms use small signaling molecules to determine their local concentration. The processes involved in the production and recognition of these signals are collectively known as quorum sensing (QS). This form of cell-cell communication is used by unicellular microorganisms to co-ordinate their activities, which allows them to function as multi-cellular systems. Recently, several groups have demonstrated artificial intra-species and inter-species communication through synthetic circuits which incorporate components of bacterial QS systems. Engineered QS-based circuits have a wide range of applications such as production of biochemicals, tissue engineering, and mixed-species fermentations. They are also highly useful in designing microbial biosensors to identify bacterial species present in the environment and within living organisms. In this review, we first provide an overview of bacterial QS systems and the mechanisms developed by bacteria and higher organisms to obstruct QS communications. Next, we describe the different ways in which researchers have designed QS-based circuits and their applications in biotechnology. Finally, disruption of quorum sensing is discussed as a viable strategy for preventing the formation of harmful biofilms in membrane bioreactors and marine transportation.

  10. Applications of cyanobacteria in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Abed, R M M; Dobretsov, S; Sudesh, K

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have gained a lot of attention in recent years because of their potential applications in biotechnology. We present an overview of the literature describing the uses of cyanobacteria in industry and services sectors and provide an outlook on the challenges and future prospects of the field of cyanobacterial biotechnology. Cyanobacteria have been identified as a rich source of biologically active compounds with antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and anticancer activities. Several strains of cyanobacteria were found to accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoates, which can be used as a substitute for nonbiodegradable petrochemical-based plastics. Recent studies showed that oil-polluted sites are rich in cyanobacterial consortia capable of degrading oil components. Cyanobacteria within these consortia facilitated the degradation processes by providing the associated oil-degrading bacteria with the necessary oxygen, organics and fixed nitrogen. Cyanobacterial hydrogen has been considered as a very promising source of alternative energy, and has now been made commercially available. In addition to these applications, cyanobacteria are also used in aquaculture, wastewater treatment, food, fertilizers, production of secondary metabolites including exopolysaccharides, vitamins, toxins, enzymes and pharmaceuticals. Future research should focus on isolating new cyanobacterial strains producing high value products and genetically modifying existing strains to ensure maximum production of the desired products. Metagenomic libraries should be constructed to discover new functional genes that are involved in the biosynthesis of biotechnological relevant compounds. Large-scale industrial production of the cyanobacterial products requires optimization of incubation conditions and fermenter designs in order to increase productivity.

  11. Ecology and biotechnological potential of Paenibacillus polymyxa: a minireview.

    PubMed

    Lal, Sadhana; Tabacchioni, Silvia

    2009-03-01

    Microbial diversity is a major resource for biotechnological products and processes. Bacteria are the most dominant group of this diversity which produce a wide range of products of industrial significance. Paenibacillus polymyxa (formerly Bacillus polymyxa), a non pathogenic and endospore-forming Bacillus, is one of the most industrially significant facultative anaerobic bacterium. It occurs naturally in soil, rhizosphere and roots of crop plants and in marine sediments. During the last two decades, there has been a growing interest for their ecological and biotechnological importance, despite their limited genomic information. P. polymyxa has a wide range of properties, including nitrogen fixation, plant growth promotion, soil phosphorus solubilisation and production of exopolysaccharides, hydrolytic enzymes, antibiotics, cytokinin. It also helps in bioflocculation and in the enhancement of soil porosity. In addition, it is known to produce optically active 2,3-butanediol (BDL), a potentially valuable chemical compound from a variety of carbohydrates. The present review article aims to provide an overview of the various roles that these microorganisms play in the environment and their biotechnological potential.

  12. Seaweed cultivation: A new applied field for biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Xiu-Geng; Lu, Shan; Bao, Ying

    1998-03-01

    Seaweeds cultivation has resulted in great achievements, although it has a history of only a few decades. With higher productivity and resulting higher profit, it has become the leading marine exploitation industry with the brightest prospects. The relatively limited species introduced for commercial cultivation showed great biological diversity. Introduction of selected good strains for traditional cultivation and the transformation from cultivation of mixed strains to that of pure cell lines are two certain tendencies in the future. Pure line cultivation of seaweeds in a sort of advanced biotechnology. It provides new opportunities for not only the industry itself, but also the stable market of high quality natural marine products. More work should be done on principles and methods to obtain optimal results from the combination of pure line cultivation techniques with advanced biochemistry. The programmed batch production of fine chemicals such as polysaccharides and proteins will probably become the social demand.

  13. Environmental biotechnology: the ongoing quest.

    PubMed

    Grommen, R; Verstraete, W

    2002-09-11

    Environmental biotechnology, until now, has primarily focused on the development of technologies to treat aqueous, solid and gaseous wastes. At present, the basic knowledge on how biotechnology can handle these wastes has been acquired and the focus is now on the implementation of these processes as 'best available technology not entailing excessive costs' (BATNEEC) in the framework of strict and transparent environmental legislation. New environmental challenges continue to evolve, as it becomes clear that waste streams should be tackled in an overall holistic way. New technologies to reach this goal are currently under development. Novel aspects with respect to the domain of water treatment are, for example, the biomembrane reactor technology and the newly discovered processes to remove nitrogen by means of anaerobic ammonium oxidation. Also, most challenging is the continuing strive for re-use of treated wastewater. Indeed, water shortage is emerging in an increasing number of countries all over the world and necessitates the short cycling of water. Finally, biotechnology has a key role to play in the novel approaches to design wastewater treatment based on decentralised sanitation and reuse (DESAR). Solid waste is a major challenge worldwide. The implementation of anaerobic digestion to treat biowastes has become a grown-up technology. New approaches in which biotechnological processes are linked to physical processes, such as plasma technology, certainly deserve special attention for the coming decades. Soil and sediment clean up by means of biostimulation/remediation/augmentation is now well established. Certainly, a number of prospects need to be further explored, such as the use of special energy sources to stimulate in situ the microbial community and the seeding of knowledge to the in situ community by means of horizontal gene transfer mechanisms. A number of waste gases can be handled by biofilter systems. Biological treatment of wastegases is also

