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Sample records for marine phytoplankton final

  1. Identifying Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargraves, Paul E.

    Until recently, anyone who needed to accurately identify marine phytoplankton had one of four choices: use the outdated Englishlanguage volumes by E. E. Cupp and N. I. Hendey plus the more recent book by J. Dodge, acquire a working knowledge of German and use the old volumes by Schiller and Hustedt, spend huge amounts of time in an exceedingly well-equipped marine science library trying in vain to keep up with the rapidly evolving field of phytoplankton systematics and taxonomy, or track down one of the rarest of endangered species—a phytoplankton taxonomist—and beg for help.To these unfortunate choices is added one considerably more hopeful: Identifying Marine Phytoplankton. This volume, which has seven contributing authors, contains most of the taxonomic groups that make up the planktonic autotrophs and some heterotrophs of the seas, coasts, and estuaries of the world (missing are cyanobacteria and some of the picoplankton groups).

  2. Why marine phytoplankton calcify.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Fanny M; Bach, Lennart T; Brownlee, Colin; Bown, Paul; Rickaby, Rosalind E M; Poulton, Alex J; Tyrrell, Toby; Beaufort, Luc; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Gibbs, Samantha; Gutowska, Magdalena A; Lee, Renee; Riebesell, Ulf; Young, Jeremy; Ridgwell, Andy

    2016-07-01

    Calcifying marine phytoplankton-coccolithophores- are some of the most successful yet enigmatic organisms in the ocean and are at risk from global change. To better understand how they will be affected, we need to know "why" coccolithophores calcify. We review coccolithophorid evolutionary history and cell biology as well as insights from recent experiments to provide a critical assessment of the costs and benefits of calcification. We conclude that calcification has high energy demands and that coccolithophores might have calcified initially to reduce grazing pressure but that additional benefits such as protection from photodamage and viral/bacterial attack further explain their high diversity and broad spectrum ecology. The cost-benefit aspect of these traits is illustrated by novel ecosystem modeling, although conclusive observations remain limited. In the future ocean, the trade-off between changing ecological and physiological costs of calcification and their benefits will ultimately decide how this important group is affected by ocean acidification and global warming.

  3. Experimental evolution meets marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Thorsten B H; Boyd, Philip W

    2013-07-01

    Our perspective highlights potentially important links between disparate fields-biological oceanography, climate change research, and experimental evolutionary biology. We focus on one important functional group-photoautotrophic microbes (phytoplankton), which are responsible for ∼50% of global primary productivity. Global climate change currently results in the simultaneous change of several conditions such as warming, acidification, and nutrient supply. It thus has the potential to dramatically change phytoplankton physiology, community composition, and may result in adaptive evolution. Although their large population sizes, standing genetic variation, and rapid turnover time should promote swift evolutionary change, oceanographers have focussed on describing patterns of present day physiological differentiation rather than measure potential adaptation in evolution experiments, the only direct way to address whether and at which rate phytoplankton species will adapt to environmental change. Important open questions are (1) is adaptation limited by existing genetic variation or fundamental constraints? (2) Will complex ecological settings such as gradual versus abrupt environmental change influence adaptation processes? (3) How will increasing environmental variability affect the evolution of phenotypic plasticity patterns? Because marine phytoplankton species display rapid acclimation capacity (phenotypic buffering), a systematic study of reaction norms renders them particularly interesting to the evolutionary biology research community.

  4. Why marine phytoplankton calcify

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Fanny M.; Bach, Lennart T.; Brownlee, Colin; Bown, Paul; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.; Poulton, Alex J.; Tyrrell, Toby; Beaufort, Luc; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Gibbs, Samantha; Gutowska, Magdalena A.; Lee, Renee; Riebesell, Ulf; Young, Jeremy; Ridgwell, Andy

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying marine phytoplankton—coccolithophores— are some of the most successful yet enigmatic organisms in the ocean and are at risk from global change. To better understand how they will be affected, we need to know “why” coccolithophores calcify. We review coccolithophorid evolutionary history and cell biology as well as insights from recent experiments to provide a critical assessment of the costs and benefits of calcification. We conclude that calcification has high energy demands and that coccolithophores might have calcified initially to reduce grazing pressure but that additional benefits such as protection from photodamage and viral/bacterial attack further explain their high diversity and broad spectrum ecology. The cost-benefit aspect of these traits is illustrated by novel ecosystem modeling, although conclusive observations remain limited. In the future ocean, the trade-off between changing ecological and physiological costs of calcification and their benefits will ultimately decide how this important group is affected by ocean acidification and global warming. PMID:27453937

  5. Phosphorus physiological ecology and molecular mechanisms in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Lin, Senjie; Litaker, Richard Wayne; Sunda, William G

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for marine phytoplankton and indeed all life forms. Current data show that P availability is growth-limiting in certain marine systems and can impact algal species composition. Available P occurs in marine waters as dissolved inorganic phosphate (primarily orthophosphate [Pi]) or as a myriad of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) compounds. Despite numerous studies on P physiology and ecology and increasing research on genomics in marine phytoplankton, there have been few attempts to synthesize information from these different disciplines. This paper is aimed to integrate the physiological and molecular information on the acquisition, utilization, and storage of P in marine phytoplankton and the strategies used by these organisms to acclimate and adapt to variations in P availability. Where applicable, we attempt to identify gaps in our current knowledge that warrant further research and examine possible metabolic pathways that might occur in phytoplankton from well-studied bacterial models. Physical and chemical limitations governing cellular P uptake are explored along with physiological and molecular mechanisms to adapt and acclimate to temporally and spatially varying P nutrient regimes. Topics covered include cellular Pi uptake and feedback regulation of uptake systems, enzymatic utilization of DOP, P acquisition by phagotrophy, P-limitation of phytoplankton growth in oceanic and coastal waters, and the role of P-limitation in regulating cell size and toxin levels in phytoplankton. Finally, we examine the role of P and other nutrients in the transition of phytoplankton communities from early succession species (diatoms) to late succession ones (e.g., dinoflagellates and haptophytes).

  6. Production of isoprene by marine phytoplankton cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.M.; Oram, D.E.; Penkett, S.A.

    1994-11-15

    The authors report experiments which demonstrate the production of light volatile hydrocarbons, including isoprene, by different marine phytoplankton cultures. This indicates that the ocean is a potential source of natural releases of isoprene to the atmosphere. Laboratory results do not allow extrapolation to atmospheric release rates.

  7. The dynamical landscape of marine phytoplankton diversity

    PubMed Central

    Lévy, Marina; Jahn, Oliver; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Follows, Michael J.; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Observations suggest that the landscape of marine phytoplankton assemblage might be strongly heterogeneous at the dynamical mesoscale and submesoscale (10–100 km, days to months), with potential consequences in terms of global diversity and carbon export. But these variations are not well documented as synoptic taxonomic data are difficult to acquire. Here, we examine how phytoplankton assemblage and diversity vary between mesoscale eddies and submesoscale fronts. We use a multi-phytoplankton numerical model embedded in a mesoscale flow representative of the North Atlantic. Our model results suggest that the mesoscale flow dynamically distorts the niches predefined by environmental contrasts at the basin scale and that the phytoplankton diversity landscape varies over temporal and spatial scales that are one order of magnitude smaller than those of the basin-scale environmental conditions. We find that any assemblage and any level of diversity can occur in eddies and fronts. However, on a statistical level, the results suggest a tendency for larger diversity and more fast-growing types at fronts, where nutrient supplies are larger and where populations of adjacent water masses are constantly brought into contact; and lower diversity in the core of eddies, where water masses are kept isolated long enough to enable competitive exclusion. PMID:26400196

  8. The dynamical landscape of marine phytoplankton diversity.

    PubMed

    Lévy, Marina; Jahn, Oliver; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Follows, Michael J; d'Ovidio, Francesco

    2015-10-06

    Observations suggest that the landscape of marine phytoplankton assemblage might be strongly heterogeneous at the dynamical mesoscale and submesoscale (10-100 km, days to months), with potential consequences in terms of global diversity and carbon export. But these variations are not well documented as synoptic taxonomic data are difficult to acquire. Here, we examine how phytoplankton assemblage and diversity vary between mesoscale eddies and submesoscale fronts. We use a multi-phytoplankton numerical model embedded in a mesoscale flow representative of the North Atlantic. Our model results suggest that the mesoscale flow dynamically distorts the niches predefined by environmental contrasts at the basin scale and that the phytoplankton diversity landscape varies over temporal and spatial scales that are one order of magnitude smaller than those of the basin-scale environmental conditions. We find that any assemblage and any level of diversity can occur in eddies and fronts. However, on a statistical level, the results suggest a tendency for larger diversity and more fast-growing types at fronts, where nutrient supplies are larger and where populations of adjacent water masses are constantly brought into contact; and lower diversity in the core of eddies, where water masses are kept isolated long enough to enable competitive exclusion.

  9. Infection of phytoplankton by aerosolized marine viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sharoni, Shlomit; Trainic, Miri; Schatz, Daniella; Lehahn, Yoav; Flores, Michel J.; Bidle, Kay D.; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Rudich, Yinon; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Marine viruses constitute a major ecological and evolutionary driving force in the marine ecosystems. However, their dispersal mechanisms remain underexplored. Here we follow the dynamics of Emiliania huxleyi viruses (EhV) that infect the ubiquitous, bloom-forming phytoplankton E. huxleyi and show that EhV are emitted to the atmosphere as primary marine aerosols. Using a laboratory-based setup, we showed that the dynamic of EhV aerial emission is strongly coupled to the host–virus dynamic in the culture media. In addition, we recovered EhV DNA from atmospheric samples collected over an E. huxleyi bloom in the North Atlantic, providing evidence for aerosolization of marine viruses in their natural environment. Decay rate analysis in the laboratory revealed that aerosolized viruses can remain infective under meteorological conditions prevailing during E. huxleyi blooms in the ocean, allowing potential dispersal and infectivity over hundreds of kilometers. Based on the combined laboratory and in situ findings, we propose that atmospheric transport of EhV is an effective transmission mechanism for spreading viral infection over large areas in the ocean. This transmission mechanism may also have an important ecological impact on the large-scale host–virus “arms race” during bloom succession and consequently the turnover of carbon in the ocean. PMID:25964340

  10. Infection of phytoplankton by aerosolized marine viruses.

    PubMed

    Sharoni, Shlomit; Trainic, Miri; Schatz, Daniella; Lehahn, Yoav; Flores, Michel J; Bidle, Kay D; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Rudich, Yinon; Koren, Ilan; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-05-26

    Marine viruses constitute a major ecological and evolutionary driving force in the marine ecosystems. However, their dispersal mechanisms remain underexplored. Here we follow the dynamics of Emiliania huxleyi viruses (EhV) that infect the ubiquitous, bloom-forming phytoplankton E. huxleyi and show that EhV are emitted to the atmosphere as primary marine aerosols. Using a laboratory-based setup, we showed that the dynamic of EhV aerial emission is strongly coupled to the host-virus dynamic in the culture media. In addition, we recovered EhV DNA from atmospheric samples collected over an E. huxleyi bloom in the North Atlantic, providing evidence for aerosolization of marine viruses in their natural environment. Decay rate analysis in the laboratory revealed that aerosolized viruses can remain infective under meteorological conditions prevailing during E. huxleyi blooms in the ocean, allowing potential dispersal and infectivity over hundreds of kilometers. Based on the combined laboratory and in situ findings, we propose that atmospheric transport of EhV is an effective transmission mechanism for spreading viral infection over large areas in the ocean. This transmission mechanism may also have an important ecological impact on the large-scale host-virus "arms race" during bloom succession and consequently the turnover of carbon in the ocean.

  11. Global biodiversity patterns of marine phytoplankton and zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Irigoien, Xabier; Huisman, Jef; Harris, Roger P

    2004-06-24

    Although the oceans cover 70% of the Earth's surface, our knowledge of biodiversity patterns in marine phytoplankton and zooplankton is very limited compared to that of the biodiversity of plants and herbivores in the terrestrial world. Here, we present biodiversity data for marine plankton assemblages from different areas of the world ocean. Similar to terrestrial vegetation, marine phytoplankton diversity is a unimodal function of phytoplankton biomass, with maximum diversity at intermediate levels of phytoplankton biomass and minimum diversity during massive blooms. Contrary to expectation, we did not find a relation between phytoplankton diversity and zooplankton diversity. Zooplankton diversity is a unimodal function of zooplankton biomass. Most strikingly, these marine biodiversity patterns show a worldwide consistency, despite obvious differences in environmental conditions of the various oceanographic regions. These findings may serve as a new benchmark in the search for global biodiversity patterns of plants and herbivores.

  12. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Paytan, Adina; Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chen, Ying; Lima, Ivan D.; Doney, Scott C.; Mahowald, Natalie; Labiosa, Rochelle; Post, Anton F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus. We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere–ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia. PMID:19273845

  13. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paytan, A.; Mackey, K.R.M.; Chen, Y.; Lima, I.D.; Doney, S.C.; Mahowald, N.; Labiosa, R.; Post, A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosol deposition is an important source of nutrients and trace metals to the open ocean that can enhance ocean productivity and carbon sequestration and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and climate. Using aerosol samples from different back trajectories in incubation experiments with natural communities, we demonstrate that the response of phytoplankton growth to aerosol additions depends on specific components in aerosols and differs across phytoplankton species. Aerosol additions enhanced growth by releasing nitrogen and phosphorus, but not all aerosols stimulated growth. Toxic effects were observed with some aerosols, where the toxicity affected picoeukaryotes and Synechococcus but not Prochlorococcus.We suggest that the toxicity could be due to high copper concentrations in these aerosols and support this by laboratory copper toxicity tests preformed with Synechococcus cultures. However, it is possible that other elements present in the aerosols or unknown synergistic effects between these elements could have also contributed to the toxic effect. Anthropogenic emissions are increasing atmospheric copper deposition sharply, and based on coupled atmosphere-ocean calculations, we show that this deposition can potentially alter patterns of marine primary production and community structure in high aerosol, low chlorophyll areas, particularly in the Bay of Bengal and downwind of South and East Asia.

  14. A prospective study of marine phytoplankton and reported ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    BACKGROUND: Blooms of marine phytoplankton may adversely affect human health. The potential public health impact of low-level exposures is not well established, and few prospective cohort studies of recreational exposures to marine phytoplankton have been conducted.OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the association between phytoplankton cell counts and subsequent illness among recreational beachgoers.METHODS:We recruited beachgoers at Boquer6n Beach, Puerto Rico, during the summer of 2009. We conducted interviews at three time points to assess baseline health, water activities, and subsequent illness. Daily water samples were quantitatively assayed for phytoplankton cell count. Logistic regression models, adjusted for age and sex, were used to assess the association between exposure to three categories of phytoplankton concentration and subsequent illness.RESULTS: During 26 study days, 15,726 individuals successfully completed all three interviews. Daily total phytoplankton cell counts ranged from 346 to 2,012 cells/ml (median, 712 cells/ml). The category with the highest (≥75th percentile) total phytoplankton cell count was associated with eye irritation [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (Cl): 1.01, 1.66], rash (OR = 1.27; 95% Cl: 1.02, 1.57), and earache (OR = 1.25; 95% Cl: 0.88, 1.77). In phytoplankton group-specific analyses, the category with the highest Cyanobacteria counts was associated with respiratory illness (OR = 1.37; 95% Cl: 1.12, 1

  15. Evolutionary potential of marine phytoplankton under ocean acidification

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sinéad; Rost, Björn; Rynearson, Tatiana A

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton have many obvious characters, such as rapid cell division rates and large population sizes, that give them the capacity to evolve in response to global change on timescales of weeks, months or decades. However, few studies directly investigate if this adaptive potential is likely to be realized. Because of this, evidence of to whether and how marine phytoplankton may evolve in response to global change is sparse. Here, we review studies that help predict evolutionary responses to global change in marine phytoplankton. We find limited support from experimental evolution that some taxa of marine phytoplankton may adapt to ocean acidification, and strong indications from studies of variation and structure in natural populations that selection on standing genetic variation is likely. Furthermore, we highlight the large body of literature on plastic responses to ocean acidification available, and evolutionary theory that may be used to link plastic and evolutionary responses. Because of the taxonomic breadth spanned by marine phytoplankton, and the diversity of roles they fill in ocean ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, we stress the necessity of treating taxa or functional groups individually. PMID:24454553

  16. Marine biogeochemistry: Phytoplankton in a witch's brew

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenfeld, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Natural seafloor hydrocarbon seeps are responsible for roughly half of the oil released into the ocean. As these oils and gases rise to the surface, they transport nutrients upwards, benefiting phytoplankton in the upper sunlit layer.

  17. A global pattern of thermal adaptation in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mridul K; Kremer, Colin T; Klausmeier, Christopher A; Litchman, Elena

    2012-11-23

    Rising ocean temperatures will alter the productivity and composition of marine phytoplankton communities, thereby affecting global biogeochemical cycles. Predicting the effects of future ocean warming on biogeochemical cycles depends critically on understanding how existing global temperature variation affects phytoplankton. Here we show that variation in phytoplankton temperature optima over 150 degrees of latitude is well explained by a gradient in mean ocean temperature. An eco-evolutionary model predicts a similar relationship, suggesting that this pattern is the result of evolutionary adaptation. Using mechanistic species distribution models, we find that rising temperatures this century will cause poleward shifts in species' thermal niches and a sharp decline in tropical phytoplankton diversity in the absence of an evolutionary response.

  18. Methanol Production by a Broad Phylogenetic Array of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Mincer, Tracy J.; Aicher, Athena C.

    2016-01-01

    Methanol is a major volatile organic compound on Earth and serves as an important carbon and energy substrate for abundant methylotrophic microbes. Previous geochemical surveys coupled with predictive models suggest that the marine contributions are exceedingly large, rivaling terrestrial sources. Although well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, methanol sources are poorly understood in the marine environment and warrant further investigation. To this end, we adapted a Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) method which allowed reliable measurements of methanol in seawater and marine phytoplankton cultures with a method detection limit of 120 nanomolar. All phytoplankton tested (cyanobacteria: Synechococcus spp. 8102 and 8103, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Prochlorococcus marinus), and Eukarya (heterokont diatom: Phaeodactylum tricornutum, coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi, cryptophyte: Rhodomonas salina, and non-diatom heterokont: Nannochloropsis oculata) produced methanol, ranging from 0.8–13.7 micromolar in culture and methanol per total cellular carbon were measured in the ranges of 0.09–0.3%. Phytoplankton culture time-course measurements displayed a punctuated production pattern with maxima near early stationary phase. Stabile isotope labeled bicarbonate incorporation experiments confirmed that methanol was produced from phytoplankton biomass. Overall, our findings suggest that phytoplankton are a major source of methanol in the upper water column of the world’s oceans. PMID:26963515

  19. Methanol Production by a Broad Phylogenetic Array of Marine Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Mincer, Tracy J; Aicher, Athena C

    2016-01-01

    Methanol is a major volatile organic compound on Earth and serves as an important carbon and energy substrate for abundant methylotrophic microbes. Previous geochemical surveys coupled with predictive models suggest that the marine contributions are exceedingly large, rivaling terrestrial sources. Although well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, methanol sources are poorly understood in the marine environment and warrant further investigation. To this end, we adapted a Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) method which allowed reliable measurements of methanol in seawater and marine phytoplankton cultures with a method detection limit of 120 nanomolar. All phytoplankton tested (cyanobacteria: Synechococcus spp. 8102 and 8103, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Prochlorococcus marinus), and Eukarya (heterokont diatom: Phaeodactylum tricornutum, coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi, cryptophyte: Rhodomonas salina, and non-diatom heterokont: Nannochloropsis oculata) produced methanol, ranging from 0.8-13.7 micromolar in culture and methanol per total cellular carbon were measured in the ranges of 0.09-0.3%. Phytoplankton culture time-course measurements displayed a punctuated production pattern with maxima near early stationary phase. Stabile isotope labeled bicarbonate incorporation experiments confirmed that methanol was produced from phytoplankton biomass. Overall, our findings suggest that phytoplankton are a major source of methanol in the upper water column of the world's oceans.

  20. The Molecular Ecophysiology of Programmed Cell Death in Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidle, Kay D.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  1. The molecular ecophysiology of programmed cell death in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  2. Effects of phytoplankton cell size and chloride concentration on the bioaccumulation of methylmercury in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunji; Van Duong, Hieu; Kim, Eunhee; Lee, Byeong-Gweon; Han, Seunghee

    2014-08-01

    In the current study, the effects of phytoplankton cell size and methylmercury (MeHg) speciation on the bioaccumulation of MeHg by marine phytoplankton were investigated. Volume concentration factors (VCFs) of MeHg were determined in relation to the surface area to volume ratio of the cells for four species of diatom and a cyanobacteria species cultured in unenriched seawater. The VCFs of MeHg, ranging from 7.3 × 10(4) to 1.6 × 10(6) , increased linearly as the cell surface area-to-volume ratio increased. It suggests that pico- and nano-dominated phytoplankton communities may lead to larger MeHg accumulation than the one dominated by microphytoplankton. MeHg VCFs increased with increasing chloride concentration from 0.47 to 470 mM, indicating that MeHg bioaccumulation is enhanced under conditions that facilitate membrane permeability by the formation of neutral MeHgCl species. Overall results suggest that the size distributions of the planktonic community as well as the seawater chemistry affect MeHg bioaccumulation by marine phytoplankton.

