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Sample records for marine photosynthetic bacterium

  1. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect

    Matsunaga, T.; Matsunaga, N.; Tsubaki, K.; Tanaka, T.

    1986-10-01

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 ..mu..mol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria.

  2. Characterization of giant spheroplasts generated from the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic marine bacterium Roseobacter litoralis.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Akane; Ogita, Shinjiro; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    We generated and characterized giant spheroplasts from the aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic marine bacterium Roseobacter litoralis. The giant spheroplasts contained vacuole-like structures within the cells, mainly consisting of a single membrane. The in vivo absorption spectrum of the giant spheroplasts did not have peaks typically observed for bacteriochlorophyll a. The culture media pH decreased during the growth of the giant spheroplasts. The change in the pH profile for cells grown under light was no different from that for cells grown in the dark. These results showed that the R. litoralis giant spheroplasts formed lost their photosynthetic apparatus in culture. Most of the giant spheroplasts returned to their original size, likely via filamentous cells. The culture media pH increased during the growth of the filamentous cells. Some filamentous cells had septum-like structures. In such filamentous cells, DNA was separated. Initially, the color of the separated cells was white. Two weeks later, the cells changed to red in the dark, and the in vivo absorption spectrum of the cells had peaks typically observed for bacteriochlorophyll a. Our findings strongly suggest that the giant spheroplasts of R. litoralis can control the genetic information, return to their original cell size, and regain their original functions.

  3. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate by the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinling; Wei, Ying; Zhao, Yupeng; Pan, Guanghua; Wang, Guangce

    2012-07-01

    The effects of different NaCl concentrations, nitrogen sources, carbon sources, and carbon to nitrogen molar ratios on biomass accumulation and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) production were studied in batch cultures of the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodovulum sulfidophilum P5 under aerobic-dark conditions. The results show that the accumulation of PHB in strain P5 is a growth-associated process. Strain P5 had maximum biomass and PHB accumulation at 2%-3% NaCl, suggesting that the bacterium can maintain growth and potentially produce PHB at natural seawater salinity. In the nitrogen source test, the maximum biomass accumulation (8.10±0.09 g/L) and PHB production (1.11±0.13 g/L and 14.62%±2.2 of the cell dry weight) were observed when peptone and ammonium chloride were used as the sole nitrogen source. NH{4/+}-N was better for PHB production than other nitrogen sources. In the carbon source test, the maximum biomass concentration (7.65±0.05 g/L) was obtained with malic acid as the sole carbon source, whereas the maximum yield of PHB (5.03±0.18 g/L and 66.93%±1.69% of the cell dry weight) was obtained with sodium pyruvate as the sole carbon source. In the carbon to nitrogen ratios test, sodium pyruvate and ammonium chloride were selected as the carbon and nitrogen sources, respectively. The best carbon to nitrogen molar ratio for biomass accumulation (8.77±0.58 g/L) and PHB production (6.07±0.25 g/L and 69.25%±2.05% of the cell dry weight) was 25. The results provide valuable data on the production of PHB by R. sulfidophilum P5 and further studies are on-going for best cell growth and PHB yield.

  4. Proton efflux coupled to dark H2 oxidation in whole cells of a marine sulfur photosynthetic bacterium (Chromatium sp. strain Miami PBS1071).

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, S; Izawa, S; Mitsui, A

    1983-04-01

    Whole cells of photoanaerobically grown Chromatium sp. strain Miami PBS1071, a marine sulfur purple bacterium, oxidized H2 in the dark through the oxyhydrogen reaction at rates of up to 59 nmol of H2 per mg (dry weight) per min. H2 oxidation was routinely measured in H2 pulse experiments with air-equilibrated cells. The reaction was accompanied by a reversible H+ efflux from the cells, suggesting an outward H+ translocation reaction coupled to H2 oxidation. The H+/e- ratio, calculated from simultaneous measurements of H2, O2, and H+ changes in the medium, varied with the cultures from 0.7 to 1.2. The ratio increased considerably when the backflow of H+ was taken into account. Anaerobic H2 uptake with 2,5-dimethyl-p-benzoguinone as an oxidant also showed a weak H+-translocating activity. No H+-translocating activity was detected with methylene blue as an oxidant. Carbonylcyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (1 microM) stimulated H2 oxidation and abolished the associated H+ changes when H2 oxidation was observed in O2 pulse experiments with H2-Ar-equilibrated cells. However, the uncoupler inhibited both H2 oxidation and H+ changes when measurements were made in H2 pulse experiments with air-equilibrated cells. It is suggested that in this bacterium the susceptibility of hydrogenase to reversible O2 inactivation in situ is enhanced by the presence of uncoupling agents.

  5. Proton efflux coupled to dark H/sub 2/ oxidation in whole cells of a marine sulfur photosynthetic bacterium (Chromatium sp. strain Miami PBS1071)

    SciTech Connect

    Kumazawa, S.; Izawa, S.; Mitsui, A.

    1983-04-01

    Whole cells of photoanaerobically grown Chromatium sp. strain Miami PBS1071, a marine sulfur purple bacterium, oxidized H/sub 2/ in the dark through the oxyhydrogen reaction at rates of up to 59 nmol of H/sub 2/ per mg (dry weight) per min. H/sub 2/ oxidation was routinely measured in H/sub 2/ pulse experiments with air-equilibrated cells. The reaction was accompanied by a reversible H/sup +/ efflux from the cells, suggesting an outward H/sup +/ translocation reaction coupled to H/sub 2/ oxidation. Anaerobic H/sub 2/ uptake with 2,5-dimethyl-p-benzoguinone as an oxidant also showed a weak H/sup +/-translocating activity. Carbonylcyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (1 ..mu..M) stimulated H/sub 2/ oxidation and abolished the associated H/sup +/ changes when H/sub 2/ oxidation was observed in O/sub 2/ pulse experiments with H/sub 2/-Ar-equilibrated cells. However, the uncoupler inhibited both H/sub 2/ oxidation and H/sup +/ changes when measurements were made in H/sub 2/ pulse experiments with air-equilibrated cells. It is suggested that in this bacterium the susceptibility of hydrogenase to reversible O/sub 2/ inactivation in situ is enhanced by the presence of uncoupling agents.

  6. The Photosynthetic Reaction Center from the Purple Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deisenhofer, Johann; Michel, Hartmut

    1989-09-01

    The history and methods of membrane protein crystallization are described. The solution of the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis is described, and the structure of this membrane protein complex is correlated with its function as a light-driven electron pump across the photosynthetic membrane. Conclusions about the structure of the photosystem II reaction center from plants are drawn, and aspects of membrane protein structure are discussed.

  7. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alfred E.; Gilbert, Carl W.; Guy, Rachel; Arntzen, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa QB protein of chloroplast membranes. Images PMID:16593520

  8. Inorganic nitrogen assimilation by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, B C; Gest, H

    1976-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata lacks glutamate dehydrogenase and normally uses the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase sequence of reactions for assimilation of N2 and ammonia. The glutamine synthetase in cell-free extracts of the organism is completely sedimented by centrifugation at 140,000 X g for 2 h, is inhibited by L-alanine but not by adenosine 5'-monophosphate, and exhibits two apparent Km values for ammonia (ca. 13 muM and 1 mM). PMID:10281

  9. Triazine herbicide resistance in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.E.; Gilbert, C.W.; Guy, R.; Arntzen, C.J.

    1984-10-01

    The photoaffinity herbicide azidoatrazine (2-azido-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) selectively labels the L subunit of the reaction center of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Herbicide-resistant mutants retain the L subunit and have altered binding properties for methylthio- and chloro-substituted triazines as well as altered equilibrium constants for electron transfer between primary and secondary electron acceptors. We suggest that a subtle alteration in the L subunit is responsible for herbicide resistance and that the L subunit is the functional analog of the 32-kDa Q/sub B/ protein of chloroplast membranes. 42 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  10. Nitric oxide in marine photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a versatile and powerful signaling molecule in plants. However, most of our understanding stems from studies on terrestrial plants and very little is known about marine autotrophs. This review summarizes current knowledge about the source of nitric oxide synthesis in marine photosynthetic organisms and its role in various physiological processes under normal and stress conditions. The interactions of nitric oxide with other stress signals and cross talk among secondary messengers are also highlighted.

  11. Polaromonas vacuolata gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrophilic, marine, gas vacuolate bacterium from Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Irgens, R L; Gosink, J J; Staley, J T

    1996-07-01

    Several strains of a novel heterotrophic gas vacuolate bacterium were isolated from antarctic marine waters. The results of phylogenetic analyses in which 16S ribosomal DAN sequencing was used, coupled with phenotypic tests, indicated that strain 34-P(T) (T = type strain) belongs to a new genus and species of the beta subgroup of the Proteobacteria, for which the name Polaromonas vacuolata is proposed. Although the other four strains studied probably belong to this new species, DNA-DNA hybridization tests were not conducted. The closest phylogenetic relatives of P. vacuolata are the photosynthetic nonsulfur purple bacterium Rhodoferax fermentans and the hydrogen autotroph Variovorax paradoxus.

  12. Albidovulum inexpectatum gen. nov., sp. nov., a nonphotosynthetic and slightly thermophilic bacterium from a marine hot spring that is very closely related to members of the photosynthetic genus Rhodovulum.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Luciana; Santos, João; Travassos, Pedro; Nobre, M Fernanda; Rainey, Fred A; Wait, Robin; Empadinhas, Nuno; Silva, Manuel T; da Costa, Milton S

    2002-09-01

    Several bacterial isolates, with an optimum growth temperature of about 50 degrees C, were recovered from the marine hot spring at Ferraria on the island of São Miguel in the Azores. The geothermal water emerged from a porous lava flow and rapidly cooled in contact with seawater except at low tide. The bacterial species represented by strains FRR-10(T) and FRR-11 was nonpigmented, strictly aerobic, and organotrophic. Several genes, bchZ, pufB, pufA, pufL, or pufM, encoding the photosynthetic reaction center proteins and the core light-harvesting complexes were not detected in these strains. The organism oxidized thiosulfate to sulfate with enhancement of growth. The organism did not require additional NaCl in the culture medium for growth, but NaCl at 1.0% enhanced growth. Phylogenetic analyses using the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain FRR-10(T) indicated that the new organism represented a new species of the alpha-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria and that it branches within the species of the genus Rhodovulum. The contradiction of classifying an organism which branches within the radiation of the genus Rhodovulum but does not possess the hallmark characteristics of this genus is discussed. However, the absence of several of these characteristics, namely, the lack of photosynthesis and pigmentation, which could be related to colonization of dark environments, and growth at high temperatures, leads to our proposal that strains FRR-10(T) and FRR-11 should be classified as a new species of a novel genus, Albidovulum inexpectatum, representing, at present, the most thermophilic organism within the alpha-3 subclass of the Proteobacteria.

  13. Hydrogen Production by Co-cultures of Rhizopus oryzae and a Photosynthetic Bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Nagata, Yoko; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun; Kohno, Hideki

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a fungus, Rhizopus oryzae NBRC5384, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. The co-immobilized cultures converted glucose to hydrogen via lactate in a high molar yield of about 8moles of hydrogen per glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions.

  14. Hydrogen Production by the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Zürrer, Hans; Bachofen, Reinhard

    1979-01-01

    Continuous photosynthetic production of hydrogen by Rhodospirillum rubrum in batch cultures was observed up to 80 days with the hydrogen donor, pure lactate or lactic acid-containing wastes, supplied periodically. Hydrogen was produced at an average rate of 6 ml/h per g (dry weight) of cells with whey as a hydrogen donor. In continuous cultures with glutamate as a growth-limiting nitrogen source and lactate as a hydrogen donor, hydrogen was evolved at a rate of 20 ml/h per g (dry weight). The composition of the gas evolved remained practically constant (70 to 75% H2, 25 to 30% CO2). Photosynthetic bacteria processing specific organic wastes could be an advantage in large-scale production of hydrogen together with food protein of high value, compared to other biological systems. Images PMID:16345375

  15. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas

    PubMed Central

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7–83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9–5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed. PMID:27189983

  16. [Biological characteristics and phylogenetic analysis of a denitrifying photosynthetic bacterium].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhang, Demin; Wang, Longgang; Pan, Zhichong

    2011-02-01

    Nitrite accumulation in aquaculture water is toxic to reared animals. One of the solutions to this problem is to apply denitrifying bacteria. This paper is intended to get a strain of phototrophic bacteria for efficient removal of nitrite from aquaculture water. We used soft agar to isolate and purify phototrophic bacteria. We investigated biological characteristics of the isolate by means of light and electronic observations, physical and chemical tests. We analyzed its phylogenetical position based on the sequences of 16S rDNA and the gene that codes for photosynthetic reaction center subunit M (pufM). A photosynthetic bacterial strain, named wps, showing high removal efficiency of nitrite, was isolated from the freshwater ponds. Cells were Gram-negative, rod-shaped, slightly curved, 0.4 - 0.6 x 1.5 - 4.0 microm, motile by means of polar multiple flagella. Intracellular membranes were of the lamellar type. It grew under facultative anaerobic conditions in the light with bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoid of sppirilloxanthin series as photosynthetic pigment. The optimum growth was obtained at pH 5.5 - 8.5, in a range of 0 - 2% salinity and at 25 - 38 degrees C. The similarity of 16S rDNA between strain wps and Rhodopseudomonas palustris was 98.9% and 94.9% for pufM gene. However, there are significant differences between them in the morphological and physiological characteristics, i. e. grew at pH 5.5; no growth photoautotrophicaly with sodium hydrogen carbonate; could not utilize citrate or formate as only carbon source; required thiamine hydrochloride and calcium pantothenate as growth factors. Strain wps may represent a novel species in genus Rhodopseudomonas and possibly find its application in the bioremediation of polluted aquaculture water.

  17. Efficiency of light harvesting in a photosynthetic bacterium adapted to different levels of light.

    PubMed

    Timpmann, Kõu; Chenchiliyan, Manoop; Jalviste, Erko; Timney, John A; Hunter, C Neil; Freiberg, Arvi

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we use the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides to find out how the acclimation of photosynthetic apparatus to growth conditions influences the rates of energy migration toward the reaction center traps and the efficiency of charge separation at the reaction centers. To answer these questions we measured the spectral and picosecond kinetic fluorescence responses as a function of excitation intensity in membranes prepared from cells grown under different illumination conditions. A kinetic model analysis yielded the microscopic rate constants that characterize the energy transfer and trapping inside the photosynthetic unit as well as the dependence of exciton trapping efficiency on the ratio of the peripheral LH2 and core LH1 antenna complexes, and on the wavelength of the excitation light. A high quantum efficiency of trapping over 80% was observed in most cases, which decreased toward shorter excitation wavelengths within the near infrared absorption band. At a fixed excitation wavelength the efficiency declines with the LH2/LH1 ratio. From the perspective of the ecological habitat of the bacteria the higher population of peripheral antenna facilitates growth under dim light even though the energy trapping is slower in low light adapted membranes. The similar values for the trapping efficiencies in all samples imply a robust photosynthetic apparatus that functions effectively at a variety of light intensities.

  18. Photosynthetic characteristics and organization of chlorophyll in marine dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Prézelin, Barbara B.; Alberte, Randall S.

    1978-01-01

    The photosystem I reaction center complex, the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein, has been isolated from the photosynthetic membranes of two marine dinoflagellates, Gonyaulax polyedra and Glenodinium sp., by detergent solubilization with Triton X-100. The complexes isolated from the two species were indistinguishable, exhibiting identical absorption properties (400-700 nm) at both room (300 K) and low (77 K) temperature. The room temperature, red wavelength maximum was at 675 nm. The absorption properties, kinetics of photobleaching, sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoretic mobilities, and chlorophyll a/P-700 ratio (50 ± 10) of the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes from the two species also were essentially the same and similar to those properties characterizing P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes of higher plants and green algae. Photosynthetic unit sizes were determined for cells grown at 1000 μW/cm2. Both dinoflagellates had unit sizes (total chlorophyll/P-700 ratios) of about 600, even though the distribution of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and peridinin in the light-harvesting components differed in Gonyaulax and Glenodinium. The number of photosynthetic units per cell in the two species correlates directly with their photosynthetic activities. A model is presented for the distribution of chlorophyll in the photosynthetic apparatus of these dinoflagellates which accounts for the known role of the isolated pigment-protein complexes and for the known photoadaptive physiology in pigmentation and photosynthesis for these species. PMID:16592518

  19. Isolation of an algal morphogenesis inducer from a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yoshihide; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Mugio; Shizuri, Yoshikazu

    2005-03-11

    Ulva and Enteromorpha are cosmopolitan and familiar marine algal genera. It is well known that these green macroalgae lose their natural morphology during short-term cultivation under aseptic conditions and during long-term cultivation in nutrient-added seawater and adopt an unusual form instead. These phenomena led to the belief that undefined morphogenetic factors that were indispensable to the foliaceous morphology of macroalgae exist throughout the oceans. We characterize a causative factor, named thallusin, isolated from an epiphytic marine bacterium. Thallusin induces normal germination and morphogenesis of green macroalgae.

  20. Ectothiorhodospira mobilis Pelsh, a Photosynthetic Sulfur Bacterium Depositing Sulfur Outside the Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Trüper, Hans G.

    1968-01-01

    From salt flats on the Galapagos Islands, two strains of a red photosynthetic bacterium were isolated and identified as Ectothiorhodospira mobilis, an organism first described by Pelsh in 1937. The cells are curved in a short spiral, 0.7 to 1.0 μ wide and 2.0 to 4.8 μ long. They are motile by a polar tuft of flagella. Cells contain several large stacks of lamellar membranes, carrying the pigments bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the spirillo xanthin series. Cell division occurs by binary fission, not budding. The organism is strictly anaerobic and obligately photosynthetic. Its ability to grow well with sulfide, sulfur, thiosulfate, or sulfite as photosynthetic H donors puts it taxonomically in the Thiorhodaceae. During growth with sulfide, elementary sulfur is deposited outside the cells in the medium and disappears during further growth. A limited number of organic carbon compounds can be utilized as hydrogen donors in place of inorganic sulfur compounds. Under these conditions, sulfate can serve as the sulfur source. The enzymes catalase and hydrogenase are present. The newly isolated strains require vitamin B12. They also require a salinity of 2 to 3% NaCl, but they are not extreme halophiles. The organism is not identical with any of the species listed in Bergey's Manual. Images PMID:5650091

  1. Isolation of pigmentation mutants of the green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, B.K.; Keith, L.M.; Leovy, J.G.

    1984-07-01

    Mutants deficient in the production of bateriochlorophyll c (Bchl c) and one mutant lacking colored carotenoids were isolated from the filamentous gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Mutagenesis was achieved by using UV radiation or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Several clones were isolated that were deficient in Bchl c synthesis. All reverted. One double mutant deficient both in Bchl c synthesis and in the synthesis of colored carotenoids under anaerobic conditions was isolated. Isolation of a revertant in Bchl c synthesis from this double mutant produced a mutant strain of Chloroflexus that grew photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions and lacked colored carotenoids. Analysis of pigment contents and growth rates of the mutants revealed a positive association between growth rate and content of Bchl c under light-limiting conditions. 11 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Decoherence dynamics of coherent electronic excited states in the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xian-Ting; Zhang, Wei-Min; Zhuo, Yi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a theoretical description to the quantum coherence and decoherence phenomena of energy transfer in photosynthesis observed in a recent experiment [Science 316, 1462 (2007)]. As a successive two-color laser pulses with selected frequencies cast on a sample of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rb. sphaeroides two resonant excitations of electrons in chromophores can be generated. However, this effective two-level subsystem will interact with its protein environment and decoherence is inevitable. We describe this subsystem coupled with its environment as a dynamical spin-boson model. The non-Markovian decoherence dynamics is described using a quasiadiabatic propagator path integral (QUAPI) approach. With the photon-induced effective time-dependent level splitting energy and level flip coupling coefficient between the two excited states and the environment-induced non-Markovian decoherence dynamics, our theoretical result is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Native Mass Spectrometry Characterizes the Photosynthetic Reaction Center Complex from the Purple Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Harrington, Lucas B.; Lu, Yue; Prado, Mindy; Saer, Rafael; Rempel, Don; Blankenship, Robert E.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is an emerging approach to study protein complexes in their near-native states and to elucidate their stoichiometry and topology. Here, we report a native MS study of the membrane-embedded reaction center (RC) protein complex from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The membrane-embedded RC protein complex is stabilized by detergent micelles in aqueous solution, directly introduced into a mass spectrometer by nano-electrospray (nESI), and freed of detergents and dissociated in the gas phase by collisional activation. As the collision energy is increased, the chlorophyll pigments are gradually released from the RC complex, suggesting that native MS introduces a near-native structure that continues to bind pigments. Two bacteriochlorophyll a pigments remain tightly bound to the RC protein at the highest collision energy. The order of pigment release and their resistance to release by gas-phase activation indicates the strength of pigment interaction in the RC complex. This investigation sets the stage for future native MS studies of membrane-embedded photosynthetic pigment-protein and related complexes.

  4. A serendipic legacy: Erwin Esmarch's isolation of the first photosynthetic bacterium in pure culture.

    PubMed

    Gest, H

    1995-01-01

    During the 1880's, Erwin von Esmarch was a junior associate ('Assistent') of Robert Koch studying bacteria of medical significance. In 1887, he isolated the first example of spiral-shaped bacteria in pure culture, from the dry residue of a dead mouse that he had suspended sometime earlier in Berlin tap-water. Under certain conditions, colonies of the organism were the color of red wine, and this led Esmarch to name the bacterium Spirillum rubrum. Twenty years later, Hans Molisch demonstrated that S. rubrum, an apparent heterotroph, was in fact a non-oxygenic purple photosynthetic bacterium, and it was renamed Rhodospirillum rubrum. Esmarch was a careful investigator and his classic paper of 1887 details the serendipitous isolation and general characteristics of the first pure culture of an anoxyphototroph, which later played a prominent role as an experimental system for study of basic aspects of bacterial photosynthesis. This report includes an English translation of his original paper (in German), a commentary on the historical significance of 'Esmarch's spirillum', and a summary of Esmarch's career.

  5. Excitation dynamics of two spectral forms of the core complexes from photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Kimura, Yukihiro; Zhao, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Yi-Shi; Wang, Peng; Fu, Li-Min; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2008-10-01

    The intact core antenna-reaction center (LH1-RC) core complex of thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum is peculiar in its long-wavelength LH1-Q(y) absorption (915 nm). We have attempted comparative studies on the excitation dynamics of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and carotenoid (Car) between the intact core complex and the EDTA-treated one with the Q(y) absorption at 889 nm. For both spectral forms, the overall Car-to-BChl excitation energy transfer efficiency is determined to be approximately 20%, which is considerably lower than the reported values, e.g., approximately 35%, for other photosynthetic purple bacteria containing the same kind of Car (spirilloxanthin). The RC trapping time constants are found to be 50 approximately 60 ps (170 approximately 200 ps) for RC in open (closed) state irrespective to the spectral forms and the wavelengths of Q(y) excitation. Despite the low-energy LH1-Q(y) absorption, the RC trapping time are comparable to those reported for other photosynthetic bacteria with normal LH1-Q(y) absorption at 880 nm. Selective excitation to Car results in distinct differences in the Q(y)-bleaching dynamics between the two different spectral forms. This, together with the Car band-shift signals in response to Q(y) excitation, reveals the presence of two major groups of BChls in the LH1 of Tch. tepidum with a spectral heterogeneity of approximately 240 cm(-1), as well as an alteration in BChl-Car geometry in the 889-nm preparation with respect to the native one.

  6. Isolation of Bacteriophages of the Marine Bacterium Beneckea natriegens from Coastal Salt Marshes1

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Arthur

    1974-01-01

    Bacteriophages of the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens were isolated from coastal marshes where they were limited to brackish and marine waters. The phages were widely distributed and morphologically diverse in the marshes. Images PMID:4133830

  7. Prosthecochloris indica sp. nov., a novel green sulfur bacterium from a marine aquaculture pond, Kakinada, India.

    PubMed

    Anil Kumar, Pinnaka; Naga Radha Srinivas, Tanuku; Sasikala, Chintalapati; Venkata Ramana, Chintalapati; Süling, Jorg; Imhoff, Johannes

    2009-04-01

    A green sulfur bacterium, strain JAGS6T was isolated from a marine aquaculture pond located near Kakinada on the east coast of India. Cells of strain JAGS6T were Gram-negative, non-motile, coccoid, 1-1.2 microm in diameter, with prosthecae. Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain JAGS6T clusters with members of the genus Prosthecochloris and the sequence similarity with the nearest relative, Prosthecochloris vibrioformis, is 96.7%. Cultures of strain JAGS6T are green in color and the cells contain bacteriochlorophyll c and most likely carotenoids of the chlorobactene series as photosynthetic pigments. Strain JAGS6T is mesophilic, halotolerant (up to 7% NaCl) and is obligately phototrophic, utilizing sulfide but not thiosulfate as a photosynthetic electron donor. Sulfur globules are deposited outside the cells during oxidation of sulfide. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and its morphological and physiological characteristics, strain JAGS6T is distinct from described species of the genus Prosthecochloris and we propose to describe it as a new species, Prosthecochloris indica, sp. nov. The type strain is JAGS6T (=JCM 13299T=ATCC BAA1214T).

  8. Nitrogenase from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata: purification and molecular properties.

    PubMed Central

    Hallenbeck, P C; Meyer, C M; Vignais, P M

    1982-01-01

    Nitrogenase proteins were isolated from cultures of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata grown on a limiting amount of ammonia. Under these conditions, the nitrogenase N2ase A was active in vivo, and nitrogenase activity in vitro was not dependent upon manganese and the activating factor. The nitrogenase proteins were also isolated from nitrogen-limited cultures in which the in vivo nitrogenase activity had been stopped by an ammonia shock. This nitrogenase activity, N2ase R, showed an in vitro requirement for manganese and the activating factor for maximal activity. The Mo-Fe protein (dinitrogenase) was composed of two dissimilar subunits with molecular weights of 55,000 and 59,500; the Fe protein (dinitrogenase reductase), from either type of culture, was composed of a single subunit (molecular weight), 33,500). The metal and acid labile sulfur contents of both nitrogenase proteins were similar to those found for previously isolated nitrogenases. The Fe proteins from both N2ase A and N2ase R contained phosphate and ribose, 2 mol of each per mol of N2ase R Fe protein and about 1 mol of each per mol of N2ase A Fe protein. The greatest difference between the two types of Fe protein was that the N2ase R Fe protein contained about 1 mol per mol of an adenine-like molecule, whereas the N2ase A Fe protein content of this compound was insignificant. These results are compared with various models previously presented for the short-term regulation of nitrogenase activity in the photosynthetic bacteria. PMID:6799495

  9. Anaerobic and aerobic metabolism of diverse aromatic compounds by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed Central

    Harwood, C S; Gibson, J

    1988-01-01

    The purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris used diverse aromatic compounds for growth under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Many phenolic, dihydroxylated, and methoxylated aromatic acids, as well as aromatic aldehydes and hydroaromatic acids, supported growth of strain CGA001 in both the presence and absence of oxygen. Some compounds were metabolized under only aerobic or under only anaerobic conditions. Two other strains, CGC023 and CGD052, had similar anaerobic substrate utilization patterns, but CGD052 was able to use a slightly larger number of compounds for growth. These results show that R. palustris is far more versatile in terms of aromatic degradation than had been previously demonstrated. A mutant (CGA033) blocked in aerobic aromatic metabolism remained wild type with respect to anaerobic degradative abilities, indicating that separate metabolic pathways mediate aerobic and anaerobic breakdown of diverse aromatics. Another mutant (CGA047) was unable to grow anaerobically on either benzoate or 4-hydroxybenzoate, and these compounds accumulated in growth media when cells were grown on more complex aromatic compounds. This indicates that R. palustris has two major anaerobic routes for aromatic ring fission, one that passes through benzoate and one that passes through 4-hydroxybenzoate. Images PMID:3377491

  10. Purification and properties of a nif-specific flavodoxin from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, A F; Gennaro, G; Hallenbeck, P C

    1993-01-01

    A flavodoxin was isolated from iron-sufficient, nitrogen-limited cultures of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus. Its molecular properties, molecular weight, UV-visible absorption spectrum, and amino acid composition suggest that it is similar to the nif-specific flavodoxin, NifF, of Klebsiella pneumoniae. The results of immunoblotting showed that R. capsulatus flavodoxin is nif specific, since it is absent from ammonia-replete cultures and is not synthesized by the mutant strain J61, which lacks a nif-specific regulator (NifR1). Growth of cultures under iron-deficient conditions causes a small amount of flavodoxin to be synthesized under ammonia-replete conditions and increases its synthesis under N2-fixing conditions, suggesting that its synthesis is under a dual system of control with respect to iron and fixed nitrogen availability. Here we show that flavodoxin, when supplemented with catalytic amounts of methyl viologen, is capable of efficiently reducing nitrogenase in an illuminated chloroplast system. Thus, this nif-specific flavodoxin is a potential in vivo electron carrier to nitrogenase; however, its role in the nitrogen fixation process remains to be established. Images PMID:8226618

  11. Secreted protease mediates interspecies interaction and promotes cell aggregation of the photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aggregans.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Sho; Matsuura, Katsumi; Haruta, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Interspecies interactions were studied in hot spring microbial mats where diverse species of bacterial cells are densely packed. The anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium, Chloroflexus aggregans, has been widely found in the microbial mats as a major component in terrestrial hot springs in Japan at the temperature from 50 to 70°C. C. aggregans shows cellular motility to form a microbial mat-like dense cell aggregate. The aggregating ability of C. aggregans was affected by another bacterial species, strain BL55a (related to Bacillus licheniformis) isolated from the microbial mats containing C. aggregans. Cell aggregation rate of C. aggregans was promoted by the addition of culture supernatants of strain BL55a. Similar effects were also detected from other bacterial isolates, specifically Geobacillus sp. and Aeribacillus sp. Protease activity was detected from the culture supernatants from all of these isolates. The promoting effect of strain BL55a was suppressed by a serine protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. A purified serine protease, subtilisin obtained from B. licheniformis, showed a promoting effect on the cell aggregation. These results suggest that an extracellular protease, secreted from co-existing bacterial species promoted the aggregating motility of C. aggregans. This is the first report that exogenous protease affects bacterial cellular motility.

  12. Characterisation of the LH2 spectral variants produced by the photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Honkanen, Suvi; Kelly, Sharon; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Blankenship, Robert E; Shimizu, Yuuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    This study systematically investigated the different types of LH2 produced by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulphur bacterium, in response to variations in growth conditions. Three different spectral forms of LH2 were isolated and purified, the B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types, all of which exhibit an unusual split 800 peak in their low temperature absorption spectra. However, it is likely that more forms are also present. Relatively more B800-820 and B800-840 are produced under low light conditions, while relatively more B800-850 is produced under high light conditions. Polypeptide compositions of the three different LH2 types were determined by a combination of HPLC and TOF/MS. The B800-820, B800-840 and B800-850 LH2 types all have a heterogeneous polypeptide composition, containing multiple types of both α and β polypeptides, and differ in their precise polypeptide composition. They all have a mixed carotenoid composition, containing carotenoids of the spirilloxanthin series. In all cases the most abundant carotenoid is rhodopin; however, there is a shift towards carotenoids with a higher conjugation number in LH2 complexes produced under low light conditions. CD spectroscopy, together with the polypeptide analysis, demonstrates that these Alc. vinosum LH2 complexes are more closely related to the LH2 complex from Phs. molischianum than they are to the LH2 complexes from Rps. acidophila.

  13. The Protective Roles of the Antioxidant Enzymes Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase in the Green Photosynthetic Bacterium Chloroflexus Aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, Robert E.; Rothschild, Lynn (Technical Monitor)

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the biochemical response of the green thermophilic photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus to oxidative stress. Lab experiments focused primarily on characterizing the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and the response of this organism to oxidative stress. Experiments in the field at the hotsprings in Yellowstone National Park focused on the changes in the level of these enzymes during the day in response to oxidants and to the different types of ultraviolet radiation.

  14. Functional Genomic Analysis of Three Nitrogenase Isozymes in the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris‡

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yasuhiro; Samanta, Sudip K.; Rey, Federico E.; Wu, Liyou; Liu, Xiudan; Yan, Tingfen; Zhou, Jizhong; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2005-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris is one of just a few prokaryotes described so far that has vnf and anf genes for alternative vanadium cofactor (V) and iron cofactor (Fe) nitrogenases in addition to nif genes for a molybdenum cofactor (Mo) nitrogenase. Transcriptome data indicated that the 32 genes in the nif gene cluster, but not the anf or vnf genes, were induced in wild-type and Mo nitrogenase-expressing strains grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions in Mo-containing medium. Strains that were unable to express a functional Mo nitrogenase due to mutations in Mo nitrogenase structural genes synthesized functional V and Fe nitrogenases and expressed vnf and anf genes in nitrogen-fixing growth media that contained Mo and V at concentrations far in excess of those that repress alternative nitrogenase gene expression in other bacteria. Thus, not only does R. palustris have multiple enzymatic options for nitrogen fixation, but in contrast to reports on other nitrogen-fixing bacteria, the expression of its alternative nitrogenases is not repressed by transition metals. Between 95 and 295 genes that are not directly associated with nitrogenase synthesis and assembly were induced under nitrogen-fixing conditions, depending on which nitrogenase was being used by R. palustris. Genes for nitrogen acquisition were expressed at particularly high levels during alternative nitrogenase-dependent growth. This suggests that alternative nitrogenase-expressing cells are relatively starved for nitrogen and raises the possibility that fixed nitrogen availability may be the primary signal that controls the synthesis of the V and Fe nitrogenases. PMID:16267302

  15. High-level production of the industrial product lycopene by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Shu; Grammel, Hartmut; Abou-Aisha, Khaled; Sägesser, Rudolf; Ghosh, Robin

    2012-10-01

    The biosynthesis of the major carotenoid spirilloxanthin by the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum is thought to occur via a linear pathway proceeding through phytoene and, later, lycopene as intermediates. This assumption is based solely on early chemical evidence (B. H. Davies, Biochem. J. 116:93-99, 1970). In most purple bacteria, the desaturation of phytoene, catalyzed by the enzyme phytoene desaturase (CrtI), leads to neurosporene, involving only three dehydrogenation steps and not four as in the case of lycopene. We show here that the chromosomal insertion of a kanamycin resistance cassette into the crtC-crtD region of the partial carotenoid gene cluster, whose gene products are responsible for the downstream processing of lycopene, leads to the accumulation of the latter as the major carotenoid. We provide spectroscopic and biochemical evidence that in vivo, lycopene is incorporated into the light-harvesting complex 1 as efficiently as the methoxylated carotenoids spirilloxanthin (in the wild type) and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydrospirilloxanthin (in a crtD mutant), both under semiaerobic, chemoheterotrophic, and photosynthetic, anaerobic conditions. Quantitative growth experiments conducted in dark, semiaerobic conditions, using a growth medium for high cell density and high intracellular membrane levels, which are suitable for the conventional industrial production in the absence of light, yielded lycopene at up to 2 mg/g (dry weight) of cells or up to 15 mg/liter of culture. These values are comparable to those of many previously described Escherichia coli strains engineered for lycopene production. This study provides the first genetic proof that the R. rubrum CrtI produces lycopene exclusively as an end product.

  16. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfite and thiosulfate by the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D, catalyzes several oxidations of reduced sulfur compounds under anaerobic conditions in the light: e.g., sulfide --> sulfur --> sulfate, sulfite --> sulfate, and thiosulfate --> sulfur + sulfate. Here it is shown that no sulfur isotope effect is associated with the last of these processes; isotopic compositions of the sulfur and sulfate produced can differ, however, if the sulfane and sulfonate positions within the thiosulfate have different isotopic compositions. In the second process, an observed change from an inverse to a normal isotope effect during oxidation of sulfite may indicate the operation of 2 enzymatic pathways. In contrast to heterotrophic anaerobic reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds, anaerobic oxidations of inorganic sulfur compounds by photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by relatively small isotope effects.

  17. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfite and thiosulfate by the photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, strain D, catalyzes several oxidations of reduced sulfur compounds under anaerobic conditions in the light: e.g., sulfide --> sulfur --> sulfate, sulfite --> sulfate, and thiosulfate --> sulfur + sulfate. Here it is shown that no sulfur isotope effect is associated with the last of these processes; isotopic compositions of the sulfur and sulfate produced can differ, however, if the sulfane and sulfonate positions within the thiosulfate have different isotopic compositions. In the second process, an observed change from an inverse to a normal isotope effect during oxidation of sulfite may indicate the operation of 2 enzymatic pathways. In contrast to heterotrophic anaerobic reduction of oxidized sulfur compounds, anaerobic oxidations of inorganic sulfur compounds by photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by relatively small isotope effects.

  18. Fluoroacetate biosynthesis from the marine-derived bacterium Streptomyces xinghaiensis NRRL B-24674.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng; Ma, Long; Tong, Ming Him; Yu, Yi; O'Hagan, David; Deng, Hai

    2014-07-21

    Genome sequencing identified a fluorinase gene in the marine bacterium Streptomyces xinghaiensis NRRL B-24674. Fermentation of the organism with inorganic fluoride (2 mM) demonstrated that the organism could biosynthesise fluoroacetate and that fluoroacetate production is sea-salt dependent. This is the first fluorometabolite producing microorganism identified from the marine environment.

  19. Assessing the effects of ultraviolet radiation on the photosynthetic potential in Archean marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Alonso, Dailé; Baetens, Jan M.; Cardenas, Rolando; de Baets, Bernard

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the photosynthesis model presented by Avila et al. in 2013 is extended and more scenarios inhabited by ancient cyanobacteria are investigated to quantify the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on their photosynthetic potential in marine environments of the Archean eon. We consider ferrous ions as blockers of UV during the Early Archean, while the absorption spectrum of chlorophyll a is used to quantify the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by photosynthetic organisms. UV could have induced photoinhibition at the water surface, thereby strongly affecting the species with low light use efficiency. A higher photosynthetic potential in early marine environments was shown than in the Late Archean as a consequence of the attenuation of UVC and UVB by iron ions, which probably played an important role in the protection of ancient free-floating bacteria from high-intensity UV radiation. Photosynthetic organisms in Archean coastal and ocean environments were probably abundant in the first 5 and 25 m of the water column, respectively. However, species with a relatively high efficiency in the use of light could have inhabited ocean waters up to a depth of 200 m and show a Deep Chlorophyll Maximum near 60 m depth. We show that the electromagnetic radiation from the Sun, both UV and visible light, could have determined the vertical distribution of Archean marine photosynthetic organisms.

  20. Effects of carotenoid inhibition on the photosynthetic RC-LH1 complex in purple sulphur bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K; Fiedor, L; Scheer, H

    2005-11-01

    Core complexes (LH1-RC) were isolated using preparative gel electrophoresis from photosynthetic membranes of the purple bacterium, Thiorhodospira sibirica, grown in the absence or presence of the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor, diphenylamine. The biosynthesis of carotenoids is affected by diphenylamine both quantitavely and qualitatively: after inhibition, the level of carotenoids in core complexes reaches only 10% of the normal content, as analyzed by HPLC and absorption spectroscopy. The normally grown bacterium biosynthesizes spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, anhydrorhodovibrin and lycopene, whereas after inhibition only neurosporene, zeta-carotene and their derivatives are found in the complexes. There is no concomitant accumulation of appreciable amounts of colorless carotenoid precursors. Interestingly, the main absorption band of the core light harvesting complex isolated from carotenoid-inhibited cells, shows a red shift to 889 nm, instead of a blue shift observed in many carotenoid-deficient species of purple photosynthetic bacteria. The stability of isolated core complexes against n-octyl-beta-D: -glucopyranoside clearly depends on the presence of carotenoids. Subcomplexes resulting from the detergent treatment, were characterized by non-denaturating gel electrophoresis combined with in situ absorption spectroscopy. Core complexes with the native carotenoid complement dissociate into three subcomplexes: (a) LH1 complexes partially depleted of carotenoids, with an unusual spectrum in the NIR region (lambdamax = 791, 818, 847 and 875 nm), (b) reaction centers associated with fragments of LH1, (c) small amounts of a carotenoidless B820 subcomplex. The core complex from the carotenoid-deficient bacterium is much less stable and yields only the two sub-complexes (b) and (c). We conclude that carotenoids contribute critically to stability and interactions of the core complexes with detergents.

  1. Identification, isolation, and sequence of the reaction center protein genes of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Reaction centers in photosynthetic membranes are the centers to which electronic excitation due to light absorption is transferred. This excitation brings about a charge separation between a bacteriochlorophyll molecule and two quinone molecules which ultimately leads to the formation of a hydroquinone. The reduced hydroquinone is then utilized to produce a proton gradient across the membrane and ultimately to produce ATP. We have focused our interest on the structure of the reaction center in the photosynthetic purple bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas capsulata, with the intention of establishing a detailed understanding of these first chemical steps in the natural fixation of sunlight. The methods used to identify and isolate the genes for the three reaction center subunits, L, M, and H, in Rps. capsulata are outlined. These genes have then been sequenced, and the sequences analyzed in detail for their similarity with sequences of comparable proteins from more advanced photosynthetic bacteria such as Anabena, from algae such as Euglena and Chlamydomonas, and from higher plants such as amaranthus, soybean, tobacco and spinach. Homology was found which has been tentatively interpreted to be in the region of quinone binding in all of these reaction centers. There is growing optimism that there will be substantial structural similarity between the reaction centers of the purple bacteria and those of photosystem II in higher plants. This conclusion is important because the x-ray crystal structures of several of the purple bacteria reaction center complexes are presently being worked on and will ultimately be solved.

  2. Vibrio damsela, a Marine Bacterium, Causes Skin Ulcers on the Damselfish Chromis punctipinnis.

    PubMed

    Love, M; Teebken-Fisher, D; Hose, J E; Farmer, J J; Hickman, F W; Fanning, G R

    1981-12-04

    A previously undescribed marine bacterium, Vibrio damsela, was isolated from naturally occurring skin ulcers on a species of temperate-water damselfish, the blacksmith (Chromis punctipinnis). Laboratory infection of the blacksmith with Vibrio damsela produced similar ulcers. Vibrio damsela was pathogenic for four other species of damselfish but not for members of other families of fish. The bacterium has also been isolated from water and from two human wounds and may be a cause of human disease.

  3. Primary photochemistry in the facultatively aerobic green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Barry D.; Fuller, R. Clinton; Blankenship, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    Photochemical activity was examined in membrane fragments and a purified membrane preparation from Chloroflexus. Flash-induced absorption difference spectroscopy strongly suggests a primary donor (P865) that is more similar to the P870 bacteriochlorophyll a dimer found in the purple photosynthetic bacteria than it is to P840 found in the anaerobic green bacteria. Redox measurements on P865 and an early acceptor also indicate a photochemical system characteristic of the purple bacteria. The membrane preparation contains a tightly bound type c cytochrome, c554, that is closely coupled to the reaction center as indicated by its ability to rereduce photooxidized P865. Chloroflexus thus appears to be distinct photochemically from other families of photosynthetic bacteria and may occupy an important role in photosynthetic evolution. PMID:16593246

  4. Ammonificins C and D, Hydroxyethylamine Chromene Derivatives from a Cultured Marine Hydrothermal Vent Bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans

    PubMed Central

    Andrianasolo, Eric H.; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans. PMID:23170085

  5. Ammonificins C and D, hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives from a cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans.

    PubMed

    Andrianasolo, Eric H; Haramaty, Liti; Rosario-Passapera, Richard; Vetriani, Costantino; Falkowski, Paul; White, Eileen; Lutz, Richard

    2012-10-01

    Chemical and biological investigation of the cultured marine hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonifican led to the isolation of two hydroxyethylamine chromene derivatives, ammonificins C and D. Their structures were elucidated using combination of NMR and mass spectrometry. Absolute stereochemistry was ascertained by comparison of experimental and calculated CD spectra. Biological evaluation and assessment were determined using the patented ApopScreen cell-based screen for apoptosis-induction. Ammonificins C and D induce apoptosis in micromolar concentrations. To our knowledge, this finding is the first report of chemical compounds that induce apoptosis from the cultured deep-sea marine organism, hydrothermal vent bacterium, Thermovibrio ammonificans.

  6. Breakdown of food waste by anaerobic fermentation and non-oxygen producing photosynthesis using a photosynthetic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Mekjinda, N; Ritchie, R J

    2015-01-01

    Large volumes of food waste are produced by restaurants, hotels, etc generating problems in its collection, processing and disposal. Disposal as garbage increases the organic matter in landfills and leachates. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris (CGA 009) easily broke down food waste. R. palustris produces H2 under anaerobic conditions and digests a very wide range of organic compounds. R. palustris reduced BOD by ≈70% and COD by ≈33%, starch, ammonia, nitrate, was removed but had little effect on reducing sugar or the total phosphorus, lipid, protein, total solid in a 7-day incubation. R. palustris produced a maximum of 80ml H2/g COD/day. A two-stage anaerobic digestion using yeast as the first stage, followed by a R. palustris digestion was tested but production of H2 was low.

  7. Isolation of a thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides Strain, NAT, and its capacity for oil and chemical oxygen demand removal at high temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Yosuke; Takeno, Kenji; Shinkawa, Hidenori; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Sasaki, Ken

    2008-06-01

    A thermotolerant photosynthetic bacterium NAT identified as Rhodobacter sphaeroides was isolated. When alginate-immobilized cells of strain NAT were used in high-temperature treatment of artificial sewage wastewater containing oil, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased by 80% and 76% of the oil was removed after 96 h of treatment at 55 degrees C. Lipase activity was observed in the culture.

  8. Prochlorococcus, a Marine Photosynthetic Prokaryote of Global Significance

    PubMed Central

    Partensky, F.; Hess, W. R.; Vaulot, D.

    1999-01-01

    The minute photosynthetic prokaryote Prochlorococcus, which was discovered about 10 years ago, has proven exceptional from several standpoints. Its tiny size (0.5 to 0.7 μm in diameter) makes it the smallest known photosynthetic organism. Its ubiquity within the 40°S to 40°N latitudinal band of oceans and its occurrence at high density from the surface down to depths of 200 m make it presumably the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth. Prochlorococcus typically divides once a day in the subsurface layer of oligotrophic areas, where it dominates the photosynthetic biomass. It also possesses a remarkable pigment complement which includes divinyl derivatives of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and Chl b, the so-called Chl a2 and Chl b2, and, in some strains, small amounts of a new type of phycoerythrin. Phylogenetically, Prochlorococcus has also proven fascinating. Recent studies suggest that it evolved from an ancestral cyanobacterium by reducing its cell and genome sizes and by recruiting a protein originally synthesized under conditions of iron depletion to build a reduced antenna system as a replacement for large phycobilisomes. Environmental constraints clearly played a predominant role in Prochlorococcus evolution. Its tiny size is an advantage for its adaptation to nutrient-deprived environments. Furthermore, genetically distinct ecotypes, with different antenna systems and ecophysiological characteristics, are present at depth and in surface waters. This vertical species variation has allowed Prochlorococcus to adapt to the natural light gradient occurring in the upper layer of oceans. The present review critically assesses the basic knowledge acquired about Prochlorococcus both in the ocean and in the laboratory. PMID:10066832

  9. Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine bacterium with a generation time of less than 10 minutes.

    PubMed

    EAGON, R G

    1962-04-01

    Eagon, R. G. (University of Georgia, Athens). Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine bacterium with a generation time of less than 10 minutes. J. Bacteriol. 83:736-737. 1962.-Pseudomonas natriegens, a marine microorganism, was demonstrated to have a generation time of 9.8 min. This is the shortest generation time reported to date. Optimal growth occurred at 37 C in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with 1.5% sea salt.

  10. Isolation, characterization, and amino acid sequences of auracyanins, blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, J. D.; Brune, D. C.; Han, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Tollin, G.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three small blue copper proteins designated auracyanin A, auracyanin B-1, and auracyanin B-2 have been isolated from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. All three auracyanins are peripheral membrane proteins. Auracyanin A was described previously (Trost, J. T., McManus, J. D., Freeman, J. C., Ramakrishna, B. L., and Blankenship, R. E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7858-7863) and is not glycosylated. The two B forms are glycoproteins and have almost identical properties to each other, but are distinct from the A form. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparent monomer molecular masses are 14 (A), 18 (B-2), and 22 (B-1) kDa. The amino acid sequences of the B forms are presented. All three proteins have similar absorbance, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra, but the electron spin resonance signals are quite different. Laser flash photolysis kinetic analysis of the reactions of the three forms of auracyanin with lumiflavin and flavin mononucleotide semiquinones indicates that the site of electron transfer is negatively charged and has an accessibility similar to that found in other blue copper proteins. Copper analysis indicates that all three proteins contain 1 mol of copper per mol of protein. All three auracyanins exhibit a midpoint redox potential of +240 mV. Light-induced absorbance changes and electron spin resonance signals suggest that auracyanin A may play a role in photosynthetic electron transfer. Kinetic data indicate that all three proteins can donate electrons to cytochrome c-554, the electron donor to the photosynthetic reaction center.

  11. Isolation, characterization, and amino acid sequences of auracyanins, blue copper proteins from the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McManus, J. D.; Brune, D. C.; Han, J.; Sanders-Loehr, J.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Tollin, G.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Three small blue copper proteins designated auracyanin A, auracyanin B-1, and auracyanin B-2 have been isolated from the thermophilic green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. All three auracyanins are peripheral membrane proteins. Auracyanin A was described previously (Trost, J. T., McManus, J. D., Freeman, J. C., Ramakrishna, B. L., and Blankenship, R. E. (1988) Biochemistry 27, 7858-7863) and is not glycosylated. The two B forms are glycoproteins and have almost identical properties to each other, but are distinct from the A form. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis apparent monomer molecular masses are 14 (A), 18 (B-2), and 22 (B-1) kDa. The amino acid sequences of the B forms are presented. All three proteins have similar absorbance, circular dichroism, and resonance Raman spectra, but the electron spin resonance signals are quite different. Laser flash photolysis kinetic analysis of the reactions of the three forms of auracyanin with lumiflavin and flavin mononucleotide semiquinones indicates that the site of electron transfer is negatively charged and has an accessibility similar to that found in other blue copper proteins. Copper analysis indicates that all three proteins contain 1 mol of copper per mol of protein. All three auracyanins exhibit a midpoint redox potential of +240 mV. Light-induced absorbance changes and electron spin resonance signals suggest that auracyanin A may play a role in photosynthetic electron transfer. Kinetic data indicate that all three proteins can donate electrons to cytochrome c-554, the electron donor to the photosynthetic reaction center.

  12. Colwellia agarivorans sp. nov., an agar-digesting marine bacterium isolated from coastal seawater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, yellowish and agar-digesting marine bacterium, designated strain QM50**T, was isolated from coastal seawater in an aquaculture site near Qingdao, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the novel isolate represented...

  13. Photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris GJ-22 induces systemic resistance against viruses.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin; Tan, Xinqiu; Li, Chenggang; Zhang, Deyong; Cheng, Ju'e; Zhang, Songbai; Zhou, Xuguo; Yan, Qingpin; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Liu, Yong; Lu, Xiangyang

    2017-03-14

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) have been extensively used in agriculture to promote plant growth and to improve crop quality. Their potential application in plant disease management, however, is largely overlooked. In this study, the PSB strain Rhodopseudomonas palustris GJ-22 was investigated for its ability to induce resistance against a plant virus while promoting plant growth. In the field, a foliar spray of GJ-22 suspension protected tobacco plants against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Under axenic conditions, GJ-22 colonized the plant phyllosphere and induced resistance against TMV. Additionally, GJ-22 produced two phytohormones, indole-3-acetic acid and 5-aminolevulinic acid, which promote growth and germination in tobacco. Furthermore, GJ-22-inoculated plants elevated their immune response under subsequent TMV infection. This research may give rise to a novel biological agent with a dual function in disease management while promoting plant growth.

  14. The complete genome sequence of Chlorobium tepidum TLS, a photosynthetic, anaerobic, green-sulfur bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Jonathan A.; Nelson, Karen E.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Heidelberg, John F.; Wu, Martin; Dodson, Robert J.; Deboy, Robert; Gwinn, Michelle L.; Nelson, William C.; Haft, Daniel H.; Hickey, Erin K.; Peterson, Jeremy D.; Durkin, A. Scott; Kolonay, James L.; Yang, Fan; Holt, Ingeborg; Umayam, Lowell A.; Mason, Tanya; Brenner, Michael; Shea, Terrance P.; Parksey, Debbie; Nierman, William C.; Feldblyum, Tamara V.; Hansen, Cheryl L.; Craven, M. Brook; Radune, Diana; Vamathevan, Jessica; Khouri, Hoda; White, Owen; Gruber, Tanja M.; Ketchum, Karen A.; Venter, J. Craig; Tettelin, Hervé; Bryant, Donald A.; Fraser, Claire M.

    2002-01-01

    The complete genome of the green-sulfur eubacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS was determined to be a single circular chromosome of 2,154,946 bp. This represents the first genome sequence from the phylum Chlorobia, whose members perform anoxygenic photosynthesis by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Genome comparisons have identified genes in C. tepidum that are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. Many of these have no assigned function and may play novel roles in photosynthesis or photobiology. Phylogenomic analysis reveals likely duplications of genes involved in biosynthetic pathways for photosynthesis and the metabolism of sulfur and nitrogen as well as strong similarities between metabolic processes in C. tepidum and many Archaeal species. PMID:12093901

  15. Light-enhanced bioaccumulation of molybdenum by nitrogen-deprived recombinant anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    PubMed

    Naito, Taki; Sachuronggui; Ueki, Masayoshi; Maeda, Isamu

    2016-01-01

    As molybdenum (Mo) is an indispensable metal for plant nitrogen metabolisms, accumulation of dissolved Mo into bacterial cells may connect to the development of bacterial fertilizers that promote plant growth. In order to enhance Mo bioaccumulation, nitrogen removal and light illumination were examined in anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria (APB) because APB possess Mo nitrogenase whose synthesis is strictly regulated by ammonium ion concentration. In addition, an APB, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, transformed with a gene encoding Mo-responsive transcriptional regulator ModE was constructed. Mo content was most markedly enhanced by the removal of ammonium ion from medium and light illumination while their effects on other metal contents were limited. Increases in contents of trace metals including Mo by the genetic modification were observed. Thus, these results demonstrated an effective way to enrich Mo in the bacterial cells by the culture conditions and genetic modification.

  16. Triplet excited state spectra and dynamics of carotenoids from the thermophilic purple photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-01-13

    Light-harvesting complex 2 from the anoxygenic phototrophic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption, fluorescence and flash photolysis spectroscopy. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements show that carotenoids play a negligible role as supportive energy donors and transfer excitation to bacteriochlorophyll-a with low energy transfer efficiency of ~30%. HPLC analysis determined that the dominant carotenoids in the complex are rhodopin and spirilloxanthin. Carotenoid excited triplet state formation upon direct (carotenoid) or indirect (bacteriochlorophyll-a Q{sub x} band) excitation shows that carotenoid triplets are mostly localized on spirilloxanthin. In addition, no triplet excitation transfer between carotenoids was observed. Such specific carotenoid composition and spectroscopic results strongly suggest that this organism optimized carotenoid composition in the light-harvesting complex 2 in order to maximize photoprotective capabilities of carotenoids but subsequently drastically suppressed their supporting role in light-harvesting process.

  17. Cyclobacterium halophilum sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from a coastal-marine wetland.

    PubMed

    Shahinpei, Azadeh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated strain GASx41(T), was isolated from soil of the coastal-marine wetland Gomishan in Iran. Cells of strain GASx41(T) were curved, ring-like or horseshoe-shaped rods and non-motile. Strain GASx41(T) was strictly aerobic, and catalase- and oxidase-positive. The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 1-10% (w/v), with optimum growth occurring at 2.5-3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 25-30 °C and pH 7.5-8.0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain GASx41(T) was shown to belong to the genus Cyclobacterium within the phylum Bacteroidetes and showed closest phylogenetic similarity to 'Cyclobacterium jeungdonense' HMD3055 (98.0%). The DNA G+C content of strain GASx41(T) was 48.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids of strain GASx41(T) were iso-C15 : 0, summed feature 4 (iso-C15 : 0 2-OH and/or C16 : 1ω7c), anteiso-C15 : 0 2-OH, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, and its polar lipid pattern consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine and 12 unknown lipids. The only quinone present was menaquinone 7 (MK-7). All these features confirmed the placement of isolate GASx41(T) within the genus Cyclobacterium. On the basis of evidence from this study, a novel species of the genus Cyclobacterium, Cyclobacterium halophilum sp. nov., is proposed, with strain GASx41(T) ( = IBRC-M 10761(T) = CECT 8341(T)) as the type strain.

  18. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide.

  19. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide. PMID:27513570

  20. Pseudomonas creosotenesis sp. n., a Creosote-tolerant Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Thomas B.; Drisko, Richard W.; Hochman, Harry

    1961-01-01

    In a study of the marine biological environment in which creosoted pilings are located, a previously unreported species of bacteria was isolated. This species was detected on creosoted piling from 11 widely differing locations and was the predominant species of bacteria found on these piling. The new organism was identified as a gram-negative rod belonging to the genus Pseudomonas and has been named Pseudomonas creosotensis. It has been completely described by the standard morphological and biochemical tests. Images FIG. 1 PMID:14480909

  1. [Screening and identification of a photosynthetic bacterium reducing selenite to red elemental selenium].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-liang; Xiao, Min; Qian, Wei; Han, Bo

    2007-02-01

    Selenium is essential element for humans and animals but is very toxic at higher concentrations. In four inorganic states of selenate [SeO4 2- ( VI)], selenite [SeO3 2- (IV)], elemental selenium [Se (0)] and selenide [Se2- (- II )], selenite is well known to be more soluble and higher toxic than other three forms. Many microorganisms have the capacity to reduce selenite to red elemental selenium, which provide the potential to cope with the detoxification of pollution and to use the biological availability of red elemental selenium. Strain S3 that was more resistant to sodium selenite was selected from 20 photosynthetic bacteria preserved in laboratory. The red granule produced by S3 was identified as elemental selenium ( Se) by transmission electron microscopy and Electron-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The granule diameter of the red elemental selenium was 5nm - 200nm, similar as the Nano-Se that has bioavailability. Morphology, physiology and photosynthetic pigments analysis results showed that strain S3 was essentially consistent with Rhodobacter azotoformans . The 16S rDNA sequence analysis (GenBank accession number DQ402051) suggested that strain S3 was clustered together with R. azotoformans in phylogenetic tree, with the sequence identity of 99% . Based on all the results of taxonomy, strain S3 was identified as R. azotoformans S3. The effects of selenite on growth kinetics and the ability to resistant selenite of strain S3 were investigated. In contrast to Rhodospirillum rubrum which was reported not to reduce selenite until the end of exponential growth, strain S3 transformed selenite (1.25mmol/L) at the beginning of the growth, suggesting that strain S3 and Rs. rubrum may employ different strategies to reduce selenite. Strain S3 can grow in the presence of up to 125mmol/L sodium selenite, which is much higher than those which could be resisted to by other bacteria such as Escherichia coli ( < 20mmol/L) and Ralstonia metallidurans CH34 ( < 6mmol/L) . It

  2. Extraction of extracellular polymeric substances from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing; Yu, Zhou

    2005-04-01

    Among the four methods for extracting extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila (EDTA, NaOH, H(2)SO(4), heating/centrifugation), EDTA extraction was found to be the most effective. The contents of the major components of EPS from R. acidophila, i.e., carbohydrate, protein and nucleic acid, were 6.5, 58.4 and 5.4 mg g(-1) dry cells, respectively. The optimum extraction time was 1-3 h and the EDTA dosage was approximately 2.8 g g(-1) dry cells. Under these conditions, no cell lysis was observed. The EPS content and the percentage of the three main components were greatly dependent on the extraction method. The intensity of absorption peaks for photosynthetic pigments in the UV-visible spectrum of bacteria remained unchanged prior to and after EDTA extraction; and no pigment peaks appeared in the EPS spectrum. This suggests that few cells were destroyed and lysis did not occur. UV-visible spectrum analysis, an easy and rapid technique, could be used to monitor cell lysis during EPS extraction from R. acidophila.

  3. Melatonin production in an aerobic photosynthetic bacterium: an evolutionarily early association with darkness.

    PubMed

    Tilden, A R; Becker, M A; Amma, L L; Arciniega, J; McGaw, A K

    1997-03-01

    Melatonin was measured in a species of aerobic photosynthetic bacteria, Erythrobacter longus, grown in either constant light or constant dark. A radioimmunoassay was used to quantify melatonin levels and thin-layer chromatography to confirm the identity of melatonin immunoactivity. Melatonin levels were significantly higher (nearly 2.3-fold) in the dark-grown than in the light-grown samples. Also, the homogenates of the dark-grown bacteria retained melatonin-producing enzymatic activity, whereas the light-grown homogenates did not; melatonin levels extracted from the dark-grown homogenates increased with increasing extraction time, reaching as high as 29.2 ng.mg-1 protein at 120 min. Removal of membrane fragments from homogenates did not influence melatonin levels in light-grown homogenate, but this procedure increased melatonin levels in dark-grown homogenate, indicating that at least some of the enzymes in the pathway of melatonin production are not membrane-bound. This study is the second to demonstrate the presence of melatonin at the prokaryotic level, supporting the evidence that melatonin appeared very early in evolution. Its function in prokaryotes has not been determined, but may relate to its antioxidative actions.

  4. Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Borghese, Roberto; Brucale, Marco; Fortunato, Gianuario; Lanzi, Massimiliano; Mezzi, Alessio; Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Zannoni, Davide

    2016-05-15

    The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO3(2-)) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te(0) in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te(0) nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600-700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te(0) to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  5. Inhibitor-complexed Structures of the Cytochrome bc[subscript 1] from the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    SciTech Connect

    Esser, Lothar; Elberry, Maria; Zhou, Fei; Yu, Chang-An; Yu, Linda; Xia, Di

    2008-06-30

    The cytochrome bc{sub 1} complex (bc{sub 1}) is a major contributor to the proton motive force across the membrane by coupling electron transfer to proton translocation. The crystal structures of wild type and mutant bc{sub 1} complexes from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Rsbc{sub 1}), stabilized with the quinol oxidation (Q{sub P}) site inhibitor stigmatellin alone or in combination with the quinone reduction (Q{sub N}) site inhibitor antimycin, were determined. The high quality electron density permitted assignments of a new metal-binding site to the cytochrome c1 subunit and a number of lipid and detergent molecules. Structural differences between Rsbc{sub 1} and its mitochondrial counterparts are mostly extra membranous and provide a basis for understanding the function of the predominantly longer sequences in the bacterial subunits. Functional implications for the bc{sub 1} complex are derived from analyses of 10 independent molecules in various crystal forms and from comparisons with mitochondrial complexes.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas faecalis Strain A from Swine Sewage Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyi; Okunishi, Suguru; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Kamei, Yuto; Maeda, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    A purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacterium (PNSB), PSB Strain A was isolated from swine sewage wastewater. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that PSB Strain A was most closely related to Rhodopseudomonas faecalis. Growth of the isolate under anaerobic-light conditions with a variety of carbon sources was investigated. Both PSB Strain A and the standard strain showed good growth with acetic acid, propionic acid, and n-butyric acid at a concentration of 20 mM. At the high concentration of 200 mM, PSB Strain A showed better growth in pyruvate, acetate, propionate, succinate and malate. By applying PSB Strain A to treat swine sewage wastewater, the concentration of VFAs, which were acetic acid and propionic acid, decreased from 158.0 mM to 120.2±2.9 mM, and 14.9 mM to 9.3±0.9 mM, respectively, after 216-h incubation. After 330-h incubation, the concentrations of TOC and ammonia nitrogen dropped from 4508.0 mg/L to 3104.0±451.5 mg/L, and 629.7 mg/L to 424.1±7.4 mg/L, respectively. The isolated PSB Strain A showed almost the same efficiency compared with the standard strain on the removal of VFAs and TOC. The results suggest the possibility of using the isolated strain to treat swine sewage wastewater.

  7. The lipidome of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 is affected by cobalt and chromate ions stress.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Italiano, Francesca; Catucci, Lucia; Agostiano, Angela; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco; Trotta, Massimo

    2014-02-01

    A detailed characterization of membrane lipids of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides was accomplished by thin-layer chromatography coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Such an approach allowed the identification of the main membrane lipids belonging to different classes, namely cardiolipins (CLs), phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylglycerols (PGs), phosphatidylcholines, and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDGs). Thus, the lipidomic profile of R. sphaeroides R26 grown in abiotic stressed conditions by exposure to bivalent cobalt cation and chromate oxyanion, was investigated. Compared to bacteria grown under control conditions, significant lipid alterations take place under both stress conditions; cobalt exposure stress results in the relative content increase of CLs and SQDGs, most likely compensating the decrease in PGs content, whereas chromate stress conditions result in the relative content decrease of both PGs and SQDGs, leaving CLs unaltered. For the first time, the response of R. sphaeroides to heavy metals as Co(2+) and CrO4 (2-) is reported and changes in membrane lipid profiles were rationalised.

  8. In Vitro Enzymatic Activities of Bacteriochlorophyll a Synthase Derived from the Green Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Hirota, Keiya; Harada, Jiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2015-08-18

    The activity of an enzyme encoded by the CT1610 gene in the green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum, which was annotated as bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a synthase, BchG (denoted as tepBchG), was examined in vitro using the lysates of Escherichia coli containing the heterologously expressed enzyme. BChl a possessing a geranylgeranyl group at the 17-propionate residue (BChl aGG) was produced from bacteriochlorophyllide (BChlide) a and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in the presence of tepBchG. Surprisingly, tepBchG catalyzed the formation of BChl a bearing a farnesyl group (BChl aF) as in the enzymatic production of BChl aGG, indicating loose recognition of isoprenoid pyrophosphates in tepBchG. In contrast to such loose recognition of isoprenoid substrates, BChlide c and chlorophyllide a gave no esterifying product upon being incubated with geranylgeranyl or farnesyl pyrophosphate in the presence of tepBchG. These results confirm that tepBchG undoubtedly acts as the BChl a synthase in Cba. tepidum. The enzymatic activity of tepBchG was higher than that of BchG of Rhodobacter sphaeroides at 45 °C, although the former activity was lower than the latter below 35 °C.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Agarivorans albus Strain MKT 106T, an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Kai, Wataru; Fujiwara, Atushi; Fukui, Youhei; Satomi, Masataka; Sano, Motohiko

    2013-07-18

    Agarivorans albus is a Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, and agar-hydrolyzing marine bacterium. We present the draft genome sequence of the A. albus strain MKT 106(T), which is composed of 67 contigs (>500 bp) totaling 4,734,285 bp and containing 4,397 coding DNA sequences (CDSs), four rRNAs, and 64 tRNA sequences.

  10. Cadherin domains in the polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 are carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A; Weiner, Ronald M; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium.

  11. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  12. Genomic Analysis of a Marine Bacterium: Bioinformatics for Comparison, Evaluation, and Interpretation of DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Rekadwad, Bhagwan N; Gonzalez, Juan M; Khobragade, Chandrahasya N

    2016-01-01

    A total of five highly related strains of an unidentified marine bacterium were analyzed through their short genome sequences (AM260709-AM260713). Genome-to-Genome Distance (GGDC) showed high similarity to Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (X67024). The generated unique Quick Response (QR) codes indicated no identity to other microbial species or gene sequences. Chaos Game Representation (CGR) showed the number of bases concentrated in the area. Guanine residues were highest in number followed by cytosine. Frequency of Chaos Game Representation (FCGR) indicated that CC and GG blocks have higher frequency in the sequence from the evaluated marine bacterium strains. Maximum GC content for the marine bacterium strains ranged 53-54%. The use of QR codes, CGR, FCGR, and GC dataset helped in identifying and interpreting short genome sequences from specific isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the bootstrap test (1000 replicates) using MEGA6 software. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was carried out using EMBL-EBI MUSCLE program. Thus, generated genomic data are of great assistance for hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics which combined with phenotypic features represents a basic procedure for a polyphasic approach on unambiguous bacterial isolate taxonomic classification.

  13. Genomic Analysis of a Marine Bacterium: Bioinformatics for Comparison, Evaluation, and Interpretation of DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Khobragade, Chandrahasya N.