  14. A Project Approach to Teaching Aquaculture and Entrepreneurial Skills in the Cage Culture of Salmonids Program at the Marine Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Edgar; Smith, Boyd

    Between September and December 1986, the Marine Institute in Newfoundland, Canada, used a "projects approach" to train aquaculture workers for 10 new salmon farms to be opened in spring 1987 by a producers' cooperative. The projects approach combined instruction in the aquaculture skills needed to operate a salmon farm and the entrepreneurial…

  15. Situating Arab-Israeli artisanal fishermen's perceptions of marine litter in a socio-institutional and socio-cultural context.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Ruth E; Portman, Michelle E

    2017-02-15

    Understanding the mental constructs underlying people's social responses, decisions and behaviors is crucial to defining the governance challenges faced in dealing with marine anthropogenic litter. Using interactive governance theory, this study provides qualitative insights into how a small group of Arab-Israeli artisanal fishermen perceive marine litter and its impact (system to be governed) in the context of the socio-institutional structures (governing system) which manage waste and aim to protect the surrounding environment. It demonstrates that, until the relationships between local people and the various governing institutions are transformed, there is little hope for citizen cooperation in reducing marine litter long-term in the case-study site. More generally, underlying narratives and politics playing out at a local level need to be understood in order to identify which interventions are likely to be effective and which are not. An intervention checklist to assess the potential effectiveness of a marine litter intervention is proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Project Approach to Teaching Aquaculture and Entrepreneurial Skills in the Cage Culture of Salmonids Program at the Marine Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Edgar; Smith, Boyd

    Between September and December 1986, the Marine Institute in Newfoundland, Canada, used a "projects approach" to train aquaculture workers for 10 new salmon farms to be opened in spring 1987 by a producers' cooperative. The projects approach combined instruction in the aquaculture skills needed to operate a salmon farm and the entrepreneurial…

  17. Culture-dependent and culture-independent diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve from the South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Dai, Shikun; Jiang, Shumei; Wang, Guanghua; Liu, Guohui; Wu, Houbo; Li, Xiang

    2010-06-01

    In this report, the diversity of Actinobacteria associated with the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve collected from a remote island of the South China Sea was investigated employing classical cultivation and characterization, 16S rDNA library construction, 16S rDNA-restriction fragment length polymorphism (rDNA-RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis. A total of 184 strains were isolated using seven different media and 24 isolates were selected according to their morphological characteristics for phylogenetic analysis on the basis of their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Results showed that the 24 isolates were assigned to six genera including Salinispora, Gordonia, Mycobacterium, Nocardia, Rhodococcus and Streptomyces. This is the first report that Salinispora is present in a marine sponge from the South China Sea. Subsequently, 26 rDNA clones were selected from 191 clones in an Actinobacteria-specific 16S rDNA library of the H. perleve sample, using the RFLP technique for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. In total, 26 phylotypes were clustered in eight known genera of Actinobacteria including Mycobacterium, Amycolatopsis, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Microlunatus, Nocardioides, Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces. This study contributes to our understanding of actinobacterial diversity in the marine sponge H. perleve from the South China Sea.

  18. Enhanced agarose and xylan degradation for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by co-culture of marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans and its contaminant, Bacillus cereus

    DOE PAGES

    Sawant, Shailesh S.; Salunke, Bipinchandra K.; Taylor, II, Larry E.; ...

    2017-02-28

    Over reliance on energy or petroleum products has raised concerns both in regards to the depletion of their associated natural resources as well as their increasing costs. Bioplastics derived from microbes are emerging as promising alternatives to fossil fuel derived petroleum plastics. The development of a simple and eco-friendly strategy for bioplastic production with high productivity and yield, which is produced in a cost effective manner utilising abundantly available renewable carbon sources, would have the potential to result in an inexhaustible global energy source. Here we report the biosynthesis of bioplastic polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in pure cultures of marine bacterium, Saccharophagusmore » degradans 2-40 (Sde 2-40), its contaminant, Bacillus cereus, and a co-culture of these bacteria (Sde 2-40 and B. cereus) degrading plant and algae derived complex polysaccharides. Sde 2-40 degraded the complex polysaccharides agarose and xylan as sole carbon sources for biosynthesis of PHAs. The ability of Sde 2-40 to degrade agarose increased after co-culturing with B. cereus. The association of Sde 2-40 with B. cereus resulted in increased cell growth and higher PHA production (34.5% of dry cell weight) from xylan as a carbon source in comparison to Sde 2-40 alone (22.7% of dry cell weight). Lastly, the present study offers an innovative prototype for production of PHA through consolidated bioprocessing of complex carbon sources by pure and co-culture of microorganisms.« less