  3. What Regulates Spatial Gradients in Marine Phytoplankton Diversity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, A. D.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Bragg, J.

    2008-12-01

    A global, three-dimensional self-assembling model of marine phytoplankton communities, initialized with many tens of plausible physiologies, shows a pronounced equator-to-pole decrease in the diversity of phytoplankton species. This pattern is common among many marine taxa. Regions of enhanced phytoplankton diversity also occur in association with areas of energetic flow including western boundary currents. In the three-dimensional model, the most abundant phytoplankton types in the stable, warm waters tend to have similar, low R* values, which indicate a strong ability to compete for scarce nutrients. We use a highly idealized, zero-dimensional model to interpret and illustrate mechanisms causing the broad meridional diversity gradient in terms of the variability of the environment. We demonstrate that in stable, oligotrophic conditions there are very long exclusion timescales (hundreds to thousands of years) for organisms with similar and low R* values if temporal variability in resource supply is either long (inter-annual or longer) or short (comparable to the growth period or shorter). High amplitude variability in resource supply, with seasonal timescales, leads to rapid competitive exclusion.

  4. The evolutionary inheritance of elemental stoichiometry in marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigg, Antonietta; Finkel, Zoe V.; Irwin, Andrew J.; Rosenthal, Yair; Ho, Tung-Yuan; Reinfelder, John R.; Schofield, Oscar; Morel, Francois M. M.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2003-09-01

    Phytoplankton is a nineteenth century ecological construct for a biologically diverse group of pelagic photoautotrophs that share common metabolic functions but not evolutionary histories. In contrast to terrestrial plants, a major schism occurred in the evolution of the eukaryotic phytoplankton that gave rise to two major plastid superfamilies. The green superfamily appropriated chlorophyll b, whereas the red superfamily uses chlorophyll c as an accessory photosynthetic pigment. Fossil evidence suggests that the green superfamily dominated Palaeozoic oceans. However, after the end-Permian extinction, members of the red superfamily rose to ecological prominence. The processes responsible for this shift are obscure. Here we present an analysis of major nutrients and trace elements in 15 species of marine phytoplankton from the two superfamilies. Our results indicate that there are systematic phylogenetic differences in the two plastid types where macronutrient (carbon:nitrogen:phosphorus) stoichiometries primarily reflect ancestral pre-symbiotic host cell phenotypes, but trace element composition reflects differences in the acquired plastids. The compositional differences between the two plastid superfamilies suggest that changes in ocean redox state strongly influenced the evolution and selection of eukaryotic phytoplankton since the Proterozoic era.

  5. Light utilization and photoinhibition of photosynthesis in marine phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G., Greene, R., Kolber, Z.

    1993-12-31

    Introduction to Phytoplankton. Based on the record of the oldest identifiable fossils, the first oxygenic photosynthetic organisms appeared about 2 {times} l0{sup 9} years ago in the form of marine single celled, planktonic procaryotes (Riding, 1992; Sarmiento and Bender, 1993). In the intervening eons, phytoplankton have evolved and diversified; presently they represent at least 11 classes of procaryotic and euacaryotic photoautotrophs. While the carbon of these organisms cumulatively amounts to only 1 to 2% of the global plant biomass, they fix between 35 and 50 gigatonnes ({times} 10{sup 9} metric tons) of carbon annually, about 40% of the global total (Falkowski and Woodhead, 1992). On average, each gram of phytoplankton chlorophyll converts about 6% of the photosynthetically active radiation (440 to 700 nm) incident on the sea surface to photochemical energy (Morel, 1978). Despite a great deal of variability in ocean environments, this photosynthetic conversion efficiency is relatively constant for integrated water column production (Morel, 1978; Falkowski, 1981; Platt, 1986; Morel, 1991). Here we review the factors determining light utilization efficiency of phytoplankton in the oceans, and the physiological acclimations which have evolved to optimize light utilization efficiency.

  6. Cellular partitioning of nanoparticulate versus dissolved metals in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Lenihan, Hunter S; Miller, Robert J

    2014-11-18

    Discharges of metal oxide nanoparticles into aquatic environments are increasing with their use in society, thereby increasing exposure risk for aquatic organisms. Separating the impacts of nanoparticle from dissolved metal pollution is critical for assessing the environmental risks of the rapidly growing nanomaterial industry, especially in terms of ecosystem effects. Metal oxides negatively affect several species of marine phytoplankton, which are responsible for most marine primary production. Whether such toxicity is generally due to nanoparticles or exposure to dissolved metals liberated from particles is uncertain. The type and severity of toxicity depends in part on whether phytoplankton cells take up and accumulate primarily nanoparticles or dissolved metal ions. We compared the responses of the marine diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii, exposed to ZnO, AgO, and CuO nanoparticles with the responses of T. weissflogii cells exposed to the dissolved metals ZnCl2, AgNO3, and CuCl2 for 7 d. Cellular metal accumulation, metal distribution, and algal population growth were measured to elucidate differences in exposure to the different forms of metal. Concentration-dependent metal accumulation and reduced population growth were observed in T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides, as well as dissolved metals. Significant effects on population growth were observed at the lowest concentrations tested for all metals, with similar toxicity for both dissolved and nanoparticulate metals. Cellular metal distribution, however, markedly differed between T. weissflogii exposed to nanometal oxides versus those exposed to dissolved metals. Metal concentrations were highest in the algal cell wall when cells were exposed to metal oxide nanoparticles, whereas algae exposed to dissolved metals had higher proportions of metal in the organelle and endoplasmic reticulum fractions. These results have implications for marine plankton communities as well as higher trophic levels, since

  7. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  8. Differential Growth Responses of Marine Phytoplankton to Herbicide Glyphosate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Lin, Xin; Li, Ling; Lin, Senjie

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a globally popular herbicide to kill weeds and its wide applications may lead to accumulation in coastal oceans as a source of phosphorus (P) nutrient or growth inhibitor of phytoplankton. We studied the physiological effects of glyphosate on fourteen species representing five major coastal phytoplankton phyla (haptophyta, bacillariophyta, dinoflagellata, raphidophyta, and chlorophyta). Based on growth responses to different concentrations of glyphosate under contrasting dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) conditions, we found that phytoplankton species could be classified into five groups. Group I (Emiliania huxleyi, Skeletonema costatum, Phaeodactylum tricornutum) could utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth in axenic culture, but in the presence of DIP, they were inhibited by both 36-μM and 360-μM glyphosate. Group II (Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum minimum, Dunaliella tertiolecta, Symbiodinium sp., Heterosigma akashiwo and Alexandrium catenella) could not utilize glyphosate as sole P-source to support growth, and in the presence of DIP growth was not affected by 36-μM but inhibited by 360-μM glyphosate. Glyphosate consistently enhanced growth of Group III (Isochrysis galbana) and inhibited Group IV (Thalassiosira weissflogii, Thalassiosira pseudonana and Chattonella marina) regardless of DIP condition. Group V (Amphidinium carterae) exhibited no measurable response to glyphosate regardless of DIP condition. This grouping is not congruent with the phylogenetic relationships of the phytoplankton species suggesting functional differentiation driven by environmental pressure. We conclude that glyphosate could be used as P-source by some species while is toxic to some other species and yet has no effects on others. The observed differential effects suggest that the continued use of glyphosate and increasing concentration of this herbicide in the coastal waters will likely exert significant impact on coastal marine phytoplankton

  9. A prospective study of marine phytoplankton and reported illness among recreational beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Blooms of marine phytoplankton may adversely affect human health. The potential public health impact of low-level exposures is not well established, and few prospective cohort studies of recreational exposures to marine phytoplankton have been conducted.OBJECTIVE: We ...

  10. Paleolatitudinal Gradients in Marine Phytoplankton Composition and Cell Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderiks, J.; Bordiga, M.; Bartol, M.; Šupraha, L.

    2014-12-01

    Coccolithophores, a prominent group of marine calcifying unicellular algae, are widely studied in context of current and past climate change. We know that marine phytoplankton are sensitive to climatic changes, but the complex interplay of several processes such as warming, changes in nutrient content, and ocean acidification, makes future scenarios difficult to predict. Some taxa may be more susceptible to environmental perturbations than others, as evidenced by significantly different species-specific sensitivities observed in laboratory experiments. However, short-term plastic responses may not translate into longer-term climatic adaptation, nor should we readily extrapolate the behavior of single strains in the laboratory to natural, multi-species assemblages and their interactions in the ocean. The extensive fossil record of coccolithophores (in the form of coccoliths) reveals high morphological and taxonomic diversity and allows reconstructing the cell size of individual taxonomic groups. In a suite of deep-sea drilling sites from the Atlantic Ocean, we document distinct latitudinal gradients in phytoplankton composition and cell size across major climate transitions of the late Eocene - earliest Oligocene, and the middle - late Miocene. With these data we test hypotheses of species migration, phenotypic evolution, as well as the rates of species extinction and speciation in relation to concurrent paleoenvironmental changes during the Cenozoic.

  11. Chromium uptake and adsorption in cultured marine phytoplankton - implications for the marine Cr cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, D.; Maldonado, M. T.; Jaccard, S.

    2015-12-01

    While chromium (Cr) is a known carcinogen and pervasive industrial contaminant, little is known about the processes that affect the distribution and speciation of Cr in uncontaminated seawater. Given the recent development and application of the stable Cr isotope system in the marine environment, a full account of the sources, sinks, and internal processes affecting the modern marine Cr cycle is prudent. Using the radioisotope 51Cr, we investigated the controls of cellular Cr accumulation in an array of marine phytoplankton grown in environmentally relevant Cr concentrations (1-10 nM). Given the affinity of Cr(III) for amorphous Fe-hydroxide mineral surfaces, and the formation of these mineral phases on the outside of phytoplankton cells, extracellular Cr was monitored in a model diatom species (Thalassiosira weissflogii) as extracellular Fe concentrations varied. Extracellular Cr in T. weissflogii increased with increasing extracellular Fe, demonstrating that Cr may be removed from seawater via extracellular adsorption to phytoplankton. Short-term Cr(VI) and Cr(III) uptake experiments performed with T. weissflogii demonstrated that Cr(III) both adsorbed to and was internalized by the cells ~20x faster than Cr(VI). This suggests that Cr(III) is the dominant oxidation state associated with phytoplankton cells. Cellular Cr:C ratios (<0.5 µmol Cr mol C-1) of the nine phytoplankton species surveyed were significantly lower than previously reported Cr:C ratios of sinking particulate organic matter (~500 µmol Cr mol C-1). Thus, Cr accumulates in sinking particles- likely as Cr(III) - as it travels to the seafloor. Given the large fractionation of stable Cr isotopes during Cr(VI) reduction, Cr associated with exported phytoplankton may be enriched in lighter Cr isotopes. These data will assist investigators using stable Cr isotopes to examine past and present Cr biogeochemical cycles.

  12. Production, Organic Characterization, and Phase Transformations of Marine Particles Aerosolized from a Laboratory Mesocosm Phytoplankton Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, P. A.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that particles emitted from bubble bursting and wave breaking of ocean waters with high biological activity can contain sea salts associated with organic material, with smaller particles containing a larger mass fraction of organics than larger particles. This likely indicates a link between phytoplankton productivity in oceans and particulate organic material in marine air. Once aerosolized, particles with significant amount of organic material can affect cloud activation and formation of ice crystals, among other atmospheric processes, thus influencing climate. This is significant for clouds and climate particularly over nutrient rich polar seas, in which concentrations of biological organisms can reach up to 109 cells per ml during spring phytoplankton blooms. Here we present results of bubble bursting aerosol production from a seawater mesocosm containing artificial seawater, natural seawater and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species. These phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emilianaia huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus), possessed siliceous frustules, calcareous frustules and no frustules, respectively. Bubbles were generated employing recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits. Dry and humidified aerosol size distributions and bulk aerosol organic composition were measured as a function of phytoplankton growth, and chlorophyll composition and particulate and dissolved organic carbon in the water were determined. Finally, particles were collected on substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, their elemental compositions were determined using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEMEDAX), and their carbon speciation was determined using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Particle size distributions exposed to dry and humidified air employing

  13. Cell-associated proteolytic enzymes from marine phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, J.A.; Falkowski, P.G.

    1996-08-01

    Despite their central importance in cell metabolism, little is known about proteases in marine phytoplankton. Caseinolytic and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) activities was surveyed in log-phase cultures of the chlorophyte Dunaliella tertiolecta Butcher, the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii Fryxell et Hasle, the chrysophyte Isochrysis galbana Parke, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi Hay et Mohler, and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. LAP activity was very low at pH < 6 and peaked between pH 7.5 and 8.5 in all species, whereas caseinolytic activity in most species showed only minor peaks in the pH 4-5 range and broad maxima above pH 8. Acidic vacuolar proteases apparently represented only a small fraction of total protease activity. Attempts to classify protease using selective inhibitors were inconclusive. Caserinolytic activities were remarkably stable. Casein zymograms were used to identify >200-and <20-kDa proteases in homogenates of log-phase T. weissflogii; only the smaller protease was found in D. tertiolecta. Antibodies in the ATPase subunit (C) of the conserved, chloroplastic Clp protease from Pisum cross-reacted with proteins in Synechococcus, D. tertiolecta, and I. galbana, but no cross-reactions were found for any species with antibodies against the ClpP subunit from either E. coli or Nicotiana. Our results show that phytoplankton contain a diverse complement of proteases with novel characteristics. 46 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. [Biooptical properties of marine phytoplankton as they apply to satellite remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yentsch, Charles S.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers research performed over a period of 10 years from 1982 to 1992. During this time, Grant #NAGW410 was funded under three titles through a series of Supplements. The original proposal was entitled 'Photoecology, optical properties and remote sensing of warm core rings'; the second and major portion was entitled 'Continuation of studies of biooptical properties of phytoplankton and the study of mesoscale and submesoscale features using fluorescence and colorimetry'; with the final portion named 'Studies of biooptical properties of phytoplankton, with reference to identification of spectral types associated with meso- and submesoscale features in the ocean'. The focus of these projects was to try to expand our knowledge of the biooptical properties of marine phytoplankton as they apply to satellite remote sensing. We used a variety of techniques, new and old, to better measure these optical properties at appropriate scales, in some cases at the level of individual cells. We also exploited the specialized oceanic conditions that occur within certain regions and features of the ocean around the world in order to explain the tremendous variability one sees in a single remote sensing image. This document strives to provide as complete a summary as possible for this large body of work, including the pertinent publications supported by this funding.

  15. Chromium uptake and adsorption in marine phytoplankton - Implications for the marine chromium cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeniuk, David M.; Maldonado, Maria T.; Jaccard, Samuel L.

    2016-07-01

    Using the radioisotope 51Cr, we investigated the controls of cellular Cr accumulation in an array of marine phytoplankton grown in environmentally relevant Cr concentrations (1-10 nM). Given the affinity of Cr(III) for amorphous Fe-hydroxide mineral surfaces, and the formation of these mineral phases on the outside of phytoplankton cells, extracellular Cr was monitored in a model diatom species (Thalassiosira weissflogii) as extracellular Fe concentrations varied. Extracellular Cr in T. weissflogii increased with increasing extracellular Fe, demonstrating that Cr may be removed from seawater via extracellular adsorption to phytoplankton. Short-term Cr(VI) and Cr(III) uptake experiments performed with T. weissflogii demonstrated that Cr(III) was the primary oxidation state adsorbing to cells and being internalized by them. Cellular Cr:C ratios (<0.5 μmol Cr mol C-1) of the eight phytoplankton species surveyed were significantly lower than previously reported Cr:C ratios in marine particles with a high biogenic component (10-300 μmol Cr mol C-1). This indicates that Cr(III) likely accumulates in marine particles due to uptake and/or adsorption. Mass balance calculations demonstrate that surface water Cr deficits can be explained via loss of Cr(III) to exported particles, thereby providing a mechanism to account for the nutrient depth profile for Cr in modern seawater. Given the large fractionation of stable Cr isotopes during Cr(VI) reduction, Cr(III) associated with exported organic carbon is likely enriched in lighter isotopes. Most sedimentary Cr isotope studies have thus far neglected internal fractionating processes in the marine Cr cycle, but our data indicate that loss of Cr to exported particles may be traced in the sedimentary δ53Cr record.

  16. Oil spill dispersants induce formation of marine snow by phytoplankton-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    van Eenennaam, Justine S; Wei, Yuzhu; Grolle, Katja C F; Foekema, Edwin M; Murk, AlberTinka J

    2016-03-15

    Unusually large amounts of marine snow, including Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS), were formed during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The marine snow settled with oil and clay minerals as an oily sludge layer on the deep sea floor. This study tested the hypothesis that the unprecedented amount of chemical dispersants applied during high phytoplankton densities in the Gulf of Mexico induced high EPS formation. Two marine phytoplankton species (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) produced EPS within days when exposed to the dispersant Corexit 9500. Phytoplankton-associated bacteria were shown to be responsible for the formation. The EPS consisted of proteins and to lesser extent polysaccharides. This study reveals an unexpected consequence of the presence of phytoplankton. This emphasizes the need to test the action of dispersants under realistic field conditions, which may seriously alter the fate of oil in the environment via increased marine snow formation.

  17. Plastids of Marine Phytoplankton Produce Bioactive Pigments and Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Heydarizadeh, Parisa; Poirier, Isabelle; Loizeau, Damien; Ulmann, Lionel; Mimouni, Virginie; Schoefs, Benoît; Bertrand, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton is acknowledged to be a very diverse source of bioactive molecules. These compounds play physiological roles that allow cells to deal with changes of the environmental constrains. For example, the diversity of light harvesting pigments allows efficient photosynthesis at different depths in the seawater column. Identically, lipid composition of cell membranes can vary according to environmental factors. This, together with the heterogenous evolutionary origin of taxa, makes the chemical diversity of phytoplankton compounds much larger than in terrestrial plants. This contribution is dedicated to pigments and lipids synthesized within or from plastids/photosynthetic membranes. It starts with a short review of cyanobacteria and microalgae phylogeny. Then the bioactivity of pigments and lipids (anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, anti-allergic activities, and cardio- neuro-, hepato- and photoprotective effects), alone or in combination, is detailed. To increase the cellular production of bioactive compounds, specific culture conditions may be applied (e.g., high light intensity, nitrogen starvation). Regardless of the progress made in blue biotechnologies, the production of bioactive compounds is still limited. However, some examples of large scale production are given, and perspectives are suggested in the final section. PMID:24022731

  18. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Mitchell, James G.; Stocker, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These “phycospheres” may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean. PMID:26802122

  19. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I; Mitchell, James G; Stocker, Roman

    2016-02-09

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These "phycospheres" may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean.

  20. Net production and consumption of fluorescent colored dissolved organic matter by natural bacterial assemblages growing on marine phytoplankton exudates.

    PubMed

    Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Sarmento, Hugo; Alvarez-Salgado, Xosé Antón; Gasol, Josep M; Marrasé, Celia

    2011-11-01

    An understanding of the distribution of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the oceans and its role in the global carbon cycle requires a better knowledge of the colored materials produced and consumed by marine phytoplankton and bacteria. In this work, we examined the net uptake and release of CDOM by a natural bacterial community growing on DOM derived from four phytoplankton species cultured under axenic conditions. Fluorescent humic-like substances exuded by phytoplankton (excitation/emission [Ex/Em] wavelength, 310 nm/392 nm; Coble's peak M) were utilized by bacteria in different proportions depending on the phytoplankton species of origin. Furthermore, bacteria produced humic-like substances that fluoresce at an Ex/Em wavelength of 340 nm/440 nm (Coble's peak C). Differences were also observed in the Ex/Em wavelengths of the protein-like materials (Coble's peak T) produced by phytoplankton and bacteria. The induced fluorescent emission of CDOM produced by prokaryotes was an order of magnitude higher than that of CDOM produced by eukaryotes. We have also examined the final compositions of the bacterial communities growing on the exudates, which differed markedly depending on the phytoplankton species of origin. Alteromonas and Roseobacter were dominant during all the incubations on Chaetoceros sp. and Prorocentrum minimum exudates, respectively. Alteromonas was the dominant group growing on Skeletonema costatum exudates during the exponential growth phase, but it was replaced by Roseobacter afterwards. On Micromonas pusilla exudates, Roseobacter was replaced by Bacteroidetes after the exponential growth phase. Our work shows that fluorescence excitation-emission matrices of CDOM can be a helpful tool for the identification of microbial sources of DOM in the marine environment, but further studies are necessary to explore the association of particular bacterial groups with specific fluorophores.