    2016-01-01

    A total of five highly related strains of an unidentified marine bacterium were analyzed through their short genome sequences (AM260709–AM260713). Genome-to-Genome Distance (GGDC) showed high similarity to Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis (X67024). The generated unique Quick Response (QR) codes indicated no identity to other microbial species or gene sequences. Chaos Game Representation (CGR) showed the number of bases concentrated in the area. Guanine residues were highest in number followed by cytosine. Frequency of Chaos Game Representation (FCGR) indicated that CC and GG blocks have higher frequency in the sequence from the evaluated marine bacterium strains. Maximum GC content for the marine bacterium strains ranged 53-54%. The use of QR codes, CGR, FCGR, and GC dataset helped in identifying and interpreting short genome sequences from specific isolates. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the bootstrap test (1000 replicates) using MEGA6 software. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was carried out using EMBL-EBI MUSCLE program. Thus, generated genomic data are of great assistance for hierarchical classification in Bacterial Systematics which combined with phenotypic features represents a basic procedure for a polyphasic approach on unambiguous bacterial isolate taxonomic classification. PMID:27882328

  14. Structural analysis of the homodimeric reaction center complex from the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    He, Guannan; Zhang, Hao; King, Jeremy D; Blankenship, Robert E

    2014-08-05

    The reaction center (RC) complex of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum is composed of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson antenna protein (FMO) and the reaction center core (RCC) complex. The RCC complex has four subunits: PscA, PscB, PscC, and PscD. We studied the FMO/RCC complex by chemically cross-linking the purified sample followed by biochemical and spectroscopic analysis. Blue-native gels showed that there were two types of FMO/RCC complexes, which are consistent with complexes with one copy of FMO per RCC and two copies of FMO per RCC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the samples after cross-linking showed that all five subunits of the RC can be linked by three different cross-linkers: bissulfosuccinimidyl suberate, disuccinimidyl suberate, and 3,3-dithiobis-sulfosuccinimidyl propionate. The interaction sites of the cross-linked complex were also studied using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The results indicated that FMO, PscB, PscD, and part of PscA are exposed on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. PscD helps stabilize FMO to the reaction center and may facilitate transfer of the electron from the RC to ferredoxin. The soluble domain of the heme-containing cytochrome subunit PscC and part of the core subunit PscA are located on the periplasmic side of the membrane. There is a close relationship between the periplasmic portions of PscA and PscC, which is needed for the efficient transfer of the electron between PscC and P840.

  15. Substrate dependent production of extracellular biosurfactant by a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Das, Palashpriya; Mukherjee, Soumen; Sen, Ramkrishna

    2009-01-01

    The potential of a marine microorganism to utilize different carbon substrates for the production of an extracellular biosurfactant was evaluated. Among the several carbon substrates tested for this purpose, production of the crude biosurfactant was found to be highest with glycerol (2.9+/-0.11 g L(-1)) followed by starch (2.5+/-0.11 g L(-1)), glucose (1.16+/-0.11 g L(-1)) and sucrose (0.94+/-0.07 g L(-1)). The crude biosurfactant obtained from glycerol, starch and sucrose media had significantly higher antimicrobial action than those obtained from glucose containing medium. RP-HPLC resolved the crude biosurfactants into several fractions one of which had significant antimicrobial action. The antimicrobial fraction was found in higher concentrations in biosurfactant obtained using glycerol, starch and sucrose as compared to the biosurfactants from glucose medium, thereby explaining higher antimicrobial activity. The carbon substrate was thus found to affect biosurfactant production both in a qualitative and quantitative manner.

  16. Role of Rhodobacter sp. Strain PS9, a Purple Non-Sulfur Photosynthetic Bacterium Isolated from an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon, in Odor Remediation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Young S.; Schmidt, Thomas M.; Zahn, James A.; Boyd, Eric S.; de la Mora, Arlene; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2003-01-01

    Temporal pigmentation changes resulting from the development of a purple color in anaerobic swine waste lagoons were investigated during a 4-year period. The major purple photosynthetic bacterium responsible for these color changes and the corresponding reductions in odor was isolated from nine photosynthetic lagoons. By using morphological, physiological, and phylogenetic characterization methods we identified the predominant photosynthetic bacterium as a new strain of Rhodobacter, designated Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9. Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 is capable of photoorganotrophic growth on a variety of organic compounds, including all of the characteristic volatile organic compounds (VOC) responsible for the odor associated with swine production facilities (J. A. Zahn, A. A. DiSpirito, Y. S. Do, B. E. Brooks, E. E. Copper, and J. L. Hatfield, J. Environ. Qual. 30:624-634, 2001). The seasonal variations in airborne VOC emitted from waste lagoons showed that there was a 80 to 93% decrease in the concentration of VOC during a photosynthetic bloom. During the height of a bloom, the Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 population accounted for 10% of the total community and up to 27% of the eubacterial community based on 16S ribosomal DNA signals. Additional observations based on seasonal variations in meteorological, biological, and chemical parameters suggested that the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were correlated with lagoon water temperature and with the concentrations of sulfate and phosphate. In addition, the photosynthetic blooms of Rhodobacter sp. strain PS9 were inversely correlated with the concentrations of protein and fluoride. PMID:12620863

  17. Delineating ecotypes of marine photosynthetic picoeukaryotes in the wild

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limardo, A. J.; Sudek, S.; Rii, Y. M.; Church, M. J.; Wei, C. L.; Armbrust, E. V.; Worden, A. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Extremely small eukaryotic green algae are abundant primary producers found in diverse marine habitats. Over the last decade several studies have revealed extensive diversity within the "pico-prasinophytes" (≤2 µm diameter) that was previously unrecognized due to a lack of distinguishing morphological features. Using whole genome and marker gene analyses, distinct species have since been recognized within the Micromonas and Ostreococcus genera. Relatively little is known about environmental factors driving distributions of these species, but for Ostreococcus, laboratory studies suggested that differentiation reflects high- and low-light adapted ecotypes. Subsequent field studies indicated that Ostreococcus Clade OI and Clade OII rarely co-occur but partition according to distinct habitats - representing 'mesotrophic' and 'oligotrophic' ecotypes, respectively. Unlike Micromonas and Ostreococcus, Bathycoccus was presumed to be a single cosmopolitan species because identical 18S rRNA gene sequences are observed in cultured isolates and in environmental surveys. However, analysis of a targeted metagenome from a Bathycoccus population in the tropical Atlantic led to the hypothesis that Bathycoccus also harbors distinct ecotypes. Here, we have developed qPCR assays to enumerate the two Bathycoccus types which can be discriminated based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS). Statistical analysis of qPCR and environmental data from >200 North Pacific Ocean samples shows that the two Bathycoccus clades are only somewhat analogous to oligotrophic and mesotrophic Ostreococcus clades. The two Bathycoccus clades co-occurred more than twice as often as the Ostreococcus clades. Additionally, while Bathycoccus BII and oligotrophic Ostreococcus OII were found at warm temperatures up to 26°C, BII extended into colder waters than OII. Similarly, Bathycoccus BI extended into warmer waters than mesotrophic Ostreococcus OI. Currently, we are analyzing metatranscriptomes to

  18. Inhibition of algal spore germination by the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata.

    PubMed

    Egan, S; James, S; Holmström, C; Kjelleberg, S

    2001-03-01

    A collection of 56 bacteria isolated from different surfaces in the marine environment were assayed for their effects on the germination of spores from the common green alga Ulva lactuca. Thirteen bacterial isolates were shown to inhibit spore germination. Of these bacteria, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata displayed the most pronounced effects against algal spores. Further characterisation of the anti-algal activity of P. tunicata was performed and it was found that this bacterium produces an extracellular component with specific activity toward algal spores that is heat-sensitive, polar and between 3 and 10 kDa in size. This biologically active compound was also found to prevent the germination of spores from the red alga Polysiphonia sp. and, given the widespread occurrence of P. tunicata in a range of marine habitats, this may suggest that it is effective against a variety of marine algae.

  19. The structure of ferricytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H

    PubMed Central

    Harvilla, Paul B.; Wolcott, Holly N.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 40% of all proteins are metalloproteins, and approximately 80% of Earth’s ecosystems are at temperatures ≤ 5 °C, including 90% of the global ocean. Thus, an essential aspect of marine metallobiochemistry is an understanding of the structure, dynamics, and mechanisms of cold adaptation of metalloproteins from marine microorganisms. Here, the molecular structure of the electron-transfer protein cytochrome c552 from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H has been determined by X-ray crystallography (PDB: 4O1W). The structure is highly superimposable with that of the homologous cytochrome from the mesophile Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus. Based on structural analysis and comparison of psychrophilic, psychrotolerant, and mesophilic sequences, a methionine-based ligand-substitution mechanism for psychrophilic protein stabilization is proposed. PMID:24727932

  20. Characterization of chlorophyll pigments in the mutant lacking 8-vinyl reductase of green photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Harada, Jiro; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2012-12-01

    The mutant lacking the enzyme BciA (renamed CT1063), which catalyzed reduction of the 8-vinyl group of a porphyrinoid-type 3,8-divinyl-(proto)chlorophyllide-a [DV-(P)Chlide-a] in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum, was reconstructed on the basis of the previous study reported by Chew and Bryant [J. Biol. Chem.2007, 282, 2967-2975]. Cba. tepidum biosynthesizes the following three different types of chlorophylls (Chls) through their common precursory DV-(P)Chlide-a as its photosynthetically active pigments: bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)-c and Chl-a with the partially reduced 17,18-trans-dihydroporphyrin and BChl-a with the further reduced 7,8-trans-17,18-trans-tetrahydroporphyrin. The structures of Chls thus produced were characterized in detail by various spectroscopic techniques. In the mutant, both BChl-c and Chl-a possessing the alkyl group at the 8-position were exclusively replaced by their 8-vinylated derivatives, whereas BChl-a possessed the original 8-ethyl group. The present observations were inconsistent with the previous report. However, it was apparently confirmed that the enzyme BciA was responsible for the reduction of DV-(P)Chlide-a to produce BChl-c and Chl-a. Noteworthily, exclusive accumulation of the reduced (8-ethylated) form of BChl-a, not its 8-vinylated derivative, in the mutant indicates the presence of another enzyme catalyzing the 8-vinyl reduction as yet unidentified or any other reduction mechanism using a known enzyme to yield BChl-a.

  1. Purification and characterization of a catalase from photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 grown under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yoon-Suk; Lee, Dong-Heon; Yoon, Byoung-Jun; Oh, Duck-Chul

    2006-04-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum S1, when grown under anaerobic conditions, generated three different types of catalases. In this study, we purified and characterized the highest molecular weight catalase from the three catalases. The total specific catalase activity of the crude cell extracts was 88 U/mg. After the completion of the final purification step, the specific activity of the purified catalase was 1,256 U/mg. The purified catalase evidenced an estimated molecular mass of 318 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits, each of 79 kDa. The purified enzyme exhibited an apparent Km value of 30.4 mM and a Vmax of 2,564 U against hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme also exhibited a broad optimal pH (5.0-9.0), and remained stable over a broad temperature range (20 degrees C-60 degrees C). It maintained 90% activity against organic solvents (ethanol/chloroform) known hydroperoxidase inhibitors, and exhibited no detectable peroxidase activity. The catalase activity of the purified enzyme was reduced to 19% of full activity as the result of the administration of 10 mM 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, a heme-containing catalase inhibitor. Sodium cyanide, sodium azide, and hydroxylamine, all of which are known heme protein inhibitors, inhibited catalase activity by 50% at concentrations of 11.5 microM, 0.52 microM, and 0.11 microM, respectively. In accordance with these findings, the enzyme was identified as a type of monofunctional catalase.

  2. Exploration of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system of a marine algicidal Bacillus and its effect on four harmful algal bloom species.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaoling; Shu, Wanjiao; Tan, Shuo; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe

    2016-01-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain B1, initially showed 96.4% algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa. Under this situation, 3 other harmful algal species (Skeletonema costatum, Heterosigma akashiwo, and Prorocentrum donghaiense) were chosen to study the algicidal effects of strain B1, and the algicidal activities were 91.4%, 90.7%, and 90.6%, respectively. To explore the algicidal mechanism of strain B1 on these 4 harmful algal species, the characteristics of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system were studied. Sensitivity to strain B1 supernatant, enzyme activity, and gene expression varied with algal species, while the algicidal patterns were similar. Strain B1 supernatant increased malondialdehyde contents; decreased chlorophyll a contents; changed total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase activity; and restrained psbA, psbD, and rbcL genes expression, which eventually resulted in the algal cells death. The algicidal procedure was observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, which indicated that algal cells were lysed and cellular substances were released. These findings suggested that the antioxidant and photosynthetic system of these 4 algal species was destroyed under strain B1 supernatant stress. This is the first report to explore and compare the mechanism of a marine Bacillus against harmful algal bloom species of covered 4 phyla.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Marine Bacterium, Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain S1, with High Mercury Resistance and Bioaccumulation Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bing; Bian, Chao; Huang, Huiwei; Yin, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes S1, a marine bacterium, exhibited strong resistance to a high concentration of Hg2+ and remarkable Hg2+ bioaccumulation capacity. Here, we report the 6.9-Mb genome sequence of P. pseudoalcaligenes S1, which may help clarify its phylogenetic status and provide further understanding of the mechanisms of mercury bioremediation in a marine environment. PMID:27198018

  4. Isolation and biological characteristics of aerobic marine magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Pan, Hongmiao; Yue, Haidong; Song, Tao; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Guanjun; Wu, Longfei; Xiao, Tian

    2006-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria have become a hot spot of research in microbiology attracting intensive interest of researchers in multiple disciplinary fields. However, the studies were limited in few fastidious bacteria. The objective of this study aims at isolating new marine magnetic bacteria and better comprehension of magnetotactic bacteria. In this study, an aerobic magnetotactic bacterium YSC-1 was isolated from sediments in the Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass (YSCWM). In TEM, magnetic cells have one or several circular magnetosomes in diameter of 100nm, and consist of Fe and Co shown on energy dispersive X-ray spectrum. The biological and physiological characteristics of this bacterium were also described. The colour of YSC-1 colony is white in small rod. The gram stain is negative. Results showed that Strain YSC-1 differs from microaerophile magnetotactic bacteria MS-1 and WD-1 in biology.

  5. Study on photosynthetic parameters and primary production of marine phytoplankton in Minnan-Taiwan Shoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian; Li, Wen-Quan

    1994-03-01

    Carbon assimilation rates were determined in situ in the Minnan-Taiwan Shoal with the C-14 tracer method. Seasonal variations of photosynthetic parameters of marine phytoplankton were measured together with determination of Chl a and carbon content. Experimental results indicated that the average carbon-specific carbon accumulation rate is 0.85 d-1, mean primary productivity is 0.55 g C (m2d)-1. Temperature effect on the growth of the algae can be described by the model of Goldman and Carpenter. Supplementation of nutrients brought up by the upwelling in summer caused the observably high primary productivities in autumn.

  6. An Updated genome annotation for the model marine bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When the genome of Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3 was published in 2004, it represented the first sequence from a heterotrophic marine bacterium. Over the last ten years, the strain has become a valuable model for understanding the cycling of sulfur and carbon in the ocean. To ensure that this genome remains useful, we have updated 69 genes to incorporate functional annotations based on new experimental data, and improved the identification of 120 protein-coding regions based on proteomic and transcriptomic data. We review the progress made in understanding the biology of R. pomeroyi DSS-3 and list the changes made to the genome. PMID:25780504

  7. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin, a predatory marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Saw, Jimmy H W; Yuryev, Anton; Kanbe, Masaomi; Hou, Shaobin; Young, Aaron G; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi; Alam, Maqsudul

    2012-03-19

    Saprospira grandis is a coastal marine bacterium that can capture and prey upon other marine bacteria using a mechanism known as 'ixotrophy'. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin isolated from La Jolla beach in San Diego, California. The complete genome sequence comprises a chromosome of 4.35 Mbp and a plasmid of 54.9 Kbp. Genome analysis revealed incomplete pathways for the biosynthesis of nine essential amino acids but presence of a large number of peptidases. The genome encodes multiple copies of sensor globin-coupled rsbR genes thought to be essential for stress response and the presence of such sensor globins in Bacteroidetes is unprecedented. A total of 429 spacer sequences within the three CRISPR repeat regions were identified in the genome and this number is the largest among all the Bacteroidetes sequenced to date.

  8. Complete genome sequencing and analysis of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin, a predatory marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Saw, Jimmy H. W.; Yuryev, Anton; Kanbe, Masaomi; Hou, Shaobin; Young, Aaron G.; Aizawa, Shin-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    Saprospira grandis is a coastal marine bacterium that can capture and prey upon other marine bacteria using a mechanism known as ‘ixotrophy’. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Saprospira grandis str. Lewin isolated from La Jolla beach in San Diego, California. The complete genome sequence comprises a chromosome of 4.35 Mbp and a plasmid of 54.9 Kbp. Genome analysis revealed incomplete pathways for the biosynthesis of nine essential amino acids but presence of a large number of peptidases. The genome encodes multiple copies of sensor globin-coupled rsbR genes thought to be essential for stress response and the presence of such sensor globins in Bacteroidetes is unprecedented. A total of 429 spacer sequences within the three CRISPR repeat regions were identified in the genome and this number is the largest among all the Bacteroidetes sequenced to date. PMID:22675601

  9. Death-specific protein in a marine diatom regulates photosynthetic responses to iron and light availability.

    PubMed

    Thamatrakoln, Kimberlee; Bailleul, Benjamin; Brown, Christopher M; Gorbunov, Maxim Y; Kustka, Adam B; Frada, Miguel; Joliot, Pierre A; Falkowski, Paul G; Bidle, Kay D

    2013-12-10

    Diatoms, unicellular phytoplankton that account for ∼40% of marine primary productivity, often dominate coastal and open-ocean upwelling zones. Limitation of growth and productivity by iron at low light is attributed to an elevated cellular Fe requirement for the synthesis of Fe-rich photosynthetic proteins. In the dynamic coastal environment, Fe concentrations and daily surface irradiance levels can vary by two to three orders of magnitude on short spatial and temporal scales. Although genome-wide studies are beginning to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms used by diatoms to rapidly respond to such fluxes, their functional role in mediating the Fe stress response remains uncharacterized. Here, we show, using reverse genetics, that a death-specific protein (DSP; previously named for its apparent association with cell death) in the coastal diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana (TpDSP1) localizes to the plastid and enhances growth during acute Fe limitation at subsaturating light by increasing the photosynthetic efficiency of carbon fixation. Clone lines overexpressing TpDSP1 had a lower quantum requirement for growth, increased levels of photosynthetic and carbon fixation proteins, and increased cyclic electron flow around photosystem I. Cyclic electron flow is an ATP-producing pathway essential in higher plants and chlorophytes with a heretofore unappreciated role in diatoms. However, cells under replete conditions were characterized as having markedly reduced growth and photosynthetic rates at saturating light, thereby constraining the benefits afforded by overexpression. Widespread distribution of DSP-like sequences in environmental metagenomic and metatranscriptomic datasets highlights the presence and relevance of this protein in natural phytoplankton populations in diverse oceanic regimes.

  10. Genome Sequence of the Marine Bacterium Vibrio campbellii DS40M4, Isolated from Open Ocean Water

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Graciela M.; Thompson, Cristiane C.; Fishman, Brian; Naka, Hiroaki; Haygood, Margo G.; Crosa, Jorge H.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio sp. strain DS40M4 is a marine bacterium that was isolated from open ocean water. In this work, using genomic taxonomy, we were able to classify this bacterium as V. campbellii. Our genomic analysis revealed that V. campbellii DS40M4 harbors genes related to iron transport, virulence, and environmental fitness, such as those encoding anguibactin and vanchrobactin biosynthesis proteins, type II, III, IV, and VI secretion systems, and proteorhodopsin. PMID:22275102

  11. In situ associations between marine photosynthetic picoeukaryotes and potential parasites - a role for fungi?

    PubMed

    Lepère, Cécile; Ostrowski, Martin; Hartmann, Manuela; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, David J

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) are important components of the marine picophytoplankton community playing a critical role in CO2 fixation but also as bacterivores, particularly in the oligotrophic gyres. Despite an increased interest in these organisms and an improved understanding of the genetic diversity of this group, we still know little of the environmental factors controlling the abundance of these organisms. Here, we investigated the quantitative importance of eukaryotic parasites in the free-living fraction as well as in associations with PPEs along a transect in the South Atlantic. Using tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH), we provide quantitative evidence of the occurrence of free-living fungi in open ocean marine systems, while the Perkinsozoa and Syndiniales parasites were not abundant in these waters. Using flow cytometric cell sorting of different PPE populations followed by a dual-labelled TSA-FISH approach, we also demonstrate fungal associations, potentially parasitic, occurring with both pico-Prymnesiophyceae and pico-Chrysophyceae. These data highlight the necessity for further work investigating the specific role of marine fungi as parasites of phytoplankton to improve understanding of carbon flow in marine ecosystems. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Complex Carbohydrate-Degrading Marine Bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans Strain 2-40T

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Ronald M.; Taylor, Larry E.; Henrissat, Bernard; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Rancurel, Corinne; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Longmire, Atkinson G.; Zhang, Haitao; Bayer, Edward A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Larimer, Frank; Zhulin, Igor B.; Ekborg, Nathan A.; Lamed, Raphael; Richardson, Paul M.; Borovok, Ilya; Hutcheson, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 (Sde 2-40) is emerging as a vanguard of a recently discovered group of marine and estuarine bacteria that recycles complex polysaccharides. We report its complete genome sequence, analysis of which identifies an unusually large number of enzymes that degrade >10 complex polysaccharides. Not only is this an extraordinary range of catabolic capability, many of the enzymes exhibit unusual architecture including novel combinations of catalytic and substrate-binding modules. We hypothesize that many of these features are adaptations that facilitate depolymerization of complex polysaccharides in the marine environment. This is the first sequenced genome of a marine bacterium that can degrade plant cell walls, an important component of the carbon cycle that is not well-characterized in the marine environment. PMID:18516288

  13. Physiology and ecology of bacteriophages of the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens: salinity.

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, A

    1976-01-01

    The effects of variation in ionic levels on the stability and replication of two bacteriophages (nt-1 and nt-6) host specific for the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens were examined. Monovalent cations influenced the adsorption of the nt-1 but not the nt-6 phage; however, one-step growth studies showed that NaCl was required for replication of both phage. The NaCl optimum for nt-1 production was 0.25 M NaCl, the same as the growth optimum for B. natriegens. However, the optimum for nt-6 production was 0.16 M NaCl. These NaCl optima for host and phage are at estuarine rather than oceanic levels. The nt-1 phage was better suited to replicate at NaCl levels typical of higher salinity areas (18-35%) and the nt-6 phage was better suited to replicate at lower salinities (5-18%). The nt phage were more resistant to low NaCl levels than their host bacterium and appeared limited to marine waters by the lower survival salinity of B. natriegens coupled with phage inactivation processes occurring in natural estuarine waters. Images PMID:938035

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel, highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Asker, Dalal

    2017-09-18

    A high throughput screening approach for astaxanthin-producing bacteria led to the discovery of a novel highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium (strain N-5). Phylogenetic analysis based on partial 16S rRNA gene and phenotypic metabolic testing indicated it belongs to the genus Brevundimonas. Therefore, it was designated as Brevundimonas sp. strain N-5. To identify and quantify carotenoids produced by strain N-5, HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS methods were used. The culture conditions including media, shaking and time had significant effects on cell growth and carotenoids production including astaxanthin. The total carotenoids were ~601.2 µg g-1 dry cells including a remarkable amount (364.6 µg g-1 dry cells) of optically pure astaxanthin (3S, 3'S) isomer, with high selectivity (~60.6%) under medium aeration conditions. Notably, increasing the culture aeration enhanced astaxanthin production up to 85% of total carotenoids. This is the first report that describes a natural, highly selective astaxanthin-producing marine bacterium.

  15. Enrichment and physiological characterization of a novel Nitrospira-like bacterium obtained from a marine sponge.

    PubMed

    Off, Sandra; Alawi, Mashal; Spieck, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Members of the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira are most likely responsible for the second step of nitrification, the conversion of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) to nitrate (NO(3)(-)), within various sponges. We succeeded in obtaining an enrichment culture of Nitrospira derived from the mesohyl of the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba using a traditional cultivation approach. Electron microscopy gave first evidence of the shape and ultrastructure of this novel marine Nitrospira-like bacterium (culture Aa01). We characterized these bacteria physiologically with regard to optimal incubation conditions, especially the temperature and substrate range in comparison to other Nitrospira cultures. Best growth was obtained at temperatures between 28 degrees C and 30 degrees C in mineral medium with 70% North Sea water and a substrate concentration of 0.5 mM nitrite under microaerophilic conditions. The Nitrospira culture Aa01 is very sensitive against nitrite, because concentrations higher than 1.5 mM resulted in a complete inhibition of growth. Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the novel Nitrospira-like bacterium is separated from the sponge-specific subcluster and falls together with an environmental clone from Mediterranean sediments (98.6% similarity). The next taxonomically described species Nitrospira marina is only distantly related, with 94.6% sequence similarity, and therefore the culture Aa01 represents a novel species of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Strain MMB-1 (CECT 4803), a Novel Melanogenic Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Solano, F; Garcia, E; Perez, D; Sanchez-Amat, A

    1997-09-01

    A novel marine melanogenic bacterium, strain MMB-1, was isolated from the Mediterranean Sea. The taxonomic characterization of this strain indicated that it belongs to the genus Alteromonas. Under in vivo conditions, L-tyrosine was the specific monophenolic precursor for melanin synthesis. This bacterium contained all types of activities associated with polyphenol oxidases (PPOs), cresolase (EC 1.18.14.1), catecholase (EC 1.10.3.1), and laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). These activities were due to the presence of two different PPOs. The first one showed all the enzymatic activities, but it was not involved in melanogenesis in vivo, since amelanogenic mutant strains obtained by nitrosoguanidine treatment contained levels of this PPO similar to that of the wild-type MMB-1 strain. The second PPO showed cresolase and catecholase activities but no laccase, and it was involved in melanogenesis, since this enzyme was lost in amelanogenic mutant strains. This PPO was strongly activated by sodium dodecyl sulfate below the critical micelle concentration, and it is a tyrosinase-like enzyme showing a lag period in its tyrosine hydroxylase activity that could be avoided by small amounts of L-dopa. This is the first report of a bacterium that contains two PPOs and also the first report of a pluripotent PPO showing all types of oxidase activities. The bacterium and the pluripotent PPO may be useful models for exploring the roles of PPOs in cellular physiology, aside from melanin formation. On the other hand, the high oxidizing capacity of the PPO for a wide range of substrates could make possible its application in phenolic biotransformations, food processing, or the cosmetic industry, where fungal and plant PPOs are being used.

  17. Discovery of a marine bacterium producing 4-hydroxybenzoate and its alkyl esters, parabens.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xue; Adachi, Kyoko; Chen, Choryu; Kasai, Hiroaki; Kanoh, Kaneo; Shizuri, Yoshikazu; Misawa, Norihiko

    2006-08-01

    Chemically synthesized 4-hydroxybenzoate (4HBA) is widely used in the chemical and electrical industries as a material for producing polymers such as those of the liquid crystal type. Its alkyl esters, called parabens, have been the most widely used preservatives by the food and cosmetic industries. We report here for the first time a microorganism, a marine bacterium, which biosynthesizes these petrochemical products. The marine bacterial strain, A4B-17, which was found to belong to the genus Microbulbifer on the basis of its rRNA and gyrB sequences, was isolated from an ascidian in the coastal waters of Palau. Strain A4B-17 was, surprisingly, found to produce 10 mg/liter of 4HBA, together with its butyl (24 mg/liter), heptyl (0.4 mg/liter), and nonyl (6 mg/liter) esters. We therefore characterized 23 other marine bacteria belonging to the genus Microbulbifer, which our institute had previously isolated from various marine environments, and found that these bacteria also produced 4HBA, although with low production levels (less than one-fifth of that produced by A4B-17). We also show that the alkyl esters of 4HBA produced by strain A4B-17 were effective in preventing the growth of yeasts, molds, and gram-positive bacteria.

  18. Discovery of a Marine Bacterium Producing 4-Hydroxybenzoate and Its Alkyl Esters, Parabens

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xue; Adachi, Kyoko; Chen, Choryu; Kasai, Hiroaki; Kanoh, Kaneo; Shizuri, Yoshikazu; Misawa, Norihiko

    2006-01-01

    Chemically synthesized 4-hydroxybenzoate (4HBA) is widely used in the chemical and electrical industries as a material for producing polymers such as those of the liquid crystal type. Its alkyl esters, called parabens, have been the most widely used preservatives by the food and cosmetic industries. We report here for the first time a microorganism, a marine bacterium, which biosynthesizes these petrochemical products. The marine bacterial strain, A4B-17, which was found to belong to the genus Microbulbifer on the basis of its rRNA and gyrB sequences, was isolated from an ascidian in the coastal waters of Palau. Strain A4B-17 was, surprisingly, found to produce 10 mg/liter of 4HBA, together with its butyl (24 mg/liter), heptyl (0.4 mg/liter), and nonyl (6 mg/liter) esters. We therefore characterized 23 other marine bacteria belonging to the genus Microbulbifer, which our institute had previously isolated from various marine environments, and found that these bacteria also produced 4HBA, although with low production levels (less than one-fifth of that produced by A4B-17). We also show that the alkyl esters of 4HBA produced by strain A4B-17 were effective in preventing the growth of yeasts, molds, and gram-positive bacteria. PMID:16885309

  19. Transcriptional Changes Underlying Elemental Stoichiometry Shifts in a Marine Heterotrophic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Leong-Keat; Newton, Ryan J.; Sharma, Shalabh; Smith, Christa B.; Rayapati, Pratibha; Limardo, Alexander J.; Meile, Christof; Moran, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    Marine bacteria drive the biogeochemical processing of oceanic dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a 750-Tg C reservoir that is a critical component of the global C cycle. Catabolism of DOC is thought to be regulated by the biomass composition of heterotrophic bacteria, as cells maintain a C:N:P ratio of ∼50:10:1 during DOC processing. Yet a complicating factor in stoichiometry-based analyses is that bacteria can change the C:N:P ratio of their biomass in response to resource composition. We investigated the physiological mechanisms of resource-driven shifts in biomass stoichiometry in continuous cultures of the marine heterotrophic bacterium Ruegeria pomeroyi (a member of the Roseobacter clade) under four element limitation regimes (C, N, P, and S). Microarray analysis indicated that the bacterium scavenged for alternate sources of the scarce element when cells were C-, N-, or P-limited; reworked the ratios of biomolecules when C- and P- limited; and exerted tighter control over import/export and cytoplasmic pools when N-limited. Under S limitation, a scenario not existing naturally for surface ocean microbes, stress responses dominated transcriptional changes. Resource-driven changes in C:N ratios of up to 2.5-fold and in C:P ratios of up to sixfold were measured in R. pomeroyi biomass. These changes were best explained if the C and P content of the cells was flexible in the face of shifting resources but N content was not, achieved through the net balance of different transcriptional strategies. The cellular-level metabolic trade-offs that govern biomass stoichiometry in R. pomeroyi may have implications for global carbon cycling if extendable to other heterotrophic bacteria. Strong homeostatic responses to N limitation by marine bacteria would intensify competition with autotrophs. Modification of cellular inventories in C- and P-limited heterotrophs would vary the elemental ratio of particulate organic matter sequestered in the deep ocean. PMID:22783226

  20. RecA Expression in Response to Solar UVR in the Marine Bacterium Vibrio natriegens.

    PubMed

    Booth, M.G.; Jeffrey, W.H.; Miller, R.V.

    2001-12-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation may produce daily stress on marine and estuarine communities as cells are damaged and repair that damage. Reduction in the earth's stratospheric ozone layer has increased awareness of the potential effects that ultraviolet radiation may have in the environment, including how marine bacteria respond to changes in solar radiation. We examined the use of the bacterial RecA protein as an indicator of the potential of bacteria to repair DNA damage caused by solar UV irradiation using the marine bacterium Vibrio natriegens as a model. RecA is universally present in bacteria and is a regulator protein for the so-called Dark Repair Systems, which include excision repair, postreplication recombinational repair, and mutagenic or SOS repair. Solar UVB and UVA both reduced V. natriegens viability in seawater microcosms. After exposure to unfiltered solar radiation or radiation in which UVB was blocked, survival dropped below 1%, whereas visible light from which UVA and UVB had been filtered had no effect on survival. Using a RecA-specific antibody for detection, RecA protein was induced by solar radiation in a diel pattern in marine microcosms conducted in the Gulf of Mexico. Peak induction was observed at dusk each day. Although RecA expression was correlated with the formation of UVB-induced cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, longer wavelength UVA radiation also induced recA gene expression. Our results demonstrate that RecA-regulated, light-independent repair is an important component in the ability of marine bacteria to survive exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation and that RecA expression is a useful monitor of bacterial repair after exposure to solar UVR.

  1. Discovery of a novel iota carrageenan sulfatase isolated from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genicot, Sabine; Groisillier, Agnès; Rogniaux, Hélène; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbeyron, Tristan; Helbert, William

    2014-08-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from the cell wall of some marine red algae. These polysaccharides are widely used as gelling, stabilizing, and viscosifying agents in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Since the rheological properties of these polysaccharides depend on their sulfate content, we screened several isolated marine bacteria for carrageenan specific sulfatase activity, in the aim of developing enzymatic bioconversion of carrageenans. As a result of the screening, an iota-carrageenan sulfatase was detected in the cell-free lysate of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora strain PscT. It was purified through Phenyl Sepharose and Diethylaminoethyl Sepharose chromatography. The pure enzyme, Psc ?-CgsA, was characterized. It had a molecular weight of 115.9 kDaltons and exhibited an optimal activity/stability at pH ~8.3 and at 40°C ± 5°C. It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Psc ?-CgsA specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-S sulfate of iota-carrageenan. The purified enzyme could transform iota-carrageenan into hybrid iota-/alpha- or pure alpha-carrageenan under controlled conditions. The gene encoding Psc ?-CgsA, a protein of 1038 amino acids, was cloned into Escherichia coli, and the sequence analysis revealed that Psc ?-CgsA has more than 90% sequence identity with a putative uncharacterized protein Q3IKL4 from the marine strain Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, but besides this did not share any homology to characterized sulfatases. Phylogenetic studies show that P. carrageenovora sulfatase thus represents the first characterized member of a new sulfatase family, with a C-terminal domain having strong similarity with the superfamily of amidohydrolases, highlighting the still unexplored diversity of marine polysaccharide modifying enzymes.

  2. Discovery of a novel iota carrageenan sulfatase isolated from the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora

    PubMed Central

    Genicot, Sabine M.; Groisillier, Agnès; Rogniaux, Hélène; Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Barbeyron, Tristan; Helbert, William

    2014-01-01

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides extracted from the cell wall of some marine red algae. These polysaccharides are widely used as gelling, stabilizing, and viscosifying agents in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Since the rheological properties of these polysaccharides depend on their sulfate content, we screened several isolated marine bacteria for carrageenan specific sulfatase activity, in the aim of developing enzymatic bioconversion of carrageenans. As a result of the screening, an iota-carrageenan sulfatase was detected in the cell-free lysate of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas carrageenovora strain PscT. It was purified through Phenyl Sepharose and Diethylaminoethyl Sepharose chromatography. The pure enzyme, Psc ι-CgsA, was characterized. It had a molecular weight of 115.9 kDaltons and exhibited an optimal activity/stability at pH ~8.3 and at 40 ± 5°C. It was inactivated by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride but not by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Psc ι-CgsA specifically catalyzes the hydrolysis of the 4-S sulfate of iota-carrageenan. The purified enzyme could transform iota-carrageenan into hybrid iota-/alpha- or pure alpha-carrageenan under controlled conditions. The gene encoding Psc ι-CgsA, a protein of 1038 amino acids, was cloned into Escherichia coli, and the sequence analysis revealed that Psc ι-CgsA has more than 90% sequence identity with a putative uncharacterized protein Q3IKL4 from the marine strain Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC 125, but besides this did not share any homology to characterized sulfatases. Phylogenetic studies show that P. carrageenovora sulfatase thus represents the first characterized member of a new sulfatase family, with a C-terminal domain having strong similarity with the superfamily of amidohydrolases, highlighting the still unexplored diversity of marine polysaccharide modifying enzymes. PMID:25207269

  3. Biofilm Development and Cell Death in the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata

    PubMed Central

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Evans, Flavia; Dalisay-Saludes, Doralyn; Stelzer, Sacha; Egan, Suhelen; James, Sally; Webb, Jeremy S.; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2004-01-01

    The newly described green-pigmented bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata (D2) produces target-specific inhibitory compounds against bacteria, algae, fungi, and invertebrate larvae and is frequently found in association with living surfaces in the marine environment. As part of our studies on the ecology of P. tunicata and its interaction with marine surfaces, we examined the ability of P. tunicata to form biofilms under continuous culture conditions within the laboratory. P. tunicata biofilms exhibited a characteristic architecture consisting of differentiated microcolonies surrounded by water channels. Remarkably, we observed a repeatable pattern of cell death during biofilm development of P. tunicata, similar to that recently reported for biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (J. S. Webb et al., J. Bacteriol. 185:4585-4595, 2003). Killing and lysis occurred inside microcolonies, apparently resulting in the formation of voids within these structures. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed within the regions of killing in the biofilm. Moreover, extensive killing in mature biofilms appeared to result in detachment of the biofilm from the substratum. A novel 190-kDa autotoxic protein produced by P. tunicata, designated AlpP, was found to be involved in this biofilm killing and detachment. A ΔalpP mutant derivative of P. tunicata was generated, and this mutant did not show cell death during biofilm development. We propose that AlpP-mediated cell death plays an important role in the multicellular biofilm development of P. tunicata and subsequent dispersal of surviving cells within the marine environment. PMID:15184116

  4. Biofilm development and cell death in the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata.

    PubMed

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Evans, Flavia; Dalisay-Saludes, Doralyn; Stelzer, Sacha; Egan, Suhelen; James, Sally; Webb, Jeremy S; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2004-06-01

    The newly described green-pigmented bacterium Pseudoalteromonas tunicata (D2) produces target-specific inhibitory compounds against bacteria, algae, fungi, and invertebrate larvae and is frequently found in association with living surfaces in the marine environment. As part of our studies on the ecology of P. tunicata and its interaction with marine surfaces, we examined the ability of P. tunicata to form biofilms under continuous culture conditions within the laboratory. P. tunicata biofilms exhibited a characteristic architecture consisting of differentiated microcolonies surrounded by water channels. Remarkably, we observed a repeatable pattern of cell death during biofilm development of P. tunicata, similar to that recently reported for biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (J. S. Webb et al., J. Bacteriol. 185:4585-4595, 2003). Killing and lysis occurred inside microcolonies, apparently resulting in the formation of voids within these structures. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed within the regions of killing in the biofilm. Moreover, extensive killing in mature biofilms appeared to result in detachment of the biofilm from the substratum. A novel 190-kDa autotoxic protein produced by P. tunicata, designated AlpP, was found to be involved in this biofilm killing and detachment. A Delta alpP mutant derivative of P. tunicata was generated, and this mutant did not show cell death during biofilm development. We propose that AlpP-mediated cell death plays an important role in the multicellular biofilm development of P. tunicata and subsequent dispersal of surviving cells within the marine environment.

  5. Evidence for quorum sensing and differential metabolite production by a marine bacterium in response to DMSP

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Winifred M; Kido Soule, Melissa C; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, the foundation of the marine foodweb, do not function in isolation, but rather rely on molecular level interactions among species to thrive. Although certain types of interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms have been well documented, the role of specific organic molecules in regulating inter-species relationships and supporting growth are only beginning to be understood. Here, we examine one such interaction by characterizing the metabolic response of a heterotrophic marine bacterium, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, to growth on dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an abundant organosulfur metabolite produced by phytoplankton. When cultivated on DMSP, R. pomeroyi synthesized a quorum-sensing molecule, N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, at significantly higher levels than during growth on propionate. Concomitant with the production of a quorum-sensing molecule, we observed differential production of intra- and extracellular metabolites including glutamine, vitamin B2 and biosynthetic intermediates of cyclic amino acids. Our metabolomics data indicate that R. pomeroyi changes regulation of its biochemical pathways in a manner that is adaptive for a cooperative lifestyle in the presence of DMSP, in anticipation of phytoplankton-derived nutrients and higher microbial density. This behavior is likely to occur on sinking marine particles, indicating that this response may impact the fate of organic matter. PMID:26882264

  6. Adhesive properties of a symbolic bacterium from a wood-boreing marine shipworm

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, S.H.; Greene, R.V.; Griffin, H.L. )

    1990-05-01

    Adhesive properties of cellulolytic, nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from a marine shipworm are described. {sup 35}S-labeled cells of the shipworm bacterium bound preferentially Whatman no.1 cellulose filter paper, compared with its binding to other cellulose substrata or substrata lacking cellulose. The ability of the bacteria to bind to Whatman no. 1 filter paper was significantly reduced by glutaraldehyde or heat treatment of cells. Pretreatment of cells with azide, valinomycin, gramicidin-D, bis-hexafluoroacetylacetone (1799), or carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone inhibited adhesion activity. Cells pretreated with pronase or trypsin also exhibited reduced binding activity, but chymotrypsin and peptidase had no effect on adhesion activity. Cellodextrins and methyl cellulose 15 inhibited the adhesion of the shipworm bacteria to filter paper, whereas glucose, cellobiose, and soluble carboxymethyl cellulose had no significant effect. The divalent cation chelators EDTA and EGTA (ethylene hlycol-bis({beta}-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N{prime}N{prime}-tetraacetic acid) had little or no effect on adhesive properties of shipworm bacteria. Also, preabsorbing the substratum with extracellular endoglucanase isolated from the ship worm bacterium or 1% bovine serum albumin had no apparent effect on bacterial binding. Low concentration (0.01%) of sodium dodecyl sulfate solubilized a fraction from whole cells, which appeared to be involved in cellular binding activity. After removal of sodium dodecyl, sulfate, several proteins in this fraction associated with intact cells. These cells exhibited up to 50% enhanced binding to filter paper in comparison to cells which had not been exposed to the sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized fraction.

  7. Oceanobacillus arenosus sp. nov., a moderately halophilic bacterium isolated from marine sand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonyong; Siamphan, Chatuphon; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Sukhoom, Ampaitip

    2015-09-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming, rod-shaped, motile, strictly aerobic bacterium, designated CAU 1183(T), was isolated from marine sand and its taxonomic position was investigated by using a polyphasic approach. The bacterium grew optimally at 30 °C, at pH 8.5 and in the presence of 2% (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain CAU 1183(T) formed a distinct lineage within the genus Oceanobacillus and exhibited the highest similarity to Oceanobacillus chungangensis CAU 1051(T) (97.6%). The strain contained MK-7 as the predominant isoprenoid quinone and anteiso-C15 : 0 was the major cellular fatty acid. The cell-wall peptidoglycan contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The polar lipid pattern of strain CAU 1183(T) consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and unidentified lipids, including two phospholipids, two glycolipids, a phosphoglycolipid and two lipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 37.5 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic data, strain CAU 1183(T) should be assigned to a novel species in the genus Oceanobacillus, for which the name Oceanobacillus arenosus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CAU 1183(T) ( = KCTC 33037(T) = CECT 8560(T)).

  8. Marine bacterium strain screening and pyrethroid insecticide-degrading efficiency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Aili; Liu, Jinghua; Shi, Xizhi; Li, Dexiang; Chen, Jiong; Tang, Daojun

    2014-09-01

    A pyrethroid insecticide-degrading bacterium, strain HS-24, was isolated from an offshore seawater environment. The strain, which can degrade cypermethrin (CYP) and deltamethrin (DEL), was identified as Methylophaga sp. The optimal culture and degradation conditions for CYP and DEL by strain HS-24 is pH 7 at 28°C. Under optimum culture conditions, strain HS-24 exhibited a broad degradation concentration range of 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg/L for CYP and DEL. The metabolic intermediates were analyzed by NMR, which provided strong evidence that CYP and DEL removal occurred mainly because of a biological process. The toxicity of the degradation products of strain HS-24 was studied simultaneously by measuring the light output of the luminescence bacterium. This demonstrated that the biodegradation ability of strain HS-24 significantly decreased the toxicity of CYP- and DEL-contaminated aquaculture seawater. Finally, the findings of this paper indicate that strain HS-24 is thus revealed as a biological agent for the remediation of marine aquatic environments.

  9. Characterization of acetonitrile-tolerant marine bacterium Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 and its tolerance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kongpol, Ajiraporn; Kato, Junichi; Tajima, Takahisa; Vangnai, Alisa S

    2012-01-01

    A Gram-positive marine bacterium, Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81, was isolated as a hydrophilic organic-solvent tolerant bacterium, and exhibited high tolerance to various types of toxic hydrophilic organic solvents, including acetonitrile, at relatively high concentrations (up to 6% [v/v]) under the growing conditions. Investigation of its tolerance mechanisms illustrated that it does not rely on solvent inactivation processes or modification of cell surface characteristics, but rather, increase of the cell size lowers solvent partitioning into cells and the extrusion of solvents through the efflux system. A test using efflux pump inhibitors suggested that secondary transporters, i.e. resistance nodulation cell division (RND) and the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family, are involved in acetonitrile tolerance in this strain. In addition, its acetonitrile tolerance ability could be stably and significantly enhanced by repetitive growth in the presence of toxic acetonitrile. The marked acetonitrile tolerance of Exiguobacterium sp. SBH81 indicates its potential use as a host for biotechnological fermentation processes as well as bioremediation.

  10. Characterization of a Marine Bacterium Associated with Crassostrea virginica (the Eastern Oyster)

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Ronald M.; Segall, Anca M.; Colwell, Rita R.

    1985-01-01

    A gram-negative bacterium found to be closely associated with oysters has been isolated and characterized. The organism, designated LST, has a generation time of 106 min in Marine broth under optimal growth conditions at 25°C. During the decline phase of growth, it exhibits a morphological transition from a motile rod (ca. 1 μm in length) to an elongated, 3- to 40-μm, nonmotile, tightly coiled helix. LST synthesizes and releases a pigment in the stationary and decline phases of growth. Identified as melanin on the basis of chemical properties and UV absorbance maxima, the pigment comprises polymers of heterogeneous molecular weights, ranging from 12,000 to 120,000. The guanosine-plus-cytosine content of the LST DNA is 46%, and results of phenetic analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization indicate that this bacterium represents a new species. LST adheres to a variety of surfaces, including glass, plastics, and oyster shell, and has been shown to promote the settlement of oyster larvae. Images PMID:16346712

  11. Complete genome of a metabolically-diverse marine bacterium Shewanella japonica KCTC 22435(T).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Choe, Hanna; Kim, Byung Kwon; Nasir, Arshan

    2017-10-01

    Shewanella japonica KCTC 22435(T) is a facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative, mesophilic, rod-shaped bacterium isolated from sea water at the Pacific Institute of Bio-organic Chemistry of the Marine Experimental Station, Troitza Bay, Gulf of Peter the Great, Russia. Here, we report the complete genome of S. japonica KCTC 22435(T), which consists of 4,975,677bp (G+C content of 40.80%) with a single chromosome, 4036 protein-coding genes, 97 tRNAs and 8 rRNA operons. Genes detected in the genome reveal that the strain possesses a type II secretion system, cytochrome c family proteins with various numbers of heme-binding motifs, and metabolic pathways for utilizing diverse carbon sources, supporting the potential of KCTC 22435(T) to generate electricity in salinity culture conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A marine sulfate-reducing bacterium producing multiple antibiotics: biological and chemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Gu, Xiaojie; Zhao, Chenyan; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xie, Zeping

    2009-07-21

    A marine sulfate-reducing bacterium SRB-22 was isolated by means of the agar shake dilution method and identified as Desulfovibrio desulfuricans by morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA analysis. In the bioassay, its extract showed broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity using the paper disc agar diffusion method. This isolate showed a different antimicrobial profile than either ampicillin or nystatin and was found to produce at least eight antimicrobial components by bioautography. Suitable fermentation conditions for production of the active constituents were determined to be 28 day cultivation at 25 degrees C to 30 degrees C with a 10% inoculation ratio. Under these conditions, the SRB-22 was fermented, extracted and chemically investigated. So far an antimicrobial compound, mono-n-butyl phthalate, and an inactive compound, thymine, have been isolated and characterized.

  13. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  14. Biosynthesis and characterization of polyhydroxyalkanoates in the polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans ATCC 43961.

    PubMed

    González-García, Yolanda; Nungaray, Jesús; Córdova, Jesús; González-Reynoso, Orfil; Koller, Martin; Atlic, Aid; Braunegg, Gerhart

    2008-06-01

    The marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans was investigated for the synthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), using glucose as the sole source of carbon in a two-step batch culture. In the first step the microorganism grew under nutrient balanced conditions; in the second step the cells were cultivated under limitation of nitrogen source. The biopolymer accumulated in S. degradans cells was detected by Nile red staining and FT-IR analysis. From GC-MS analysis, it was found that this strain produced a homopolymer of 3-hydroxybutyric acid. The cellular polymer concentration, its molecular mass, glass transition temperature, melting point and heat of fusion were 17.2+/-2.7% of dry cell weight, 54.2+/-0.6 kDa, 37.4+/-6.0 degrees C, 165.6+/-5.5 degrees C and 59.6+/-2.2 J g(-1), respectively. This work is the first report determining the capacity of S. degradans to synthesize PHAs.

  15. Expression of multiple complex polysaccharide-degrading enzyme systems by marine bacterium strain 2-40.

    PubMed

    Ensor; Stosz; Weiner

    1999-08-01

    Saprophytic marine bacterium strain 2-40 (2-40) can degrade numerous complex polysaccharides (CP) including agar, alginic acid, carrageenan, carboxymethylcellulose, chitin, beta-glucan, laminarin, pectin, pullulan, starch, and xylan. The growth of 2-40 was assessed in minimal media containing one of 16 CP or simple carbohydrates, with the result that all supported growth. Each of the carbohydrase systems was elicited at highest levels by the homologous substrate. Each, excluding amylase, was repressed when 2-40 was cultured in glucose minimal synthetic media. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate alleviated the repression. Agarose as sole carbon source supported the synthesis of the most heterologous complex carbohydrase systems, although, generally, at a lower level of activity than the homologous CP.

  16. The nucleotide sequence of Beneckea harveyi 5S rRNA. [bioluminescent marine bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luehrsen, K. R.; Fox, G. E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary sequence of the 5S ribosomal RNA isolated from the free-living bioluminescent marine bacterium Beneckea harveyi is reported and discussed in regard to indications of phylogenetic relationships with the bacteria Escherichia coli and Photobacterium phosphoreum. Sequences were determined for oligonucleotide products generated by digestion with ribonuclease T1, pancreatic ribonuclease and ribonuclease T2. The presence of heterogeneity is indicated for two sites. The B. harveyi sequence can be arranged into the same four helix secondary structures as E. coli and other prokaryotic 5S rRNAs. Examination of the 5S-RNS sequences of the three bacteria indicates that B. harveyi and P. phosphoreum are specifically related and share a common ancestor which diverged from an ancestor of E. coli at a somewhat earlier time, consistent with previous studies.

  17. Draft Genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Vázquez, Susana C.; MacCormack, Walter P.; Iriarte, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a marine bacterium from King George Island, Antarctica, which encodes the carbapenemase SFP-1. The assembly contains 4,799,218 bp (G+C content 41.24%). This strain harbors several mobile genetic elements that provide insight into lateral gene transfer and bacterial plasticity and evolution. PMID:27151790

  18. Draft Genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from Potter Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Parmeciano Di Noto, Gisela; Vázquez, Susana C; MacCormack, Walter P; Iriarte, Andrés; Quiroga, Cecilia

    2016-05-05

    We present the draft genome of Shewanella frigidimarina Ag06-30, a marine bacterium from King George Island, Antarctica, which encodes the carbapenemase SFP-1. The assembly contains 4,799,218 bp (G+C content 41.24%). This strain harbors several mobile genetic elements that provide insight into lateral gene transfer and bacterial plasticity and evolution.

  19. Enhanced carboxymethylcellulase production by a newly isolated marine bacterium, Cellulophaga lytica LBH-14, using rice bran.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wa; Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Sang-Un; Li, Jianhong; Chung, Chung-Han; Lee, Jin-Woo

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was to establish the optimal conditions for production of carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase) by a newly isolated marine bacterium using response surface methodology (RSM). A microorganism producing CMCase, isolated from seawater, was identified as Cellulophaga lytica based 16S rDNA sequencing and the neighborjoining method. The optimal conditions of rice bran, ammonium chloride, and initial pH of the medium for cell growth were 100.0 g/l, 5.00 g/l, and 7.0, respectively, whereas those for production of CMCase were 79.9 g/l, 8.52 g/l, and 6.1. The optimal concentrations of K2HPO4, NaCl, MgSO4·7H2O, and (NH4)2SO4 for cell growth were 6.25, 0.62, 0.28, and 0.42 g/l, respectively, whereas those for production of CMCase were 3.72, 0.54, 0.70, and 0.34 g/l. The optimal temperature for cell growth and the CMCase production by C. lytica LBH-14 were 35 degrees C and 25 degrees C, respectively. The maximal production of CMCase under optimized condition for 3 days was 110.8 U/ml, which was 5.3 times higher than that before optimization. In this study, rice bran and ammonium chloride were developed as carbon and nitrogen sources for the production of CMCase by C. lytica LBH-14. The time for production of CMCase by a newly isolated marine bacterium with submerged fermentations reduced to 3 days, which resulted in enhanced productivity of CMCase and a decrease in its production cost.

  20. Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation on the Gram-positive marine bacterium Microbacterium maritypicum.

    PubMed

    Williams, Patrick D; Eichstadt, Shaundra L; Kokjohn, Tyler A; Martin, Eugene L

    2007-07-01

    Although extensive information is available on the effect ultraviolet (UV) radiation has on Gram-negative marine bacteria, there is a scarcity of data concerning UV radiation and Gram-positive marine bacteria. The focus of this paper is on Microbacterium maritypicum, with the Gram-negative Vibrio natriegens being used as a standard of comparison. M. maritypicum exhibited growth over a NaCl range of 0-1000 mM: , with optimum growth occurring between 0 and 400 mM: NaCl. In contrast, V. natriegens grew over a NaCl span of 250-1000 mM: , with best growth being observed between 250 and 600 mM: NaCl. UV radiation experiments were done using the medium with 250 mM: NaCl. For solar (UV-A and B) radiation and log-phase cells, M. maritypicum was determined to be three times more resistant than V. natriegens. For germicidal (UV-C) radiation, the pattern of resistance of the log-phase cells to the lethal effects of the radiation was even more pronounced, with the Gram-positive bacterium being more than 12 to 13 times more resistant. Similar data to the solar and germicidal log-phase UV kill curves were obtained for stationary-phase cells of both organisms. Photoreactivation was observed for both types of cells exposed to UV-C but none for cells treated with UV-A and B. When log phase cells of M.maritypicum were grown at 0.0 and 0.6 M: NaCl and exposed to UV-C radiation, no difference in survivorship patterns was noted from that of 0.25 M: NaCl grown cells. Although this study has only focused on two marine bacteria, our results indicate that the Gram-positive M. maritypicum could have a built-in advantage for survival in some marine ecosystems.

  1. A Novel Eliminase from a Marine Bacterium That Degrades Hyaluronan and Chondroitin Sulfate*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenjun; Wang, Wenshuang; Zhao, Mei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Li, Fuchuan

    2014-01-01

    Lyases cleave glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in an eliminative mechanism and are important tools for the structural analysis and oligosaccharide preparation of GAGs. Various GAG lyases have been identified from terrestrial but not marine organisms even though marine animals are rich in GAGs with unique structures and functions. Herein we isolated a novel GAG lyase for the first time from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. FC509 and then recombinantly expressed and characterized it. It showed strong lyase activity toward hyaluronan (HA) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) and was designated as HA and CS lyase (HCLase). It exhibited the highest activities to both substrates at pH 8.0 and 0.5 m NaCl at 30 °C. Its activity toward HA was less sensitive to pH than its CS lyase activity. As with most other marine enzymes, HCLase is a halophilic enzyme and very stable at temperatures from 0 to 40 °C for up to 24 h, but its activity is independent of divalent metal ions. The specific activity of HCLase against HA and CS reached a markedly high level of hundreds of thousands units/mg of protein under optimum conditions. The HCLase-resistant tetrasaccharide Δ4,5HexUAα1-3GalNAc(6-O-sulfate)β1-4GlcUA(2-O-sulfate)β1-3GalNAc(6-O-sulfate) was isolated from CS-D, the structure of which indicated that HCLase could not cleave the galactosaminidic linkage bound to 2-O-sulfated d-glucuronic acid (GlcUA) in CS chains. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that HCLase may work via a catalytic mechanism in which Tyr-His acts as the Brønsted base and acid. Thus, the identification of HCLase provides a useful tool for HA- and CS-related research and applications. PMID:25122756

  2. Could narrow marine embayments prevent sea-glacier invasion, and protect photosynthetic life during a Snowball Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Adam J.

    During the Snowball Earth events of the Neoproterozoic, the Earth's oceans may have been completely covered in ice. This ice would have been thick enough to prohibit the transmission of light to the liquid water underneath the entirely frozen surface of the ocean. However, photosynthetic eukaryotes are thought to have survived during these events. This is the first work to throughly attempt to reconcile how photosynthetic eukaryotes survived on a planet with a completely frozen ocean surface. Narrow marine embayments like the modern-day Red Sea, would restrict the inflow of sea glaciers. These embayments, if located in regions of net sublimation, would restrict sea-glacier invasion and could provide refuge for these organisms at the end of their channels. This work demonstrates that under a set of climate conditions and channel geometries, narrow marine embayments allow for incomplete sea-glacier invasion, a necessary condition for marine embayments to provide refugia.

  3. Proteome Analysis of the UVB-Resistant Marine Bacterium Photobacterium angustum S14

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Joux, Fabien; Wattiez, Ruddy; Lebaron, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The proteome of the marine bacterium Photobacterium angustum S14 was exposed to UVB and analyzed by the implementation of both the post-digest ICPL labeling method and 2D-DIGE technique using exponentially growing cells. A total of 40 and 23 proteins were quantified in all replicates using either the ICPL or 2D-DIGE methods, respectively. By combining both datasets from 8 biological replicates (4 biological replicates for each proteomics technique), 55 proteins were found to respond significantly to UVB radiation in P. angustum. A total of 8 UVB biomarkers of P. angustum were quantified in all replicates using both methods. Among them, the protein found to present the highest increase in abundance (almost a 3-fold change) was RecA, which is known to play a crucial role in the so-called recombinational repair process. We also observed a high number of antioxidants, transport proteins, metabolism-related proteins, transcription/translation regulators, chaperonins and proteases. We also discuss and compare the UVB response and global protein expression profiles obtained for two different marine bacteria with trophic lifestyles: the copiotroph P. angustum and oligotroph Sphingopyxis alaskensis. PMID:22870314

  4. Hydrogen peroxide-dependent uptake of iodine by marine Flavobacteriaceae bacterium strain C-21.

    PubMed

    Amachi, Seigo; Kimura, Koh; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Shinoyama, Hirofumi; Fujii, Takaaki

    2007-12-01

    The cells of the marine bacterium strain C-21, which is phylogenetically closely related to Arenibacter troitsensis, accumulate iodine in the presence of glucose and iodide (I-). In this study, the detailed mechanism of iodine uptake by C-21 was determined using a radioactive iodide tracer, 125I-. In addition to glucose, oxygen and calcium ions were also required for the uptake of iodine. The uptake was not inhibited or was only partially inhibited by various metabolic inhibitors, whereas reducing agents and catalase strongly inhibited the uptake. When exogenous glucose oxidase was added to the cell suspension, enhanced uptake of iodine was observed. The uptake occurred even in the absence of glucose and oxygen if hydrogen peroxide was added to the cell suspension. Significant activity of glucose oxidase was found in the crude extracts of C-21, and it was located mainly in the membrane fraction. These findings indicate that hydrogen peroxide produced by glucose oxidase plays a key role in the uptake of iodine. Furthermore, enzymatic oxidation of iodide strongly stimulated iodine uptake in the absence of glucose. Based on these results, the mechanism was considered to consist of oxidation of iodide to hypoiodous acid by hydrogen peroxide, followed by passive translocation of this uncharged iodine species across the cell membrane. Interestingly, such a mechanism of iodine uptake is similar to that observed in iodine-accumulating marine algae.

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide-Dependent Uptake of Iodine by Marine Flavobacteriaceae Bacterium Strain C-21▿

    PubMed Central

    Amachi, Seigo; Kimura, Koh; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Shinoyama, Hirofumi; Fujii, Takaaki

    2007-01-01

    The cells of the marine bacterium strain C-21, which is phylogenetically closely related to Arenibacter troitsensis, accumulate iodine in the presence of glucose and iodide (I−). In this study, the detailed mechanism of iodine uptake by C-21 was determined using a radioactive iodide tracer, 125I−. In addition to glucose, oxygen and calcium ions were also required for the uptake of iodine. The uptake was not inhibited or was only partially inhibited by various metabolic inhibitors, whereas reducing agents and catalase strongly inhibited the uptake. When exogenous glucose oxidase was added to the cell suspension, enhanced uptake of iodine was observed. The uptake occurred even in the absence of glucose and oxygen if hydrogen peroxide was added to the cell suspension. Significant activity of glucose oxidase was found in the crude extracts of C-21, and it was located mainly in the membrane fraction. These findings indicate that hydrogen peroxide produced by glucose oxidase plays a key role in the uptake of iodine. Furthermore, enzymatic oxidation of iodide strongly stimulated iodine uptake in the absence of glucose. Based on these results, the mechanism was considered to consist of oxidation of iodide to hypoiodous acid by hydrogen peroxide, followed by passive translocation of this uncharged iodine species across the cell membrane. Interestingly, such a mechanism of iodine uptake is similar to that observed in iodine-accumulating marine algae. PMID:17933915

  6. Aurantibacter crassamenti gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, orange-colored, rod-shaped, chemoheterotrophic bacterium, designated HG732(T), was isolated from marine sediment in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the novel marine strain was affiliated with the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes and that it shared the highest (94.1 %) sequence similarity with Kriegella aquimaris KMM 3665(T). The strain could be differentiated phenotypically from related members of the family Flavobacteriaceae. Major fatty acids of strain HG732(T) were iso-C15:1 G, iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, three unidentidied aminolipids and two unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content of the strain was determined to be 35.2 mol%, and the major respiratory quinone was identified as menaquinone 6 (MK-6). From the distinct phylogenetic position and combination of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain is considered to represent a novel genus in the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Aurantibacter crassamenti gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of A. crassamenti gen. nov., sp. nov. is HG732(T) (= KCTC 52207(T) = NBRC 112211(T)).

  7. Complete Cellulase System in the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans Strain 2-40T

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Larry E.; Henrissat, Bernard; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Ekborg, Nathan A.; Hutcheson, Steven W.; Weiner, Ronald M.

    2006-01-01

    Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 is a representative of an emerging group of marine complex polysaccharide (CP)-degrading bacteria. It is unique in its metabolic versatility, being able to degrade at least 10 distinct CPs from diverse algal, plant and invertebrate sources. The S. degradans genome has been sequenced to completion, and more than 180 open reading frames have been identified that encode carbohydrases. Over half of these are likely to act on plant cell wall polymers. In fact, there appears to be a full array of enzymes that degrade and metabolize plant cell walls. Genomic and proteomic analyses reveal 13 cellulose depolymerases complemented by seven accessory enzymes, including two cellodextrinases, three cellobiases, a cellodextrin phosphorylase, and a cellobiose phosphorylase. Most of these enzymes exhibit modular architecture, and some contain novel combinations of catalytic and/or substrate binding modules. This is exemplified by endoglucanase Cel5A, which has three internal family 6 carbohydrate binding modules (CBM6) and two catalytic modules from family five of glycosyl hydrolases (GH5) and by Cel6A, a nonreducing-end cellobiohydrolase from family GH6 with tandem CBM2s. This is the first report of a complete and functional cellulase system in a marine bacterium with a sequenced genome. PMID:16707677

  8. Hydrolysis of Fucoidan by Fucoidanase Isolated from the Marine Bacterium, Formosa algae

    PubMed Central

    Silchenko, Artem S.; Kusaykin, Mikhail I.; Kurilenko, Valeriya V.; Zakharenko, Alexander M.; Isakov, Vladimir V.; Zaporozhets, Tatyana S.; Gazha, Anna K.; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular fucoidanase was isolated from the marine bacterium, Formosa algae strain KMM 3553. The first appearance of fucoidan enzymatic hydrolysis products in a cell-free extract was detected after 4 h of bacterial growth, and maximal fucoidanase activity was observed after 12 h of growth. The fucoidanase displayed maximal activity in a wide range of pH values, from 6.5 to 9.1. The presence of Mg2+, Ca2+ and Ba2+ cations strongly activated the enzyme; however, Cu2+ and Zn2+ cations had inhibitory effects on the enzymatic activity. The enzymatic activity of fucoidanase was considerably reduced after prolonged (about 60 min) incubation of the enzyme solution at 45 °C. The fucoidanase catalyzed the hydrolysis of fucoidans from Fucus evanescens and Fucus vesiculosus, but not from Saccharina cichorioides. The fucoidanase also did not hydrolyze carrageenan. Desulfated fucoidan from F. evanescens was hydrolysed very weakly in contrast to deacetylated fucoidan, which was hydrolysed more actively compared to the native fucoidan from F. evanescens. Analysis of the structure of the enzymatic products showed that the marine bacteria, F. algae, synthesized an α-l-fucanase with an endo-type action that is specific for 1→4-bonds in a polysaccharide molecule built up of alternating three- and four-linked α-l-fucopyranose residues sulfated mainly at position 2. PMID:23852092

  9. Hydrolysis of fucoidan by fucoidanase isolated from the marine bacterium, Formosa algae.

    PubMed

    Silchenko, Artem S; Kusaykin, Mikhail I; Kurilenko, Valeriya V; Zakharenko, Alexander M; Isakov, Vladimir V; Zaporozhets, Tatyana S; Gazha, Anna K; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N

    2013-07-11

    Intracellular fucoidanase was isolated from the marine bacterium, Formosa algae strain KMM 3553. The first appearance of fucoidan enzymatic hydrolysis products in a cell-free extract was detected after 4 h of bacterial growth, and maximal fucoidanase activity was observed after 12 h of growth. The fucoidanase displayed maximal activity in a wide range of pH values, from 6.5 to 9.1. The presence of Mg2+, Ca2+ and Ba2+ cations strongly activated the enzyme; however, Cu2+ and Zn2+ cations had inhibitory effects on the enzymatic activity. The enzymatic activity of fucoidanase was considerably reduced after prolonged (about 60 min) incubation of the enzyme solution at 45 °C. The fucoidanase catalyzed the hydrolysis of fucoidans from Fucus evanescens and Fucus vesiculosus, but not from Saccharina cichorioides. The fucoidanase also did not hydrolyze carrageenan. Desulfated fucoidan from F. evanescens was hydrolysed very weakly in contrast to deacetylated fucoidan, which was hydrolysed more actively compared to the native fucoidan from F. evanescens. Analysis of the structure of the enzymatic products showed that the marine bacteria, F. algae, synthesized an α-l-fucanase with an endo-type action that is specific for 1→4-bonds in a polysaccharide molecule built up of alternating three- and four-linked α-l-fucopyranose residues sulfated mainly at position 2.