  19. Comparison of spiculogenesis in in vitro ADCP-primmorph and explants culture of marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve with 3-TMOSPU supplementation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xupeng; Yu, Xingju; Zhang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to test the feasibility of introducing functional chemical groups into biogenic silica spicules by examining the effect of supplementing a silican coupler [3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]urea (3-TMOSPU) as silica source in the cultures of archaeocytes-dominant-cell-population (ADCP) primmorphs and explants of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve. Analysis by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed that the organic group in 3-TMOSPU was introduced into silica spicules. By comparing ADCP-primmorph cultures when supplemented with Na2SiO3, 3-TMOSPU supplementation showed no notable effect on the primmorphs development and cell locomotion behaviors. A decline in silicatein expression quantified by real-time RT-PCR was, however, observed during spiculogenesis. The decline was slower for the 3-TMOSPU group whereas significantly fewer spicules were formed. When sponge papillae explants were cultured, 3-TMOSPU supplementation had no negative effect on sponge growth but inhibited the growth biofouling of the diatom Nitzschia closterium. By monitoring the detectable Si concentration, it seemed that 3-TMOSPU was converted by the sponge and its conversion was related to spiculogenesis. Analysis of spicule dimensional changes indicated that the inhibition of spiculogenesis by 3-TMOSPU supplementation was less in ADCP-primmorphs culture due to lower 3-TMOSPU/detectable Si ratio in the media.

  20. Editorial: Latest methods and advances in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Yup; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-01-01

    The latest "Biotech Methods and Advances" special issue of Biotechnology Journal continues the BTJ tradition of featuring the latest breakthroughs in biotechnology. The special issue is edited by our Editors-in-Chief, Prof. Sang Yup Lee and Prof. Alois Jungbauer and covers a wide array of topics in biotechnology, including the perennial favorite workhorses of the biotech industry, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Cancer Biotechnology | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Biotechnology advances continue to underscore the need to educate NCI fellows in new methodologies. The Cancer Biotechnology course will be held on the NCI-Frederick campus on January 29, 2016 (Bldg. 549, Main Auditorium) and the course will be repeated on the Bethesda campus on February 9, 2016 (Natcher Balcony C). The latest advances in DNA, protein and image analysis will be presented. Clinical and postdoctoral fellows who want to learn about new biotechnology advances are encouraged to attend this course.

  2. Towards harmonization: the European biotechnology patent directive.

    PubMed

    Curley, Duncan

    2002-01-01

    Having first been proposed over a decade ago to harmonize European patent law for the benefit of Europe's fledgling biotechnology industry, the Biotechnology Patent Directive underwent a somewhat tortured introduction to adolescence when its adoption was challenged by a legal annulment action from the Governments of the Netherlands, Italy and Norway. This article explores the nature of the legal challenge to the Directive, which to an extent typify European concerns about biotechnological inventions, particularly the "patenting of life."

  3. Relevance of chemistry to white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Munishwar N; Raghava, Smita

    2007-06-20

    White biotechnology is a fast emerging area that concerns itself with the use of biotechnological approaches in the production of bulk and fine chemicals, biofuels, and agricultural products. It is a truly multidisciplinary area and further progress depends critically on the role of chemists. This article outlines the emerging contours of white biotechnology and encourages chemists to take up some of the challenges that this area has thrown up.

  4. Culture.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy B; Rodríguez, Melanie Domenech; Bernal, Guillermo

    2011-02-01

    This article summarizes the definitions, means, and research of adapting psychotherapy to clients' cultural backgrounds. We begin by reviewing the prevailing definitions of cultural adaptation and providing a clinical example. We present an original meta-analysis of 65 experimental and quasi-experimental studies involving 8,620 participants. The omnibus effect size of d = .46 indicates that treatments specifically adapted for clients of color were moderately more effective with that clientele than traditional treatments. The most effective treatments tended to be those with greater numbers of cultural adaptations. Mental health services targeted to a specific cultural group were several times more effective than those provided to clients from a variety of cultural backgrounds. We recommend a series of research-supported therapeutic practices that account for clients' culture, with culture-specific treatments being more effective than generally culture-sensitive treatments. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Entrapment of anaerobic thermophilic and hyperthermophilic marine micro-organisms in a gellan/xanthan matrix.

    PubMed

    Landreau, M; Duthoit, F; Claeys-Bruno, M; Vandenabeele-Trambouze, O; Aubry, T; Godfroy, A; Le Blay, G

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to develop a protocol for the entrapment of anaerobic (hyper)thermophilic marine micro-organisms; (ii) to test the use of the chosen polymers in a range of physical and chemical conditions and (iii) to validate the method with batch cultures. The best conditions for immobilization were obtained at 80°C with gellan and xanthan gums. After 5-week incubation, beads showed a good resistance to all tested conditions except those simultaneously including high temperature (100°C), low NaCl (<0∙5 mol l(-1) ) and extreme pH (4/8). To confirm the method efficiency, batch cultures with immobilized Thermosipho sp. strain AT1272 and Thermococcus kodakarensis strain KOD1 showed an absence of detrimental effect on cell viability and a good growth within and outside the beads. This suggests that entrapment in a gellan-xanthan matrix could be employed for the culture of anaerobic (hyper)thermophilic marine micro-organisms. (Hyper)thermophilic marine micro-organisms possess a high biotechnological potential. Generally microbial cells are grown as free-cell cultures. The use of immobilized cells may offer several advantages such as protection against phage attack, high cell biomass and better production rate of desired metabolites. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Undergraduate Biotechnology Students' Views of Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmondston, Joanne Elisabeth; Dawson, Vaille; Schibeci, Renato