  1. Decoding Size Distribution Patterns in Marine and Transitional Water Phytoplankton: From Community to Species Level

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, Leonilde; Basset, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of phytoplankton community assembly is a fundamental issue of aquatic ecology. Here, we use field data from transitional (e.g. coastal lagoons) and coastal water environments to decode patterns of phytoplankton size distribution into organization and adaptive mechanisms. Transitional waters are characterized by higher resource availability and shallower well-mixed water column than coastal marine environments. Differences in physico-chemical regime between the two environments have been hypothesized to exert contrasting selective pressures on phytoplankton cell morphology (size and shape). We tested the hypothesis focusing on resource availability (nutrients and light) and mixed layer depth as ecological axes that define ecological niches of phytoplankton. We report fundamental differences in size distributions of marine and freshwater diatoms, with transitional water phytoplankton significantly smaller and with higher surface to volume ratio than marine species. Here, we hypothesize that mixing condition affecting size-dependent sinking may drive phytoplankton size and shape distributions. The interplay between shallow mixed layer depth and frequent and complete mixing of transitional waters may likely increase the competitive advantage of small phytoplankton limiting large cell fitness. The nutrient regime appears to explain the size distribution within both marine and transitional water environments, while it seem does not explain the pattern observed across the two environments. In addition, difference in light availability across the two environments appear do not explain the occurrence of asymmetric size distribution at each hierarchical level. We hypothesize that such competitive equilibria and adaptive strategies in resource exploitation may drive by organism’s behavior which exploring patch resources in transitional and marine phytoplankton communities. PMID:25974052

  2. Decoding size distribution patterns in marine and transitional water phytoplankton: from community to species level.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Leonilde; Basset, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of phytoplankton community assembly is a fundamental issue of aquatic ecology. Here, we use field data from transitional (e.g. coastal lagoons) and coastal water environments to decode patterns of phytoplankton size distribution into organization and adaptive mechanisms. Transitional waters are characterized by higher resource availability and shallower well-mixed water column than coastal marine environments. Differences in physico-chemical regime between the two environments have been hypothesized to exert contrasting selective pressures on phytoplankton cell morphology (size and shape). We tested the hypothesis focusing on resource availability (nutrients and light) and mixed layer depth as ecological axes that define ecological niches of phytoplankton. We report fundamental differences in size distributions of marine and freshwater diatoms, with transitional water phytoplankton significantly smaller and with higher surface to volume ratio than marine species. Here, we hypothesize that mixing condition affecting size-dependent sinking may drive phytoplankton size and shape distributions. The interplay between shallow mixed layer depth and frequent and complete mixing of transitional waters may likely increase the competitive advantage of small phytoplankton limiting large cell fitness. The nutrient regime appears to explain the size distribution within both marine and transitional water environments, while it seem does not explain the pattern observed across the two environments. In addition, difference in light availability across the two environments appear do not explain the occurrence of asymmetric size distribution at each hierarchical level. We hypothesize that such competitive equilibria and adaptive strategies in resource exploitation may drive by organism's behavior which exploring patch resources in transitional and marine phytoplankton communities.

  3. Insights into eukaryotic phytoplankton and CO2 uptake in the marine biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Approximately half of global photosynthetic fixation of CO2 occurs in the marine biosphere. Development of more predictive mechanistic carbon cycle models is currently limited by the lack of understanding of physiological growth controls and quantitative information on the forces of mortality that act on the phytoplankton responsible for this CO2 uptake. A complication for research in this area is the fact that phytoplankton are exceptionally diverse. Primary productivity is not only partitioned between cyanobacterial and eukaryotic phytoplankton, but groups within the latter also have very different evolutionary histories and only some are represented in culture. Here, we will explore the advances and challenges in studying eukaryotic phytoplankton and factors that limit their growth in nature. Specifically, we will discuss ecosystems biology approaches that involve iteration between the lab and field and are proving most successful for gaining insight to environmental parameters that structure phytoplankton communities and growth.

  4. Assignment of photosynthetic parameters in estimation of marine phytoplankton production from remote sensing of ocean colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forget, Marie-Helene

    2007-12-01

    Photosynthesis (primary production) is the fundamental process by which solar photons are transformed into organic matter that is the source of energy for the entire food web. The first chapter of this thesis reviews the concepts that underpin models of marine primary production as well as the relevant parameters and their variation according to phytoplankton functional type. The application of the models to compute primary production from remotely-sensed images of ocean colour is then reviewed. The different approaches for assignment of the photosynthetic parameters in the model are presented and the advantages and disadvantages of each one of them are discussed. Particular emphasis is given to understanding the variability in photosynthesis-irradiance ( P -- E) parameters, which is the focus of the thesis. In Chapter 2 and 4, new measurements of P -- E are presented for two ecologically-different regions of the North Atlantic: the tropical Caribbean waters and the temperate North-West Atlantic. The issues that have to be addressed for regional computations of primary production are examined, and results are presented for primary production in the two regions using remotely-sensed data on ocean colour. Chapter 3 presents a new method for extraction of the photosynthesis-response parameters from profiles of in situ phytoplankton production. The procedure, previously proposed but hitherto untested, is here implemented in various aquatic systems and a protocol is established for its use. The major conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented in the fifth and final chapter.

  5. Effect of ultraviolet radiation on marine phytoplankton community in Akkeshi Bay, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, S.; Saito, H.; Kasai, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Effect of ultraviolet radiation on marine phytoplankton community was determined during a spring and fall bloom in a boreal embayment, Akkeshi Bay, Japan, which was located at 43[degrees]N, 144[degrees]50[prime]E. A time-series of observation was made every 6 h for 24 hours. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation always caused a depression of photosynthetic activity was observed at the end of day light period in both blooms. During a nigh period a degree of depression was decreased by 50% at least. The results of the present study may suggest that the effect of ultraviolet radiation on photosynthesis of marine phytoplankton is significantly large even in the boreal sea region and marine phytoplankton community has a capability to recover more than 40% from a damage by ultraviolet radiation during a night period.

  6. A Prospective Study of Marine Phytoplankton and Reported Illness Among Recreational Beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cynthia J.; Wade, Timothy J.; Sams, Elizabeth A.; Dufour, Alfred P.; Chapman, Andrew D.; Hilborn, Elizabeth D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blooms of marine phytoplankton may adversely affect human health. The potential public health impact of low-level exposures is not well established, and few prospective cohort studies of recreational exposures to marine phytoplankton have been conducted. Objective: We evaluated the association between phytoplankton cell counts and subsequent illness among recreational beachgoers. Methods: We recruited beachgoers at Boquerón Beach, Puerto Rico, during the summer of 2009. We conducted interviews at three time points to assess baseline health, water activities, and subsequent illness. Daily water samples were quantitatively assayed for phytoplankton cell count. Logistic regression models, adjusted for age and sex, were used to assess the association between exposure to three categories of phytoplankton concentration and subsequent illness. Results: During 26 study days, 15,726 individuals successfully completed all three interviews. Daily total phytoplankton cell counts ranged from 346 to 2,012 cells/mL (median, 712 cells/mL). The category with the highest (≥ 75th percentile) total phytoplankton cell count was associated with eye irritation [adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.01, 1.66], rash (OR = 1.27; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.57), and earache (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 0.88, 1.77). In phytoplankton group-specific analyses, the category with the highest Cyanobacteria counts was associated with respiratory illness (OR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.67), rash (OR = 1.32; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.66), eye irritation (OR = 1.25; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.62), and earache (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.95, 1.93). Conclusions: We found associations between recreational exposure to marine phytoplankton and reports of eye irritation, respiratory illness, and rash. We also found that associations varied by phytoplankton group, with Cyanobacteria having the strongest and most consistent associations. Citation: Lin CJ, Wade TJ, Sams EA, Dufour AP, Chapman AD, Hilborn ED. 2016. A

  7. Top-down control of marine phytoplankton diversity in a global ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowe, A. E. Friederike; Pahlow, Markus; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Follows, Michael; Oschlies, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The potential of marine ecosystems to adapt to ongoing environmental change is largely unknown, making prediction of consequences for nutrient and carbon cycles particularly challenging. Realizing that biodiversity might influence the adaptation potential, recent model approaches have identified bottom-up controls on patterns of phytoplankton diversity regulated by nutrient availability and seasonality. Top-down control of biodiversity, however, has not been considered in depth in such models. Here we demonstrate how zooplankton predation with prey-ratio based food preferences can enhance phytoplankton diversity in a ecosystem-circulation model with self-assembling community structure. Simulated diversity increases more than threefold under preferential grazing relative to standard density-dependent predation, and yields better agreement with observed distributions of phytoplankton diversity. The variable grazing pressure creates refuges for less competitive phytoplankton types, which reduces exclusion and improves the representation of seasonal phytoplankton succession during blooms. The type of grazing parameterization also has a significant impact on primary and net community production. Our results demonstrate how a simple parameterization of a zooplankton community response affects simulated phytoplankton community structure, diversity and dynamics, and motivates development of more detailed representations of top-down processes essential for investigating the role of diversity in marine ecosystems.

  8. Resource supply overrides temperature as a controlling factor of marine phytoplankton growth.

    PubMed

    Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; Huete-Ortega, María; López-Sandoval, Daffne C; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The universal temperature dependence of metabolic rates has been used to predict how ocean biology will respond to ocean warming. Determining the temperature sensitivity of phytoplankton metabolism and growth is of special importance because this group of organisms is responsible for nearly half of global primary production, sustains most marine food webs, and contributes to regulate the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Phytoplankton growth rates increase with temperature under optimal growth conditions in the laboratory, but it is unclear whether the same degree of temperature dependence exists in nature, where resources are often limiting. Here we use concurrent measurements of phytoplankton biomass and carbon fixation rates in polar, temperate and tropical regions to determine the role of temperature and resource supply in controlling the large-scale variability of in situ metabolic rates. We identify a biogeographic pattern in phytoplankton metabolic rates, which increase from the oligotrophic subtropical gyres to temperate regions and then coastal waters. Variability in phytoplankton growth is driven by changes in resource supply and appears to be independent of seawater temperature. The lack of temperature sensitivity of realized phytoplankton growth is consistent with the limited applicability of Arrhenius enzymatic kinetics when substrate concentrations are low. Our results suggest that, due to widespread resource limitation in the ocean, the direct effect of sea surface warming upon phytoplankton growth and productivity may be smaller than anticipated.

  9. Resource Supply Overrides Temperature as a Controlling Factor of Marine Phytoplankton Growth

    PubMed Central

    Marañón, Emilio; Cermeño, Pedro; Huete-Ortega, María; López-Sandoval, Daffne C.; Mouriño-Carballido, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Ramos, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The universal temperature dependence of metabolic rates has been used to predict how ocean biology will respond to ocean warming. Determining the temperature sensitivity of phytoplankton metabolism and growth is of special importance because this group of organisms is responsible for nearly half of global primary production, sustains most marine food webs, and contributes to regulate the exchange of CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere. Phytoplankton growth rates increase with temperature under optimal growth conditions in the laboratory, but it is unclear whether the same degree of temperature dependence exists in nature, where resources are often limiting. Here we use concurrent measurements of phytoplankton biomass and carbon fixation rates in polar, temperate and tropical regions to determine the role of temperature and resource supply in controlling the large-scale variability of in situ metabolic rates. We identify a biogeographic pattern in phytoplankton metabolic rates, which increase from the oligotrophic subtropical gyres to temperate regions and then coastal waters. Variability in phytoplankton growth is driven by changes in resource supply and appears to be independent of seawater temperature. The lack of temperature sensitivity of realized phytoplankton growth is consistent with the limited applicability of Arrhenius enzymatic kinetics when substrate concentrations are low. Our results suggest that, due to widespread resource limitation in the ocean, the direct effect of sea surface warming upon phytoplankton growth and productivity may be smaller than anticipated. PMID:24921945

  10. The chronic effects of oil pollution on marine phytoplankton in a subtropical bay, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Jun; Jiang, Zhi-Bing; Zeng, Jiang-Ning; Chen, Quan-Zhen; Zhao, Yong-qiang; Liao, Yi-bo; Shou, Lu; Xu, Xiao-qun

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of crude oil water accommodated fraction (WAF) on marine phytoplankton community, natural phytoplankton collected seasonally from the Yueqing bay were exposed to eight groups of crude oil WAF for 15 days under laboratory conditions. Chlorophyll a and cell density were measured, and species of phytoplankton were identified every 24 h to reflect the change of phytoplankton community. The results showed that (1) High concentrations (≥ 2.28 mg l(-1)) of oil pollution would greatly restrain phytoplankton growth (p<0.001), decrease chlorophyll a content and cell density, whereas low concentrations (≤ 1.21 mg l(-1)) did not restrain its growth but rather promoted the phytoplankton growth. (2) The biodiversity, evenness, and species number of phytoplankton were all significantly influenced by crude oil WAF in all seasons (p<0.001). (3) The dominant species changes were different under different pollutant concentrations in different seasons. Different species had different tolerances to the oil pollution, thus leading to abnormal succession.

  11. Do marine phytoplankton follow Bergmann's rule sensu lato?

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ulrich; Peter, Kalista H; Genitsaris, Savvas; Moustaka-Gouni, Maria

    2016-03-30

    Global warming has revitalized interest in the relationship between body size and temperature, proposed by Bergmann's rule 150 years ago, one of the oldest manifestations of a 'biogeography of traits'. We review biogeographic evidence, results from clonal cultures and recent micro- and mesocosm experiments with naturally mixed phytoplankton communities regarding the response of phytoplankton body size to temperature, either as a single factor or in combination with other factors such as grazing, nutrient limitation, and ocean acidification. Where possible, we also focus on the comparison between intraspecific size shifts and size shifts resulting from changes in species composition. Taken together, biogeographic evidence, community-level experiments and single-species experiments indicate that phytoplankton average cell sizes tend to become smaller in warmer waters, although temperature is not necessarily the proximate environmental factor driving size shifts. Indirect effects via nutrient supply and grazing are important and often dominate. In a substantial proportion of field studies, resource availability is seen as the only factor of relevance. Interspecific size effects are greater than intraspecific effects. Direct temperature effects tend to be exacerbated by indirect ones, if warming leads to intensified nutrient limitation or copepod grazing while ocean acidification tends to counteract the temperature effect on cell size in non-calcifying phytoplankton. We discuss the implications of the temperature-related size trends in a global-warming context, based on known functional traits associated with phytoplankton size. These are a higher affinity for nutrients of smaller cells, highest maximal growth rates of moderately small phytoplankton (ca. 10(2)  µm(3) ), size-related sensitivities for different types of grazers, and impacts on sinking rates. For a phytoplankton community increasingly dominated by smaller algae we predict that: (i) a higher

  12. The impact of temperature on marine phytoplankton resource allocation and metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toseland, A.; Daines, S. J.; Clark, J. R.; Kirkham, A.; Strauss, J.; Uhlig, C.; Lenton, T. M.; Valentin, K.; Pearson, G. A.; Moulton, V.; Mock, T.

    2013-11-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for ~50% of the CO2 that is fixed annually worldwide, and contribute massively to other biogeochemical cycles in the oceans. Their contribution depends significantly on the interplay between dynamic environmental conditions and the metabolic responses that underpin resource allocation and hence biogeochemical cycling in the oceans. However, these complex environment-biome interactions have not been studied on a larger scale. Here we use a set of integrative approaches that combine metatranscriptomes, biochemical data, cellular physiology and emergent phytoplankton growth strategies in a global ecosystems model, to show that temperature significantly affects eukaryotic phytoplankton metabolism with consequences for biogeochemical cycling under global warming. In particular, the rate of protein synthesis strongly increases under high temperatures even though the numbers of ribosomes and their associated rRNAs decreases. Thus, at higher temperatures, eukaryotic phytoplankton seem to require a lower density of ribosomes to produce the required amounts of cellular protein. The reduction of phosphate-rich ribosomes in warmer oceans will tend to produce higher organismal nitrogen (N) to phosphate (P) ratios, in turn increasing demand for N with consequences for the marine carbon cycle due to shifts towards N-limitation. Our integrative approach suggests that temperature plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in resource allocation and marine phytoplankton stoichiometry, with implications for the biogeochemical cycles that they drive.

  13. Associations between marine phytoplankton and symptoms of illness among recreational beachgoers in Puerto Rico, 2009

    EPA Science Inventory

    While phytoplankton generally have crucial roles in marine ecosystems, a small subset can release toxins and produce harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs can be a threat to human health as symptoms from exposure range from neurological impairment to gastrointestinal (GI), dermal, a...

  14. Marine phytoplankton and the changing ocean iron cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, D. A.; Boyd, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    The availability of the micronutrient iron governs phytoplankton growth across much of the ocean, but the global iron cycle is changing rapidly due to accelerating acidification, stratification, warming and deoxygenation. These mechanisms of global change will cumulatively affect the aqueous chemistry, sources and sinks, recycling, particle dynamics and bioavailability of iron. Biological iron demand will vary as acclimation to environmental change modifies cellular requirements for photosynthesis and nitrogen acquisition and as adaptive evolution or community shifts occur. Warming, acidification and nutrient co-limitation interactions with iron biogeochemistry will all strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics. Predicting the shape of the future iron cycle will require understanding the responses of each component of the unique biogeochemistry of this trace element to many concurrent and interacting environmental changes.

  15. Effect of ocean acidification on iron availability to marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dalin; Xu, Yan; Hopkinson, Brian M; Morel, François M M

    2010-02-05

    The acidification caused by the dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ocean changes the chemistry and hence the bioavailability of iron (Fe), a limiting nutrient in large oceanic regions. Here, we show that the bioavailability of dissolved Fe may decline because of ocean acidification. Acidification of media containing various Fe compounds decreases the Fe uptake rate of diatoms and coccolithophores to an extent predicted by the changes in Fe chemistry. A slower Fe uptake by a model diatom with decreasing pH is also seen in experiments with Atlantic surface water. The Fe requirement of model phytoplankton remains unchanged with increasing CO2. The ongoing acidification of seawater is likely to increase the Fe stress of phytoplankton populations in some areas of the ocean.

  16. Effect of Ocean Acidification on Iron Availability to Marine Phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Dalin; Xu, Yan; Hopkinson, Brian M.; Morel, François M. M.

    2010-02-01

    The acidification caused by the dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ocean changes the chemistry and hence the bioavailability of iron (Fe), a limiting nutrient in large oceanic regions. Here, we show that the bioavailability of dissolved Fe may decline because of ocean acidification. Acidification of media containing various Fe compounds decreases the Fe uptake rate of diatoms and coccolithophores to an extent predicted by the changes in Fe chemistry. A slower Fe uptake by a model diatom with decreasing pH is also seen in experiments with Atlantic surface water. The Fe requirement of model phytoplankton remains unchanged with increasing CO2. The ongoing acidification of seawater is likely to increase the Fe stress of phytoplankton populations in some areas of the ocean.

  17. Community composition has greater impact on the functioning of marine phytoplankton communities than ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Sarah L; Lewandowska, Aleksandra M; Barcelos E Ramos, Joana; Blanco-Ameijeiras, Sonia; Gallo, Francesca; Matthiessen, Birte

    2014-03-01

    Ecosystem functioning is simultaneously affected by changes in community composition and environmental change such as increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and subsequent ocean acidification. However, it largely remains uncertain how the effects of these factors compare to each other. Addressing this question, we experimentally tested the hypothesis that initial community composition and elevated CO2 are equally important to the regulation of phytoplankton biomass. We full-factorially exposed three compositionally different marine phytoplankton communities to two different CO2 levels and examined the effects and relative importance (ω(2) ) of the two factors and their interaction on phytoplankton biomass at bloom peak. The results showed that initial community composition had a significantly greater impact than elevated CO2 on phytoplankton biomass, which varied largely among communities. We suggest that the different initial ratios between cyanobacteria, diatoms, and dinoflagellates might be the key for the varying competitive and thus functional outcome among communities. Furthermore, the results showed that depending on initial community composition elevated CO2 selected for larger sized diatoms, which led to increased total phytoplankton biomass. This study highlights the relevance of initial community composition, which strongly drives the functional outcome, when assessing impacts of climate change on ecosystem functioning. In particular, the increase in phytoplankton biomass driven by the gain of larger sized diatoms in response to elevated CO2 potentially has strong implications for nutrient cycling and carbon export in future oceans.

  18. Climate regulation by marine phytoplankton. : A test by anthropogenic SO/sub 2/ emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1989-05-01

    The potential sensitivity of global mean albedo and temperature to N prompted a novel suggestion consistent with the Gaia hypothesis for regulation of global climate by marine phytoplankton. Certain species of coccolithophores excrete dimethylsulfide (DMS), and this DMS is arguably the principal source of reduced sulfur gases in the global atmosphere and, in the absence of anthropogenic SO/sub 2/, the principal source of atmospheric gaseous sulfur species. Such gaseous sulfur species are oxidized in the atmosphere to form sulfuric acid, which rapidly forms an aerosol. Since sulfate-containing AP are highly efficient CCN, it is argued that an increase in DMS production by marine phytoplankton would yield increased concentrations of CCN, resulting in increased cloud albedo, decreased surface insolation, and decreased planetary temperature. It is further hypothesized that such decreased insolation or temperature might result in decreased production of DMS by marine phytoplankton, i.e., that the process might constitute a negative feedback loop for regulation of planetary climate by marine microorganisms. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Controls on marine carbon fluxes via phytoplankton-microzooplankton interactions in continental shelf waters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The project is an in-depth evaluation of the phytoplankton-microzooplankton trophic link. The principal goals of the project remain as originally proposed: (1) Impact of grazing by phagotrophic microzooplankton on phytoplankton, particularly on phototrophic cells <5 {mu}m in size, which are not effectively grazed by macrozooplankton. (2) Impact of grazing by phagotrophic microzooplankton on bacterioplankton. (3) Taxon-specific growth rates of phytoplankton in situ, particularly of <5 {mu}m sized cells, as they are affected by phagotrophy rates. The authors are developing protocols for making quantitative estimates of grazing by phagotrophic protists on ultraphytoplankton, and for determining the intrinsic reproductive rates of phytoplankton species. They have also begun a series of experiments, testing and utilizing these methods, evaluating the grazing impact of flagellates and ciliates on phytoplankton species of different sizes and taxonomic affinities. A series of preliminary experiments in coastal waters adjacent to the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology have provided a coastal benchmark. They participated in a preliminary cruise in May, 1993 to the OMP field site off Cape Hatteras. Their purpose was to obtain background information on heterotrophic microbial distributional patterns in this region and to measure rates of protist bacterivory.