  10. A Novel Exopolysaccharide with Metal Adsorption Capacity Produced by a Marine Bacterium Alteromonas sp. JL2810

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zilian; Cai, Ruanhong; Zhang, Wenhui; Fu, Yingnan; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2017-01-01

    Most marine bacteria can produce exopolysaccharides (EPS). However, very few structures of EPS produced by marine bacteria have been determined. The characterization of EPS structure is important for the elucidation of their biological functions and ecological roles. In this study, the structure of EPS produced by a marine bacterium, Alteromonas sp. JL2810, was characterized, and the biosorption of the EPS for heavy metals Cu2+, Ni2+, and Cr6+ was also investigated. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis indicated that the JL2810 EPS have a novel structure consisting of the repeating unit of [-3)-α-Rhap-(1→3)-α-Manp-(1→4)-α-3OAc-GalAp-(1→]. The biosorption of the EPS for heavy metals was affected by a medium pH; the maximum biosorption capacities for Cu2+ and Ni2+ were 140.8 ± 8.2 mg/g and 226.3 ± 3.3 mg/g at pH 5.0; however, for Cr6+ it was 215.2 ± 5.1 mg/g at pH 5.5. Infrared spectrometry analysis demonstrated that the groups of O-H, C=O, and C-O-C were the main function groups for the adsorption of JL2810 EPS with the heavy metals. The adsorption equilibrium of JL2810 EPS for Ni2+ was further analyzed, and the equilibrium data could be better represented by the Langmuir isotherm model. The novel EPS could be potentially used in industrial applications as a novel bio-resource for the removal of heavy metals. PMID:28604644

  11. Photosynthetic performance, lipid production and biomass composition in response to nitrogen limitation in marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuelu; Yoshida, Tomomi; Quigg, Antonietta

    2012-05-01

    Increasing energy prices demand a renewable, carbon neutral, transport fuel that is environmentally and commercially sustainable. The interest in the production of microalgae as biofuels is increasing due to their high oil content, rapid biomass production and small foot print. In this research, marine microalgae Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyceae) and Thalassiosira pseudonana (Bacillariophyceae) were incubated in nitrogen (N)-replete medium, and then transferred to N-free medium for 15 and 11 days, respectively. Fluorescence induction and relaxation (FIRe) fluorometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to monitor the photosynthetic performance, lipid production and metabolic responses to changing N availability. Growth rates of D. tertiolecta and T. pseudonana were 0.84 ± 0.16 d(-1) and 1.21 ± 0.09 d(-), respectively in N-replete medium. Upon transfer to N-free medium. The growth rates of T. pseudonana declined rapidly, while D. tertiolecta continued to grow for 5 days in N-free medium before growth declined slowly. The maximum quantum yield of photochemistry (F(v)/F(m)) remained high initially for D. tertiolecta but decreased immediately after transfer to N-free media for T. pseudonana. The functional absorption cross section for PSII (σ(PSII)) increased, the time constant for Q(A) reoxidation (τ(Qa)) and connectivity factor (p) decreased in parallel to the nutritional status of the microalgae. The relative protein and lipid content varied in response to N limitation, but carbohydrates did not change. Based on FTIR, D. tertiolecta and T. pseudonana produced 20-26% lipid when most stressed. The combination of photosynthetic efficiency and biomass composition monitoring provided evidence that metabolic strategies to changing nutrient status are species-specific. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of two spectral variants of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Bina, David; Picken, Nichola; Honkanen, Suvi; Blankenship, Robert E; Holten, Dewey; Cogdell, Richard J

    2012-09-01

    Two spectral forms of the peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) from the purple sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Allochromatium vinosum were purified and their photophysical properties characterized. The complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and multiple species of carotenoids. The composition of carotenoids depends on the light conditions applied during growth of the cultures. In addition, LH2 grown under high light has a noticeable split of the B800 absorption band. The influence of the change of carotenoid distribution as well as the spectral change of the excitonic absorption of the bacteriochlorophylls on the light-harvesting ability was studied using steady-state absorption, fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved absorption at 77K. The results demonstrate that the change of the distribution of the carotenoids when cells were grown at low light adapts the absorptive properties of the complex to the light conditions and maintains maximum photon-capture performance. In addition, an explanation for the origin of the enigmatic split of the B800 absorption band is provided. This spectral splitting is also observed in LH2 complexes from other photosynthetic sulfur purple bacterial species. According to results obtained from transient absorption spectroscopy, the B800 band split originates from two spectral forms of the associated BChl a monomeric molecules bound within the same complex.

  13. Expressed genes for plant-type ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase in the photosynthetic bacterium Chromatium vinosum, which possesses two complete sets of the genes.

    PubMed Central

    Viale, A M; Kobayashi, H; Akazawa, T

    1989-01-01

    Two sets of genes for the large and small subunits of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) were detected in the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Chromatium vinosum by hybridization analysis with RuBisCO gene probes, cloned by using the lambda Fix vector, and designated rbcL-rbcS and rbcA-rbcB. rbcL and rbcA encode the large subunits, and rbcS and rbcB encode the small subunits. rbcL-rbcS was the same as that reported previously (A. M. Viale, H. Kobayashi, T. Takabe, and T. Akazawa, FEBS Lett. 192:283-288, 1985). A DNA fragment bearing rbcA-rbcB was subcloned in plasmid vectors and sequenced. We found that rbcB was located 177 base pairs downstream of the rbcA coding region, and both genes were preceded by plausible procaryotic ribosome-binding sites. rbcA and rbcD encoded polypeptides of 472 and 118 amino acids, respectively. Edman degradation analysis of the subunits of RuBisCO isolated from C. vinosum showed that rbcA-rbcB encoded the enzyme present in this bacterium. The large- and small-subunit polypeptides were posttranslationally processed to remove 2 and 1 amino acid residues from their N-termini, respectively. Among hetero-oligomeric RuBisCOs, the C. vinosum large subunit exhibited higher homology to that from cyanobacteria, eucaryotic algae, and higher plants (71.6 to 74.2%) than to that from the chemolithotrophic bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus (56.6%). A similar situation has been observed for the C. vinosum small subunit, although the homology among small subunits from different organisms was lower than that among the large subunits. Images PMID:2708310

  14. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  15. Physiological and biochemical response of the photosynthetic apparatus of two marine diatoms to Fe stress

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.M.L.; LaRoche, J.; Geider, R.J.

    1997-06-01

    Flavodoxin is a small electron-transfer protein capable of replacing ferredoxin during periods of Fe deficiency. When evaluating the suitability of flavodoxin as a diagnostic indicator for Fe limitation of phytoplankton growth, we examined its expression in two marine diatoms we cultured using trace-metal-buffered medium. Thalassiosira weissflogii and Phaeodactylum tricornutum were cultured in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-buffered Sargasso Sea water containing from 10 to 1000 nm added Fe. Trace-metal-buffered cultures of each diatom maintained high growth rates across the entire range of Fe additions. Similarly, declines in chlorophyll/cell and in the ratio of photosystem II variable-to-maximum fluorescence were negligible (P. tricornutum) to moderate (T. weissflogii, 54% decline in chlorophyll/cell and 22% decrease in variable-to-maximum fluorescence). Moreover, only minor variations in photosynthetic parameters were observed across the range of additions. In contrast, flavodoxin was expressed to high levels in low-Fe cultures. Despite the inverse relationship between flavodoxin expression and Fe content of the medium, its expression was seemingly independent of any of the indicators of cell physiology that were assayed. It appears that flavodoxin is expressed as an early-stage response to Fe stress and that its accumulation need not be intimately connected to limitations imposed by Fe on the growth rate of these diatoms.

  16. Assignment of photosynthetic parameters in estimation of marine phytoplankton production from remote sensing of ocean colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, Marie-Helene

    2007-12-01

    Photosynthesis (primary production) is the fundamental process by which solar photons are transformed into organic matter that is the source of energy for the entire food web. The first chapter of this thesis reviews the concepts that underpin models of marine primary production as well as the relevant parameters and their variation according to phytoplankton functional type. The application of the models to compute primary production from remotely-sensed images of ocean colour is then reviewed. The different approaches for assignment of the photosynthetic parameters in the model are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each one of them are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to understanding the variability in photosynthesis-irradiance ( P -- E) parameters, which is the focus of the thesis. In Chapter 2 and 4, new measurements of P -- E are presented for two ecologically-different regions of the North Atlantic: the tropical Caribbean waters and the temperate North-West Atlantic. The issues that have to be addressed for regional computations of primary production are examined, and results are presented for primary production in the two regions using remotely-sensed data on ocean colour. Chapter 3 presents a new method for extraction of the photosynthesis-response parameters from profiles of in situ phytoplankton production. The procedure, previously proposed but hitherto untested, is here implemented in various aquatic systems and a protocol is established for its use. The major conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented in the fifth and final chapter.

  17. Recombinant production and characterization of a highly active alkaline phosphatase from marine bacterium Cobetia marina.

    PubMed

    Golotin, Vasily; Balabanova, Larissa; Likhatskaya, Galina; Rasskazov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    The psychrophilic marine bacterium, Cobetia marina, recovered from the mantle tissue of the marine mussel, Crenomytilus grayanus, which contained a gene encoding alkaline phosphatase (AP) with apparent biotechnology advantages. The enzyme was found to be more efficient than its counterparts and showed k cat value 10- to 100-fold higher than those of all known commercial APs. The enzyme did not require the presence of exogenous divalent cations and dimeric state of its molecule for activity. The recombinant enzyme (CmAP) production and purification were optimized with a final recovery of 2 mg of the homogenous protein from 1 L of the transgenic Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)/Pho40 cells culture. CmAP displayed a half-life of 16 min at 45 °C and 27 min at 40 °C in the presence of 2 mM EDTA, thus suggesting its relative thermostability in comparison with the known cold-adapted analogues. A high concentration of EDTA in the incubation mixture did not appreciably inhibit CmAP. The enzyme was stable in a wide range of pH (6.0-11.0). CmAP exhibited its highest activity at the reaction temperature of 40-50 °C and pH 9.5-10.3. The structural features of CmAP could be the reason for the increase in its stability and catalytic turnover. We have modeled the CmAP 3D structure on the base of the high-quality experimental structure of the close homologue Vibrio sp. AP (VAP) and mutated essential residues predicted to break Mg(2+) bonds in CmAP. It seems probable that the intrinsically tight binding of catalytic and structural metal ions together with the flexibility of intermolecular and intramolecular links in CmAP could be attributed to the adapted mutualistic lifestyle in oceanic waters.

  18. Methanosarcina acetivorans sp. nov., an Acetotrophic Methane-Producing Bacterium Isolated from Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, Kevin R.; Baron, Stephen F.; Ferry, James G.

    1984-01-01

    A new acetotrophic marine methane-producing bacterium that was isolated from the methane-evolving sediments of a marine canyon is described. Exponential phase cultures grown with sodium acetate contained irregularly shaped cocci that aggregated in the early stationary phase and finally differentiated into communal cysts that released individual cocci when ruptured or transferred to fresh medium. The irregularly shaped cocci (1.9 ± 0.2 mm in diameter) were gram negative and occurred singly or in pairs. Cells were nonmotile, but possessed a single fimbria-like structure. Micrographs of thin sections showed a monolayered cell wall approximately 10 nm thick that consisted of protein subunits. The cells in aggregates were separated by visible septation. The communal cysts contained several single cocci encased in a common envelope. An amorphous form of the communal cyst that had incomplete septation and internal membrane-like vesicles was also present in late exponential phase cultures. Sodium acetate, methanol, methylamine, dimethylamine, and trimethylamine were substrates for growth and methanogenesis; H2-CO2 (80:20) and sodium formate were not. The optimal growth temperature was 35 to 40°C. The optimal pH range was 6.5 to 7.0. Both NaCl and Mg2+ were required for growth, with maximum growth rates at 0.2 M NaCl and 0.05 M MgSO4. The DNA base composition was 41 ± 1% guanine plus cytosine. Methanosarcina acetivorans is the proposed species. C2A is the type strain (DSM 2834, ATCC 35395). Images PMID:16346552

  19. Purification and Characterization of a Fucoidanase (FNase S) from a Marine Bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Joo Woong; Park, Jae Kweon; Choi, Doo Jin; Park, Yong Il

    2015-01-01

    The Search for enzyme activities that efficiently degrade marine polysaccharides is becoming an increasingly important area for both structural analysis and production of lower-molecular weight oligosaccharides. In this study, an endo-acting fucoidanase that degrades Miyeokgui fucoidan (MF), a sulfated galactofucan isolated from the sporophyll (called Miyeokgui in Korean) of Undaria pinnatifida, into smaller-sized galactofuco-oligosaccharides (1000–4000 Da) was purified from a marine bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1, by ammonium sulfate precipitation, diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose column chromatography, and chromatofocusing. The specific activity of this enzyme was approximately 112-fold higher than that of the crude enzyme, and its molecular weight was approximately 130 kDa (FNase S), as determined by native gel electrophoresis and 130 (S1), 70 (S2) and 60 (S3) kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH and temperature of FNase S were pH 6.0–7.0 and 40–45 °C, respectively. FNase S activity was enhanced by Mn2+ and Na+ (115.7% and 131.2%), but it was inhibited by Ca2+, K+, Ba2+, Cu2+ (96%, 83.7%, 84.3%, and 89.3%, respectively), each at 1 mM. The Km, Vmax and Kcat values of FNase S on MF were 1.7 mM, 0.62 mg·min−1, and 0.38·S−1, respectively. This enzyme could be a valuable tool for the structural analysis of fucoidans and production of bioactive fuco-oligosaccharides. PMID:26193285

  20. Fibrinolytic enzyme from newly isolated marine bacterium Bacillus subtilis ICTF-1: media optimization, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prafulla M; Nayak, Shubhada; Lele, Smita S

    2012-03-01

    Fibrinolytic enzymes are important in treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The present work reports isolation, screening and identification of marine cultures for production of fibrinolytic enzymes. A potent fibrinolytic enzyme-producing bacterium was isolated from marine niches and identified as Bacillus subtilis ICTF-1 on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequencing and biochemical properties. Further, media optimization using L(18)-orthogonal array method resulted in enhanced production of fibrinolytic enzyme (8814 U/mL) which was 2.6 fold higher than in unoptimized medium (3420 U/mL). In vitro assays revealed that the enzyme could catalyze blood clot lysis effectively, indicating that this enzyme could be a useful thrombolytic agent. A fibrinolytic enzyme was purified from the culture supernatant to homogeneity by three step procedures with a 34.42-fold increase in specific activity and 7.5% recovery. This purified fibrinolytic enzyme had molecular mass of 28 kDa, optimal temperature and pH at 50 °C and 9, respectively. It was stable at pH 5.0-11.0 and temperature of 25-37 °C. The enzyme activity was activated by Ca(2+) and obviously inhibited by Zn(2+), Fe(3)(+), Hg(2+) and PMSF. The purified fibrinolytic enzyme showed high stability towards various surfactants and was relatively stable towards oxidizing agent. Considering these properties purified fibrinolytic enzyme also finds potential application in laundry detergents in addition to thrombolytic agent. The gene encoding fibrinolytic enzyme was isolated and its DNA sequence was determined. Compared the full DNA sequence with those in NCBI, it was considered to be a subtilisin like serine-protease.

  1. Comprehensive insights into the response of Alexandrium tamarense to algicidal component secreted by a marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xueqian; Li, Dong; Li, Yi; Chen, Zhangran; Chen, Yao; Cai, Guanjing; Yang, Xujun; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms occur throughout the world, threatening human health, and destroying marine ecosystems. Alexandrium tamarense is a globally distributed and notoriously toxic dinoflagellate that is responsible for most paralytic shellfish poisoning incidents. The culture supernatant of the marine algicidal bacterium BS02 showed potent algicidal effects on A. tamarense ATGD98-006. In this study, we investigated the effects of this supernatant on A. tamarense at physiological and biochemical levels to elucidate the mechanism involved in the inhibition of algal growth by the supernatant of the strain BS02. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels increased following exposure to the BS02 supernatant, indicating that the algal cells had suffered from oxidative damage. The levels of cellular pigments, including chlorophyll a and carotenoids, were significantly decreased, which indicated that the accumulation of ROS destroyed pigment synthesis. The decline of the maximum photochemical quantum yield (Fv/Fm) and relative electron transport rate (rETR) suggested that the photosynthesis systems of algal cells were attacked by the BS02 supernatant. To eliminate the ROS, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), increased significantly within a short period of time. Real-time PCR revealed changes in the transcript abundances of two target photosynthesis-related genes (psbA and psbD) and two target respiration-related genes (cob and cox). The transcription of the respiration-related genes was significantly inhibited by the treatments, which indicated that the respiratory system was disturbed. Our results demonstrate that the BS02 supernatant can affect the photosynthesis process and might block the PS II electron transport chain, leading to the production of excessive ROS. The increased ROS can further destroy membrane integrity and pigments, ultimately inducing algal cell death. PMID:25667582

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Providencia sneebia Strain ST1, a Quorum Sensing Bacterium Associated with Marine Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Lao, Yong-Min; Cai, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Providencia sneebia strain ST1 is a symbiotic bacterium (belonging to phylum gammaproteobacteria) with marine microalgae. This bacterium exhibits the ability to produce N-Acyl homoserine lactone signal molecule. To date, no genome that originates from marine Providencia spp. has been reported. In this study, we present the genome sequence of this strain. It has a genome size of 4.89 M, with 19 contigs and an average G+C of 51.97%. The function of 4,631 proteins was predicted, and 3,652 proteins were assigned to COG functional categories. Among them, 407 genes are involved in carbohydrate metabolism, 306 genes participate in nitrogen utilization and energy conversion, and 185 genes related to signal transduction process. Thus, this strain plays an active role in the biogeochemical cycle in algal life history. The whole-genome of this isolate and annotation will help enhance understanding of bacterial ecological behavior in the phycosphere. PMID:27026792

  3. Stereochemical course of hydrolytic reaction catalyzed by alpha-galactosidase from cold adaptable marine bacterium of genus Pseudoalteromonas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakunina, Irina; Balabanova, Larissa; Golotin, Vasiliy; Slepchenko, Lyubov; Isakov, Vladimir; Rasskazov, Valeriy

    2014-10-01

    The recombinant α-galactosidase of the marine bacterium (α-PsGal) was synthesized with the use of the plasmid 40Gal, consisting of plasmid pET-40b (+) (Novagen) and the gene corresponding to the open reading frame of the mature α-galactosidase of marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. KMM 701, transformed into the E. coli Rosetta(DE3) cells. In order to understand the mechanism of action, the stereochemistry of hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl α-D-galactopyranoside (4-NPGP) by α-PsGal was measured by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The kinetics of formation of α- and β-anomer of galactose showed that α-anomer initially formed and accumulated, and then an appreciable amount of β-anomer appeared as a result of mutarotation. The data clearly show that the enzymatic hydrolysis of 4-NPGP proceeds with the retention of anomeric configuration, probably, due to a double displacement mechanism of reaction.

  4. Purification and Characterization of a New Alginate Lyase from Marine Bacterium Vibrio sp. SY08

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Hao, Jianhua; Xing, Mengxin; Sun, Jingjing; Sun, Mi

    2016-01-01

    Unsaturated alginate disaccharides (UADs), enzymatically derived from the degradation of alginate polymers, are considered powerful antioxidants. In this study, a new high UAD-producing alginate lyase, AlySY08, has been purified from the marine bacterium Vibrio sp. SY08. AlySY08, with a molecular weight of about 33 kDa and a specific activity of 1070.2 U/mg, showed the highest activity at 40 °C in phosphate buffer at pH 7.6. The enzyme was stable over a broad pH range (6.0–9.0) and retained about 75% activity after incubation at 40 °C for 2 h. Moreover, the enzyme was active in the absence of salt ions and its activity was enhanced by the addition of NaCl and KCl. AlySY08 resulted in an endo-type alginate lyase that degrades both polyM and polyG blocks, yielding UADs as the main product (81.4% of total products). All these features made AlySY08 a promising candidate for industrial applications in the production of antioxidants from alginate polysaccharides. PMID:28025527

  5. Purification and Characterization of Catalase from Marine Bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xinhua; Wang, Wei; Hao, Jianhua; Zhu, Xianglin; Sun, Mi

    2014-01-01

    The catalase from marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. YS0810 (YS0810CAT) was purified and characterized. Consecutive steps were used to achieve the purified enzyme as follows: ethanol precipitation, DEAE Sepharose ion exchange, Superdex 200 gel filtration, and Resource Q ion exchange. The active enzyme consisted of four identical subunits of 57.256 kDa. It showed a Soret peak at 405 nm, indicating the presence of iron protoporphyrin IX. The catalase was not apparently reduced by sodium dithionite but was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, hydroxylamine hydrochloride, and sodium azide. Peroxidase-like activity was not found with the substrate o-phenylenediamine. So the catalase was determined to be a monofunctional catalase. N-terminal amino acid of the catalase analysis gave the sequence SQDPKKCPVTHLTTE, which showed high degree of homology with those of known catalases from bacteria. The analysis of amino acid sequence of the purified catalase by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry showed that it was a new catalase, in spite of its high homology with those of known catalases from other bacteria. The catalase showed high alkali stability and thermostability. PMID:25045672

  6. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium.

    PubMed Central

    Visscher, P T; Taylor, B F

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters. PMID:8285707

  7. Physicochemical properties of the exopolysaccharides produced by marine bacterium Zoogloea sp. KCCM10036.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dong-Jung; Kim, Jong-Deog; Kim, Min-Yong; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Kong, Jai-Yul

    2007-06-01

    The physicochemical properties of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by marine bacterium Zoogloea sp. KCCM10036 were investigated. Two types of isolated EPSs were shown to have average relative molecular masses (Mr) of 4.07 x 10(6) of CBP (cell-bound polysaccharide) and 3.43 x 10(6) of WSP (water-soluble polysaccharide), respectively. When the CBP was utilized as an emulsifier, it stabilized the emulsion for up to 148 h. Compared with other commercially available hydrocolloids such as xanthan gum, the Tween series, and Triton, the CBP showed much better emulsifying capability on a water-in-oil system. Phase separation occurred in the Tween series after 24 h, whereas the emulsion was better stabilized by the CBP. The CBP thus has potential as an emulsifying agent in commercial emulsions. The flocculating activity was also greatest at 0.01% (w/v) and decreased at higher concentrations than the optimized concentration of the WSP and CBP. The results also showed that both types of exopolysaccharides from Zoogloea sp. had excellent flocculating activity.

  8. Relationship between ion requirements for respiration and membrane transport in a marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Khanna, G; DeVoe, L; Brown, L; Niven, D F; MacLeod, R A

    1984-01-01

    Intact cells of the marine bacterium Alteromonas haloplanktis 214 oxidized NADH, added to the suspending medium, by a process which was stimulated by Na+ or Li+ but not K+. Toluene-treated cells oxidized NADH at three times the rate of untreated cells by a mechanism activated by Na+ but not by Li+ or K+. In the latter reaction, K+ spared the requirement for Na+. Intact cells of A. haloplanktis oxidized ethanol by a mechanism stimulated by either Na+ or Li+. The uptake of alpha-aminoisobutyric acid by intact cells of A. haloplanktis in the presence of either NADH or ethanol as an oxidizable substrate required Na+, and neither Li+ nor K+ could replace it. The results indicate that exogenous and endogenous NADH and ethanol are oxidized by A. haloplanktis by processes distinguishable from one another by their requirements for alkali metal ions and from the ion requirements for membrane transport. Intact cells of Vibrio natriegens and Photobacterium phosphoreum oxidized NADH, added externally, by an Na+-activated process, and intact cells of Vibrio fischeri oxidized NADH, added externally, by a K+-activated process. Toluene treatment caused the cells of all three organisms to oxidize NADH at much faster rates than untreated cells by mechanisms which were activated by Na+ and spared by K+.

  9. Aerobic and anaerobic degradation of a range of alkyl sulfides by a denitrifying marine bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visscher, P.T.; Taylor, B.F.

    1993-01-01

    A pure culture of a bacterium was obtained from a marine microbial mat by using an anoxic medium containing dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and nitrate. The isolate grew aerobically or anaerobically as a denitrifier on alkyl sulfides, including DMS, dimethyl disulfide, diethyl sulfide (DES), ethyl methyl sulfide, dipropyl sulfide, dibutyl sulfide, and dibutyl disulfide. Cells grown on an alkyl sulfide or disulfide also oxidized the corresponding thiols, namely, methanethiol, ethanethiol, propanethiol, or butanethiol. Alkyl sulfides were metabolized by induced or derepressed cells with oxygen, nitrate, or nitrite as electron acceptor. Cells grown on DMS immediately metabolized DMS, but there was a lag before DES was consumed; with DES-grown cells, DES was immediately used but DMS was used only after a lag. Chloramphenicol prevented the eventual use of DES by DMS-grown cells and DMS use by DES-grown cells, respectively, indicating separate enzymes for the metabolism of methyl and ethyl groups. Growth was rapid on formate, acetate, propionate, and butyrate but slow on methanol. The organism also grew chemolithotrophically on thiosulfate with a decrease in pH; growth required carbonate in the medium. Growth on sulfide was also carbonate dependent but slow. The isolate was identified as a Thiobacillus sp. and designated strain ASN-1. It may have utility for removing alkyl sulfides, and also nitrate, nitrite, and sulfide, from wastewaters.

  10. Three Alginate Lyases from Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HZJ216: Purification and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Liyan, Li; Jiang, Xiaolu; Wang, Peng; Guan, Huashi; Guo, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Three alginate lyases (A, B, and C) from an alginate-degrading marine bacterium strain HZJ216 isolated from brown seaweed in the Yellow Sea of China and identified preliminarily as Pseudomonas fluorescens are purified, and their biochemical properties are described. Molecular masses of the three enzymes are determined by SDS-PAGE to be 60.25, 36, and 23 kDa with isoelectric points of 4, 4.36, and 4.59, respectively. Investigations of these enzymes at different pH and temperatures show that they are most active at pH 7.0 and 35 C. Alginate lyases A and B are stable in the pH range of 5.0 9.0, while alginate lyase C is stable in the pH range of 5.0 7.0. Among the metal ions tested, additions of Na+, K+, and Mg2+ ions can enhance the enzyme activities while Fe2+, Fe3+, Ba2+, and Zn2+ ions show inhibitory effects. The substrate specificity results demonstrate that alginate lyase C has the specificity for G block while alginate lyases A and B have the activities for both M and G blocks. It is the first report about extracellular alginate lyases with high alginate-degrading activity from P. fluorescens.

  11. A thermostable serralysin inhibitor from marine bacterium Flavobacterium sp. YS-80-122

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pengjuan; Li, Shangyong; Wang, Kun; Wang, Fang; Xing, Mengxin; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2017-06-01

    Serralysin inhibitors have been proposed as potent drugs against many diseases and may help to prevent further development of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria. In this study, a novel serralysin inhibitor gene, lupI, was cloned from the marine bacterium Flavobacterium sp. YS-80-122 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced serralysin inhibitor, LupI, shows <40% amino acid identity to other reported serralysin inhibitors. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of LupI with other serralysin inhibitors indicated that LupI was a novel type of serralysin inhibitor. The inhibitory constant for LupI towards its target metalloprotease was 0.64 μmol/L. LupI was thermostable at high temperature, in which 35.6%-90.7% of its inhibitory activity was recovered after treatment at 100°C for 1-60 min followed by incubation at 0°C. This novel inhibitor may represent a candidate drug for the treatment of serralysin-related infections.

  12. A polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Flammeovirga sp. MY04 and its extracellular agarase system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wenjun; Gu, Jingyan; Yan, Qiujie; Li, Jungang; Wu, Zhihong; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Yuezhong

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria of the genus Flammeovirga can digest complex polysaccharides (CPs), but no details have been reported regarding the CP depolymerases of these bacteria. MY04, an agarolytic marine bacterium isolated from coastal sediments, has been identified as a new member of the genus Flammeovirga. The MY04 strain is able to utilize multiple CPs as a sole carbon source and grows well on agarose, mannan, or xylan. This strain produces high concentrations of extracellular proteins (490 mg L-1 ± 18.2 mg L-1 liquid culture) that exhibit efficient and extensive degradation activities on various polysaccharides, especially agarose. These proteins have an activity of 310 U mg-1 ± 9.6 U mg-1 proteins. The extracellular agarase system (EAS) in the crude extracellular enzymes contains at least four agarose depolymerases, which are with molecular masses of approximately 30-70 kDa. The EAS is stable at a wide range of pH values (6.0-11.0), temperatures (0-50°C), and sodium chloride (NaCl) concentrations (0-0.9 mol L-1). Two major degradation products generated from agarose by the EAS are identified to be neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose, suggesting that β-agarases are the major constituents of the MY04 EAS. These results suggest that the Flammeovirga strain MY04 and its polysaccharide-degradation system hold great promise in industrial applications.

  13. Phage resistance of a marine bacterium, Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114, as revealed by comparative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunxiao; Zhang, Yongyu; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2010-08-01

    Roseobacter is a dominant lineage in the marine environment. This group of bacteria is diverse in terms of both their phylogenetic composition and their physiological potential. Roseobacter denitrificans OCh114 is one of the most studied bacteria of the Roseobacter lineage. Recently, a lytic phage (RDJLPhi1) that infects this bacterium was isolated and a mutant strain (M1) of OCh114 that is resistant to RDJLPhi1 was also obtained. Here, we investigate the mechanisms supporting phage resistance of M1. Our results excluded the possibilities of several phage resistance mechanisms, including abortive infection, lysogeny, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) related mechanism. Adsorption kinetics assays revealed that adsorption inhibition might be a potential cause for the phage resistance of M1. Comparative proteomic analysis of M1 and OCh114 revealed significant changes in the membrane protein compliment of these bacteria. Five membrane proteins with important biological functions were significantly down-regulated in the phage-resistant M1. Meanwhile, several outer membrane porins with different modifications and an OmpA family domain protein were markedly up-regulated. We hypothesize that the down-regulated membrane proteins in M1 may serve as the potential phage receptors, whose absence prevented the adsorption of phage RDJLPhi1 to host cells and subsequent infection.

  14. A serine hydroxymethyltransferase from marine bacterium Shewanella algae: Isolation, purification, characterization and l-serine production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Bingzhao; Liu, Ziduo

    2013-10-01

    Currently, l-serine is mainly produced by enzymatic conversion, in which serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is the key enzyme, suggesting the importance of searching for a SHMT with high activity. Shewanella algae, a methanol-utilizing marine bacterium showing high SHMT activity, was selected based on screening bacterial strains and comparison of the activities of SHMTs. A glyA was isolated from the S. algae through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) and it encoded a 417 amino acid polypeptide. The SaSHMT, encoded by the glyA, showed the optimal activity at 50°C and pH 7.0, and retained over 45% of its maximal activity after incubation at 40°C for 3h. The enzyme showed better stability under alkaline environment (pH 6.5-9.0) than Hyphomicrobium methylovorum GM2's SHMT (pH 6.0-7.5). The SaSHMT can produce 77.76mM of l-serine by enzymatic conversion, with the molecular conversion rate in catalyzing glycine to l-serine being 1.41-fold higher than that of Escherichia coli. Therefore, the SaSHMT has the potential for industrial applications due to its tolerance of alkaline environment and a relatively high enzymatic conversion rate.

  15. Capture of Arginine at Low Concentrations by a Marine Psychrophilic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Geesey, Gill G.; Morita, Richard Y.

    1979-01-01

    The cells of the marine bacterium Ant-300 were found to take up arginine when this substrate was at low concentrations. The cells possessed an uptake system(s) that specifically transported l-arginine. The kinetic parameters for uptake appeared to differ when the cells were exposed to nanomolar and micromolar concentrations of the amino acid. Uptake over this concentration range functioned in the absence of an exogenous energy source, even after the cells had been preincubated in unsupplemented artificial seawater. Respiratory activity appeared to be a more important driving force for arginine uptake than adenosine 5′-triphosphate hydrolysis. The cells also exhibited chemotaxis toward l-arginine. The minimum arginine concentration needed to elicit a chemotactic response was between 10−5 and 10−6 M. It is proposed that the capture of arginine by cells of Ant-300 in nutrient-depleted waters, which are typical of the open ocean, proceeds via high-affinity active transport, whereas in substrate-enriched seawater, capture involves chemotaxis and an active transport mechanism with reduced affinity for the substrate. PMID:16345475

  16. Non-Redfield, nutrient synergy and flexible internal elemental stoichiometry in a marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Kathleen; Feenders, Christoph; Hulsch, Reiner; Ruppersberg, Hanna S.; Strijkstra, Annemieke; Kant, Mirjam; Vagts, Jannes; Wünsch, Daniel; Michalke, Bernhard; Maczka, Michael; Schulz, Stefan; Hillebrand, Helmut; Blasius, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The stoichiometric constraints of algal growth are well understood, whereas there is less knowledge for heterotrophic bacterioplankton. Growth of the marine bacterium Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, belonging to the globally distributed Roseobacter group, was studied across a wide concentration range of NH4+ and PO43−. The unique dataset covers 415 different concentration pairs, corresponding to 207 different molar N:P ratios (from 10−2 to 105). Maximal growth (by growth rate and biomass yield) was observed within a restricted concentration range at N:P ratios (∼50−120) markedly above Redfield. Experimentally determined growth parameters deviated to a large part from model predictions based on Liebig's law of the minimum, thus implicating synergistic co-limitation due to biochemical dependence of resources. Internal elemental ratios of P. inhibens varied with external nutrient supply within physiological constraints, thus adding to the growing evidence that aquatic bacteria can be flexible in their internal elemental composition. Taken together, the findings reported here revealed that P. inhibens is well adapted to fluctuating availability of inorganic N and P, expected to occur in its natural habitat (e.g. colonized algae, coastal areas). Moreover, this study suggests that elemental variability in bacterioplankton needs to be considered in the ecological stoichiometry of the oceans. PMID:28486660

  17. Regulation of iron transport related genes by boron in the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ariel; Trimble, Lyndsay; Hobusch, Ashtian R; Schroeder, Kristine J; Amin, Shady A; Hartnett, Andrej D; Barker, Ryan A; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Carrano, Carl J

    2013-08-01

    While there has been extensive interest in the use of boron isotope ratios as a surrogate of pH in paleoclimate studies in the context of climate change-related questions, the high (0.4 mM) concentration and the depth-independent (conservative or non-nutrient-like) concentration profile of this element have led to boron being neglected as a potentially biologically relevant element in the modern ocean. Here we report that boron affects the expression of a number of protein and genes in the "algal-associated" Gram-negative marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Most intriguingly, a number of these proteins and genes are related to iron uptake. In a recent separate publication we have shown that boron regulates one such iron transport related protein, i.e. the periplasmic iron binding protein FbpA via a direct interaction of the metalloid with this protein. Here we show that a number of other iron uptake related genes are also affected by boron but in the opposite way i.e. they are up-regulated. We propose that the differential effect of boron on FbpA expression relative to other iron transport related genes is a result of an interaction between boron and the global iron regulatory protein Fur.

  18. A new κ-carrageenase CgkS from marine bacterium Shewanella sp. Kz7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linna; Li, Shangyong; Zhang, Shilong; Li, Jiejing; Yu, Wengong; Gong, Qianhong

    2015-08-01

    A new κ-carrageenase gene cgkS was cloned from marine bacterium Shewanella sp. Kz7 by using degenerate and site-finding PCR. The gene was comprised of an open reading frame of 1224 bp, encoding 407 amino acid residues, with a signal peptide of 24 residues. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, the κ-carrageenase CgkS was classified into the Glycoside Hydrolase family 16. The cgkS gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified to homogeneity with a specific activity of 716.8 U mg-1 and a yield of 69%. Recombinant CgkS was most active at 45°C and pH 8.0. It was stable at pH 6.0-9.0 and below 30°C. The enzyme did not require NaCl for activity, although its activity was enhanced by NaCl. CgkS degraded κ-carrageenan in an endo-fashion releasing tetrasaccharides and disaccharides as main hydrolysis products.

  19. Three alginate lyases from marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens HZJ216: purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Li, Liyan; Jiang, Xiaolu; Guan, Huashi; Wang, Peng; Guo, Hong

    2011-06-01

    Three alginate lyases (A, B, and C) from an alginate-degrading marine bacterium strain HZJ216 isolated from brown seaweed in the Yellow Sea of China and identified preliminarily as Pseudomonas fluorescens are purified, and their biochemical properties are described. Molecular masses of the three enzymes are determined by SDS-PAGE to be 60.25, 36, and 23 kDa with isoelectric points of 4, 4.36, and 4.59, respectively. Investigations of these enzymes at different pH and temperatures show that they are most active at pH 7.0 and 35 °C. Alginate lyases A and B are stable in the pH range of 5.0-9.0, while alginate lyase C is stable in the pH range of 5.0-7.0. Among the metal ions tested, additions of Na(+), K(+), and Mg(2+) ions can enhance the enzyme activities while Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Ba(2+), and Zn(2+) ions show inhibitory effects. The substrate specificity results demonstrate that alginate lyase C has the specificity for G block while alginate lyases A and B have the activities for both M and G blocks. It is the first report about extracellular alginate lyases with high alginate-degrading activity from P. fluorescens.

  20. Genome shuffling of marine derived bacterium Nocardia sp. ALAA 2000 for improved ayamycin production.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, Mervat M A; El-Bondkly, Ahmed M A

    2011-05-01

    Genome shuffling is a recent development in microbiology. The advantage of this technique is that genetic changes can be made in a microorganism without knowing its genetic background. Genome shuffling was applied to the marine derived bacterium Nocardia sp. ALAA 2000 to achieve rapid improvement of ayamycin production. The initial mutant population was generated by treatment with ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) combined with UV irradiation of the spores, resulting in an improved population (AL/11, AL/136, AL/213 and AL/277) producing tenfold (150 μg/ml) more ayamycin than the original strain. These mutants were used as the starting strains for three rounds of genome shuffling and after each round improved strains were screened and selected based on their ayamycin productivity. The population after three rounds of genome shuffling exhibited an improved ayamycin yield. Strain F3/22 yielded 285 μg/ml of ayamycin, which was 19-fold higher than that of the initial strain and 1.9-fold higher than the mutants used as the starting point for genome shuffling. We evaluated the genetic effect of UV + EMS-mutagenesis and three rounds of genome shuffling on the nucleotide sequence by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. Many differences were noticed in mutant and recombinant strains compared to the wild type strain. These differences in RAPD profiles confirmed the presence of genetic variations in the Nocardia genome after mutagenesis and genome shuffling.

  1. Copper-induced production of copper-binding supernatant proteins by the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Sears, V.; Gordon, A.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus is temporarily inhibited by micromolar levels of copper. During the copper-induced lag phase, supernatant compounds and detoxify copper are produced. In this study two copper-inducible supernatant proteins having molecular masses of ca. 21 and 19 kilodaltons (CuBP1 and CuPB2) were identified; these proteins were, respectively, 25 and 46 times amplified in supernatants of copper-challenged cultures compared with controls. Experiments in which chloramphenicol was added to cultures indicated that there was de novo synthesis of these proteins in response to copper. When supernatants were separated by gel permeation chromatography, CuBP1 and CuPB2 coeluted with a copper-induced peak in copper-binding activity. CuBP1 and CuBP2 from whole supernatants were concentrated and partially purified by using a copper-charged immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography column, confirming the affinity of these proteins for copper. A comparison of cell pellets and supernatants demonstrated that CuBP1 was more concentrated in supernatants than in cells. Our data are consistent with a model for a novel mechanism of copper detoxification in which excretion of copper-binding protein is induced by copper.

  2. Thalassospira xianhensis sp. nov., a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baisuo; Wang, Hui; Li, Ruirui; Mao, Xinwei

    2010-05-01

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium, designated strain P-4(T), was isolated from oil-polluted saline soil in Xianhe, Shangdong Province, China. Strain P-4(T) was Gram-negative-staining with curved to spiral rod-shaped cells and grew optimally with 3-6 % (w/v) NaCl and at 30 degrees C. The predominant fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega7c (35.0 %), C(16 : 0) (25.0 %), C(16 : 1)omega7c (17.9 %), C(14 : 0) (6.2 %) and C(17 : 0) cyclo (5.2 %). The major respiratory quinone was Q-9 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 61.2+/-1.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain P-4(T) belonged to the genus Thalassospira of the class Alphaproteobacteria. DNA-DNA hybridization with Thalassospira xiamenensis DSM 17429(T) showed relatedness of 36.0 %, and lower values were obtained with respect to other Thalassospira species. Based on physiological and biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis as well as DNA-DNA relatedness, strain P-4(T) should be placed in the genus Thalassospira within a novel species. The name Thalassospira xianhensis sp. nov. is proposed, with P-4(T) (=CGMCC 1.6849(T) =JCM 14850(T)) as the type strain.

  3. Iridescence of a Marine Bacterium and Classification of Prokaryotic Structural Colors

    PubMed Central

    Vukusic, Peter; Luke, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Iridescence is a property of structural color that is occasionally encountered in higher eukaryotes but that has been poorly documented in the prokaryotic kingdom. In the present work, we describe a marine bacterium, identified as Cellulophaga lytica, isolated from the surface of an anemone, that exhibits bright green iridescent colonies under direct epi-illumination. This phenomenon has not previously been investigated in detail. In this study, color changes of C. lytica colonies were observed at various angles of direct illumination or observation. Its iridescent green appearance was dominant on various growth media. Red and violet colors were also discerned on colony edges. Remarkable C. lytica bacterial iridescence was revealed and characterized using high-resolution optical spectrometry. In addition to this, by culturing other bacterial strains to which various forms of faintly iridescent traits have previously been attributed, we identify four principal appearance characteristics of structural color in prokaryotes. A new general classification of bacterial iridescence is therefore proposed in this study. Furthermore, a specific separate class is described for iridescent C. lytica strains because they exhibit what is so far a unique intense glitter-like iridescence in reflection. C. lytica is the first prokaryote discovered to produce the same sort of intense iridescence under direct illumination as that associated with higher eukaryotes, like some insects and birds. Due to the nature of bacterial biology, cultivation, and ubiquity, this discovery may be of significant interest for both ecological and nanoscience endeavors. PMID:22267664

  4. Thalassospira povalilytica sp. nov., a polyvinyl-alcohol-degrading marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Yuichi; Yoshizumi, Masaki; Miyazaki, Masayuki

    2014-04-01

    A polyvinyl-alcohol-degrading marine bacterium was isolated from plastic rope litter found in Tokyo Bay, Japan. The isolated strain, Zumi 95(T), was a Gram-reaction-negative, non-spore-forming and facultatively anaerobic chemo-organotroph. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The predominant fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolated strain was closely affiliated with members of the genus Thalassospira in the class Alphaproteobacteria. The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 55.1 mol%. The hybridization values for DNA-DNA relatedness between this strain and four reference strains representing species of the genus Thalassospira were significantly lower than that accepted as the phylogenetic definition of a species. On the basis of differences in taxonomic characteristics, the isolated strain represents a novel species of the genus Thalassospira for which the name Thalassospira povalilytica sp. nov. (type strain Zumi 95(T) = JCM 18746(T) = DSM 26719(T)) is proposed.

  5. Genome Sequence of Nitratireductor basaltis Strain UMTGB225, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from a Green Barrel Tunicate in Bidong Island, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Huan You; Gan, Han Ming; Saari, Nur Azna; Usup, Gires

    2014-01-01

    Nitratireductor basaltis strain UMTGB225 is a Gram-negative bacterium isolated from a marine tunicate found in Bidong Island, Terengganu, Malaysia. In this study, the genome of Nitratireductor basaltis UMTGB225 was sequenced to gain insight into the role of this bacterium and its association with tunicate hosts in a coral reef habitat. PMID:25301654

  6. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Fuciman, Marcel; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Frank, Harry A.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2011-10-08

    The light-harvesting complex 2 from the thermophilic purple bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum was purified and studied by steady-state absorption and fluorescence, sub-nanosecond-time-resolved fluorescence and femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The measurements were performed at room temperature and at 10 K. The combination of both ultrafast and steady-state optical spectroscopy methods at ambient and cryogenic temperatures allowed the detailed study of carotenoid (Car)-to-bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) as well BChl-to-BChl excitation energy transfer in the complex. The studies show that the dominant Cars rhodopin (N = 11) and spirilloxanthin (N = 13) do not play a significant role as supportive energy donors for BChl a. This is related with their photophysical properties regulated by long π-electron conjugation. On the other hand, such properties favor some of the Cars, particularly spirilloxanthin (N = 13) to play the role of the direct quencher of the excited singlet state of BChl.

  7. The metagenome of the marine anammox bacterium ‘Candidatus Scalindua profunda’ illustrates the versatility of this globally important nitrogen cycle bacterium

    PubMed Central

    van de Vossenberg, Jack; Woebken, Dagmar; Maalcke, Wouter J; Wessels, Hans J C T; Dutilh, Bas E; Kartal, Boran; Janssen-Megens, Eva M; Roeselers, Guus; Yan, Jia; Speth, Daan; Gloerich, Jolein; Geerts, Wim; van der Biezen, Erwin; Pluk, Wendy; Francoijs, Kees-Jan; Russ, Lina; Lam, Phyllis; Malfatti, Stefanie A; Tringe, Susannah Green; Haaijer, Suzanne C M; Op den Camp, Huub J M; Stunnenberg, Henk G; Amann, Rudi; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Jetten, Mike S M

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria are responsible for a significant portion of the loss of fixed nitrogen from the oceans, making them important players in the global nitrogen cycle. To date, marine anammox bacteria found in marine water columns and sediments worldwide belong almost exclusively to the ‘Candidatus Scalindua’ species, but the molecular basis of their metabolism and competitive fitness is presently unknown. We applied community sequencing of a marine anammox enrichment culture dominated by ‘Candidatus Scalindua profunda’ to construct a genome assembly, which was subsequently used to analyse the most abundant gene transcripts and proteins. In the S. profunda assembly, 4756 genes were annotated, and only about half of them showed the highest identity to the only other anammox bacterium of which a metagenome assembly had been constructed so far, the freshwater ‘Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis’. In total, 2016 genes of S. profunda could not be matched to the K. stuttgartiensis metagenome assembly at all, and a similar number of genes in K. stuttgartiensis could not be found in S. profunda. Most of these genes did not have a known function but 98 expressed genes could be attributed to oligopeptide transport, amino acid metabolism, use of organic acids and electron transport. On the basis of the S. profunda metagenome, and environmental metagenome data, we observed pronounced differences in the gene organization and expression of important anammox enzymes, such as hydrazine synthase (HzsAB), nitrite reductase (NirS) and inorganic nitrogen transport proteins. Adaptations of Scalindua to the substrate limitation of the ocean may include highly expressed ammonium, nitrite and oligopeptide transport systems and pathways for the transport, oxidation, and assimilation of small organic compounds that may allow a more versatile lifestyle contributing to the competitive fitness of Scalindua in the marine realm. PMID:22568606

  8. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Complex Agarolytic Enzyme System from the Marine Bacterium Zobellia galactanivorans*

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Correc, Gaëlle; Thomas, François; Bernard, Thomas; Barbeyron, Tristan; Jam, Murielle; Helbert, William; Michel, Gurvan; Czjzek, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Zobellia galactanivorans is an emerging model bacterium for the bioconversion of algal biomass. Notably, this marine Bacteroidetes possesses a complex agarolytic system comprising four β-agarases and five β-porphyranases, all belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 16. Although β-agarases are specific for the neutral agarobiose moieties, the recently discovered β-porphyranases degrade the sulfated polymers found in various quantities in natural agars. Here, we report the biochemical and structural comparison of five β-porphyranases and β-agarases from Z. galactanivorans. The respective degradation patterns of two β-porphyranases and three β-agarases are analyzed by their action on defined hybrid oligosaccharides. In light of the high resolution crystal structures, the biochemical results allowed a detailed mapping of substrate specificities along the active site groove of the enzymes. Although PorA displays a strict requirement for C6-sulfate in the −2- and +1-binding subsites, PorB tolerates the presence of 3–6-anhydro-l-galactose in subsite −2. Both enzymes do not accept methylation of the galactose unit in the −1 subsite. The β-agarase AgaD requires at least four consecutive agarose units (DP8) and is highly intolerant to modifications, whereas for AgaB oligosaccharides containing C6-sulfate groups at the −4, +1, and +3 positions are still degraded. Together with a transcriptional analysis of the expression of these enzymes, the structural and biochemical results allow proposition of a model scheme for the agarolytic system of Z. galactanivorans. PMID:22778272

  9. DMSP: tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase from the marine sulfate-reducing bacterium strain WN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, M.; Hansen, T. A.

    2000-08-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an important compatible solute of many marine algae, can be metabolised by bacteria via cleavage to dimethylsulfide and acrylate or via an initial demethylation. This is the first report on the purification of an enzyme that specifically catalyses the demethylation of DMSP. The enzyme was isolated from the sulfate-reducing bacterium strain WN, which grows on DMSP and demethylates it to methylthiopropionate. DMSP:tetrahydrofolate (THF) methyltransferase from strain WN was purified 76-fold [to a specific activity of 40.5 μmol min -1 (mg protein) -1]. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed two bands of approximately 10 and 35 kDa; in particular the 35 kDa polypeptide became significantly enriched during the purification. Storage of the purified fraction at -20°C under nitrogen resulted in a 99% loss of activity in two days. The activity could be partially restored by addition of 200 μM cyanocobalamin, hydroxocobalamin or coenzyme B 12. ATP did not have any positive effect on activity. Reduction of the assay mixture by titanium(III)nitrilotriacetic acid slightly stimulated the activity. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a native molecular mass between 45 and 60 kDa for the DMSP:THF methyltransferase. The enzyme was most active at 35°C and pH 7.8. Glycine betaine, which can be considered an N-containing structural analogue of DMSP, did not serve as a methyl donor for DMSP:THF methyltransferase. Various sulfur-containing DMSP-analogues were tested but only methylethylsulfoniopropionate served as methyl donor. None of these compounds inhibited methyl transfer from DMSP to THF. Strain WN did not grow on any of the sulfur-containing DMSP-analogues.

  10. A Comparative biochemical study on two marine endophytes, Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS, Isolated from red sea algae.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Eman Fadl; Hassan, Hossam Mokhtar; Rateb, Mostafa Ezzat; Abdel-Wahab, Noha; Sameer, Somayah; Aly Taie, Hanan Anwar; Abdel-Hameed, Mohammed Sayed; Hammouda, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Two marine endophytic bacteria were isolated from the Red Sea algae; a red alga; Acanthophora dendroides and the brown alga Sargassum sabrepandum. The isolates were identified based on their 16SrRNA sequences as Bacterium SRCnm and Bacillus sp. JS. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential anti-microbial and antioxidant activities of the extracts of the isolated bacteria grown in different nutrient conditions. Compared to amoxicillin (25μg/disk) and erythromycin (15μg/disk), the extracts of Bacterium SRCn min media II, III, IV and V were potent inhibitors of the gram-positive bacterium Sarcina maxima even at low concentrations. Also, the multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was more sensitive to the metabolites produced in medium (II) of the same endophyte than erythromycin (15μg/disk). A moderate activity of the Bacillus sp. JS extracts of media I and II was obtained against the same pathogen. The total compounds (500ug/ml) of both isolated endophytes showed moderate antioxidant activities (48.9% and 46.1%, respectively). LC/MS analysis of the bacterial extracts was carried out to investigate the likely natural products produced. Cyclo(D-cis-Hyp-L-Leu), dihydrosphingosine and 2-Amino-1,3-hexadecanediol were identified in the fermentation medium of Bacterium SRCnm, whereas cyclo (D-Pro-L-Tyr) and cyclo (L-Leu-L-Pro) were the suggested compounds of Bacillus sp. JS.

  11. Trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide are supplementary energy sources for a marine heterotrophic bacterium: implications for marine carbon and nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Lidbury, Ian D E A; Murrell, J Colin; Chen, Yin

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria of the marine Roseobacter clade are characterised by their ability to utilise a wide range of organic and inorganic compounds to support growth. Trimethylamine (TMA) and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) are methylated amines (MA) and form part of the dissolved organic nitrogen pool, the second largest source of nitrogen after N2 gas, in the oceans. We investigated if the marine heterotrophic bacterium, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, could utilise TMA and TMAO as a supplementary energy source and whether this trait had any beneficial effect on growth. In R. pomeroyi, catabolism of TMA and TMAO resulted in the production of intracellular ATP which in turn helped to enhance growth rate and growth yield as well as enhancing cell survival during prolonged energy starvation. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of two different exogenous energy sources led to a greater enhancement of chemoorganoheterotrophic growth. The use of TMA and TMAO primarily as an energy source resulted in the remineralisation of nitrogen in the form of ammonium, which could cross feed into another bacterium. This study provides greater insight into the microbial metabolism of MAs in the marine environment and how it may affect both nutrient flow within marine surface waters and the flux of these climatically important compounds into the atmosphere.

  12. Trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide are supplementary energy sources for a marine heterotrophic bacterium: implications for marine carbon and nitrogen cycling

    PubMed Central

    Lidbury, Ian DEA; Murrell, J Colin; Chen, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria of the marine Roseobacter clade are characterised by their ability to utilise a wide range of organic and inorganic compounds to support growth. Trimethylamine (TMA) and trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) are methylated amines (MA) and form part of the dissolved organic nitrogen pool, the second largest source of nitrogen after N2 gas, in the oceans. We investigated if the marine heterotrophic bacterium, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, could utilise TMA and TMAO as a supplementary energy source and whether this trait had any beneficial effect on growth. In R. pomeroyi, catabolism of TMA and TMAO resulted in the production of intracellular ATP which in turn helped to enhance growth rate and growth yield as well as enhancing cell survival during prolonged energy starvation. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of two different exogenous energy sources led to a greater enhancement of chemoorganoheterotrophic growth. The use of TMA and TMAO primarily as an energy source resulted in the remineralisation of nitrogen in the form of ammonium, which could cross feed into another bacterium. This study provides greater insight into the microbial metabolism of MAs in the marine environment and how it may affect both nutrient flow within marine surface waters and the flux of these climatically important compounds into the atmosphere. PMID:25148480

  13. Coupling of cytochrome and quinone turnovers in the photocycle of reaction centers from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Osváth, S; Maróti, P

    1997-01-01

    A minimal kinetic model of the photocycle, including both quinone (Q-6) reduction at the secondary quinone-binding site and (mammalian) cytochrome c oxidation at the cytochrome docking site of isolated reaction centers from photosynthetic purple bacteria Rhodobacter sphaeroides, was elaborated and tested by cytochrome photooxidation under strong continuous illumination. The typical rate of photochemical excitation by a laser diode at 810 nm was 2.200 s-1, and the rates of stationary turnover of the reaction center (one-half of that of cytochrome photooxidation) were 600 +/- 70 s-1 at pH 6 and 400 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 8. The rate of turnover showed strong pH dependence, indicating the contribution of different rate-limiting processes. The kinetic limitation of the photocycle was attributed to the turnover of the cytochrome c binding site (pH < 6), light intensity and quinone/quinol exchange (6 < pH < 8), and proton-coupled second electron transfer in the quinone acceptor complex (pH > 8). The analysis of the double-reciprocal plot of the rate of turnover versus light intensity has proved useful in determining the light-independent (maximum) turnover rate of the reaction center (445 +/- 50 s-1 at pH 7.8). PMID:9251814

  14. Flux coupling and transcriptional regulation within the metabolic network of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Montagud, Arnau; Zelezniak, Aleksej; Navarro, Emilio; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández; Urchueguía, Javier F; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2011-03-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 is a model cyanobacterium capable of producing biofuels with CO(2) as carbon source and with its metabolism fueled by light, for which it stands as a potential production platform of socio-economic importance. Compilation and characterization of Synechocystis genome-scale metabolic model is a pre-requisite toward achieving a proficient photosynthetic cell factory. To this end, we report iSyn811, an upgraded genome-scale metabolic model of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 consisting of 956 reactions and accounting for 811 genes. To gain insights into the interplay between flux activities and metabolic physiology, flux coupling analysis was performed for iSyn811 under four different growth conditions, viz., autotrophy, mixotrophy, heterotrophy, and light-activated heterotrophy (LH). Initial steps of carbon acquisition and catabolism formed the versatile center of the flux coupling networks, surrounded by a stable core of pathways leading to biomass building blocks. This analysis identified potential bottlenecks for hydrogen and ethanol production. Integration of transcriptomic data with the Synechocystis flux coupling networks lead to identification of reporter flux coupling pairs and reporter flux coupling groups - regulatory hot spots during metabolic shifts triggered by the availability of light. Overall, flux coupling analysis provided insight into the structural organization of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 metabolic network toward designing of a photosynthesis-based production platform. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Presence of exclusively bacteriochlorophyll-c containing substrain in the culture of green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme strain NCIB 8327 producing bacteriochlorophyll-d.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Oh-oka, Hirozo; Hayashi, Takashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2003-12-01

    The light-dependent composition change of light harvesting bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)s in the present culture of a green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium (Chl.) vibrioforme f. sp. thiosulfatophilum strain NCIB 8327 was investigated by visible absorption spectroscopy and HPLC analyses. When the culture was repeatedly grown in liquid media under a low light condition, both the Soret and Qy absorption bands of the in vivo spectrum were shifted to longer wavelengths. Analysis of the extracted pigments by HPLC revealed that the ratio of the amount of BChl-c to that of BChl-d molecules gradually increased during repeated cultivation. In contrast, when the culture grown under a low light intensity was transferred to a high light condition and continued to be grown, the absorption bands were shifted to shorter wavelengths and the ratio of BChls-c/d decreased finally to the almost original value. Colonies were prepared on solid agar media from the liquid culture containing both BChls-c and d, which was grown under a low light intensity. Each colony obtained was found to contain either BChl-c or d, but not both of them. Two types of cells isolated in this study were derived from the same clone, judged from their genetic analyses. The variation of pigment composition in our liquid culture observed here could be ascribed to the difference of growth rates between two substrains containing BChl-c and BChl-d, respectively, depending on light conditions.

  16. Polarization angle dependence of stark absorption spectra of spirilloxanthin bound to the reconstituted LH1 complexes using LH1-subunits isolated from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomoko; Nakagawa, Katsunori; Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Ritsuko; Cogdell, Richard J; Nango, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Reconstituted LH1 complexes were prepared using the LH1 subunit-type complexes, isolated from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum (Rs.) rubrum, and purified all-trans spirilloxanthin. Stark absorption spectra of spirilloxanthin bound to both the native and reconstituted LH1 complexes were compared in different polarization angles (χ) against the external electric field. From the polarization angle dependence of the Stark absorption spectra, two angles were determined in reference to the direction of transition dipole moment (m) of spirilloxanthin: one is the change in polarizability upon photoexcitation (Δα), θ(Δα) and the other is the change in static dipole moment upon photoexcitation (Δμ), θ(Δμ). Despite the symmetric molecular structure of all-trans spirilloxanthin, its Stark absorption spectra show pronounced values of Δμ. This large Δμ values essentially caused by the effect of induced dipole moment through Δα both in the cases for native and reconstituted LH1 complexes. However, slightly different values of θ(Δα) and θ(Δμ) observed for the native LH1 complex suggest that spirilloxanthin is asymmetrically distorted when bound to the native LH1 complex and gives rise to intrinsic Δμ value.

  17. Specific Ca2+-binding motif in the LH1 complex from photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum as revealed by optical spectroscopy and structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Kimura, Yukihiro; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang, Peng; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Ping

    2009-03-01

    Native and Ca(2+)-depleted light-harvesting-reaction center core complexes (LH1-RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum exhibit maximal LH1-Q(y) absorption at 915 and 889 nm, respectively. To understand the structural origins of the spectral variation, we performed spectroscopic and structure modeling investigations. For the 889 nm form of LH1-RC, bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) in the native form was found by means of near-infrared Fourier-transform Raman spectroscopy, a higher degree of macrocycle distortion and a stronger hydrogen bond with the beta-Trp(-8) residue. SWISS-MODEL structure modeling suggests the presence of a specific coordination motif of Ca(2+) at the C-terminus of the alpha-subunit of LH1, while MODELLER reveals the tilt of alpha- and beta-polypeptides with reference to the structural template, as well as a change in the concentric orientation of BChl a molecules, both of which may be connected to the long-wavelength LH1-Q(y) absorption of the 915 nm form. The carotenoid spirilloxanthin shows a twisted all-trans configuration in both forms of LH1 as evidenced by the resonance Raman spectroscopic results. With regard to the thermal stability, the 915 nm form was shown by the use of temperature-dependent fluorescence spectroscopy to be approximately 20 K more stable than the 889 nm form, which may be ascribed to the specific Ca(2+)-binding motif of LH1.

  18. Excitation energy transfer in the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus: A specific effect of 1-hexanol on the optical properties of baseplate and energy transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Mimuro, M; Nishimura, Y; Yamazaki, I; Kobayashi, M; Wang, Z Y; Nozawa, T; Shimada, K; Matsuura, K

    1996-05-01

    The effect of 1-hexanol on spectral properties and the processes of energy transfer of the green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was investigated with reference to the baseplate region. On addition of 1-hexanol to a cell suspension in a concentration of one-fourth saturation, a specific change in the baseplate region was induced: that is, a bleach of the 793-nm component, and an increase in absorption of the 813-nm component. This result was also confirmed by fluorescence spectra of whole cells and isolated chlorosomes. The processes of energy transfer were affected in the overall transfer efficiency but not kinetically, indicating that 1-hexanol suppressed the flux of energy flow from the baseplate to the B806-866 complexes in the cytoplasmic membranes. The fluorescence excitation spectrum suggests a specific site of interaction between bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c with a maximum at 771 nm in the rod elements and BChl a with a maximum at 793 nm in the baseplate, which is a funnel for a fast transfer of energy to the B806-866 complexes in the membranes. The absorption spectrum of chlorosomes was resolved to components consistently on the basis, including circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism spectra; besides two major BChl c forms, bands corresponding to tetramer, dimer, and monomer were also discernible, which are supposed to be intermediary components for a higher order structure. A tentative model for the antenna system of C. aurantiacus is proposed.

  19. Genome sequence of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3, an agarolytic marine bacterium metabolizing 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose as a sole carbon source.

    PubMed

    Roh, Hanseong; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Saeyoung; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Byung-Yong; Song, Heesang; Lim, Kwang-il; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2012-05-01

    The metabolic fate of 3,6-anhydro-L-galactose (L-AHG) is unknown in the global marine carbon cycle. Vibrio sp. strain EJY3 is an agarolytic marine bacterium that can utilize L-AHG as a sole carbon source. To elucidate the metabolic pathways of L-AHG, we have sequenced the complete genome of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3.

  20. H2 metabolism in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata: production and utilization of H2 by resting cells.

    PubMed

    Hillmer, P; Gest, H

    1977-02-01

    Photoproduction of H2 and activation of H2 for CO2 reduction (photoreduction) by Rhodopseudomonas capsulata are catalyzed by different enzyme systems. Formation of H2 from organic compounds is mediated by nitrogenase and is nto inhibited by an atmosphere of 99% H2. Cells grown photoheterotrophically on C4 dicarboxylic acids (with glutamate as N source) evolve H2 from the C4 acids and also from lactate and pyruvate; cells grown on C3 carbon sources, however, are inactive with the C4 acids, presumably because they lack inducible transport systems. Ammonia is known to inhibit N2 fixation by photosynthetic bacteria, and it also effectively prevents photoproduction of H2; these effects are due to inhibition and, in part, inactivation of nitrogenase. Biosynthesis of the latter, as measured by both H2 production and acetylene reduction assays, is markedly increased when cells are grown at high light intensity; synthesis of the photoreduction system, on the other hand, is not appreciably influenced by light intensity during photoheterotrophic growth. The photoreduction activity of cells grown on lactate + glutamate (which contain active nitrogenase) is greatly activated by NH4+, but this effect is not observed in cells grown with NH4+ as N source (nitrogenase repressed) or in a Nif- mutant that is unable to produce H2. Lactate, malate, and succinate, which are readily used as growth substrates by R. capsulata and are excellent H donors for photoproduction of H2, abolish photoreduction activity. The physiological significances of this phenomenon and of the reciprocal regulatory effects of NH4+ on H2 production and photoreduction are discussed.

  1. H2 metabolism in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata: production and utilization of H2 by resting cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hillmer, P; Gest, H

    1977-01-01

    Photoproduction of H2 and activation of H2 for CO2 reduction (photoreduction) by Rhodopseudomonas capsulata are catalyzed by different enzyme systems. Formation of H2 from organic compounds is mediated by nitrogenase and is nto inhibited by an atmosphere of 99% H2. Cells grown photoheterotrophically on C4 dicarboxylic acids (with glutamate as N source) evolve H2 from the C4 acids and also from lactate and pyruvate; cells grown on C3 carbon sources, however, are inactive with the C4 acids, presumably because they lack inducible transport systems. Ammonia is known to inhibit N2 fixation by photosynthetic bacteria, and it also effectively prevents photoproduction of H2; these effects are due to inhibition and, in part, inactivation of nitrogenase. Biosynthesis of the latter, as measured by both H2 production and acetylene reduction assays, is markedly increased when cells are grown at high light intensity; synthesis of the photoreduction system, on the other hand, is not appreciably influenced by light intensity during photoheterotrophic growth. The photoreduction activity of cells grown on lactate + glutamate (which contain active nitrogenase) is greatly activated by NH4+, but this effect is not observed in cells grown with NH4+ as N source (nitrogenase repressed) or in a Nif- mutant that is unable to produce H2. Lactate, malate, and succinate, which are readily used as growth substrates by R. capsulata and are excellent H donors for photoproduction of H2, abolish photoreduction activity. The physiological significances of this phenomenon and of the reciprocal regulatory effects of NH4+ on H2 production and photoreduction are discussed. PMID:838686

  2. Cyclobacterium qasimii sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from Arctic marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Shivaji, S; Reddy, P Vishnu Vardhan; Rao, S S S Nageshwara; Begum, Zareena; Manasa, Poorna; Srinivas, T N R

    2012-09-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, horseshoe-shaped, non-motile bacterium, designated strain M12-11B(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected at a depth of 200 m from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard. The colony colour was orangish red due to the presence of carotenoids. Fatty acids were dominated by branched and unsaturated fatty acids (90.8 %), with a high abundance of iso-C(15 : 0) (14.9 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (11.4 %), iso-C(15 : 1) G (13.1 %), C(15 : 1)ω6c (5.4 %), C(17 : 1)ω6c (6.7 %), summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)ω7c and/or C(16 : 1)ω6c; 9.3 %) and summed feature 9 (10-methyl C(16 : 0) and/or iso-C(17 : 1)ω9c; 5.9 %). Strain M12-11B(T) contained MK-7 as the major respiratory quinone. The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid and three unidentified lipids. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, the type strains of Cyclobacterium amurskyense, Cyclobacterium marinum and Cyclobacterium lianum were most closely related to M12-11B(T) with sequence similarities of 98.2, 96.8 and 93.3 %, respectively. Other members of the family Cyclobacteriaceae had sequence similarities of <92.0 %. However, DNA-DNA hybridization with Cyclobacterium amurskyense KCTC 12363(T) and Cyclobacterium marinum DSM 745(T) showed relatedness values of only 24.5 and 32.5 % with respect to strain M12-11B(T). Based on the results of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments and phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data, it appears that strain M12-11B(T) represents a novel species of the genus Cyclobacterium, for which the name Cyclobacterium qasimii sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is M12-11B(T) (= KCTC 23011(T) = NBRC 106168(T)) and it has a DNA G+C content of 40.5 mol%.

  3. C3 and C4 pathways of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in marine diatoms are under genetic, not environmental, control.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Karen; Granum, Espen; Leegood, Richard C; Raven, John A

    2007-09-01

    Marine diatoms are responsible for up to 20% of global CO(2) fixation. Their photosynthetic efficiency is enhanced by concentrating CO(2) around Rubisco, diminishing photorespiration, but the mechanism is yet to be resolved. Diatoms have been regarded as C(3) photosynthesizers, but recent metabolic labeling and genome sequencing data suggest that they perform C(4) photosynthesis. We studied the pathways of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in two diatoms by short-term metabolic (14)C labeling. In Thalassiosira weissflogii, both C3 (glycerate-P and triose-P) and C4 (mainly malate) compounds were major initial (2-5 s) products, whereas Thalassiosira pseudonana produced mainly C3 and C6 (hexose-P) compounds. The data provide evidence of C(3)-C(4) intermediate photosynthesis in T. weissflogii, but exclusively C(3) photosynthesis in T. pseudonana. The labeling patterns were the same for cells grown at near-ambient (380 microL L(-1)) and low (100 microL L(-1)) CO(2) concentrations. The lack of environmental modulation of carbon assimilatory pathways was supported in T. pseudonana by measurements of gene transcript and protein abundances of C(4)-metabolic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) and Rubisco. This study suggests that the photosynthetic pathways of diatoms are diverse, and may involve combined CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms. Furthermore, it emphasizes the requirement for metabolic and functional genetic and enzymic analyses before accepting the presence of C(4)-metabolic enzymes as evidence for C(4) photosynthesis.

  4. Photoinhibition of Phaeocystis globosa resulting from oxidative stress induced by a marine algicidal bacterium Bacillus sp. LP-10

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Chengwei; Guo, Xiaoyun; Li, Yi; Zhang, Huajun; Lei, Xueqian; Cai, Guanjing; Guo, Jiajia; Yu, Zhiming; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms caused by Phaeocystis globosa have resulted in staggering losses to coastal countries because of their world-wide distribution. Bacteria have been studied for years to control the blooms of harmful alga, however, the action mechanism of them against harmful algal cells is still not well defined. Here, a previously isolated algicidal bacterium Bacillus sp. LP-10 was used to elucidate the potential mechanism involved in the dysfunction of P. globosa algal cells at physiological and molecular levels. Our results showed Bacillus sp. LP-10 induced an obvious rise of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was supposed to be major reason for algal cell death. Meanwhile, the results revealed a significant decrease of photosynthetic physiological indexes and apparent down-regulated of photosynthesis-related genes (psbA and rbcS) and protein (PSII reaction center protein D1), after treated by Bacillus sp. LP-10 filtrates, suggesting photoinhibition occurred in the algal cells. Furthermore, our results indicated that light played important roles in the algal cell death. Our work demonstrated that the major lethal reason of P. globosa cells treated by the algicidal bacterium was the photoinhibition resulted from oxidative stress induced by Bacillus sp. LP-10. PMID:26601700

  5. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of the halophilic marine bacterium Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Hayoung; Ro, Hyun-Joo; Jun, Sangmi; Kwon, Yong Min; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Sang-Jin; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2017-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a Gram-negative halophilic marine bacterium able to utilize several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. In this study, using transmission electron microscopy, we confirmed that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). N. pentaromativorans OMVs (hereafter OMVNovo) are spherical in shape, and the average diameter of OMVNovo is 25-70 nm. Proteomic analysis revealed that outer membrane proteins and periplasmic proteins of N. pentaromativorans are the major protein components of OMVNovo. Comparative proteomic analysis with the membrane-associated protein fraction and correlation analysis demonstrated that the outer membrane proteins of OMVNovo originated from the membrane- associated protein fraction. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize OMV purified from halophilic marine bacteria.