    2010-12-01

    Despite rapid growth of the biotechnology industry worldwide, a number of public concerns about the application of biotechnology and its regulation remain. In response to these concerns, greater emphasis has been placed on promoting biotechnologists' public engagement. As tertiary science degree programmes form the foundation of the biotechnology sector by providing a pipeline of university graduates entering into the profession, it has been proposed that formal science communication training be introduced at this early stage of career development. The aim of the present study was to examine the views of biotechnology students towards science communication and science communication training. Using an Australian biotechnology degree programme as a case study, 69 undergraduates from all three years of the programme were administered a questionnaire that asked them to rank the importance of 12 components of a biotechnology curriculum, including two science communication items. The results were compared to the responses of 274 students enrolled in other science programmes. Additional questions were provided to the second year biotechnology undergraduates and semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 13 of these students to further examine their views of this area. The results of this study suggest that the biotechnology students surveyed do not value communication with non-scientists nor science communication training. The implications of these findings for the reform of undergraduate biotechnology courses yet to integrate science communication training into their science curriculum are discussed.

  7. Advanced agricultural biotechnologies and sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Lyson, Thomas A

    2002-05-01

    Agricultural biotechnologies are anchored to a scientific paradigm rooted in experimental biology, whereas sustainable agriculture rests on a biological paradigm that is best described as ecological. Both biotechnology and sustainable agriculture are associated with particular social science paradigms: biotechnology has its foundation in neoclassical economics, but sustainability is framed by an emerging community-centered, problem-solving perspective. Fundamentally, biotechnology and neoclassical economics are reductionist in nature. Sustainability and community problem-solving, however, are nonreductionist. Given these differences, we might see the development of two rather distinct systems of food production in the near future.

  8. Current status of biotechnology in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Stuchlík, Stanislav; Turna, Ján

    2013-07-01

    The United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity defines biotechnology as: 'Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms, or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.' In other words biotechnology is 'application of scientific and technical advances in life science to develop commercial products' or briefly 'the use of molecular biology for useful purposes'. This short overview is about different branches of biotechnology carried out in Slovakia and it shows that Slovakia has a good potential for further development of modern biotechnologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Agricultural biotechnology: myth and measurement.

    PubMed

    McLaren, J S

    2000-12-01

    The title of this article could easily have been "The Inquisition, The First 100 Million Acres, and Future Quantification Challenges." After approximately 20 years of research, transgenic crops have made it through the maze of scientific and regulatory testing to reach commercial practice and have been adopted at a rapid rate. Plant scientists and growers have quickly recognized the extensive portfolio of benefits that can be obtained: it is analogous to the discovery of electricity (biotech) in a world of candles (conventional breeding). Despite the potential for advancement, a few groups have revolted against biotechnological crops. Misinformation has been used to capture headlines, and good scientific research principles have been castigated by self-appointed judges. Conversely, the probiotech camp has not been good at communicating in a broadly understandable manner, but they have the weight of scientific evidence on their side. There are 100 million acres of commercial transgenic crops, and more than 30,000 intensive field trials have been performed, but not one shred of reproducible evidence indicates that biotechnological crops are dangerous, unsafe, or a threat to the environment. Looking ahead, dozens of new beneficial traits are being explored in laboratories across the world, and their application will bring new issues and more difficult challenges. For example, several genes may be stacked in different combinations to provide trait sets with various levels of added value. These crops will no longer be traded as bulk-mixed commodities; therefore, some mechanism will be required to measure the value at each transaction point. The need to develop standards, operating procedures, and devices for accurate, real-time quantification of multiple possible trait sets may be one of the major limitations to rapid future progress in some sectors of crop biotechnology.

  10. Skin and soft-tissue infections after injury in the ocean: culture methods and antibiotic therapy for marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reed, K C; Crowell, M C; Castro, M D; Sloan, M L

    1999-03-01

    Isolated organisms from two common Indo-Pacific marine animals (Echinometra mathaei urchins and Acanthaster planci sea stars) likely to cause puncture wounds to recreational beachcombers, diverse, or operational military forces during amphibious assaults demonstrate why practitioners should consider their first choice for potential antibiotic therapy differently from their usual favorite antibiotics. The effects of thiosulfate-citrate-bile-sucrose (TCBS) agar, varying salt concentrations in the standard media, and comparison of room temperature incubation versus use of the 30 degrees C (86 degrees F) incubator are reviewed. The yield of pathogenic marine bacteria is increased if TCBS agar is used and more than one temperature is used for incubation. A potentially significant human pathogen, Vibrio vulnificus, appears to be ubiquitous.