  20. A database of marine phytoplankton abundance, biomass and species composition in Australian waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Claire H.; Coughlan, Alex; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Ajani, Penelope; Armbrecht, Linda; Atkins, Natalia; Bonham, Prudence; Brett, Steve; Brinkman, Richard; Burford, Michele; Clementson, Lesley; Coad, Peter; Coman, Frank; Davies, Diana; Dela-Cruz, Jocelyn; Devlin, Michelle; Edgar, Steven; Eriksen, Ruth; Furnas, Miles; Hassler, Christel; Hill, David; Holmes, Michael; Ingleton, Tim; Jameson, Ian; Leterme, Sophie C.; Lønborg, Christian; McLaughlin, James; McEnnulty, Felicity; McKinnon, A. David; Miller, Margaret; Murray, Shauna; Nayar, Sasi; Patten, Renee; Pritchard, Tim; Proctor, Roger; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Raes, Eric; Rissik, David; Ruszczyk, Jason; Slotwinski, Anita; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Tattersall, Katherine; Thompson, Peter; Thomson, Paul; Tonks, Mark; Trull, Thomas W.; Uribe-Palomino, Julian; Waite, Anya M.; Yauwenas, Rouna; Zammit, Anthony; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2016-06-01

    There have been many individual phytoplankton datasets collected across Australia since the mid 1900s, but most are unavailable to the research community. We have searched archives, contacted researchers, and scanned the primary and grey literature to collate 3,621,847 records of marine phytoplankton species from Australian waters from 1844 to the present. Many of these are small datasets collected for local questions, but combined they provide over 170 years of data on phytoplankton communities in Australian waters. Units and taxonomy have been standardised, obviously erroneous data removed, and all metadata included. We have lodged this dataset with the Australian Ocean Data Network (http://portal.aodn.org.au/) allowing public access. The Australian Phytoplankton Database will be invaluable for global change studies, as it allows analysis of ecological indicators of climate change and eutrophication (e.g., changes in distribution; diatom:dinoflagellate ratios). In addition, the standardised conversion of abundance records to biomass provides modellers with quantifiable data to initialise and validate ecosystem models of lower marine trophic levels.

  1. A database of marine phytoplankton abundance, biomass and species composition in Australian waters

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Claire H.; Coughlan, Alex; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf; Ajani, Penelope; Armbrecht, Linda; Atkins, Natalia; Bonham, Prudence; Brett, Steve; Brinkman, Richard; Burford, Michele; Clementson, Lesley; Coad, Peter; Coman, Frank; Davies, Diana; Dela-Cruz, Jocelyn; Devlin, Michelle; Edgar, Steven; Eriksen, Ruth; Furnas, Miles; Hassler, Christel; Hill, David; Holmes, Michael; Ingleton, Tim; Jameson, Ian; Leterme, Sophie C.; Lønborg, Christian; McLaughlin, James; McEnnulty, Felicity; McKinnon, A. David; Miller, Margaret; Murray, Shauna; Nayar, Sasi; Patten, Renee; Pritchard, Tim; Proctor, Roger; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Raes, Eric; Rissik, David; Ruszczyk, Jason; Slotwinski, Anita; Swadling, Kerrie M.; Tattersall, Katherine; Thompson, Peter; Thomson, Paul; Tonks, Mark; Trull, Thomas W.; Uribe-Palomino, Julian; Waite, Anya M.; Yauwenas, Rouna; Zammit, Anthony; Richardson, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    There have been many individual phytoplankton datasets collected across Australia since the mid 1900s, but most are unavailable to the research community. We have searched archives, contacted researchers, and scanned the primary and grey literature to collate 3,621,847 records of marine phytoplankton species from Australian waters from 1844 to the present. Many of these are small datasets collected for local questions, but combined they provide over 170 years of data on phytoplankton communities in Australian waters. Units and taxonomy have been standardised, obviously erroneous data removed, and all metadata included. We have lodged this dataset with the Australian Ocean Data Network (http://portal.aodn.org.au/) allowing public access. The Australian Phytoplankton Database will be invaluable for global change studies, as it allows analysis of ecological indicators of climate change and eutrophication (e.g., changes in distribution; diatom:dinoflagellate ratios). In addition, the standardised conversion of abundance records to biomass provides modellers with quantifiable data to initialise and validate ecosystem models of lower marine trophic levels. PMID:27328409

  2. Molecular Mechanisms by Which Marine Phytoplankton Respond to Their Dynamic Chemical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palenik, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Marine scientists have long been interested in the interactions of marine phytoplankton with their chemical environments. Nutrient availability clearly controls carbon fixation on a global scale, but the interactions between phytoplankton and nutrients are complex and include both short-term responses (seconds to minutes) and longer-term evolutionary adaptations. This review outlines how genomics and functional genomics approaches are providing a better understanding of these complex interactions, especially for cyanobacteria and diatoms, for which the genome sequences of multiple model organisms are available. Transporters and related genes are emerging as the most likely candidates for biomarkers in stress-specific studies, but other genes are also possible candidates. One surprise has been the important role of horizontal gene transfer in mediating chemical-biological interactions.

  3. Protective function of nitric oxide on marine phytoplankton under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Li, Peifeng; Liu, Chun-Ying; Liu, Huanhuan; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Lili

    2013-09-01

    As an important signaling molecule, nitric oxide (NO) plays diverse physiological functions in plants, which has gained particular attention in recent years. We investigated the roles of NO in the growth of marine phytoplankton Platymonas subcordiforms and Skeletonema costatum under abiotic stresses. The growth of these two microalgae was obviously inhibited under non-metal stress (sodium selenium, Na2SeO3), heavy metal stress (lead nitrate, Pb(NO3)2), pesticide stress (methomyl) and UV radiation stress. After the addition of different low concentrations of exogenous NO (10(-10)-10(-8) mol L(-1)) twice each day during cultivation, the growth of these two microalgae was obviously promoted. Results showed that NO could relieve the oxidative stresses to protect the growth of the two microalgae. For different environmental stress, there is a different optimum NO concentration for marine phytoplankton. It is speculated that the protective effect of NO is related to its antioxidant ability.

  4. Methyl mercury uptake by diverse marine phytoplankton and trophic transfer to zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. S.; Fisher, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    While it is well known that methylmercury (MeHg) biomagnifies in aquatic food chains, few studies have quantified its bioaccumulation in marine phytoplankton from seawater, even though that is overwhelmingly the largest bioaccumulation step. Aquatic animals acquire MeHg mainly from dietary exposure and it is important to evaluate the bioaccumulation of this compound in planktonic organisms that form the base of marine food webs. We used a gamma-emitting radioisotope, 203Hg, to assess the rate and extent of MeHg uptake in marine diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, cryptophytes chlorophytes, and cyanobacteria held in unialgal cultures under varying temperature and light conditions. For experimental conditions in which the dissolved MeHg was at 300 pM, the uptake rates in all species ranged from 0.004 to 0.75 amol Hg μm-3 cell volume d-1 and reached steady state within 2 d. Volume concentration factors (VCFs) ranged from 0.4 to 60 x 105 for the different species. Temperature and light conditions had no direct effect on cellular MeHg uptake but ultimately affected growth of the cells, resulting in greater suspended particulate matter and associated MeHg. VCFs strongly correlated with cell surface area to volume ratios in all species. Assimilation efficiencies of MeHg from phytoplankton food (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Dunaliella tertiolecta and Rhodomonas salina) in a marine copepod grazer (Acartia tonsa) ranged from 74 to 92%, directly proportional to the cytoplasmic partitioning of MeHg in the phytoplankton cells. MeHg uptake in copepods from the aqueous phase was low and modeling shows that nearly all the MeHg acquired by this zooplankter is from diet. Herbivorous zooplankton can be an important link from phytoplankton at the base of the food web to fish higher in the food chain.

  5. Relative contribution of persistent organic pollutants to marine phytoplankton biomass dynamics in the North Sea and the Kattegat.

    PubMed

    Everaert, Gert; De Laender, Frederik; Goethals, Peter L M; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we use concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and of chlorophyll a to infer POP-induced effects on marine primary production in the Kattegat and the North Sea between the 1990s and the 2000s. To do so, we modelled phytoplankton dynamics using four classical drivers (light and nutrient availability, temperature and zooplankton grazing) and tested whether extending this model with a POP-induced phytoplankton growth limitation term improved model fit to observed chlorophyll a concentrations. Including monitored concentrations of PCBs and pesticides did not lead to a better model fit, suggesting that POP-induced growth limitation of marine phytoplankton in the North Sea and the Kattegat is small compared to the limitations caused by the classical drivers. In an attempt to more fully represent the multitude of POPs in the marine environment, the monitored concentrations were multiplied with a factor 10 and 100. Under these two configurations, region-specific contributions of POPs in the phytoplankton growth limitation were found. The inferred contribution of POPs to phytoplankton growth limitation was ca. 1% in Belgian marine waters, but in the Kattegat POPs explained ca. 10% of the phytoplankton growth limitation. These results suggest that there are regional differences in the contribution of POPs to the phytoplankton growth limitation.

  6. Use of ultrafiltration to isolate viruses from seawater which are pathogens of marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Suttle, C A; Chan, A M; Cottrell, M T

    1991-03-01

    Viruses may be major structuring elements of phytoplankton communities and hence important regulators of nutrient and energy fluxes in aquatic environments. In order to ascertain whether viruses are potentially important in dictating phytoplankton community structure, it is essential to determine the extent to which representative phytoplankton taxa are susceptible to viral infection. We used a spiral ultrafiltration cartridge (30,000-molecular-weight cutoff) to concentrate viruses from seawater at efficiencies approaching 100%. Natural virus communities were concentrated from stations in the Gulf of Mexico, a barrier island pass, and a hypersaline lagoon (Laguna Madre) and added to cultures of potential phytoplankton hosts. By following changes in in vivo fluorescence over time, it was possible to isolate several viruses that were pathogens to a variety of marine phytoplankton, including a prasinophyte (Micromonas pusilla), a pennate diatom (likely a Navicula sp.), a centric diatom (of unknown taxa), and a chroococcoid cyanobacterium (a Synechococcus sp.). As well, we observed changes in fluorescence in cultures of a cryptophyte (a Rhodomonas sp.) and a chlorophyte (Nannochloropsis oculata) which were consistent with the presence of viral pathogens. Although pathogens were isolated from all stations, all the pathogens were not isolated from every station. Filterability studies on the viruses infecting M. pusilla and the Navicula sp. showed that the viruses were consistently infective after filtration through polycarbonate and glass-fiber filters but were affected by most other filter types. Establishment of phytoplankton-pathogen systems will be important in elucidating the effect that viruses have on primary producers in aquatic systems.

  7. Uptake of {sup 64}Cu-oxine by marine phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Croot, P.L.; Karson, B.; Elteren, J.T. van; Kroon, J.J.

    1999-10-15

    Short-term uptake experiments using fie phytoplankton species (Synechococcus clone DC2, Amphidinium carterae, Chrysochromulina polylepis, Ditylum brightwelli, and Prorocentrum micans) demonstrated rapid uptake of the lipophilic complex {sup 64}Cu-oxine, presumably by diffusion of the complex across the plasma membrane. This passive uptake mechanism was extremely rapid and significantly faster than facilitated uptake by the free metal ion. Measured values of the observed permeability, P{sub obs}, ranged from 0.55 to 18.6 x 10{sup {minus}4} cm s{sup {minus}1}, showing only small differences between the various algal species. Removal rate constants, k{sup bio}, varied much more widely, 0.009--570 x 10{sup {minus}9} L cell{sup {minus}1} h{sup {minus} 1}, between the algae, indicating the influence of surface area on the uptake kinetics. Maximum internal Cu levels were reached after approximately 2 h, showing that a major limiting factor in the uptake of Cu from Cu-oxine is the concentration of intracellular Cu binding sites.

  8. A comprehensive framework for functional diversity patterns of marine chromophytic phytoplankton using rbcL phylogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Brajogopal; Bhadury, Punyasloke

    2016-02-01

    Marine chromophytes are taxonomically diverse group of algae and contribute approximately half of the total oceanic primary production. To understand the global patterns of functional diversity of chromophytic phytoplankton, robust bioinformatics and statistical analyses including deep phylogeny based on 2476 form ID rbcL gene sequences representing seven ecologically significant oceanographic ecoregions were undertaken. In addition, 12 form ID rbcL clone libraries were generated and analyzed (148 sequences) from Sundarbans Biosphere Reserve representing the world’s largest mangrove ecosystem as part of this study. Global phylogenetic analyses recovered 11 major clades of chromophytic phytoplankton in varying proportions with several novel rbcL sequences in each of the seven targeted ecoregions. Majority of OTUs was found to be exclusive to each ecoregion, whereas some were shared by two or more ecoregions based on beta-diversity analysis. Present phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses provide a strong statistical support for the hypothesis that different oceanographic regimes harbor distinct and coherent groups of chromophytic phytoplankton. It has been also shown as part of this study that varying natural selection pressure on form ID rbcL gene under different environmental conditions could lead to functional differences and overall fitness of chromophytic phytoplankton populations.

  9. A comprehensive framework for functional diversity patterns of marine chromophytic phytoplankton using rbcL phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Brajogopal; Bhadury, Punyasloke

    2016-02-10

    Marine chromophytes are taxonomically diverse group of algae and contribute approximately half of the total oceanic primary production. To understand the global patterns of functional diversity of chromophytic phytoplankton, robust bioinformatics and statistical analyses including deep phylogeny based on 2476 form ID rbcL gene sequences representing seven ecologically significant oceanographic ecoregions were undertaken. In addition, 12 form ID rbcL clone libraries were generated and analyzed (148 sequences) from Sundarbans Biosphere Reserve representing the world's largest mangrove ecosystem as part of this study. Global phylogenetic analyses recovered 11 major clades of chromophytic phytoplankton in varying proportions with several novel rbcL sequences in each of the seven targeted ecoregions. Majority of OTUs was found to be exclusive to each ecoregion, whereas some were shared by two or more ecoregions based on beta-diversity analysis. Present phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses provide a strong statistical support for the hypothesis that different oceanographic regimes harbor distinct and coherent groups of chromophytic phytoplankton. It has been also shown as part of this study that varying natural selection pressure on form ID rbcL gene under different environmental conditions could lead to functional differences and overall fitness of chromophytic phytoplankton populations.

  10. A comprehensive framework for functional diversity patterns of marine chromophytic phytoplankton using rbcL phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Brajogopal; Bhadury, Punyasloke

    2016-01-01

    Marine chromophytes are taxonomically diverse group of algae and contribute approximately half of the total oceanic primary production. To understand the global patterns of functional diversity of chromophytic phytoplankton, robust bioinformatics and statistical analyses including deep phylogeny based on 2476 form ID rbcL gene sequences representing seven ecologically significant oceanographic ecoregions were undertaken. In addition, 12 form ID rbcL clone libraries were generated and analyzed (148 sequences) from Sundarbans Biosphere Reserve representing the world’s largest mangrove ecosystem as part of this study. Global phylogenetic analyses recovered 11 major clades of chromophytic phytoplankton in varying proportions with several novel rbcL sequences in each of the seven targeted ecoregions. Majority of OTUs was found to be exclusive to each ecoregion, whereas some were shared by two or more ecoregions based on beta-diversity analysis. Present phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses provide a strong statistical support for the hypothesis that different oceanographic regimes harbor distinct and coherent groups of chromophytic phytoplankton. It has been also shown as part of this study that varying natural selection pressure on form ID rbcL gene under different environmental conditions could lead to functional differences and overall fitness of chromophytic phytoplankton populations. PMID:26861415

  11. Energy cost and putative benefits of cellular mechanisms modulating buoyancy in aflagellate marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Michel; Raven, John A; Levasseur, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    Little information is available on the energetics of buoyancy modulation in aflagellate phytoplankton, which comprises the majority of autotrophic cells found in the ocean. Here, we computed for three aflagellate species of marine phytoplankton (Emiliania huxleyi, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Ethmodiscus rex) the theoretical minimum energy cost as photons absorbed and nitrogen resource required of the key physiological mechanisms (i.e., replacement of quaternary ammonium by dimethyl-sulfoniopropionate, storage of polysaccharides, and cell wall biosynthesis) affecting the cell's vertical movement as a function of nitrogen (N) availability. These energy costs were also normalized to the capacity of each buoyancy mechanism to modulate sinking or rising rates based on Stokes' law. The three physiological mechanisms could act as ballast in the three species tested in conditions of low N availability at a low fraction (<12%) of the total photon energy cost for growth. Cell wall formation in E. huxleyi was the least costly ballast strategy, whereas in T. pseudonana, the photon energy cost of the three ballast strategies was similar. In E. rex, carbohydrate storage and mobilization appear to be energetically cheaper than modulations in organic solute synthesis to achieve vertical migration. This supports the carbohydrate-ballast strategy for vertical migration for this species, but argues against the theory of replacement of low- or high-density organic solutes. This study brings new insights into the energy cost and potential selective advantages of several strategies modulating the buoyancy of aflagellate marine phytoplankton.

  12. Study on photosynthetic parameters and primary production of marine phytoplankton in Minnan-Taiwan Shoal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian; Li, Wen-Quan

    1994-03-01

    Carbon assimilation rates were determined in situ in the Minnan-Taiwan Shoal with the C-14 tracer method. Seasonal variations of photosynthetic parameters of marine phytoplankton were measured together with determination of Chl a and carbon content. Experimental results indicated that the average carbon-specific carbon accumulation rate is 0.85 d-1, mean primary productivity is 0.55 g C (m2d)-1. Temperature effect on the growth of the algae can be described by the model of Goldman and Carpenter. Supplementation of nutrients brought up by the upwelling in summer caused the observably high primary productivities in autumn.

  13. Induction of reactive oxygen species in marine phytoplankton under crude oil exposure.

    PubMed

    Ozhan, Koray; Zahraeifard, Sara; Smith, Aaron P; Bargu, Sibel

    2015-12-01

    Exposure of phytoplankton to the water-accommodated fraction of crude oil can elicit a number of stress responses, but the mechanisms that drive these responses are unclear. South Louisiana crude oil was selected to investigate its effects on population growth, chlorophyll a (Chl a) content, antioxidative defense, and lipid peroxidation, for the marine diatom, Ditylum brightwellii, and the dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa triquetra, in laboratory-based microcosm experiments. The transcript levels of several possible stress-responsive genes in D. brightwellii were also measured. The microalgae were exposed to crude oil for up to 96 h, and Chl a content, superoxide dismutase (SOD), the glutathione pool (GSH and GSSG), and lipid peroxidation content were analyzed. The cell growth of both phytoplankton species was inhibited with increasing crude oil concentrations. Crude oil exposure did not affect Chl a content significantly in cells. SOD activities showed similar responses in both species, being enhanced at 4- and 8-mg/L crude oil exposure. Only H. triquetra demonstrated enhanced activity in GSSG pool and lipid peroxidation at 8-mg/L crude oil exposure, suggesting that phytoplankton species have distinct physiological responses and tolerance levels to crude oil exposure. This study indicated the activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phytoplankton under crude oil exposure; however, the progressive damage in cells is still unknown. Thus, ROS-related damage in nucleic acid, lipids, proteins, and DNA, due to crude oil exposure could be a worthwhile subject of study to better understand crude oil toxicity at the base of the food web.

  14. Indicators: Phytoplankton

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Phytoplankton are free-floating, microscopic algae that inhabit the sunlit, upper layer of most freshwater and marine environments. They are usually responsible for the color and clarity of lakes, wetlands, rivers, streams and estuaries.

  15. In situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells with infrared laser-based optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, G. J.; Liu, Y.; Iturriaga, R. H.