  6. Investigation of the mechanism of iron acquisition by the marine bacterium Alteromonas luteoviolaceus: Characterization of siderophore production

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.T.; Butler, A. )

    1991-12-01

    Iron availability in the ocean ranges from one to four orders of magnitude below typical growth requirements of bacteria. The discrepancy between Fe availability and requirements raises questions about the mechanisms that marine bacteria use to sequester Fe{sup 3+}. Surprisingly little is known about the siderophores produced by marine bacteria. Growth conditions of an open-ocean bacterial isolate, Alteromonas luteoviolaceus, were investigated to determine the conditions which enhance siderophore production. Methods to isolate and purify the siderophores were determined. The siderophores produced by A. luteoviolaceus were partially characterized by mass spectral analysis, amino acid analysis, qualitative analytical tests, chemical degradation, and nuclear magnetic resonance. A new set of outer membrane proteins was also produced when the bacterium was grown under Fe-limited conditions.

  7. Thiocapsa marina sp. nov., a novel, okenone-containing, purple sulfur bacterium isolated from brackish coastal and marine environments.

    PubMed

    Caumette, Pierre; Guyoneaud, Remy; Imhoff, Johannes F; Süling, Jörg; Gorlenko, Vladimir

    2004-07-01

    Four marine, phototrophic, purple sulfur bacteria (strains 5811T, 5812, BM-3 and BS-1) were isolated in pure culture from different brackish to marine sediments in the Mediterranean Sea, the White Sea and the Black Sea. Single cells of these strains were coccus-shaped, non-motile and did not contain gas vesicles. The colour of cell suspensions that were grown in the light was purple-red. Bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoids of the okenone series were present as photosynthetic pigments. Photosynthetic membrane systems were of the vesicular type. Hydrogen sulfide, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur and molecular hydrogen were used as electron donors during photolithotrophic growth under anoxic conditions; carbon dioxide was utilized as the carbon source. During growth on sulfide, elemental sulfur globules were stored inside the cells. In the presence of hydrogen sulfide, several organic substances could be photoassimilated. Comparative 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed an affiliation of these four strains to the genus Thiocapsa. Both phylogenetic analysis and the results of DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that these strains formed a separate cluster within the genus Thiocapsa. Thus, according to phenotypic characteristics and mainly the carotenoid composition, 16S rDNA sequence analysis and DNA-DNA hybridization data, it is proposed that these strains should be classified as a novel species, Thiocapsa marina sp. nov., with strain 5811T (=DSM 5653T=ATCC 43172T) as the type strain.

  8. Engineered marine Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125: a promising micro-organism for the bioremediation of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Papa, R; Parrilli, E; Sannia, G

    2009-01-01

    The recombinant Antarctic Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 (P. haloplanktis TAC/tou) expressing toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) can efficiently convert several aromatic compounds into their corresponding catechols in a broad range of temperature. When the genome of P. haloplanktis TAC125 was analysed in silico, the presence of a DNA sequence coding for a putative laccase-like protein was revealed. It is well known that bacterial laccases are able to oxidize dioxygenated aromatic compounds such as catechols. We analysed the catabolic features, conferred by recombinant ToMO activity and the endogenous laccase enzymatic activity, of P. haloplanktis TAC/tou engineered strain and its ability to grow on aromatic compounds as sole carbon and energy sources. Results presented highlight the broad potentiality of P. haloplanktis TAC/tou cells expressing recombinant ToMO in bioremediation and suggest the use of this engineered Antarctic bacterium in the bioremediation of chemically contaminated marine environments and/or cold effluents. This paper demonstrates the possibility to confer new and specific degradative capabilities to a bacterium isolated from an unpolluted environment (Antarctic seawater) transforming it into a bacterium able to grow on phenol as sole carbon and energy source.

  9. Structure and organization of a 25 kbp region of the genome of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme containing Mg-chelatase encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B L; Møller, M G; Stummann, B M; Henningsen, K W

    1998-01-01

    A region comprising approximately 25 kbp of the genome of the strictly anaerobic and obligate photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme has been mapped, subcloned and partly sequenced. Approximately 15 kbp have been sequenced in it's entirety and three genes with significant homology and feature similarity to the bchI, -D and -H genes and the chlI, -D and -H genes of Rhodobacter and Synechocystis strain PCC6803, respectively, which encode magnesium chelatase subunits, have been identified. Magnesium chelatase catalyzes the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX, and is the first enzyme unique to the (bacterio)chlorophyll specific branch of the porphyrin biosynthetic pathway. The organization of the three Mg-chelatase encoding genes is unique to Chlorobium and suggests that the magnesium chelatase of C. vibrioforme is encoded by a single operon. The analyzed 25 kbp region contains five additional open reading frames, two of which display significant homology and feature similarity to genes encoding lipoamide dehydrogenase and genes with function in purine synthesis, and another three display significant homology to open reading frames with unknown function in distantly related bacteria. Putative E. coli sigma 70-like promoter sequences, ribosome binding sequences and rho-independent transcriptional stop signals within the sequenced 15 kbp region are related to the identified genes and orfs. Southern analysis, restriction mapping and partial sequencing of the remaining ca. 10 kbp of the analyzed 25 kbp region have shown that this part includes the hemA, -C, -D and -B genes (MOBERG and AVISSAR 1994), which encode enzymes with function in the early part of the biosynthetic pathway of porphyrins.

  10. A heterogeneous tag-attachment to the homodimeric type 1 photosynthetic reaction center core protein in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Azai, Chihiro; Kim, Kwang; Kondo, Toru; Harada, Jiro; Itoh, Shigeru; Oh-oka, Hirozo

    2011-07-01

    The 6xHis-tag-pscA gene, which was genetically engineered to express N-terminally histidine (His)-tagged PscA, was inserted into a coding region of the recA gene in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum (C. tepidum). Although the inactivation of the recA gene strongly suppressed a homologous recombination in C. tepidum genomic DNA, the mutant grew well under normal photosynthetic conditions. The His-tagged reaction center (RC) complex could be obtained simply by Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography after detergent solubilization of chlorosome-containing membranes. The complex consisted of three subunits, PscA, PscB, and PscC, in addition to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein, but there was no PscD. Low-temperature EPR spectroscopic studies in combination with transient absorption measurements indicated that the complex contained all intrinsic electron transfer cofactors as detected in the wild-type strain. Furthermore, the LC/MS/MS analysis revealed that the core protein consisted of a mixture of a His-/His-tagged PscA homodimer and a non-/His-tagged PscA heterodimer. The development of the pscA gene duplication method presented here, thus, enables not only a quick and large-scale preparation of the RC complex from C. tepidum but also site-directed mutagenesis experiments on the artificially incorporated 6xHis-tag-pscA gene itself, since the expression of the authentic PscA/PscA homodimeric RC complex could complement any defect in mutated His-tagged PscA. This method would provide an invaluable tool for structural and functional analyses of the homodimeric type 1 RC complex.

  11. Enrichment and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Nitrospira-Like Bacterium Obtained from a Marine Sponge ▿

    PubMed Central

    Off, Sandra; Alawi, Mashal; Spieck, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Members of the nitrite-oxidizing genus Nitrospira are most likely responsible for the second step of nitrification, the conversion of nitrite (NO2−) to nitrate (NO3−), within various sponges. We succeeded in obtaining an enrichment culture of Nitrospira derived from the mesohyl of the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba using a traditional cultivation approach. Electron microscopy gave first evidence of the shape and ultrastructure of this novel marine Nitrospira-like bacterium (culture Aa01). We characterized these bacteria physiologically with regard to optimal incubation conditions, especially the temperature and substrate range in comparison to other Nitrospira cultures. Best growth was obtained at temperatures between 28°C and 30°C in mineral medium with 70% North Sea water and a substrate concentration of 0.5 mM nitrite under microaerophilic conditions. The Nitrospira culture Aa01 is very sensitive against nitrite, because concentrations higher than 1.5 mM resulted in a complete inhibition of growth. Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA gene revealed that the novel Nitrospira-like bacterium is separated from the sponge-specific subcluster and falls together with an environmental clone from Mediterranean sediments (98.6% similarity). The next taxonomically described species Nitrospira marina is only distantly related, with 94.6% sequence similarity, and therefore the culture Aa01 represents a novel species of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:20511427

  12. Fermentation Products of Solvent Tolerant Marine Bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and Its Biotechnological Applications in Salicylic Acid Bioconversion

    PubMed Central

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N.; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3–8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9–12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment. PMID:24391802

  13. Fermentation products of solvent tolerant marine bacterium Moraxella spp. MB1 and its biotechnological applications in salicylic acid bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Wahidullah, Solimabi; Naik, Deepak N; Devi, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    As part of a proactive approach to environmental protection, emerging issues with potential impact on the environment is the subject of ongoing investigation. One emerging area of environmental research concerns pharmaceuticals like salicylic acid, which is the main metabolite of various analgesics including aspirin. It is a common component of sewage effluent and also an intermediate in the degradation pathway of various aromatic compounds which are introduced in the marine environment as pollutants. In this study, biotransformation products of salicylic acid by seaweed, Bryopsis plumosa, associated marine bacterium, Moraxella spp. MB1, have been investigated. Phenol, conjugates of phenol and hydroxy cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl, caffeoyl, feruloyl and trihydroxy cinnamyl) with salicylic acid (3-8) were identified as the bioconversion products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. These results show that the microorganism do not degrade phenolic acid but catalyses oxygen dependent transformations without ring cleavage. The degradation of salicylic acid is known to proceed either via gentisic acid pathway or catechol pathway but this is the first report of biotransformation of salicylic acid into cinnamates, without ring cleavage. Besides cinnamic acid derivatives (9-12), metabolites produced by the bacterium include antimicrobial indole (13) and β-carbolines, norharman (14), harman (15) and methyl derivative (16), which are beneficial to the host and the environment.

  14. Proteomic studies highlight outer-membrane proteins related to biofilm development in the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. D41.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Andrés; Com, Emmanuelle; Bazire, Alexis; Goncalves, Marina Dos Santos; Delage, Ludovic; Le Pennec, Gaël; Pineau, Charles; Dreanno, Catherine; Compère, Chantal; Dufour, Alain

    2012-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm development is conditioned by complex processes involving bacterial attachment to surfaces, growth, mobility, and exoproduct production. The marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain D41 is able to attach strongly onto a wide variety of substrates, which promotes subsequent biofilm development. Study of the outer-membrane and total soluble proteomes showed ten spots with significant intensity variations when this bacterium was grown in biofilm compared to planktonic cultures. MS/MS de novo sequencing analysis allowed the identification of four outer-membrane proteins of particular interest since they were strongly induced in biofilms. These proteins are homologous to a TonB-dependent receptor (TBDR), to the OmpW and OmpA porins, and to a type IV pilus biogenesis protein (PilF). Gene expression assays by quantitative RT-PCR showed that the four corresponding genes were upregulated during biofilm development on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants unable to produce any of the OmpW, OmpA, and PilF homologues yielded biofilms with lower biovolumes and altered architectures, confirming the involvement of these proteins in the biofilm formation process. Our results indicate that Pseudoalteromonas sp. D41 shares biofilm formation mechanisms with human pathogenic bacteria, but also relies on TBDR, which might be more specific to the marine environment. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. In vitro antiplasmodial activity of bacterium RJAUTHB 14 associated with marine sponge Haliclona Grant against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Jacob Inbaneson, Samuel; Ravikumar, Sundaram

    2012-06-01

    Malaria is the most important parasitic disease, leading to annual death of about one million people, and the Plasmodium falciparum develops resistance to well-established antimalarial drugs. The newest antiplasmodial drug from a marine microorganism helps in addressing this problem. In the present study, Haliclona Grant were collected and subjected for enumeration and isolation of associated bacteria. The count of bacterial isolates was maximum in November 2007 (18 × 10(4) colony-forming units (CFU) g(-1), and the average count was maximum during the monsoon season (117 × 10(3) CFU g(-1)). Thirty-three morphologically different bacterial isolates were isolated from Haliclona Grant, and the extracellular ethyl acetate extracts were screened for antiplasmodial activity against P. falciparum. The antiplasmodial activity of bacterium RJAUTHB 14 (11.98 μg[Symbol: see text]ml(-1)) is highly comparable with the positive control chloroquine (IC(50) 19.59 μg[Symbol: see text]ml(-1)), but the other 21 bacterial extracts showed an IC(50) value of more than 100 μg[Symbol: see text]ml(-1). Statistical analysis reveals that significant in vitro antiplasmodial activity (P < 0.05) was observed between the concentrations and time of exposure. The chemical injury to erythrocytes showed no morphological changes in erythrocytes by the ethyl acetate extract of bacterial isolates after 48 h of incubation. The in vitro antiplasmodial activity might be due to the presence of reducing sugars and alkaloids in the ethyl acetate extracts of bacterium RJAUTHB 14. The 16S rRNA gene partial sequence of bacterium RJAUTHB 14 is deposited in NCBI (GenBank accession no. GU269569). It is concluded from the present study that the ethyl acetate extracts of bacterium RJAUTHB 14 possess lead compounds for the development of antiplasmodial drugs.

  16. Yields, photosynthetic efficiencies, and proximate chemical composition of dense cultures of marine microalgae. A subcontract report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, W.H.; Seibert, D.L.R.; Alden, M.; Eldridge, P.; Neori, A.

    1983-07-01

    The yields, photosynthetic efficiencies, and proximate composition of several microalgae were compared in dense cultures grown at light intensities up to 70% sunlight. Yields ranged from 3.4 to 21.7 g dry weight/m/sup 2/ day. The highest yield was obtained with Phaeodactylum; the lowest in Botryococcus cultures. The same species had the highest and lowest efficiencies of utilization of photosynthetically active radiation. In nitrogen-sufficient cells of all but one species, most of the dry weight consisted of protein. Lipid content of all species was 20 to 29%, and carbohydrate content 11 to 23%. Lipid content increased somewhat in N-deficient Phaeodactylum and Isochrysis cells, but decreased in deficient Monallanthus cells. Because the overall dry weight yield was reduced by deficiency, lipid yields did not increase. However, since the carbohydrate content increased to about 65% in N-deficient Dunaliella and Tetraselmis cells, the carbohydrate yield increased. In Phaeodactylum the optimum light intensity was about 40% of full sunlight. Most experimets with this alga included a CUSO/sub 4/ filter to decrease infrared irradiance. When this filter was removed, the yield increased because more red light in the photosynthetically active spectral range was included. These results should prove useful to workers attempting to maximize yields and efficiencies, but additional studies are needed. 69 references, 27 figures, 18 tables.

  17. Aerobic and anoxic growth and nitrate removal capacity of a marine denitrifying bacterium isolated from a recirculation aquaculture system.

    PubMed

    Borges, Maria-Teresa; Sousa, André; De Marco, Paolo; Matos, Ana; Hönigová, Petra; Castro, Paula M L

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilters used in marine recirculation aquaculture systems need improvements to enhance nitrogen removal efficiency. Relatively little is known about biofilter autochthonous population structure and function. The present study was aimed at isolating and characterizing an autochthonous denitrifying bacterium from a marine biofilter installed at a recirculation aquaculture system. Colonization of four different media in a marine fish farm was followed by isolation of various denitrifying strains and molecular classification of the most promising one, strain T2, as a novel member of the Pseudomonas fluorescens cluster. This strain exhibits high metabolic versatility regarding N and C source utilization and environmental conditions for growth. It removed nitrate through aerobic assimilatory metabolism at a specific rate of 116.2 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal was observed under oxic conditions at a limited rate, where transient NO(2)-N formed represented 22% (0.17 mg L(-1)) of the maximum transient NO(2)-N observed under anoxic conditions. Dissimilatory NO(3)-N removal under anoxic conditions occurred at a specific rate of 53.5 mg NO(3)-N g dw(-1) h(-1). The isolated denitrifying strain was able to colonize different materials, such as granular activated carbon (GAC), Filtralite and Bioflow plastic rings, which allow the development of a prototype bioreactor for strain characterization under dynamic conditions and mimicking fish-farm operating conditions.

  18. Differentiation of Chitinase-Active and Non-Chitinase-Active Subpopulations of a Marine Bacterium during Chitin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Baty, Ace M.; Eastburn, Callie C.; Diwu, Zhenjun; Techkarnjanaruk, Somkiet; Goodman, Amanda E.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of marine bacteria to adhere to detrital particulate organic matter and rapidly switch on metabolic genes in an effort to reproduce is an important response for bacterial survival in the pelagic marine environment. The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the relationship between chitinolytic gene expression and extracellular chitinase activity in individual cells of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 attached to solid chitin. A green fluorescent protein reporter gene under the control of the chiA promoter was used to evaluate chiA gene expression, and a precipitating enzyme-linked fluorescent probe, ELF-97–N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminide, was used to evaluate extracellular chitinase activity among cells in the bacterial population. Evaluation of chiA expression and ELF-97 crystal location at the single-cell level revealed two physiologically distinct subpopulations of S91 on the chitin surface: one that was chitinase active and remained associated with the surface and another that was non-chitinase active and released daughter cells into the bulk aqueous phase. It is hypothesized that the surface-associated, non-chitinase-active population is utilizing chitin degradation products that were released by the adjacent chitinase-active population for cell replication and dissemination into the bulk aqueous phase. PMID:10919822

  19. Genome Sequence of Vibrio sp. Strain EJY3, an Agarolytic Marine Bacterium Metabolizing 3,6-Anhydro-l-Galactose as a Sole Carbon Source

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hanseong; Yun, Eun Ju; Lee, Saeyoung; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Kim, Byung-Yong; Song, Heesang; Lim, Kwang-il

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic fate of 3,6-anhydro-l-galactose (l-AHG) is unknown in the global marine carbon cycle. Vibrio sp. strain EJY3 is an agarolytic marine bacterium that can utilize l-AHG as a sole carbon source. To elucidate the metabolic pathways of l-AHG, we have sequenced the complete genome of Vibrio sp. strain EJY3. PMID:22535948

  20. Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Chondroitin Sulfate/Dermatan Sulfate 4-O-Endosulfatase from a Marine Bacterium*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenshuang; Han, Wenjun; Cai, Xingya; Zheng, Xiaoyu; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Li, Fuchuan

    2015-01-01

    Sulfatases are potentially useful tools for structure-function studies of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). To date, various GAG exosulfatases have been identified in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. However, endosulfatases that act on GAGs have rarely been reported. Recently, a novel HA and CS lyase (HCLase) was identified for the first time from a marine bacterium (Han, W., Wang, W., Zhao, M., Sugahara, K., and Li, F. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 27886–27898). In this study, a putative sulfatase gene, closely linked to the hclase gene in the genome, was recombinantly expressed and characterized in detail. The recombinant protein showed a specific N-acetylgalactosamine-4-O-sulfatase activity that removes 4-O-sulfate from both disaccharides and polysaccharides of chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS), suggesting that this sulfatase represents a novel endosulfatase. The novel endosulfatase exhibited maximal reaction rate in a phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) at 30 °C and effectively removed 17–65% of 4-O-sulfates from various CS and DS and thus significantly inhibited the interactions of CS and DS with a positively supercharged fluorescent protein. Moreover, this endosulfatase significantly promoted the digestion of CS by HCLase, suggesting that it enhances the digestion of CS/DS by the bacterium. Therefore, this endosulfatase is a potential tool for use in CS/DS-related studies and applications. PMID:25648894

  1. Azide anions inhibit GH-18 endochitinase and GH-20 Exo β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Sirimontree, Paknisa; Fukamizo, Tamo; Suginta, Wipa

    2016-02-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a bioluminescent marine bacterium that utilizes chitin as its sole source of energy. In the course of chitin degradation, the bacterium primarily secretes an endochitinase A (VhChiA) to hydrolyze chitin, generating chitooligosaccharide fragments that are readily transported into the cell and broken down to GlcNAc monomers by an exo β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (VhGlcNAcase). Here we report that sodium salts, especially sodium azide, inhibit two classes of these chitin-degrading enzymes (VhChiA and VhGlcNAcase) with distinct modes of action. Kinetic analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis of pNP-glycoside substrates reveals that sodium azide inhibition of VhChiA has a mixed-type mode, but that it inhibits VhGlcNAcase competitively. We propose that azide anions inhibit chitinase activity by acting as strong nucleophiles that attack Cγ of the catalytic Glu or Cβ of the neighbouring Asp residues. Azide anions may bind not only to the catalytic centre, but also to the other subsites in the substrate-binding cleft of VhChiA. In contrast, azide anions may merely occupy the small-binding pocket of VhGlcNAcase, thereby blocking the accessibility of its active site by short-chain substrates.

  2. Genome Sequence of Cobetia sp. Strain MM1IDA2H-1, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Biosurfactant-Producing Marine Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Ibacache-Quiroga, Claudia; Canales, Christian; Charifeh, Mariam; Dinamarca, M Alejandro

    2017-04-13

    Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 is a marine bacterium isolated from seawater samples that uses the heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene as the sole carbon source and produces a biosurfactant that inhibits bacterial quorum sensing. The Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1 genome was sequenced, processed, assembled, and annotated for basic and applied studies.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas caviae CH129, a Marine-Derived Bacterium Isolated from the Coast of São Paulo State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso Vargas, Nadia Catalina; Zimpel, Cristina Kraemer; Pessoa, Adalberto; Rivera, Irma Nelly Gutierrez

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas caviae CH129, a marine-derived bacterium isolated from the coast of São Paulo state, Brazil. Genomic analysis revealed genes encoding enzymes involved in binding, transport, and chitin metabolism and different virulence-associated factors. PMID:27908996

  4. Genome Sequence of Cobetia sp. Strain MM1IDA2H-1, a Hydrocarbon-Degrading and Biosurfactant-Producing Marine Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ibacache-Quiroga, Claudia; Canales, Christian; Charifeh, Mariam

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 is a marine bacterium isolated from seawater samples that uses the heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene as the sole carbon source and produces a biosurfactant that inhibits bacterial quorum sensing. The Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1 genome was sequenced, processed, assembled, and annotated for basic and applied studies. PMID:28408668

  5. Draft Genome Sequence of Aeromonas caviae CH129, a Marine-Derived Bacterium Isolated from the Coast of São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Flávio Augusto; Alfonso Vargas, Nadia Catalina; Zimpel, Cristina Kraemer; Pessoa, Adalberto; Rivera, Irma Nelly Gutierrez

    2016-12-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Aeromonas caviae CH129, a marine-derived bacterium isolated from the coast of São Paulo state, Brazil. Genomic analysis revealed genes encoding enzymes involved in binding, transport, and chitin metabolism and different virulence-associated factors.

  6. Involvement of an Extracellular Protease in Algicidal Activity of the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain A28

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-og; Kato, Junichi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Mitsutani, Atsushi; Ohtake, Hisao

    2000-01-01

    The marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain A28 was able to kill the diatom Skeletonema costatum strain NIES-324. The culture supernatant of strain A28 showed potent algicidal activity when it was applied to a paper disk placed on a lawn of S. costatum NIES-324. The condensed supernatant, which was prepared by subjecting the A28 culture supernatant to ultrafiltration with a 10,000-Mw-cutoff membrane, showed algicidal activity, suggesting that strain A28 produced extracellular substances capable of killing S. costatum cells. The condensed supernatant was then found to have protease and DNase activities. Two Pseudoalteromonas mutants lacking algicidal activity, designated NH1 and NH2, were selected after N-methyl-N′-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. The culture supernatants of NH1 and NH2 showed less than 15% of the protease activity detected with the parental strain, A28. The protease was purified to homogeneity from A28 culture supernatants by using ion-exchange chromatography followed by preparative gel electrophoresis. Paper-disk assays revealed that the purified protease had potent algicidal activity. The purified protease had a molecular mass for 50 kDa, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined to be Ala-Thr-Pro-Asn-Asp-Pro. The optimum pH and temperature of the protease were found to be 8.8 and 30°C, respectively, by using succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide as a substrate. The protease activity was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, antipain, chymostatin, and leupeptin. No significant inhibition was detected with EDTA, EGTA, phenanthroline or tetraethylenepentamine. These results suggest that Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain A28 produced an extracellular serine protease which was responsible for the algicidal activity of this marine bacterium. PMID:11010878

  7. Living in a coastal lagoon environment: photosynthetic and biochemical mechanisms of key marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Marta; Korbee, Nathalie; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel María; Marcos, Concepción; Figueroa, Félix L; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel

    2014-10-01

    The physiological status of Cystoseira compressa, Padina pavonica and Palisada tenerrima was studied by in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence, pigment content, stoichiometry (C:N), accumulation of UV photoprotectors and antioxidant activity; comparing their photosynthetic response in a coastal lagoon (Mar Menor) and in Mediterranean coastal waters. In general, the specimens reached their highest ETRmax in spring in the Lagoon, but in summer in the Mediterranean, coinciding with their maximum biomass peak. The species exhibited a dynamic photoinhibition. Except C. compressa, they showed a lower decrease in Fv/Fm and higher recovery rates in the Mediterranean populations when exposed to high irradiance. The higher salinity and temperature of the lagoon could impair the photoprotection mechanisms. The acclimation to lagoon environments is species-specific and involves complex regulatory mechanisms. The results underline the importance of N in repair, avoidance, quenching and scavenging mechanisms. In general, Lagoon specimens showed higher pigment concentration. Although xanthophylls play important photo-protective and antioxidant roles, the observed trend is more likely to be explained by the higher temperatures reached in the lagoon compared to Mediterranean. Therefore the studied photosynthetic and biochemical mechanisms can be effective not only for high irradiance, but also for higher temperatures in a climate change scenario, but are highly dependent on nutrient availability.

  8. Spongiimicrobium salis gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from a marine sponge.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jaewoo; Adachi, Kyoko; Kasai, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, pale-yellow pigmented, rod-shaped, chemoheterotrophic bacterium, designated A6F-11(T), was isolated from a marine sponge collected in Japan. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the novel marine strain was affiliated with the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes and that it shared the highest (92.9 %) sequence similarity with Arenibacter palladensis LMG 21972(T). The strain could be differentiated phenotypically from related members of the family Flavobacteriaceae. The major fatty acids of strain A6F-11(T) were iso-C15:1 G, iso-C15:0, C16:1 ω6c and/or C16:1 ω7c and iso-C17:0 3-OH. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified lipids. The DNA G+C content was 34.7 mol%, and the major respiratory quinone was menaquinone 6 (MK-6). From the distinct phylogenetic position and combination of genotypic and phenotypic characteristics, the strain is considered to represent a novel taxon in the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Spongiimicrobium salis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of S. salis gen. nov., sp. nov. is A6F-11(T) (= KCTC 42753(T) = NBRC 111401(T)).

  9. Strategies developed by the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to resist metals: A proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Isabelle; Hammann, Philippe; Kuhn, Lauriane; Bertrand, Martine

    2013-03-15

    A global proteomic evaluation of the response of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to Cd, Zn and Cu was performed by two dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. When stressed with Cd, the most toxic metal for P. fluorescens BA3SM1, cell growth is rapidly affected and the number of proteins up-regulated (sixteen for 0.4 mM Cd) remains low in comparison with results obtained for Zn and Cu (twenty eight for 1.5mM Zn and forty four for 1.5 mM Cu). The changes in protein expression indicate that the cell adapts to metals by inducing essentially seven defense mechanisms: cell aggregation/biofilm formation (Zn=Cu>Cd); modification of envelope properties to increase the extracellular metal biosorption and/or control the uptake of metal (Cu>Zn); metal export (Cd=Zn and probably Cu); responses to oxidative stress (Cu>Zn>Cd); intracellular metal sequestration (Zn=Cu and probably Cd); hydrolysis of abnormally folded proteins (Cd=Cu), and the over-synthesis of proteins inhibited by metal (Cd>Cu>Zn). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that a marine P. fluorescens is able to acquire a metal-resistant phenotype, making the strain BA3SM1 a promising agent for bioremediation processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Purification and characterization of a novel alginate lyase from the marine bacterium Cobetia sp. NAP1 isolated from brown algae.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Fujise, Asako; Itabashi, Narumi; Ohshiro, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The application of marine resources, instead of fossil fuels, for biomass production is important for building a sustainable society. Seaweed is valuable as a source of marine biomass for producing biofuels such as ethanol, and can be used in various fields. Alginate is an anionic polysaccharide that forms the main component of brown algae. Various alginate lyases (e.g. exo- and endo-types and oligoalginate lyase) are generally used to degrade alginate. We herein describe a novel alginate lyase, AlgC-PL7, which belongs to the polysaccharide lyase 7 family. AlgC-PL7 was isolated from the halophilic Gram-negative bacterium Cobetia sp. NAP1 collected from the brown algae Padina arborescens Holmes. The optimal temperature and pH for AlgC-PL7 activity were 45 °C and 8, respectively. Additionally, AlgC-PL7 was thermostable and salt-tolerant, exhibited broad substrate specificity, and degraded alginate into monosaccharides. Therefore, AlgC-PL7 is a promising enzyme for the production of biofuels.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Rhodococcus sp. Strain WMMA185, a Marine Sponge-Associated Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Adnani, Navid; Braun, Doug R.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Chevrette, Marc G.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2016-01-01

    The Rhodococcus strain WMMA185 was isolated from the marine sponge Chondrilla nucula as part of ongoing drug discovery efforts. Analysis of the 4.44-Mb genome provides information regarding interspecies interactions as pertains to regulation of secondary metabolism and natural product biosynthetic potentials. PMID:27979952

  12. Membrane potential is involved in regulation of photosynthetic reactions in the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii.

    PubMed

    Antal, Taras K; Osipov, Vladimir; Matorin, Dmitriy N; Rubin, Andrey B

    2011-02-07

    High-intensity Chl fluorescence transients (OJIP transients) and light-induced kinetics of the delayed light emission were measured in diatom microalga Thalassiosira weissflogii in the presence of various uncouplers and photosynthetic inhibitors. The I step in the OJIP transients in T. weissflogii was essentially reduced or completely absent but was restored in the presence of uncouplers valinomycin, FCCP, and nigericin. Moreover, valinomycin enhanced ΔpH-dependent non-photochemical fluorescence quenching following the OJIP rise. In the presence of valinomycin, the transthylakoid membrane potential was significantly inhibited as evaluated by measurements of the delayed light emission. The results suggest a membrane potential control of the fluorescence yield in T. weissflogii. Possible mechanisms underlying the observed effects of uncouplers are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Excited state coherent dynamics in light-harvesting complexes from photosynthetic marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, G. H.; Wilk, K. E.; Curmi, P. M. G.; Quiney, H. M.; Davis, J. A.

    2012-08-01

    We explore coherence dynamics in light-harvesting complexes and their interactions with other electronic states and vibrational modes. This is achieved by utilizing a two-colour four-wave mixing spectroscopy to excite and analyse a specific coherence pathway in the phycocyanin-645 (PC645) light-harvesting complex. We observe the dephasing rate increase as a function of temperature and oscillations in the signal intensity as a function of waiting time which reveals coherent excitation of pathways not directly resonant with the laser pulses. This coherent excitation of non-resonant electronic states implies strong coupling to phonon modes, which is necessary if coherent energy transfer between non-resonant states is to play any role in photosynthetic energy transfer.

  14. A halotolerant thermostable lipase from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 with an ability to disrupt bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Seghal Kiran, George; Nishanth Lipton, Anuj; Kennedy, Jonathan; Dobson, Alan DW; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A halotolerant thermostable lipase was purified and characterized from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02. This lipase displayed a high degree of stability over a wide range of conditions including pH, salinity, and temperature. It was optimally active at 30 °C and pH 8.0 respectively and was stable at higher temperatures (50–70 °C) and alkaline pH. The molecular mass of the lipase was approximately 31 kDa based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-ToF fingerprint analysis. Conditions for enhanced production of lipase by Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 were attained in response surface method-guided optimization with factors such as olive oil, sucrose, potassium chromate, and NaCl being evaluated, resulting in levels of 58.84 U/ml being achieved. The biofilm disruption potential of the PUMB02 lipase was evaluated and compared with a marine sponge metagenome derived halotolerant lipase Lpc53E1. Good biofilm disruption activity was observed with both lipases against potential food pathogens such as Bacillus cereus MTCC1272, Listeria sp. MTCC1143, Serratia sp. MTCC4822, Escherichia coli MTCC443, Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC1748, and Vibrio parahemolyticus MTCC459. Phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed very effective disruption of pathogenic biofilms. This study reveals that marine derived hydrolytic enzymes such as lipases may have potential utility in inhibiting biofilm formation in a food processing environment and is the first report of the potential application of lipases from the genus Oceanobacillus in biofilm disruption strategies. PMID:25482232

  15. A substantial fraction of phytoplankton-derived DON is resistant to degradation by a metabolically versatile, widely distributed marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kimmance, Susan; McCormack, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria for degrading dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and remineralising ammonium is of importance for marine ecosystems, as nitrogen availability frequently limits productivity. Here, we assess the capacity of a widely distributed and metabolically versatile marine bacterium to degrade phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen. To achieve this, we lysed exponentially growing diatoms and used the derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) to support an axenic culture of Alteromonas sp.. Bacterial biomass (as particulate carbon and nitrogen) was monitored for 70 days while growth dynamics (cell count), DOM (DOC, DON) and dissolved nutrient concentrations were monitored for up to 208 days. Bacterial biomass increased rapidly within the first 7 days prior to a period of growth/death cycles potentially linked to rapid nutrient recycling. We found that ≈75% of the initial DOC and ≈35% of the initial DON were consumed by bacteria within 40 and 4 days respectively, leaving a significant fraction of DOM resilient to degradation by this bacterial species. The different rates and extents to which DOC and DON were accessed resulted in changes in DOM stoichiometry and the iterative relationship between DOM quality and bacterial growth over time influenced bacterial cell C:N molar ratio. C:N values increased to 10 during the growth phase before decreasing to values of ≈5, indicating a change from relative N-limitation/C-sufficiency to relative C-limitation/N-sufficiency. Consequently, despite its reported metabolic versatility, we demonstrate that Alteromonas sp. was unable to access all phytoplankton derived DOM and that a bacterial community is likely to be required. By making the relatively simple assumption that an experimentally derived fraction of DOM remains resilient to bacterial degradation, these experimental results were corroborated by numerical simulations using a previously published model describing the interaction

  16. A halotolerant thermostable lipase from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 with an ability to disrupt bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Seghal Kiran, George; Nishanth Lipton, Anuj; Kennedy, Jonathan; Dobson, Alan D W; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    A halotolerant thermostable lipase was purified and characterized from the marine bacterium Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02. This lipase displayed a high degree of stability over a wide range of conditions including pH, salinity, and temperature. It was optimally active at 30 °C and pH 8.0 respectively and was stable at higher temperatures (50-70 °C) and alkaline pH. The molecular mass of the lipase was approximately 31 kDa based on SDS-PAGE and MALDI-ToF fingerprint analysis. Conditions for enhanced production of lipase by Oceanobacillus sp. PUMB02 were attained in response surface method-guided optimization with factors such as olive oil, sucrose, potassium chromate, and NaCl being evaluated, resulting in levels of 58.84 U/ml being achieved. The biofilm disruption potential of the PUMB02 lipase was evaluated and compared with a marine sponge metagenome derived halotolerant lipase Lpc53E1. Good biofilm disruption activity was observed with both lipases against potential food pathogens such as Bacillus cereus MTCC1272, Listeria sp. MTCC1143, Serratia sp. MTCC4822, Escherichia coli MTCC443, Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC1748, and Vibrio parahemolyticus MTCC459. Phase contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed very effective disruption of pathogenic biofilms. This study reveals that marine derived hydrolytic enzymes such as lipases may have potential utility in inhibiting biofilm formation in a food processing environment and is the first report of the potential application of lipases from the genus Oceanobacillus in biofilm disruption strategies.

  17. The effect of humic acid on uptake/adsorption of copper by a marine bacterium and two marine ciliates.

    PubMed

    Lores, E M; Snyder, R A; Pennock, J R

    1999-01-01

    The effect of humic acid (HA) on Cu uptake by a bacterium and two bacterivorus ciliates was investigated. The presence of HA resulted in a statistically significant (p<0.001) decrease in Cu associated with bacteria that were exposed to 67 microg Cu L(-1). Complexation of Cu appears to lower the availability of Cu with respect to bacterial cell surface binding and uptake. For ciliates, 10 mg HA L(-1) significantly reduced uptake of Cu by Uronema, but did not reduce uptake of Cu by Pleuronema. Uronema exposed to 67 microg Cu L(-1) accumulated 54% less Cu when 10 mg HA L(-1) was present (0.50 pg ciliate(-1) vs 0.23 pg ciliate(-1)). Uronema feeding on V. natriegens, took up less than half as much Cu as unfed Uronema when exposed to Cu without HA (0.41 pg Cu fed ciliate(-1) vs 0.86 pg Cu unfed ciliate(-1), but only 40% less when exposed to Cu and HA (0.31 pg Cu fed ciliate(-1) vs 0.51 pg Cu unfed ciliate(-1)). The lower % reduction attributable to fed ciliates in the presence of HA suggests that some of the Cu associated with HA is available through trophic processes.

  18. Crassaminicella profunda gen. nov., sp. nov., an anaerobic marine bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Lakhal, Raja; Pradel, Nathalie; Postec, Anne; Ollivier, Bernard; Cayol, Jean-Luc; Godfroy, Anne; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Galés, Grégoire

    2015-09-01

    A novel, anaerobic, chemo-organotrophic bacterium, designated strain Ra1766H(T), was isolated from sediments of the Guaymas basin (Gulf of California, Mexico) taken from a depth of 2002  m. Cells were thin, motile, Gram-stain-positive, flexible rods forming terminal endospores. Strain Ra1766H(T) grew at temperatures of 25-45 °C (optimum 30 °C), pH 6.7-8.1 (optimum 7.5) and in a salinity of 5-60 g l(-1) NaCl (optimum 30 g l(-1)). It was an obligate heterotrophic bacterium fermenting carbohydrates (glucose and mannose) and organic acids (pyruvate and succinate). Casamino acids and amino acids (glutamate, aspartate and glycine) were also fermented. The main end products from glucose fermentation were acetate, butyrate, ethanol, H2 and CO2. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, elemental sulfur, fumarate, nitrate, nitrite and Fe(III) were not used as terminal electron acceptors. The predominant cellular fatty acids were C14  : 0, C16 : 1ω7, C16 : 1ω7 DMA and C16 : 0. The main polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phospholipids. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 33.7 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated that strain Ra1766H(T) was affiliated to cluster XI of the order Clostridiales, phylum Firmicutes. The closest phylogenetic relative of Ra1766H(T) was Geosporobacter subterraneus (94.2% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity). On the basis of phylogenetic inference and phenotypic properties, strain Ra1766H(T) ( = DSM 27501(T) = JCM 19377(T)) is proposed to be the type strain of a novel species of a novel genus, named Crassaminicella profunda.

  19. Genome Sequence of the Agar-Degrading Marine Bacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. Strain G7

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Min-Jung; Song, Ju Yeon; Kim, Byung Kwon; Chi, Won-Jae; Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Choi, Soobeom; Chang, Yong-Keun

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present the high-quality draft genome sequence of the agar-degrading marine gammaproteobacterium Alteromonadaceae sp. strain G7, which was isolated from coastal seawater to be utilized as a bioresource for production of agar-derived biofuels. The 3.91-Mb genome contains a number of genes encoding algal polysaccharide-degrading enzymes such as agarases and sulfatases. PMID:23209220

  20. Biogeography of the ubiquitous marine bacterium Alteromonas macleodii determined by multilocus sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Ivars-Martínez, Elena; D'Auria, Giuseppe; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Sânchez-Porro, Cristina; Ventosa, Antonio; Joint, Ian; Mühling, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Twenty-three isolates of the widely distributed marine bacteria Alteromonas macleodii have been analysed by multilocus sequence analysis combined with phylogenetic and multivariate statistical analyses. The strains originated from the Pacific Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, English Channel, Black Sea and Thailand. Using the nucleotide sequences of nine loci for each of the 23 isolates, a robust identification was achieved of different clades within the single species. Strains generally clustered with the depth in the water column from which the isolate originated. Strains also showed more recombination with isolates from the same vicinity, suggesting that genetic exchange plays a role in diversification of planktonic marine prokaryotes. This study thus shows for the first time for a large set of isolates of a species of planktonic marine prokaryotes that multilocus sequence analysis overcomes the problems associated with the analysis of individual marker genes or presence of extensive recombination events. It can thus achieve intraspecific identification to the level of genotypes and, by comparison with relevant environmental data, ecotypes.

  1. Marine biosurfactants, II. Production and characterization of an anionic trehalose tetraester from the marine bacterium Arthrobacter sp. EK 1.

    PubMed

    Passeri, A; Lang, S; Wagner, F; Wray, V

    1991-01-01

    Within a screening for biosurfactants we could isolate various n-alkanes utilizing marine bacteria which were capable of synthesizing glycolipids. One strain was identified as Arthrobacter sp. EK 1 which produced trehalose lipids. After purification by column and thick layer chromatography the main fraction, an anionic 2,3,4,2'-trehalose tetraester, was obtained. The chain lengths of fatty acids ranged from 8 up to 14, furthermore succinate could be detected. Since the place of substitution of succinate has so far not been cited in literature, a definitive structural elucidation was carried out chemically by hydroboration and by 1H, 2D1H, 13C and 13C-1H correlation NMR measurements. All investigations confirmed the exact position of succinate at C 2 atom of trehalose. After improvement of growth conditions the production of the trehalose tetraester increased up to 4.8 milligrams during a fermentation in 20 l bioreactor under nitrogen limitation.

  2. Vertical distribution of major photosynthetic picoeukaryotic groups in stratified marine waters.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Ana M; Latasa, Mikel; Forn, Irene; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Massana, Ramon

    2016-05-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) are fundamental contributors to oceanic primary production and form diverse communities dominated by prymnesiophytes, chlorophytes, pelagophytes and chrysophytes. Here, we studied the vertical distribution of these major groups in two offshore regions of the northern Iberian Peninsula during summer stratification. We performed a fine-scale vertical sampling (every ∼2 m) across the DCM and used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to determine the PPE composition and to explore the possible segregation of target groups in the light, nutrient and temperature gradients. Chlorophytes, pelagophytes and prymnesiophytes, in this order of abundance, accounted for the total PPEs recorded by flow cytometry in the Avilés canyon, and for more than half in the Galicia Bank, whereas chrysophytes were undetected. Among the three detected groups, often the prymnesiophytes were dominant in biomass. In general, all groups were present throughout the water column with abundance peaks around the DCM, but their distributions differed: pelagophytes were located deeper than the other two groups, chlorophytes presented two peaks and prymnesiophytes exhibited surface abundances comparable to those at the DCM. This study offers first indications that the vertical distribution of different PPE groups is heterogeneous within the DCM. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Extracellular haem peroxidases mediate Mn(II) oxidation in a marine Roseobacter bacterium via superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Andeer, Peter F; Learman, Deric R; McIlvin, Matt; Dunn, James A; Hansel, Colleen M

    2015-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in environmental systems. A number of biotic and abiotic pathways induce the oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn oxides. Here, we use a combination of proteomic analyses and activity assays, to identify the enzyme(s) responsible for extracellular superoxide-mediated Mn oxide formation by a bacterium within the ubiquitous Roseobacter clade. We show that animal haem peroxidases (AHPs) located on the outer membrane and within the secretome are responsible for Mn(II) oxidation. These novel peroxidases have previously been implicated in direct Mn(II) oxidation by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Yet, we show that in this Roseobacter species, AHPs mediate Mn(II) oxidation not through a direct reaction but by producing superoxide and likely also by degrading hydrogen peroxide. These findings point to a eukaryotic-like oscillatory oxidative-peroxidative enzymatic cycle by these AHPs that leads to Mn oxide formation by this organism. AHP expression appears unaffected by Mn(II), yet the large energetic investment required to produce and secrete these enzymes points to an as yet unknown physiological function. These findings are further evidence that bacterial peroxidases and secreted enzymes, in general, are unappreciated controls on the cycling of metals and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and by extension carbon, in natural systems.

  4. Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov., a marine sediment-derived bacterium with antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Tanaka, Naoto; Svetashev, Vassilii I; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2015-06-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped bacterium designated KMM 9500(T) was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the Sea of Japan seashore. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis affiliated strain KMM 9500(T) to the genus Pseudomonas as a distinct subline clustered with Pseudomonas marincola KMM 3042(T) and Pseudomonas segetis KCTC 12331(T) sharing the highest similarities of 98 and 97.9 %, respectively. Strain KMM 9500(T) was characterized by mainly possessing ubiquinone Q-9, and by the predominance of C18:1 ω7c, C16:1 ω7c, and C16:0 followed by C12:0 in its fatty acid profile. Polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, an unknown aminophospholipid, and unknown phospholipids. Strain KMM 9500(T) was found to inhibit growth of Gram-negative and Gram-positive indicatory microorganisms. Based on the phylogenetic analysis and distinctive phenotypic characteristics, strain 9500(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas glareae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is strain KMM 9500(T) (=NRIC 0939(T)).

  5. Vibrio psychroerythrus sp. n.: Classification of the Psychrophilic Marine Bacterium, NRC 1004

    PubMed Central

    D'aoust, J. Y.; Kushner, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    A red-pigmented organism, formerly known as marine psychrophile NRC 1004, has been classified as Vibrio psychroerythrus sp. n. Classification was mainly based on morphology, the ability of the organism to oxidize and ferment glucose, its sensitivity to vibriostat 0/129, and its deoxyribonucleic acid base composition of 40.0 moles% guanine plus cytosine, determined by thermal denaturation. The organism gave positive reactions for catalase, oxidase, and starch hydrolysis and produced acid from maltose and dextrin but not from arabinose. It was indole- and citrate-negative and reduced nitrate to nitrite without producing gas. PMID:5053463

  6. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  7. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012

    PubMed Central

    Metfies, Katja; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Kilias, Estelle; Nicolaus, Anja; Nöthig, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2–3 μm) is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin) using chlorophyll a (Chl a) measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60–90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean. PMID:26895333

  8. Biogeography and Photosynthetic Biomass of Arctic Marine Pico-Eukaroytes during Summer of the Record Sea Ice Minimum 2012.

    PubMed

    Metfies, Katja; von Appen, Wilken-Jon; Kilias, Estelle; Nicolaus, Anja; Nöthig, Eva-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Information on recent photosynthetic biomass distribution and biogeography of Arctic marine pico-eukaryotes (0.2-3 μm) is needed to better understand consequences of environmental change for Arctic marine ecosystems. We analysed pico-eukaryote biomass and community composition in Fram Strait and large parts of the Central Arctic Ocean (Nansen Basin, Amundsen Basin) using chlorophyll a (Chl a) measurements, automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and 454-pyrosequencing. Samples were collected during summer 2012, the year with the most recent record sea ice minimum. Chl a concentrations were highest in eastern Fram Strait and pico-plankton accounted for 60-90% of Chl a biomass during the observation period. ARISA-patterns and 454-pyrosequencing revealed that pico-eukaryote distribution is closely related to water mass distribution in the euphotic zone of the Arctic Ocean. Phaeocystaceae, Micromonas sp., Dinophyceae and Syndiniales constitute a high proportion of sequence reads, while sequence abundance of autotrophic Phaeocystaceae and mixotrophic Micromonas sp. was inversely correlated. Highest sequence abundances of Phaeocystaceae were observed in the warm Atlantic Waters in Fram Strait, while Micromonas sp. dominated the abundant biosphere in the arctic halocline. Our results are of particular interest considering existing hypotheses that environmental conditions in Nansen Basin might become more similar to the current conditions in Fram Strait. We propose that in response, biodiversity and biomass of pico-eukaryotes in Nansen Basin could resemble those currently observed in Fram Strait in the future. This would significantly alter biogeochemical cycles in a large part of the Central Arctic Ocean.

  9. Dimethylsulfide is an energy source for the heterotrophic marine bacterium Sagittula stellata.

    PubMed

    Boden, Rich; Murrell, J Colin; Schäfer, Hendrik

    2011-09-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a volatile organosulfur compound, ubiquitous in the oceans, that has been credited with various roles in biogeochemical cycling and in climate control. Various oceanic sinks of DMS are known - both chemical and biological - although they are poorly understood. In addition to the utilization of DMS as a carbon or a sulfur source, some Bacteria are known to oxidize it to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Sagittula stellata is a heterotrophic member of the Alphaproteobacteria found in marine environments. It has been shown to oxidize DMS during heterotrophic growth on sugars, but the reasons for and the mechanisms of this oxidation have not been investigated. Here, we show that the oxidation of DMS to DMSO is coupled to ATP synthesis in S. stellata and that DMS acts as an energy source during chemoorganoheterotrophic growth of the organism on fructose and on succinate. DMS dehydrogenase (which is responsible for the oxidation of DMS to DMSO in other marine Bacteria) and DMSO reductase activities were absent from cells grown in the presence of DMS, indicating an alternative route of DMS oxidation in this organism.

  10. Dealing with salinity extremes and nitrogen limitation - an unexpected strategy of the marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Sarah; Ulbrich, Marcus; Bill, Nelli; Schmidt-Hohagen, Kerstin; Geffers, Robert; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2017-03-01

    Having the right coping strategy for changes in osmolarity or desiccation is essential for the survival of every cell. So far, nothing is known about compatible solutes and the salt adaptation of the marine Rhodobacteraceae. The family member Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) is shown here to form the compatible solutes α-glucosylglycerol (GG) and α-glucosylglycerate (GGA). To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence for GGA formation within the α-proteobacteria. Together with glutamate and putrescine, these substances enable good growth in salinity ranging from 0.3% to 5%. A salinity of 5% leads to a biomass share of 7.6% of compatible solutes and the very low salt level of 0.3% results in an 18-fold increased putrescine concentration compared with environmental conditions. Additionally, the substitution of glutamate by GGA has been shown during exposure to nitrogen limitation and in the stationary growth phase of the organism. Salt shock transcriptome analysis of D. shibae has revealed the essential role of its 153 kb chromid, which carries the genes for GG biosynthesis and several transport and exchange systems. Within the family of Rhodobacteraceae, the genomic capability of forming GG and GGA is strictly restricted to marine family members.

  11. Antiangiogenic activity of low-temperature lysozyme from a marine bacterium in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenhua; Liu, Jincheng; Su, Ai; Sun, Mi; Wang, Chunbo

    2009-11-01

    We extracted marine low-temperature lysozyme (MLTL), a novel lysozyme, from a marine microorganism through fermentation. Our previous study suggested that a low molecular weight (16 kDa) may exert anti-tumor activity through antiangiogenesis. In this study, we extracted a high weight (39 kDa) and investigated its antiangiogenic activity in vivo and in vitro. Using zebrafish embryos as an in vivo study model, we found that treatment with MLTL significantly inhibited the growth of subintestinal vessels (SIVs) in a dose-dependent manner and that 400 µg/ml MLTL was sufficient to block the growth of SIVs. An in vitro study conducted using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) revealed that MLTL suppressed the proliferation, migration and tube formation of HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, assays by flow cytometry and DNA electrophoresis indicated that MLTL was able to induce apoptosis of HUVECs. Moreover, further study demonstrated that the disruption of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis may play an important role in MLTL induced apoptosis of HUVECs. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate for the first time that MLTL inhibits angiogenesis through its pleiotropic effects on vascular endothelial cells and induces apoptosis through regulation of cellular Ca2+ levels. The results of this study also revealed a possible mechanism underlying the antiangiogenic effect of MLTL and suggested that MLTL may be a promising new antiangiogenic agent for use in cancer therapy.

  12. A Chloroflexi bacterium dechlorinates polychlorinated biphenyls in marine sediments under in situ-like biogeochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Zanaroli, Giulio; Balloi, Annalisa; Negroni, Andrea; Borruso, Luigimaria; Daffonchio, Daniele; Fava, Fabio

    2012-03-30

    We investigated the reductive dechlorination of Aroclor 1254 PCBs by a coplanar PCB-dechlorinating microbial community enriched from an actual site contaminated marine sediment of the Venice lagoon in sterile slurry microcosms of the same sediment suspended in its site water, i.e., under biogeochemical conditions that closely mime those occurring in situ. The culture dechlorinated more than 75% of the penta- through hepta-chlorinated biphenyls to tri- and tetra-chlorinated congeners in 30 weeks. The dechlorination rate was reduced by the addition of H(2) and short chain fatty acids, which stimulated sulfate-reduction and methane production, and markedly increased by the presence of vancomycin or ampicillin. DGGE analysis of 16S rRNA genes on PCB-spiked and PCB-free cultures ruled out sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria and revealed the presence of a single Chloroflexi phylotype closely related to the uncultured bacteria m-1 and SF1 associated to PCB dechlorination. These findings suggest that a single dechlorinator is responsible for the observed extensive dechlorination of Aroclor 1254 and that a Chloroflexi species similar to those already detected in freshwater and estuarine contaminated sediments mediates PCB dechlorination in the marine sediment adopted in this study under biogeochemical conditions resembling those occurring in situ in the Brentella Canal of Venice Lagoon.

  13. Physiological characterization of a halotolerant anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing green-sulfur bacterium isolated from a marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Niemeyer, Annika; Nikeleit, Verena; Halama, Maximilian; Byrne, James M; Kappler, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    Anoxygenic photoautotrophic bacteria which use light energy and electrons from Fe(II) for growth, so-called photoferrotrophs, are suggested to have been amongst the first phototrophic microorganisms on Earth and to have contributed to the deposition of sedimentary iron mineral deposits, i.e. banded iron formations. To date only two isolates of marine photoferrotrophic bacteria exist, both of which are closely related purple non-sulfur bacteria. Here we present a novel green-sulfur photoautotrophic Fe(II) oxidizer isolated from a marine coastal sediment, Chlorobium sp. strain N1, which is closely related to the freshwater green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium luteolum DSM273 that is incapable of Fe(II) oxidation. Besides Fe(II), our isolated strain grew phototrophically with other inorganic and organic substrates such as sulfide, hydrogen, lactate or yeast extract. Highest Fe(II) oxidation rates were measured at pH 7.0-7.3, the temperature optimum was 25°C. Mössbauer spectroscopy identified ferrihydrite as the main Fe(III) mineral and fluorescence and helium-ion microscopy revealed cell-mineral aggregates without obvious cell encrustation. In summary, our study showed that the new isolate is physiologically adapted to the conditions of its natural habitat but also to conditions as proposed for early Earth and is thus a suitable model organism for further studies addressing phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation on early Earth. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Phosphate Limitation Triggers the Dissolution of Precipitated Iron by the Marine Bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Stefano; Bondarev, Vladimir; Kölling, Martin; Dittmar, Thorsten; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. In bacteria, the preferential phosphorus source is phosphate, which is often a limiting macronutrient in many areas of the ocean. The geochemical cycle of phosphorus is strongly interconnected with the cycles of other elements and especially iron, because phosphate tends to adsorb onto iron minerals, such as iron oxide formed in oxic marine environments. Although the response to either iron or phosphate limitation has been investigated in several bacterial species, the metabolic interplay between these two nutrients has rarely been considered. In this study we evaluated the impact of phosphate limitation on the iron metabolism of the marine bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1. We observed that phosphate limitation led to an initial decrease of soluble iron in the culture up to three times higher than under phosphate surplus conditions. Similarly, a decrease in soluble cobalt was more pronounced under phosphate limitation. These data point toward physiological changes induced by phosphate limitation that affect either the cellular surface and therefore the metal adsorption onto it or the cellular metal uptake. We discovered that under phosphate limitation strain FO-BEG1, as well as selected strains of the Roseobacter clade, secreted iron-chelating molecules. This leads to the hypothesis that these bacteria might release such molecules to dissolve iron minerals, such as iron-oxyhydroxide, in order to access the adsorbed phosphate. As the adsorption of phosphate onto iron minerals can significantly decrease phosphate concentrations in the environment, the observed release of iron-chelators might represent an as yet unrecognized link between the biogeochemical cycle of phosphorus and iron, and it suggests another biological function of iron-chelating molecules in addition to metal-scavenging. PMID:28352252

  15. Desulfoconvexum algidum gen. nov., sp. nov., a psychrophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from a permanently cold marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Könneke, Martin; Kuever, Jan; Galushko, Alexander; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2013-03-01

    A sulfate-reducing bacterium, designated JHA1(T), was isolated from a permanently cold marine sediment sampled in an Artic fjord on the north-west coast of Svalbard. The isolate was originally enriched at 4 °C in a highly diluted liquid culture amended with hydrogen and sulfate. Strain JHA1(T) was a psychrophile, growing fastest between 14 and 16 °C and not growing above 20 °C. Fastest growth was found at neutral pH (pH 7.2-7.4) and at marine concentrations of NaCl (20-30 g l(-1)). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain JHA1(T) was a member of the family Desulfobacteraceae in the Deltaproteobacteria. The isolate shared 99 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with an environmental sequence obtained from permanently cold Antarctic sediment. The closest recognized relatives were Desulfobacula phenolica DSM 3384(T) and Desulfobacula toluolica DSM 7467(T) (both <95 % sequence similarity). In contrast to its closest phylogenetic relatives, strain JHA1(T) grew chemolithoautotrophically with hydrogen as an electron donor. CO dehydrogenase activity indicated the operation of the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway for inorganic carbon assimilation. Beside differences in physiology and morphology, strain JHA1(T) could be distinguished chemotaxonomically from the genus Desulfobacula by the absence of the cellular fatty acid C16 : 0 10-methyl. Phylogenetic differentiation from other genera was further supported by DsrAB and AprBA sequence analysis. Based on the described phylogenetic and phenotypic differences between strain JHA1(T) and its closest relatives, the establishment of a novel genus and a novel species, Desulfoconvexum algidum gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JHA1(T) ( = DSM 21856(T)  = JCM 16085(T)).

  16. Phosphate Limitation Triggers the Dissolution of Precipitated Iron by the Marine Bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1.

    PubMed

    Romano, Stefano; Bondarev, Vladimir; Kölling, Martin; Dittmar, Thorsten; Schulz-Vogt, Heide N

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. In bacteria, the preferential phosphorus source is phosphate, which is often a limiting macronutrient in many areas of the ocean. The geochemical cycle of phosphorus is strongly interconnected with the cycles of other elements and especially iron, because phosphate tends to adsorb onto iron minerals, such as iron oxide formed in oxic marine environments. Although the response to either iron or phosphate limitation has been investigated in several bacterial species, the metabolic interplay between these two nutrients has rarely been considered. In this study we evaluated the impact of phosphate limitation on the iron metabolism of the marine bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. FO-BEG1. We observed that phosphate limitation led to an initial decrease of soluble iron in the culture up to three times higher than under phosphate surplus conditions. Similarly, a decrease in soluble cobalt was more pronounced under phosphate limitation. These data point toward physiological changes induced by phosphate limitation that affect either the cellular surface and therefore the metal adsorption onto it or the cellular metal uptake. We discovered that under phosphate limitation strain FO-BEG1, as well as selected strains of the Roseobacter clade, secreted iron-chelating molecules. This leads to the hypothesis that these bacteria might release such molecules to dissolve iron minerals, such as iron-oxyhydroxide, in order to access the adsorbed phosphate. As the adsorption of phosphate onto iron minerals can significantly decrease phosphate concentrations in the environment, the observed release of iron-chelators might represent an as yet unrecognized link between the biogeochemical cycle of phosphorus and iron, and it suggests another biological function of iron-chelating molecules in addition to metal-scavenging.

  17. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC19707

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, M G; Arp, D J; Chain, P S; El-Sheikh, A F; Hauser, L J; Hommes, N G; Larimer, F W; Malfatti, S A; Norton, J M; Poret-Peterson, A T; Vergez, L M; Ward, B B

    2006-08-03

    The Gammaproteobacterium, Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707), is a Gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; 50.4% G+C) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. In contrast to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance and the ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I RuBisCO was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H{sup +}-dependent F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-type, one Na{sup +}-dependent V-type).

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC 19707

    SciTech Connect

    Klots, Martin G.; Arp, D J; Chain, Patrick S; El-Sheikh, Amal F.; Hauser, Loren John; Hommes, Norman G.; Larimer, Frank W; Malfatti, Stephanie; Norton, Jeanette M.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Vergez, Lisa; Ward, Bess B.

    2006-01-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; G+C content of 50.4%) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3,052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. Contrary to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor, were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance, and ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H+-dependent F0F1 type, one Na+-dependent V type).

  19. Shewanella algicola sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from brown algae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Yoo, Han-Su; Lee, Dong-Heon; Park, So-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ju; Oh, Duck-Chul

    2016-06-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium motile by means of a single polar flagella, strain ST-6T, was isolated from a brown alga (Sargassum thunbergii) collected in Jeju, Republic of Korea. Strain ST-6T was psychrotolerant, growing at 4-30 °C (optimum 20 °C). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences revealed that strain ST-6T belonged to a distinct lineage in the genus Shewanella. Strain ST-6T was related most closely to Shewanella basaltis J83T, S. gaetbuli TF-27T, S. arctica IT12T, S. vesiculosa M7T and S. aestuarii SC18T, showing 96-97 % and 85-70 % 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences similarities, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness values between strain ST-6T and the type strains of two species of the genus Shewanella were <22.6 %. The major cellular fatty acids (>5 %) were summed feature 3 (comprising C16:1ω7c and/ or iso-C15:0 2-OH), C16:0, iso-C13:0 and C17:1ω8c. The DNA G+C content of strain ST-6Twas 42.4 mol%, and the predominant isoprenoid quinones were menaquinone MK-7 and ubiquinones Q-7 and Q-8. On the basis of its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic distinctiveness, strain ST-6T is considered to represent a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella algicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is ST-6T (= KCTC 23253T = JCM 31091T).

  20. Zooshikella marina sp. nov. a cycloprodigiosin- and prodigiosin-producing marine bacterium isolated from beach sand.

    PubMed

    Ramaprasad, E V V; Bharti, Dave; Sasikala, Ch; Ramana, Ch V

    2015-12-01

    A red-pigmented bacterium producing a metallic green sheen, designated strain JC333T, was isolated from a sand sample collected from Shivrajpur-Kachigad beach, Gujarat, India. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain JC333T showed highest sequence similarity to Zooshikella ganghwensis JC2044T (99.24 %) and less than 91.94 % similarity with other members of the class Gammaproteobacteria. DNA-DNA hybridizations between JC333T and Z. ganghwensis JC2044T showed low relatedness values of 19 ± 1.3 % (reciprocal 21 ± 2.2 %). The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone-9 (Q9) and the polar lipid profile was composed of the major components diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, an unidentified aminophospholipid and an unidentified lipid. The presence of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c, C16 : 0, C18 : 1ω7c and C12 : 0 as major fatty acids supported the affiliation of strain JC333T to the genus Zooshikella. Prodigiosin, cycloprodigiosin and eight other prodigiosin analogues were the pigments of JC333T. Characterization based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, physiological parameters, pigment analysis, ubiquinone, and polar lipid and fatty acid compositions revealed that JC333T represents a novel species of the genus Zooshikella, for which the name Zooshikella marina sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JC333T ( = KCTC 42659T = LMG 28823T).

  1. Olleya algicola sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from the green alga Ulva fenestrata.

    PubMed

    Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Kim, Song-Gun; Zhukova, Natalia V; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2017-07-01

    A strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, motile by gliding and yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain 3Alg 18T, was isolated from the Pacific green alga Ulva fenestrata. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the novel strain was affiliated to the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes, being most closely related to the type strains of recognized species of the genus Olleya, with 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 97.9-99.3 %. Strain 3Alg 18T grew in the presence of 0.5-5 % (w/v) NaCl and at 4-37 °C, and hydrolysed aesculin, casein, gelatin, starch and Tweens 20, 40 and 80. The prevalent fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 1 G, iso-C15 : 0 3-OH, iso-C16:0 2-OH, iso-C17 : 0 3-OH, summed feature 3, iso-C16 : 0 3-OH, anteiso-C15 : 0 and C15 : 0. The polar lipid profile contained phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified aminolipids and four unidentified lipids. The major respiratory quinone was menaquinone MK-6. The genomic DNA G+C content was 34.6 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence data, and chemotaxonomic and phenotypic characteristics, strain 3Alg 18T represents a novel species of the genus Olleya, for which the name Olleya algicola sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 3Alg 18T (=KCTC 22024T=KMM 6133T).

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Marine, Chemolithoautotrophic, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosococcus oceani ATCC 19707†

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Martin G.; Arp, Daniel J.; Chain, Patrick S. G.; El-Sheikh, Amal F.; Hauser, Loren J.; Hommes, Norman G.; Larimer, Frank W.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Norton, Jeanette M.; Poret-Peterson, Amisha T.; Vergez, Lisa M.; Ward, Bess B.

    2006-01-01

    The gammaproteobacterium Nitrosococcus oceani (ATCC 19707) is a gram-negative obligate chemolithoautotroph capable of extracting energy and reducing power from the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing and annotation of the genome revealed a single circular chromosome (3,481,691 bp; G+C content of 50.4%) and a plasmid (40,420 bp) that contain 3,052 and 41 candidate protein-encoding genes, respectively. The genes encoding proteins necessary for the function of known modes of lithotrophy and autotrophy were identified. Contrary to betaproteobacterial nitrifier genomes, the N. oceani genome contained two complete rrn operons. In contrast, only one copy of the genes needed to synthesize functional ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase, as well as the proteins that relay the extracted electrons to a terminal electron acceptor, were identified. The N. oceani genome contained genes for 13 complete two-component systems. The genome also contained all the genes needed to reconstruct complete central pathways, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnass and pentose phosphate pathways. The N. oceani genome contains the genes required to store and utilize energy from glycogen inclusion bodies and sucrose. Polyphosphate and pyrophosphate appear to be integrated in this bacterium's energy metabolism, stress tolerance, and ability to assimilate carbon via gluconeogenesis. One set of genes for type I ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was identified, while genes necessary for methanotrophy and for carboxysome formation were not identified. The N. oceani genome contains two copies each of the genes or operons necessary to assemble functional complexes I and IV as well as ATP synthase (one H+-dependent F0F1 type, one Na+-dependent V type). PMID:16957257

  3. Isolation and identification of a bacterium from marine shrimp digestive tract: A new degrader of starch and protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiqiu; Tan, Beiping; Mai, Kangsen

    2011-09-01

    It is a practical approach to select candidate probiotic bacterial stains on the basis of their special traits. Production of digestive enzyme was used as a trait to select a candidate probiotic bacterial strain in this study. In order to select a bacterium with the ability to degrade both starch and protein, an ideal bacterial strain STE was isolated from marine shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) intestines by using multiple selective media. The selected isolate STE was identified on the basis of its morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics as well as molecular analyses. Results of degradation experiments confirmed the ability of the selected isolate to degrade both starch and casein. The isolate STE was aerobic, Gram-negative, rod-shaped, motile and non-spore-forming, and had catalase and oxidase activities but no glucose fermentation activity. Among the tested carbon/nitrogen sources, only Tween40, alanyl-glycine, aspartyl-glycine, and glycyl-l-glutamic acid were utilized by the isolate STE. Results of homology comparison analyses of the 16S rDNA sequences showed that the isolate STE had a high similarity to several Pseudoalteromonas species and, in the phylogenetic tree, grouped with P. ruthenica with maximum bootstrap support (100%). In conclusion, the isolate STE was characterized as a novel strain belonging to the genus Pseudoalteromonas. This study provides a further example of a probiotic bacterial strain with specific characteristics isolated from the host gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Aerobic-heterotrophic nitrogen removal through nitrate reduction and ammonium assimilation by marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Y1-5.