  11. Modulation of cell adhesion and viability of cultured murine bone marrow cells by arsenobetaine, a major organic arsenic compound in marine animals

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Teruaki; Fujiwara, Kitao

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the biological effects of trimethyl (carboxymethyl) arsonium zwitterion, namely arsenobetaine (AsBe), which is a major organic arsenic compound in marine animals using murine bone marrow (BM) cells and compared them with those of an inorganic arsenical, sodium arsenite, in vitro. Sodium arsenite showed strong cytotoxicity in BM cells, and its IC50 was 6 μM. In contrast, AsBe significantly enhanced the viability of BM cells in a dose-dependent manner during a 72-h incubation; about a twofold increase in the viability of cells compared with that of control cells cultured with the medium alone was observed with a μM level of AsBe. In morphological investigations, AsBe enhanced the numbers of large mature adherent cells, especially granulocytes, during a 72-h BM culture. When BM cells were cultured together with AsBe and a low dose (1 u ml−1) of recombinant murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rMu GM-CSF), significant additive-like increasing effects were observed on the numbers of both granulocytes and macrophages originated from BM cells. However, AsBe did not cause proliferation of BM cells at all as determined by colony-forming assay using a gelatious medium. These findings demonstrate the unique and potent biological effects in mammalian cells of AsBe, a major organic arsenic compound in various marine animals which are ingested daily as seafood in many countries. PMID:11156571

  12. Microgravity Materials and Biotechnology Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasse, Marcus

    1998-01-01

    Presentation will deal with an overview of the Materials Science and Biotechnology/Crystal Growth flight experiments and their requirements for a successful execution. It will also deal with the hardware necessary to perform these experiments as well as the hardware requirements. This information will serve as a basis for the Abstract: workshop participants to review the poss7ibilifies for a low cost unmanned carrier and the simple automation to carry-out experiments in a microgravity environment with little intervention from the ground. The discussion will include what we have now and what will be needed to automate totally the hardware and experiment protocol at relatively low cost.

  13. Certain problems of space biotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyarov, V. N.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments in the field of biotechnology conducted by the USA Apollo and Skylab space probes are described, as well as the joint Soviet-American Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). Experiments in electrophoretic separation in space of biological compounds in a liquid medium are detailed. Space processing of vaccines and separation of human and animal cells are described. Methyl-cellulose, a coating for use in electrophoresis was developed. Erythropoietin, which stimulates the formation of red blood corpuscles in bone marrow, was obtained in pure form.

  14. Microgravity Materials and Biotechnology Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlasse, Marcus

    1998-01-01

    Presentation will deal with an overview of the Materials Science and Biotechnology/Crystal Growth flight experiments and their requirements for a successful execution. It will also deal with the hardware necessary to perform these experiments as well as the hardware requirements. This information will serve as a basis for the Abstract: workshop participants to review the poss7ibilifies for a low cost unmanned carrier and the simple automation to carry-out experiments in a microgravity environment with little intervention from the ground. The discussion will include what we have now and what will be needed to automate totally the hardware and experiment protocol at relatively low cost.

  15. Infusing Authentic Inquiry into Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanegan, Nikki L.; Bigler, Amber

    2009-10-01

    Societal benefit depends on the general public's understandings of biotechnology (Betsch in World J Microbiol Biotechnol 12:439-443, 1996; Dawson and Cowan in Int J Sci Educ 25(1):57-69, 2003; Schiller in Business Review: Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia (Fourth Quarter), 2002; Smith and Emmeluth in Am Biol Teach 64(2):93-99, 2002). A National Science Foundation funded survey of high school biology teachers reported that hands-on biotechnology education exists in advanced high school biology in the United States, but is non-existent in mainstream biology coursework (Micklos et al. in Biotechnology labs in American high schools, 1998). The majority of pre-service teacher content preparation courses do not teach students appropriate content knowledge through the process of inquiry. A broad continuum exists when discussing inquiry-oriented student investigations (Hanegan et al. in School Sci Math J 109(2):110-134, 2009). Depending on the amount of structure in teacher lessons, inquiries can often be categorized as guided or open. The lesson can be further categorized as simple or authentic (Chinn and Malhotra in Sci Educ 86(2):175-218, 2002). Although authentic inquiries provide the best opportunities for cognitive development and scientific reasoning, guided and simple inquiries are more often employed in the classroom (Crawford in J Res Sci Teach 37(9):916-937, 2000; NRC in Inquiry and the national science education standards: a guide for teaching and learning, 2000). For the purposes of this study we defined inquiry as "authentic" if original research problems were resolved (Hanegan et al. in School Sci Math J 109(2):110-134, 2009; Chinn and Malhotra in Sci Educ 86(2):175-218, 2002; Roth in Authentic school science: knowing and learning in open-inquiry science laboratories, 1995). The research question to guide this study through naturalistic inquiry research methods was: How will participants express whether or not an authentic inquiry experience enhanced

  16. Molecular tools for chemical biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Galanie, Stephanie; Siddiqui, Michael S.; Smolke, Christina D.