    1995-11-01

    We describe the application of infrared optical tweezers to the in situ microparticle analysis of marine phytoplankton cells. A Nd:YAG laser (lambda=3D 1064 nm) trap is used to confine and manipulate single Nannochloris and Synechococcus cells in an enriched seawater medium while spectral fluorescence and Lorenz-Mie backscatter signals are simultaneously acquired under a variety of excitation and trapping conditions. Variations in the measured fluorescence intensities of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and phycoerythrin pigments in phytoplankton cells are observed. These variations are related, in part, to basic intrasample variability, but they also indicate that increasing ultraviolet-exposure time and infrared trapping power may have short-term effects on cellular physiology that are related to Chl a photobleaching and laser-induced heating, respectively. The use of optical tweezers to study the factors that affect marine cell physiology and the processes of absorption, scattering, and attenuation by individual cells, organisms, and particulate matter that contribute to optical closure on a microscopic scale are also described. (c)1995 Optical Society of America

  16. Use of plankton-derived vitamin B1 precursors, especially thiazole-related precursor, by key marine picoeukaryotic phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Ryan W; Bouget, Francois-Yves; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Vergé, Valérie; Schatt, Philippe; Allen, Eric E; Palenik, Brian; Azam, Farooq

    2017-01-01

    Several cosmopolitan marine picoeukaryotic phytoplankton are B1 auxotrophs requiring exogenous vitamin B1 or precursor to survive. From genomic evidence, representatives of picoeukaryotic phytoplankton (Ostreococcus and Micromonas spp.) were predicted to use known thiazole and pyrimidine B1 precursors to meet their B1 demands, however, recent culture-based experiments could not confirm this assumption. We hypothesized these phytoplankton strains could grow on precursors alone, but required a thiazole-related precursor other the well-known and extensively tested 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol. This hypothesis was tested using bioassays and co-cultures of picoeukaryotic phytoplankton and bacteria. We found that specific B1-synthesizing proteobacteria and phytoplankton are sources of a yet-to-be chemically identified thiazole-related precursor(s) that, along with pyrimidine B1 precursor 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine, can support growth of Ostreococcus spp. (also Micromonas spp.) without B1. We additionally found that the B1-synthesizing plankton do not require contact with picoeukaryotic phytoplankton cells to produce thiazole-related precursor(s). Experiments with wild-type and genetically engineered Ostreococcus lines revealed that the thiazole kinase, ThiM, is required for growth on precursors, and that thiazole-related precursor(s) accumulate to appreciable levels in the euphotic ocean. Overall, our results point to thiazole-related B1 precursors as important micronutrients promoting the survival of abundant phytoplankton influencing surface ocean production and biogeochemical cycling. PMID:27935586

  17. Use of plankton-derived vitamin B1 precursors, especially thiazole-related precursor, by key marine picoeukaryotic phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Paerl, Ryan W; Bouget, Francois-Yves; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Vergé, Valérie; Schatt, Philippe; Allen, Eric E; Palenik, Brian; Azam, Farooq

    2017-03-01

    Several cosmopolitan marine picoeukaryotic phytoplankton are B1 auxotrophs requiring exogenous vitamin B1 or precursor to survive. From genomic evidence, representatives of picoeukaryotic phytoplankton (Ostreococcus and Micromonas spp.) were predicted to use known thiazole and pyrimidine B1 precursors to meet their B1 demands, however, recent culture-based experiments could not confirm this assumption. We hypothesized these phytoplankton strains could grow on precursors alone, but required a thiazole-related precursor other the well-known and extensively tested 4-methyl-5-thiazoleethanol. This hypothesis was tested using bioassays and co-cultures of picoeukaryotic phytoplankton and bacteria. We found that specific B1-synthesizing proteobacteria and phytoplankton are sources of a yet-to-be chemically identified thiazole-related precursor(s) that, along with pyrimidine B1 precursor 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine, can support growth of Ostreococcus spp. (also Micromonas spp.) without B1. We additionally found that the B1-synthesizing plankton do not require contact with picoeukaryotic phytoplankton cells to produce thiazole-related precursor(s). Experiments with wild-type and genetically engineered Ostreococcus lines revealed that the thiazole kinase, ThiM, is required for growth on precursors, and that thiazole-related precursor(s) accumulate to appreciable levels in the euphotic ocean. Overall, our results point to thiazole-related B1 precursors as important micronutrients promoting the survival of abundant phytoplankton influencing surface ocean production and biogeochemical cycling.

  18. MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR IN SITU IDENTIFCIATION OF NITRATE UTILIZATION BY MARINE BACTERIA AND PHYTOPLANKTON

    SciTech Connect

    Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Gilligan, Mathew R.; Bronk, Deborah A.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Booth, Melissa G.

    2013-09-12

    Traditionally, the importance of inorganic nitrogen (N) for the nutrition and growth of marine phytoplankton has been recognized, while inorganic N utilization by bacteria has received less attention. Likewise, organic N has been thought to be important for heterotrophic organisms but not for phytoplankton. However, accumulating evidence suggests that bacteria compete with phytoplankton for nitrate (NO3-) and other N species. The consequences of this competition may have a profound effect on the flux of N, and therefore carbon (C), in ocean margins. Because it has been difficult to differentiate between N uptake by heterotrophic bacterioplankton versus autotrophic phytoplankton, the processes that control N utilization, and the consequences of these competitive interactions, have traditionally been difficult to study. Significant bacterial utilization of DIN may have a profound effect on the flux of N and C in the water column because sinks for dissolved N that do not incorporate inorganic C represent mechanisms that reduce the atmospheric CO2 drawdown via the ?biological pump? and limit the flux of POC from the euphotic zone. This project was active over the period of 1998-2007 with support from the DOE Biotechnology Investigations ? Ocean Margins Program (BI-OMP). Over this period we developed a tool kit of molecular methods (PCR, RT-PCR, Q-PCR, QRT-PCR, and TRFLP) and combined isotope mass spectrometry and flow-cytometric approaches that allow selective isolation, characterization, and study of the diversity and genetic expression (mRNA) of the structural gene responsible for the assimilation of NO3- by heterotrophic bacteria (nasA). As a result of these studies we discovered that bacteria capable of assimilating NO3- are ubiquitous in marine waters, that the nasA gene is expressed in these environments, that heterotrophic bacteria can account for a significant fraction of total DIN uptake in different ocean margin systems, that the expression of nasA is

  19. Effect of a simulated oil spill on natural assemblages of marine phytoplankton enclosed in microcosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J.; Figueiras, F. G.; Aranguren-Gassis, M.; Crespo, B. G.; Fernández, E.; Morán, X. A. G.; Nieto-Cid, M.

    2009-07-01

    Two microcosm experiments were carried out to simulate the effect of sporadic oil spills derived from tanker accidents on oceanic and coastal marine phytoplankton assemblages. Treatments were designed to reproduce the spill from the Prestige, which took place in Galician coastal waters (NW Iberia) in November 2002. Two different concentrations of the water soluble fraction of oil were used: low (8.6 ± 0.7 μg l -1 of chrysene equivalents) and high (23 ± 5 μg l -1 of chrysene equivalents l -1). Photosynthetic activity and chlorophyll a concentration decreased in both assemblages after 24-72 h of exposure to the two oil concentrations, even though the effect was more severe on the oceanic assemblage. These variables progressively recovered up to values close or higher than those in the controls, but the short-term negative effect of oil, which was generally stronger at the high concentration, also induced changes in the structure of the plankton community. While the biomass of nanoflagellates increased in both assemblages, oceanic picophytoplankton was drastically reduced by the addition of oil. Effects on diatoms were also observed, particularly in the coastal assemblage. The response of coastal diatoms to oil addition showed a clear dependence on size. Small diatoms (<20 μm) were apparently stimulated by oil, whereas diatoms >20 μm were only negatively affected by the high oil concentration. These differences, which could be partially due to indirect trophic interactions, might also be related to different sensitivity of species to PAHs. These results, in agreement with previous observations, additionally show that the negative effect of the water soluble fraction of oil on oceanic phytoplankton was stronger than on coastal phytoplankton.

  20. Development of a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy for analysis of the marine phytoplankton community

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Tae-Ho; Kang, Hye-Eun; Kang, Chang-Keun; Lee, Sang Heon; Ahn, Do-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a cost-effective metabarcoding strategy to analyze phytoplankton community structure using the Illumina MiSeq system. The amplicons (404–411 bp) obtained by end-pairing of two reads were sufficiently long to distinguish algal species and provided barcode data equivalent to those generated with the Roche 454 system, but at less than 1/20th of the cost. The original universal primer sequences targeting the 23S rDNA region and the PCR strategy were both modified, and this resulted in higher numbers of eukaryotic algal sequences by excluding non-photosynthetic proteobacterial sequences supporting effectiveness of this strategy. The novel strategy was used to analyze the phytoplankton community structure of six water samples from the East/Japan Sea: surface and 50 m depths at coastal and open-sea sites, with collections in May and July 2014. In total, 345 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified, which covered most of the prokaryotic and eukaryotic algal phyla, including Dinophyta, Rhodophyta, Ochrophyta, Chlorophyta, Streptophyta, Cryptophyta, Haptophyta, and Cyanophyta. This highlights the importance of plastid 23S primers, which perform better than the currently used 16S primers for phytoplankton community surveys. The findings also revealed that more efforts should be made to update 23S rDNA sequences as well as those of 16S in the databases. Analysis of algal proportions in the six samples showed that community structure differed depending on location, depth and season. Across the six samples evaluated, the numbers of OTUs in each phylum were similar but their relative proportions varied. This novel strategy would allow laboratories to analyze large numbers of samples at reasonable expense, whereas this has not been possible to date due to cost and time. In addition, we expect that this strategy will generate a large amount of novel data that could potentially change established methods and tools that are currently used in the realms of

  1. Marine bacterial community structure resilience to changes in protist predation under phytoplankton bloom conditions.

    PubMed

    Baltar, Federico; Palovaara, Joakim; Unrein, Fernando; Catala, Philippe; Horňák, Karel; Šimek, Karel; Vaqué, Dolors; Massana, Ramon; Gasol, Josep M; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2016-03-01

    To test whether protist grazing selectively affects the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, we combined high-throughput sequencing to determine bacterial community composition with analyses of grazing rates, protist and bacterial abundances and bacterial cell sizes and physiological states in a mesocosm experiment in which nutrients were added to stimulate a phytoplankton bloom. A large variability was observed in the abundances of bacteria (from 0.7 to 2.4 × 10(6) cells per ml), heterotrophic nanoflagellates (from 0.063 to 2.7 × 10(4) cells per ml) and ciliates (from 100 to 3000 cells per l) during the experiment (∼3-, 45- and 30-fold, respectively), as well as in bulk grazing rates (from 1 to 13 × 10(6) bacteria per ml per day) and bacterial production (from 3 to 379 μg per C l per day) (1 and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively). However, these strong changes in predation pressure did not induce comparable responses in bacterial community composition, indicating that bacterial community structure was resilient to changes in protist predation pressure. Overall, our results indicate that peaks in protist predation (at least those associated with phytoplankton blooms) do not necessarily trigger substantial changes in the composition of coastal marine bacterioplankton communities.

  2. Marine bacterial community structure resilience to changes in protist predation under phytoplankton bloom conditions

    PubMed Central

    Baltar, Federico; Palovaara, Joakim; Unrein, Fernando; Catala, Philippe; Horňák, Karel; Šimek, Karel; Vaqué, Dolors; Massana, Ramon; Gasol, Josep M; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2016-01-01

    To test whether protist grazing selectively affects the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, we combined high-throughput sequencing to determine bacterial community composition with analyses of grazing rates, protist and bacterial abundances and bacterial cell sizes and physiological states in a mesocosm experiment in which nutrients were added to stimulate a phytoplankton bloom. A large variability was observed in the abundances of bacteria (from 0.7 to 2.4 × 106 cells per ml), heterotrophic nanoflagellates (from 0.063 to 2.7 × 104 cells per ml) and ciliates (from 100 to 3000 cells per l) during the experiment (∼3-, 45- and 30-fold, respectively), as well as in bulk grazing rates (from 1 to 13 × 106 bacteria per ml per day) and bacterial production (from 3 to 379 μg per C l per day) (1 and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively). However, these strong changes in predation pressure did not induce comparable responses in bacterial community composition, indicating that bacterial community structure was resilient to changes in protist predation pressure. Overall, our results indicate that peaks in protist predation (at least those associated with phytoplankton blooms) do not necessarily trigger substantial changes in the composition of coastal marine bacterioplankton communities. PMID:26262814

  3. Evolution and extinction in the marine realm: some constraints imposed by phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    The organic and mineralized remains of planktonic algae provide a rich record of microplankton evolution extending over nearly half of the preserved geological record. In general, Phanerozoic patterns of phytoplankton radiation and extinction parallel those documented for skeletonized marine invertebrates, both augmenting and constraining thought about evolution in the oceans. Rapidly increasing knowledge of Proterozoic plankton is making possible the recognition of additional episodes of diversification and extinction that antedate the Ediacaran radiation of macroscopic animals. In contrast to earlier phytoplankton history, the late Mesozoic and Cainozoic record is documented in sufficient detail to constrain theories of mass extinction in more than a general way. Broad patterns of diversity change in planktonic algae show similarities across the Cretaceous-Tertiary and Eocene-Oligocene boundaries, but detailed comparisons of origination and extinction rates in calcareous nannoplankton, as well as other algae and skeletonized protozoans, suggest that the two episodes were quite distinct. Common causation appears unlikely, casting doubt on monolithic theories of mass extinction, whether periodic or not. Studies of mass extinction highlight a broader class of insights that paleontologists can contribute to evolutionary biology: the evaluation of evolutionary change in the context of evolving Earth-surface environments.

  4. Phytoplankton Biomass Distribution and Identification of Productive Habitats Within the Galapagos Marine Reserve by MODIS, a Surface Acquisition System, and In-Situ Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Galapagos Marine Reserve (GMR) is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world. Phytoplankton are the base of the ecosystem food chain for many higher trophic organisms, so identifying phytoplankton biomass distribution is the first step in understanding the dynamic envir...

  5. Connecting marine productivity to sea-spray via nanoscale biological processes: Phytoplankton Dance or Death Disco?

    PubMed Central

    O’Dowd, Colin; Ceburnis, Darius; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bialek, Jakub; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Zacharias, Merry; Nitschke, Udo; Connan, Solene; Rinaldi, Matteo; Fuzzi, Sandro; Decesari, Stefano; Cristina Facchini, Maria; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Dell’Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Tangherlini, Michael; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Bursting bubbles at the ocean-surface produce airborne salt-water spray-droplets, in turn, forming climate-cooling marine haze and cloud layers. The reflectance and ultimate cooling effect of these layers is determined by the spray’s water-uptake properties that are modified through entrainment of ocean-surface organic matter (OM) into the airborne droplets. We present new results illustrating a clear dependence of OM mass-fraction enrichment in sea spray (OMss) on both phytoplankton-biomass, determined from Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). The correlation coefficient for OMss as a function of Chl-a increased form 0.67 on a daily timescale to 0.85 on a monthly timescale. An even stronger correlation was found as a function of NPP, increasing to 0.93 on a monthly timescale. We suggest the observed dependence is through the demise of the bloom, driven by nanoscale biological processes (such as viral infections), releasing large quantities of transferable OM comprising cell debris, exudates and other colloidal materials. This OM, through aggregation processes, leads to enrichment in sea-spray, thus demonstrating an important coupling between biologically-driven plankton bloom termination, marine productivity and sea-spray modification with potentially significant climate impacts. PMID:26464099

  6. Connecting marine productivity to sea-spray via nanoscale biological processes: Phytoplankton Dance or Death Disco?

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Colin; Ceburnis, Darius; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bialek, Jakub; Stengel, Dagmar B; Zacharias, Merry; Nitschke, Udo; Connan, Solene; Rinaldi, Matteo; Fuzzi, Sandro; Decesari, Stefano; Facchini, Maria Cristina; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Tangherlini, Michael; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-10-14

    Bursting bubbles at the ocean-surface produce airborne salt-water spray-droplets, in turn, forming climate-cooling marine haze and cloud layers. The reflectance and ultimate cooling effect of these layers is determined by the spray's water-uptake properties that are modified through entrainment of ocean-surface organic matter (OM) into the airborne droplets. We present new results illustrating a clear dependence of OM mass-fraction enrichment in sea spray (OMss) on both phytoplankton-biomass, determined from Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). The correlation coefficient for OMss as a function of Chl-a increased form 0.67 on a daily timescale to 0.85 on a monthly timescale. An even stronger correlation was found as a function of NPP, increasing to 0.93 on a monthly timescale. We suggest the observed dependence is through the demise of the bloom, driven by nanoscale biological processes (such as viral infections), releasing large quantities of transferable OM comprising cell debris, exudates and other colloidal materials. This OM, through aggregation processes, leads to enrichment in sea-spray, thus demonstrating an important coupling between biologically-driven plankton bloom termination, marine productivity and sea-spray modification with potentially significant climate impacts.

  7. Connecting marine productivity to sea-spray via nanoscale biological processes: Phytoplankton Dance or Death Disco?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dowd, Colin; Ceburnis, Darius; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Bialek, Jakub; Stengel, Dagmar B.; Zacharias, Merry; Nitschke, Udo; Connan, Solene; Rinaldi, Matteo; Fuzzi, Sandro; Decesari, Stefano; Cristina Facchini, Maria; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Tangherlini, Michael; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Bursting bubbles at the ocean-surface produce airborne salt-water spray-droplets, in turn, forming climate-cooling marine haze and cloud layers. The reflectance and ultimate cooling effect of these layers is determined by the spray’s water-uptake properties that are modified through entrainment of ocean-surface organic matter (OM) into the airborne droplets. We present new results illustrating a clear dependence of OM mass-fraction enrichment in sea spray (OMss) on both phytoplankton-biomass, determined from Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Net Primary Productivity (NPP). The correlation coefficient for OMss as a function of Chl-a increased form 0.67 on a daily timescale to 0.85 on a monthly timescale. An even stronger correlation was found as a function of NPP, increasing to 0.93 on a monthly timescale. We suggest the observed dependence is through the demise of the bloom, driven by nanoscale biological processes (such as viral infections), releasing large quantities of transferable OM comprising cell debris, exudates and other colloidal materials. This OM, through aggregation processes, leads to enrichment in sea-spray, thus demonstrating an important coupling between biologically-driven plankton bloom termination, marine productivity and sea-spray modification with potentially significant climate impacts.

  8. Rapidly diverging evolution of an atypical alkaline phosphatase (PhoAaty) in marine phytoplankton: insights from dinoflagellate alkaline phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xin; Wang, Lu; Shi, Xinguo; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase (AP) is a key enzyme that enables marine phytoplankton to scavenge phosphorus (P) from dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) when inorganic phosphate is scarce in the ocean. Yet how the AP gene has evolved in phytoplankton, particularly dinoflagellates, is poorly understood. We sequenced full-length AP genes and corresponding complementary DNA (cDNA) from 15 strains (10 species), representing four classes of the core dinoflagellate lineage, Gymnodiniales, Prorocentrales, Suessiales, and Gonyaulacales. Dinoflagellate AP gene sequences exhibited high variability, containing variable introns, pseudogenes, single nucleotide polymorphisms and consequent variations in amino acid sequence, indicative of gene duplication events and consistent with the “birth-and-death” model of gene evolution. Further sequence comparison showed that dinoflagellate APs likely belong to an atypical type AP (PhoAaty), which shares conserved motifs with counterparts in marine bacteria, cyanobacteria, green algae, haptophytes, and stramenopiles. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that PhoAaty probably originated from an ancestral gene in bacteria and evolved divergently in marine phytoplankton. Because variations in AP amino acid sequences may lead to differential subcellular localization and potentially different metal ion requirements, the multiple types of APs in algae may have resulted from selection for diversifying strategies to utilize DOP in the P variable marine environment. PMID:26379645

  9. Spatio-temporal distribution of net-collected phytoplankton community and its response to marine exploitation in Xiangshan Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhibing; Zhu, Xuyu; Gao, Yu; Chen, Quanzhen; Zeng, Jiangning; Zhu, Genhai

    2013-07-01

    To explore the spatial-temporal distribution of the phytoplankton community and evaluate the combined effects of marine resource exploitation, net-collected phytoplankton and physical-chemical parameters were investigated in the Xiangshan Bay during the four seasons of 2010. A total of eight phyla, 97 genera, and 310 species were found, including 232 diatom species, 45 dinoflagellate species and 33 other taxa. The phytoplankton abundances presented a significant ( P<0.001) seasonal difference with the average of 60.66×104 cells/m3. Diatoms (mainly consisting of Coscinodiscus jonesianus, Cerataulina pelagica, Skeleto n ema costatum, and genus Chaetoceros) dominated the phytoplankton assemblage in all seasons. We found great spatio-temporal variation in community composition based on the multidimensional scaling and similarity analysis. Canonical correspondence analysis show that temperature, nutrition, illumination, and salinity were the main variables associated with microalgal assemblage. Compared with the previous studies, an increase in phytoplankton abundance and change in the dominant species coincided with increased exploitation activities in this bay (e.g. operation of coastal power plants, intensive mariculture, tidal flat reclamation, and industrial and agricultural development). The present findings suggest that the government should exercise caution when deciding upon developmental patterns in the sea-related economy.

  10. Toxicological effects of cypermethrin to marine phytoplankton in a co-culture system under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Hui; Nie, Xiang-Ping; Yue, Wen-Jie

    2011-08-01

    The growth of three marine phytoplankton species Skeletonema costatum, Scrippsiella trochoidea and Chattonella marina and the response of the antioxidant defense system have been investigated on exposure to commercial cypermethrin for 96 h and 32 days in a co-culture system. Growth of the three species was generally comparable over 96 h with an inoculation of 1:3:6.5 (C. marina:S. trochoidea:S. costatum), with stimulation at 5 μg l(-1) and inhibition under higher concentrations (50, 100 μg l(-1)). However, when inoculating at ratios of 1:1:1 during a 32 day test, S. costatum became the most sensitive species and was significantly inhibited in all test groups under the dual stresses of cypermethrin and interspecies competition. The growth of C. marina was significantly inhibited at the concentrations higher than 5 μg l(-1), while the growth of S. trochoidea was significantly promoted at low concentrations. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities significantly increased during 6-12 h exposure periods in test treatments at low concentrations, and enhanced in the control as well due to interspecies competition. The lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde was enhanced at high concentrations, but did not increase in control and low concentration cultures with high SOD activities, indicating that algal cells activated the antioxidant enzymes promptly to protect the cells from lipid membrane damage. Results from this study suggested that cypermethrin pollution in maricultural sea waters might lead to a shift in phytoplankton community structure from diatom to harmful dinoflagellate species, and thus potentially stimulatory for harmful algal blooms.