    PubMed

    Li, Yating; Wang, Yanru; Fu, Lin; Gao, Yizhan; Zhao, Haixia; Zhou, Weizhi

    2017-04-01

    An aerobic marine bacterium Vibrio sp. Y1-5 was screened to achieve efficient nitrate and ammonium removal simultaneously and fix nitrogen in cells without N loss. Approximately 98.0% of nitrate (100mg/L) was removed in 48h through assimilatory nitrate reduction and nitrate reductase was detected in the cytoplasm. Instead of nitrification, the strain assimilated ammonium directly, and it could tolerate as high as 1600mg/L ammonium concentration while removing 844.6mg/L. In addition, ammonium assimilation occurred preferentially in the medium containing nitrate and ammonium with a total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency of 80.4%. The results of nitrogen balance and Fourier infrared spectra illustrated that the removed nitrogen was all transformed to protein or stored as organic nitrogen substances in cells and no N was lost in the process. Toxicological studies with the brine shrimp species Artemia naupliia indicated that Vibrio sp. Y1-5 can be applied in aquatic ecosystems safely. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancing production of a 24-membered ring macrolide compound by a marine bacterium using response surface methodology*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Wu, Mian-bin; Chen, Zheng-jie; Wang, Ming-lu; Lin, Jian-ping; Yang, Li-rong

    2013-01-01

    A 24-membered ring macrolide compound, macrolactin A has potential applications in pharmaceuticals for its anti-infectious and antiviral activity. In this study, macrolactin A was produced by a marine bacterium, which was identified as Bacillus subtilis by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses were used to characterize this compound. To improve the production, response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed. Faeces bombycis, the main by-product in sericulture, was used as a nitrogen source in fermentation. The interactions between three significant factors, F. bombycis, soluble starch, and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated. A quadratic model was constructed to fit the production and the factors. Optimum medium composition was obtained by analysis of the model. When cultivated in the optimum medium, the production of macrolactin A was increased to 851 mg/L, 2.7 times as compared to the original. This study is also useful to find another way in utilizing F. bombycis. PMID:23549852

  6. A CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase purified from a marine bacterium, Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Hitomi; Mine, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Tatsuo; Yamamoto, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    A cytidine 5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-Neu5Ac) synthetase was found in a crude extract prepared from Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145, a marine bacterium that also produces a β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase. The CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase was purified from the crude extract of the cells by a combination of anion-exchange and gel filtration column chromatography. The purified enzyme migrated as a single band (60 kDa) on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The activity of the enzyme was maximal at 35 °C at pH 9.0, and the synthetase required Mg(2+) for activity. Although these properties are similar to those of other CMP-Neu5Ac synthetases isolated from bacteria, this synthetase produced not only CMP-Neu5Ac from cytidine triphosphate and Neu5Ac, but also CMP-N-glycolylneuraminic acid from cytidine triphosphate and N-glycolylneuraminic acid, unlike CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase purified from Escherichia coli.

  7. Interaction of Pb(II) and biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Supriya; Mangwani, Neelam; Das, Surajit

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (3D EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to evaluate the interaction of biofilm associated extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of a marine bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NP103 with lead [Pb(II)]. EEM fluorescence spectroscopic analysis revealed the presence of one protein-like fluorophore in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. Stern-Volmer equation indicated the existence of only one binding site (n = 0.789) in the EPS of P. pseudoalcaligenes NP103. The interaction of Pb(II) with EPS was spontaneous at room temperature (∆ G = - 2.78 kJ/K/mol) having binding constant (Kb) of 2.59 M- 1. ATR-FTIR analysis asserted the involvement of various functional groups such as sulphydryl, phosphate and hydroxyl and amide groups of protein in Pb(II) binding. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy analysis displayed reduced growth of biofilm with altered surface topology in Pb(II) supplemented medium. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed the entrapment of Pb in the EPS. Uronic acid, a characteristic functional group of biofilm, was observed in 1H NMR spectroscopy. The findings suggest that biofilm associated EPS are perfect organic ligands for Pb(II) complexation and may significantly augment the bioavailability of Pb(II) in the metal contaminated environment for subsequent sequestration.

  8. Digestion by serine proteases enhances salt tolerance of glutaminase in the marine bacterium Micrococcus luteus K-3.

    PubMed

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Yamashita, Ryoko; Masuo, Naohisa; Wakayama, Mamoru; Moriguchi, Mitsuaki

    2004-12-01

    Salt-tolerant glutaminase (Micrococcus glutaminase, with an apparent molecular mass of 48.3 kDa, intact glutaminase) from the marine bacterium Micrococcus luteus K-3 was digested using protease derived from M. luteus K-3. The digestion products were a large fragment (apparent molecular mass of 38.5 kDa, the glutaminase fragment) and small fragments (apparent molecular mass of 8 kDa). The digestion was inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). Digestion of intact glutaminase by serine proteases including trypsin, elastase, lysyl endopeptidase, and arginylendopeptidase also produced the glutaminase fragment. The N-terminus of the glutaminase fragment was the same as that of intact glutaminase. The N-termini of two small fragments were Ala394 and Ala396, respectively. The enzymological and kinetic properties of the glutaminase fragment were almost the same as those of intact glutaminase except for salt-tolerant behavior. The glutaminase fragment was a higher salt-tolerant enzyme than the intact glutaminase, suggesting that Micrococcus glutaminase is digested in the C-terminal region by serine protease from M. luteus K-3 to confer salt tolerance on glutaminase.

  9. Enhancing production of a 24-membered ring macrolide compound by a marine bacterium using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Wu, Mian-bin; Chen, Zheng-jie; Wang, Ming-lu; Lin, Jian-ping; Yang, Li-rong

    2013-04-01

    A 24-membered ring macrolide compound, macrolactin A has potential applications in pharmaceuticals for its anti-infectious and antiviral activity. In this study, macrolactin A was produced by a marine bacterium, which was identified as Bacillus subtilis by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence analysis. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy analyses were used to characterize this compound. To improve the production, response surface methodology (RSM) involving Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed. Faeces bombycis, the main by-product in sericulture, was used as a nitrogen source in fermentation. The interactions between three significant factors, F. bombycis, soluble starch, and (NH4)2SO4 were investigated. A quadratic model was constructed to fit the production and the factors. Optimum medium composition was obtained by analysis of the model. When cultivated in the optimum medium, the production of macrolactin A was increased to 851 mg/L, 2.7 times as compared to the original. This study is also useful to find another way in utilizing F. bombycis.

  10. Influence of subtilisin on the adhesion of a marine bacterium which produces mainly proteins as extracellular polymers.

    PubMed

    Leroy, C; Delbarre, C; Ghillebaert, F; Compere, C; Combes, D

    2008-09-01

    The nature of exopolymers involved in the adhesion of a marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. D41 was investigated to evaluate and understand the antifouling potential of subtilisin. The exopolymers of D41 produced by fermentation were analysed by FTIR and SDS-PAGE showing the presence of polysaccharides, glycoproteins and proteins. A high content of proteins was detected both in soluble and capsular fractions. The microscopic observations of fluorescamine and calcofluor stained adhered D41 indicated mainly the presence of proteins in exopolymers produced during adhesion. Subtilisin, the broad spectrum protease, tested in natural sea water and in polystyrene microplates showed that antifouling activity was higher in the prevention of bacterial adhesion than in the detachment of adhered D41 cells. Overall, these results demonstrate the involvement of proteins in Pseudoalteromonas sp. D41 adhesion and confirm the high antifouling potential of subtilisin. This study emphasizes the major role of proteins instead of polysaccharides, thus extending our knowledge regarding the nature of extracellular polymers involved in bacterial adhesion. Furthermore, the high antifouling potential of subtilisin evaluated in the very first stages of fouling, bacterial adhesion, could lead to less toxic compounds than organometallic compounds in antifouling paint.

  11. Characterization of a new marine nitrite oxidizing bacterium, Nitrospina watsonii sp. nov., a member of the newly proposed phylum "Nitrospinae".

    PubMed

    Spieck, Eva; Keuter, Sabine; Wenzel, Thilo; Bock, Eberhard; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Nitrite oxidizing bacteria are an integral part of the nitrogen cycle in marine waters, but the knowledge about their diversity is limited. Recently, a high abundance of Nitrospina-like 16S rRNA gene sequences has been detected in oceanic habitats with low oxygen content by molecular methods. Here, we describe a new strain of Nitrospina, which was sampled in 100m depth from the Black Sea. It coexisted with a not-yet cultivated chemoorganotrophic gammaproteobacterium and could be purified by classical isolation methods including Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The new Nitrospina-like bacterium grew lithoautotrophically at 28°C in diluted seawater supplemented with inorganic salts and nitrite. Gram-negative rods were characterized morphologically, physiologically and partly biochemically. The 16S rRNA gene of the new strain of Nitrospina is 97.9% similar to the described species N. gracilis and DNA/DNA hybridization experiments revealed a relatedness of 30.0%. The data from both Nitrospina species and environmental clones were used for an extensive 16S rRNA based phylogenetic study applying high quality filtering. Treeing analyses confirm the newly defined phylum status for "Nitrospinae" [18]. The results of phylogenetic and genotypic analyses support the proposal of a novel species Nitrospina watsonii sp. nov. (type strain 347(T), LMG 27401(T), NCIMB 14887(T)). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Ieodoglucomide C and Ieodoglycolipid, New Glycolipids from a Marine-Derived Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis 09IDYM23.

    PubMed

    Tareq, Fakir Shahidullah; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Shin, Hee Jae

    2015-05-01

    Chemical examination of the ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived bacterium Bacillus licheniformis resulted in the isolation of two new glycolipids, ieodoglucomide C (1) and ieodoglycolipid (2). The structural characterization of 1 and 2 was achieved by extensive spectroscopic evidence, including 2D NMR experiments. A combination of chemical derivatization techniques followed by NMR studies, LC-MS data analysis and a literature review was deployed for the establishment of the stereo-configurations of 1 and 2. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited good antibiotic properties against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MICs ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 μM. Furthermore, the antifungal activity of 1 and 2 was evaluated against plant pathogenic fungi Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum as well as the human pathogen Candida albicans. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited the mycelial growth of these pathogens with MIC values of 0.03-0.05 μM, revealing that these compounds are good candidates for the development of new fungicides.

  13. Bile acids are new products of a marine bacterium, Myroides sp. strain SM1.

    PubMed

    Maneerat, Suppasil; Nitoda, Teruhiko; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Kawai, Fusako

    2005-06-01

    Strain SM1 was isolated as a biosurfactant-producing microorganism from seawater and presumptively identified as Myroides sp., based on morphology, biochemical characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence. The strain produced surface-active compounds in marine broth, which were purified, using emulsification activity for n-hexadecane as an indicator. The purified compounds were identified by thin-layer chromatography, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectra and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry as cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and their glycine conjugates. Type strains of the genus Myroides, M. odoratus JCM7458 and M. odoramitimus JCM7460, also produced these compounds. Myroides sp. strain SM1 possessed a biosynthetic route to cholic acid from cholesterol. Thus, bile acids were found as new products of prokaryotic cells, genus Myroides.

  14. Effects of commercial enzymes on the adhesion of a marine biofilm-forming bacterium.

    PubMed

    Leroy, C; Delbarre, C; Ghillebaert, F; Compere, C; Combes, D

    2008-01-01

    The antifouling potential of commercial hydrolases, four proteases, seven glycosidases and one lipase was evaluated on the adhesion of marine Pseudoalteromonas sp. D41. The experimental method, adapted to screen antifouling agents, was based on bacterial adhesion in natural sterile sea water in a microtiter plate and on total biomass quantification by the fluorescent dye DAPI (4[prime]6-diamidino-2-phenylindole). Savinase (subtilisin) was the most effective hydrolase in both the prevention of bacterial adhesion and the removal of adhered bacteria. However, some enzymatic preparations tested such as Amano protease were not only ineffective but also increased the number of adhered bacterial cells. Enumeration using epifluorescence microscopy of CTC (5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride) and DAPI stained adhered D41 cells confirmed these observations. Overall, these results demonstrated that hydrolases could either prevent adhesion and remove adhered bacterial cells effectively, or conversely increase bacterial adhesion, depending on enzymatic concentrations and the type of enzymes tested.

  15. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D; Thrash, J Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, Emily K; Aldrich, Joshua T; Nicora, Carrie D; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H; Johnston, Andrew W B; Davie-Martin, Cleo L; Halsey, Kimberly H; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2016-05-16

    Marine phytoplankton produce ∼10(9) tonnes of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year(1,2), an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide(3,4). SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemo-organotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell's unusual requirement for reduced sulfur(5,6). Here, we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol, and that a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a cupin-like DMSP lyase, DddK, simultaneously shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to dimethyl sulfide production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of dimethyl sulfide as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis.

  16. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Haydn F.; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%. PMID:25814607

  17. Genome Sequence of Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus Strain MCTG13d, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-06-18

    Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus strain MCTG13d is a recently discovered bacterium that is associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and that almost exclusively utilizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 2,474,654 bp with 2,385 genes and has an average G+C content of 53.1%.

  18. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Thompson, Haydn F; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-03-26

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%.

  19. Genome Sequence of Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus Strain MCTG13d, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus strain MCTG13d is a recently discovered bacterium that is associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and that almost exclusively utilizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 2,474,654 bp with 2,385 genes and has an average G+C content of 53.1%. PMID:26089431

  20. Toxic Effect of a Marine Bacterium on Aquatic Organisms and Its Algicidal Substances against Phaeocystis globosa

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiuchan; Chen, Lina; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v) for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v), respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms. PMID:25646807

  1. Antibiofilm Activity of the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain 3J6▿

    PubMed Central

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Soum-Soutéra, Emmanuelle; Klein, Géraldine L.; Bazire, Alexis; Compère, Chantal; Haras, Dominique; Dufour, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Biofilm formation results in medical threats or economic losses and is therefore a major concern in a variety of domains. In two-species biofilms of marine bacteria grown under dynamic conditions, Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 3J6 formed mixed biofilms with Bacillus sp. strain 4J6 but was largely predominant over Paracoccus sp. strain 4M6 and Vibrio sp. strain D01. The supernatant of Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 liquid culture (SN3J6) was devoid of antibacterial activity against free-living Paracoccus sp. 4M6 and Vibrio sp. D01 cells, but it impaired their ability to grow as single-species biofilms and led to higher percentages of nonviable cells in 48-h biofilms. Antibiofilm molecules of SN3J6 were able to coat the glass surfaces used to grow biofilms and reduced bacterial attachment about 2-fold, which might partly explain the biofilm formation defect but not the loss of cell viability. SN3J6 had a wide spectrum of activity since it affected all Gram-negative marine strains tested except other Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilm biovolumes of the sensitive strains were reduced 3- to 530-fold, and the percentages of nonviable cells were increased 3- to 225-fold. Interestingly, SN3J6 also impaired biofilm formation by three strains belonging to the human-pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli. Such an antibiofilm activity is original and opens up a variety of applications for Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 and/or its active exoproducts in biofilm prevention strategies. PMID:20363799

  2. Toxic effect of a marine bacterium on aquatic organisms and its algicidal substances against Phaeocystis globosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiuchan; Chen, Lina; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms have caused enormous damage to the marine ecosystem and the coastal economy in China. In this paper, a bacterial strain B1, which had strong algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa, was isolated from the coastal waters of Zhuhai in China. The strain B1 was identified as Bacillus sp. on the basis of 16S rDNA gene sequence and morphological characteristics. To evaluate the ecological safety of the algicidal substances produced by strain B1, their toxic effects on marine organisms were tested. Results showed that there were no adverse effects observed in the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Chaetoceros muelleri, and Isochrystis galbana after exposure to the algicidal substances at a concentration of 1.0% (v/v) for 96 h. The 48h LC50 values for Brachionus plicatilis, Moina mongolica Daday and Paralichthys olivaceus were 5.7, 9.0 and 12.1% (v/v), respectively. Subsequently, the algicidal substances from strain B1 culture were isolated and purified by silica gel column, Sephadex G-15 column and high-performance liquid chromatography. Based on quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and PeakView Software, the purified substances were identified as prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine. Algicidal mechanism indicated that prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine inhibited the growth of P. globosa by disrupting the antioxidant systems. In the acute toxicity assessment using M. mongolica, 24h LC50 values of prolyl-methionine and hypoxanthine were 7.0 and 13.8 g/L, respectively. The active substances produced by strain B1 can be considered as ecologically and environmentally biological agents for controlling harmful algal blooms.

  3. Antibiofilm activity of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 3J6.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Alexandra; Soum-Soutéra, Emmanuelle; Klein, Géraldine L; Bazire, Alexis; Compère, Chantal; Haras, Dominique; Dufour, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Biofilm formation results in medical threats or economic losses and is therefore a major concern in a variety of domains. In two-species biofilms of marine bacteria grown under dynamic conditions, Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 3J6 formed mixed biofilms with Bacillus sp. strain 4J6 but was largely predominant over Paracoccus sp. strain 4M6 and Vibrio sp. strain D01. The supernatant of Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 liquid culture (SN(3J6)) was devoid of antibacterial activity against free-living Paracoccus sp. 4M6 and Vibrio sp. D01 cells, but it impaired their ability to grow as single-species biofilms and led to higher percentages of nonviable cells in 48-h biofilms. Antibiofilm molecules of SN(3J6) were able to coat the glass surfaces used to grow biofilms and reduced bacterial attachment about 2-fold, which might partly explain the biofilm formation defect but not the loss of cell viability. SN(3J6) had a wide spectrum of activity since it affected all Gram-negative marine strains tested except other Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilm biovolumes of the sensitive strains were reduced 3- to 530-fold, and the percentages of nonviable cells were increased 3- to 225-fold. Interestingly, SN(3J6) also impaired biofilm formation by three strains belonging to the human-pathogenic species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli. Such an antibiofilm activity is original and opens up a variety of applications for Pseudoalteromonas sp. 3J6 and/or its active exoproducts in biofilm prevention strategies.

  4. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aromatic-Hydrocarbon-Degrading Marine Bacterium Found Associated with Laboratory Cultures of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Green, David H.; Nichols, Peter D.; Whitman, William B.; Semple, Kirk T.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1 ω7c, and C18:1 ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  5. Excited-state absorption in bacteriochlorophyll a-protein from the green photosynthetic bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii: Reinterpretation of the absorption difference spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Amerongen, H. van; Struve, W.S. )

    1991-10-31

    Excited-state absorption arising from transitions between singly and doubly excited exciton components in strongly coupled photosynthetic antennae profoundly influences the absorption difference spectra observed in pump-probe spectroscopy. Model calculations of the absorption difference spectrum in the BChl a-protein complex from P. aestuarii are compared with the experimental spectrum.

  6. Trapping kinetics in mutants of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides: influence of the charge separation rate and consequences for the rate-limiting step in the light-harvesting process.

    PubMed

    Beekman, L M; van Mourik, F; Jones, M R; Visser, H M; Hunter, C N; van Grondelle, R

    1994-03-22

    The primary light-harvesting processes, energy transfer in the light-harvesting antenna, and trapping of the excited states by reaction centers were studied in several mutant strains of the photosynthetic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The mutants had reaction centers in which the rates of electron transfer were modified by site-directed mutations at the M210 position. Low-intensity pump-probe laser spectroscopy was used to monitor the absorbance transients in the Qy region of the antenna pigments, and it was found that despite a wide variation in charge separation rates within the RC, produced by the alterations at Tyr M210, there was relatively little corresponding variation in the overall trapping rate. These effects of the mutations on the trapping kinetics demonstrate that the rate-limiting step of the overall light-harvesting process is the transfer of the excitations from the antenna to the reaction center.

  7. Structural properties of the tubular appendage spinae from marine bacterium Roseobacter sp. strain YSCB

    PubMed Central

    Bernadac, A.; Wu, L.-F.; Santini, C.-L.; Vidaud, C.; Sturgis, J. N.; Menguy, N.; Bergam, P.; Nicoletti, C.; Xiao, T.

    2012-01-01

    Spinae are tubular surface appendages broadly found in Gram-negative bacteria. Little is known about their architecture, function or origin. Here, we report structural characterization of the spinae from marine bacteria Roseobacter sp. YSCB. Electron cryo-tomography revealed that a single filament winds into a hollow flared base with progressive change to a cylinder. Proteinase K unwound the spinae into proteolysis-resistant filaments. Thermal treatment ripped the spinae into ribbons that were melted with prolonged heating. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a dominant beta-structure of the spinae. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses showed three endothermic transformations at 50–85°C, 98°C and 123°C, respectively. The heating almost completely disintegrated the spinae, abolished the 98°C transition and destroyed the beta-structure. Infrared spectroscopy identified the amide I spectrum maximum at a position similar to that of amyloid fibrils. Therefore, the spinae distinguish from other bacterial appendages, e.g. flagella and stalks, in both the structure and mechanism of assembly. PMID:23230515

  8. Shimia sagamensis sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from cold-seep sediment.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Yuichi; Mori, Kozue; Uchida, Hiromi; Hatada, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    A novel marine bacterial strain designated JAMH 011(T) was isolated from the cold-seep sediment in Sagami Bay, Japan. Cells were Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, aerobic chemo-organotrophs and motile by means of a single polar flagellum. Growth occurred at temperatures below 31 °C, with the optimum at 25 °C. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The predominant fatty acid was C18 : 1ω7c. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolated strain was closely affiliated with members of the genus Shimia in the class Alphaproteobacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of the novel isolate with the type strain of the closest related species, Shimia haliotis WM35(T), was 98.1%. The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 57.3 mol%. The hybridization values for DNA-DNA relatedness between strain JAMH 011(T) and reference strains belonging to the genus Shimia were less than 9.4 ± 0.7%. Based on differences in taxonomic characteristics, the isolated strain represents a novel species of the genus Shimia, for which the name Shimia sagamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is JAMH 011(T) ( = JCM 30583(T) = DSM 29734(T)).

  9. Thalassobius abyssi sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from the cold-seep sediment.

    PubMed

    Nogi, Yuichi; Mori, Kozue; Makita, Hiroko; Hatada, Yuji

    2015-11-09

    A novel marine bacterial strain designated JAMH 043T was isolated from the cold-seep sediment in Sagami Bay, Japan. Cells were Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile and aerobic chemo-organotrophs. The cells of the isolate grew optimally at 25 °C, pH 7.0-7.5, and with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10. The predominant fatty acid was C18:1ω7c. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolated strain was closely affiliated with members of the genus Thalassobius in the class Alphaproteobacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of the novel isolate with the type strain of closest related species, Thalassobius aestuarii JC2049T, was 98.4 %. The DNA G+C content of the novel strain was 58.0 mol%. The hybridization values for DNA-DNA relatedness between strain JAMH043T and reference strains belonging to the genus Thalassobius were less than 14.1±2.2 %. Based on differences in taxonomic characteristics, the isolated strain represents a novel species of the genus Thalassobius, for which the name Thalassobius abyssi sp. nov. is proposed. Type strain is JAMH 043T (=JCM 30900T =DSMZ 100673T).

  10. Glaciecola agarilytica sp. nov., an agar-digesting marine bacterium from the East Sea, Korea.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jeong-Joong; Park, Soo-Je; Kim, Hyeon-Ju; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2007-05-01

    A taxonomic study was carried out on an isolate, strain NO2(T), from marine sediment collected from the East Sea, Korea. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence studies showed that this strain belonged to the Gammaproteobacteria and was most closely related to Glaciecola mesophila KMM 241(T) and Glaciecola polaris LMG 21857(T) (98.6 and 98.0 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, respectively). The isolate was Gram-negative, aerobic and slightly halophilic and grew in 2-8 % NaCl and at 7-30 degrees C. Strain NO2(T) shared some physiological and biochemical properties with G. mesophila KMM 241(T) and G. polaris LMG 21857(T). The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain NO2(T) was 45 mol%. Strain NO2(T) possessed C(16 : 0), summed feature 4 (C(16 : 1)omega7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH) and summed feature 7 (C(18 : 1)omega9c/omega12t/omega7c) as the major cellular fatty acids. DNA-DNA relatedness data indicated that strain NO2(T) represents a distinct species that is separate from G. mesophila and G. polaris. On the basis of polyphasic evidence, it is proposed that strain NO2(T) (=KCTC 12755(T)=LMG 23762(T)) represents the type strain of a novel species, Glaciecola agarilytica sp. nov.

  11. Biodegradable Polymeric Substances Produced by a Marine Bacterium from a Surplus Stream of the Biodiesel Industry.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sourish; Dubey, Sonam; Singh, Priyanka; Shrivastava, Anupama; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-11-30

    Crude glycerol is generated as a by-product during transesterification process and during hydrolysis of fat in the soap-manufacturing process, and poses a problem for waste management. In the present approach, an efficient process was designed for simultaneous production of 0.2 g/L extracellular ε-polylysine and 64.6% (w/w) intracellular polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) in the same fermentation broth (1 L shake flask) utilizing Jatropha biodiesel waste residues as carbon rich source by marine bacterial strain (Bacillus licheniformis PL26), isolated from west coast of India. The synthesized ε-polylysine and polyhydroxyalkanoate PHA by Bacillus licheniformis PL26 was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning colorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and ¹H Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The PHA produced by Bacillus licheniformis was found to be poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate (P3HB-co-3HV). The developed process needs to be statistically optimized further for gaining still better yield of both the products in an efficient manner.

  12. Spongiispira norvegica gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from the boreal sponge Isops phlegraei.

    PubMed

    Kaesler, Ines; Graeber, Ingeborg; Borchert, Martin S; Pape, Thomas; Dieckmann, Ralf; von Döhren, Hans; Nielsen, Preben; Lurz, Rudi; Michaelis, Walter; Szewzyk, Ulrich

    2008-08-01

    The bacterial strain Gp_4_7.1T, isolated from the marine sponge Isops phlegraei collected at the Sula Ridge off the Norwegian coast, was characterized. The isolate was a motile spirillum that was monopolarly and monotrichously flagellated. It was aerobic, Gram-negative, oxidase-positive and catalase-negative. Optimal growth occurred between 20 and 30 degrees C, at pH 7-8 and with a salt concentration of 2-3 % (w/v). The isolate showed a relatively restricted nutritional profile. Substrate utilization tests were only positive for arabinose. Enzyme tests were positive for esterase lipase C8, lipase C14, leucine arylamidase and naphthol-AS-BI-phosphohydrolase. The strain was not able to reduce nitrate. The major cellular fatty acids were C16:1 omega7 and C16:0. The DNA G+C content was 62.6 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison classified the strain as a member of the order Oceanospirillales in the class Gammaproteobacteria. Strain Gp_4_7.1T formed a distinct phyletic line with less than 94 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to its closest relatives with validly published names. Based on the determined data, it is proposed that the strain represents a novel species in a new genus, Spongiispira norvegica gen. nov., sp. nov.; the type strain of Spongiispira norvegica is Gp_4_7.1T (=DSM 17749T =NCIMB 14401T).

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Stationary Phase in the Marine Bacterium 'Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'

    SciTech Connect

    Sowell, Sarah M.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Smith, Richard D.; Barofsky, Douglas F.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2008-05-01

    Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique, an abundant marine alphaproteobacterium, subsists in nature at low ambient nutrient concentrations and may often be exposed to nutrient limitation, but its genome revealed no evidence of global regulatory adaptations to stationary phase. We used high-resolution capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled online to an LTQ mass spectrometer to build an Accurate Mass and Time (AMT) tag library, and employed the AMT tag approach to quantitatively examine proteome differences between exponentially growing and stationary phase Cand. P. ubique cells cultivated in a seawater medium. The AMT tag library represented 72% of the predicted protein coding genes. Stationary phase protein abundance increased for OsmC, which mitigates oxidative damage, and for molecular chaperones, enzymes involved in methionine and cysteine biosynthesis, proteins involved in rho-dependent transcription termination, and the signal transduction enzymes CheY-FisH and ChvG. Our findings indicate that Cand. P. ubique responds adaptively to stationary phase by increasing the abundance of a suite of proteins that contribute to homeostasis, but does not undergo major proteome remodeling. We speculate that this limited response may enable Cand. P. ubique to cope with ambient conditions in which nutrients are often insufficient for short periods, and the ability to resume growth overrides the capacity for long term survival afforded by more comprehensive global stationary phase responses.

  14. Cloning and characterization of three epoxide hydrolases from a marine bacterium, Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jung-Hee; Hwang, Young-Ok; Kang, Sung Gyun; Lee, Hyun Sook; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Kim, Sang-Jin

    2007-08-01

    Previously, we reported that ten strains belonging to Erythrobacter showed epoxide hydrolase (EHase) activities toward various epoxide substrates. Three genes encoding putative EHases were identified by analyzing open reading frames of Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594. Despite low similarities to reported EHases, the phylogenetic analysis of the three genes showed that eeh1 was similar to microsomal EHase, while eeh2 and eeh3 could be grouped with soluble EHases. The three EHase genes were cloned, and the recombinant proteins (rEEH1, rEEH2, and rEEH3) were purified. The functionality of purified proteins was proved by hydrolytic activities toward styrene oxide. EEH1 preferentially hydrolyzed (R)-styrene oxide, whereas EEH3 preferred to hydrolyze (S)-styrene oxide, representing enantioselective hydrolysis of styrene oxide. On the other hand, EEH2 could hydrolyze (R)- and (S)-styrene oxide at an equal rate. The optimal pH and temperature for the EHases occurred largely at neutral pHs and 40-55 degrees C. The substrate selectivity of rEEH1, rEEH2, and rEEH3 toward various epoxide substrates were also investigated. This is the first representation that a strict marine microorganism possessed three EHases with different enantioselectivity toward styrene oxide.

  15. The abundant marine bacterium Pelagibacter simultaneously catabolizes dimethylsulfoniopropionate to the gases dimethyl sulfide and methanethiol

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jing; Todd, Jonathan D.; Thrash, J. Cameron; Qian, Yanping; Qian, Michael C.; Temperton, Ben; Guo, Jiazhen; Fowler, Emily K.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.; De Leenheer, Patrick; Payne, Samuel H.; Johnston, Andrew W. B.; Davie-Martin, Cleo L.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2016-05-16

    Marine phytoplankton produce ~109 tons of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) per year1,2, an estimated 10% of which is catabolized by bacteria through the DMSP cleavage pathway to the climatically active gas dimethyl sulfide (DMS)3,4. SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria (order Pelagibacterales), the most abundant chemoorganotrophic bacteria in the oceans, have been shown to assimilate DMSP into biomass, thereby supplying this cell’s unusual requirement for reduced sulfur5,6. Here we report that Pelagibacter HTCC1062 produces the gas methanethiol (MeSH) and that simultaneously a second DMSP catabolic pathway, mediated by a DMSP lyase, shunts as much as 59% of DMSP uptake to DMS production. We propose a model in which the allocation of DMSP between these pathways is kinetically controlled to release increasing amounts of DMS as the supply of DMSP exceeds cellular sulfur demands for biosynthesis. These findings suggest that DMSP supply and demand relationships in Pelagibacter metabolism are important to determining rates of oceanic DMS production.

  16. Characterization of the first alginolytic operons in a marine bacterium: from their emergence in marine Flavobacteriia to their independent transfers to marine Proteobacteria and human gut Bacteroides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, François; Barbeyron, Tristan; Tonon, Thierry; Génicot, Sabine; Czjzek, Mirjam; Michel, Gurvan

    2012-09-01

    Alginate constitutes a significant part of seaweed biomass and thus a crucial nutrient for numerous marine heterotrophic bacteria. However, the mechanisms for alginate assimilation remain largely unknown in marine microorganisms. We show here that the genome of the marine flavobacterium Zobellia galactanivorans contains seven putative alginate lyase genes, five of them localized within two clusters comprising additional carbohydrate-related genes. The transcription of these genes and the alginolytic activity were strongly induced when Z. galactanivorans used alginate as sole carbon source. These clusters were shown to be transcribed as polycistronic mRNAs and thus to constitute operons. Several candidate enzymes were successfully overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and their activity tested. Particularly, AlyA1, AlyA4, AlyA5 and AlyA7 are confirmed as active alginate lyases. Zg2622 and Zg2614 are a dehydrogenase and a kinase, respectively, further converting the terminal unsaturated monosaccharides released by alginate lyases into 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate. In-depth phylogenomic analyses reveal that such alginolytic operons originated from an ancestral marine flavobacterium and were independently transferred to marine proteobacteria and Japanese gut Bacteroides. These bacteria thus gained the capacity to assimilate the main polysaccharide of brown algae, an adaptive advantage in coastal environments but also in the gut microbiota of specific human population. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Ability of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to counteract the toxicity of CdSe nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Isabelle; Kuhn, Lauriane; Demortière, Arnaud; Mirvaux, Boris; Hammann, Philippe; Chicher, Johana; Caplat, Christelle; Pallud, Marie; Bertrand, Martine

    2016-10-04

    In the marine environment, bacteria from estuarine and coastal sediments are among the first targets of nanoparticle pollution; it is therefore relevant to improve the knowledge of interactions between bacteria and nanoparticles. In this work, the response of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BA3SM1 to CdSe nanocrystals (CdSe NPs) of 3nm (NP3) and 8nm (NP8) in diameter was evaluated through microscopic, physiological, biochemical and proteomic approaches. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that NP3 were able to penetrate the bacteria, while NP8 were highly concentrated around the cells, embedded in large exopolysaccharides. In our experimental conditions, both CdSe NP sizes induced a decrease in respiration during the stationary growth phase, while only NP8 caused growth retardation and a decrease in pyoverdine production. Proteomic analyses highlighted that the strain responded to CdSe NP toxicity by inducing various defence mechanisms such as cell aggregation, extracellular CdSe NP sequestration, effective protection against oxidative stress, modifications of envelope organization and properties, and cadmium export. In addition, BA3SM1 presented a biosorption capacity of 1.6×10(16)NP3/g dry weight and 1.7×10(15)NP8/g dry weight. This strain therefore appears as a promising agent for NP bioremediation processes. Proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004012. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report focussing on the effects of CdSe colloidal nanocrystals (CdSe NPs) on a marine strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens. CdSe NPs are extensively used in the industry of renewable energies and it is regrettably expected that these pollutants will sometime soon appear in the marine environment through surface runoff, urban effluents and rivers. Bacteria living in estuarine and coastal sediments will be among the first targets of these new pollutants. The pseudomonads are frequently found in these ecosystems

  18. Biomineralogy and Morphology of the Marine Iron-oxidizing Bacterium Mariprofundus ferrooxydans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. S.; Emerson, D.; Edwards, K. J.

    2006-12-01

    Mariprofundus ferrooxydans strain PV-1 is a lithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing proteobacterium isolated from the Loihi Seamount in Hawaii. As cells grow, they form filaments upon which iron minerals are deposited. Based on similarities in morphology, these structures appear to accumulate and form the bulk of iron mats at Loihi. Furthermore, Mariprofundus has been observed in a number of other seafloor mat samples (e.g. by microscopy and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of East Pacific Rise samples, C. M. Santelli unpublished data), suggesting that the occurrence of Mariprofundus is widespread. To learn about the effect of Mariprofundus on iron cycling, we are studying the processes by which it oxidizes iron and influences iron mineral formation. We are conducting studies on the spatial relationships between the cells, stalks, and minerals using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Identification and imaging of stalk-bound, nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide minerals is being performed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We have developed sample preparation methods to preserve in vivo spatial relationships, involving direct colonization of sample holders in cultures and in the environment. Method development has been performed on stalk-forming, iron-oxidizing Gallionella ferruginea cultures and terrestrial iron mats. Gallionella is morphologically and physiologically very similar to Mariprofundus, although 16S rRNA gene phylogeny shows that they are not closely related. Comparison of the terrestrial and marine iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) gives us insight into adaptations that are particular to marine iron-oxidizers and those that are common to all FeOB. Light and fluorescence microscopy of Mariprofundus cultures has shown that a single bean-shaped cell lies at the end of each filament. SEM and TEM results have revealed that the filament is ribbon-like, sometimes twisted as with the classic Gallionella stalk, but sometimes not

  19. Shewanella arctica sp. nov., an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Arctic marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Jeong; Park, Soo-Je; Oh, Yong-Sik; Lee, Sang-Ah; Shin, Kee-Sun; Roh, Dong-Hyun; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2012-05-01

    Two strains of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, which could couple lactate oxidation to iron reduction for energy conservation, were isolated from Arctic marine sediment. The strains, IR12(T) and IR26, were both Gram-staining-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive and facultative anaerobes. Their cells were rod-shaped and motile by means of a polar flagellum. Both strains grew in the presence of 0.5-3.5 % (w/v) NaCl, with an absolute requirement for Na(+). Both were psychrotolerant since they could grow at 4-28 °C but had an optimum growth temperature of 20 °C. Both grew at pH 4.5-9.0 (optimum, pH 7.5). The major fatty acids of strains IR12(T) and IR26 were summed feature 3 (C(16 : 1)ω6c and/or C(16 : 1)ω7c) and C(16 : 0). Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strains IR12(T) and IR26 belonged to the class Gammaproteobacteria and were most closely related to Shewanella vesiculosa M7(T), Shewanella livingstonensis NF22(T) and Shewanella frigidimarina ACAM 591(T) (with 98.5 and 98.8 %, 98.5 and 98.8 %, and 98.5 and 98.8 % sequence similarities, respectively). The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains IR12(T) and IR26 were 40.0 and 40.3 mol%, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness data indicated that the two novel strains represented a single species that was distinct from S. vesiculosa M7(T), S. livingstonensis NF22(T) and S. frigidimarina ACAM 591(T). Based on the phylogenetic, phenotypic and DNA-DNA relatedness data, the two new strains represent a single novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella arctica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IR12(T) ( = KCTC 23109(T) = JCM 16723(T)).

  20. Winogradskyella psychrotolerans sp. nov., a marine bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from Arctic sediment.

    PubMed

    Begum, Z; Srinivas, T N R; Manasa, P; Sailaja, B; Sunil, B; Prasad, S; Shivaji, S

    2013-05-01

    A novel Gram-negative, rod-coccus shaped, non-motile, strain, RS-3(T), was isolated from a sediment sample collected from the marine transect of Kongsfjorden, Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, Arctic. Colonies and broth cultures were yellowish in colour due to the presence of carotenoids. Strain RS-3(T) was positive for oxidase, aesculinase, caseinase, gelatinase and urease activities and negative for amylase, catalase, lipase, lysine decarboxylase, ornithine decarboxylase, DNase and β-galactosidase activities. The predominant fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0 (18.0), anteiso-C15 : 0 (16.8), iso-C15 : 1 G (14.2), anteiso-C15 : 1 A (6.0) and iso-C15 : 0 3-OH (6.8). Strain RS-3(T) contained MK-6 (72.42 %) and MK-7 (27.58 %) as the major respiratory quinones and phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified lipids make up the polar lipid composition. The DNA G+C content of strain RS-3(T) was 34.7±1.2 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that Winogradskyella pacifica and Winogradskyella thalassocola are the most closely related species with sequence similarities to the type strains of these species of 98.5 and 97.7 %, respectively. However, DNA-DNA hybridization with Winogradskyella pacifica KCTC 22997(T) and Winogradskyella thalassocola DSM 15363(T) showed a relatedness of 22 and 42.5 % with respect to strain RS-3(T). Based on the DNA-DNA hybridization values, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic inference, strain RS-3(T) is proposed as a novel species of the genus Winogradskyella, for which the name Winogradskyella psychrotolerans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Winogradskyella psychrotolerans sp. nov. is RS-3(T) ( = CIP 110154(T) = NBRC 106169(T)). An emended description of the genus Winogradskyella is provided.

  1. Kordia ulvae sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from the surface of green marine algae Ulva sp.

    PubMed

    Qi, Feng; Huang, Zhaobin; Lai, Qiliang; Li, Dengfeng; Shao, Zongze

    2016-04-20

    A novel bacterial strain SC2T was isolated from Ulva sp. a green marine algae. Strain SC2T was Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped and had no flagellum. Oxidase and catalase were positive. Strain SC2T can degrade skim milk, agar, soluble starch, Tween 20 and Tween 80. The optimal salinity and temperature of strain SC2T were 2% and 30 °C, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene indicated that strain SC2T was affiliated to the genus Kordia, with highest sequence similarity to Kordia algicida OT-1T (97.23%), Kordia antarctica IMCC3317T (97.23%) and Kordia jejudonensis SSK3-3T (97.02%); other species of the genus Kordia shared 93.98%-95.78% sequence similarity. The ANI value and the DNA-DNA hybridization estimated value between strain SC2T and three type strains (K. algicida OT-1T, K. antarctica IMCC3317T and K. jejudonensis SSK3-3T) were found to be 79.4%-82.4% and 24.2%-27.0%, respectively. The predominant fatty acids (>5.0%) were C16:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C15:0 3-OH, iso-C17:0 3-OH, summed feature 3 (comprised C16:1 ω7c/C16:1 ω6c), summed feature 8 (comprised C18:1 ω7c/C18:1 ω6c) and summed feature 9 (comprised iso-C17:1 ω9c/C16:0 10-methyl). The respiratory quinone was Menaquinone-6 (MK-6). The polar lipid profile consisted of four unknown lipids, three unidentified phospholipids, one unidentified aminolipid and one phosphatidylethanolamine. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.5 mol%. The combined genotypic and phenotypic data showed that strain SC2T represents a novel species within the genus Kordia, for which the name Kordia ulvae sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain SC2T (= KCTC 42872T = MCCC 1A01772T = LMG 29123T).

  2. Structure and function of a short LOV protein from the marine phototrophic bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae.

    PubMed

    Endres, Stephan; Granzin, Joachim; Circolone, Franco; Stadler, Andreas; Krauss, Ulrich; Drepper, Thomas; Svensson, Vera; Knieps-Grünhagen, Esther; Wirtz, Astrid; Cousin, Anneliese; Tielen, Petra; Willbold, Dieter; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Batra-Safferling, Renu

    2015-02-14

    Light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domains are widely distributed in plants, algae, fungi, bacteria, and represent the photo-responsive domains of various blue-light photoreceptor proteins. Their photocycle involves the blue-light triggered adduct formation between the C(4a) atom of a non-covalently bound flavin chromophore and the sulfur atom of a conserved cysteine in the LOV sensor domain. LOV proteins show considerable variation in the structure of N- and C-terminal elements which flank the LOV core domain, as well as in the lifetime of the adduct state. Here, we report the photochemical, structural and functional characterization of DsLOV, a LOV protein from the photoheterotrophic marine α-proteobacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae which exhibits an average adduct state lifetime of 9.6 s at 20°C, and thus represents the fastest reverting bacterial LOV protein reported so far. Mutational analysis in D. shibae revealed a unique role of DsLOV in controlling the induction of photopigment synthesis in the absence of blue-light. The dark state crystal structure of DsLOV determined at 1.5 Å resolution reveals a conserved core domain with an extended N-terminal cap. The dimer interface in the crystal structure forms a unique network of hydrogen bonds involving residues of the N-terminus and the β-scaffold of the core domain. The structure of photoexcited DsLOV suggests increased flexibility in the N-cap region and a significant shift in the Cα backbone of β strands in the N- and C-terminal ends of the LOV core domain. The results presented here cover the characterization of the unusual short LOV protein DsLOV from Dinoroseobacter shibae including its regulatory function, extremely fast dark recovery and an N-terminus mediated dimer interface. Due to its unique photophysical, structural and regulatory properties, DsLOV might thus serve as an alternative model system for studying light perception by LOV proteins and physiological responses in bacteria.

  3. Quantitative measurement of the growth rate of the PHA-producing photosynthetic bacterium Rhodocyclus gelatinous CBS-2[PolyHydroxyAlkanoate

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfrum, E.J.; Weaver, P.F.

    1999-07-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been investigating the use of model photosynthetic microorganisms that use sunlight and two-carbon organic substrates (e.g., ethanol, acetate) to produce biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) copolymers as carbon storage compounds. Use of these biological PHAs in single-use plastics applications, followed by their post-consumer composting or anaerobic digestion, could impact petroleum consumption as well as the overloading of landfills. The large-scale production of PHA polymers by photosynthetic bacteria will require large-scale reactor systems utilizing either sunlight or artificial illumination. The first step in the scale-up process is to quantify the microbial growth rates and the PHA production rates as a function of reaction conditions such as nutrient concentration, temperature, and light quality and intensity.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Flow into Photosynthetic Products Functioning as Carbon Storage in the Marine Coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yoshinori; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Iwane; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    The bloom-forming coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi (Haptophyta) is a dominant marine phytoplankton, cells of which are covered with calcareous plates (coccoliths). E. huxleyi produces unique lipids of C37-C40 long-chain ketones (alkenones) with two to four trans-unsaturated bonds, β-glucan (but not α-glucan) and acid polysaccharide (AP) associated with the morphogenesis of CaCO3 crystals in coccoliths. Despite such unique features, there is no detailed information on the patterns of carbon allocation into these compounds. Therefore, we performed quantitative estimation of carbon flow into various macromolecular products by conducting (14)C-radiotracer experiments using NaH(14)CO3 as a substrate. Photosynthetic (14)C incorporation into low molecular-mass compounds (LMC), extracellular AP, alkenones, and total lipids except alkenones was estimated to be 35, 13, 17, and 25 % of total (14)C fixation in logarithmic growth phase cells and 33, 19, 18, and 18 % in stationary growth phase cells, respectively. However, less than 1 % of (14)C was incorporated into β-glucan in both cells. (14)C-mannitol occupied ca. 5 % of total fixed (14)C as the most dominant LMC product. Levels of all (14)C compounds decreased in the dark. Therefore, alkenones and LMC (including mannitol), but not β-glucan, function in carbon/energy storage in E. huxleyi, irrespective of the growth phase. Compared with other algae, the low carbon flux into β-glucan is a unique feature of carbon metabolism in E. huxelyi.

  5. Molecular topology of the photosynthetic light-harvesting pigment complex, peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein, from marine dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Song, P S; Koka, P; Prézelin, B B; Haxo, F T

    1976-10-05

    The photosynthetic light-harvesting complex, peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein, was isolated from several marine dinoflagellates including Glenodinium sp. by Sephadex and ion-exchange chromatography. The carotenoid (peridinin)-chlorophyll a ratio in the complex is estimated to be 4:1. The fluorescence excitation spectrum of the complex indicates that energy absorbed by the carotenoid is transferred to the chlorophyll a molecule with 100% efficiency. Fluorescence lifetime measurements indicate that the energy transfer is much faster than fluorescence emission from chlorophyll a. The four peridinin molecules within the complex appear to form two allowed exciton bands which split the main absorption band of the carotenoid into two circular dichronic bands (with negative ellipticity band at 538 nm and positive band at 463 nm in the case of peridinin-chlorophyl a-protein complex from Glenodinium sp.). The fluorescence polarization of chlorophyll a in the complex at 200 K is about 0.1 in both circular dichroic excitation bands of the carotenoid chromophore. From these circular dichroic and fluorescence polarization data, a possible molecular arrangement of the four peridinin and chlorophyll molecules has been deduced for the complex. The structure of the complex deduced is also consistent with the magnitude of the exciton spliting (ca. greater than 3000 cm-1) at the intermolecular distance in the dimer pair of peridinin (ca. 12 A). This structural feature accounts for the efficient light-harvesting process of dinoflagellates as the exciton interaction lengthens the lifetime of peridinin (radiative) and the complex topology increases the energy transfer probability. The complex is, therefore, a useful molecular model for elucidating the mechanism and efficiency of solar energy conversion in vivo as well as in vitro.

  6. The use of solar radiation by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodopseudomonas palustris: model simulation of conditions found in a shallow pond or a flatbed reactor.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Raymond J

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria are attractive for biotechnology because they produce no oxygen and so H2 -production is not inhibited by oxygen as occurs in oxygenic photoorganisms. Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Afifella marina containing BChl a can use irradiances from violet near-UV (VNUV) to orange (350-650 nm) light and near-infrared (NIR) light (762-870 nm). Blue diode-based pulse amplitude modulation technology was used to measure their photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR). ETR vs Irradiance curves fitted the waiting-in-line model--ETR = (ETRmax × E/Eopt) × exp (1 - E/Eopt). The equation was integrated over pond depth to calculate ETR of Afifella and Rhodopseudomonas in a pond up to 30 cm deep (A376, 1 cm = 0.1). Afifella saturates at low irradiances and so photoinhibition results in very low photosynthesis in a pond. Rhodopseudomonas saturates at ≈15% sunlight and shows photoinhibition in the surface layers of the pond. Total ETR is ≈335 μmol (e(-)) m(-2) s(-1) in NUV + photosynthetically active radiation light (350-700 nm). Daily ETR curves saturate at low irradiances and have a square-wave shape: ≈11-13 mol (e(-)) m(-2) day(-1) (350-700 nm). Up to 20-24% of daily 350-700 nm irradiance can be converted into ETR. NIR is absorbed by water and so competes with the bacterial RC-2 photosystem for photons. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Lacinutrix gracilariae sp. nov., a bacterium isolated from the surface of a marine red alga Gracilaria sp.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhaobin; Li, Guizhen; Lai, Qiliang; Gu, Li; Shao, Zongze

    2015-11-09

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, non-flagellated, rod-shaped bacterium, designated as strain Lxc1T, was isolated from the surface of a marine red alga, Gracilaria sp., which was collected from the coastal regions in Jinjiang, Fujian Province, China. The colony of the strain was orange-yellow, circular and smooth. The 16S rRNA gene of Lxc1T had maximum sequence similarity with Lacinutrix himadriensis E4-9aT (97.1%), followed by L. jangbogonensis PAMC 27137T, L. copepodicola DJ3T, L. algicola AKS293T, and L. mariniflava AKS 432T (similarities <96.4%). Phylogenetic analysis showed strain Lxc1T formed a tight cluster with L. himadriensis E4-9aT and L. copepodicola DJ3T, but represented a novel lineage belonging to the genus Lacinutrix. The predominant fatty acids were iso-C15:1 G (18.3%), iso-C15:0 (16.7%), iso-C17:0-3OH (10.6%), and iso-C15:0-3OH (8.6%). Menaquinone-6 (MK-6) was the only respiratory quinone present. The DNA G+C content of Lxc1T was 31.7 mol%. Combining the results above, it was ascertained that the strain Lxc1T represented a novel species of the genus Lacinutrix, for which the name Lacinutrix gracilariae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Lxc1T (=MCCC 1A01567T=KCTC 42808T).

  8. Lutibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from tidal flat sediment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong H; Cho, Byung C

    2006-04-01

    A rod-shaped marine bacterium, designated strain CL-TF09T, isolated from a tidal flat in Ganghwa, Korea, was characterized based on its physiological and biochemical features, fatty acid profile and phylogenetic position. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed a clear affiliation with the family Flavobacteriaceae. Strain CL-TF09T showed the closest phylogenetic relationship with the genera Tenacibaculum and Polaribacter; sequence similarities between CL-TF09T and the type strains of Tenacibaculum and Polaribacter species ranged from 90.7 to 91.8 %. Cells of strain CL-TF09T were non-motile and grew on solid media as yellow colonies. The strain grew in the presence of 1-5 % sea salts, within a temperature range of 5-30 degrees C and at pH 7-8. The strain had iso-C(15 : 0) 3-OH (17.4 %), iso-C(15 : 0) (16.7 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (15.1 %) and iso-C(16 : 0) 3-OH (13.4 %) as predominant fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 33.9 mol%. Based on the physiological, fatty acid composition and phylogenetic data presented, strain CL-TF09T is considered to represent a novel genus and species of the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Lutibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CL-TF09T (=KCCM 42118T = JCM 13034T).

  9. Litoricolaceae fam. nov., to include Litoricola lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium belonging to the order Oceanospirillales.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hana; Choo, Yoe-Jin; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2007-08-01

    A Gram-negative, non-motile, chemoheterotrophic, facultatively aerobic, short-rod-shaped bacterium, designated IMCC1097(T), was isolated from coastal seawater (10 m depth) of the East Sea, Korea. The temperature, pH and NaCl ranges for growth were 15-30 degrees C, pH 5.0-10.0 and 1.5-10 % NaCl. The colonies of the strain were very small, having a mean diameter of 0.05 mm. 16S rRNA gene sequence data indicated that the strain was most closely related to genera within the class Gammaproteobacteria. Members of the most closely related genera showed less than 90 % sequence similarity and included Saccharospirillum (89.3 %), Oleiphilus (88.7 %), Reinekea (88.2 %), Alcanivorax (86.4-87.6 %) and Zooshikella (87.6 %), which represent five different families of the order Oceanospirillales. Phylogenetic analyses showed that this marine strain represented a distinct phylogenetic lineage in the order Oceanospirillales and could not be assigned to any of the defined families in the order. The predominant fatty acids were C(16 : 1) omega 7c and/or iso-C(15 : 0) 2-OH, C(18 : 1) omega 7c and C(10 : 0) 3-OH, and the DNA G+C content was 57.9 mol%. These chemotaxonomic properties, together with phenotypic characteristics, served to differentiate the strain from phylogenetically closely related genera. The very low sequence similarities (<90 %) and distant relationships between IMCC1097(T) and members of the order Oceanospirillales suggested that the strain merited classification within a novel genus within a novel family in the order. On the basis of taxonomic evidence collected in this study, a novel genus and species are proposed, Litoricola lipolytica gen. nov., sp. nov., within a new family Litoricolaceae fam. nov. Strain IMCC1097(T) (=KCCM 42360(T) =NBRC 102074(T)) is the type strain of Litoricola lipolytica.

  10. Molecular characterization of a homolog of the ferric-uptake regulator, Fur, from the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893.

    PubMed

    Barker, Ryan A; Tisnado, Jerrell; Lambert, Lisa A; Gärdes, Astrid; Carrano, Mary W; Carrano, Paul N; Gillian, Christopher; Carrano, Carl J

    2015-02-01

    Full length recombinant iron regulatory protein, Fur, has been isolated and characterized from the algal-associated marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Under nondenaturing conditions the Fur protein behaves on size exclusion chromatography as a dimer while it is monomeric under SDS PAGE conditions. ICP-MS and fluorescence quenching experiments show that Mb-Fur binds a single metal ion (Zn, Mn, or Co) per monomer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to probe the interaction of Mb-Fur with the purported Fur box in the promoter region upstream of the vibrioferrin biosynthetic operon. Interaction of Mb-Fur with a 100 bp DNA fragment containing the Fur box in the presence of 10 µM Mn, Co or Zn(II) resulted in decreased migration of DNA on a 7.5% polyacrylamide gel. In the absence of the Fur protein or the metal, no interaction is seen. The presence of EDTA in the binding, loading or running buffers also abolished all activity demonstrating the importance of the metal in formation of the promoter-repressor complex. Based on a high degree of similarity between Mb-Fur and its homolog from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) whose X-ray structure is known we developed a structural model for the former which suggested that only one of the several metal binding sites found in other Fur's would be functional. This is consistent with the single metal binding stoichiometry we observed. Since the purported metal binding site was one that has been described as "structural" rather than "functional" in PA and yet the monometallic Mb-Fur retains DNA Fur box binding ability it reopens the question of which site is which, or if different species have adapted the sites for different purposes.

  11. Molecular characterization of a homolog of the ferric-uptake regulator, Fur, from the marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Ryan A.; Tisnado, Jerrell; Lambert, Lisa A.; Gärdes, Astrid; Carrano, Mary W.; Carrano, Paul N.; Gillian, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Full length recombinant iron regulatory protein, Fur, has been isolated and characterized from the algal-associated marine bacterium Marinobacter algicola DG893. Under nondenaturing conditions the Fur protein behaves on size exclusion chromatography as a dimer while it is monomeric under SDS PAGE conditions. ICP-MS and fluorescence quenching experiments show that Mb-Fur binds a single metal ion (Zn, Mn, or Co) per monomer. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to probe the interaction of Mb-Fur with the purported Fur box in the promoter region upstream of the vibrioferrin biosynthetic operon. Interaction of Mb-Fur with a 100 bp DNA fragment containing the Fur box in the presence of 10 μM Mn, Co or Zn(II) resulted in decreased migration of DNA on a 7.5 % polyacrylamide gel. In the absence of the Fur protein or the metal, no interaction is seen. The presence of EDTA in the binding, loading or running buffers also abolished all activity demonstrating the importance of the metal in formation of the promoter-repressor complex. Based on a high degree of similarity between Mb-Fur and its homolog from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) whose X-ray structure is known we developed a structural model for the former which suggested that only one of the several metal binding sites found in other Fur’s would be functional. This is consistent with the single metal binding stoichiometry we observed. Since the purported metal binding site was one that has been described as “structural” rather than “functional” in PA and yet the monometallic Mb-Fur retains DNA Fur box binding ability it reopens the question of which site is which, or if different species have adapted the sites for different purposes. PMID:25528647

  12. Novel Carbohydrate-Binding Module of β-1,3-Xylanase from a Marine Bacterium, Alcaligenes sp. Strain XY-234

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Fumiyoshi; Tamaru, Yutaka; Hashikawa, Shinnosuke; Li, Yu-Teh; Araki, Toshiyoshi

    2002-01-01

    A β-1,3-xylanase gene (txyA) from a marine bacterium, Alcaligenes sp. strain XY-234, has been cloned and sequenced. txyA consists of a 1,410-bp open reading frame that encodes 469 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 52,256 Da. The domain structure of the β-1,3-xylanase (TxyA) consists of a signal peptide of 22 amino acid residues, followed by a catalytic domain which belongs to family 26 of the glycosyl hydrolases, a linker region with one array of DGG and six repeats of DNGG, and a novel carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) at the C terminus. The recombinant TxyA hydrolyzed β-1,3-xylan but not other polysaccharides such as β-1,4-xylan, carboxymethylcellulose, curdlan, glucomannan, or β-1,4-mannan. TxyA was capable of binding specifically to β-1,3-xylan. The analysis using truncated TxyA lacking either the N- or C-terminal region indicated that the region encoding the CBM was located between residues 376 and 469. Binding studies on the CBM revealed that the Kd and the maximum amount of protein bound to β-1,3-xylan were 4.2 μM and 18.2 μmol/g of β-1,3-xylan, respectively. Furthermore, comparison of the enzymatic properties between proteins with and without the CBM strongly indicated that the CBM of TxyA plays an important role in the hydrolysis of β-1,3-xylan. PMID:11948152

  13. Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., a nitrogen-fixing bacterium isolated from an artificial oil-spill marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang Rim; Srinivasan, Sathiyaraj; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2015-10-01

    A Gram-staining-negative, halophilic, facultatively anaerobic, motile, rod-shaped and nitrogen-fixing bacterium, designated strain S37T, was isolated from an artificial oil-spill sediment sample from the coast of Taean, South Korea. Cells grew at 10-37 °C and pH 5.0-9.0, with optimal growth at 28 °C and pH 6.0-8.0. Growth was observed with 1-9 % (w/v) NaCl in marine broth, with optimal growth with 3-5 % NaCl, but no growth was observed in the absence of NaCl. According to the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain S37T represents a member of the genus Vibrio of the class Gammaproteobacteria and forms a clade with Vibrio plantisponsor MSSRF60T (97.38 %), Vibrio diazotrophicus ATCC 33466T (97.31 %), Vibrio aestuarianus ATCC 35048T (97.07 %) Vibrio areninigrae J74T (96.76 %) and Vibrio hispanicus LMG 13240T (96.76 %). The major fatty acids were C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c and C18 : 1ω7c/C18 : 1ω6c. The DNA G+C content was 41.9 %. The DNA-DNA hybridization analysis results showed a 30.2 % association value with the closely related type strain V. plantisponsor DSM 21026T. On the basis of phenotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain S37T represents a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio oceanisediminis sp. nov., is proposed with the type strain S37T ( = KEMB 2255-005T = JCM 30409T).

  14. Identification of the Antibacterial Compound Produced by the Marine Epiphytic Bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. D323 and Related Sponge-Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Penesyan, Anahit; Tebben, Jan; Lee, Matthew; Thomas, Torsten; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Egan, Suhelen

    2011-01-01

    Surface-associated marine bacteria often produce secondary metabolites with antagonistic activities. In this study, tropodithietic acid (TDA) was identified to be responsible for the antibacterial activity of the marine epiphytic bacterium Pseudovibrio sp. D323 and related strains. Phenol was also produced by these bacteria but was not directly related to the antibacterial activity. TDA was shown to effectively inhibit a range of marine bacteria from various phylogenetic groups. However TDA-producers themselves were resistant and are likely to possess resistance mechanism preventing autoinhibition. We propose that TDA in isolate D323 and related eukaryote-associated bacteria plays a role in defending the host organism against unwanted microbial colonisation and, possibly, bacterial pathogens. PMID:21892353

  15. Effect of Na+ Concentration and Nutritional Factors on the Lag Phase and Exponential Growth Rates of the Marine Bacterium Deleya aesta and of Other Marine Species

    PubMed Central

    Berthelet, Marc; MacLeod, Robert A.

    1989-01-01

    Growth of the marine bacterium Deleya aesta in a succinate minimal medium showed increasingly long lag phases as Na+ was decreased below the optimum (200 to 500 mM). The minimum Na+ concentration permitting growth consistently was 15 mM. Supplementation of the medium with KHCO3 (as a source of CO2) or yeast extract, especially in combination, reduced the lag phase, increased the rate of exponential growth, and allowed growth at 8 mM Na+. KHCO3 did not reduce the lag period but did increase the rate of exponential growth of Deleya venusta, Deleya pacifica, and Alteromonas haloplanktis 214. Yeast extract was active for all three. The effect of yeast extract on D. aesta could be reproduced by a mixture of amino acids approximating its amino acid composition. l-Alanine, l-aspartate, and l-methionine, in combination, were the most effective in reducing the lag phase, although not as effective as the complete mixture. Succinate, l-aspartate, and l-alanine were transported into the cells by largely independent pathways and oxidized at rates which were much lower at 10 than at 200 mM Na+. l-Methionine was transported at a low rate in the absence of Na+ and at a higher rate at 10 mM but was not oxidized. Above 25 mM Na+, the rate of transport of the carbon source was not the rate-limiting step for growth. It is concluded that a combination of transportable carbon sources reduced the lag period and increased the rate of exponential growth because they can be taken up independently and at low Na+ utilized simultaneously. PMID:16347969

  16. Genome sequence of the pink–pigmented marine bacterium Loktanella hongkongensis type strain (UST950701–009PT), a representative of the Roseobacter group

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Stanley CK; Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-08-11

    Loktanella hongkongensis UST950701-009PT is a Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from a marine biofilm in the subtropical seawater of Hong Kong. When growing as a monospecies biofilm on polystyrene surfaces, this bacterium is able to induce larval settlement and metamorphosis of a ubiquitous polychaete tubeworm Hydroides elegans. The inductive cues are low-molecular weight compounds bound to the exopolymeric matrix of the bacterial cells. In the present study we describe the features of L. hongkongensis strain DSM 17492T together with its genome sequence and annotation and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 3,198,444 bp long genome sequence encodes 3104 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. Lastly, the two unambiguously identified extrachromosomal replicons contain replication modules of the RepB and the Rhodobacteraceae-specific DnaA-like type, respectively.

  17. Genome sequence of the pink–pigmented marine bacterium Loktanella hongkongensis type strain (UST950701–009PT), a representative of the Roseobacter group

    DOE PAGES

    Lau, Stanley CK; Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; ...

    2015-08-11

    Loktanella hongkongensis UST950701-009PT is a Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from a marine biofilm in the subtropical seawater of Hong Kong. When growing as a monospecies biofilm on polystyrene surfaces, this bacterium is able to induce larval settlement and metamorphosis of a ubiquitous polychaete tubeworm Hydroides elegans. The inductive cues are low-molecular weight compounds bound to the exopolymeric matrix of the bacterial cells. In the present study we describe the features of L. hongkongensis strain DSM 17492T together with its genome sequence and annotation and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 3,198,444 bp long genome sequence encodes 3104 protein-codingmore » genes and 57 RNA genes. Lastly, the two unambiguously identified extrachromosomal replicons contain replication modules of the RepB and the Rhodobacteraceae-specific DnaA-like type, respectively.« less

  18. Genome sequence of the pink-pigmented marine bacterium Loktanella hongkongensis type strain (UST950701-009P(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group.

    PubMed

    Lau, Stanley Ck; Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Han, James; Huntemann, Marcel; Petersen, Jörn; Ivanova, Natalia N; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Göker, Markus; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Loktanella hongkongensis UST950701-009P(T) is a Gram-negative, non-motile and rod-shaped bacterium isolated from a marine biofilm in the subtropical seawater of Hong Kong. When growing as a monospecies biofilm on polystyrene surfaces, this bacterium is able to induce larval settlement and metamorphosis of a ubiquitous polychaete tubeworm Hydroides elegans. The inductive cues are low-molecular weight compounds bound to the exopolymeric matrix of the bacterial cells. In the present study we describe the features of L. hongkongensis strain DSM 17492(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation and novel aspects of its phenotype. The 3,198,444 bp long genome sequence encodes 3104 protein-coding genes and 57 RNA genes. The two unambiguously identified extrachromosomal replicons contain replication modules of the RepB and the Rhodobacteraceae-specific DnaA-like type, respectively.

  19. Lacinutrix himadriensis sp. nov., a psychrophilic bacterium isolated from a marine sediment, and emended description of the genus Lacinutrix.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, T N R; Prasad, S; Manasa, P; Sailaja, B; Begum, Z; Shivaji, S

    2013-02-01

    A novel gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-motile, psychrophilic bacterium, designated strain E4-9a(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected at a depth of 276 m from Kongsfjorden, Svalbard, in the Arctic Ocean. The colony colour was golden yellow. Strain E4-9a(T) was positive for amylase activity at 5 °C. The predominant fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 1) G (21.8 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (19.1 %), anteiso-C(15 : 1) A (18.6 %), iso-C(15 : 0) (13.8 %) and iso-C(16 : 1) H (6.4 %). Strain E4-9a(T) contained MK-6 as the major respiratory quinone. The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, three unidentified aminolipids (AL1, AL4 and AL5), an unidentified phospholipid and four unidentified lipids (L1, L4 to L6). Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, it was ascertained that the closest related species to E4-9a(T) were Lacinutrix copepodicola, L. algicola and L. mariniflava, with sequence similarity to the respective type strains of 98.5, 96.5 and 95.8 %. Phylogenetic analysis showed that strain E4-9a(T) clustered with the type strain of L. copepodicola and with those of L. algicola and L. mariniflava at distances of 1.5 and 4.8 % (98.5 and 95.2 % similarity), respectively. However, DNA-DNA hybridization with L. copepodicola DJ3(T) showed 59 % relatedness with respect to strain E4-9a(T). The DNA G+C content of strain E4-9a(T) was 29 mol%. Based on the results of DNA-DNA hybridization and phenotypic data, it appears that strain E4-9a(T) represents a novel species of the genus Lacinutrix, for which the name Lacinutrix himadriensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is E4-9a(T) ( = CIP 110310(T)  = KCTC 23612(T)).