    2013-01-01

    Biotechnological production of high value chemical products increasingly involves engineering in vivo multi-enzyme pathways and host metabolism. Recent approaches to these engineering objectives have made use of molecular tools to advance de novo pathway identification, tunable enzyme expression, and rapid pathway construction. Molecular tools also enable optimization of single enzymes and entire genomes through diversity generation and screening, whole cell analytics, and synthetic metabolic control networks. In this review, we focus on advanced molecular tools and their applications to engineered pathways in host organisms, highlighting the degree to which each tool is generalizable. PMID:23528237

  17. From yeast genetics to biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Maráz, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Roots of classical yeast genetics go back to the early work of Lindegreen in the 1930s, who studied thallism, sporulation and inheritance of wine yeast strains belonging to S. cerevisiae. Consequent mutation and hybridization of heterothallic S. cerevisae strains resulted in the discovery of life cycle and mating type system, as well as construction of the genetic map. Elaboration of induced mutation and controlled hybridization of yeast strains opened up new possibilities for the genetic analysis of technologically important properties and for the production of improved industrial strains, but a big drawback was the widely different genetic properties of laboratory and industrial yeast strains. Genetic analysis and mapping of industrial strains were generally hindered because of homothallism, poor sporulation and/or low spore viability of brewing and wine yeast strains [1, 2]. In spite of this, there are a few examples of the application of sexual hybridization in the study of genetic control of important technological properties, e.g. sugar utilization, flocculation and flavor production in brewing yeast strains [3] or in the improvement of ethanol producing S. cerevisiae strains [4]. Rare mating and application of karyogamy deficient (kar-) mutants also proved useful in strain improvement [5]. Importance of yeasts in biotechnology is enormous. This includes food and beverage fermentation processes where a wide range of yeast species are playing role, but S. cerevisiae is undoubtedly the most important species among them. New biotechnology is aiming to improve these technologies, but besides this, a completely new area of yeast utilization has been emerged, especially in the pharmaceutical and medical areas. Without decreasing the importance of S. cerevisiae, numerous other yeast species, e.g. Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia pastoris, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Yarrowia lipolytica have gained increasing potentialities in the modern

  18. Marine heterotrophic bacteria in continuous culture, the bacterial carbon growth efficiency, and mineralization at excess substrate and different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Mercado, Alejandrina; Cajal-Medrano, Ramón; Maske, Helmut

    2007-07-01

    To model the physiological potential of marine heterotrophic bacteria, their role in the food web, and in the biogeochemical carbon cycle, we need to know their growth efficiency response within a matrix of different temperatures and degrees of organic substrate limitation. In this work, we present one part of this matrix, the carbon growth efficiencies of marine bacteria under different temperatures and nonlimiting organic and inorganic substrate supply. We ran aerobic turbidostats with glucose enriched seawater, inoculated with natural populations of heterotrophic marine bacteria at 10, 14, 18, 22, and 26 degrees C. The average cell-specific growth rates increased with temperature from 1.17 to 2.6 h-1. At steady-state total CO2 production, biomass production [particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON)], and viruslike particle abundance was measured. CO2 production and specific growth rate increased with increasing temperature. Bacterial carbon growth efficiency (BCGE), the particulate carbon produced per dissolved carbon utilized, varied between 0.12 and 0.70. Maximum BCGE values and decreased specific respiration rates occurred at higher temperatures (22 and 26 degrees C) and growth rates. This trend was largely attributable to an increase in POC per cell abundance; when the BCGE was recalculated, parameterizing the biomass as the product of cell concentration and a constant cellular carbon content, the opposite trend was observed.

  19. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-12-15

    NASA is looking to biological techniques that are millions of years old to help it develop new materials and nanotechnology for the 21st century. Sponsored by NASA, Jerzy Bernholc, a principal investigator in the microgravity materials science program and a physics professor at North Carolina State University, Bernholc works with very large-scale computations to model carbon molecules as they assemble themselves to form nanotubes. The strongest confirmed material known, nanotubes are much stronger than graphite, a more common material made of carbon, and weigh six times less than steel. Nanotubes have potential uses such as strain gauges, advanced electronic devices, amd batteries. The strength, light weight, and conductive qualities of nanotubes, shown in light blue in this computed electron distribution, make them excellent components of nanoscale devices. One way to conduct electricity to such devices is through contact with aluminum, shown in dark blue.

  20. Biotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    manipulation, insertion and transvection. Genomics - Genomics is the study of the genome , which is the genetic basis of life. Complete sequences ...market through the FDA process. That attitude changed in 2000 with genomics leading the way. “The progress made by Celera Corporation and The Human ...simultaneous publication of the public and private results of a draft genomic map of the entire human genome . This landmark scientific

  1. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-09

    Dwarf wheat were photographed aboard the International Space Station in April 2002. Lessons from on-orbit research on plants will have applications to terrestrial agriculture as well as for long-term space missions. Alternative agricultural systems that can efficiently produce greater quantities of high-quality crops in a small area are important for future space expeditions. Also regenerative life-support systems that include plants will be an important component of long-term space missions. Data from the Biomass Production System (BPS) and the Photosynthesis Experiment and System Testing and Operations (PESTO) will advance controlled-environment agricultural systems and will help farmers produce better, healthier crops in a small area. This same knowledge is critical to closed-loop life support systems for spacecraft. The BPS comprises a miniature environmental control system for four plant growth chambers, all in the volume of two space shuttle lockers. The experience with the BPS on orbit is providing valuable design and operational lessons that will be incorporated into the Plant Growth Units. The objective of PESTO was to flight verify the BPS hardware and to determine how the microgravity environment affects the photosynthesis and metabolic function of Super Dwarf wheat and Brassica rapa (a member of the mustard family).

  2. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    Anthrax spores are inactive forms of Bacillus anthracis. They can survive for decades inside a spore's tough protective coating; they become active when inhaled by humans. A result of NASA- and industry-sponsored research to develop small greenhouses for space research is the unique AiroCide TiO2 system that kills anthrax spores and other pathogens.