  11. Phosphate transporters in marine phytoplankton and their viruses: cross-domain commonalities in viral-host gene exchanges.

    PubMed

    Monier, Adam; Welsh, Rory M; Gentemann, Chelle; Weinstock, George; Sodergren, Erica; Armbrust, E Virginia; Eisen, Jonathan A; Worden, Alexandra Z

    2012-01-01

    Phosphate (PO(4)) is an important limiting nutrient in marine environments. Marine cyanobacteria scavenge PO(4) using the high-affinity periplasmic phosphate binding protein PstS. The pstS gene has recently been identified in genomes of cyanobacterial viruses as well. Here, we analyse genes encoding transporters in genomes from viruses that infect eukaryotic phytoplankton. We identified inorganic PO(4) transporter-encoding genes from the PHO4 superfamily in several virus genomes, along with other transporter-encoding genes. Homologues of the viral pho4 genes were also identified in genome sequences from the genera that these viruses infect. Genome sequences were available from host genera of all the phytoplankton viruses analysed except the host genus Bathycoccus. Pho4 was recovered from Bathycoccus by sequencing a targeted metagenome from an uncultured Atlantic Ocean population. Phylogenetic reconstruction showed that pho4 genes from pelagophytes, haptophytes and infecting viruses were more closely related to homologues in prasinophytes than to those in what, at the species level, are considered to be closer relatives (e.g. diatoms). We also identified PHO4 superfamily members in ocean metagenomes, including new metagenomes from the Pacific Ocean. The environmental sequences grouped with pelagophytes, haptophytes, prasinophytes and viruses as well as bacteria. The analyses suggest that multiple independent pho4 gene transfer events have occurred between marine viruses and both eukaryotic and bacterial hosts. Additionally, pho4 genes were identified in available genomes from viruses that infect marine eukaryotes but not those that infect terrestrial hosts. Commonalities in marine host-virus gene exchanges indicate that manipulation of host-PO(4) uptake is an important adaptation for viral proliferation in marine systems. Our findings suggest that PO(4) -availability may not serve as a simple bottom-up control of marine phytoplankton.

  12. Water quality, phytoplankton and zooplankton of Par Pond and Pond B. Volume 2. Phytoplankton. Final report, January 1984-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Chimney, M.J.; Cody, W.R.; Starkel, W.M.

    1985-08-01

    This document reports on the Par Pond and Pond B phytoplankton community. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the biological communities and environmental conditions in Par Pond and Pond B; (2) assess the impact and significance of entrainment losses of plankton at the Par Pond pumphouse; (3) assess the impact of heated discharge on the biotic communities throughout the reservoir; and (4) help determine if Par Pond maintains an indigenous balanced biological community as defined in state and federal regulations. A total of 368 phytoplankton taxa, representing all the major taxonomic groups characteristic of North American freshwaters, were identified from Par Pond and Pond B during this study (73 Bacillariophyta, 166 Chlorophyta, 30 Chrysophyta, 5 Cryptophyta, 47 Cyanophyta, 18 Euglenophyta, 11 phytoflaggelates and 18 Pyrrophyta).

  13. Effects of environmental stresses on the species composition of phytoplankton populations. Final report, 1 March 1979-15 July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J. H.; Sanders, J. G.

    1980-07-01

    Studies concerned with the impact of anthropogenic stress associated with coastally located power plants on the species composition of marine phytoplankton assemblages have been underway under this Contract for 24 months. The impact of three pollutants associated with power plant cooling water systems has been studied: copper, chlorine, and thermal elevation. The primary goal has been to determine whether chronic addition of these pollutants at sublethal levels can affect the species composition and the succession of dominant species in natural phytoplankton assemblages. Stresses have been studied both singly and in combination. In conjunction with these primary objectives, a number of related problems imvolving phytoplankton response to pollutants and to zooplankton grazing have been studied. These experiments have been performed both in the large volume enclosures outdoors, and in laboratory cultures under constant conditions.

  14. Marine phytoplankton CO2 records since the Miocene - magnitudes of change inplied by cellular process models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, H. M.; Mejia, L. M.; Abrevaya, L.; Hernandez-Sanchez, M. T.; Bolton, C. T.; Mendez-Vicente, A.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 proxy records from the Mio-Pliocene rely heavily on data from the carbon isotopic fractionation of marine phytoplankton during photosynthesis (ep). However, fractionation is also sensitive to cell size, growth rate, and the degree of active C concentration at the site of photosynthesis. The ACTI-CO cell model provides one venue for exploring the implications of these multiple factors for the CO2 value consistent with a given ep determination. Using our recent alkenone ep record from the last 14 Ma, we explore in ACTI-CO mechanisms for using constraints of coccolith size for cell geometry, and coccolith calcification and isotopic fractionation coccoliths to constrain changes in carbon acquisition and the consequences for CO2 estimates. In addition, we present a new ep reconstruction for the past 13 Ma from the Equatorial Pacific based on diatom-bound organic matter . The isolation of pennate diatoms assures a similar cell geometry for the entire period, so that unlike the alkenone record, ep is not sensitive to temporal changes in cell size. The similar trends in CO2 from the size-corrected alkenone ep record and the diatom record suggest that there is a common global CO2 trend, and that size correction of the alkenone record reliably accounts for cell geometry effects. We employ the ACTI-CO model to evaluate the potential influence of changes in active carbon uptake on the magnitude of CO2 decrease since the Miocene.

  15. Impact of measurement uncertainties on determination of chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficient for marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, David; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Neukermans, Griet; Calzado, Violeta Sanjuan; Trees, Charles; Ampolo-Rella, Marina; Neil, Claire; Cunningham, Alex

    2014-12-01

    Understanding variability in the chlorophyll-specific absorption of marine phytoplankton, aph*Chl (λ), is essential for primary production modelling, calculation of underwater light field characteristics, and development of algorithms for remote sensing of chlorophyll concentrations. Previous field and laboratory studies have demonstrated significant apparent variability in aph*Chl (λ) for natural samples and algal cultures. However, the potential impact of measurement uncertainties on derived values of aph*Chl (λ) has received insufficient study. This study presents an analysis of measurement uncertainties for a data set collected in the Ligurian Sea in Spring and assesses the impact on estimates of aph*Chl (λ). It is found that a large proportion of apparent variability in this set of aph*Chl (λ) can be attributed to measurement errors. Application of the same analysis to the global NOMAD data set suggests that a significant fraction of variability in aph*Chl (λ) may also be due to measurement errors. The copyright line for this article was changed on 16 JAN 2015 after original online publication.

  16. A universal driver of macroevolutionary change in the size of marine phytoplankton over the Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Finkel, Z V; Sebbo, J; Feist-Burkhardt, S; Irwin, A J; Katz, M E; Schofield, O M E; Young, J R; Falkowski, P G

    2007-12-18

    The size structure of phytoplankton assemblages strongly influences energy transfer through the food web and carbon cycling in the ocean. We determined the macroevolutionary trajectory in the median size of dinoflagellate cysts to compare with the macroevolutionary size change in other plankton groups. We found the median size of the dinoflagellate cysts generally decreases through the Cenozoic. Diatoms exhibit an extremely similar pattern in their median size over time, even though species diversity of the two groups has opposing trends, indicating that the macroevolutionary size change is an active response to selection pressure rather than a passive response to changes in diversity. The changes in the median size of dinoflagellate cysts are highly correlated with both deep ocean temperatures and the thermal gradient between the surface and deep waters, indicating the magnitude and frequency of nutrient availability may have acted as a selective factor in the macroevolution of cell size in the plankton. Our results suggest that climate, because it affects stratification in the ocean, is a universal abiotic driver that has been responsible for macroevolutionary changes in the size structure of marine planktonic communities over the past 65 million years of Earth's history.

  17. Controls on marine carbon fluxes via phytoplankton-mesoplankton interactions in continental shelf waters

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Sherr, B.F.; Sherr, E.B.

    1992-01-01

    The project is an in-depth evaluation of the phytoplankton [yields] phagotrophic protist trophic link. The principal goals of the first year are to develop methods for the second phase of the Ocean Margins Program: investigations in the field. Our project is focused on: impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on phytoplankton; impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on bacterioplankton; taxon-specific growth rates of phytoplankton in situ, as they are affected by phagotrophy rates.

  18. Photochemical responses of three marine phytoplankton species exposed to ultraviolet radiation and increased temperature: role of photoprotective mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Halac, S R; Villafañe, V E; Gonçalves, R J; Helbling, E W

    2014-12-01

    We carried out experiments using long-term (5-7 days) exposure of marine phytoplankton species to solar radiation, in order to assess the joint effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and temperature on the photochemical responses and photoprotective mechanisms. In the experiments, carried out at Atlantic coast of Patagonia (43°18.7'S; 65°2.5'W) in spring-summer 2011, we used three species as model organisms: the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans, the chlorophyte Dunaliella salina and the haptophyte Isochrysis galbana. They were exposed under: (1) two radiation quality treatments (by using different filters): P (PAR, >400 nm) and PAB (PAR+UV-A+UV-B, >280 nm); (2) two radiation intensities (100% and 50%) and (3) two experimental temperatures: 18 °C and 23 °C during summer and 15 °C and 20 °C in spring experiments, simulating a 5 °C increase under a scenario of climate change. In addition, short-term (4h) artificial radiation exposure experiments were implemented to study vertical migration of cells pre- and non-acclimated to solar radiation. We observed species-specific responses: P. micans displayed a better photochemical performance and a lower inhibition induced by UVR than D. salina and I. galbana. In accordance, P. micans was the only species that showed a synthesis of UV-absorbing compounds (UVACs) during the experiment. On the other hand, non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) was activated in D. salina at noon throughout the exposure, while I. galbana did not show a regular NPQ pattern. This mechanism was almost absent in P. micans. Regarding vertical migration, I. galbana showed the most pronounced displacement to deepest layers since the first two hours of exposure in pre- and non-acclimated cells, while only non-acclimated D. salina cells moved to depth at the end of the experiment. Finally, temperature partially counteracted solar radiation inhibition in D. salina and I. galbana, whereas no effect was observed upon P. micans. In particular, significant

  19. Polychlorinated biphenyls may alter marine trophic pathways by reducing phytoplankton size and production.

    PubMed

    O'Connors, H B; Wurster, C F; Powers, C D; Biggs, D C; Rowland, R G

    1978-08-25

    Polychlorinated biphenyls at concentrations of 1 to 10 micrograms per liter reduced phytoplankton biomass and size in natural estuarine phytoplankton communities grown within dialysis bags in situ in an estuarine marsh. In polychlorinated biphenyls-contaminated waters, these changes could increase the number of trophic levels and divert the flow of biomass from harvestable fish to jellyfish and other gelatinous predators.

  20. Vertical migration and motility responses in three marine phytoplankton species exposed to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Peter R; Häder, Donat-P; Gonçalves, Rodrigo J; Marcoval, M Alejandra; Villafañe, Virginia E; Helbling, E Walter

    2007-01-01

    Diurnal vertical migration in the water column and the impact of solar radiation on motility were investigated in three marine phytoplankton species: Tetraselmis suecica, Dunaliella salina and Gymnodinium chlorophorum. Cells were exposed to solar radiation either in ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280-400 nm) transparent Plexiglas tubes (45 cm length, 10 cm diameter) or in quartz tubes under three radiation treatments: PAB (280-700 nm), PA (320-700 nm) and P (400-700 nm). The three species displayed different behavior after exposure to solar radiation. Tetraselmis suecica was insensitive to UVR and under high solar radiation levels, cells accumulated preferentially near the surface. Exposure experiments did not indicate any significant changes in swimming speed nor in the percentage of motile cells after 5 h of exposure. On the other hand, D. salina was sensitive to UV-B displaying a significant decrease in swimming speed and percentage of motile cells after 2-3 h of exposure. Moreover, D. salina cells migrated deep in the water column when irradiance was high. The response of G. chlorophorum was in between that of the other two species tested, with a slight (but significant) decrease in swimming speed and percentage of motile cells in all radiation treatments after 5 h of exposure. While G. chlorophorum cells were more or less homogenously distributed in the water column, a slight (but significant) avoidance response to high radiation was observed at local noon, with cells migrating deep in the water column. Our data clearly indicate that these sub-lethal effects of solar radiation are species-specific and they might have important implications for the aquatic ecosystem.

  1. Carbon budget of a marine phytoplankton-herbivore system with carbon-14 as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, A.E.; Lorenzen, C.J.

    1980-09-01

    Adult female and stage V Calanus pacificus were fed /sup 14/C-labeled phytoplankton in the laboratory in the form of monospecific cultures and natural populations. A carbon budget was constructed by following the /sup 14/C activity and the specific activity, over 48 h, in the phytoplankton, copepod, dissolved organic, dissolved inorganic, and fecal carbon compartments. The average incorporation of carbon into the copepod's body was 45% of the phytoplankton carbon available. Of the phytoplankton carbon, 27% appeared as dissolved organic carbon, 24% as dissolved inorganic carbon, and 3 to 4% in the form of fecal pellets. All of the tracer was recovered at the end of the experiments. The specific activity of the phytoplankton compartment was constant throughout each experiment. The other compartments had initial specific activities of zero, or close to zero, and increased throughout the experiment. In most experiments, the copepod specific activity equalled that of the phytoplankton at the end of 48 h, while the dissolved organic carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon, and fecal specific activities remained well below that of the phytoplankton.

  2. Impact of phytoplankton community structure and function on marine particulate optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Malcolm Neil

    Phytoplankton are an ecologically important and diverse group of organisms whose distribution, abundance, and population dynamics vary significantly over small spatial (cm) and temporal (minutes) scales in the coastal ocean. Our inability to observe phytoplankton community structure and function at these small scales has severely limited our understanding of the fundamental ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that drive phytoplankton growth, mortality, adaptation and speciation. The goal of this dissertation was to enhance our understanding of phytoplankton ecology by improving in situ observational techniques based on the optical properties of cells, colonies, populations, and communities. Field and laboratory studies were used to determine the effects of phytoplankton species composition, morphology, and physiology on the inherent optical properties of communities and to explore the adaptive significance of bio-optically important cellular characteristics. Initial field studies found a strong association between species composition and the relative magnitude and shape of particulate absorption, scattering, and attenuation coefficient spectra. Subsequent field studies using scanning flow cytometry to directly measure optically important phytoplankton and non-algal particle characteristics demonstrated that the size and pigment content of large (>20 microm) phytoplankton cells and colonies vary significantly with the slope of particulate attenuation and absorption spectra, and with the ratio of particulate scattering to absorption. These relationships enabled visualization of phytoplankton community composition and mortality over small spatial and temporal scales derived from high resolution optical measurements acquired with an autonomous profiling system. Laboratory studies with diverse uni-algal cultures showed that morphological and physiological characteristics of cells and colonies can account for ˜30% of the optical variation observed in natural

  3. Carbon isotope fractionation by marine phytoplankton in culture: The effects of CO[sub 2] concentration, pH, temperature, and species

    SciTech Connect

    Hinga, K.R.; Arthur, M.A.; Pilson, M.E.Q.; Whitaker, D. )

    1994-03-01

    Carbon isotopes are fractionated during many biological and geological processes and often one can infer the nature of the conditions and processes by looking at the isotopic ratios. This study investigates how dissolved carbon dioxide concentrations, temperature, pH, and phytoplankton species affect the fractionation of carbon isotopes during the growth of marine phytoplankton using single species cultures. 49 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Controls on marine carbon fluxes via phytoplankton-mesoplankton interactions in continental shelf waters

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Sherr, B.F.; Sherr, E.B.

    1992-01-01

    The principal goals of our projects were to develop methods for the second phase of the Ocean Margins Program: investigations in the field. Our project is focused on: (1) Impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on phytoplankton, particularly on phototrophic cells < 5 [mu]m in size which are not effectively grazed by metazooplankton; the impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on bacterioplankton; and the taxon-specific growth rates of phytoplankton in situ, as they are affected by phagotrophy rates.

  5. Does the 14C method estimate net photosynthesis? II. Implications from cyclostat studies of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward A.

    2014-09-01

    Two species of marine phytoplankton, Isochrysis galbana and Chlorella kessleri, were grown in a continuous culture system on a 12-h:12-h light:dark cycle of illumination under nitrate-limited growth conditions. At growth rates of ~1 d-1, production rates estimated from 14C uptake were not significantly different from production rates estimated from changes in particulate organic carbon (POC) and total organic carbon (TOC). At growth rates of ~0.35 d-1, however, production rates based on uptake of 14C significantly (p<0.05) overestimated production rates based on changes in POC and TOC in all cases for C. kessleri and after 24 h for I. galbana. The ratio of production based on 14C uptake to production based on changes in POC and TOC concentrations was in all cases higher after 24 h than after 12 h. The extent of overestimation after a 24-h incubation at ~0.35 d-1 was about 23 and 40% in the cases of I. galbana and C. kessleri, respectively. Dark respiration rates estimated from changes in 14C activity during the dark period were lower than the rates estimated from changes of POC and TOC concentrations during the 12 h of darkness because only about 73% of the carbon respired during the dark period had been fixed during the previous 12-h photoperiod. The fact that the 14C method tends to overestimate net carbon assimilation by a greater percentage at low growth rates than at high growth rates probably reflects the greater efficiency of intracellular recycling of respired CO2 at high growth rates. The fact that the extent of overestimation is greater when cells are grown on a light:dark cycle probably reflects the fact that not all carbon respired in the dark was fixed during the previous photoperiod and that intracellular recycling of respired CO2 during the photoperiod is inefficient during some phases of the synchronized growth that tends to be entrained by light:dark cycles.

  6. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-11-24

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation.

  7. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  8. [Behaviors of engineered nanoparticles in aquatic environments and impacts on marine phytoplankton].

    PubMed

    Li, Man-lu; Jiang, Yue-lu

    2015-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) have shown invaluable societal benefits and applications in drug targeting, biological imaging and industrial products. ENPs enter the water body through various paths during the processes of production, usage and emission, therefore the behavior and the biosafety of ENPs in water bodies have attracted increasing attention. As the primary producer of ecosystems, phytoplankton provide nutrients, energy and oxygen for both themselves and organisms at higher trophic levels in the aquatic ecosystems. These primary producers may be exposed to the biological and unpredictable effects of this emergent pollutant to the aquatic ecosystems. Numerous studies have proved the toxic effects of ENPs on phytoplankton, but the mechanisms of entry into the aquatic organisms as well as the stability, fate and biotransformation in phytoplankton still remain unclear. Here, we present a review of the pathways of ENPs entering the water, the subsequent behavior and biological effects of ENPs on phytoplankton with an emphasis on latest findings and current knowledge. Future research and endeavors shall focus further on the understanding of mechanisms, fate and transport of ENPs in the aquatic ecosystems.

  9. Toxicity of natural mixtures of organic pollutants in temperate and polar marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Echeveste, Pedro; Galbán-Malagón, Cristóbal; Dachs, Jordi; Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Agustí, Susana

    2016-11-15

    Semivolatile and persistent organic pollutants (POPs) undergo atmospheric transport before being deposited to the oceans, where they partition to phytoplankton organic matter. The goal of this study was to determine the toxicity of naturally occurring complex mixtures of organic pollutants to temperate and polar phytoplankton communities from the Mediterranean Sea, the North East (NE) Atlantic, and Southern Oceans. The cell abundance of the different phytoplankton groups, chlorophyll a concentrations, viability of the cells, and growth and decay constants were monitored in response to addition of a range of concentrations of mixtures of organic pollutants obtained from seawater extracts. Almost all of the phytoplankton groups were significantly affected by the complex mixtures of non-polar and polar organic pollutants, with toxicity being greater for these mixtures than for single POPs or simple POP mixtures. Cocktails' toxicity arose at concentrations as low as tenfold the field oceanic levels, probably due to a higher chemical activity of the mixture than of simple POPs mixtures. Overall, smaller cells were the most affected, although Mediterranean picophytoplankton was significantly more tolerant to non-polar POPs than picophytoplankton from the Atlantic Ocean or the Bellingshausen Sea microphytoplankton.

  10. A substantial fraction of phytoplankton-derived DON is resistant to degradation by a metabolically versatile, widely distributed marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kimmance, Susan; McCormack, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria for degrading dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and remineralising ammonium is of importance for marine ecosystems, as nitrogen availability frequently limits productivity. Here, we assess the capacity of a widely distributed and metabolically versatile marine bacterium to degrade phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen. To achieve this, we lysed exponentially growing diatoms and used the derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) to support an axenic culture of Alteromonas sp.. Bacterial biomass (as particulate carbon and nitrogen) was monitored for 70 days while growth dynamics (cell count), DOM (DOC, DON) and dissolved nutrient concentrations were monitored for up to 208 days. Bacterial biomass increased rapidly within the first 7 days prior to a period of growth/death cycles potentially linked to rapid nutrient recycling. We found that ≈75% of the initial DOC and ≈35% of the initial DON were consumed by bacteria within 40 and 4 days respectively, leaving a significant fraction of DOM resilient to degradation by this bacterial species. The different rates and extents to which DOC and DON were accessed resulted in changes in DOM stoichiometry and the iterative relationship between DOM quality and bacterial growth over time influenced bacterial cell C:N molar ratio. C:N values increased to 10 during the growth phase before decreasing to values of ≈5, indicating a change from relative N-limitation/C-sufficiency to relative C-limitation/N-sufficiency. Consequently, despite its reported metabolic versatility, we demonstrate that Alteromonas sp. was unable to access all phytoplankton derived DOM and that a bacterial community is likely to be required. By making the relatively simple assumption that an experimentally derived fraction of DOM remains resilient to bacterial degradation, these experimental results were corroborated by numerical simulations using a previously published model describing the interaction

  11. Effect of (a)synchronous light fluctuation on diversity, functional and structural stability of a marine phytoplankton metacommunity.