  20. A Novel Type II NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Cai; Tian, Chang-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Xu, Lei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In most living organisms, isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) convert isocitrate into ɑ-ketoglutarate (ɑ-KG). Phylogenetic analyses divide the IDH protein family into two subgroups: types I and II. Based on cofactor usage, IDHs are either NAD+-specific (NAD-IDH) or NADP+-specific (NADP-IDH); NADP-IDH evolved from NAD-IDH. Type I IDHs include NAD-IDHs and NADP-IDHs; however, no type II NAD-IDHs have been reported to date. This study reports a novel type II NAD-IDH from the marine bacterium Congregibacter litoralis KT71 (ClIDH, GenBank accession no. EAQ96042). His-tagged recombinant ClIDH was produced in Escherichia coli and purified; the recombinant enzyme was NAD+-specific and showed no detectable activity with NADP+. The Km values of the enzyme for NAD+ were 262.6±7.4 μM or 309.1±11.2 μM with Mg2+ or Mn2+ as the divalent cation, respectively. The coenzyme specificity of a ClIDH Asp487Arg/Leu488His mutant was altered, and the preference of the mutant for NADP+ was approximately 24-fold higher than that for NAD+, suggesting that ClIDH is an NAD+-specific ancestral enzyme in the type II IDH subgroup. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation analyses revealed the homohexameric structure of ClIDH, which is the first IDH hexamer discovered thus far. A 163-amino acid segment of CIIDH is essential to maintain its polymerization structure and activity, as a truncated version lacking this region forms a non-functional monomer. ClIDH was dependent on divalent cations, the most effective being Mn2+. The maximal activity of purified recombinant ClIDH was achieved at 35°C and pH 7.5, and a heat inactivation experiment showed that a 20-min incubation at 33°C caused a 50% loss of ClIDH activity. The discovery of a NAD+-specific, type II IDH fills a gap in the current classification of IDHs, and sheds light on the evolution of type II IDHs.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a mutant of the marine bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 defective in lipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Manilla-Pérez, Efraín; Lange, Alvin Brian; Hetzler, Stephan; Wältermann, Marc; Kalscheuer, Rainer; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    In many microorganisms, the key enzyme responsible for catalyzing the last step in triacylglycerol (TAG) and wax ester (WE) biosynthesis is an unspecific acyltransferase which is also referred to as wax ester synthase/acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA):diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT; AtfA). The importance and function of two AtfA homologues (AtfA1 and AtfA2) in the biosynthesis of TAGs and WEs in the hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 have been described recently. However, after the disruption of both the AtfA1 and AtfA2 genes, reduced but substantial accumulation of TAGs was still observed, indicating the existence of an alternative TAG biosynthesis pathway. In this study, transposon-induced mutagenesis was applied to an atfA1 atfA2 double mutant to screen for A. borkumensis mutants totally defective in biosynthesis of neutral lipids in order to identify additional enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of these lipids. At the same time, we have searched for a totally TAG-negative mutant in order to study the function of TAGs in A. borkumensis. Thirteen fluorescence-negative mutants were identified on Nile red ONR7a agar plates and analyzed for their abilities to synthesize lipids. Among these, mutant 2 M(131) was no longer able to synthesize and accumulate TAGs if pyruvate was used as the sole carbon source. The transposon insertion was localized in a gene encoding a putative cytochrome c family protein (ABO_1185). Growth and TAG accumulation experiments showed that the disruption of this gene resulted in the absence of TAGs in 2 M(131) but that growth was not affected. In cells of A. borkumensis SK2 grown on pyruvate as the sole carbon source, TAGs represented about 11% of the dry weight of the cells, while in the mutant 2 M(131), TAGs were not detected by thin-layer and gas chromatography analyses. Starvation and lipid mobilization experiments revealed that the lipids play an important role in the survival of the cells. The

  2. Recombinant expression of Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 in the marine Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Siani, Loredana; Papa, Rosanna; Di Donato, Alberto; Sannia, Giovanni

    2006-11-10

    The psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125, isolated from Antarctic seawater, was used as recipient for a biodegradative gene of the mesophilic Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1. tou cluster, coding for Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase (ToMO), was successfully cloned and expressed into a "cold expression" vector. Apparent catalytic parameters of the recombinant microorganisms on three different substrates were determined and compared with those exhibited by Escherichia coli recombinant cells expressing ToMO. Production of a catalytically efficient TAC/tou microorganism supports the possibility of developing specific degradative capabilities for the bioremediation of chemically contaminated marine environments and of industrial effluents characterised by low temperatures.

  3. System Responses to Equal Doses of Photosynthetically Usable Radiation of Blue, Green, and Red Light in the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions. PMID:25470731

  4. System responses to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green, and red light in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Valle, Kristin Collier; Nymark, Marianne; Aamot, Inga; Hancke, Kasper; Winge, Per; Andresen, Kjersti; Johnsen, Geir; Brembu, Tore; Bones, Atle M

    2014-01-01

    Due to the selective attenuation of solar light and the absorption properties of seawater and seawater constituents, free-floating photosynthetic organisms have to cope with rapid and unpredictable changes in both intensity and spectral quality. We have studied the transcriptional, metabolic and photo-physiological responses to light of different spectral quality in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum through time-series studies of cultures exposed to equal doses of photosynthetically usable radiation of blue, green and red light. The experiments showed that short-term differences in gene expression and profiles are mainly light quality-dependent. Transcription of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes was activated mainly through a light quality-independent mechanism likely to rely on chloroplast-to-nucleus signaling. In contrast, genes encoding proteins important for photoprotection and PSII repair were highly dependent on a blue light receptor-mediated signal. Changes in energy transfer efficiency by light-harvesting pigments were spectrally dependent; furthermore, a declining trend in photosynthetic efficiency was observed in red light. The combined results suggest that diatoms possess a light quality-dependent ability to activate photoprotection and efficient repair of photodamaged PSII. In spite of approximately equal numbers of PSII-absorbed quanta in blue, green and red light, the spectral quality of light is important for diatom responses to ambient light conditions.

  5. Preparative isolation and purification of macrolactin antibiotics from marine bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens using high-speed counter-current chromatography in stepwise elution mode.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Wang, Hongqiang; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhu, Peng; Chen, Juanjuan; Yang, Rui

    2013-01-11

    Preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC) was successfully applied to the isolation and purification of two macrolactin antibiotics from marine bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens for the first time using stepwise elution with a pair of two-phase solvent systems composed of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at (1:4:1:4, v/v) and (3:4:3:4, v/v). The preparative HSCCC separation was performed on 300 mg of crude sample yielding macrolactin B (22.7 mg) and macrolactin A (40.4 mg) in a one-step separation, with purities over 95% as determined by HPLC. The structures of these compounds were identified by MS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. Our results demonstrated that HSCCC was an efficient technique to separate marine antibiotics, which provide an approach to solve the problem of their sample availability for drug development.

  6. Inhibitory activity of an extract from a marine bacterium Halomonas sp. HSB07 against the red-tide microalga Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Li, Fuchao; Liu, Ling; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Zhaopu

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, red tides occurred frequently in coastal areas worldwide. Various methods based on the use of clay, copper sulfate, and bacteria have been successful in controlling red tides to some extent. As a new defensive agent, marine microorganisms are important sources of compounds with potent inhibitory bioactivities against red-tide microalgae, such as Gymnodinium sp. (Pyrrophyta). In this study, we isolated a marine bacterium, HSB07, from seawater collected from Hongsha Bay, Sanya, South China Sea. Based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence and biochemical characteristics, the isolated strain HSB07 was identified as a member of the genus Halomonas. A crude ethyl acetate extract of strain HSB07 showed moderate inhibition activity against Gymnodinium sp. in a bioactive prescreening experiment. The extract was further separated into fractions A, B, and C by silica gel column chromatography. Fractions B and C showed strong inhibition activities against Gymnodinium. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of secondary metabolites of a Halomonas bacterium against a red-tide-causing microalga.

  7. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Matias, Pedro M.; Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin

    2016-08-09

    The gene encoding a putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium S. frigidimarina was successfully cloned, followed by expression and purification of the gene product. Optimized crystals diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution and preliminary crystallographic analysis is promising with respect to structure determination and increased insight into the poorly understood molecular mechanisms underlying iron acquisition. Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI-RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing.

  8. Relaxation dynamics of the LH2 complex from a photosynthetic purple bacterium Thiorhodospira sibirica studied by the near-IR femtosecond pump-probe method

    SciTech Connect

    Razjivin, A P; Pishchal'nikov, R Yu; Kozlovskii, V S; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Moskalenko, A A; Makhneva, Z K

    2005-01-31

    Photoinduced changes in the absorption spectrum of the LH2 (B800-830-850) complex from a Thiorhodospira sibirica (Trs. sibirica) bacterium are studied by the pump-probe method. The complex has the anomalous absorption spectrum exhibiting three bands in the near-IR region at 793, 826.5, and 846.5 nm. At room temperature, the excitation energy transfer from the B800, B830, and B859 bands was detected with the time constants {tau}{sub 1{approx}}0.5 ps, {tau}{sub 2{approx}}2.5 ps, and {tau}{sub 3} of the order of a few hundreds of picoseconds, respectively. A rapid energy transfer from the B830 band compared to energy transfer from the B850 band ({tau}{sub 2}||{tau}{sub 3}) suggests that all the three bands belong to the same complex (i.e., that the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica is homogeneous). A slower energy transfer (by three - five times) from the B830 band of the LH2 complex from Trs. sibirica compared to energy transfer from the B800 band of the LH2 complexes (B800-850 and especially B800-820) from other purple bacteria suggests that the electronic structures of ensembles of bacteriochlorophyll molecules in these complexes are substantially different. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  9. Stark absorption spectroscopy on the carotenoids bound to B800-820 and B800-850 type LH2 complexes from a purple photosynthetic bacterium, Phaeospirillum molischianum strain DSM120.

    PubMed

    Horibe, Tomoko; Qian, Pu; Hunter, C Neil; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2015-04-15

    Stark absorption spectroscopy was applied to clarify the structural differences between carotenoids bound to the B800-820 and B800-850 LH2 complexes from a purple photosynthetic bacterium Phaeospirillum (Phs.) molischianum DSM120. The former complex is produced when the bacteria are grown under stressed conditions of low temperature and dim light. These two LH2 complexes bind carotenoids with similar composition, 10% lycopene and 80% rhodopin, each with the same number of conjugated CC double bonds (n=11). Quantitative classical and semi-quantum chemical analyses of Stark absorption spectra recorded in the carotenoid absorption region reveal that the absolute values of the difference dipole moments |Δμ| have substantial differences (2 [D/f]) for carotenoids bound to either B800-820 or B800-850 complexes. The origin of this striking difference in the |Δμ| values was analyzed using the X-ray crystal structure of the B800-850 LH2 complex from Phs. molischianum DSM119. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations predict structural deformations of the major carotenoid, rhodopin, bound within the B800-820 complex. We propose that simultaneous rotations around neighboring CC and CC bonds account for the differences in the 2 [D/f] of the |Δμ| value. The plausible position of the rotation is postulated to be located around C21-C24 bonds of rhodopin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Carotenoid-to-Bacteriochlorophyll Energy Transfer in the LH1-RC Core Complex of a Bacteriochlorophyll b Containing Purple Photosynthetic Bacterium Blastochloris viridis.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki Cecil M; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Goodson, Carrie; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-06-16

    Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer has been widely investigated in bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a-containing light harvesting complexes. Blastochloris viridis utilizes BChl b, whose absorption spectrum is more red-shifted than that of BChl a. This has implications on the efficiency and pathways of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer in this organism. The carotenoids that comprise the light-harvesting reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) of B. viridis are 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, which are derivatives of carotenoids found in the light harvesting complexes of several BChl a-containing purple photosynthetic bacteria. Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopic measurements were performed on the LH1-RC complex of B. viridis at room and cryogenic temperatures. The overall efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer obtained from steady-state absorption and fluorescence measurements were determined to be ∼27% and ∼36% for 1,2-dihydroneurosporene and 1,2-dihydrolycopene, respectively. These results were combined with global fitting and target analyses of the transient absorption data to elucidate the energetic pathways by which the carotenoids decay and transfer excitation energy to BChl b. 1,2-Dihydrolycopene transfers energy to BChl b via the S2 → Qx channel with kET2 = (500 fs)(-1) while 1,2-dihydroneurosporene transfers energy via S1→ Qy (kET1 = (84 ps)(-1)) and S2 → Qx (kET2 = (2.2 ps)(-1)) channels.

  11. Influence of nitrogen substrates and substrate C:N ratios on the nitrogen isotopic composition of amino acids from the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, K.; Ohkouchi, N.; Chikaraishi, Y.; Fukuda, H.; Miyajima, T.; Nagata, T.

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) isotopic compositions of individual hydrolysable amino acids (δ15NAAs) in N pools have been increasingly used for trophic position assessment and evaluation of sources and transformation processes of organic matter in marine environments. However, there are limited data about variability in δ15NAAs patterns and how this variability influences marine bacteria, an important mediator of trophic transfer and organic matter transformation. We explored whether marine bacterial δ15NAAs profiles change depending on the type and C:N ratio of the substrate. The δ15NAAs profile of a marine bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, was examined using medium containing either glutamate, alanine or ammonium as the N source [substrate C:N ratios (range, 3 to 20) were adjusted with glucose]. The data were interpreted as a reflection of isotope fractionations associated with de novo synthesis of amino acids by bacteria. Principal component analysis (PCA) using the δ15N offset values normalized to glutamate + glutamine δ15N revealed that δ15NAAs profiles differed depending on the N source and C:N ratio of the substrate. High variability in the δ15N offset of alanine and valine largely explained this bacterial δ15NAAs profile variability. PCA was also conducted using bacterial and phytoplankton (cyanobacteria and eukaryotic algae) δ15NAAs profile data reported previously. The results revealed that bacterial δ15NAAs patterns were distinct from those of phytoplankton. Therefore, the δ15NAAs profile is a useful indicator of biochemical responses of bacteria to changes in substrate conditions, serving as a potentially useful method for identifying organic matter sources in marine environments.

  12. The thylakoid membrane proteome of two marine diatoms outlines both diatom-specific and species-specific features of the photosynthetic machinery.

    PubMed

    Grouneva, Irina; Rokka, Anne; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2011-12-02

    The thylakoid membrane of photoautotrophic organisms contains the main components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain. Detailed proteome maps of the thylakoid protein complexes of two marine diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, were created by means of two-dimensional blue native (BN)/SDS-PAGE coupled with mass spectrometry analysis. One novel diatom-specific photosystem I (PS I)-associated protein was identified. A second plastid-targeted protein with possible PS I interaction was discovered to be restricted to the centric diatom species T. pseudonana. PGR5/PGRL homologues were found to be the only protein components of PS I-mediated cyclic electron transport common to both species. For the first time, evidence for a possible PS I localization of LI818-like light harvesting proteins (Lhcx) is presented. This study also advances the current knowledge on the light harvesting antenna composition and Lhcx expression in T. pseudonana on the protein level and presents details on the molecular distribution of Lhcx in diatoms. Above mentioned proteins and several others with unknown function provide a broad basis for further mutagenesis analysis, aiming toward further understanding of the composition and function of the photosynthetic apparatus of diatoms. The proteomics approach of this study further served as a tool to confirm and improve genome-derived protein models.

  13. A novel marine bacterium Isoptericola sp. JS-C42 with the ability to saccharifying the plant biomasses for the aid in cellulosic ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Santhi, Velayudhan Satheeja; Gupta, Ashutosh; Saranya, Somasundaram; Jebakumar, Solomon Robinson David

    2014-06-01

    The ever growing demands for food products such as starch and sugar produces; there is a need to find the sources for saccharification for cellulosic bioethanol production. This study provides the first evidence of the lignocellulolytic and saccharifying ability of a marine bacterium namely Isoptericola sp. JS-C42, a Gram positive actinobacterium with the cocci cells embedded on mycelia isolated from the Arabian Sea, India. It exhibited highest filter paper unit effect, endoglucanase, exoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, xylanase and ligninase effect. The hydrolytic potential of the enzymes displayed the efficient saccharification capability of steam pretreated biomass. It was also found to degrade the paddy, sorghum, Acacia mangium and Ficus religiosa into simple reducing sugars by its efficient lignocellulose enzyme complex with limited consumption of sugars. Production of ethanol was also achieved with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Overall, it offers a great potential for the cellulosic ethanol production in an economically reliable and eco-friendly point-of-care.

  14. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M.; Matias, Pedro M.; Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin

    2016-01-01

    Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI_RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing. PMID:27599855

  15. Heme and nitric oxide binding by the transcriptional regulator DnrF from the marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae increases napD promoter affinity.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Matthias; Schweyen, Peter; Bröring, Martin; Laass, Sebastian; Härtig, Elisabeth; Jahn, Dieter

    2017-09-15

    Under oxygen-limiting conditions, the marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae DFL12(T) generates energy via denitrification, a respiratory process in which nitric oxide (NO) is an intermediate. Accumulation of NO may cause cytotoxic effects. The response to this nitrosative (NO-triggered) stress is controlled by the Crp/Fnr-type transcriptional regulator DnrF. We analyzed the response to NO and the mechanism of NO sensing by the DnrF regulator. Using reporter gene fusions and transcriptomics, here we report that DnrF selectively repressed nitrate reductase (nap) genes, preventing further NO formation. In addition, DnrF induced the expression of the NO reductase genes (norCB), which promote NO consumption. We used UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy to characterize heme binding to DnrF and subsequent NO coordination. DnrF detects NO via its bound heme cofactor. We found that the dimeric DnrF bound one molecule of heme per subunit. Purified recombinant apo-DnrF bound its target promoter sequences (napD, nosR2, norC, hemA, and dnrE) in electromobility shift assays, and we identified a specific palindromic DNA-binding site 5'-TTGATN4ATCAA-3' in these target sequences via mutagenesis studies. Most importantly, successive addition of heme as well as heme and NO to purified recombinant apo-DnrF protein increased affinity of the holo-DnrF for its specific binding motif in the napD promoter. On the basis of these results, we propose a model for the DnrF-mediated NO stress response of this marine bacterium. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Thermal alteration of organic matter in recent marine sediments. 1: Pigments. [photosynthetic pigments from Tanner Basin off Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikan, R.; Aizenshtat, Z.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1974-01-01

    Sediment from Tanner Basin, the outer continental shelf off Southern California, was analyzed for photosynthetic pigments and their derivatives, namely carotenes and chlorins. Samples of the sediment were also exposed to raised temperatures (65, 100, 150 C) for various periods of time (1 week, 1 month, 2 months). Analysis of the heat-treated sediment revealed the presence of alpha-ionene and 2,6-dimethylnapthalene, thermal degradation products of Betacarotente. Chlorins were converted to nickel porphyrins of both DPEP and etio series. Possible mechanisms of these transformations are presented.

  17. Chromopeptide A, a highly cytotoxic depsipeptide from the marine sediment-derived bacterium Chromobacterium sp. HS-13-94

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhenfang; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Jingya; Zheng, Linghui; Liu, Hongchun; Wang, Jidong; Shen, Aijun; Geng, Meiyu; Guo, Yuewei

    2015-01-01

    A bicyclic depsipeptide, chromopeptide A (1), was isolated from a deep-sea-derived bacterium Chromobacterium sp. HS-13-94. Its structure was determined by extensive spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with a related known compound. The absolute configuration of chromopeptide A was established by X-ray diffraction analysis employing graphite monochromated Mo Kα radiation (λ=0.71073 Å) with small Flack parameter 0.03. Chromopeptide A suppressed the proliferation of HL-60, K-562, and Ramos cells with average IC50 values of 7.7, 7.0, and 16.5 nmol/L, respectively. PMID:26579426

  18. Photosynthetic activity in marine and brackish water strains of Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus radicans (Phaeophyceae) at different light qualities.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Carina; Maria Gylle, A; Ekelund, Nils G A

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of different light qualities on the photosynthetic capacity of the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus, from the Norwegian Sea, and Fucus radicans and F. vesiculosus, from the Bothnian Sea. The electron transport rates (ETR) obtained for F. vesiculosus from the Norwegian Sea showed significantly higher levels of light saturation compared with both species of algae from the Bothnian Sea. The maximum of ETR values for the Norwegian Sea strain showed no significant changes due to varying light quality compared with the initial values. For F. vesiculosus, from the Bothnian Sea, treatment with blue light showed an effect after 1 week of 30 and 90 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) (P<0.01), and for F. radicans from the Bothnian Sea, at the irradiance of 90 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) and 1 week (P<0.01). After 1 week in the Bothnian Sea species and after 2 weeks in F. vesiculosus from the Norwegian Sea, the photosynthetic efficiency (α) was significantly higher regardless of light quality and irradiance compared with the initial values. Variation in light quality and irradiance had minor effects on the F(v):F(m) values of the three algal strains studied.

  19. Quorum sensing in marine snow and its possible influence on production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes in marine snow bacterium Pantoea ananatis B9.

    PubMed

    Jatt, Abdul Nabi; Tang, Kaihao; Liu, Jiwen; Zhang, Zenghu; Zhang, Xiao-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Marine snow is a continuous shower of organic and inorganic detritus, and plays a crucial role in transporting materials from the sea surface to the deep ocean. The aims of the current study were to identify N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) signaling molecules directly from marine snow particles and to investigate the possible regulatory link between QS signals and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by marine snow bacteria. The marine snow samples were collected from the surface water of China marginal seas. Two AHLs, i.e. 3OC6-HSL and C8-HSL, were identified directly from marine snow particles, while six different AHL signals, i.e. C4-HSL, 3OC6-HSL, C6-HSL, C10-HSL, C12-HSL and C14-HSL were produced by Pantoea ananatis B9 inhabiting natural marine snow particles. Of the extracellular hydrolytic enzymes produced by P. ananatis B9, alkaline phosphatase activity was highly enhanced in growth medium supplemented with exogenous AHL (C10-HSL), while quorum quenching enzyme (AiiA) drastically reduced the enzyme activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report revealing six different AHL signals produced by P. ananatis B9 and AHL-based QS system enhanced the extracellular hydrolytic enzyme in P. ananatis B9. Furthermore, this study first time revealing 3OC6-HSL production by Paracoccus carotinifaciens affiliated with Alphaproteobacteria.

  20. Purification and Characterization of N-Acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate Deacetylase from a Psychrotrophic Marine Bacterium, Alteromonas Species.

    PubMed

    Yamano; Higashida; Endo; Sakata; Fujishima; Maruyama; Higashihara

    2000-01-01

    A psychrotrophic bacterium, strain Mct-9, which produced an N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate deacetylase, was isolated from a deep-seawater sample in the Mariana Trough. The Mct-9 strain was identified as Alteromonas sp. The native enzyme had a molecular mass of 164,000 Da, and was predicted to be composed of four identical subunits with molecular masses of 41,000 Da. The purified enzyme hydrolyzed N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), GlcNAc-6-phosphate, and GlcNAc-6-sulfate. Considering the low K(m) and high k(cat)/K(m) for GlcNAc-6-phosphate, it probably acts as a GlcNAc-6-phosphate deacetylase in vivo. The enzyme was functional in the temperature range of 5 degrees to 70 degrees C and displayed optimal activity at 55 degrees C. The optimal temperature was higher than that of the deacetylase from the mesophilic bacterium Vibrio cholerae non-O1. The characteristics of the GlcNAc-6-phosphate deacetylase from Alteromonas sp. are unique among psychrotrophs and psychrophiles, whose intracellular enzymes are mostly thermolabile.

  1. Habitat and taxon as driving forces of carbohydrate catabolism in marine heterotrophic bacteria: example of the model algae-associated bacterium Zobellia galactanivorans Dsij(T).

    PubMed

    Barbeyron, Tristan; Thomas, François; Barbe, Valérie; Teeling, Hanno; Schenowitz, Chantal; Dossat, Carole; Goesmann, Alexander; Leblanc, Catherine; Oliver Glöckner, Frank; Czjzek, Mirjam; Amann, Rudolf; Michel, Gurvan

    2016-12-01

    The marine flavobacterium Zobellia galactanivorans Dsij(T) was isolated from a red alga and by now constitutes a model for studying algal polysaccharide bioconversions. We present an in-depth analysis of its complete genome and link it to physiological traits. Z. galactanivorans exhibited the highest gene numbers for glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases and carbohydrate esterases and the second highest sulfatase gene number in a comparison to 125 other marine heterotrophic bacteria (MHB) genomes. Its genome contains 50 polysaccharide utilization loci, 22 of which contain sulfatase genes. Catabolic profiling confirmed a pronounced capacity for using algal polysaccharides and degradation of most polysaccharides could be linked to dedicated genes. Physiological and biochemical tests revealed that Z. galactanivorans stores and recycles glycogen, despite loss of several classic glycogen-related genes. Similar gene losses were observed in most Flavobacteriia, suggesting presence of an atypical glycogen metabolism in this class. Z. galactanivorans features numerous adaptive traits for algae-associated life, such as consumption of seaweed exudates, iodine metabolism and methylotrophy, indicating that this bacterium is well equipped to form profitable, stable interactions with macroalgae. Finally, using statistical and clustering analyses of the MHB genomes we show that their carbohydrate catabolism correlates with both taxonomy and habitat. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of a Selenite- and Tellurite-Reducing Marine Bacterium, Lysinibacillus sp. Strain ZYM-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yonghe; Dong, Yuxuan; Zhang, Yiwen; Che, Lin; Pan, Haixia

    2016-01-01

    Lysinibacillus sp. ZYM-1, a Gram-positive strain isolated from marine sediments, reduces selenite and tellurite efficiently. Meanwhile, it also exhibits high resistance to Zn2+ and Mn2+. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain ZYM-1, which contains genes related to selenite and tellurite reduction and also metal resistance. PMID:26769938

  3. Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri Cell Density-Dependent Activation of Symbiosis-Related Genes in a Marine Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE August 3, 1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri Cell...of the proposed research is to fully elucidate the mechanism of quorum sensing and response in bacteria by continuing investigations of the most well...Regulation/Marine bacteria/Symbiosis Genes/ Transcriptional activation/ Quorum Sensing 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT u NSN 7540-01-280

  4. Probing the effect of the binding site on the electrostatic behavior of a series of carotenoids reconstituted into the light-harvesting 1 complex from purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum detected by stark spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Katsunori; Suzuki, Satoru; Fujii, Ritsuko; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Nango, Mamoru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-08-07

    Reconstitutions of the LH1 complexes from the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 were performed with a range of carotenoid molecules having different numbers of C=C conjugated double bonds. Since, as we showed previously, some of the added carotenoids tended to aggregate and then to remain with the reconstituted LH1 complexes (Nakagawa, K.; Suzuki, S.; Fujii, R.; Gardiner, A.T.; Cogdell, R.J.; Nango, M.; Hashimoto, H. Photosynth. Res. 2008, 95, 339-344), a further purification step using a sucrose density gradient centrifugation was introduced to improve purity of the final reconstituted sample. The measured absorption, fluorescence-excitation, and Stark spectra of the LH1 complex reconstituted with spirilloxanthin were identical with those obtained with the native, spirilloxanthin-containing, LH1 complex of Rs. rubrum S1. This shows that the electrostatic environments surrounding the carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules in both of these LH1 complexes were essentially the same. In the LH1 complexes reconstituted with either rhodopin or spheroidene, however, the wavelength maximum at the BChl a Qy absorption band was slightly different to that of the native LH1 complexes. These differences in the transition energy of the BChl a Qy absorption band can be explained using the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of this absorption band, i.e., the polarizability change Tr(Deltaalpha) and the static dipole-moment change |Deltamu| upon photoexcitation, as determined using Stark spectroscopy. The local electric field around the BChl a in the native LH1 complex (ES) was determined to be approximately 3.0x10(6) V/cm. Furthermore, on the basis of the values of the nonlinear optical parameters of the carotenoids in the reconstituted LH1 complexes, it is possible to suggest that the conformations of carotenoids, anhydrorhodovibrin and spheroidene, in the LH1 complex were similar to that of rhodopin glucoside in crystal structure of

  5. O-heterocyclic derivatives with antibacterial properties from marine bacterium Bacillus subtilis associated with seaweed, Sargassum myriocystum.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kajal; Thilakan, Bini; Chakraborty, Rekha Devi; Raola, Vamshi Krishna; Joy, Minju

    2017-01-01

    The brown seaweed, Sargassum myriocystum associated with heterotrophic bacterium, Bacillus subtilis MTCC 10407 (JF834075) exhibited broad-spectra of potent antibacterial activities against pathogenic bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. B. subtilis MTCC 10407 was found to be positive for polyketide synthetase (pks) gene, and therefore, was considered to characterize secondary metabolites bearing polyketide backbone. Using bioassay-guided fractionation, two new antibacterial O-heterocyclic compounds belonging to pyranyl benzoate analogs of polyketide origin, with activity against pathogenic bacteria, have been isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of B. subtilis MTCC 10407. In the present study, the secondary metabolites of B. subtilis MTCC 10407 with potent antibacterial action against bacterial pathogens was recognized to represent the platform of pks-1 gene-encoded products. Two homologous compounds 3 (3-(methoxycarbonyl)-4-(5-(2-ethylbutyl)-5,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2H-pyran-2-yl)-butyl benzoate) and 4 [2-(8-butyl-3-ethyl-3,4,4a,5,6,8a-hexahydro-2H-chromen-6-yl)-ethyl benzoate] also have been isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of host seaweed S. myriocystum. The two compounds isolated from ethyl acetate extract of S. myriocystum with lesser antibacterial properties shared similar structures with the compounds purified from B. subtilis that suggested the ecological and metabolic relationship between these compounds in seaweed-bacterial relationship. Tetrahydropyran-2-one moiety of the tetrahydropyrano-[3,2b]-pyran-2(3H)-one system of 1 might be cleaved by the metabolic pool of seaweeds to afford methyl 3-(dihydro-3-methyl-2H-pyranyl)-propanoate moiety of 3, which was found to have no significant antibacterial activity. It is therefore imperative that the presence of dihydro-methyl-2H-pyran-2-yl propanoate system is essentially required to impart the greater activity. The direct involvement of polarisability (Pl) with

  6. Biochemical characterization of a novel cold-adapted GH39 β-agarase, AgaJ9, from an agar-degrading marine bacterium Gayadomonas joobiniege G7.

    PubMed

    Jung, Subin; Lee, Chang-Ro; Chi, Won-Jae; Bae, Chang-Hwan; Hong, Soon-Kwang

    2017-03-01

    Gayadomonas joobiniege G7 is an agar-degrading marine bacterium belonging to a novel genus. Genomic sequencing of G. joobiniege revealed that AgaJ9 (formerly YjdB) belonging to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) 39 family. It showed the highest similarity (47% identity) to a putative β-agarase from Catenovulum agarivorans DS-2, an agar-degrading marine bacterium sharing the highest similarity in the nucleotide sequence of 16s rRNA gene with G. joobiniege G7. The agaJ9 gene encodes a protein (134 kDa) of 1205 amino acids, including a 23-amino acid signal peptide. The agarase activity of purified AgaJ9 was confirmed by zymogram analysis. The optimum pH and temperature for AgaJ9 activity were determined as 5 and 25 °C, respectively. Notably, AgaJ9 is a cold-adapted β-agarase retaining more than 80% of its activity even at a temperature of 5 °C. In addition, gel filtration chromatography revealed that AgaJ9 exists as two forms, dimer and monomer. Although the two forms had similar enzymatic properties, their kinetic parameters were different. The K m and V max of dimeric AgaJ9 for agarose was 0.68 mg/ml (5.7 × 10(-6) M) and 17.2 U/mg, respectively, whereas the monomeric form had a K m of 1.43 mg/ml (1.2 × 10(-5) M) and V max of 10.7 U/mg. Thin-layer chromatography and agarose-liquefying analyses revealed that AgaJ9 is an endo-type β-agarase that hydrolyzes agarose into neoagarotetraose and neoagarobiose. This study is the first report of a GH39 β-agarase with a cold-adapted enzymatic feature, a unique attribute, which may be useful for industrial applications.

  7. Laboratory Simulation of an Iron(II)-rich Precambrian Marine Upwelling System to Explore the Growth of Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Markus; Wu, Wenfang; Kappler, Andreas; Swanner, Elizabeth D

    2016-07-24

    A conventional concept for the deposition of some Precambrian Banded Iron Formations (BIF) proceeds on the assumption that ferrous iron [Fe(II)] upwelling from hydrothermal sources in the Precambrian ocean was oxidized by molecular oxygen [O2] produced by cyanobacteria. The oldest BIFs, deposited prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) at about 2.4 billion years (Gy) ago, could have formed by direct oxidation of Fe(II) by anoxygenic photoferrotrophs under anoxic conditions. As a method for testing the geochemical and mineralogical patterns that develop under different biological scenarios, we designed a 40 cm long vertical flow-through column to simulate an anoxic Fe(II)-rich marine upwelling system representative of an ancient ocean on a lab scale. The cylinder was packed with a porous glass bead matrix to stabilize the geochemical gradients, and liquid samples for iron quantification could be taken throughout the water column. Dissolved oxygen was detected non-invasively via optodes from the outside. Results from biotic experiments that involved upwelling fluxes of Fe(II) from the bottom, a distinct light gradient from top, and cyanobacteria present in the water column, show clear evidence for the formation of Fe(III) mineral precipitates and development of a chemocline between Fe(II) and O2. This column allows us to test hypotheses for the formation of the BIFs by culturing cyanobacteria (and in the future photoferrotrophs) under simulated marine Precambrian conditions. Furthermore we hypothesize that our column concept allows for the simulation of various chemical and physical environments - including shallow marine or lacustrine sediments.

  8. Flavobacterium ahnfeltiae sp. nov., a new marine polysaccharide-degrading bacterium isolated from a Pacific red alga.

    PubMed

    Nedashkovskaya, Olga I; Balabanova, Larissa A; Zhukova, Natalia V; Kim, So-Jeong; Bakunina, Irina Y; Rhee, Sung-Keun

    2014-10-01

    A Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped, motile by gliding and yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain 10Alg 130(T), that displayed the ability to destroy polysaccharides of red and brown algae, was isolated from the red alga Ahnfeltia tobuchiensis. The phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence placed the novel strain within the genus Flavobacterium, the type genus of the family Flavobacteriaceae, the phylum Bacteroidetes, with sequence similarities of 96.2 and 95.7 % to Flavobacterium jumunjiense KCTC 23618(T) and Flavobacterium ponti CCUG 58402(T), and 95.3-92.5 % to other recognized Flavobacterium species. The prevalent fatty acids of strain 10Alg 130(T) were iso-C15:0, iso-C15:0 3-OH, iso-C17:0 3-OH, C15:0 and iso-C17:1ω9c. The polar lipid profile consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, two unknown aminolipids and three unknown lipids. The DNA G+C content of the type strain was 34.3 mol%. The new isolate and the type strains of recognized species of the genus Flavobacterium could strongly be distinguished by a number of phenotypic characteristics. A combination of the genotypic and phenotypic data showed that the algal isolate represents a novel species of the genus Flavobacterium, for which the name Flavobacterium ahnfeltiae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 10Alg 130(T) (=KCTC 32467(T) = KMM 6686(T)).

  9. Photosynthetic Carbon Isotope Fractionation of the Marine Dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense: A Chemostat Investigation of Taxonomic and Physiological Controls on the Stable Carbon Isotope Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, E.; Carter, S. J.; Pearson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Interpretations of stable carbon isotope excursions in the sedimentary record are strengthened by laboratory culture studies investigating the photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation (ɛp) of marine phytoplankton taxa with long geological records. These studies are essential for understanding organic matter δ13C signals in terms of environmental changes (e.g., atmospheric pCO2 and nutrient availability) or taxonomic changes (e.g., algal species succession and community composition). Dinoflagellates are among the most widespread and ecologically dominant primary producers in modern oceans and throughout the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Compared to more recently evolved phytoplankton taxa, however, dinoflagellate carbon isotope fractionation has received relatively little mechanistic study. Several dilute batch culture experiments with dinoflagellates have investigated ɛp as a function of CO2 availability, but the influences of changing growth rates, nutrient limitation, pH, and irradiance require further systematic exploration. We investigated stable carbon isotope fractionation in the marine dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense under nitrate-limited conditions in a chemostat culture system in which full DIC system parameters, including the concentration and δ13C value of CO2, were determined. Growth rates were varied between experiments, and cells were grown under continuous light. Previously reported ɛp values for seven dinoflagellate species including A. tamarense ranged from approximately -1 to 14‰ in nutrient-replete batch culture studies ([CO2] = 0-50 µmol kg-1). In contrast, in chemostat conditions we measured ɛp values on the order of 20‰ ([CO2] = 20-30 µmol kg-1). These experiments provide an initial step toward understanding the physiological controls on ɛp in dinoflagellates and illuminating the role of algal taxonomy in shaping the Phanerozoic stable carbon isotope record.

  10. A unique capsular polysaccharide structure from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H that mimics antifreeze (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Carillo, Sara; Casillo, Angela; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Sannino, Filomena; Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W; Lanzetta, Rosa; Marino, Gennaro; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Randazzo, Antonio; Tutino, Maria L; Corsaro, M Michela

    2015-01-14

    The low temperatures of polar regions and high-altitude environments, especially icy habitats, present challenges for many microorganisms. Their ability to live under subfreezing conditions implies the production of compounds conferring cryotolerance. Colwellia psychrerythraea 34H, a γ-proteobacterium isolated from subzero Arctic marine sediments, provides a model for the study of life in cold environments. We report here the identification and detailed molecular primary and secondary structures of capsular polysaccharide from C. psychrerythraea 34H cells. The polymer was isolated in the water layer when cells were extracted by phenol/water and characterized by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy together with chemical analysis. Molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations were also performed. The polysaccharide consists of a tetrasaccharidic repeating unit containing two amino sugars and two uronic acids bearing threonine as substituent. The structural features of this unique polysaccharide resemble those present in antifreeze proteins and glycoproteins. These results suggest a possible correlation between the capsule structure and the ability of C. psychrerythraea to colonize subfreezing marine environments.

  11. Characterisation of a marine bacterium Vibrio brasiliensis T33 producing N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Pui-Wan; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-07-08

    N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL) plays roles as signal molecules in quorum sensing (QS) in most Gram-negative bacteria. QS regulates various physiological activities in relation with population density and concentration of signal molecules. With the aim of isolating marine water-borne bacteria that possess QS properties, we report here the preliminary screening of marine bacteria for AHL production using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as the AHL biosensor. Strain T33 was isolated based on preliminary AHL screening and further identified by using 16S rDNA sequence analysis as a member of the genus Vibrio closely related to Vibrio brasiliensis. The isolated Vibrio sp. strain T33 was confirmed to produce N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C10 HSL) through high resolution tandem mass spectrometry analysis. We demonstrated that this isolate formed biofilms which could be inhibited by catechin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that documents the production of these AHLs by Vibrio brasiliensis strain T33.

  12. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETRRCII, mol e- mol RCII-1 s-1) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal – oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETRRCII: CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements. PMID:26171963

  13. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T; Tortell, Philippe D

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETR(RCII), mol e- mol RCII(-1) s(-1)) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal--oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETR(RCII): CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements.

  14. A thermophilic, hydrogenogenic and carboxydotrophic bacterium, Calderihabitans maritimus gen. nov., sp. nov., from a marine sediment core of an undersea caldera.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Yasuko; Yoshida, Takashi; Yasuda, Hisato; Imada, Chiaki; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-01

    A hydrogenogenic, carboxydotrophic marine bacterium, strain KKC1(T), was isolated from a sediment core sample taken from a submerged marine caldera. Cells were non-motile, Gram-stain-negative, 1.0-3.0 µm straight rods, often observed with round endospores. Strain KKC1(T) grew at 55-68 °C, pH 5.2-9.2 and 0.8-14 % (w/v) salinity. Optimum growth occurred at 65 °C, pH 7.0-7.5 and 2.46 % salinity with a doubling time of 3.7 h. The isolate grew chemolithotrophically, producing H2 from carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation with reduction of various electron acceptors, e.g. sulfite, thiosulfate, fumarate, ferric iron and AQDS (9,10-anthraquinone 2,6-disulfonate). KKC1(T) grew heterotrophically on pyruvate, lactate, fumarate, glucose, fructose and mannose with thiosulfate as an electron acceptor. When grown mixotrophically on CO and pyruvate, C16 : 0 constituted almost half of the total cellular fatty acids. The DNA G+C content was 50.6 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of KKC1(T) was most closely related to those of members of the genus Moorella with similarity ranging from 91 to 89 %. Based on physiological and phylogenetic novelty, we propose the isolate as a representative of a new genus and novel species with the name Calderihabitans maritimus gen. nov., sp. nov.; the type strain of the type species is KKC1(T) ( = DSM 26464(T) = NBRC 109353(T)).

  15. Characterization of Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture and isolation of Fe (III)-reducing bacterium Enterobacter sp. L6 from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-07-01

    To enrich the Fe (III)-reducing bacteria, sludge from marine sediment was inoculated into the medium using Fe (OH)3 as the sole electron acceptor. Efficiency of Fe (III) reduction and composition of Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture were analyzed. The results indicated that the Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture with the dominant bacteria relating to Clostridium and Enterobacter sp. had high Fe (III) reduction of (2.73 ± 0.13) mmol/L-Fe (II). A new Fe (III)-reducing bacterium was isolated from the Fe (III)-reducing enrichment culture and identified as Enterobacter sp. L6 by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The Fe (III)-reducing ability of strain L6 under different culture conditions was investigated. The results indicated that strain L6 had high Fe (III)-reducing activity using glucose and pyruvate as carbon sources. Strain L6 could reduce Fe (III) at the range of NaCl concentrations tested and had the highest Fe (III) reduction of (4.63 ± 0.27) mmol/L Fe (II) at the NaCl concentration of 4 g/L. This strain L6 could reduce Fe (III) with unique properties in adaptability to salt variation, which indicated that it can be used as a model organism to study Fe (III)-reducing activity isolated from marine environment. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A new recombinant endo-1,3-β-D-glucanase from the marine bacterium Formosa algae KMM 3553: enzyme characteristics and transglycosylation products analysis.

    PubMed

    Kusaykin, Mikhail I; Belik, Alexey A; Kovalchuk, Svetlana N; Dmitrenok, Pavel S; Rasskazov, Valerii A; Isakov, Vladimir V; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N

    2017-02-01

    A specific endo-1,3-β-D-glucanase (GFA) gene was found in genome of marine bacterium Formosa algae KMM 3553. For today this is the only characterized endo-1,3-β-D-glucanase (EC 3.2.1.39) in Formosa genus and the only bacterial EC 3.2.1.39 GH16 endo-1,3-β-D-glucanase with described transglycosylation activity. It was expressed in E. coli and isolated in homogeneous state. Investigating the products of polysaccharides digestion with GFA allowed to establish it's substrate specificity and classify this enzyme as glucan endo-1,3-β-D-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.39). The amino-acid sequence of GFA consists of 556 residues and shows sequence similarity of 45-85% to β-1,3-glucanases of bacteria belonging to the CAZy 16th structural family of glycoside hydrolases GH16. Enzyme has molecular weight 61 kDa, exhibits maximum of catalytic activity at 45 °C, pH 5.5. Half-life period at 45 °С is 20 min, complete inactivation happens at 55 °C within 10 min. Km for hydrolysis of laminarin is 0.388 mM. GFA glucanase from marine bacteria F. algae is one of rare enzymes capable to catalyze reactions of transglycosylation. It catalyzed transfer of glyconic part of substrate molecule on methyl-β-D-xylopyranoside, glycerol and methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside. The enzyme can be used in structure determination of β-1,3-glucans (or mixed 1,3;1,4- and 1,3;1,6-β-D-glucans) and enzymatic synthesis of new carbohydrate-containing compounds.

  17. Croceicoccus naphthovorans sp. nov., a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading and acylhomoserine-lactone-producing bacterium isolated from marine biofilm, and emended description of the genus Croceicoccus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yili; Zeng, Yanhua; Feng, Hao; Wu, Yuehong; Xu, Xuewei

    2015-05-01

    A polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading and acylhomoserine-lactone-producing marine bacterium, designated strain PQ-2(T), was isolated from marine biofilm collected from a boat shell at a harbour of Zhoushan island in Zhejiang Province, PR China. Strain PQ-2(T) is Gram-stain-negative, yellow-pigmented, non-motile and short rod-shaped. Optimal growth of strain PQ-2(T) was observed at 32 °C, at pH 7.0 and in 2% (w/v) NaCl. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain PQ-2(T) showed highest similarity to Croceicoccus marinus E4A9(T) (96.3%) followed by Novosphingobium malaysiense MUSC 273(T) (95.6%) and Altererythrobacter marinus H32(T) (95.6%). Phylogenetic analysis with all species of the family Erythrobacteraceae with validly published names revealed that strain PQ-2(T) formed a phyletic line with Croceicoccus marinus E4A9(T) that was distinct from other members of the family Erythrobacteraceae . The sole respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10). The predominant fatty acids were C18 : 1ω7c, C17 : 1ω6c and summed feature 3 (C16 : 1ω7c and/or iso-C15 : 0 2-OH). The genomic DNA G+C content was 61.7 mol%. In the polar lipid profile, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, one unidentified phospholipid and one sphingoglycolipid were the major compounds; and another sphingoglycolipid was present in a minor amount. Based on the genotypic and phenotypic data, strain PQ-2(T) represents a novel species of the genus Croceicoccus , for which the name Croceicoccus naphthovorans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PQ-2(T) ( =CGMCC 1.12805(T) =NBRC 110381(T)). In addition, emended descriptions for the genus Croceicoccus and the species C. marinus are given. © 2015 IUMS.

  18. Optimization of culture conditions and medium composition for the marine algicidal bacterium Alteromonas sp. DH46 by uniform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jing; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Wang, Guizhong; Zheng, Tianling

    2013-09-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have led to extensive ecological and environmental issues and huge economic losses. Various HAB control techniques have been developed, and biological methods have been paid more attention. Algicidal bacteria is a general designation for bacteria which inhibit algal growth in a direct or indirect manner, and kill or damage the algal cells. A metabolite which is strongly toxic to the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense was produced by strain DH46 of the alga-lysing bacterium Alteromonas sp. The culture conditions were optimized using a single-factor test method. Factors including carbon source, nitrogen source, temperature, initial pH value, rotational speed and salinity were studied. The results showed that the cultivation of the bacteria at 28°C and 180 r min-1 with initial pH 7 and 30 salt contcentration favored both the cell growth and the lysing effect of strain DH46. The optimal medium composition for strain DH46 was determined by means of uniform design experimentation, and the most important components influencing the cell density were tryptone, yeast extract, soluble starch, NaNO3 and MgSO4. When the following culture medium was used (tryptone 14.0g, yeast extract 1.63g, soluble starch 5.0 g, NaNO3 1.6 g, MgSO4 2.3 g in 1L), the largest bacterial dry weight (7.36 g L-1) was obtained, which was an enhancement of 107% compared to the initial medium; and the algal lysis rate was as high as 98.4% which increased nearly 10% after optimization.

  19. Multiple N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone autoinducers of luminescence in the marine symbiotic bacterium Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, A; Blough, N V; Dunlap, P V

    1994-01-01

    In Vibrio fischeri, the synthesis of N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, the autoinducer for population density-responsive induction of the luminescence operon (the lux operon, luxICDABEG), is dependent on the autoinducer synthase gene luxI. Gene replacement mutants of V. fischeri defective in luxI, which had been expected to produce no autoinducer, nonetheless exhibited lux operon transcriptional activation. Mutants released into the medium a compound that, like N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, activated expression of the lux system in a dose-dependent manner and was both extractable with ethyl acetate and labile to base. The luxI-independent compound, also like N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, was produced by V. fischeri cells in a regulated, population density-responsive manner and required the transcriptional activator LuxR for activity in the lux system. The luxI-independent compound was identified as N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone by coelution with the synthetic compound in reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography, by derivatization treatment with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, by mass spectrometry, and by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A locus, ain, necessary and sufficient for Escherichia coli to synthesize N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone was cloned from the V. fischeri genome and found to be distinct from luxI by restriction mapping and Southern hybridization. N-Octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone and ain constitute a second, novel autoinduction system for population density-responsive signalling and regulation of lux gene expression, and possibly other genes, in V. fischeri. A third V. fischeri autoinducer, N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, dependent on luxI for its synthesis, was also identified. The presence of multiple chemically and genetically distinct but cross-acting autoinduction systems in V. fischeri indicates unexpected complexity for autoinduction as a regulatory mechanism in this bacterium. Images PMID:8002580

  20. Physiological and Genetic Description of Dissimilatory Perchlorate Reduction by the Novel Marine Bacterium Arcobacter sp. Strain CAB

    PubMed Central

    Carlström, Charlotte I.; Wang, Ouwei; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Bauer, Stefan; Lee, Joyce; Engelbrektson, Anna; Coates, John D.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT A novel dissimilatory perchlorate-reducing bacterium (DPRB), Arcobacter sp. strain CAB, was isolated from a marina in Berkeley, CA. Phylogenetically, this halophile was most closely related to Arcobacter defluvii strain SW30-2 and Arcobacter ellisii. With acetate as the electron donor, strain CAB completely reduced perchlorate (ClO4−) or chlorate (ClO3−) [collectively designated (per)chlorate] to innocuous chloride (Cl−), likely using the perchlorate reductase (Pcr) and chlorite dismutase (Cld) enzymes. When grown with perchlorate, optimum growth was observed at 25 to 30°C, pH 7, and 3% NaCl. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) preparations were dominated by free-swimming straight rods with 1 to 2 polar flagella per cell. Strain CAB utilized a variety of organic acids, fructose, and hydrogen as electron donors coupled to (per)chlorate reduction. Further, under anoxic growth conditions strain CAB utilized the biogenic oxygen produced as a result of chlorite dismutation to oxidize catechol via the meta-cleavage pathway of aerobic catechol degradation and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase enzyme. In addition to (per)chlorate, oxygen and nitrate were alternatively used as electron acceptors. The 3.48-Mb draft genome encoded a distinct perchlorate reduction island (PRI) containing several transposases. The genome lacks the pcrC gene, which was previously thought to be essential for (per)chlorate reduction, and appears to use an unrelated Arcobacter c-type cytochrome to perform the same function. PMID:23695836

  1. Oleiphilaceae fam. nov., to include Oleiphilus messinensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel marine bacterium that obligately utilizes hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Golyshin, Peter N; Chernikova, Tatiana N; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Timmis, Kenneth N; Yakimov, Michail M

    2002-05-01

    A bacterial isolate, ME102T, was obtained from an n-hexadecane enrichment culture of seawater/sediment samples collected in the harbour of Messina (Italy). This gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacterium used a narrow spectrum of organic compounds, including aliphatic hydrocarbons, alkanoates and alkanoles, as carbon and energy sources. None of the sugars, organic acids or amino acids tested was used. During cultivation on n-alkanes as the sole source of carbon and energy, the cells formed a biofilm on the surface of the alkane droplets. Large-scale (sometimes >50% of the cell mass) intracellular accumulation of alkanoates occurred in cells adsorbed on the alkane surface and under nitrogen-limiting conditions. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that this isolate represents a distinct lineage in the gamma-Proteobacteria and has about 91% sequence identity to members of Marinobacter and Alcanivorax, the closest genera. Four different types of polar lipid could be detected, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl ethylamine, phosphatidyl dimethylethylamine and lipids belonging to an unknown type of phospholipid (m/z between 861 and 879). The principal fatty acids in the polar lipid fatty acid profile were 16:0 and 16:1. The putative gene encoding the key enzyme of alkane catabolism, alkane hydroxylase (AlkB), has been cloned. The protein sequence of the putative AlkB of the isolate ME102T was related to the AlkB of Pseudomonas oleovorans and Alcanivorax borkumensis, showing about 60% sequence identity. On the basis of physiological studies and taking into account the distant phylogenetic position of isolate ME102T relative to previously described organisms, a novel genus and species is proposed, Oleiphilus messinensis gen. nov., sp. nov., within a new family, Oleiphilaceae fam. nov. Strain ME102T (= DSM 13489T = LMG 20357T) is the type and only strain of O. messinensis.

  2. Proteomic Characterization of Plasmid pLA1 for Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Marine Bacterium, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Kwon, Joseph; Leem, Sun Hee; Chung, Young Ho; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Kim, Sang Jin; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a halophilic marine bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Genome sequence analysis revealed that the large plasmid pLA1 present in N. pentaromativorans US6-1 consists of 199 ORFs and possess putative biodegradation genes that may be involved in PAH degradation. 1-DE/LC-MS/MS analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured in the presence of different PAHs and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) identified approximately 1,000 and 1,400 proteins, respectively. Up-regulated biodegradation enzymes, including those belonging to pLA1, were quantitatively compared. Among the PAHs, phenanthrene induced the strongest up-regulation of extradiol cleavage pathway enzymes such as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, putative biphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in pLA1. These enzymes lead the initial step of the lower catabolic pathway of aromatic hydrocarbons through the extradiol cleavage pathway and participate in the attack of PAH ring cleavage, respectively. However, N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured with p-hydroxybenzoate induced activation of another extradiol cleavage pathway, the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase pathway, that originated from chromosomal genes. These results suggest that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 utilizes two different extradiol pathways and plasmid pLA1 might play a key role in the biodegradation of PAH in N. pentaromativorans US6-1. PMID:24608660

  3. Construction and use of a broad-host-range plasmid expressing the lamB gene for utilization of bacteriophage lambda vectors in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Jasiecki, J; Czy, A; Gabig, M; Wegrzyn, G

    2001-07-01

    The remarkable success of Escherichia coli as a model organism in molecular genetics was dependent, among other things, on its susceptibility to genetic manipulation. Many versatile and sophisticated genetic tools for molecular biology studies are derived from bacteriophage lambda. However, this bacteriophage is specific for E. coli, and thus lambda-based techniques have been restricted to this bacterium. Plasmids expressing the E. coli gene coding for bacteriophage lambda receptor were reported previously, and introduction of such plasmids into cells of some other bacteria made them sensitive to phage lambda infection. However, we found that these systems were not efficient for Vibrio harveyi, one of the most frequently investigated species of marine bacteria. Here we describe construction of a broad-host-range plasmid expressing the lamB gene. Introduction of this plasmid to V. harveyi cells and expression of lamB made this strain susceptible to bacteriophage lambda adsorption and lambda DNA injection. Foreign genetic material could be introduced into cells of this strain using a cosmid vector.

  4. Evidence of mercury trapping in biofilm-EPS and mer operon-based volatilization of inorganic mercury in a marine bacterium Bacillus cereus BW-201B.

    PubMed

    Dash, Hirak R; Basu, Subham; Das, Surajit

    2017-04-01

    Biofilm-forming mercury-resistant marine bacterium Bacillus cereus BW-201B has been explored to evident that the bacterial biofilm-EPS (exopolymers) trap inorganic mercury but subsequently release EPS-bound mercury for induction of mer operon-mediated volatilization of inorganic mercury. The isolate was able to tolerate 50 ppm of mercury and forms biofilm in presence of mercury. mer operon-mediated volatilization was confirmed, and -SH was found to be the key functional group of bacterial EPS responsible for mercury binding. Biofilm-EPS-bound mercury was found to be internalized to the bacterial system as confirmed by reversible conformational change of -SH group and increased expression level of merA gene in a timescale experiment. Biofilm-EPS trapped Hg after 24 h of incubation, and by 96 h, the volatilization process reaches to its optimum confirming the internalization of EPS-bound mercury to the bacterial cells. Biofilm disintegration at the same time corroborates the results.

  5. Enhanced agarose and xylan degradation for production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by co-culture of marine bacterium, Saccharophagus degradans and its contaminant, Bacillus cereus

    DOE PAGES

    Sawant, Shailesh S.; Salunke, Bipinchandra K.; Taylor, II, Larry E.; ...

    2017-02-28

    Over reliance on energy or petroleum products has raised concerns both in regards to the depletion of their associated natural resources as well as their increasing costs. Bioplastics derived from microbes are emerging as promising alternatives to fossil fuel derived petroleum plastics. The development of a simple and eco-friendly strategy for bioplastic production with high productivity and yield, which is produced in a cost effective manner utilising abundantly available renewable carbon sources, would have the potential to result in an inexhaustible global energy source. Here we report the biosynthesis of bioplastic polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in pure cultures of marine bacterium, Saccharophagusmore » degradans 2-40 (Sde 2-40), its contaminant, Bacillus cereus, and a co-culture of these bacteria (Sde 2-40 and B. cereus) degrading plant and algae derived complex polysaccharides. Sde 2-40 degraded the complex polysaccharides agarose and xylan as sole carbon sources for biosynthesis of PHAs. The ability of Sde 2-40 to degrade agarose increased after co-culturing with B. cereus. The association of Sde 2-40 with B. cereus resulted in increased cell growth and higher PHA production (34.5% of dry cell weight) from xylan as a carbon source in comparison to Sde 2-40 alone (22.7% of dry cell weight). Lastly, the present study offers an innovative prototype for production of PHA through consolidated bioprocessing of complex carbon sources by pure and co-culture of microorganisms.« less

  6. Aliikangiella marina gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium from the culture broth of Picochlorum sp. 122, and proposal of Kangiellaceae fam. nov. in the order Oceanospirillales.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghua; Tang, Mingxing; Wu, Huanlian; Dai, Shikun; Li, Tao; Chen, Chenghao; He, Hui; Fan, Jiewei; Xiang, Wenzhou; Li, Xiang

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-motile, non-spore-forming, long rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain GYP-15T, was isolated from the culture broth of a marine microalga, Picochloruma sp. 122. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that strain GYP-15T shared 90.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with its closest relative, Kangiella aquimarina KCTC 12183T, and represents a distinct phylogenetic lineage in a robust clade consisting of GYP-15T and members of the genera Kangiella and Pleionea in the order Oceanospirillales. Chemotaxonomic and physiological characteristics, including major cellular fatty acids, NaCl tolerance and pattern of carbon source utilization, could also readily distinguish strain GYP-15T from all established genera and species. Thus, it is concluded that strain GYP-15T represents a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Aliikangiella marina gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Aliikangiella marina is GYP-15T ( = MCCC 1K01163T = KCTC 42667T). Based on phylogenetic results, 16S rRNA gene signature nucleotide pattern and some physiological characteristics, the three genera Kangiella, Pleionea and Aliikangiella are proposed to make up a novel family, Kangiellaceae fam. nov., in the order Oceanospirillales.

  7. Biochemical characterization and structural analysis of a new cold-active and salt-tolerant esterase from the marine bacterium Thalassospira sp.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Concetta; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S; Di Scala, Alessia; de Pascale, Donatella; Altermark, Bjørn; Willassen, Nils-Peder

    2016-05-01

    A gene encoding an esterase, ThaEst2349, was identified in the marine psychrophilic bacterium Thalassospira sp. GB04J01. The gene was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli as a His-tagged fusion protein. The recombinant enzyme showed optimal activity at 45 °C and the thermal stability displayed a retention of 75 % relative activity at 40 °C after 2 h. The optimal pH was 8.5 but the enzyme kept more than 75 % of its maximal activity between pH 8.0 and 9.5. ThaEst2349 also showed remarkable tolerance towards high concentrations of salt and it was active against short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters, displaying optimal activity with the acetate. The enzyme was tested for tolerance of organic solvents and the results are suggesting that it could function as an interesting candidate for biotechnological applications. The crystal structure of ThaEst2349 was determined to 1.69 Å revealing an asymmetric unit containing two chains, which also is the biological unit. The structure has a characteristic cap domain and a catalytic triad comprising Ser158, His285 and Asp255. To explain the cold-active nature of the enzyme, we compared it against thermophilic counterparts. Our hypothesis is that a high methionine content, less hydrogen bonds and less ion pairs render the enzyme more flexible at low temperatures.

  8. Spectroscopic Characterization and Mechanistic Investigation of P-Methyl Transfer by a Radical SAM Enzyme from the Marine Bacterium Shewanella denitrificans OS217

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kylie D.; Wang, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Natural products containing carbon-phosphorus bonds elicit important bioactivity in many organisms. L-phosphinothricin contains the only known naturally-occurring carbon-phosphorus-carbon bond linkage. In actinomycetes, the cobalamin-dependent radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) methyltransferase PhpK catalyzes the formation of the second C-P bond to generate the complete C-P-C linkage in phosphinothricin. Here we use electron paramagnetic resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies to characterize and demonstrate the activity of a cobalamin-dependent radical SAM methyltransferase denoted SD_1168 from Shewanella denitrificans OS217, a marine bacterium that has not been reported to synthesize phosphinothricin. Recombinant, refolded, and reconstituted SD_1168 binds a four-iron, four-sulfur cluster that interacts with SAM and cobalamin. In the presence of SAM, a reductant, and methylcobalamin, SD_1168 surprisingly catalyzes the P-methylation of N-acetyl-demethylphosphinothricin and demethylphosphinothricin to produce N-acetyl-phosphinothricin and phosphinothricin, respectively. In addition, this enzyme is active in the absence of methylcobalamin if the strong reductant titanium (III) citrate and hydroxocobalamin are provided. When incubated with [methyl-13C] cobalamin and titanium citrate, both [methyl-13C] and unlabeled N-acetylphosphinothricin are produced. Our results suggest that SD_1168 catalyzes P-methylation using radical SAM-dependent chemistry with cobalamin as a coenzyme. In light of recent genomic information, the discovery of this P-methyltransferase suggests that S. denitrificans produces a phosphinate natural product. PMID:25224746

  9. A new alkaliphilic cold-active esterase from the psychrophilic marine bacterium Rhodococcus sp.: functional and structural studies and biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Concetta; Tedesco, Pietro; Ambrosino, Luca; Altermark, Bjørn; Willassen, Nils-Peder; de Pascale, Donatella

    2014-03-01

    The special features of cold-adapted lipolytic biocatalysts have made their use possible in several industrial applications. In fact, cold-active enzymes are known to be able to catalyze reactions at low temperatures, avoiding side reactions taking place at higher temperatures and preserving the integrity of products. A lipolytic gene was isolated from the Arctic marine bacterium Rhodococcus sp. AW25M09 and expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion bodies. The recombinant enzyme (hereafter called RhLip) showed interesting cold-active esterase activity. The refolded purified enzyme displayed optimal activity at 30 °C and was cold-active with retention of 50% activity at 10 °C. It is worth noting that the optimal pH was 11, and the low relative activity below pH 10 revealed that RhLip was an alkaliphilic esterase. The enzyme was active toward short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters (C2-C6), displaying optimal activity with the butyrate (C4) ester. In addition, the enzyme revealed a good organic solvent and salt tolerance. These features make this an interesting enzyme for exploitation in some industrial applications.

  10. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Five-domain GH115 α-Glucuronidase from the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40T*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weijun; Yan, Ruoyu; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Vuong, Thu V.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Gatenholm, Paul; Toriz, Guillermo; Tenkanen, Maija; Savchenko, Alexei; Master, Emma R.

    2016-01-01

    Glucuronic acid (GlcAp) and/or methylglucuronic acid (MeGlcAp) decorate the major forms of xylan in hardwood and coniferous softwoods as well as many cereal grains. Accordingly, the complete utilization of glucuronoxylans or conversion to sugar precursors requires the action of main chain xylanases as well as α-glucuronidases that release the α- (1→2)-linked (Me)GlcAp side groups. Herein, a family GH115 enzymefrom the marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40T, SdeAgu115A, demonstrated activity toward glucuronoxylan and oligomers thereof with preference toward MeGlcAp linked to internal xylopyranosyl residues. Unique biochemical characteristics of NaCl activation were also observed. The crystal structure of SdeAgu115A revealed a five-domain architecture, with an additional insertion C+ domain that had significant impact on the domain arrangement of SdeAgu115A monomer and its dimerization. The participation of domain C+ in substrate binding was supported by reduced substrate inhibition upon introducing W773A, W689A, and F696A substitutions within this domain. In addition to Asp-335, the catalytic essentiality of Glu-216 was revealed by site-specific mutagenesis. A primary sequence analysis suggested that the SdeAgu115A architecture is shared by more than half of GH115 members, thus defining a distinct archetype for GH115 enzymes. PMID:27129264

  11. Proteomic characterization of plasmid pLA1 for biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the marine bacterium, Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    PubMed

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Lee, Yeol Gyun; Kwon, Joseph; Leem, Sun Hee; Chung, Young Ho; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Kim, Sang Jin; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Seung Il

    2014-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a halophilic marine bacterium able to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Genome sequence analysis revealed that the large plasmid pLA1 present in N. pentaromativorans US6-1 consists of 199 ORFs and possess putative biodegradation genes that may be involved in PAH degradation. 1-DE/LC-MS/MS analysis of N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured in the presence of different PAHs and monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs) identified approximately 1,000 and 1,400 proteins, respectively. Up-regulated biodegradation enzymes, including those belonging to pLA1, were quantitatively compared. Among the PAHs, phenanthrene induced the strongest up-regulation of extradiol cleavage pathway enzymes such as ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, putative biphenyl-2,3-diol 1,2-dioxygenase, and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in pLA1. These enzymes lead the initial step of the lower catabolic pathway of aromatic hydrocarbons through the extradiol cleavage pathway and participate in the attack of PAH ring cleavage, respectively. However, N. pentaromativorans US6-1 cultured with p-hydroxybenzoate induced activation of another extradiol cleavage pathway, the protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase pathway, that originated from chromosomal genes. These results suggest that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 utilizes two different extradiol pathways and plasmid pLA1 might play a key role in the biodegradation of PAH in N. pentaromativorans US6-1.

  12. Fijiolides A and B, inhibitors of TNF-alpha-induced NFkappaB activation, from a marine-derived sediment bacterium of the genus Nocardiopsis.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sang-Jip; Gaudêncio, Susana P; Kauffman, Christopher A; Jensen, Paul R; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Marler, Laura E; Pezzuto, John M; Fenical, William

    2010-06-25

    Fijiolide A, a potent inhibitor of TNF-alpha-induced NFkappaB activation, along with fijiolide B, were isolated from a marine-derived bacterium of the genus Nocardiopsis. The planar structures of fijiolides A (1) and B (2) were elucidated by interpretation of 2D NMR spectroscopic data, while the absolute configurations of these compounds were defined by interpretation of circular dichroism and 2D NMR data combined with application of the advanced Mosher's method. Fijiolides A and B are related to several recently isolated chloroaromatic compounds, which appear to be the Bergman cyclization products of enediyne precursors. Fijiolide A reduced TNF-alpha-induced NFkappaB activation by 70.3%, with an IC(50) value of 0.57 micro-M. Fijiolide B demonstrated less inhibition, only 46.5%, without dose dependence. The same pattern was also observed with quinone reductase (QR) activity: fijiolide A was found to induce quinone reductase-1 (QR1) with an induction ratio of 3.5 at a concentration of 20 microg/mL (28.4 microM). The concentration required to double the activity was 1.8 microM. Fijiolide B did not affect QR1 activity, indicating the importance of the nitrogen substitution pattern for biological activity. On the basis of these data, fijiolide A is viewed as a promising lead for more advanced anticancer testing.

  13. Assessment of Bioflocculant Production by Bacillus sp. Gilbert, a Marine Bacterium Isolated from the Bottom Sediment of Algoa Bay

    PubMed Central

    Nontembiso, Piyo; Sekelwa, Cosa; Leonard, Mabinya V.; Anthony, Okoh I.

    2011-01-01

    The bioflocculant-producing potentials of a marine bacteria isolated from the bottom sediment of Algoa Bay was investigated using standard methods. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed 98% similarity to that of Bacillus sp. HXG-C1 and the nucleotide sequence was deposited in GenBank as Bacillus sp. Gilbert with accession number HQ537128. Bioflocculant was optimally produced when sucrose (72% flocculating activity) and ammonium chloride (91% flocculating activity) were used as sole sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively; an initial pH 6.2 of the production medium; and Mg2+ as cation. Chemical analysis of the purified bioflocculant revealed the compound to be a polysaccharide. PMID:21822413

  14. Assessment of bioflocculant production by Bacillus sp. Gilbert, a marine bacterium isolated from the bottom sediment of Algoa Bay.

    PubMed

    Nontembiso, Piyo; Sekelwa, Cosa; Leonard, Mabinya V; Anthony, Okoh I

    2011-01-01

    The bioflocculant-producing potentials of a marine bacteria isolated from the bottom sediment of Algoa Bay was investigated using standard methods. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed 98% similarity to that of Bacillus sp. HXG-C1 and the nucleotide sequence was deposited in GenBank as Bacillus sp. Gilbert with accession number HQ537128. Bioflocculant was optimally produced when sucrose (72% flocculating activity) and ammonium chloride (91% flocculating activity) were used as sole sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively; an initial pH 6.2 of the production medium; and Mg²⁺ as cation. Chemical analysis of the purified bioflocculant revealed the compound to be a polysaccharide.

  15. Anaerobic degradation of naphthalene by a pure culture of a novel type of marine sulphate-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Galushko, A; Minz, D; Schink, B; Widdel, F

    1999-10-01

    Incubation of marine sediment in anoxic, sulphate-rich medium in the presence of naphthalene resulted in the enrichment of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Pure cultures with short, oval cells (1.3 by 1.3-1.9 microm) were isolated that grew with naphthalene as the only organic carbon source and electron donor for sulphate reduction to sulphide. One strain, NaphS2, was characterized. It affiliated with completely oxidizing sulphate-reducing bacteria of the delta-subclass of the Proteobacteria, as revealed by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. 2-Naphthoate, benzoate, pyruvate and acetate were used in addition to naphthalene. Quantification of substrate consumption, sulphide formation and formed cell mass revealed that naphthalene was completely oxidized with sulphate as the electron acceptor.