  3. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-09

    Dr. Weijia Zhou, director of the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, inspects the Advanced Astroculture(tm) plant growth unit before its first flight last spring. Coating technology is used inside the miniature plant greenhouse to remove ethylene, a chemical produced by plant leaves that can cause plants to mature too quickly. This same coating technology is used in a new anthrax-killing device. The Space Station experiment is managed by the Space Product Development Program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. DuPont is partnering with NASA and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to grow soybeans aboard the Space Station to find out if they have improved oil, protein, carbohydrates or secondary metabolites that could benefit farmers and consumers. Principal Investigators: Dr. Tom Corbin, Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., a Dupont Company, with headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa, and Dr. Weijia Zhou, Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR), University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  4. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-31

    Renal stones are never convenient, but they are a particular concern for astronauts who have limited access to treatment during flight. Researchers are examining how earthbound preventions for renal stone formation work in flight, ensuring missions are not ended prematurely due to this medical condition. The micrograph shows calcium oxalate crystals in urine. These small crystals can develop to form renal stones. Principal Investigator: Dr. Peggy Whitson, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  5. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-09

    The Phantom Torso is a tissue-muscle plastic anatomical model of a torso and head. It contains over 350 radiation measuring devices to calculate the radiation that penetrates internal organs in space travel. The Phantom Torso is one of three radiation experiments in Expedition Two including the Borner Ball Neutron Detector and Dosimetric Mapping.

  6. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    ProVision Technologies, a NASA commercial space center at Sternis Space Center in Mississippi, has developed a new hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system that is much smaller than the original large units used aboard remote sensing aircraft and satellites. The new apparatus is about the size of a breadbox. HSI may be useful to ophthalmologists to study and diagnose eye health, both on Earth and in space, by examining the back of the eye to determine oxygen and blood flow quickly and without any invasion. ProVision's hyperspectral imaging system can scan the human eye and produce a graph showing optical density or light absorption, which can then be compared to a graph from a normal eye. Scans of the macula, optic disk or optic nerve head, and blood vessels can be used to detect anomalies and identify diseases in this delicate and important organ. ProVision has already developed a relationship with the University of Alabama at Birmingham, but is still on the lookout for a commercial partner in this application.

  7. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    ProVision Technologies, a NASA research partnership center at Sternis Space Center in Mississippi, has developed a new hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system that is much smaller than the original large units used aboard remote sensing aircraft and satellites. The new apparatus is about the size of a breadbox. HSI may be useful to ophthalmologists to study and diagnose eye health, both on Earth and in space, by examining the back of the eye to determine oxygen and blood flow quickly and without any invasion. ProVision's hyperspectral imaging system can scan the human eye and produce a graph showing optical density or light absorption, which can then be compared to a graph from a normal eye. Scans of the macula, optic disk or optic nerve head, and blood vessels can be used to detect anomalies and identify diseases in this delicate and important organ. ProVision has already developed a relationship with the University of Alabama at Birmingham, but is still on the lookout for a commercial partner in this application.

  8. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    ProVision Technologies, a NASA research partnership center at Sternis Space Center in Mississippi, has developed a new hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system that is much smaller than the original large units used aboard remote sensing aircraft and satellites. The new apparatus is about the size of a breadbox. Health-related applications of HSI include scanning chickens during processing to help prevent contaminated food from getting to the table. ProVision is working with Sanderson Farms of Mississippi and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ProVision has a record in its spectral library of the unique spectral signature of fecal contamination, so chickens can be scanned and those with a positive reading can be separated. HSI sensors can also determine the quantity of surface contamination. Research in this application is quite advanced, and ProVision is working on a licensing agreement for the technology. The potential for future use of this equipment in food processing and food safety is enormous.

  9. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-06-03

    Diabetic patients may someday reduce their insulin injections and lead more normal lives because of new insights gained through innovative space research in which insulin crystals were grown on the Space Shuttle. Results from a 1994 insulin crystals growth experiment in space are leading to a new understanding of protein insulin. Lack of insulin is the cause of diabetes, a disease that accounts for one-seventh of the nation's health care costs. Champion Deivanaygam, a researcher at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography at the University of Alabama in Birmingham, assists in this work. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  10. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  11. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-12

    The short-arm centrifuge subjects an astronaut to conflicting sensory input and study the astronaut's perception of motion. It is one of several instruments used in the Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight investigation to be conducted after astronauts return to Earth. During space flight, the vestibular organs no longer respond in a familiar way. Instead, inputs from the irner ear do not match those coming from the eyes. While on Earth, you can open your eyes to see if you truly are spinning, but astronauts do not have this luxury. Astronauts can see the floor, but have no sense of down; when they bend their heads forward, the otoliths are not stimulated properly. This state, called sensory conflict, must be resolved by the brain to maintain orientation. When they first return to Earth, astronauts are again disoriented because of sensory conflict. They undergo a period of spatial reorientation, as their brains reconcile what their eyes see and what their vestibular system senses. Recovery can take anywhere from hours to days depending on the length of the mission. Principal Investigator: Dr. William Paloski, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  12. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-07-31

    This diagram shows the normal pathways of calcium movement in the body and indicates changes (green arrows) seen during preliminary space flight experiments. Calcium plays a central role because 1) it gives strength and structure to bone and 2) all types of cells require it to function normally. To better understand how and why weightlessness induces bone loss, astronauts have participated in a study of calcium kinetics -- that is, the movement of calcium through the body, including absorption from food, and its role in the formation and breakdown of bone.