    PubMed

    Guelzow, Nils; Dirks, Merten; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    Disentangling the mechanisms that maintain the stability of communities and ecosystem properties has become a major research focus in ecology in the face of anthropogenic environmental change. Dispersal plays a pivotal role in maintaining diversity in spatially subdivided communities, but only a few experiments have simultaneously investigated how dispersal and environmental fluctuation affect community dynamics and ecosystem stability. We performed an experimental study using marine phytoplankton species as model organisms to test these mechanisms in a metacommunity context. We established three levels of dispersal and exposed the phytoplankton to fluctuating light levels, where fluctuations were either spatially asynchronous or synchronous across patches of the metacommunity. Dispersal had no effect on diversity and ecosystem function (biomass), while light fluctuations affected both evenness and community biomass. The temporal variability of community biomass was reduced by fluctuating light and temporal beta diversity was influenced interactively by dispersal and fluctuation, whereas spatial variability in community biomass and beta diversity were barely affected by treatments. Along the establishing gradient of species richness and dominance, community biomass increased but temporal variability of biomass decreased, thus highest stability was associated with species-rich but highly uneven communities and less influenced by compensatory dynamics. In conclusion, both specific traits (dominance) and diversity (richness) affected the stability of metacommunities under fluctuating conditions.

  12. Microzooplankton grazing and phytoplankton growth in marine mesocosms with increased CO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suffrian, K.; Simonelli, P.; Nejstgaard, J. C.; Putzeys, S.; Carotenuto, Y.; Antia, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Microzooplankton grazing and algae growth responses to increasing pCO2 levels (350, 700 and 1050 μatm) were investigated in nitrate and phosphate fertilized mesocosms during the PeECE III experiment 2005. Grazing and growth rates were estimated by the dilution technique combined with taxon specific HPLC pigment analysis. Phytoplankton and microzooplankton composition were determined by light microscopy. Despite a range up to 3 times the present CO2 levels, there were no clear differences in any measured parameter between the different CO2 treatments. Thus, during the first 9 days of the experiment the algae community standing stock (SS), measured as chlorophyll a (Chl a), showed the highest instantaneous grow rates (0.02-0.99 d-1) and increased from ca 2-3 to 6-12 μg l-1, in all mesocosms. Afterwards the phytoplankton SS decreased in all mesocosms until the end of the experiment. The microzooplankton SS, that was mainly dinoflagellates and ciliates varied between 23 and 130 μg C l-1, peaking on day 13-15, apparently responding to the phytoplankton development. Instantaneous Chl a growth rates were generally higher than the grazing rates, indicating only a limited overall effect of microzooplankton grazing on the most dominant phytoplankton. Diatoms and prymnesiophytes were significantly grazed (14-43% of the SS d-1) only in the pre-bloom phase when they were in low numbers and in the post-bloom phase when they were already limited by low nutrients and/or virus lysis. The cyanobacteria populations appeared more effected by microzooplankton grazing, generally removing 20-65% of the SS d-1.

  13. MARINER 9 SPACE PROBE UNDERGOES FINAL CHECKS PRIOR TO ENCAPSULATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Technicians make final checks of the Mariner I spacecraft prior to its encapsulation. The Mars- bound spacecraft lifted off aboard an Atlas-Centaur rocket from Cape Kennedy at 6:23 p.m. EDT, May 30, 1971. Following a flight of nearly six months, the spacecraft, designated Mariner 9, will enter orbit and transmit data about the Red Planet's surface and atmosphere.

  14. Repercussions of salinity changes and osmotic stress in marine phytoplankton species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'ors, A.; Bartolomé, M. C.; Sánchez-Fortún, S.

    2016-06-01

    The short-term effect of low salinity was studied using laboratory protocols on some coastal phytoplankton species such as chlorophycea Tetraselmis suecica, among diatom the strain Nitzschia N1c1 and dinoflagellates Alexandrium minutum and Prorocentrum lima. All of cultures were exposed to low salinities, and cell growth rate, photosynthetic quantum yield (ΦPSII), and gross photosynthesis (Pg) were analyzed. Growth rate inhibition was similar in all species, and all of them also tolerate short-term exposures to salinities in the range 5-35. There were no significant differences between ΦPSII and Pg endpoints from Tetraselmis suecica and Nitzschia sp., while Alexandrium minutum and Prorocentrum lima displayed a higher affectation rate on Pg than on ΦPSII activity. The influence of low salinity was higher on respiration in T. suecica, while both dinoflagellates had higher net photosynthesis. Nitzschia sp. exhibited similar involvement of the two photosynthetic parameters. Therefore, although the four phytoplankton monocultures studied are able to survive in internal areas of estuaries under low salinity conditions, the photosynthetic activity is more affected than the growth rate in all phytoplankton communities studied except in chlorophycea T. suecica, which has increased tolerance for this salinity decrease.

  15. Calculated quantum yield of photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the Marine Light-Mixed Layers (59 deg N, 21 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Lee, Z. P.; Marra, John; Steward, R. G.; Perry, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    The quantum yield of photosynthesis (mol C/mol photons) was calculated at six depths for the waters of the Marine Light-Mixed Layer (MLML) cruise of May 1991. As there were photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) but no spectral irradiance measurements for the primary production incubations, three ways are presented here for the calculation of the absorbed photons (AP) by phytoplankton for the purpose of calculating phi. The first is based on a simple, nonspectral model; the second is based on a nonlinear regression using measured PAR values with depth; and the third is derived through remote sensing measurements. We show that the results of phi calculated using the nonlinear regreesion method and those using remote sensing are in good agreement with each other, and are consistent with the reported values of other studies. In deep waters, however, the simple nonspectral model may cause quantum yield values much higher than theoretically possible.

  16. Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., an Aromatic-Hydrocarbon-Degrading Marine Bacterium Found Associated with Laboratory Cultures of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Green, David H.; Nichols, Peter D.; Whitman, William B.; Semple, Kirk T.; Aitken, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A strictly aerobic, halotolerant, rod-shaped bacterium, designated strain TG408, was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (CCAP1077/1C) by enrichment with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole carbon source. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed this organism within the order Xanthomonadales of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Its closest relatives included representatives of the Hydrocarboniphaga-Nevskia-Sinobacter clade (<92% sequence similarity) in the family Sinobacteraceae. The strain exhibited a narrow nutritional spectrum, preferring to utilize aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds and small organic acids. Notably, it displayed versatility in degrading two- and three-ring PAHs. Moreover, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was detected in lysates, indicating that this strain utilizes the meta-cleavage pathway for aromatic compound degradation. Cells produced surface blebs and contained a single polar flagellum. The predominant isoprenoid quinone of strain TG408 was Q-8, and the dominant fatty acids were C16:0, C16:1 ω7c, and C18:1 ω7c. The G+C content of the isolate's DNA was 64.3 mol% ± 0.34 mol%. On the basis of distinct phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, strain TG408 represents a novel genus and species in the class Gammaproteobacteria for which the name Polycyclovorans algicola gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. Quantitative PCR primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene of this strain were developed and used to show that this organism is found associated with other species of marine phytoplankton. Phytoplankton may be a natural biotope in the ocean where new species of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria await discovery and which contribute significantly to natural remediation processes. PMID:23087039

  17. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETRRCII, mol e- mol RCII-1 s-1) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal – oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETRRCII: CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements. PMID:26171963

  18. Interacting Effects of Light and Iron Availability on the Coupling of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and CO2-Assimilation in Marine Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Schuback, Nina; Schallenberg, Christina; Duckham, Carolyn; Maldonado, Maria T; Tortell, Philippe D

    2015-01-01

    Iron availability directly affects photosynthesis and limits phytoplankton growth over vast oceanic regions. For this reason, the availability of iron is a crucial variable to consider in the development of active chlorophyll a fluorescence based estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity. These bio-optical approaches require a conversion factor to derive ecologically-relevant rates of CO2-assimilation from estimates of electron transport in photosystem II. The required conversion factor varies significantly across phytoplankton taxa and environmental conditions, but little information is available on its response to iron limitation. In this study, we examine the role of iron limitation, and the interacting effects of iron and light availability, on the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and CO2-assimilation in marine phytoplankton. Our results show that excess irradiance causes increased decoupling of carbon fixation and electron transport, particularly under iron limiting conditions. We observed that reaction center II specific rates of electron transport (ETR(RCII), mol e- mol RCII(-1) s(-1)) increased under iron limitation, and we propose a simple conceptual model for this observation. We also observed a strong correlation between the derived conversion factor and the expression of non-photochemical quenching. Utilizing a dataset from in situ phytoplankton assemblages across a coastal--oceanic transect in the Northeast subarctic Pacific, this relationship was used to predict ETR(RCII): CO2-assimilation conversion factors and carbon-based primary productivity from FRRF data, without the need for any additional measurements.

  19. The Mixed Lineage Nature of Nitrogen Transport and Assimilation in Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton: A Case Study of Micromonas

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Sarah M.; Plant, Joshua N.; Worden, Alexandra Z.

    2010-01-01

    The prasinophyte order Mamiellales contains several widespread marine picophytoplankton (≤2 μm diameter) taxa, including Micromonas and Ostreococcus. Complete genome sequences are available for two Micromonas isolates, CCMP1545 and RCC299. We performed in silico analyses of nitrogen transporters and related assimilation genes in CCMP1545 and RCC299 and compared these with other green lineage organisms as well as Chromalveolata, fungi, bacteria, and archaea. Phylogenetic reconstructions of ammonium transporter (AMT) genes revealed divergent types contained within each Mamiellales genome. Some were affiliated with plant and green algal AMT1 genes and others with bacterial AMT2 genes. Land plant AMT2 genes were phylogenetically closer to archaeal transporters than to Mamiellales AMT2 genes. The Mamiellales represent the first green algal genomes to harbor AMT2 genes, which are not found in Chlorella and Chlamydomonas or the chromalveolate algae analyzed but are present in oomycetes. Fewer nitrate transporter (NRT) than AMT genes were identified in the Mamiellales. NRT1 was found in all but CCMP1545 and showed highest similarity to Mamiellales and proteobacterial NRTs. NRT2 genes formed a bootstrap-supported clade basal to other green lineage organisms. Several nitrogen-related genes were colocated, forming a nitrogen gene cluster. Overall, RCC299 showed the most divergent suite of nitrogen transporters within the various Mamiellales genomes, and we developed TaqMan quantitative polymerase chain reaction primer–probes targeting a subset of these, as well as housekeeping genes, in RCC299. All those investigated showed expression either under standard growth conditions or under nitrogen depletion. Like other recent publications, our findings show a higher degree of “mixed lineage gene affiliations” among eukaryotes than anticipated, and even the most phylogenetically anomalous versions appear to be functional. Nitrogen is often considered a regulating factor for

  20. Functional traits explain phytoplankton community structure and seasonal dynamics in a marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kyle F; Litchman, Elena; Klausmeier, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental yet elusive goal of ecology is to predict the structure of communities from the environmental conditions they experience. Trait-based approaches to terrestrial plant communities have shown that functional traits can help reveal the mechanisms underlying community assembly, but such approaches have not been tested on the microbes that dominate ecosystem processes in the ocean. Here, we test whether functional traits can explain community responses to seasonal environmental fluctuation, using a time series of the phytoplankton of the English Channel. We show that interspecific variation in response to major limiting resources, light and nitrate, can be well-predicted by lab-measured traits characterising light utilisation, nitrate utilisation and maximum growth rate. As these relationships were predicted a priori, using independently measured traits, our results show that functional traits provide a strong mechanistic foundation for understanding the structure and dynamics of ecological communities.

  1. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Haydn F.; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%. PMID:25814607

  2. Genome Sequence of Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus Strain MCTG13d, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-06-18

    Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus strain MCTG13d is a recently discovered bacterium that is associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and that almost exclusively utilizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 2,474,654 bp with 2,385 genes and has an average G+C content of 53.1%.

  3. Genome Sequence of Polycyclovorans algicola Strain TG408, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Tony; Thompson, Haydn F; Angelova, Angelina; Whitman, William B; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishnaveni; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T B K; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-03-26

    Polycyclovorans algicola strain TG408 is a recently discovered bacterium associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and exhibits the ability to utilize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) almost exclusively as sole sources of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 3,653,213 bp, with 3,477 genes and an average G+C content of 63.8%.

  4. Genome Sequence of Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus Strain MCTG13d, an Obligate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Associated with Marine Eukaryotic Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, William B.; Huntemann, Marcel; Copeland, Alex; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Pillay, Manoj; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Andersen, Evan; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, T. B. K.; Ngan, Chew Yee; Chovatia, Mansi; Daum, Chris; Shapiro, Nicole; Cantor, Michael N.; Woyke, Tanja

    2015-01-01

    Porticoccus hydrocarbonoclasticus strain MCTG13d is a recently discovered bacterium that is associated with marine eukaryotic phytoplankton and that almost exclusively utilizes polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as the sole source of carbon and energy. Here, we present the genome sequence of this strain, which is 2,474,654 bp with 2,385 genes and has an average G+C content of 53.1%. PMID:26089431

  5. Toxic and harmful marine phytoplankton and microalgae (HABs) in Mexican Coasts.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Becerril, David U; Alonso-Rodríguez, Rosalba; Alvarez-Góngora, Cynthia; Barón-Campis, Sofia A; Ceballos-Corona, Gerardo; Herrera-Silveira, Jorge; Meave Del Castillo, María E; Juárez-Ruíz, Norma; Merino-Virgilio, Fanny; Morales-Blake, Alejandro; Ochoa, José L; Orellana-Cepeda, Elizabeth; Ramírez-Camarena, Casimiro; Rodríguez-Salvador, Raciel

    2007-08-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are becoming an increasing problem to human health and environment (including effects on natural and cultured resources, tourism and ecosystems) all over the world. In Mexico a number of human fatalities and important economic losses have occurred in the last 30 years because of these events. There are about 70 species of planktonic and non-planktonic microalgae considered harmful in Mexican coasts. The most important toxin-producing species are the dinoflagellates Gymnodinium catenatum and Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum, in the Mexican Pacific, and Karenia brevis in the Gulf of Mexico, and consequently the poisonings documented in Mexico are Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) and Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning (NSP). Although there is evidence that Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP), Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) and Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) also occur in Mexico, these problems are reported less frequently. The type of phytoplankton and epiphytic microalgae, their toxins and harmful effects as well as current methodology used to study these phenomena are presented in this paper. As an experienced group of workers, we include descriptions of monitoring and mitigation programs, our proposals for collaborative projects and perspectives on future research.

  6. Modelling the interactions between ammonium and nitrate uptake in marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, K. J.; Fasham, M. J. R.; Hipkin, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    An empirically based mathematical model is presented which can simulate the major features of the interactions between ammonium and nitrate transport and assimilation in phytoplankton. The model (ammonium-nitrate interaction model), which is configured to simulate a generic microalga rather than a specified species, is constructed on simplified biochemical bases. A major requirement for parametrization is that the N:C ratio of the algae must be known and that transport and internal pool sizes need to be expressed per unit of cell C. The model uses the size of an internal pool of an early organic product of N assimilation (glutamine) to regulate rapid responses in ammonium-nitrate interactions. The synthesis of enzymes for the reduction of nitrate through to ammonium is induced by the size of the internal nitrate pool and repressed by the size of the glutamine pool. The assimilation of intracellular ammonium (into glutamine) is considered to be a constitutive process subjected to regulation by the size of the glutamine pool. Longer term responses have been linked to the nutrient history of the cell using the N:C cell quota. N assimilation in darkness is made a function of the amount of surplus C present and thus only occurs at low values of N:C. The model can simulate both qualitative and quantitative temporal shifts in the ammonium-nitrate interaction, while inclusion of a derivation of the standard quota model enables a concurrent simulation of cell growth and changes in nutrient status.

  7. Chemical cues induce consumer-specific defenses in a bloom-forming marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jeremy D.; Smalley, Gabriela W.; Barsby, Todd; Anderson, Jon T.; Hay, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Blooms of the phytoplankton Phaeocystis can comprise 85% of total production and generate major biogeochemical signals across broad oceanic regions. The success of Phaeocystis may result from its ability to change size by many orders of magnitude when it shifts from small cells of 4–6 μm to large colonies of up to 30,000 μm in diameter. Single cells are consumed by ciliates but not copepods, whereas colonies are consumed by copepods but not ciliates. We demonstrate that chemical cues associated with each of these grazers induce consumer-specific, but opposing, morphological transformations in the bloom-forming species Phaeocystis globosa. Chemical cues from grazing copepods suppress colony formation by a significant 60–90%, a response that should be adaptive because copepods feed four times more on colonies versus solitary cells. In contrast, chemical cues from grazing ciliates enhance colony formation by >25%, a response that should be adaptive because ciliates grow three times faster when fed solitary cells versus colonies. Because size-selective predation fundamentally alters community structure and ecosystem function, this chemically cued shift may redirect energy and nutrients from food webs supporting fisheries to those fueling detrital pathways, thus potentially altering ecosystem-level processes such as productivity, carbon storage, and nutrient release. PMID:17563379

  8. Exploring the ammonium and nitrate transport of marine phytoplankton with nutrient analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Balch, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    Radiolabelled methylamine, an ammonium analogue and chlorate, a nitrate analogue, were transported constitutely by laboratory and field populations of phytoplakton. There was no effect of light on the transport of methylamine or chlorate which is contrary to similar measurements made with /sup 15/N-NH/sub 4//sup +/ and /sup 15/N-NO/sub 3//sup -/. The discrepancy appears to result from the fact that the analogues are only transported, while /sup 15/N-NH/sub 4/ and /sup 15/N-NO/sub 3//sup -/ are both transported and assimilated. Transport of ammonium and nitrate appeared to be active; it was against typical values of algal electrochemical gradients. Influx and efflux rates of methylamine and chlorate were measured in pulse-chase experiments; efflux rates increased as intracellular pools filled and net uptake slowed after approximately one to six hours. The pulse-chase experiments indicated that methylamine and chlorate (hence ammonium and nitrate) were stored in two intracellular compartments of diatoms, probably the vacuole and cytoplasm. Laboratory and field experiments demonstrated that chlorate transport by phytoplankton was inhibited when ambient ammonium or nitrite concentrations were high.

  9. Dynamic sinking behaviour in marine phytoplankton: rapid changes in buoyancy may aid in nutrient uptake.

    PubMed

    Gemmell, Brad J; Oh, Genesok; Buskey, Edward J; Villareal, Tracy A

    2016-10-12

    Phytoplankton sinking is an important property that can determine community composition in the photic zone and material loss to the deep ocean. To date, studies of diatom suspension have relied on bulk measurements with assumptions that bulk rates adequately capture the essential characteristics of diatom sinking. However, recent work has illustrated that individual diatom sinking rates vary considerably from the mean bulk rate. In this study, we apply high-resolution optical techniques, individual-based observations of diatom sinking and a recently developed method of flow visualization around freely sinking cells. The results show that in both field samples and laboratory cultures, some large species of centric diatoms are capable of a novel behaviour, whereby cells undergo bursts of rapid sinking that alternate with near-zero sinking rates on the timescales of seconds. We also demonstrate that this behaviour is under direct metabolic control of the cell. We discuss these results in the context of implications for nutrient flux to the cell surface. While nutrient flux in large diatoms increases during fast sinking, current mass transport models cannot incorporate the unsteady sinking behaviour observed in this study. However, large diatoms appear capable of benefiting from the enhanced nutrient flux to their surface during rapid sinking even during brief intervening periods of near-zero sinking rates.

  10. Controls on marine carbon fluxes via phytoplankton-mesoplankton interactions in continental shelf waters. Six month progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Sherr, B.F.; Sherr, E.B.

    1992-12-31

    The project is an in-depth evaluation of the phytoplankton {yields} phagotrophic protist trophic link. The principal goals of the first year are to develop methods for the second phase of the Ocean Margins Program: investigations in the field. Our project is focused on: impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on phytoplankton; impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on bacterioplankton; taxon-specific growth rates of phytoplankton in situ, as they are affected by phagotrophy rates.

  11. Analysis of sea ice and phytoplankton biomarkers in marine sediments from the Nordic Seas - a calibration study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro Rodriguez, A.; Cabedo Sanz, P.; Belt, S.; Brown, T.; Knies, J.; Husum, K.; Giraudeau, J.