  16. Comparative study of MnO2 nanoparticle synthesis by marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Bipinchandra K; Sawant, Shailesh S; Lee, Sang-Ill; Kim, Beom Soo

    2015-07-01

    Microorganisms are one of the most attractive and simple sources for the synthesis of different types of metal nanoparticles. The synthesis of manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO2 NPs) by microorganisms from reducing potassium permanganate was investigated for the first time in the present study. The microbial supernatants of the bacterium Saccharophagus degradans ATCC 43961 (Sde 2-40) and of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed positive reactions to the synthesis of MnO2 NPs by displaying a change of color in the permanganate solution from purple to yellow. KMnO4-specific peaks also disappeared and MnO2-specific peaks emerged at an absorption maximum of 365 nm in UV-visible spectrophotometry. The washed Sde 2-40 cells did not show any ability to synthesize MnO2 NPs. The medium and medium constituents of Sde 2-40 showed similar positive reactions as supernatants, which indicate the role of the Sde 2-40 medium constituents in the synthesis of MnO2 NPs. This suggests that microorganisms without nanoparticle synthesis ability can be misreported for their abilities to synthesize nanoparticles. S. cerevisiae washed cells showed an ability to synthesize MnO2 NPs. The strategies of keeping yeast cells in tea bags and dialysis membranes showed positive tests for the synthesis of MnO2 NPs. A Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy study suggested roles for the proteins, alcoholic compounds, and cell walls of S. cerevisiae cells in the synthesis of MnO2 NPs. Electron-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analyses confirmed the presence of Mn and O in the sample. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed characteristic binding energies for MnO2 NPs. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs revealed the presence of uniformly dispersed hexagonal- and spherical-shaped particles with an average size of 34.4 nm. The synthesis approach using yeast is possible by a simple reaction at low temperature without any need for catalysts, templates, or expensive and precise equipment

  17. Labrenzia suaedae sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from a halophyte, and emended description of the genus Labrenzia.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Fehmida; Jeong, Jae Heon; Chung, Eu Jin; Jeon, Che Ok; Chung, Young Ryun

    2014-04-01

    An endophytic, Gram-staining-negative bacterium was isolated from sterilized roots of a plant, Suaeda maritima, growing on tidal flats. Cells of the strain were motile by means of a single polar flagellum and colonies were pigmented light brown. Strain YC6927(T) was able to grow at 15-37 °C (optimum at 28-30 °C) and at pH 5.0-10.0 (optimum at pH 7.0-8.0). The strain was able to grow at NaCl concentrations of 0-9.0 % (w/v), with optimum growth at 0-5.0 % NaCl. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the strain was a member of the genus Labrenzia, exhibiting the highest similarity to Labrenzia marina mano18(T) (97.6 % sequence similarity). Strain YC6927(T) produced light-brown carotenoid pigments. The major respiratory quinone was Q-10 and the DNA G+C content was 58.5 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness between strain YC6927(T) and closely related strains was between 8.2±1.8 and 20.3±1.5 %. Strain YC6927(T) contained summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) and C14 : 0 3-OH as major fatty acids, confirming the affiliation of the strain with the genus Labrenzia. The polar lipids consisted of phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, an unknown aminolipid, an unknown phospholipid and five unknown lipids. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, physiological and biochemical characterization and DNA-DNA hybridization data, strain YC6927(T) should be assigned to a novel species of the genus Labrenzia, for which the name Labrenzia suaedae sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is YC6927(T) ( = KACC 13772(T) = DSM 22153(T)). An emended description of the genus Labrenzia is also proposed.

  18. Bacillus toyonensis strain AEMREG6, a bacterium isolated from South African marine environment sediment samples produces a glycoprotein bioflocculant.

    PubMed

    Okaiyeto, Kunle; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Mabinya, Leonard V; Okoh, Anthony I

    2015-03-23

    A bioflocculant-producing bacteria, isolated from sediment samples of a marine environment in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa demonstrated a flocculating activity above 60% for kaolin clay suspension. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) nucleotide sequence of the isolate in the GenBank database showed 99% similarity to Bacillus toyonensis strain BCT-7112 and it was deposited in the GenBank as Bacillus toyonensis strain AEMREG6 with accession number KP406731. The bacteria produced a bioflocculant (REG-6) optimally in the presence of glucose and NH4NO3 as the sole carbon and nitrogen source, respectively, initial medium pH of 5 and Ca2+ as the cation of choice. Chemical analysis showed that purified REG-6 was a glycoprotein mainly composed of polysaccharide (77.8%) and protein (11.5%). It was thermally stable and had strong flocculating activity against kaolin suspension over a wide range of pH values (3-11) with a relatively low dosage requirement of 0.1 mg/mL in the presence of Mn2+. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed the presence of hydroxyl, carboxyl and amide groups preferred for flocculation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that bridging was the main flocculation mechanism of REG-6. The outstanding flocculating performance of REG-6 holds great potential to replace the hazardous chemical flocculants currently used in water treatment.

  19. Algivirga pacifica gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel agar-degrading marine bacterium of the family Flammeovirgaceae isolated from Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jennifer Jooyoun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kwon, Young-Kyung; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Yang, Sung-Hyun; Jang, Jiyi; Heo, Soo-Jin; Park, Heung-Sik; Jung, Won-Kyo; Lee, Youngdeuk; Kang, Do-Hyung; Oh, Chulhong

    2013-12-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, coccoid to short rod-shaped and non-flagellated marine bacterial strain S354(T) was isolated from seawater of Micronesia. The strain was capable to degrade agar-forming slight depression into agar plate. Growth occurred at a temperature range of 12-44 °C, a pH range of 5-9, and a salinity range of 1-7 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences suggested that S354(T) belongs to the family Flammeovirgaceae. The novel strain was most closely related to Limibacter armeniacum YM 11-185(T) with similarity of 92.5 %. The DNA G+C content was 43.8 mol%. The major fatty acids (>10 %) were iso-C15:0 and C16:1 ω5c. The predominant isoprenoid quinone was determined to be MK-7. Polar lipid profile of S354(T) consisted of phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown polar lipid, and unknown glycolipids. Based on the phenotypic, phylogenetic, biochemical, and physiological tests conducted in this study, S354(T) is proposed to represent a type strain of a novel genus and species. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of S354(T) is registered in GenBank under the accession number JQ639084. The type of strain Algivirga pacifica gen. nov., sp. nov. is S354(T) (=KCCM 90107(T)=JCM 18326(T)).

  20. Production of cryoprotectant extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) by the marine psychrophilic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H under extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Marx, Joseph G; Carpenter, Shelly D; Deming, Jody W

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular polysaccharide substances (EPS) play critical roles in microbial ecology, including the colonization of extreme environments in the ocean, from sea ice to the deep sea. After first developing a sugar-free growth medium, we examined the relative effects of temperature, pressure, and salinity on EPS production (on a per cell basis) by the obligately marine and psychrophilic gamma-proteobacterium, Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H. Over growth-permissive temperatures of approximately 10 to -4 degrees C, EPS production did not change, but from -8 to -14 degrees C when samples froze, EPS production rose dramatically. Similarly, at growth-permissive hydrostatic pressures of 1-200 atm (1 atm = 101.325 kPa) (at -1 and 8 degrees C), EPS production was unchanged, but at higher pressures of 400 and 600 atm EPS production rose markedly. In salinity tests at 10-100 parts per million (and -1 and 5 degrees C), EPS production increased at the freshest salinity tested. Extreme environmental conditions thus appear to stimulate EPS production by this strain. Furthermore, strain 34H recovered best from deep-freezing to -80 degrees C (not found for Earthly environments) if first supplemented with a preparation of its own EPS, rather than other cryoprotectants like glycerol, suggesting EPS production as both a survival strategy and source of compounds with potentially novel properties for biotechnological and other applications.

  1. Transcriptional and Translational Regulatory Responses to Iron Limitation in the Globally Distributed Marine Bacterium Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel P.; Kitner, Joshua B.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Clauss, Therese R.; Lipton, Mary S.; Schwalbach, Michael S.; Steindler, Laura; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is recognized as an important micronutrient that limits microbial plankton productivity over vast regions of the oceans. We investigated the gene expression responses of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. Microarray data indicated transcription of the periplasmic iron binding protein sfuC increased by 16-fold, and iron transporter subunits, iron-sulfur center assembly genes, and the putative ferroxidase rubrerythrin transcripts increased to a lesser extent. Quantitative peptide mass spectrometry revealed that sfuC protein abundance increased 27-fold, despite an average decrease of 59% across the global proteome. Thus, we propose sfuC as a marker gene for indicating iron limitation in marine metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic ecological surveys. The marked proteome reduction was not directly correlated to changes in the transcriptome, implicating post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms as modulators of protein expression. Two RNA-binding proteins, CspE and CspL, correlated well with iron availability, suggesting that they may contribute to the observed differences between the transcriptome and proteome. We propose a model in which the RNA-binding activity of CspE and CspL selectively enables protein synthesis of the iron acquisition protein SfuC during transient growth-limiting episodes of iron scarcity. PMID:20463970

  2. Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron limitation in the globally distributed marine bacterium Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Daniel P.; Kitner, J. B.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Lipton, Mary S.; Schwalbach, M. S.; Steindler, L.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2010-05-05

    Abstract Background: Iron is recognized as an important micronutrient that limits microbial plankton productivity over vast regions of the oceans. We investigated the gene expression responses of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. Methodology/Principal Findings: Microarray data indicated transcription of the periplasmic iron binding protein sfuC increased by 16-fold, and iron transporter subunits, iron-sulfur center assembly genes, and the putative ferroxidase rubrerythrin transcripts increased to a lesser extent. Quantitative peptide mass spectrometry revealed that sfuC protein abundance increased 27-fold, despite an average decrease of 59% across the global proteome. Two RNA-binding proteins, CspE and CspL, correlated well with iron availability, suggesting that they may contribute to the observed differences between the transcriptome and proteome. Conclusions/Significance: We propose sfuC as a marker gene for indicating iron limitation in marine metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic ecological surveys. The marked proteome reduction was not directly correlated to changes in the transcriptome, implicating post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms as modulators of protein expression. We propose a model in which the RNA-binding activity of cspE and cspL selectively enables protein synthesis of the iron acquisition protein sfuC during transient growth-limiting episodes of iron scarcity.

  3. Biosorption and Biomineralization of U(VI) by the Marine Bacterium Idiomarina loihiensis MAH1: Effect of Background Electrolyte and pH

    PubMed Central

    Morcillo, Fernando; González-Muñoz, María T.; Reitz, Thomas; Romero-González, María E.; Arias, José M.; Merroun, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to compare the effects of pH, uranium concentration, and background electrolyte (seawater and NaClO4 solution) on the speciation of uranium(VI) associated with the marine bacterium Idiomarina loihiensis MAH1. This was done at the molecular level using a multidisciplinary approach combining X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). We showed that the U(VI)/bacterium interaction mechanism is highly dependent upon pH but also the nature of the used background electrolyte played a role. At neutral conditions and a U concentration ranging from 5·10−4 to 10−5 M (environmentally relevant concentrations), XAS analysis revealed that uranyl phosphate mineral phases, structurally resembling meta-autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2 2–6H2O] are precipitated at the cell surfaces of the strain MAH1. The formation of this mineral phase is independent of the background solution but U(VI) luminescence lifetime analyses demonstrated that the U(VI) speciation in seawater samples is more intricate, i.e., different complexes were formed under natural conditions. At acidic conditions, pH 2, 3 and 4.3 ([U] = 5·10−4 M, background electrolyte  = 0.1 M NaClO4), the removal of U from solution was due to biosorption to Extracellular Polysaccharides (EPS) and cell wall components as evident from TEM analysis. The LIII-edge XAS and TRLFS studies showed that the biosorption process observed is dependent of pH. The bacterial cell forms a complex with U through organic phosphate groups at pH 2 and via phosphate and carboxyl groups at pH 3 and 4.3, respectively. The differences in the complexes formed between uranium and bacteria on seawater compared to NaClO4 solution demonstrates that the actinide/microbe interactions are influenced by the three studied factors, i.e., the pH, the uranium concentration and the chemical composition of the

  4. Influences of metal-ligand complexes on the cadmium and zinc biokinetics in the marine bacterium, Bacillus firmus.

    PubMed

    Keung, Chung Fai; Guo, Feng; Qian, Peiyuan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2008-01-01

    Uptake kinetics of cadmium and zinc in gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus firmus, isolated from Hong Kong sediments were examined in the present study. The metal uptake by the bacteria was measured at different ambient free metal ion concentrations (10(-12)-10(-6) M Cd(2+) and 10(-10)-10(-6) M Zn(2+)) by adding different concentrations of total dissolved Cd and Zn and hydrophilic organic ligands (ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, and citrate). Our data suggest that Cd and Zn uptake by B. firmus is best predicted by Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) activities. Free metal ions were complexed with the active sites on the bacterial surface, and an equilibrium between the free metal ion and surface-metal complex was reached quickly. After binding, the metal ions were then biologically transported into the bacteria. In addition, with the presence of lipophilic organic ligands (diethyldithiocarbamate and oxine), the lipophilic metal complex was internalized rapidly into B. firmus by passive diffusion through the bacterial plasma membrane. The uptake of the lipophilic metal complex could not be predicted by the free ion activity model because the mass transport through plasma membrane was the most important metal uptake pathway. Furthermore, the efflux of Cd and Zn by B. firmus was determined in the present study. The calculated efflux rate constants of Cd and Zn were (5.55 +/- 1.96) x 10(-4)/min and (3.75 +/- 1.04) x 10(-4)/min, respectively. The present study helps us to understand the process of bioaccumulation of metals in marine bacteria, which remains a poorly studied area.

  5. Responses of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens to an excess of heavy metals: physiological and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Poirier, I; Jean, N; Guary, J C; Bertrand, M

    2008-11-15

    A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain was isolated from oxic marine sediments obtained from the strand zone of the St Anne Bay (a moderately metal-contaminated site to the west of Cherbourg harbour). The strain, which exhibited a high tolerance to metal contamination when cultivated (minimal inhibitory concentration=950 microM [62 mg L(-1)] for Zn, 660 microM [42 mg L(-1)] for Cu, and 505 microM [57 mg L(-1)] for Cd), was further characterized by its physiological and biochemical responses to metal additions to the culture medium. Bacterial growth was significantly disturbed by 380 microM Zn (25 mg L(-1)), 315 microM Cu (20 mg L(-1)) and 90 microM Cd (10 mg L(-1)). The Zn-containing alkaline phosphatase was studied as an intoxication biomarker. Its activity was stimulated (+9%) by an excess of Zn, but inhibited by Cd (-55%) and Cu (-10%), these two elements could displace the native Zn or/and disturb the enzyme 3D-structure. Bacterial O(2) consumption was recorded as a global physiological response to metal stress. This parameter dropped with increasing Cd and Cu contamination (-49% and -45%, respectively, at 20 mg L(-1)). By contrast, Zn increased O2 consumption (approximately +40% for the different tested concentrations). The proteomes of bacteria grown in the presence or absence of 20 mg metal L(-1) were characterized by 2D-gel electrophoresis. The number of spots exhibiting a difference in intensity between the contaminated sample and the control was 65, 68, and 103, for Zn, Cu and Cd, respectively. Among them, 45, 61 and 82 spots respectively appeared de novo or increased in intensity, indicative of metal-stimulated synthesis, particularly for Cu and Cd. In summary, whereas Cd and Cu treatments both stressed cells and slowed down primary metabolism to differing extents, Zn has a stimulating action on several physiological and biochemical parameters.

  6. Desulfobulbus aggregans sp. nov., a Novel Sulfate Reducing Bacterium Isolated from Marine Sediment from the Gulf of Gabes.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, Hanen; Karray, Fatma; Bartoli, Manon; Ben Hnia, Wajdi; Mhiri, Najla; Fardeau, Marie-Laure; Bennour, Feten; Kamoun, Lotfi; Alazard, Didier; Sayadi, Sami

    2017-04-01

    Three sulfate-reducing bacterial strains designated SM40(T), SM41, and SM43 were isolated from marine sediment in the region of Skhira located in the Gulf of Gabes (Tunisia). These strains grew in anaerobic media with phosphogypsum as a sulfate source and sodium lactate as an electron and carbon source. One of them, strain SM40(T), was characterized by phenotypic and phylogenetic methods. Cells were ovoid, Gram-stain-negative and non-motile. The temperature limits for growth were 10 and 55 °C with an optimum at 35 °C and the pH range was 6.5-8.1 with an optimum at pH 7.5. Growth was observed at salinities ranging from 10 to 80 g NaCl l(-1) with an optimum at 30 g NaCl l(-1). Strain SM40(T) was able to utilize butanol, ethanol, formate, L-glucose, glycerol, lactate, propanol, propionate, and pyruvate as electron donors for the reduction of sulfate, sulfite, or thiosulfate to H2S. Without electron acceptors, strain SM40(T) fermented butanol and pyruvate. The DNA G+C content of strain SM40(T) was 52.6 mol %. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate revealed that strain SM40(T) was closely related to the species in the genus Desulfobulbus of the family Desulfobulbaceae. The sequence similarity between strain SM40 and Desulfobulbus marinus was 95.4%. The phylogenetic analysis, DNA G+C content, and differences in substrate utilization suggested that strain SM40 represents a new species of the genus Desulfobulbus, D. aggregans sp. nov. The type strain is strain SM40(T) (=DSM 28693(T) = JCM 19994(T)).

  7. Nutrition and Metabolism of Marine Bacteria XVI. Formation of Protoplasts, Spheroplasts, and Related Forms from a Gram-negative Marine Bacterium1

    PubMed Central

    Costerton, J. W.; Forsberg, Cecil; Matula, Tibor I.; Buckmire, F. L. A.; MacLeod, Robert A.

    1967-01-01

    When cells of a marine pseudomonad were washed and suspended in 0.5 m sucrose, they retained their rod shape, but thin sections, when examined in an electron microscope, revealed that the outer layer of the cell wall had separated a considerable distance from the cytoplasmic membrane. Treatment of such cells with lysozyme alone produced no obvious change, but treatment with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) alone caused the outer wall to disappear. A combination of EDTA and lysozyme resulted in the rapid formation of spheres essentially free from hexosamine and indistinguishable from protoplasts of gram-positive bacteria. When cells were washed with 0.5 m NaCl and then suspended in 0.5 m sucrose, they also retained their rod shape, but in this case the outer layer separated from the cells completely and could be recovered from the suspending medium. Such cells were converted to protoplasts by the action of lysozyme alone. Cells washed and finally suspended in 0.5 m NaCl, when treated with EDTA and lysozyme, slowly became spherical. Thin sections revealed typical spheroplasts of gram-negative bacteria in which the outer wall remained intact. Protoplasts took up α-aminoisobutyric acid by a Na+-dependent process. Images PMID:4965199

  8. Transposon mutagenesis identified chromosomal and plasmid genes essential for adaptation of the marine bacterium Dinoroseobacter shibae to anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Matthias; Laaß, Sebastian; Burghartz, Melanie; Petersen, Jörn; Koßmehl, Sebastian; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Rabus, Ralf; Wittmann, Christoph; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter

    2013-10-01

    Anaerobic growth and survival are integral parts of the life cycle of many marine bacteria. To identify genes essential for the anoxic life of Dinoroseobacter shibae, a transposon library was screened for strains impaired in anaerobic denitrifying growth. Transposon insertions in 35 chromosomal and 18 plasmid genes were detected. The essential contribution of plasmid genes to anaerobic growth was confirmed with plasmid-cured D. shibae strains. A combined transcriptome and proteome approach identified oxygen tension-regulated genes. Transposon insertion sites of a total of 1,527 mutants without an anaerobic growth phenotype were determined to identify anaerobically induced but not essential genes. A surprisingly small overlap of only three genes (napA, phaA, and the Na(+)/Pi antiporter gene Dshi_0543) between anaerobically essential and induced genes was found. Interestingly, transposon mutations in genes involved in dissimilatory and assimilatory nitrate reduction (napA, nasA) and corresponding cofactor biosynthesis (genomic moaB, moeB, and dsbC and plasmid-carried dsbD and ccmH) were found to cause anaerobic growth defects. In contrast, mutation of anaerobically induced genes encoding proteins required for the later denitrification steps (nirS, nirJ, nosD), dimethyl sulfoxide reduction (dmsA1), and fermentation (pdhB1, arcA, aceE, pta, acs) did not result in decreased anaerobic growth under the conditions tested. Additional essential components (ferredoxin, cccA) of the anaerobic electron transfer chain and central metabolism (pdhB) were identified. Another surprise was the importance of sodium gradient-dependent membrane processes and genomic rearrangements via viruses, transposons, and insertion sequence elements for anaerobic growth. These processes and the observed contributions of cell envelope restructuring (lysM, mipA, fadK), C4-dicarboxylate transport (dctM1, dctM3), and protease functions to anaerobic growth require further investigation to unravel the

  9. The chitin catabolic cascade in the marine bacterium Vibrio cholerae: characterization of a unique chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Li, Xibing; Wang, Lai-Xi; Wang, Xuesong; Roseman, Saul

    2007-12-01

    Chitin, one of the most abundant organic substances in nature, is consumed by marine bacteria, such as Vibrio cholerae, via a multitude of tightly regulated genes (Li and Roseman 2004, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. 101:627-631). One such gene, cod, is reported here. It encodes a chitin oligosaccharide deacetylase (COD), when cells are induced by chitobiose, (GlcNH(2))(2), or crude crab shells. COD was molecularly cloned (COD-6His), overproduced, and purified to apparent homogeneity. COD is secreted at all stages of growth by induced V. cholerae. The gene sequence predicts a 26 N-terminal amino acid signal peptide not found in the isolated protein. COD is very active with chitin oligosaccharides, is virtually inactive with GlcNAc, and slightly active with colloidal ([(3)H]-N-acetyl)-chitin. The oligosaccharides are converted almost quantitatively to products lacking one acetyl group. The latter were characterized by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and treatment with nitrous acid. COD catalyzes the following reactions (n = 2-6): (GlcNAc)(n)--> GlcNAc-GlcNH(2)-(GlcNAc)(n-2) + Ac(-). That is, COD hydrolyzes the N-acetyl groups attached to the penultimate GlcNAc residue. The gene bank sequence data show that cod is highly conserved in Vibrios and Photobacteria. One such gene encodes a deacetylase isolated from V. alginolytics (Ohishi et al. 1997, Biosci Biotech Biochem. 61:1113-1117; Ohishi et al. 2000, J Biosci Bioeng. 90:561-563), that is specific for (GlcNAc)(2), but inactive with higher oligosaccharides. The COD enzymatic products, GlcNAc-GlcNH(2)-(GlcNAc)(n), closely resemble those obtained by hydrolysis of the chitooligosaccharides with Nod B: GlcNH(2)-(GlcNAc)(3-4). The latter are key intermediates in the biosynthesis of Nod factors, critically important in communications between the symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria and plants. Conceivably, the COD products play equally important roles in cellular communications that remain to be defined.

  10. Anti-malarial, anti-algal, anti-tubercular, anti-bacterial, anti-photosynthetic, and anti-fouling activity of diterpene and diterpene isonitriles from the tropical marine sponge Cymbastela hooperi.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anthony D; McCluskey, Adam; Robertson, Mark J; MacGregor, Kylie A; Gordon, Christopher P; Guenther, Jana

    2011-01-21

    In an investigation into their potential ecological role(s), a group of mainly diterpene isonitriles, nine in total, isolated from the tropical marine sponge Cymbastela hooperi, and the sesquiterpene axisonitrile-3, isolated from the tropical marine sponge Acanthella kletra, were evaluated in a series of bioassays including anti-fouling, anti-algal, anti-photosynthetic, anti-bacterial (Gram +ve and -ve), anti-fungal, and anti-tubercular. The results of these assays showed that all of the tested compounds, with the exception of diterpene 9, were active in at least two of the applied test systems, with axisonitrile-3 (10) and diterpene isonitrile 1 being the two most active compounds overall, closely followed by diterpene isonitrile 3. Based on the results of the photosynthetic study a molecular modelling investigation was undertaken with all of the compounds used in that study. The results showed a positive correlation between reduction in photosynthetic activity and the interaction of the modelled compounds with a potential enzyme active site.

  11. Marinilactibacillus piezotolerans sp. nov., a novel marine lactic acid bacterium isolated from deep sub-seafloor sediment of the Nankai Trough.

    PubMed

    Toffin, Laurent; Zink, Klaus; Kato, Chiaki; Pignet, Patricia; Bidault, Adeline; Bienvenu, Nadège; Birrien, Jean-Louis; Prieur, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A piezotolerant, mesophilic, marine lactic acid bacterium (strain LT20T) was isolated from a deep sub-seafloor sediment core collected at Nankai Trough, off the coast of Japan. Cells were Gram-positive, rod-shaped, non-sporulating and non-motile. The NaCl concentration range for growth was 0-120 g l(-1), with the optimum at 10-20 g l(-1). The temperature range for growth at pH 7.0 was 4-50 degrees C, with the optimum at 37-40 degrees C. The optimum pH for growth was 7.0-8.0. The optimum pressure for growth was 0.1 MPa with tolerance up to 30 MPa. The main cellular phospholipids were phosphatidylglycerols (25 %), diphosphatidylglycerols (34 %) and a group of compounds tentatively identified as ammonium-containing phosphatidylserines (32 %); phosphatidylethanolamines (9 %) were minor components. The fatty acid composition was dominated by side chains of 16 : 0, 14 : 0 and 16 : 1. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 42 mol%. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and the secondary structure of the V6 region, this organism was found to belong to the genus Marinilactibacillus and was closely related to Marinilactibacillus psychrotolerans M13-2(T) (99 %), Marinilactibacillus sp. strain MJYP.25.24 (99 %) and Alkalibacterium olivapovliticus strain ww2-SN4C (97 %). Despite the high similarity between their 16S rRNA gene sequences (99 %), the DNA-DNA hybridization levels were less than 20 %. On the basis of physiological and genetic characteristics, it is proposed that this organism be classified as a novel species, Marinilactibacillus piezotolerans sp. nov. The type strain is LT20T (=DSM 16108T=JCM 12337T).

  12. Bacillus mesophilus sp. nov., an alginate-degrading bacterium isolated from a soil sample collected from an abandoned marine solar saltern.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan-Xia; Liu, Guo-Hong; Liu, Bo; Chen, Guan-Jun; Du, Zong-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A novel Gram-stain positive, endospore-forming bacterium, designated SA4(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from an abandoned marine solar saltern at Wendeng, Shandong Province, PR China. Cells were observed to be rod shaped, alginase positive, catalase positive and motile. The strain was found to grow at temperatures ranging from 15 to 40 °C (optimum 35 °C), and pH 5.0-11.0 (optimum pH 8.0) with 0-7.0 % (w/v) NaCl concentration (optimum NaCl 3.0 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain SA4(T) belongs to the genus Bacillus and exhibits 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 96.6, 96.5, 96.3 and 96.2 % with Bacillus horikoshii DSM 8719(T), Bacillus acidicola 105-2(T), Bacillus shackletonii LMG 18435(T) and Bacillus pocheonensis Gsoil 420(T), respectively. The menaquinone was identified as MK-7 and the major polar lipids were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine. The major fatty acids detected were anteiso-C15:0 (22.3 %), iso-C15:0 (22.6 %), iso-C16:0 (14.8 %) and iso-C14:0 (14.7 %). The DNA G+C content was determined to be 42.4 mol %. Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic properties clearly indicated that isolate SA4(T) represents a novel species within the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus mesophius sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is SA4(T) (=DSM 101000(T)=CCTCC AB 2015209(T)).

  13. Structural flexibility of the heme cavity in the cold-adapted truncated hemoglobin from the Antarctic marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Daniela; Pesce, Alessandra; Boechi, Leonardo; Bustamante, Juan Pablo; Caldelli, Elena; Howes, Barry D; Riccio, Alessia; di Prisco, Guido; Nardini, Marco; Estrin, Dario; Smulevich, Giulietta; Bolognesi, Martino; Verde, Cinzia

    2015-08-01

    Truncated hemoglobins build one of the three branches of the globin protein superfamily. They display a characteristic two-on-two α-helical sandwich fold and are clustered into three groups (I, II and III) based on distinct structural features. Truncated hemoglobins are present in eubacteria, cyanobacteria, protozoa and plants. Here we present a structural, spectroscopic and molecular dynamics characterization of a group-II truncated hemoglobin, encoded by the PSHAa0030 gene from Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125 (Ph-2/2HbO), a cold-adapted Antarctic marine bacterium hosting one flavohemoglobin and three distinct truncated hemoglobins. The Ph-2/2HbO aquo-met crystal structure (at 2.21 Å resolution) shows typical features of group-II truncated hemoglobins, namely the two-on-two α-helical sandwich fold, a helix Φ preceding the proximal helix F, and a heme distal-site hydrogen-bonded network that includes water molecules and several distal-site residues, including His(58)CD1. Analysis of Ph-2/2HbO by electron paramagnetic resonance, resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra, under varied solution conditions, shows that Ph-2/2HbO can access diverse heme ligation states. Among these, detection of a low-spin heme hexa-coordinated species suggests that residue Tyr(42)B10 can undergo large conformational changes in order to act as the sixth heme-Fe ligand. Altogether, the results show that Ph-2/2HbO maintains the general structural features of group-II truncated hemoglobins but displays enhanced conformational flexibility in the proximity of the heme cavity, a property probably related to the functional challenges, such as low temperature, high O2 concentration and low kinetic energy of molecules, experienced by organisms living in the Antarctic environment.

  14. Marine Bacteria from Danish Coastal Waters Show Antifouling Activity against the Marine Fouling Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain S91 and Zoospores of the Green Alga Ulva australis Independent of Bacteriocidal Activity▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Gram, Lone

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters produce antifouling compounds and if antifouling bacteria could be ascribed to specific niches or seasons. We further assess if antibacterial effect is a good proxy for antifouling activity. We isolated 110 bacteria with anti-Vibrio activity from different sample types and locations during a 1-year sampling from Danish coastal waters. The strains were identified as Pseudoalteromonas, Phaeobacter, and Vibrionaceae based on phenotypic tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The numbers of bioactive bacteria were significantly higher in warmer than in colder months. While some species were isolated at all sampling locations, others were niche specific. We repeatedly isolated Phaeobacter gallaeciensis at surfaces from one site and Pseudoalteromonas tunicata at two others. Twenty-two strains, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva zoospores to less than 10% of the number settling on control surfaces. The antifouling alpP gene was detected only in P. tunicata strains (with purple and yellow pigmentation), so

  15. Marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters show antifouling activity against the marine fouling bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis independent of bacteriocidal activity.

    PubMed

    Bernbom, Nete; Ng, Yoke Yin; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Harder, Tilmann; Gram, Lone

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine if marine bacteria from Danish coastal waters produce antifouling compounds and if antifouling bacteria could be ascribed to specific niches or seasons. We further assess if antibacterial effect is a good proxy for antifouling activity. We isolated 110 bacteria with anti-Vibrio activity from different sample types and locations during a 1-year sampling from Danish coastal waters. The strains were identified as Pseudoalteromonas, Phaeobacter, and Vibrionaceae based on phenotypic tests and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The numbers of bioactive bacteria were significantly higher in warmer than in colder months. While some species were isolated at all sampling locations, others were niche specific. We repeatedly isolated Phaeobacter gallaeciensis at surfaces from one site and Pseudoalteromonas tunicata at two others. Twenty-two strains, representing the major taxonomic groups, different seasons, and isolation strategies, were tested for antiadhesive effect against the marine biofilm-forming bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain S91 and zoospores of the green alga Ulva australis. The antiadhesive effects were assessed by quantifying the number of strain S91 or Ulva spores attaching to a preformed biofilm of each of the 22 strains. The strongest antifouling activity was found in Pseudoalteromonas strains. Biofilms of Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, Pseudoalteromonas tunicata, and Pseudoalteromonas ulvae prevented Pseudoalteromonas S91 from attaching to steel surfaces. P. piscicida killed S91 bacteria in the suspension cultures, whereas P. tunicata and P. ulvae did not; however, they did prevent adhesion by nonbactericidal mechanism(s). Seven Pseudoalteromonas species, including P. piscicida and P. tunicata, reduced the number of settling Ulva zoospores to less than 10% of the number settling on control surfaces. The antifouling alpP gene was detected only in P. tunicata strains (with purple and yellow pigmentation), so

  16. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control. PMID:26441921

  17. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Hong; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Huajun; Cai, Guanjing; Chen, Zhangran; Fu, Lijun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control.

  18. Mimicking photosynthetic solar energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Gust, D; Moore, T A; Moore, A L

    2001-01-01

    Increased understanding of photosynthetic energy conversion and advances in chemical synthesis and instrumentation have made it possible to create artificial nanoscale devices and semibiological hybrids that carry out many of the functions of the natural process. Artificial light-harvesting antennas can be synthesized and linked to artificial reaction centers that convert excitation energy to chemical potential in the form of long-lived charge separation. Artificial reaction centers can form the basis for molecular-level optoelectronic devices. In addition, they may be incorporated into the lipid bilayer membranes of artificial vesicles, where they function as components of light-driven proton pumps that generate transmembrane proton motive force. The proton gradient may be used to synthesize adenosine triphosphate via an ATP synthase enzyme. The overall energy transduction process in the liposomal system mimics the solar energy conversion system of a photosynthetic bacterium. The results of this research illustrate the advantages of designing functional nanoscale devices based on biological paradigms.

  19. Photoacclimation and the effect of the symbiotic environment on the photosynthetic response of symbiotic dinoflagellates in the tropical marine hydroid Myrionema amboinense.

    PubMed

    Fitt; Cook

    2001-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium and residing in the tropical hydroid Myrionema amboinense acclimate to low photon flux associated with low light 'shade' environments by increasing the amount of photosynthetic pigments per algal cell. The photosynthetic light intensity (PI) curves suggested that the low-light pigment response involved an increase in the number of photosynthetic units (PSU) in the chloroplast in addition to any increases in PSU size. Comparisons of light-dependent portion of the P-I curves of freshly isolated zooxanthellae (FIZ) with those from symbionts within the intact animal suggest that the host cell environment reduced average light levels reaching the symbiotic algae by more than half. This phenomenon may protect the algae from photobleaching of pigments and/or photoinhibition of photosynthesis at high light intensities present in shallow water habitats. In addition, maximum photosynthesis (P(max)) of symbionts removed from the host cell was higher than that recorded from dinoflagellates in the intact association, suggesting that the availability of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis may be limited in the intact hydroid. Shaded polyps contained fewer zooxanthellae and had less tissue biomass (measured as protein) than unshaded polyps. However symbionts from shaded polyps acclimated to the low light intensities by increasing chlorophyll levels and photosynthetic rates. The higher photosynthetic rates may have resulted from increased availability of carbon dioxide associated with lower symbiont density. Calculations of the contribution of zooxanthellae carbon to the host animal's respiratory demand (CZAR) showed that zooxanthellae from shaded polyps living in the field potentially provide about the same amount of carbon to their host as zooxanthellae from polyps living in the field in unshaded high light intensities.

  20. Chromatic adaptation of photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    Scheuring, Simon; Sturgis, James N

    2005-07-15

    Many biological membranes adapt in response to environmental conditions. We investigated how the composition and architecture of photosynthetic membranes of a bacterium change in response to light, using atomic force microscopy. Despite large modifications in the membrane composition, the local environment of core complexes remained unaltered, whereas specialized paracrystalline light-harvesting antenna domains grew under low-light conditions. Thus, the protein mixture in the membrane shows eutectic behavior and can be mimicked by a simple model. Such structural adaptation ensures efficient photon capture under low-light conditions and prevents photodamage under high-light conditions.

  1. Isolation of Rhp-PSP, a member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family with antiviral properties, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b.

    PubMed

    Su, Pin; Feng, Tuizi; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Ju'e; Luo, Yuanhua; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-04

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b isolated from a water canal adjacent to a vegetable field produces a protein that was purified by bioactivity-guided fractionation based on ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange absorption and size exclusion. The protein was further identified as an endoribonuclease L-PSP (Liver-Perchloric acid-soluble protein) by shotgun mass spectrometry analysis and gene identification, and it is member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family. Herein, this protein is designated Rhp-PSP. Rhp-PSP exhibited significant inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vivo and in vitro. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the antiviral activity of a protein of the YER057c/YjgF/UK114 family and also the first antiviral protein isolated from R. palustris. Our research provides insight into the potential of photosynthetic bacterial resources in biological control of plant virus diseases and sustainable agriculture.

  2. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  3. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  4. Isolation of Rhp-PSP, a member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family with antiviral properties, from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b

    PubMed Central

    Su, Pin; Feng, Tuizi; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Songbai; Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Ju’e; Luo, Yuanhua; Peng, Jing; Zhang, Zhuo; Lu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain JSC-3b isolated from a water canal adjacent to a vegetable field produces a protein that was purified by bioactivity-guided fractionation based on ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange absorption and size exclusion. The protein was further identified as an endoribonuclease L-PSP (Liver-Perchloric acid-soluble protein) by shotgun mass spectrometry analysis and gene identification, and it is member of YER057c/YjgF/UK114 protein family. Herein, this protein is designated Rhp-PSP. Rhp-PSP exhibited significant inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vivo and in vitro. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the antiviral activity of a protein of the YER057c/YjgF/UK114 family and also the first antiviral protein isolated from R. palustris. Our research provides insight into the potential of photosynthetic bacterial resources in biological control of plant virus diseases and sustainable agriculture. PMID:26530252

  5. Energy transfer and exciton coupling in isolated B800-850 complexes of the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Choromatium tepidum. The effect of structural symmetry on bacteriochlorophyll excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Kennis, J.T.M.; Streltsov, A.M.; Aartsma, T.J.; Amesz, J.; Nozawa, Tsunenori

    1996-02-08

    Energy transfer and exciton coupling in isolated B800-850 complexes from the purple sulfur bacterium Chromatium tepidum were studied by means of spectrally resolved absorbance difference spectroscopy with a time resolution of 200 fs. Energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) 800 to BChl 850 was found to occur with a time constant of 0.8-0.9 ps. Remarkably, the amplitude of the absorbance changes of BChl 850 was 4 times larger than that of BChl 800. By relating this result to the crystal structure of B800-850 complexes of Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, it was concluded that the spectral properties of BChl 850 are mainly determined by strong exciton interactions between BChl 850 molecules in a circular symmetric arrangement, which lead to concentration of the oscillator strength in a few optically allowed transitions, corresponding to delocalized eigenstates. In BChl 850, a rapid red shift of the bleaching was observed. This relaxation process may be ascribed either to vibrational relaxation or exciton scattering. A similar red shift appears to occur in BChl 800. 26 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Halomonas sp. OKOH--a marine bacterium isolated from the bottom sediment of Algoa Bay--produces a polysaccharide bioflocculant: partial characterization and biochemical analysis of its properties.

    PubMed

    Mabinya, Leonard V; Cosa, Sekelwa; Mkwetshana, Noxolo; Okoh, Anthony I

    2011-05-25

    A bioflocculant-producing bacterium isolated from seawater was identified based on 16S rRNA gene nucleotide sequence to have 99% similarity to that of Halomonas sp. Au160H and the nucleotide sequence was deposited as Halomonas sp. OKOH (Genbank accession number is HQ875722). Influences of carbon source, nitrogen source, salt ions and pH on flocculating activity were investigated. The bioflocculant was optimally produced when glucose (87% flocculating activity) and urea (88% flocculating activity) were used as sources of carbon and nitrogen, respectively. Also, initial pH of 7.0 and Ca²⁺ supported optimal production of the bioflocculant with flocculating activities of 87% respectively. Chemical analyses revealed the bioflocculant to be a polysaccharide.

  7. Universally improving effect of mixed electron donors on the CO₂ fixing efficiency of non-photosynthetic microbial communities from marine environments.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiajun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shiping; Wang, Yuanqing; Jin, Fangming; Fu, Xiaohua; Li, Huirong

    2014-08-01

    The universality of improved CO₂ fixing upon the addition of mixed electron donors (MEDs) composed of Na₂S, NO₂(-), and S₂O₃(2-) to non-photosynthetic microbial communities (NPMCs) obtained from 12 locations in four oceans of the world was validated. The CO₂ fixing efficiencies of NPMCs were universally enhanced by MED compared with those obtained using H₂ alone as electron donor, with average increase of about 276%. An increase in microbial inoculation concentration could increase the net amount of CO₂ fixing to 853.34 mg/L in the presence of MED. NO₂(-) and S₂O₃(2-) may play the roles of both electron acceptor and electron donor under aerobic conditions, which may improve the energy utilization efficiency of NPMC and enhance the CO₂ fixation efficiency. The sequence determination of 16S ribosomal deoxyribonucleic acid (rDNA) from 150 bacteria of NPMC showed that more than 50% of the bacteria were symbiotic and there were many heterotrophic bacteria such as Vibrio natriegens. These results indicate that NPMC acts as a symbiotic CO₂ fixing system. The interaction between autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria may be a crucial factor supporting ladder utilization and recycling of energy/carbon source.

  8. Anticancer potential of pyrrole (1, 2, a) pyrazine 1, 4, dione, hexahydro 3-(2-methyl propyl) (PPDHMP) extracted from a new marine bacterium, Staphylococcus sp. strain MB30.

    PubMed

    Lalitha, P; Veena, V; Vidhyapriya, P; Lakshmi, Pragna; Krishna, R; Sakthivel, N

    2016-05-01

    Marine bacterium, strain MB30 isolated from the deep sea sediment of Bay of Bengal, India, exhibited antimicrobial activity against human pathogenic bacteria. Based on the 16S rRNA sequence homology and subsequent phylogenetic tree analysis, the strain MB30 was identified as Staphylococcus sp. The bioactive metabolite produced by the strain MB30 was purified through silica gel column chromatography and preparative HPLC. Purified metabolite was further characterized by FT-IR, LC-MS and NMR analyses. On the basis of spectroscopic data, the metabolite was identified as pyrrole (1, 2, a) pyrazine 1, 4, dione, hexahydro 3-(2-methyl propyl) (PPDHMP). The PPDHMP exhibited in vitro anticancer potential against lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner with the IC50 concentration of 19.94 ± 1.23 and 16.73 ± 1.78 μg ml(-1) respectively. The acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining of the IC50 concentration of PPDHMP-treated cancer cells exhibited an array of morphological changes such as nuclear condensation, cell shrinkage and formation of apoptotic bodies. The PPDHMP-treated cancer cells induced the progressive accumulation of fragmented DNA in a time-dependent manner. Based on the flow cytometric analysis, it has become evident that the compound was also effective in arresting the cell cycle at G1 phase. Further, the Western blotting analysis confirmed the down-regulation of cyclin-D1, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK-2), anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL), activation of caspase-9 and 3 with the cleavage of PARP. The PPDHMP-treated cancer cells also showed the inhibition of migration and invasive capacity of cancer cells. In the present investigation, for the first time, we have reported the extraction, purification and characterization of an anticancer metabolite, PPDHMP from a new marine bacterium, Staphylococcus sp. strain MB30.

  9. Genome sequence of Phaeobacter daeponensis type strain (DSM 23529(T)), a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine sediment, and emendation of Phaeobacter daeponensis.

    PubMed

    Dogs, Marco; Teshima, Hazuki; Petersen, Jörn; Fiebig, Anne; Chertkov, Olga; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C; Ivanova, Natalia; Lapidus, Alla; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Woyke, Tanja; Simon, Meinhard; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-10-16

    TF-218(T) is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter daeponensis Yoon et al. 2007, a facultatively anaerobic Phaeobacter species isolated from tidal flats. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium together with previously unreported aspects of its phenotype. We analyzed the genome for genes involved in secondary metabolite production and its anaerobic lifestyle, which have also been described for its closest relative Phaeobacter caeruleus. The 4,642,596 bp long genome of strain TF-218(T) contains 4,310 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes including four rRNA operons and consists of five replicons: one chromosome and four extrachromosomal elements with sizes of 276 kb, 174 kb, 117 kb and 90 kb. Genome analysis showed that TF-218(T) possesses all of the genes for indigoidine biosynthesis, and on specific media the strain showed a blue pigmentation. We also found genes for dissimilatory nitrate reduction, gene-transfer agents, NRPS/ PKS genes and signaling systems homologous to the LuxR/I system.

  10. Genome sequence of Phaeobacter daeponensis type strain (DSM 23529T), a facultatively anaerobic bacterium isolated from marine sediment, and emendation of Phaeobacter daeponensis

    PubMed Central

    Dogs, Marco; Teshima, Hazuki; Petersen, Jörn; Fiebig, Anne; Chertkov, Olga; Dalingault, Hajnalka; Chen, Amy; Pati, Amrita; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Chain, Patrick; Detter, John C.; Ivanova, Natalia; Lapidus, Alla; Rohde, Manfred; Gronow, Sabine; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Woyke, Tanja; Simon, Meinhard; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    TF-218T is the type strain of the species Phaeobacter daeponensis Yoon et al. 2007, a facultatively anaerobic Phaeobacter species isolated from tidal flats. Here we describe the draft genome sequence and annotation of this bacterium together with previously unreported aspects of its phenotype. We analyzed the genome for genes involved in secondary metabolite production and its anaerobic lifestyle, which have also been described for its closest relative Phaeobacter caeruleus. The 4,642,596 bp long genome of strain TF-218T contains 4,310 protein-coding genes and 78 RNA genes including four rRNA operons and consists of five replicons: one chromosome and four extrachromosomal elements with sizes of 276 kb, 174 kb, 117 kb and 90 kb. Genome analysis showed that TF-218T possesses all of the genes for indigoidine biosynthesis, and on specific media the strain showed a blue pigmentation. We also found genes for dissimilatory nitrate reduction, gene-transfer agents, NRPS/ PKS genes and signaling systems homologous to the LuxR/I system. PMID:24501652

  11. Marixanthomonas ophiurae gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from a deep-sea brittle star.

    PubMed

    Romanenko, Lyudmila A; Uchino, Masataka; Frolova, Galina M; Mikhailov, Valery V

    2007-03-01

    An aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile, yellow-pigmented bacterium, strain KMM 3046(T), was isolated from a deep-sea brittle star from the Fiji Sea and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic analysis. Strain KMM 3046(T) grew at 5-32 degrees C and in the presence of 1-12 % (w/v) NaCl. It contained MK-6 as the predominant menaquinone and 3-OH i16 : 0, 3-OH i17 : 0 and 3-OH a17 : 0 as the major fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain KMM 3046(T) forms a distinct evolutionary lineage within the family Flavobacteriaceae (phylum Bacteroidetes), displaying 92.3-91.9 % sequence similarity with respect to Salegentibacter species. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain KMM 3046(T) represents a novel genus and species of the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Marixanthomonas ophiurae gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Marixanthomonas ophiurae is KMM 3046(T) (=NRIC 0684(T)=JCM 14121(T)).

  12. Molecular cloning, overexpression, and enzymatic characterization of glycosyl hydrolase family 16 β-Agarase from marine bacterium Saccharophagus sp. AG21 in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngdeuk; Oh, Chulhong; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Kim, Hyowon; Wickramaarachchi, Wickramaarachchige Don Niroshana; Whang, Ilson; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Jehee

    2013-01-01

    An agar-degrading bacterium was isolated from red seaweed (Gelidium amansii) on a natural seawater agar plate, and identified as Saccharophagus sp. AG21. The β-agarase gene from Saccharophagus sp. AG21 (agy1) was screened by long and accurate (LA)-PCR. The predicted sequence has a 1,908 bp open reading frame encoding 636 amino acids (aa), and includes a glycosyl hydrolase family 16 (GH16) β-agarase module and two carbohydrate binding modules of family 6 (CBM6). The deduced aa sequence showed 93.7% and 84.9% similarity to β-agarase of Saccharophagus degradans and Microbulbifer agarilyticus, respectively. The mature agy1 was cloned and overexpressed as a His-tagged recombinant β-agarase (rAgy1) in Escherichia coli, and had a predicted molecular mass of 69 kDa and an isoelectric point of 4.5. rAgy1 showed optimum activity at 55oC and pH 7.6, and had a specific activity of 85 U/mg. The rAgy1 activity was enhanced by FeSO4 (40%), KCl (34%), and NaCl (34%), compared with the control. The newly identified rAgy1 is a β-agarase, which acts to degrade agarose to neoagarotetraose (NA4) and neoagarohexaose (NA6) and may be useful for applications in the cosmetics, food, bioethanol, and reagent industries.

  13. Kocurin, the True Structure of PM181104, an Anti-Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Thiazolyl Peptide from the Marine-Derived Bacterium Kocuria palustris

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Jesús; Sousa, Thiciana da S.; Crespo, Gloria; Palomo, Sara; González, Ignacio; Tormo, José R.; de la Cruz, Mercedes; Anderson, Matthew; Hill, Russell T.; Vicente, Francisca; Genilloud, Olga; Reyes, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    A new thiazolyl peptide, kocurin (1), was isolated from culture broths of a marine-derived Kocuria palustris. Its structural elucidation was accomplished using a combination of spectroscopic and chemical methods, including HRMS, extensive 1D and 2D NMR analysis, MS/MS fragmentation, and chemical degradation and Marfey’s analysis of the resulting amino acid residues. The structure herein reported corrects that previously assigned to PM181104 (3). Kocurin displayed activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with MIC values in the submicromolar range. PMID:23380989

  14. The marine bacterium Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 degrades a wide range of lipids and hydrocarbons through the formation of oleolytic biofilms with distinct gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Julie; Camus, Arantxa; Mitteau, Isabelle; Vaysse, Pierre-Joseph; Goulas, Philippe; Grimaud, Régis; Sivadon, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic organic compounds (mainly lipids and hydrocarbons) represent a significant part of the organic matter in marine waters, and their degradation has an important impact in the carbon fluxes within oceans. However, because they are nearly insoluble in the water phase, their degradation by microorganisms occurs at the interface with water and thus requires specific adaptations such as biofilm formation. We show that Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 develops biofilms, referred to as oleolytic biofilms, on a large variety of hydrophobic substrates, including hydrocarbons, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, triglycerides, and wax esters. Microarray analysis revealed that biofilm growth on n-hexadecane or triolein involved distinct genetic responses, together with a core of common genes that might concern general mechanisms of biofilm formation. Biofilm growth on triolein modulated the expression of hundreds of genes in comparison with n-hexadecane. The processes related to primary metabolism and genetic information processing were downregulated. Most of the genes that were overexpressed on triolein had unknown functions. Surprisingly, their genome localization was restricted to a few regions identified as putative genomic islands or mobile elements. These results are discussed with regard to the adaptive responses triggered by M. hydrocarbonoclasticus SP17 to occupy a specific niche in marine ecosystems.

  15. Analysis of defence systems and a conjugative IncP-1 plasmid in the marine polyaromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Michail M; Crisafi, Francesca; Messina, Enzo; Smedile, Francesco; Lopatina, Anna; Denaro, Renata; Pieper, Dietmar H; Golyshin, Peter N; Giuliano, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Marine prokaryotes have evolved a broad repertoire of defence systems to protect their genomes from lateral gene transfer including innate or acquired immune systems and infection-induced programmed cell suicide and dormancy. Here we report on the analysis of multiple defence systems present in the genome of the strain Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME isolated from petroleum deposits of the tanker 'Amoco Milford Haven'. Cycloclasticus are ubiquitous bacteria globally important in polyaromatic hydrocarbons degradation in marine environments. Two 'defence islands' were identified in 78-ME genome: the first harbouring CRISPR-Cas with toxin-antitoxin system, while the second was composed by an array of genes for toxin-antitoxin and restriction-modification proteins. Among all identified spacers of CRISPR-Cas system only seven spacers match sequences of phages and plasmids. Furthermore, a conjugative plasmid p7ME01, which belongs to a new IncP-1θ ancestral archetype without any accessory mobile elements was found in 78-ME. Our results provide the context to the co-occurrence of diverse defence mechanisms in the genome of Cycloclasticus sp. 78-ME, which protect the genome of this highly specialized PAH-degrader. This study contributes to the further understanding of complex networks established in petroleum-based microbial communities.

  16. Rapidithrix thailandica gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine gliding bacterium isolated from samples collected from the Andaman sea, along the southern coastline of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srisukchayakul, Pornpoj; Suwanachart, Chatrudee; Sangnoi, Yutthapong; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit; Hosoya, Shoichi; Yokota, Akira; Arunpairojana, Vullapa

    2007-10-01

    The taxonomic positions of three strains of marine gliding bacteria, TISTR 1736, TISTR 1741 and TISTR 1750(T), isolated from the southern coastline of Thailand were evaluated by using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the three isolates formed a distinct lineage within the family 'Flammeovirgaceae', phylum Bacteroidetes, and were related to the genus Flexithrix. The DNA G+C contents of the isolates were in the range 40-43 mol%. The major respiratory quinone was MK-7. The major cellular fatty acids were 16 : 1omega5c (cis-5-hexadecenoic acid) and 15 : 0 (pentadecanoic acid). The major hydroxyl fatty acids were 3-OH 17 : 0 (3-hydroxyheptadecanoic acid), 3-OH 15 : 0 (3-hydroxypentadecanoic acid) and 3-OH 16 : 0 (3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid). On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, genotypic and phylogenetic data, these marine bacteria are considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, for which the name Rapidithrix thailandica gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Rapidithrix thailandica is TISTR 1750(T) (=IAM 15448(T)).

  17. Altererythrobacter epoxidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., an epoxide hydrolase-active, mesophilic marine bacterium isolated from cold-seep sediment, and reclassification of Erythrobacter luteolus Yoon et al. 2005 as Altererythrobacter luteolus comb. nov.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Woo, Jung-Hee; Yang, Sung-Hyun; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kim, Sang-Jin; Sato, Takako; Kato, Chiaki

    2007-10-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain JCS350(T), was isolated from marine sediment samples collected from a cold-seep area. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate showed high similarity to that of Erythrobacter luteolus SW-109(T) (95.9 % sequence similarity). Lower 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities were shown to other members of the genus Erythrobacter (94.6-95.4 %) and members of the genus Porphyrobacter (94.5-95.2 %). Phylogenetic analysis with all members of the family Erythrobacteraceae and several members of the family Sphingomonadaceae revealed that the isolate formed a phyletic line with [Erythrobacter] luteolus that was distinct from other members of the family Erythrobacteraceae. The dominant fatty acids of strain JCS350(T) were 18 : 1omega7c, 16 : 1omega7c and cyclopropane 17 : 0. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10. The DNA G+C content was 54.5 mol%. The isolate did not contain bacteriochlorophyll a. Optimal growth required the presence of 2 % (w/v) NaCl with either 0.18 % CaCl(2) or 0.59 % MgCl(2), at pH 6.5 and at 35 degrees C. On the basis of the evidence of this polyphasic taxonomic study, strain JCS350(T) should be classified in a novel genus and species in the family Erythrobacteraceae, for which the name Altererythrobacter epoxidivorans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The misclassified species [Erythrobacter] luteolus is transferred to the new genus as Altererythrobacter luteolus comb. nov. The type strain of Altererythrobacter epoxidivorans is JCS350(T) (=KCCM 42314(T) =JCM 13815(T)) and the type strain of Altererythrobacter luteolus is SW-109(T) (=KCTC 12311(T) =JCM 12599(T)).

  18. Vibrio algivorus sp. nov., an alginate- and agarose-assimilating bacterium isolated from the gut flora of a turban shell marine snail.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hidetaka; Chinen, Akito; Fukuda, Hiroo; Usuda, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    An agarose- and alginate-assimilating, Gram-reaction-negative, non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain SA2T, was isolated from the gut of a turban shell sea snail (Turbo cornutus) collected near Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain SA2T was 99.59 % identical to that of Vibrio rumoiensis DSM 19141T and 98.19 % identical to that of Vibrio litoralis DSM 17657T. This suggested that strain SA2T could be a subspecies of V. rumoiensis or V. litoralis. However, DNA-DNA hybridization results showed only 37.5 % relatedness to DSM 19141T and 44.7 % relatedness to DSM 17657T, which was far lower than the 70 % widely accepted to define common species. Strain SA2T could assimilate agarose as a sole carbon source, whereas strains DSM 19141T and DSM 17657T could not assimilate it at all. Furthermore, results using API 20NE and API ZYM kits indicated that their enzymic and physiological phenotypes were also different. These results suggested that strain SA2T represented a novel species within the genus Vibrio. The major isoprenoid quinone in SA2T was Q-8, and its major polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The major fatty acids were summed feature 3, (comprising C16 : 1ω6c and/or C16 : 1ω7c), C16 : 0, and summed feature 8 (comprising C18 : 1ω6c and/or C18 : 1ω7c). The DNA G+C content of SA2T was 40.7 mol%. The name proposed for this novel species of the genus Vibrio is Vibrio algivorus sp. nov., with the type strain designated SA2T (=DSM 29824T=NBRC 111146T).

  19. Thioclava pacifica gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel facultatively autotrophic, marine, sulfur-oxidizing bacterium from a near-shore sulfidic hydrothermal area.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tourova, Tatjana P; Spiridonova, Elizaveta M; Rainey, Fred A; Muyzer, Gerard

    2005-05-01

    Strain TL 2(T) was isolated on mineral medium with thiosulfate from a near-shore sulfidic hydrothermal area in Matupi Harbour on the island of New Britain, Papua New Guinea. The cells varied from long filaments with swollen ends, often aggregated, to short rods, depending on the growth conditions. The bacterium was obligately aerobic and grew autotrophically with thiosulfate as energy source or heterotrophically with organic acids and sugars. In thiosulfate-limited continuous culture, mu(max) and Y(max) for autotrophic growth were 0.1 h(-1) and 3 g protein mol(-1), respectively. From the various reduced sulfur compounds tested, only thiosulfate and sulfide supported active respiration. Inorganic carbon was assimilated via the Calvin cycle. Presence of the 'green'-type of form I RubisCO gene was detected. Growth was possible from 15 to 47 degrees C with an optimum at 35 degrees C, pH 6.5-8.5 with an optimum at pH 8.0, and between 10 and 90 g NaCl l(-1) with an optimum at 35 g l(-1). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and cbbL gene sequences demonstrated that strain TL 2(T) forms a separate lineage within the alpha-3 subdivision of the Proteobacteria, distantly related to the genera Rhodovulum and Rhodobacter. On the basis of these results, a novel genus and species, Thioclava pacifica gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate strain TL 2(T) (= DSM 10166(T) = UNIQEM 229(T)).

  20. Biological effects of TiO2 and CeO2 nanoparticles on the growth, photosynthetic activity, and cellular components of a marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiang-Yuan; Cheng, Jie; Hu, Xiao-Li; Wang, Ling; Li, Da; Gao, Kun

    2017-01-01

    It is very important to have a good understanding of the biological effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on marine diatoms. In this study, the physiological and biochemical responses of a marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to titanium dioxide NPs (nano-TiO2) and cerium oxide NPs (nano-CeO2) were compared and evaluated using 96h growth tests in a batch-culture system. At 96h of exposure, the growth inhibition rate (IR, %) of P. tricornutum increased from 5.46 to 27.31% with increasing nano-TiO2 concentrations from 2.5 to 40mgL(-1). The maximum IR of 49.59% occurred in 40mgL(-1) nano-TiO2 treatments at 48h of exposure. Growth of the diatom was increased in low nano-CeO2 treatments (≤5mgL(-1)), but was inhibited in high nano-CeO2 treatments (≥10mgL(-1)). Large aggregates of NPs were attached to the cells of P. tricornutum in 20 and 40mgL(-1) nano-TiO2 and nano-CeO2 treatments. In addition, the effective quantum yields (ΦPSII) of P. tricornutum in 40mgL(-1) nano-TiO2 and nano-CeO2 treatments were 83.33 and 71.13% of that in the controls at 96h of exposure, respectively. Compared with that of the controls at 96h of exposure, chlorophyll a content, soluble sugar content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, SOD and POD activities of P. tricornutum in 40mgL(-1) nano-TiO2 and nano-CeO2 treatments increased by 57.56, 142.97, 373.25, 698.76, 204.85% and 21.43, 89.41, 194.97, 340.05, 502.86%, while soluble protein content decreased by 70.38 and 28.64%, respectively. These findings will be helpful to understand the effect mechanisms of NPs on marine organisms.

  1. Evolution of photosynthetic and respiratory prokaryotes and organelles

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.M.

    1981-02-28

    Common ancestors for mitochondria, chloroplasts, and photosynthetic bacteria (including cyanobacteria) probably existed more than three billion years ago. One ancestral prokaryote may have contained P(chl) Chloroplast a in photochemical reaction centers that drove cyclic electron flow and phosphorylation through membrane-bound components including cytochromes and quinones. Substitution of Chl a for Pchl a and the development of linear electron-transport chains permitted the reduction of NAD/sup +/ and/or NADP/sup +/ for carbon-dioxide fixation. Evolution of photosystem II from photosystem I enabled one prokaryote to evolve oxygen as a byproduct of carbon-dioxide fixation. This organism was the common ancestor of cyanobacteria, Prochloron, and various chloroplasts. A photosynthetic bacterium containing Bchl a appears to have branched off from the Chl a line. This bacterium was the common ancestor of extant respiring bacteria, mitochondria, and purple and green photosynthetic bacteria.

  2. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Five-domain GH115 α-Glucuronidase from the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 T

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weijun; Yan, Ruoyu; Nocek, Boguslaw P.; Vuong, Thu V.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Gatenholm, Paul; Toriz, Guillermo; Tenkanen, Maija; Savchenko, Alexei; Master, Emma R.

    2016-04-18

    Glucuronic acid (GlcAp) and/or methylglucuronic acid (MeGlcAp) decorate the major forms of xylan in hardwood and coniferous softwoods as well as many cereal grains. Accordingly, the complete utilization of glucuronoxylans or conversion to sugar precursors requires the action of main chain xylanases as well as -glucuronidases that release the - (132)-linked (Me)GlcAp side groups. Herein, a family GH115 enzyme from the marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40T, SdeAgu115A, demonstrated activity toward glucuronoxylan and oligomers thereof with preference toward MeGlcAp linked to internal xylopyranosyl residues. Unique biochemical characteristics of NaCl activation were also observed. The crystal structure of SdeAgu115A revealed a five-domain architecture, with an additional insertion C domain that had significant impact on the domain arrangement of SdeAgu115A monomer and its dimerization. The participation of domain C in substrate binding was supported by reduced substrate inhibition upon introducing W773A, W689A, and F696A substitutions within this domain. In addition to Asp-335, the catalytic essentiality of Glu-216 was revealed by site-specific mutagenesis. A primary sequence analysis suggested that the SdeAgu115A architecture is shared by more than half of GH115 members, thus defining a distinct archetype for GH115 enzymes.

  3. A marine inducible prophage vB_CibM-P1 isolated from the aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiang; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Yongle; , Richard Allen White, III; Wang, Yu; Luo, Tingwei; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2014-11-01

    A prophage vB_CibM-P1 was induced by mitomycin C from the epipelagic strain Citromicrobium bathyomarinum JL354, a member of the alpha-IV subcluster of marine aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAPB). The induced bacteriophage vB_CibM-P1 had Myoviridae-like morphology and polyhedral heads (approximately capsid 60-100 nm) with tail fibers. The vB_CibM-P1 genome is ~38 kb in size, with 66.0% GC content. The genome contains 58 proposed open reading frames that are involved in integration, DNA packaging, morphogenesis and bacterial lysis. VB_CibM-P1 is a temperate phage that can be directly induced in hosts. In response to mitomycin C induction, virus-like particles can increase to 7 × 109 per ml, while host cells decrease an order of magnitude. The vB_CibM-P1 bacteriophage is the first inducible prophage from AAPB.

  4. Quantum physics of photosynthetic light-harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damjanovic, Ana

    2001-12-01

    Absorption of light by light harvesting complexes and transfer of electronic excitation to the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) constitutes the primary step of photosynthesis, i.e., the light harvesting process. A model for an atomic level structure of a so-called photosynthetic unit of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has been established recently. The photosynthetic unit (PSU) of purple bacterium combines a nanometric assembly of three protein complexes: (i)the photosynthetic reaction center, (ii)a ring-shaped light harvesting complex LH-I, and (iii)multiple copies of a similar complex, LH-II. The model describes in detail the organization of pigments involved in primary light absorption and excitation transfer: a hierarchy of ring- shaped chlorophyll-carotenoid aggregates which surround four centrally located chlorophylls of the photosynthetic reaction center. This thesis presents a quantum- mechanical description of the light harvesting process in the PSU, based on the atomic level model. Excitation transfer rates for various excitation transfer steps have been determined through Fermi's golden rule. To describe electronic excitations of the strongly coupled chlorophyll aggregate in LH-II, an effective Hamiltonian has been established. This Hamiltonian has further been extended to describe also the LH-II --> LH-II --> LH-I --> RC cascade of excitation transfer. The results suggest that, in the absence of disorder, the electronic excitations in LH-II are coherently delocalizaed over the ring, and that such excitonic states speed up the light-harvesting process. Influence of thermal disorder on exciton coherence has been studied by means of a combined molecular dynamics/quantum chemistry approach. The results indicate a significant loss of coherence due to thermal effects. Excitation transfer between carotenoids and chlorophylls has been investigated in two light-harvesting complexes; LH-II of the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum

  5. A beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase produced by a marine bacterium, Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145, is active at pH 8.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hamada, Yoko; Ichikawa, Masako; Kajiwara, Hitomi; Mine, Toshiki; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshimitsu

    2007-11-01

    A gene encoding a sialyltransferase produced by Photobacterium leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The sialyltransferase gene contained an open reading frame of 1494 base pairs (bp) encoding a predicted protein of 497 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the sialyltransferase had no significant similarity to mammalian sialyltransferases and did not contain sialyl motifs, but did show high homology to another marine bacterial sialyltransferase, a beta-galactoside alpha2,6-sialyltransferase produced by P. damselae JT0160. The acceptor substrate specificity of the new enzyme was similar to that of the alpha2,6-sialyltransferase from P. damselae JT0160, but its activity was maximal at pH 8. This property is quite different from the properties of all mammalian and bacterial sialyltransferases reported previously, which have maximal activity at acidic pH. In general, both sialosides and cytidine-5'-monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid, the common donor substrate of sialyltransferases, are more stable under basic conditions. Therefore, a sialyltransferase with an optimum pH in the basic range should be useful for the preparation of sialosides and the modification of glycoconjugates, such as asialo-glycoproteins and asialo-glycolipids. Thus, the sialyltransferase obtained from P. leiognathi JT-SHIZ-145 is a promising tool for the efficient production of sialosides.

  6. Exceptional production of both prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin as major metabolic constituents by a novel marine bacterium, Zooshikella rubidus S1-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Suk; Kim, Yong-Sook; Park, Sooyeon; Kim, Jihoon; Kang, So-Jung; Lee, Mi-Hwa; Ryu, Sangryeol; Choi, Jong Myoung; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2011-07-01

    A Gram-negative, red-pigment-producing marine bacterial strain, designated S1-1, was isolated from the tidal flat sediment of the Yellow Sea, Korea. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic data, strain S1-1 (KCTC 11448BP) represented a new species of the genus Zooshikella. Thus, we propose the name Zooshikella rubidus sp. nov. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of the red pigments produced by strain S1-1 revealed that the major metabolic compounds were prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin. In addition, this organism produced six minor prodigiosin analogues, including two new structures that were previously unknown. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a microorganism that simultaneously produces prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin as two major metabolites. Both prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin showed antimicrobial activity against several microbial species. These bacteria were approximately 1.5-fold more sensitive to cycloprodigiosin than to prodigiosin. The metabolites also showed anticancer activity against human melanoma cells, which showed significantly more sensitivity to prodigiosin than to cycloprodigiosin. The secondary metabolite profiles of strain S1-1 and two reference bacterial strains were compared by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistical analyses based on secondary metabolite profiles by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry indicated that the metabolite profile of strain S1-1 could clearly be distinguished from those of two phylogenetically related, prodigiosin-producing bacterial strains.

  7. Exceptional Production of both Prodigiosin and Cycloprodigiosin as Major Metabolic Constituents by a Novel Marine Bacterium, Zooshikella rubidus S1-1 ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Suk; Kim, Yong-Sook; Park, Sooyeon; Kim, Jihoon; Kang, So-Jung; Lee, Mi-Hwa; Ryu, Sangryeol; Choi, Jong Myoung; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Yoon, Jung-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    A Gram-negative, red-pigment-producing marine bacterial strain, designated S1-1, was isolated from the tidal flat sediment of the Yellow Sea, Korea. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic, and genetic data, strain S1-1 (KCTC 11448BP) represented a new species of the genus Zooshikella. Thus, we propose the name Zooshikella rubidus sp. nov. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry of the red pigments produced by strain S1-1 revealed that the major metabolic compounds were prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin. In addition, this organism produced six minor prodigiosin analogues, including two new structures that were previously unknown. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a microorganism that simultaneously produces prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin as two major metabolites. Both prodigiosin and cycloprodigiosin showed antimicrobial activity against several microbial species. These bacteria were approximately 1.5-fold more sensitive to cycloprodigiosin than to prodigiosin. The metabolites also showed anticancer activity against human melanoma cells, which showed significantly more sensitivity to prodigiosin than to cycloprodigiosin. The secondary metabolite profiles of strain S1-1 and two reference bacterial strains were compared by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistical analyses based on secondary metabolite profiles by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry indicated that the metabolite profile of strain S1-1 could clearly be distinguished from those of two phylogenetically related, prodigiosin-producing bacterial strains. PMID:21642414

  8. Halotolerant, acid-alkali stable, chelator resistant and raw starch digesting α-amylase from a marine bacterium Bacillus subtilis S8-18.