  13. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    The Avian Development Facility (ADF) supports 36 eggs in two carousels, one of which rotates to provide a 1-g control for comparing to eggs grown in microgravity. The ADF was designed to incubate up to 36 Japanese quail eggs, 18 in microgravity and 18 in artificial gravity. The two sets of eggs were exposed to otherwise identical conditions, the first time this is been accomplished in space. Eggs are preserved at intervals to provide snapshots of their development for later analysis. Quails incubate in just 15 days, so they are an ideal species to be studied within the duration of space shuttle missions. Further, several investigators can use the same specimens to address different questions. The ADF originated in NASA's Shuttle Student Involvement program in the 1980s and was developed under the NASA Small Business Irnovation Research program. In late 2001, the ADF made its first flight and carried eggs used in two investigations.

  14. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    ProVision Technologies, a NASA research partnership center at Sternis Space Center in Mississippi, has developed a new hyperspectral imaging (HSI) system that is much smaller than the original large units used aboard remote sensing aircraft and satellites. The new apparatus is about the size of a breadbox. Health-related applications of HSI include non-invasive analysis of human skin to characterize wounds and wound healing rates (especially important for space travelers who heal more slowly), determining if burns are first-, second-, or third degree (rather than painful punch biopsies). The work is sponsored under NASA's Space Product Development (SPD) program.

  15. Biotechnology

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-22

    The blueprint of life, DNA's double helix is found in the cells of everything from bacteria to astronauts. Exposure to radiation(depicted at right) such as X-rays (upper) or heavy ion particles (lower), can damage DNA and cause dire consequences both to the organism itself and to future generations. One of NASA's main goals is to develop better radiation shielding materials to protect astronauts from destructive radiation in space. This is particularly important for long space missions. NASA has selected researchers to study materials that provide better shielding. This research is managed by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research and is supported by the Microgravity Science and Applications Department at NASA's Marshall Center. During International Space Station Expedition Six, the Extravehicular Activity Radiation Monitoring (EVARM) will continue to measure radiation dosage encountered by the eyes, internal organs and skin during specific spacewalks, and relate it to the type of activity, location and other factors. An analysis of this information may be useful in mitigating potential exposure to space walkers in the future. (Illustration by Dr. Frank Cucinotta, NASA/Johnson Space Center, and Prem Saganti, Lockheed Martin)

  16. Biotechnology for Non-biology Majors: An Activity Using a Commercial Biotechnology Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wray, Francis P.; Fox, Mary C.; Huether, Carl A.; Schurdak, Eric R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an inexpensive activity to stimulate student interest in biotechnology that was developed in partnership with a biotechnology company. Focuses on the use of DNA by a commercial laboratory; describing the analysis procedure; important uses of DNA technology in modern society; and ethical, social, and legal issues related to biotechnology.…

  17. Bacterial PAH degradation in marine and terrestrial habitats.

    PubMed

    Vila, Joaquim; Tauler, Margalida; Grifoll, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Cycling of pollutants is essential to preserve functional marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Progress in optimizing these natural biological processes relies on the identification of the underlying microbial actors and deciphering their interactions at molecular, cellular, community, and ecosystem level. Novel advances on PAH biodegradation are built on a progressive approach that span from pure cultures to environmental communities, illustrating the complex metabolic networks within a single cell, and their further implications in higher complexity systems. Recent analytical chemistry and molecular tools allow a deeper insight into the active microbial processes actually occurring in situ, identifying active functions, metabolic pathways and key players. Understanding these processes will provide new tools to assess biodegradation occurrence and, as a final outcome, predict the success of bioremediation thus reducing its uncertainties, the main drawback of this environmental biotechnology.

  18. Multi-User Facilities for Molecular Marine Biology and Biotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-06

    the numerous candidate sequences of DNA which encode for that specific protein. Because of redundancy in the genetic code , one has to make numerous...Box X, Building 1503/6 Zoology Department Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Univeristy of Massachusetts Amherst, MA 01003 WOESE , Carl R. Genetics Department SILVERMAN...Naval Research 6c. ADDRESS (City. State, and ZiPCode) 7b ADDRESS(City, State, and ZIP Code ) Pacific Grove, CA 93950 800 N. Quincy Street Arlington, VA

  19. Marine Biotechnology. Basic Research Relevant to Biomaterials and Biosensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    ignition retardation_____xanthgn gum Ink (Ploxo, Gravure, Jet) Gum arabic Viscosity Lithography .* Metal-Workinq - -. Re fr acto ry co at in gs Gum ...estuarine bacteria. Dev. Ind. Microbiol. 20:275-284. Orndorff, S ., and R. R. Colwell. 1981. Distribution and identification of luminous bacteria from the...community of science and technology with the Academ.’ s purpose of furthering knowledge and of advising the federal government. The Research Council operates

  20. Students' Knowledge of, and Attitudes towards Biotechnology Revisited, 1995-2014: Changes in Agriculture Biotechnology but Not in Medical Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shao-Yen; Chu, Yih-Ru; Lin, Chen-Yung; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Modern biotechnology is one of the most important scientific and technological revolutions in the 21st century, with an increasing and measurable impact on society. Development of biotechnology curriculum has become important to high school bioscience classrooms. This study has monitored high school students in Taiwan on their knowledge of and…