    PubMed

    Kalpana, Balu Jancy; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2014-08-01

    A halotolerant α-amylase having the ability of digesting the insoluble raw starches was characterized from Bacillus subtilis S8-18, a marine sediment isolate from Palk Bay region. The electrophoresis techniques unveiled that the α-amylase was indeed a monomer with a molecular weight of 57 kDa. The optimum temperature and pH for the enzyme activity were 60 °C and 6.0 respectively. The enzyme was highly stable for 24 h over a wide range of pH from 4.0 to 12.0 by showing 84-94% activity. Interestingly, by retaining 72% activity even after 24 h, the enzyme also showed tolerance towards 28% NaCl. The α-amylase retained a minimum of 93% residual activity in 1 mM concentration for the selected divalent metal ions. The enzyme was found to be chelator resistant as it remained unaffected by 1 mM of EDTA and exhibited 96% activity even at 5 mM concentration. Furthermore, though 1% SDS caused remarkable reduction (68%) in amylase activity, the enzyme showed tolerance towards other detergents (1% of Triton-X and Tween 80) with 85% activity. Additionally, the α-amylase enzyme is capable of hydrolyzing the insoluble raw starch substrates which was evident from the scanning electron microscopic (SEM) and spectrophotometric analyses. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Discovery and Characterization of a Distinctive Exo-1,3/1,4-β-Glucanase from the Marine Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. Strain BB1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, Yoshio; Lamont, Iain L.; Cutfield, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Marine bacteria residing on local red, green, and brown seaweeds were screened for exo-1,3-β-glucanase (ExoP) activity. Of the 90 bacterial species isolated from 32 seaweeds, only one, a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display such activity. It was isolated from a Durvillaea sp., a brown kelp known to contain significant amounts of the storage polysaccharide laminarin (1,3-β-d-glucan with some 1,6-β branching). Four chromatographic steps were utilized to purify the enzyme (ExoP). Chymotryptic digestion provided peptide sequences for primer design and subsequent gene cloning. The exoP gene coded for 840 amino acids and was located just 50 bp downstream from a putative lichenase (endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase) gene, suggesting possible cotranscription of these genes. Sequence comparisons revealed ExoP to be clustered within a group of bacterial glycosidases with high similarity to a group of glycoside hydrolase (GH3) plant enzymes, of which the barley exo-1,3/1,4-β-glucanase (ExoI) is the best characterized. The major difference between the bacterial and plant proteins is an extra 200- to 220-amino-acid extension at the C terminus of the former. This additional sequence does not correlate with any known functional domain, but ExoP was not active against laminarin when this region was removed. Production of recombinant ExoP allowed substrate specificity studies to be performed. The enzyme was found to possess similar levels of exoglucanase activity against both 1,4-β linkages and 1,3-β linkages, and so ExoP is designated an exo-1,3/1,4-β-exoglucanase, the first such bacterial enzyme to be characterized. This broader specificity could allow the enzyme to assist in digesting both cell wall cellulose and cytoplasmic laminarin. PMID:20729316

  10. Modulation of violacein production and phenotypes associated with biofilm by exogenous quorum sensing N-acylhomoserine lactones in the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas ulvae TC14.

    PubMed

    Mireille Ayé, Armande; Bonnin-Jusserand, Maryse; Brian-Jaisson, Florence; Ortalo-Magné, Annick; Culioli, Gérald; Koffi Nevry, Rose; Rabah, Nadia; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2015-10-01

    Various phenotypes ranging from biofilm formation to pigment production have been shown to be regulated by quorum sensing (QS) in many bacteria. However, studies of the regulation of pigments produced by marine bacteria in saline conditions and of biofilm-associated phenotypes are scarcer. This study focuses on the demonstration of the existence of a QS communication system involving N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) in the Mediterranean Sea strain Pseudoalteromonas ulvae TC14. We have investigated whether TC14 produces the violacein pigment, and whether intrinsic or exogenous AHLs could influence its production and modulate biofilm-associated phenotypes. Here, we demonstrate that the purple pigment produced by TC14 is violacein. The study shows that in planktonic conditions, TC14 produces more pigment in the medium in which it grows less. Using different approaches, the results also show that TC14 does not produce intrinsic AHLs in our conditions. When exogenous AHLs are added in planktonic conditions, the production of violacein is upregulated by C6-, C12-, 3-oxo-C8 and 3-oxo-C12-HSLs (homoserine lactones), and downregulated by 3-oxo-C6-HSL. In sessile conditions, 3-oxo-C8-HSL upregulates the production of violacein. The study of the biofilm-associated phenotypes shows that oxo-derived-HSLs decrease adhesion, swimming and biofilm formation. While 3-oxo-C8 and 3-oxo-C12-HSLs decrease both swimming and adhesion, 3-oxo-C6-HSLs decrease not only violacein production in planktonic conditions but also swimming, adhesion and more subtly biofilm formation. Therefore, TC14 may possess a functional LuxR-type QS receptor capable of sensing extrinsic AHLs, which controls violacein production, motility, adhesion and biofilm formation.

  11. Substrate Recognition and Hydrolysis by a Family 50 exo-β-Agarase, Aga50D, from the Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans*

    PubMed Central

    Pluvinage, Benjamin; Hehemann, Jan-Hendrik; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2013-01-01

    The bacteria that metabolize agarose use multiple enzymes of complementary specificities to hydrolyze the glycosidic linkages in agarose, a linear polymer comprising the repeating disaccharide subunit of neoagarobiose (3,6-anhydro-l-galactose-α-(1,3)-d-galactose) that are β-(1,4)-linked. Here we present the crystal structure of a glycoside hydrolase family 50 exo-β-agarase, Aga50D, from the marine microbe Saccharophagus degradans. This enzyme catalyzes a critical step in the metabolism of agarose by S. degradans through cleaving agarose oligomers into neoagarobiose products that can be further processed into monomers. The crystal structure of Aga50D to 1.9 Å resolution reveals a (β/α)8-barrel fold that is elaborated with a β-sandwich domain and extensive loops. The structures of catalytically inactivated Aga50D in complex with non-hydrolyzed neoagarotetraose (2.05 Å resolution) and neoagarooctaose (2.30 Å resolution) provide views of Michaelis complexes for a β-agarase. In these structures, the d-galactose residue in the −1 subsite is distorted into a 1S3 skew boat conformation. The relative positioning of the putative catalytic residues are most consistent with a retaining catalytic mechanism. Additionally, the neoagarooctaose complex showed that this extended substrate made substantial interactions with the β-sandwich domain, which resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, thus creating additional plus (+) subsites and funneling the polymeric substrate through the tunnel-shaped active site. A synthesis of these results in combination with an additional neoagarobiose product complex suggests a potential exo-processive mode of action of Aga50D on the agarose double helix. PMID:23921382

  12. Carbon monoxide metabolism by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    SciTech Connect

    Ludden, P.W.; Roberts, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    Research continued on carbon monoxide metabolism by Rhodospirillum rubrum. In the past year, progress was made in: (1) the identification and isolation of the physiological electron carrier from monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) to hydrogenase in R. rubrum; (2) the isolation, sequencing and mutagenesis of the genes encoding the components of the CO oxidation system in R. rubrum, (3) the purification and characterization of the CO-induced hydrogenase activity of R. rubrum; (4) the spectroscopic investigation of the cobalt-substituted form of the enzyme.

  13. Dethiosulfatibacter aminovorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel thiosulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from coastal marine sediment via sulfate-reducing enrichment with Casamino acids.

    PubMed

    Takii, Susumu; Hanada, Satoshi; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Ueno, Yutaka; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Ibe, Akihiro; Matsuura, Katsumi

    2007-10-01

    A sulfate-reducing enrichment culture originating from coastal marine sediment of the eutrophic Tokyo Bay, Japan, was successfully established with Casamino acids as a substrate. A thiosulfate reducer, strain C/G2(T), was isolated from the enrichment culture after further enrichment with glutamate. Cells of strain C/G2(T) were non-motile rods (0.6-0.8 microm x 2.2-4.8 microm) and were found singly or in pairs and sometimes in short chains. Spores were not formed. Cells of strain C/G2(T) stained Gram-negatively, despite possessing Gram-positive cell walls. The optimum temperature for growth was 28-30 degrees C, the optimum pH was around 7.8 and the optimum salt concentration was 20-30 g l(-1). Lactate, pyruvate, serine, cysteine, threonine, glutamate, histidine, lysine, arginine, Casamino acids, peptone and yeast extract were fermented as single substrates and no sugar was used as a fermentative substrate. A Stickland reaction was observed with some pairs of amino acids. Fumarate, alanine, proline, phenylalanine, tryptophan, glutamine and aspartate were utilized only in the presence of thiosulfate. Strain C/G2(T) fermented glutamate to H2, CO2, acetate and propionate. Thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were reduced to sulfide. Sulfate, sulfite and nitrate were not utilized as electron acceptors. The growth of strain C/G2(T) on Casamino acids or glutamate was enhanced by co-culturing with Desulfovibrio sp. isolated from the original mixed culture enriched with Casamino acids. The DNA G+C content of strain C/G2(T) was 41.0 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain C/G2(T) formed a distinct cluster with species of the genus Sedimentibacter. The closest relative was Sedimentibacter hydroxybenzoicus (with a gene sequence similarity of 91 %). On the basis of its phylogenetic and phenotypic properties, strain C/G2(T) (=JCM 13356(T)=NBRC 101112(T)=DSM 17477(T)) is proposed as representing a new genus and novel species, Dethiosulfatibacter

  14. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  15. Photosynthetic system in Blastochloris viridis revisited.

    PubMed

    Konorty, Marina; Brumfeld, Vlad; Vermeglio, Andre; Kahana, Nava; Medalia, Ohad; Minsky, Abraham

    2009-06-09

    The bacterium Blastochloris viridis carries one of the simplest photosynthetic systems, which includes a single light-harvesting complex that surrounds the reaction center, membrane soluble quinones, and a soluble periplasmic protein cytochrome c(2) that shuttle between the reaction center and the bc(1) complex and act as electron carriers, as well as the ATP synthase. The close arrangement of the photosynthetic membranes in Bl. viridis, along with the extremely tight arrangement of the photosystems within these membranes, raises a fundamental question about the diffusion of the electron carriers. To address this issue, we analyzed the structure and response of the Bl. viridis photosynthetic system to various light conditions, by using a combination of electron microscopy, whole-cell cryotomography, and spectroscopic methods. We demonstrate that in response to high light intensities, the ratio of both cytochrome c(2) and bc(1) complexes to the reaction centers is increased. The shorter membrane stacks, along with the notion that the bc(1) complex is located at the highly curved edges of these stacks, result in a smaller average distance between the reaction centers and the bc(1) complexes, leading to shorter pathways of cytochrome c(2) between the two complexes. Under anaerobic conditions, the slow diffusion rate is further mitigated by keeping most of the quinone pool reduced, resulting in a concentration gradient of quinols that allows for a constant supply of theses electron carriers to the bc(1) complex.

  16. [Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by phototrophic sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M V; Gogotova, G I; Matrosov, A G; Ziakun, A M

    1976-01-01

    Two processes of sulphur isotope fractionation have been found in experiments with the sulphur purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii. As a result, a light isotope, 32S, is concentrated in residual hydrogen sulphide, and a heavy isotope, 34S, in elementary suphur which is deposited outside the cell. The sulphate produced is lighter than elementary sulphur. Fractionation of sulphur isotopes is observed in natural conditions and is confined to places of mass growth of photosynthetic sulphur bacteria.

  17. Molecular Factors Controlling Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting by Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Polívka, Tomáš; Frank, Harry A.

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are naturally-occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photo-induced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in close proximity to chlorophylls. A few 3D structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates making the correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light-harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid, rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids, lutein, neoxanthin

  18. Molecular factors controlling photosynthetic light harvesting by carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Polívka, Tomás; Frank, Harry A

    2010-08-17

    Carotenoids are naturally occurring pigments that absorb light in the spectral region in which the sun irradiates maximally. These molecules transfer this energy to chlorophylls, initiating the primary photochemical events of photosynthesis. Carotenoids also regulate the flow of energy within the photosynthetic apparatus and protect it from photoinduced damage caused by excess light absorption. To carry out these functions in nature, carotenoids are bound in discrete pigment-protein complexes in the proximity of chlorophylls. A few three-dimensional structures of these carotenoid complexes have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Thus, the stage is set for attempting to correlate the structural information with the spectroscopic properties of carotenoids to understand the molecular mechanism(s) of their function in photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we summarize current spectroscopic data describing the excited state energies and ultrafast dynamics of purified carotenoids in solution and bound in light-harvesting complexes from purple bacteria, marine algae, and green plants. Many of these complexes can be modified using mutagenesis or pigment exchange which facilitates the elucidation of correlations between structure and function. We describe the structural and electronic factors controlling the function of carotenoids as energy donors. We also discuss unresolved issues related to the nature of spectroscopically dark excited states, which could play a role in light harvesting. To illustrate the interplay between structural determinations and spectroscopic investigations that exemplifies work in the field, we describe the spectroscopic properties of four light-harvesting complexes whose structures have been determined to atomic resolution. The first, the LH2 complex from the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, contains the carotenoid rhodopin glucoside. The second is the LHCII trimeric complex from higher plants which uses the carotenoids

  19. Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullerits, T.; Polivka, T.; Sundström, V.

    Photosynthetic organisms utilize (bacterio) chlorophylls and carotenoids as main light-harvesting pigments. In this chapter, we review bacteriochlorophyll light-harvesting in photosynthetic purple bacteria; we discuss intra- and intercomplex energy transfer processes as well as energy trapping by reaction centers. From the viewpoint of light-harvesting, in most organisms carotenoids are accessory pigments absorbing in the blue-green region of the solar spectrum, where chlorophylls and bacteriochlorophylls have weak absorption. Here, we discuss carotenoid light-harvesting in a pigment-protein complex having carotenoids as main lightharvesting pigment, the peridinin chlorophyll protein (PCP).

  20. Species-Specific Associations Between Bacterioplankton and Photosynthetic Picoeukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnelid, H.; Turk-Kubo, K.; Zehr, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes are significant contributors to marine primary productivity. Interactions between marine bacterioplankton and picoeukaryotes frequently occur and can have large biogeochemical impacts. Currently, partly due to methodological difficulties for studying microbial associations in situ, these ecological interactions are poorly characterized. Here we use flow cytometry sorting to identify novel bacterial phylotypes found in physical association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Samples were collected on eight occasions at the Santa Cruz wharf on Monterey Bay during summer and fall, 2014. The phylogeny of associated microbes was assessed through clone libraries and Illumina MiSeq sequencing of amplicons of the 16S rRNA gene. In addition, 16 bacterial isolates comprised of 14 taxa were obtained from sorted photosynthetic picoeukaryote cells. The most frequently detected bacterioplankton phyla were Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteriodetes, and Gammaproteobacteria. The sequences from the sorted populations were a community distinct from the unsorted seawater samples suggesting species-specific functional associations. These species-specific patterns were further supported by re-occurring patterns between replicates and sampling dates. The finding of sequences from the free-living genera Synechococcus and Pelagibacter also suggest that photosynthetic picoeukaryotes can be bacterivores, possibly feeding on some of the most numerically abundant bacteria. The results show that specific bacterial phylotypes are found in association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Taxonomic identification of these associations is a prerequisite for further characterizing the interactions, their metabolic pathways and ecological functions.

  1. Phosphofructokinase Activities in Photosynthetic Organisms 1

    PubMed Central

    Carnal, Nancy Wieland; Black, Clanton C.

    1983-01-01

    A pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK) activity is detectable in extracts of a wide variety of primitive and advanced plants, the Charalean algae, and in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum. Angiosperms with extractable PPi-PFK activities 4- to 70-fold higher than the respective ATP-PFK activities tend to be succulent and to exhibit CAM. Even though PPi-PFK activity is not detected in crude extracts of some well known CAM plants, e.g. plants in the Crassulaceae, gel filtration of the extract and/or inclusion of the PPi-PFK activator, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, in the assay reveals that a PPi-PFK activity is present in these species. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate likewise activates PPi-PFK activities in extracts of C3 and C4 plants. C3 and C4 plant PPi-PFK activities are roughly equivalent to ATP-PFK activities in the same species. PPi-PFK activity is also detected in some bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, and gymnosperms. The Charophytes, advanced algae presumed to be similar to species ancestral to vascular plants, exhibit at least 4-fold higher PPi-PFK than ATP-PFK activities. R. rubrum also exhibits a much higher PPi-PFK activity than ATP-PFK activity. These data indicate that PPi-PFK may serve as an alternate enzyme to ATP-PFK in glycolysis in a wide range of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:16662776

  2. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  3. Photosynthetic Photovoltaic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-21

    PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS 5b. GRANT NUMBER F49620-02-1-0399 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER MARC A. BALDO 5e. TASK...building an ’antenna’ on top of a conventional solar cell. Biomimetic organic solar cells operate as follows: The antenna absorbs the light, and acts to...no longer must absorb all the light. Thus, its quantum efficiency can approach 100% potentially doubling the performance of organic solar cells. 15

  4. Antagonistic Activity and Mode of Action of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid, Produced by Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA31x, Against Vibrio anguillarum In vitro and in a Zebrafish In vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linlin; Tian, Xueying; Kuang, Shan; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Chengsheng; Sun, Chaomin

    2017-01-01

    Phenazine and its derivatives are very important secondary metabolites produced from Pseudomonas spp. and have exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal and antibacterial activities. However, till date, there are few reports about marine derived Pseudomonas and its production of phenazine metabolites. In this study, we isolated a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA31x which produced natural product inhibiting the growth of Vibrio anguillarum C312, one of the most serious bacterial pathogens in marine aquaculture. Combining high-resolution electro-spray-ionization mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses, the functional compound against V. anguillarum was demonstrated to be phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), an important phenazine derivative. Molecular studies indicated that the production of PCA by P. aeruginosa PA31x was determined by gene clusters phz1 and phz2 in its genome. Electron microscopic results showed that treatment of V. anguillarum with PCA developed complete lysis of bacterial cells with fragmented cytoplasm being released to the surrounding environment. Additional evidence indicated that reactive oxygen species generation preceded PCA-induced microbe and cancer cell death. Notably, treatment with PCA gave highly significant protective activities against the development of V. anguillarum C312 on zebrafish. Additionally, the marine derived PCA was further found to effectively inhibit the growth of agricultural pathogens, Acidovorax citrulli NP1 and Phytophthora nicotianae JM1. Taken together, this study reveals that marine Pseudomonas derived PCA carries antagonistic activities against both aquacultural and agricultural pathogens, which broadens the application fields of PCA. PMID:28289406

  5. Antagonistic Activity and Mode of Action of Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid, Produced by Marine Bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA31x, Against Vibrio anguillarum In vitro and in a Zebrafish In vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linlin; Tian, Xueying; Kuang, Shan; Liu, Ge; Zhang, Chengsheng; Sun, Chaomin

    2017-01-01

    Phenazine and its derivatives are very important secondary metabolites produced from Pseudomonas spp. and have exhibited broad-spectrum antifungal and antibacterial activities. However, till date, there are few reports about marine derived Pseudomonas and its production of phenazine metabolites. In this study, we isolated a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA31x which produced natural product inhibiting the growth of Vibrio anguillarum C312, one of the most serious bacterial pathogens in marine aquaculture. Combining high-resolution electro-spray-ionization mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyses, the functional compound against V. anguillarum was demonstrated to be phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), an important phenazine derivative. Molecular studies indicated that the production of PCA by P. aeruginosa PA31x was determined by gene clusters phz1 and phz2 in its genome. Electron microscopic results showed that treatment of V. anguillarum with PCA developed complete lysis of bacterial cells with fragmented cytoplasm being released to the surrounding environment. Additional evidence indicated that reactive oxygen species generation preceded PCA-induced microbe and cancer cell death. Notably, treatment with PCA gave highly significant protective activities against the development of V. anguillarum C312 on zebrafish. Additionally, the marine derived PCA was further found to effectively inhibit the growth of agricultural pathogens, Acidovorax citrulli NP1 and Phytophthora nicotianae JM1. Taken together, this study reveals that marine Pseudomonas derived PCA carries antagonistic activities against both aquacultural and agricultural pathogens, which broadens the application fields of PCA.

  6. The Photosynthetic Cycle

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, Melvin

    1955-03-21

    A cyclic sequence of transformations, including the carboxylation of RuDP (ribulose diphosphate) and its re-formation, has been deduced as the route for the creation of reduced carbon compounds in photosynthetic organisms. With the demonstration of RuDP as substrate for the carboxylation in a cell-free system, each of the reactions has now been carried out independently in vitro. Further purification of this last enzyme system has confirmed the deduction that the carboxylation of RuDP leads directly to the two molecules of PGA (phosphoglyceric acid) involving an internal dismutation and suggesting the name "carboxydismutase" for the enzyme. As a consequence of this knowledge of each of the steps in the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} reduction cycle, it is possible to define the reagent requirements to maintain it. The net requirement for the reduction of one molecule of CO{sub 2} is four equivalents of [H]and three molecules of ATP (adenine triphosphate). These must ultimately be supplied by the photochemical reaction. Some possible ways in which this may be accomplished are discussed.

  7. Structure-function studies of the photosynthetic reaction center using herbicides that compete for the quinone binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Bylina, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Certain classes of herbicides act as competitive inhibitors of the photosynthetic reaction center. Genetic engineering techniques can be used to generate photosynthetic reaction centers which contain altered quinone binding sites. A genetic system for rapidly screening herbicides developed in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus has been used to examine the effect of different s-triazine herbicides on the growth of bacteria containing reaction centers with altered quinone binding sites. Structural insights into herbicide binding have been obtained by determining the level of resistance or sensitivity to structurally related herbicides in these modified reaction centers.

  8. Spatial and Diel Variability in Photosynthetic and Photoprotective Pigments in Shallow Benthic Communities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-14

    Spatial and Diel Variability in Photosynthetic and Photoprotective Pigments in Shallow Benthic Communities Larry E. Brand Rosenstiel School of Marine ...rsmas.miami.edu F. Carol Stephens Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science University of Miami 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy. Miami, FL 33149-1098 Ph...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Miami,Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science,4600 Rickenbacker Causeway,Miami,FL,33149 8

  9. Inelastic neutron scattering study of light-induced dynamics of a photosynthetic membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, A.; Stoeckli, A.

    2010-01-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering was employed to study photoeffects on the molecular dynamics of membranes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The main photoactive parts of this biomolecular system are the chlorophyll molecules whose dynamics were found to be affected under illumination by visible light in a twofold manner. First, vibrational modes are excited at energies of 12(2) and 88(21) cm{sup -1}. Second, a partial 'freezing' of rotational modes is observed at energies of 1.2(3) and 2.9(5) cm{sup -1}. These results are attributed to a possible coupling between molecular motions and particular mechanisms in the photosynthetic process.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Barry, Kerrie; Chertkov, Olga; Dalin, Eileen; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren John; Honchak, Barbara M; Karbach, Lauren E; Land, Miriam L; Lapidus, Alla L.; Larimer, Frank W; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pitluck, Sam; Pierson, Beverly K

    2011-01-01

    Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria.

  11. Identification of Associations between Bacterioplankton and Photosynthetic Picoeukaryotes in Coastal Waters

    PubMed Central

    Farnelid, Hanna M.; Turk-Kubo, Kendra A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes are significant contributors to marine primary productivity. Associations between marine bacterioplankton and picoeukaryotes frequently occur and can have large biogeochemical impacts. We used flow cytometry to sort cells from seawater to identify non-eukaryotic phylotypes that are associated with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Samples were collected at the Santa Cruz wharf on Monterey Bay, CA, USA during summer and fall, 2014. The phylogeny of associated microbes was assessed through 16S rRNA gene amplicon clone and Illumina MiSeq libraries. The most frequently detected bacterioplankton phyla within the photosynthetic picoeukaryote sorts were Proteobacteria (Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria) and Bacteroidetes. Intriguingly, the presence of free-living bacterial genera in the photosynthetic picoeukaryote sorts could suggest that some of the photosynthetic picoeukaryotes were mixotrophs. However, the occurrence of bacterial sequences, which were not prevalent in the corresponding bulk seawater samples, indicates that there was also a selection for specific OTUs in association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes suggesting specific functional associations. The results show that diverse bacterial phylotypes are found in association with photosynthetic picoeukaryotes. Taxonomic identification of these associations is a prerequisite for further characterizing and to elucidate their metabolic pathways and ecological functions. PMID:27148165

  12. Photosynthetic approaches to chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shuchi H; Atsumi, Shota

    2013-12-01

    National interest and environmental advocates encourage alternatives to petroleum-based products. Besides biofuels, many other valuable chemicals used in every-day life are petroleum derivatives or require petroleum for their production. A plausible alternative to production using petroleum for chemical production is to harvest the abundant carbon dioxide resources in the environment to produce valuable hydrocarbons. Currently, efforts are being made to utilize a natural biological system, photosynthetic microorganisms, to perform this task. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attractive to use for biochemical production because they utilize economical resources for survival: sunlight and carbon dioxide. This review examines the various compounds produced by photosynthetic microorganisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of the highly efficient oil-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter venetianus RAG-1 reveals genes important in dodecane uptake and utilization [Transcriptomic analysis of the marine oil-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter venetianus RAG-1 reveals genes important in dodecane uptake and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, Ankita; Charrier, Marimikel; Wu, Yu -Wei; Malfatti, Stephanie; Zhou, Carol E.; Singer, Steven W.; Dugan, Larry; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2016-09-22

    The hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Acinetobacter venetianus RAG-1 has attracted substantial attention due to its powerful oil-degrading capabilities and its potential to play an important ecological role in the cleanup of alkanes. In this study, we compare the transcriptome of the strain RAG-1 grown in dodecane, the corresponding alkanol (dodecanol), and sodium acetate for the characterization of genes involved in dodecane uptake and utilization. Comparison of the transcriptional responses of RAG-1 grown on dodecane led to the identification of 1074 genes that were differentially expressed relative to sodium acetate. Of these, 622 genes were upregulated when grown in dodecane. The highly upregulated genes were involved in alkane catabolism, along with stress response. Our data suggest AlkMb to be primarily involved in dodecane oxidation. Transcriptional response of RAG-1 grown on dodecane relative to dodecanol also led to the identification of permease, outer membrane protein and thin fimbriae coding genes potentially involved in dodecane uptake. As a result, this study provides the first model for key genes involved in alkane uptake and metabolism in A. venetianus RAG-1.

  14. Transcriptomic analysis of the highly efficient oil-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter venetianus RAG-1 reveals genes important in dodecane uptake and utilization [Transcriptomic analysis of the marine oil-degrading bacterium Acinetobacter venetianus RAG-1 reveals genes important in dodecane uptake and utilization

    DOE PAGES

    Kothari, Ankita; Charrier, Marimikel; Wu, Yu -Wei; ...

    2016-09-22

    The hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Acinetobacter venetianus RAG-1 has attracted substantial attention due to its powerful oil-degrading capabilities and its potential to play an important ecological role in the cleanup of alkanes. In this study, we compare the transcriptome of the strain RAG-1 grown in dodecane, the corresponding alkanol (dodecanol), and sodium acetate for the characterization of genes involved in dodecane uptake and utilization. Comparison of the transcriptional responses of RAG-1 grown on dodecane led to the identification of 1074 genes that were differentially expressed relative to sodium acetate. Of these, 622 genes were upregulated when grown in dodecane. The highly upregulatedmore » genes were involved in alkane catabolism, along with stress response. Our data suggest AlkMb to be primarily involved in dodecane oxidation. Transcriptional response of RAG-1 grown on dodecane relative to dodecanol also led to the identification of permease, outer membrane protein and thin fimbriae coding genes potentially involved in dodecane uptake. As a result, this study provides the first model for key genes involved in alkane uptake and metabolism in A. venetianus RAG-1.« less

  15. Studies on Hydrogen Production by Photosynthetic Bacteria after Anaerobic Fermentation of Starch by a Hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitate, Toshihiro; Fukatsu, Makoto; Ishimi, Katsuhiro; Kohno, Hideki; Wakayama, Tatsuki; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Miyake, Jun; Asada, Yasuo

    In order to establish the sequential hydrogen production from waste starch using a hyperthermophile, Pyrococcus furiosus, and a photosynthetic bacterium, basic studies were done. P. furiosus produced hydrogen and acetate by anaerobic fermentation at 90°C. A photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, was able to produce hydrogen from acetate under anaerobic and light conditions at 30°C. However, Rb. sphaeroides RV was not able to produce hydrogen from acetate in the presence of sodium chloride that was essential for the growth and hydrogen production of P. furiosus although it produced hydrogen from lactate at a reduced rate with 1% sodium chloride. A newly isolated strain, CST-8, from natural environment was, however, able to produce hydrogen from acetate, especially with 3 mM L-alanine and in the presence of 1% sodium chloride. The sequential hydrogen production with P. furiosus and salt-tolerant photosynthetic bacteria could be probable at least in the laboratory experiment scale.

  16. Photosynthetic reaction centers/ITO hybrid nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Tibor; Bencsik, Gábor; Magyar, Melinda; Visy, Csaba; Gingl, Zoltán; Nagy, Krisztina; Váró, György; Hajdu, Kata; Kozák, Gábor; Nagy, László

    2013-03-01

    Photosynthetic reaction center proteins purified from Rhodobacter sphaeroides purple bacterium were deposited on the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO), a transparent conductive oxide, and the photochemical/-physical properties of the composite were investigated. The kinetics of the light induced absorption change indicated that the RC was active in the composite and there was an interaction between the protein cofactors and the ITO. The electrochromic response of the bacteriopheophytine absorption at 771 nm showed an increased electric field perturbation around this chromophore on the surface of ITO compared to the one measured in solution. This absorption change is associated with the charge-compensating relaxation events inside the protein. Similar life time, but smaller magnitude of this absorption change was measured on the surface of borosilicate glass. The light induced change in the conductivity of the composite as a function of the concentration showed the typical sigmoid saturation characteristics unlike if the photochemically inactive chlorophyll was layered on the ITO. In this later case the light induced change in the conductivity was oppositely proportional to the chlorophyll concentration due to the thermal dissipation of the excitation energy. The sensitivity of the measurement is very high; few picomole RC can change the light induced resistance of the composite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy of electronic excitation transport in photosynthetic antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, W.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Polarized pump--probe spectroscopy was performed with 1.5--2 psec resolution on the bacteriochlorophyll a protein antenna complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii and on native and enriched photosystem I particles from spinach. The resulting photobleaching profiles reflect the details of singlet electronic-excitation transport in these photosynthetic antennas, in which the pigments are complexed by proteins into clusters of five or more chromophores.

  18. The photosynthetic apparatus and its regulation in the aerobic gammaproteobacterium Congregibacter litoralis gen. nov., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Spring, Stefan; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Tindall, Brian J

    2009-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that in some marine environments aerobic bacteriochlorophyll a-producing bacteria represent a significant part of the microbial population. The interaction of photosynthesis and carbon metabolism in these interesting bacteria is still largely unknown and requires further investigation in order to estimate their contribution to the marine carbon cycle. Here, we analyzed the structure, composition and regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in the obligately aerobic marine gammaproteobacterium KT71(T). Photoheterotrophically grown cells were characterized by a poorly developed lamellar intracytoplasmic membrane system, a type 1 light-harvesting antenna complex and a photosynthetic reaction center associated with a tetraheme cytochrome c. The only photosynthetic pigments produced were bacteriochlorophyll a and spirilloxanthin. Under semiaerobic conditions KT71(T) cells expressing a photosynthetic apparatus showed a light-dependent increase of growth yield in the range of 1.3-2.5 fold. The expression level of the photosynthetic apparatus depended largely on the utilized substrate, the intermediary carbon metabolism and oxygen tension. In addition, pigment synthesis was strongly influenced by light, with blue light exerting the most significant effect, implicating that proteins containing a BLUF domain may be involved in regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus. Several phenotypic traits in KT71(T) could be identified that correlated with the assumed redox state of growing cells and thus could be used to monitor the cellular redox state under various incubation conditions. In a hypothetical model that explains the regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus in strain KT71(T) we propose that the expression of photosynthesis genes depends on the cellular redox state and is maximal under conditions that allow a balanced membrane redox state. So far, bacteria capable of an obligately aerobic, photosynthetic metabolism constitute a unique

  19. Novel Alginate Lyase (Aly5) from a Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium, Flammeovirga sp. Strain MY04: Effects of Module Truncation on Biochemical Characteristics, Alginate Degradation Patterns, and Oligosaccharide-Yielding Properties

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenjun; Gu, Jingyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Liu, Huihui; Li, Yuezhong

    2015-01-01

    Alginate lyases are important tools for oligosaccharide preparation, medical treatment, and energy bioconversion. Numerous alginate lyases have been elucidated. However, relatively little is known about their substrate degradation patterns and product-yielding properties, which is a limit to wider enzymatic applications and further enzyme improvements. Herein, we report the characterization and module truncation of Aly5, the first alginate lyase obtained from the polysaccharide-degrading bacterium Flammeovirga. Aly5 is a 566-amino-acid protein and belongs to a novel branch of the polysaccharide lyase 7 (PL7) superfamily. The protein rAly5 is an endolytic enzyme of alginate and associated oligosaccharides. It prefers guluronate (G) to mannuronate (M). Its smallest substrate is an unsaturated pentasaccharide, and its minimum product is an unsaturated disaccharide. The final alginate digests contain unsaturated oligosaccharides that generally range from disaccharides to heptasaccharides, with the tetrasaccharide fraction constituting the highest mass concentration. The disaccharide products are identified as ΔG units. While interestingly, the tri- and tetrasaccharide fractions each contain higher proportions of ΔG to ΔM ends, the larger final products contain only ΔM ends, which constitute a novel oligosaccharide-yielding property of guluronate lyases. The deletion of the noncatalytic region of Aly5 does not alter its M/G preference but significantly decreases the enzymatic activity and enzyme stability. Notably, the truncated protein accumulates large final oligosaccharide products but yields fewer small final products than Aly5, which are codetermined by its M/G preference to and size enlargement of degradable oligosaccharides. This study provides novel enzymatic properties and catalytic mechanisms of a guluronate lyase for potential uses and improvements. PMID:26519393

  20. Novel Alginate Lyase (Aly5) from a Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium, Flammeovirga sp. Strain MY04: Effects of Module Truncation on Biochemical Characteristics, Alginate Degradation Patterns, and Oligosaccharide-Yielding Properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenjun; Gu, Jingyan; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Liu, Huihui; Li, Yuezhong; Li, Fuchuan

    2015-10-30

    Alginate lyases are important tools for oligosaccharide preparation, medical treatment, and energy bioconversion. Numerous alginate lyases have been elucidated. However, relatively little is known about their substrate degradation patterns and product-yielding properties, which is a limit to wider enzymatic applications and further enzyme improvements. Herein, we report the characterization and module truncation of Aly5, the first alginate lyase obtained from the polysaccharide-degrading bacterium Flammeovirga. Aly5 is a 566-amino-acid protein and belongs to a novel branch of the polysaccharide lyase 7 (PL7) superfamily. The protein rAly5 is an endolytic enzyme of alginate and associated oligosaccharides. It prefers guluronate (G) to mannuronate (M). Its smallest substrate is an unsaturated pentasaccharide, and its minimum product is an unsaturated disaccharide. The final alginate digests contain unsaturated oligosaccharides that generally range from disaccharides to heptasaccharides, with the tetrasaccharide fraction constituting the highest mass concentration. The disaccharide products are identified as ΔG units. While interestingly, the tri- and tetrasaccharide fractions each contain higher proportions of ΔG to ΔM ends, the larger final products contain only ΔM ends, which constitute a novel oligosaccharide-yielding property of guluronate lyases. The deletion of the noncatalytic region of Aly5 does not alter its M/G preference but significantly decreases the enzymatic activity and enzyme stability. Notably, the truncated protein accumulates large final oligosaccharide products but yields fewer small final products than Aly5, which are codetermined by its M/G preference to and size enlargement of degradable oligosaccharides. This study provides novel enzymatic properties and catalytic mechanisms of a guluronate lyase for potential uses and improvements.

  1. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking.

    PubMed

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-07-01

    Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra- or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish aquaculture.

  2. The hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacterium Cobetia sp. strain MM1IDA2H-1 produces a biosurfactant that interferes with quorum sensing of fish pathogens by signal hijacking

    PubMed Central

    Ibacache-Quiroga, C; Ojeda, J; Espinoza-Vergara, G; Olivero, P; Cuellar, M; Dinamarca, M A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Biosurfactants are produced by hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria in response to the presence of water-insoluble hydrocarbons. This is believed to facilitate the uptake of hydrocarbons by bacteria. However, these diffusible amphiphilic surface-active molecules are involved in several other biological functions such as microbial competition and intra-or inter-species communication. We report the isolation and characterization of a marine bacterial strain identified as Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1, which can grow using the sulfur-containing heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzothiophene (DBT). As with DBT, when the isolated strain is grown in the presence of a microbial competitor, it produces a biosurfactant. Because the obtained biosurfactant was formed by hydroxy fatty acids and extracellular lipidic structures were observed during bacterial growth, we investigated whether the biosurfactant at its critical micelle concentration can interfere with bacterial communication systems such as quorum sensing. We focused on Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, a fish pathogen whose virulence relies on quorum sensing signals. Using biosensors for quorum sensing based on Chromobacterium violaceum and Vibrio anguillarum, we showed that when the purified biosurfactant was mixed with N-acyl homoserine lactones produced by A. salmonicida, quorum sensing was inhibited, although bacterial growth was not affected. In addition, the transcriptional activities of A. salmonicida virulence genes that are controlled by quorum sensing were repressed by both the purified biosurfactant and the growth in the presence of Cobetia sp. MM1IDA2H-1. We propose that the biosurfactant, or the lipid structures interact with the N-acyl homoserine lactones, inhibiting their function. This could be used as a strategy to interfere with the quorum sensing systems of bacterial fish pathogens, which represents an attractive alternative to classical antimicrobial therapies in fish

  3. Primary arsenic(V) preserved in 3.26 billion-year-old shallow marine cherts of the Fig Tree Group demonstrates a complete Paleoarchean arsenic cycle driven by photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, K. D.; Tice, M. M.; Bostick, B. C.

    2016-12-01

    reduction potential than the Fe(III)/Fe(II) pair, and As(V) is not produced in significant abundance by photochemical processes at seawater pH. The Fig Tree As cycle must therefore have been driven by photosynthetic bacteria, either indirectly through O2 production, or more likely directly by As(III)-oxidizing anoxygenic phototrophs.

  4. Photooxidative Damage in Photosynthetic Activities of Chromatium vinosum 1

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Sumio; Akazawa, Takashi

    1978-01-01

    The capacity of photosynthetic CO2 fixation in the anaerobic purple-sulfur bacterium, Chromatium vinosum is markedly impaired by strong illumination (9 × 104 lux) in the presence of 100% O2. In the absence of HCO3−, decline in activity occurred gradually, with about 40% of the initial activity remaining after a 1-hour incubation. The addition of 50 millimolar HCO3− to the incubation medium resulted in a measurable delay (about 30 minutes) of the inactivation process. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity and light-dependent O2 uptake (electron flow) or crude extracts prepared after pretreatment of the bacterial cells with O2 and light were not affected but the photophosphorylation capacity of either bacterial cells or chromatophores was drastically reduced. The inhibition of photophos-phorylation in the chromatophore preparations was significantly reduced by the addition of either an O2− scavenger, Tiron, or an 1O2 scavenger, α-tocopherol. These results suggest that the active O2 species, O2− or 1O2, might take part in the observed inactivation. The pretreatment of the bacteria with O2 and light inhibited CO2 assimilation through the Calvin-Benson cycle, while relatively stimulating the formation of aspartate and glutamate. It also inhibited the conversion of glycolate to glycine, resulting in a sustained extracellular excretion of glycolate. The inactivation of photosynthetic CO2 fixation by intact cells was enhanced by low temperature, KCN, or methylviologen addition during the pretreatment with O2 and light. The mechanism(s) of O2-dependent photoinactivation of photosynthetic activities in Chromatium are discussed in relation to the possible role of photorespiration as a means of producing CO2 in the photosynthetic system. PMID:16660651

  5. The genome of Cyanothece 51142, a unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium important in the marine nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Eric A; Liberton, Michelle; Stöckel, Jana; Loh, Thomas; Elvitigala, Thanura; Wang, Chunyan; Wollam, Aye; Fulton, Robert S; Clifton, Sandra W; Jacobs, Jon M; Aurora, Rajeev; Ghosh, Bijoy K; Sherman, Louis A; Smith, Richard D; Wilson, Richard K; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2008-09-30

    Unicellular cyanobacteria have recently been recognized for their contributions to nitrogen fixation in marine environments, a function previously thought to be filled mainly by filamentous cyanobacteria such as Trichodesmium. To begin a systems level analysis of the physiology of the unicellular N(2)-fixing microbes, we have sequenced to completion the genome of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, the first such organism. Cyanothece 51142 performs oxygenic photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation, separating these two incompatible processes temporally within the same cell, while concomitantly accumulating metabolic products in inclusion bodies that are later mobilized as part of a robust diurnal cycle. The 5,460,377-bp Cyanothece 51142 genome has a unique arrangement of one large circular chromosome, four small plasmids, and one linear chromosome, the first report of a linear element in the genome of a photosynthetic bacterium. On the 429,701-bp linear chromosome is a cluster of genes for enzymes involved in pyruvate metabolism, suggesting an important role for the linear chromosome in fermentative processes. The annotation of the genome was significantly aided by simultaneous global proteomic studies of this organism. Compared with other nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, Cyanothece 51142 contains the largest intact contiguous cluster of nitrogen fixation-related genes. We discuss the implications of such an organization on the regulation of nitrogen fixation. The genome sequence provides important information regarding the ability of Cyanothece 51142 to accomplish metabolic compartmentalization and energy storage, as well as how a unicellular bacterium balances multiple, often incompatible, processes in a single cell.

  6. Acanthopleuribacter pedis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium isolated from a chiton, and description of Acanthopleuribacteraceae fam. nov., Acanthopleuribacterales ord. nov., Holophagaceae fam. nov., Holophagales ord. nov. and Holophagae classis nov. in the phylum 'Acidobacteria'.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Yukiyo; Kurahashi, Midori; Yanagi, Kensuke; Yokota, Akira; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2008-11-01

    Strain FYK2218(T) was isolated from a specimen of the chiton Acanthopleura japonica, which had been collected from a beach on the Boso peninsula in Japan. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the strain belonged to the phylum 'Acidobacteria'. The most closely related type strains to strain FYK2218(T) were Holophaga foetida TMBS4(T) (83.6 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) and Geothrix fermentans H-5(T) (83.6 %) in subdivision 8 of the 'Acidobacteria'. Cells of FYK2218(T) were motile, rod-shaped, Gram-negative, mesophilic and strictly aerobic. The G+C content of the strain was 56.7 mol%. The strain had isoprenoid quinones MK-6 and MK-7 as major components. Major fatty acids of the strain were iso-C(15 : 0), iso-C(17 : 0), C(16 : 0) and C(20 : 5)omega3c (cis-5,8,11,14,17-eicosapentaenoic acid). From the taxonomic data obtained in this study, it is proposed that the new marine isolate be placed into a novel genus and species named Acanthopleuribacter pedis gen. nov., sp. nov. within the new family, order and class Acanthopleuribacteraceae fam. nov., Acanthopleuribacterales ord. nov. and Holophagae classis nov. The family Holophagaceae fam. nov. is also described. The type strain of Acanthopleuribacter pedis is FYK2218(T) (=NBRC 101209(T) =KCTC 12899(T)).

  7. Decoding algal genomes: tracing back the history of photosynthetic life on Earth.

    PubMed

    Tirichine, Leïla; Bowler, Chris

    2011-04-01

    The last decade has witnessed outstanding progress in sequencing the genomes of photosynthetic eukaryotes, from major cereal crops to single celled marine phytoplankton. For the algae, we now have whole genome sequences from green, red, and brown representatives, and multiple efforts based on comparative and functional genomics approaches have provided information about the unicellular origins of higher plants, and about the evolution of photosynthetic life in general. Here we present some of the highlights from such studies, including the endosymbiotic origins of photosynthetic protists and their positioning with respect to plants and animals, the evolution of multicellularity in photosynthetic lineages, the role of sex in unicellular algae, and the potential relevance of epigenetic processes in contributing to the adaptation of algae to their environment. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Draft Genome of the Marine Gammaproteobacterium Halomonas titanicae

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Porro, Cristina; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Cruz-Hernández, Norge; González, Juan M.; Reyes-Guirao, Cristina; Navarro-Sampedro, Laura; Carballo, Modesto

    2013-01-01

    Halomonas titanicae strain BH1 is a heterotrophic, aerobic marine bacterium which was isolated from rusticles of the RMS Titanic wreck. Here we report the draft genome sequence of this halophilic gammaproteobacterium. PMID:23516210

  9. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  10. Spectral measurements of photosynthetic efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The photosynthetic efficiency of plants was examined for plants in two very different canopies, a USDA cornfield having an instrumented flux tower in Beltsville, MD, USA and a coniferous forest in British Columbia, Canada, included in the tower network of the Canadian Carbon Program. Basic field st...

  11. Environmental control of photosynthetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Punnett, T

    1971-01-22

    The transition from granular to homogeneous chloroplasts in vivo in Egeria densa caused by environmental conditions was paralleled by a decrease in photosynthetic enhancement from 30 percent to nearly zero. The drop in enhancement can be explained either by a change in the partitioning of light energy between the two photosystems or a change to a single photosystem.

  12. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-05-13

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature.

  13. Role of an elliptical structure in photosynthetic energy transfer: Collaboration between quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Hisaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments have revealed that the light-harvesting complex 1 (LH1) in purple photosynthetic bacteria has an elliptical structure. Generally, symmetry lowering in a structure leads to a decrease in quantum effects (quantum coherence and entanglement), which have recently been considered to play a role in photosynthetic energy transfer, and hence, elliptical structure seems to work against efficient photosynthetic energy transfer. Here we analyse the effect of an elliptical structure on energy transfer in a purple photosynthetic bacterium and reveal that the elliptical distortion rather enhances energy transfer from peripheral LH2 to LH1 at room temperature. Numerical results show that quantum entanglement between LH1 and LH2 is formed over a wider range of high energy levels than would have been the case with circular LH1. Light energy absorbed by LH2 is thermally pumped via thermal fluctuation and is effectively transferred to LH1 through the entangled states at room temperature rather than at low temperature. This result indicates the possibility that photosynthetic systems adopt an elliptical structure to effectively utilise both quantum entanglement and thermal fluctuation at physiological temperature. PMID:27173144

  14. Characterization of the quinones in purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuuka; Kawakami, Tomoaki; Yu, Long-Jiang; Yoshimura, Miku; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu

    2015-07-08

    Quinone distributions in the thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum have been investigated at different levels of the photosynthetic apparatus. Here we show that, on average, the intracytoplasmic membrane contains 18 ubiquinones (UQ) and 4 menaquinones (MQ) per reaction center (RC). About one-third of the quinones are retained in the light-harvesting-reaction center core complex (LH1-RC) with a similar ratio of UQ to MQ. The numbers of quinones essentially remains unchanged during crystallization of the LH1-RC. There are 1-2 UQ and 1 MQ associated with the RC-only complex in the purified solution sample. Our results suggest that a large proportion of the quinones are confined to the core complex and at least five UQs remain invisible in the current LH1-RC crystal structure. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Flavobacteriales Bacterium Strain UJ101 Isolated from a Xanthid Crab

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jhung-Ahn; Kwon, Kae Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Flavobacteriales bacterium strain UJ101 was isolated from a xanthid crab species collected from the East Sea of Korea. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain UJ101 for the study of major metabolic pathways related to microbial species from marine invertebrate species. PMID:28153900

  16. Physiological characterization of an anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing bacterium belonging to the "Candidatus scalindua" group.

    PubMed

    Awata, Takanori; Oshiki, Mamoru; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Ozaki, Noriatsu; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2013-07-01

    The phylogenetic affiliation and physiological characteristics (e.g., Ks and maximum specific growth rate [μmax]) of an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacterium, "Candidatus Scalindua sp.," enriched from the marine sediment of Hiroshima Bay, Japan, were investigated. "Candidatus Scalindua sp." exhibits higher affinity for nitrite and a lower growth rate and yield than the known anammox species.

  17. Photosynthetic gene expression in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Berry, James O; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Zielinski, Amy M; Mure, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Within the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, photosynthesis converts light into biological energy, fueling the assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide into biologically useful molecules. Two major steps, photosynthetic electron transport and the Calvin-Benson cycle, require many gene products encoded from chloroplast as well as nuclear genomes. The expression of genes in both cellular compartments is highly dynamic and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Light is the primary environmental determinant of photosynthetic gene expression. Working through photoreceptors such as phytochrome, light regulates photosynthetic genes at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Other processes that affect photosynthetic gene expression include photosynthetic activity, development, and biotic and abiotic stress. Anterograde (from nucleus to chloroplast) and retrograde (from chloroplast to nucleus) signaling insures the highly coordinated expression of the many photosynthetic genes between these different compartments. Anterograde signaling incorporates nuclear-encoded transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators, such as sigma factors and RNA-binding proteins, respectively. Retrograde signaling utilizes photosynthetic processes such as photosynthetic electron transport and redox signaling to influence the expression of photosynthetic genes in the nucleus. The basic C3 photosynthetic pathway serves as the default form used by most of the plant species on earth. High temperature and water stress associated with arid environments have led to the development of specialized C4 and CAM photosynthesis, which evolved as modifications of the basic default expression program. The goal of this article is to explain and summarize the many gene expression and regulatory processes that work together to support photosynthetic function in plants.

  18. A Screening Method for the Isolation of Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Producing Purple Non-sulfur Photosynthetic Bacteria from Natural Seawater

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a family of biopolyesters accumulated by a variety of microorganisms as carbon and energy storage under starvation conditions. We focused on marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria as host microorganisms for PHA production and developed a method for their isolation from natural seawater. To identify novel PHA-producing marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, natural seawaters were cultured in nutrient-rich medium for purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, and twelve pink- or red-pigmented colonies were picked up. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis revealed that four isolates synthesized PHA at levels ranging from 0.5 to 24.4 wt% of cell dry weight. The 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis revealed that one isolate (HM2) showed 100% identity to marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria. In conclusion, we have demonstrated in this study that PHA-producing marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria can be isolated from natural seawater under nutrient-rich conditions. PMID:27708640

  19. A Screening Method for the Isolation of Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Producing Purple Non-sulfur Photosynthetic Bacteria from Natural Seawater.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are a family of biopolyesters accumulated by a variety of microorganisms as carbon and energy storage under starvation conditions. We focused on marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria as host microorganisms for PHA production and developed a method for their isolation from natural seawater. To identify novel PHA-producing marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, natural seawaters were cultured in nutrient-rich medium for purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria, and twelve pink- or red-pigmented colonies were picked up. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry analysis revealed that four isolates synthesized PHA at levels ranging from 0.5 to 24.4 wt% of cell dry weight. The 16S ribosomal RNA sequence analysis revealed that one isolate (HM2) showed 100% identity to marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria. In conclusion, we have demonstrated in this study that PHA-producing marine purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria can be isolated from natural seawater under nutrient-rich conditions.

  20. The genetic basis of anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jaime; Sanchez-Sedillo, Benjamin; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence; McCann, Shelley; Rosen, Michael; Oremland, Ronald S; Saltikov, Chad W

    2017-01-01

    'Photoarsenotrophy', the use of arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis, is thought to be an ancient form of phototrophy along with the photosynthetic oxidation of Fe(II), H2 S, H2 and NO2-. Photoarsenotrophy was recently identified from Paoha Island's (Mono Lake, CA) arsenic-rich hot springs. The genomes of several photoarsenotrophs revealed a gene cluster, arxB2AB1CD, where arxA is predicted to encode for the sole arsenite oxidase. The role of arxA in photosynthetic arsenite oxidation was confirmed by disrupting the gene in a representative photoarsenotrophic bacterium, resulting in the loss of light-dependent arsenite oxidation. In situ evidence of active photoarsenotrophic microbes was supported by arxA mRNA detection for the first time, in red-pigmented microbial mats within the hot springs of Paoha Island. This work expands on the genetics for photosynthesis coupled to new electron donors and elaborates on known mechanisms for arsenic metabolism, thereby highlighting the complexities of arsenic biogeochemical cycling. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. SANS Investigation of the Photosynthetic Machinery of Chloroflexus Aurantiacus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Urban, Volker S; Jianzhong, Wen; Yueyong, Xin; Blankenship, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria harvest light and perform photosynthesis in low light environments, and contain specialized antenna complexes to adapt to this condition. In this report, we present studies using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to elucidate structural information about the photosynthetic apparatus, including the peripheral light harvesting chlorosome complex, the integral membrane light-harvesting B808-866 complex and the reaction center (RC) in the thermophilic green phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. Using contract variation in SANS measurments, our studies suggest that the B808-866 comples is wrapped around the RC in Cfx. aurantiacus, and the overall size and conformation for the B808-866 complex of Cfx. aurantiacus is roughly comparable to the LH1 antenna complex of the purple bacteria. A similar size for the isolated B808-866 complex is also suggested via dynamic light scattering measurements. Alos, a smaller size of the RC of Cfx. aurantiacus that the RC of the purple bacteria is observed. Further, our SANS measurements indicate that the chlorosome is a lipid body with rod-like shape, and that the self-assembly of bacteriochlorophylls, the major component of the chlorosome, is lipid-like. Finally, two populations of chlorosome particles are suggested in our SANS measurements.

  2. The genetic basis of anoxygenic photosynthetic arsenite oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hernandez-Maldonado, Jamie; Sanchez-Sedillo, Benjamin; Stoneburner, Brendon; Boren, Alison; Miller, Laurence G.; McCann, Shelley; Rosen, Michael R.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2017-01-01

    “Photoarsenotrophy”, the use of arsenite as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis, is thought to be an ancient form of phototrophy along with the photosynthetic oxidation of Fe(II), H2S, H2, and NO2-. Photoarsenotrophy was recently identified from Paoha Island's (Mono Lake, CA) arsenic-rich hot springs. The genomes of several photoarsenotrophs revealed a gene cluster, arxB2AB1CD, where arxA is predicted to encode for the sole arsenite oxidase. The role of arxA in photosynthetic arsenite oxidation was confirmed by disrupting the gene in a representative photoarsenotrophic bacterium, resulting in the loss of light-dependent arsenite oxidation. In situ evidence of active photoarsenotrophic microbes was supported by arxA mRNA detection for the first time, in red-pigmented microbial mats within the hot springs of Paoha Island. This work expands on the genetics for photosynthesis coupled to new electron donors and elaborates on known mechanisms for arsenic metabolism, thereby highlighting the complexities of arsenic biogeochemical cycling.

  3. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  4. Practical removal of radioactivity from sediment mud in a swimming pool in Fukushima, Japan by immobilized photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Ken; Morikawa, Hiroyo; Kishibe, Takashi; Mikami, Ayaka; Harada, Toshihiko; Ohta, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    About 90% of the radioactive Cs in the sediment mud of a school's swimming pool in Fukushima, Japan was removed by treatment for 3 d using the alginate immobilized photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobcater sphaeroides SSI. Even though batch treatment was carried out 3 times repeatedly, the activity of immobilized cells in removing Cs was maintained at levels of about 84% (second batch) and 78% (third batch). Cs was strongly attached to the sediment mud because, even with HNO(3) treatment at pH of 2.00-1.60 for 24 h, it was not eluted into the water. Furthermore, more than 75% of the Cs could be removed without solubilization with HNO(3). This suggests that the Cs attached to the sediment mud was transformed into immobilized cells via the Cs(+) ion by the negative charge of the immobilized cell surface and/or the potassium transport system of the photosynthetic bacterium.

  5. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    PubMed Central

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics. PMID:24240981

  6. Bioprospecting marine plankton.

    PubMed

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-11-14

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  7. The sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol is not required for photosynthetic electron transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides but enhances growth under phosphate limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. ); Beatty, J.T. ); Prince, R.C. )

    1993-02-15

    All photosynthetic organisms, with the exception of several species of photosynthetic bacteria, are thought to contain the sulfolipid 6-sulfo-[alpha]-D-quinovosyldiacylglycerol. The association of this lipid with photosynthetic membranes has led to the assumption that it plays some role in photosynthesis. Stable null mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides completely lacking sulfolipid were obtained by disruption of the sqdB gene. The ratios of the various components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as the electron transfer rates during cyclic electron transport, were not altered in the mutants, when grown under optimal conditions. Growth rates of wild type and mutants were identical under a variety of growth conditions, with the exception of phosphate limitation, which resulted in reduced growth of the mutants. Phosphate limitation of the wild type a used a significant reduction in the amount of all phospholipids and an increased amount of sulfolipid. By contrast, the sulfolipid-deficient mutant had reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but maintained a normal level of phosphatidylglycerol. In addition, two unidentified lipids lacking phosphorus accumulated in the membranes of both wild-type and mutant strains under phosphate limitation. We conclude that sulfolipid plays no significant unique role in photoheterotrophic growth or photosynthetic electron transport in R. sphaeroides but may function as a surrogate for phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylglycerol, under phosphate-limiting conditions. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. AMP metabolism in the marine bacterium Beneckea natriegens.

    PubMed

    Pickard, M A; Whelihan, J A; Knowles, C J

    1980-05-01

    The catabolism of AMP by preparations from Beneckea natriegens has been reexamined. In the absence of ATP, cell-free extracts catabolized AMP via adenosine to inosine. When ATP was present, adenylate kinase converted AMP to ADP, lowering the rate of AMP catabolism. Particle-free supernatants (225,000 x g) metabolized AMP alone slowly, but adenylate kinase was active when ATP was added. Washed particulate fractions contained AMP nucleotidase activity which converted AMP to adenosine; in the presence of ATP, adenosine formation was reduced by residual adenylate kinase associated with the particulate fraction. IMP was not detected as a metabolite in these experiments.

  9. Novel group of podovirus infecting the marine bacterium Alteromonas macleodii

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Heredia, Inmaculada; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Martin-Cuadrado, Ana-Belen

    2013-01-01

    Four novel, closely related podoviruses, which displayed lytic activity against the gamma-proteobacterium Alteromonas macleodii, have been isolated and sequenced. Alterophages AltAD45-P1 to P4 were obtained from water recovered near a fish farm in the Mediterranean Sea. Their morphology indicates that they belong to the Podoviridae. Their linear and dsDNA genomes are 100–104 kb in size, remarkably larger than any other described podovirus. The four AltAD45-phages share 99% nucleotide sequence identity over 97% of their ORFs, although an insertion was found in AltAD45-P1 and P2 and some regions were slightly more divergent. Despite the high overall sequence similarity among these four phages, the group with the insertion and the group without it, have different host ranges against the A. macleodii strains tested. The AltAD45-P1 to P4 phages have genes for DNA replication and transcription as well as structural genes, which are similar to the N4-like Podoviridae genus that is widespread in proteobacteria. However, in terms of their genomic structure, AltAD45-P1 to P4 differ from that of the N4-like phages. Some distinguishing features include the lack of a large virion encapsidated RNA polymerase gene, very well conserved among all the previously described N4-like phages, a single-stranded DNA binding protein and different tail protein genes. We conclude that the AltAD45 phages characterized in this study constitute a new genus within the Podoviridae. PMID:24228219

  10. The genome of the intracellular bacterium of the coastal bivalve, Solemya velum: a blueprint for thriving in and out of symbiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dmytrenko, Oleg; Russell, Shelbi L.; Loo, Wesley T.; Fontanez, Kristina M.; Liao, Li; Roeselers, Guus; Sharma, Raghav; Stewart, Frank J.; Newton, Irene LG; Woyke, Tanja; Wu, Dongying; Lang, Jenna; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Cavanaugh, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Symbioses between chemoautotrophic bacteria and marine invertebrates are rare examples of living systems that are virtually independent of photosynthetic primary production. These associations have evolved multiple times in marine habitats, such as deep-sea hydrothermal vents and reducing sediments, characterized by steep gradients of oxygen and reduced chemicals. Due to difficulties associated with maintaining these symbioses in the laboratory and culturing the symbiotic bacteria, studies of chemosynthetic symbioses rely heavily on culture independent methods. The symbiosis between the coastal bivalve, Solemya velum, and its intracellular symbiont is a model for chemosynthetic symbioses given its accessibility in intertidal environments and the ability to maintain it under laboratory conditions. To better understand this symbiosis, the genome of the S. velum endosymbiont was sequenced. Results: Relative to the genomes of obligate symbiotic bacteria, which commonly undergo erosion and reduction, the S. velum symbiont genome was large (2.86 Mb), GC-rich (50.4percent), and contained a large number (78) of mobile genetic elements. Comparative genomics identified sets of genes specific to the chemosynthetic lifestyle and necessary to sustain the symbiosis. In addition, a number of inferred metabolic pathways and cellular processes, including heterotrophy, branched electron transport, and motility, suggested that besides the ability to function as an endosymbiont, the bacterium may have the capacity to live outside the host. Conclusions: The physiological dexterity indicated by the genome substantially improves our understanding of the genetic and metabolic capabilities of the S. velum symbiont and the breadth of niches the partners may inhabit during their lifecycle

  11. Isolation, characterization, and primary structure of rubredoxin from the photosynthetic bacterium, Heliobacillus mobilis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. Y.; Brune, D. C.; LoBrutto, R.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    Rubredoxin is a small nonheme iron protein that serves as an electron carrier in bacterial systems. Rubredoxin has now been isolated and characterized from the strictly anaerobic phototroph, Heliobacillus mobilis. THe molecular mass (5671.3 Da from the amino acid sequence) was confirmed and partial formylation of the N-terminal methionyl residue was established by matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectroscopy. The complete 52-amino-acid sequence was determined by a combination of N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation and C-terminal sequencing by a novel method using carboxypeptidase treatment in conjunction with amino acid analysis and laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry. The molar absorption coefficient of Hc. mobilis rubredoxin at 490 nm is 6.9 mM-1 cm-1 and the midpoint redox potential at pH 8.0 is -46 mV. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized form shows resonances at g = 9.66 and 4.30 due to a high-spin ferric iron. The amino acid sequence is homologous to those of rubredoxins from other species, in particular, the gram-positive bacteria, and the phototrophic green sulfur bacteria, and the evolutionary implications of this are discussed.

  12. Light-driven carbon dioxide reduction to methane by nitrogenase in a photosynthetic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Fixen, Kathryn R.; Zheng, Yanning; Harris, Derek F.; Shaw, Sudipta; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dean, Dennis R.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogenase is an ATP-requiring enzyme capable of carrying out multielectron reductions of inert molecules. A purified remodeled nitrogenase containing two amino acid substitutions near the site of its FeMo cofactor was recently described as having the capacity to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) to methane (CH4). Here, we developed the anoxygenic phototroph, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, as a biocatalyst capable of light-driven CO2 reduction to CH4 in vivo using this remodeled nitrogenase. Conversion of CO2 to CH4 by R. palustris required constitutive expression of nitrogenase, which was achieved by using a variant of the transcription factor NifA that is able to activate expression of nitrogenase under all growth conditions. Also, light was required for generation of ATP by cyclic photophosphorylation. CH4 production by R. palustris could be controlled by manipulating the distribution of electrons and energy available to nitrogenase. This work shows the feasibility of using microbes to generate hydrocarbons from CO2 in one enzymatic step using light energy. PMID:27551090

  13. Coordinated, long-range, solid substrate movement of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Shelswell, Kristopher John; Beatty, J Thomas

    2011-05-04

    The long-range movement of Rhodobacter capsulatus cells in the glass-agar interstitial region of borosilicate Petri plates was found to be due to a subset of the cells inoculated into plates. The macroscopic appearance of plates indicated that a small group of cells moved in a coordinated manner to form a visible satellite cluster of cells. Satellite clusters were initially separated from the point of inoculation by the absence of visible cell density, but after 20 to 24 hours this space was colonized by cells apparently shed from a group of cells moving away from the point of inoculation. Cell movements consisted of flagellum-independent and flagellum-dependent motility contributions. Flagellum-independent movement occurred at an early stage, such that satellite clusters formed after 12 to 24 hours. Subsequently, after 24 to 32 hours, a flagellum-dependent dispersal of cells became visible, extending laterally outward from a line of flagellum-independent motility. These modes of taxis were found in several environmental isolates and in a variety of mutants, including a strain deficient in the production of the R. capsulatus acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing signal. Although there was great variability in the direction of movement in illuminated plates, cells were predisposed to move toward broad spectrum white light. This predisposition was increased by the use of square plates, and a statistical analysis indicated that R. capsulatus is capable of genuine phototaxis. Therefore, the variability in the direction of cell movement was attributed to optical effects on light waves passing through the plate material and agar medium.

  14. Cloning and characterization of monofunctional catalase from photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum S1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Heon; Oh, Duck-Chul; Oh, You-Sung; Malinverni, Juliana C; Kukor, Jerome J; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel

    2007-09-01

    In this study, an approx. 2.5-kb gene fragment including the catalase gene from Rhodospirillum rubrum S1 was cloned and characterized. The determination of the complete nucleotide sequence revealed that the cloned DNA fragment was organized into three open reading frames, designated as ORF1, catalase, and ORF3 in that order. The catalase gene consisted of 1,455 nucleotides and 484 amino acids, including the initiation and stop codons, and was located 326 bp upstream in the opposite direction of ORF1. The catalase was overproduced in Escherichia coli UM255, a catalase-deficient mutant, and then purified for the biochemical characterization of the enzyme. The purified catalase had an estimated molecular mass of 189 kDa, consisting of four identical subunits of 61 kDa. The enzyme exhibited activity over a broad pH range from pH 5.0 to pH 11.0 and temperature range from 20 degrees C to 60 degrees C. The catalase activity was inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, cyanide, azide, and hydroxylamine. The enzyme's K(m) value and V(max) of the catalase for H2O2 were 21.8 mM and 39,960 U/mg, respectively. Spectrophotometric analysis revealed that the ratio of A406 to A280 for the catalase was 0.97, indicating the presence of a ferric component. The absorption spectrum of catalase-4 exhibited a Soret band at 406 nm, which is typical of a heme-containing catalase. Treatment of the enzyme with dithionite did not alter the spectral shape and revealed no peroxidase activity. The combined results of the gene sequence and biochemical characterization proved that the catalase cloned from strain S1in this study was a typical monofunctional catalase, which differed from the other types of catalases found in strain S1.

  15. Isolation, characterization, and primary structure of rubredoxin from the photosynthetic bacterium, Heliobacillus mobilis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. Y.; Brune, D. C.; LoBrutto, R.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    Rubredoxin is a small nonheme iron protein that serves as an electron carrier in bacterial systems. Rubredoxin has now been isolated and characterized from the strictly anaerobic phototroph, Heliobacillus mobilis. THe molecular mass (5671.3 Da from the amino acid sequence) was confirmed and partial formylation of the N-terminal methionyl residue was established by matrix-assisted laser desorption mass spectroscopy. The complete 52-amino-acid sequence was determined by a combination of N-terminal sequencing by Edman degradation and C-terminal sequencing by a novel method using carboxypeptidase treatment in conjunction with amino acid analysis and laser desorption time of flight mass spectrometry. The molar absorption coefficient of Hc. mobilis rubredoxin at 490 nm is 6.9 mM-1 cm-1 and the midpoint redox potential at pH 8.0 is -46 mV. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized form shows resonances at g = 9.66 and 4.30 due to a high-spin ferric iron. The amino acid sequence is homologous to those of rubredoxins from other species, in particular, the gram-positive bacteria, and the phototrophic green sulfur bacteria, and the evolutionary implications of this are discussed.

  16. Origin of mitochondria by intracellular enslavement of a photosynthetic purple bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2006-08-07

    Mitochondria originated by permanent enslavement of purple non-sulphur bacteria. These endosymbionts became organelles through the origin of complex protein-import machinery and insertion into their inner membranes of protein carriers for extracting energy for the host. A chicken-and-egg problem exists: selective advantages for evolving import machinery were absent until inner membrane carriers were present, but this very machinery is now required for carrier insertion. I argue here that this problem was probably circumvented by conversion of the symbiont protein-export machinery into protein-import machinery, in three phases. I suggest that the first carrier entered the periplasmic space via pre-existing beta-barrel proteins in the bacterial outer membrane that later became Tom40, and inserted into the inner membrane probably helped by a pre-existing inner membrane protein, thereby immediately providing the protoeukaryote host with photosynthesate. This would have created a powerful selective advantage for evolving more efficient carrier import by inserting Tom70 receptors. Massive gene transfer to the nucleus inevitably occurred by mutation pressure. Finally, pressure from harmful, non-selected gene transfer to the nucleus probably caused evolution of the presequence mechanism, and photosynthesis was lost.

  17. Origin of mitochondria by intracellular enslavement of a photosynthetic purple bacterium