    2012-04-01

    The work presented here is part of the Changing Arctic and SubArctic Environment program (EU CASE) which is an Initial Training Network (ITN) on climate change and marine environment and is an interdisciplinary project focussing on biological proxies. One of these proxies is the sea ice diatom biomarker IP25 which is a highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkene synthesised by some Arctic sea-ice diatoms and has been shown to be a specific, stable and sensitive proxy measure of Arctic sea ice when detected in underlying sediments (Belt et al., 2007). The current study focuses on two key elements: (1) An analytical calibration of IP25 isolated from marine sediments and purified using a range of chromatographic methods was conducted in order to improve the quantification of this biomarker in sediment extracts. (2) Analysis of >30 near-surface sediments from the Nordic Seas was carried out to quantify biomarkers previously suggested as indicators of open-water phytoplankton (brassicasterol) (Müller et al., 2011) and sea-ice (IP25) conditions (Belt et al., 2010). The outcomes of the biomarker analyses were used to make comparisons between proxy data and known sea ice conditions in the study area derived from satellite record over the last 20 years. The results of this study should inform longer timescale reconstructions of sea ice conditions in the Nordic sea in the future. Belt, S.T., Massé, G., Rowland. S.J., Poulin. M., Michel. C., LeBlanc. B., (2007). A novel chemical fossil of palaeo sea ice : IP25 . Organic Geochemistry 38 (16-27). Belt, S. T., Vare, L. L., Massé, G., Manners, H. R., Price, J. C., MacLachlan, S. E., Andrews, J. T. & Schmidt, S. (2010) 'Striking similarities in temporal changes to spring sea ice occurrence across the central Canadian Arctic Archipelago over the last 7000 years', Quaternary Science Reviews, 29 (25-26), pp. 3489-3504. Müller, J., Wagner, A., Fahl, K., Stein, R., Prange, M., & Lohmann, G. (2011). Towards quantitative sea ice

  12. Controls on marine carbon fluxes via phytoplankton-mesoplankton interactions in continental shelf waters. Progress report, December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Sherr, B.F.; Sherr, E.B.

    1992-12-31

    The principal goals of our projects were to develop methods for the second phase of the Ocean Margins Program: investigations in the field. Our project is focused on: (1) Impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on phytoplankton, particularly on phototrophic cells < 5 {mu}m in size which are not effectively grazed by metazooplankton; the impact of grazing by phagotrophic protists on bacterioplankton; and the taxon-specific growth rates of phytoplankton in situ, as they are affected by phagotrophy rates.

  13. Does the 14C method estimate net photosynthesis? Implications from batch and continuous culture studies of marine phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Shaofeng; Laws, Edward A.

    2013-12-01

    We carried out batch culture studies with seven species of marine phytoplankton and chemostat studies with two of the seven species to determine whether and to what extent 14C uptake approximated net photosynthesis. In two of seven cases, Isochrysis galbana and Dunaliella tertiolecta, cells uniformly labeled with 14C lost no activity when they were transferred to a 14C-free medium and allowed to grow in the light. In similar experiments with four other species, uniformly labeled cells lost activity when incubated in the light, but the loss rates were only a few percent per day. Thus these six species appear to respire primarily recently fixed carbon. In the case of the remaining species, Chlorella kessleri, loss rates of 14C in the light from uniformly labeled cells were about 29% per day, the apparent ratio of respiration to net photosynthesis being 0.4. Follow-up chemostat studies with I. galbana and C. kessleri grown under both light- and nitrate-limited conditions produced results consistent with the implications of the batch culture work: uptake of 14C by I. galbana after incubations of 24 h yielded estimates of photosynthetic carbon fixation equal to the product of the chemostat dilution rate and the concentration of organic carbon in the growth chamber. Similar experiments with C. kessleri produced 14C-based estimates of photosynthetic carbon fixation that exceeded the net rates of organic carbon production in the growth chamber by roughly 55%. Time-course studies with both species indicated that at high growth rates recently fixed carbon began to enter the respiratory substrate pool after a time lag of several hours, a result consistent with previous work with D. tertiolecta. The lag time appeared to be much shorter at low growth rates. The results with C. kessleri are similar to results previously reported for Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Amphidium carteri. Collectively these results suggest that 14C uptake by species with relatively high ratios of

  14. Phytoplankton excretion revisited: healthy cells may not do it, but how many cells are healthy? Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.M.

    1996-08-06

    The goal of this project was to develop fluorescent probes that could be used on a individual cell basis to determine the physiological condition of phytoplankton cells in the field. Progress gained and problems encounter are described.

  15. Effects of the 1982-1983 El Niño on the marine phytoplankton off northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, Sergio; MuñOz, Pablo

    1987-12-01

    The evolution of phytoplankton was studied between December 1980 and August 1985. A total of 1269 net and water samples were obtained in 11 cruises as part of the Estudio Regional del Fenómeno El Niño-Chile Program covering the area extending from Arica (18°30'S) to Chañaral (26°20'S) from the coast to 200 n. mi (370 km) westward. In the period which preceded the 1982-1983 El Niño event, the coastal phytoplankton consisted predominantly of blooming diatom species which support a large phytoplanktonic biomass. The cell density up to 20 n. mi (37 km) off the coast was over 100 cells mL-1, with a maximum density nucleus near the coast, where values over 1000 cells mL-1 were found. With the anomalous conditions produced by El Niño in December 1982, changes were detected in the phytoplankton biomass and composition. There was a marked decrease in the biomass, the diatom dominance was restricted to a narrow coast band of 2 to 3 n. mi (3.7-5.5 km), and warm water species of diatoms and dinoflagellates reached the coast. These conditions reached their maximum intensity in May 1983. Phytoplankton started to return to normal conditions in December 1983 with a predominance of large diatoms, which support a biomass somewhat larger than that during El Niño. Small diatoms returned as the dominant species in large blooms in 1985. The cell numbers reached values similar to those during pre-Niño conditions, with a normal neritic and oceanic phytoplankton distribution. Red tides caused by the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum were common during normal conditions before and after El Niño.

  16. The Carolina conference on marine biotechnology: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberg, D.

    1985-01-01

    This report summarizes proceedings of a Carolina Conference on Marine Biotechnology held March 24-26, 1985, at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. This report consists of the responders' summary of each topic discussed. The topics presented were General Prospects for Marine Biotechnology, Bioactive Substances from Marine Organisms, Fundamental Processes in Marine Organisms as Guides for Biotechnology Development, Genetic Manipulation of Potential Use to Mariculture, Organisms Interactions with Marine Surfaces: Marine Glues, and Biomolecular Engineering Materials Applications.

  17. Par Pond phytoplankton in association with refilling of the pond: Final Report for sampling from February 1995 -- September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Johnson, M.A.; Cody, W.C.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the results of phytoplankton analyses from Par Pond samples collected between February 1995 and September 1996. The principal objective of the study was to determine the effect of refilling of Par Pond following repair of the dam on the phytoplankton community. Algal blooms are often responsible for fish kills and other detrimental effects in ponds and lakes, and it was postulated that decaying vegetation from formerly exposed sediments might trigger algal blooms that could result in fish kills in Par Pond following the refill. Sporadic algal blooms involving blue-green algae were detected, especially during the summer of 1996. However, the data derived from the study demonstrates that overall, the refilling effort caused no significant negative impact to the pond attributable to phytoplankton dynamics.

  18. Phytoplankton growth formulation in marine ecosystem models: Should we take into account photo-acclimation and variable stoichiometry in oligotrophic areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayata, S.-D.; Lévy, M.; Aumont, O.; Sciandra, A.; Sainte-Marie, J.; Tagliabue, A.; Bernard, O.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the consequences of accounting for variable Chl:C (chlorophyll:carbon) and C:N (carbon:nitrogen) ratios in the formulation of phytoplankton growth in biogeochemical models. We compare the qualitative behavior of a suite of phytoplankton growth formulations with increasing complexity: 1) a Redfield formulation (constant C:N ratio) without photo-acclimation (constant Chl:C ratio), 2) a Redfield formulation with diagnostic chlorophyll (variable and empirical Chl:C ratio), 3) a quota formulation (variable C:N ratio) with diagnostic chlorophyll, and 4) a quota formulation with prognostic chlorophyll (dynamic variable). These phytoplankton growth formulations are embedded in a simple marine ecosystem model in a 1D framework at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series (BATS) station. The model parameters are tuned using a stochastic assimilation method (micro-genetic algorithm) and skill assessment techniques are used to compare results. The lowest misfits with observations are obtained when photo-acclimation is taken into account (variable Chl:C ratio) and with non-Redfield stoichiometry (variable C:N ratio), both under spring and summer conditions. This indicates that the most flexible models (i.e., with variable ratios) are necessary to reproduce observations. As seen previously, photo-acclimation is essential in reproducing the observed deep chlorophyll maximum and subsurface production present during summer. Although Redfield and quota formulations of C:N ratios can equally reproduce chlorophyll data the higher primary production that arises from the quota model is in better agreement with observations. Under the oligotrophic conditions that typify the BATS site no clear difference was detected between quota formulations with diagnostic or prognostic chlorophyll.

  19. Differing growth responses of major phylogenetic groups of marine bacteria to natural phytoplankton blooms in the western North Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yuya; Taniguchi, Akito; Nagao, Ippei; Miki, Takeshi; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Tsuda, Atsushi; Hamasaki, Koji

    2011-06-01

    Growth and productivity of phytoplankton substantially change organic matter characteristics, which affect bacterial abundance, productivity, and community structure in aquatic ecosystems. We analyzed bacterial community structures and measured activities inside and outside phytoplankton blooms in the western North Pacific Ocean by using bromodeoxyuridine immunocytochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization (BIC-FISH). Roseobacter/Rhodobacter, SAR11, Betaproteobacteria, Alteromonas, SAR86, and Bacteroidetes responded differently to changes in organic matter supply. Roseobacter/Rhodobacter bacteria remained widespread, active, and proliferating despite large fluctuations in organic matter and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentrations. The relative contribution of Bacteroidetes to total bacterial production was consistently high. Furthermore, we documented the unexpectedly large contribution of Alteromonas to total bacterial production in the bloom. Bacterial abundance, productivity, and growth potential (the proportion of growing cells in a population) were significantly correlated with Chl-a and particulate organic carbon concentrations. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that organic matter supply was critical for determining bacterial community structures. The growth potential of each bacterial group as a function of Chl-a concentration showed a bell-shaped distribution, indicating an optimal organic matter concentration to promote growth. The growth of Alteromonas and Betaproteobacteria was especially strongly correlated with organic matter supply. These data elucidate the distinctive ecological role of major bacterial taxa in organic matter cycling during open ocean phytoplankton blooms.

  20. Phytoplankton assemblages and lipid biomarkers indicate sea-surface warming and sea-ice decline in the Ross Sea during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Julian D.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Peterse, Francien; Barcena, Maria A.; Albertazzi, Sonia; Asioli, Alessandra; Giglio, Federico; Langone, Leonardo; Tateo, Fabio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e (~ 125 - 119 kyrs BP), the last interglacial period before the present, is believed to have been globally warmer (~ 2°C) than today. Studying this time interval might therefore provide insights into near future climate state given the ongoing climate change and global temperature increase. Of particular interest are the expected changes in polar ice cover. One important aspect of the cryosphere is sea-ice, which influences albedo, deep and surface water currents, and phytoplankton production, and thus affects the global climate system. To investigate whether changes in sea-ice cover occurred in the Southern Ocean close to Antarctica during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e dinoflagellate and diatom assemblages have been analyzed in core AS05-10, drilled in the continental slope off the Drygalski basin (Ross Sea) at a water depth of 2377 m. The core was drilled within the frame of the PNRA 2009/A2.01 project, an Italian project with a multidisciplinary approach, and covers the interval from Present to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7. The core stratigraphy is based on diatom bioevents and on the climate cyclicity provided by the variations of the diatom assemblages. For this study we focused on the interval from MIS7 to MIS5. A strong reduction of sea-ice-loving diatom taxa with respect to open water-loving diatom taxa is observed during MIS5. In general the production of phytoplankton increases at the base of MIS5 and then slowly decreases. Dinoflagellate cysts, particularly heterotrophic species, are abundant during MIS5e only. The sea surface temperature reconstruction based on the TEX86L, a proxy based on lipid biomarkers produced by Thaumarcheota, shows a 4°C temperature increase from MIS6 to MIS5e. A slightly smaller temperature increase is observed at the onset of MIS7, but this stage is barren of heterotrophic dinoflagellates. All proxies together seem to indicate that the retreat of the summer sea-ice in the Ross Sea during MIS5e was

  1. Nano liquid chromatography with hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the determination of yessotoxin in marine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Ruppén Cañás, Isabel; Hamilton, Brett; Fernández Amandi, Mónica; Furey, Ambrose; James, Kevin J

    2004-11-12

    Studies of yessotoxin involving confirmation of fragmentation processes using a high-resolution orthogonal hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometer and nanoLC hybrid quadrupole TOF MS have been undertaken. The fragmentation of YTX was studied in negative mode using nano electrospray (nanoESI) QqTOF mass spectrometry. Three major molecule-related ions were observed, [M - 2Na + H]-, [M - Na]- and [M - 2Na]2-, and fragmentation of the latter was studied in detail. This showed that product ions were formed as a consequence of charge-remote fragmentation processes that included a strong directional cleavage of the polyether rings of YTX. NanoLC coupled with QqTOF MS was used to determine YTX in small samples of the phytoplankton, Protoceratium reticulatum, by monitoring the [M - 2Na]2- ion at m/z 570. A PepMap C18 nanoLC column (75 microm x 10 cm, 100 A, 3 microm, LC Packings) was used and the solvent was acetonitrile/water (90:10 (v/v)) containing 1 mM ammonium acetate, at a flow rate of 400 nl/min, for 30 min. Calibrations obtained with YTX standard solutions were linear over four orders of magnitude, 0.75-250 ng/ml; r2 = 0.9947-0.9998. Phytoplankton cells (ca. 100-300) were picked, extracted with methanol/water (40:60), and the YTX concentration was determined over the range 0.011-0.020 ng/cell. The detection limit (3 x S/N) of this method was ca. 0.5 pg YTX on-column.

  2. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are responsible for roughly half the net primary production (NPP) on Earth, fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels global ocean ecosystems and drives the ocean's biogeochemical cycles. Phytoplankton growth is highly sensitive to variations in ocean physical properties, such as upper ocean stratification and light availability within this mixed layer. Satellite ocean color sensors, such as the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS; McClain 2009) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS; Esaias 1998), provide observations of sufficient frequency and geographic coverage to globally monitor physically-driven changes in phytoplankton distributions. In practice, ocean color sensors retrieve the spectral distribution of visible solar radiation reflected upward from beneath the ocean surface, which can then be related to changes in the photosynthetic phytoplankton pigment, chlorophyll- a (Chla; measured in mg m-3). Here, global Chla data for 2013 are evaluated within the context of the 16-year continuous record provided through the combined observations of SeaWiFS (1997-2010) and MODIS on Aqua (MODISA; 2002-present). Ocean color measurements from the recently launched Visible and Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS; 2011-present) are also considered, but results suggest that the temporal calibration of the VIIRS sensor is not yet sufficiently stable for quantitative global change studies. All MODISA (version 2013.1), SeaWiFS (version 2010.0), and VIIRS (version 2013.1) data presented here were produced by NASA using consistent Chla algorithms.

  3. MARINER 9 SPACE PROBE UNDERGOES FINAL CHECKS PRIOR TO ENCAPSULATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A technician checks the Mariner I spacecraft prior to its encapsulation for launch to Mars. An Atlas-Centaur rocket successfully launched the mars-bound spacecraft from Cape Kennedy at 6:23 p.m. EDT, May 30, 1971. Designated Mariner 9 following launch, the probe will arrive at Mars in mid-November. It will transmit scientific data about that planet's surface and atmosphere.

  4. State of Climate 2011 - Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, D. A.; Antoine, D.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; d'Andon, O. H. Fanton; Fields, E.; Franz, B. A.; Goryl, P.; Maritorena, S.; McClain, C. R.; Wang, M.; Yoder, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton photosynthesis in the sun lit upper layer of the global ocean is the overwhelmingly dominant source of organic matter that fuels marine ecosystems. Phytoplankton contribute roughly half of the global (land and ocean) net primary production (NPP; gross photosynthesis minus plant respiration) and phytoplankton carbon fixation is the primary conduit through which atmospheric CO2 concentrations interact with the ocean s carbon cycle. Phytoplankton productivity depends on the availability of sunlight, macronutrients (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorous), and micronutrients (e.g., iron), and thus is sensitive to climate-driven changes in the delivery of these resources to the euphotic zone

  5. Effects of ocean acidification on marine dissolved organic matter are not detectable over the succession of phytoplankton blooms.

    PubMed

    Zark, Maren; Riebesell, Ulf; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-10-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the largest active organic carbon reservoirs on Earth, and changes in its pool size or composition could have a major impact on the global carbon cycle. Ocean acidification is a potential driver for these changes because it influences marine primary production and heterotrophic respiration. We simulated ocean acidification as expected for a "business-as-usual" emission scenario in the year 2100 in an unprecedented long-term mesocosm study. The large-scale experiments (50 m(3) each) covered a full seasonal cycle of marine production in a Swedish Fjord. Five mesocosms were artificially enriched in CO2 to the partial pressure expected in the year 2100 (900 μatm), and five more served as controls (400 μatm). We applied ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry to monitor the succession of 7360 distinct DOM formulae over the course of the experiment. Plankton blooms had a clear effect on DOM concentration and molecular composition. This succession was reproducible across all 10 mesocosms, independent of CO2 treatment. In contrast to the temporal trend, there were no significant differences in DOM concentration and composition between present-day and year 2100 CO2 levels at any time point of the experiment. On the basis of our results, ocean acidification alone is unlikely to affect the seasonal accumulation of DOM in productive coastal environments.

  6. Effects of ocean acidification on marine dissolved organic matter are not detectable over the succession of phytoplankton blooms

    PubMed Central

    Zark, Maren; Riebesell, Ulf; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the largest active organic carbon reservoirs on Earth, and changes in its pool size or composition could have a major impact on the global carbon cycle. Ocean acidification is a potential driver for these changes because it influences marine primary production and heterotrophic respiration. We simulated ocean acidification as expected for a “business-as-usual” emission scenario in the year 2100 in an unprecedented long-term mesocosm study. The large-scale experiments (50 m3 each) covered a full seasonal cycle of marine production in a Swedish Fjord. Five mesocosms were artificially enriched in CO2 to the partial pressure expected in the year 2100 (900 μatm), and five more served as controls (400 μatm). We applied ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry to monitor the succession of 7360 distinct DOM formulae over the course of the experiment. Plankton blooms had a clear effect on DOM concentration and molecular composition. This succession was reproducible across all 10 mesocosms, independent of CO2 treatment. In contrast to the temporal trend, there were no significant differences in DOM concentration and composition between present-day and year 2100 CO2 levels at any time point of the experiment. On the basis of our results, ocean acidification alone is unlikely to affect the seasonal accumulation of DOM in productive coastal environments. PMID:26601292

  7. Effect of phytoplankton-released organic matter on the production and properties of the primary marine aerosol (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; de Leeuw, G.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of the biogenic matter exuded by marine biota on the production and properties of the submicron primary sea-spray, based on the laboratory simulation of marine aerosol formation from seawater enriched with organic matter released by laboratory-grown algal cultures. Primary aerosol formation by bubble bursting was reproduced by using a plunging water jet generation system. Particle production experiments with seawater enriched in marine exudate <0.2 μm at organic carbon concentrations (OC) representative of biologically active oceanic waters were conducted and compared with blanks performed with artificial seawater devoid of marine organics. An increase in the production of particles <100 nm and a shift of the size distribution toward smaller sizes were observed with increasing amounts of diatomaceous exudate in the source seawater. A novel sub-micrometric size-resolved parameterisation for deriving primary particle fluxes as a function of the seawater diatomaceous OC concentration was inferred from the production experiments. Estimations of the relationship between Chl-a biomass and seawater OC concentration indicated that effects on particle fluxes due to biological activity are likely to occur in diatom blooms with Chl-a diatom biomass >0.35-2 mg/m3 (OC>175 µM), depending on the primary organic production conditions in the algal bloom. Analysis of the hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of the organics-enriched primary aerosol indicated both a suppression of the water uptake and the CCN activity with increasing amount of organic exudate in the source seawater. The increase in the CCN number likely to occur in algal bloom areas due to the potential increase in particle production would therefore be counteracted by the reduction of the particle CCN activity induced by the incorporation of organic matter. Calculations of the primary particle composition using a mixing rule yielded organic mass fractions in

  8. Response of marine viral populations to a nutrient induced phytoplankton bloom at different pCO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J. B.; Larsen, A.; Thyrhaug, R.; Bratbak, G.; Sandaa, R.-A.

    2008-04-01

    During the PeECE III mesocosm experiment in 2005 we investigated how the virioplankton community responded to increased levels of nutrients (N and P) and CO2. We applied a combination of flow cytometry, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and degenerate PCR primers to categorize and quantify individual viral populations, and to investigate their temporal dynamics. Species specific and degenerate primers enabled us to identify two specific large dsDNA viruses, EhV and CeV, infecting the haptophytes Emiliania huxleyi and Crysochromulina ericina, respectively. Some of the viral populations detected and enumerated by flow cytometry did not respond to altered CO2-levels, but the abundance of EhV and an unidentified dsDNA virus decreased with increasing CO2 levels. Our results thus indicate that CO2 conditions, or the related change in pH, may affect the marine pelagic food web at the viral level. Our results also demonstrate that in order to unravel ecological problems as how CO2 and nutrient levels affect the relationship between marine algal viruses and their hosts, we need to continue the effort to develop molecular markers used to identify both hosts and viruses.

  9. Marine viral populations detected during a nutrient induced phytoplankton bloom at elevated pCO2 levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J. B.; Larsen, A.; Thyrhaug, R.; Bratbak, G.; Sandaa, R.-A.

    2007-11-01

    During the PEeCE III mesocosm experiment in 2005 we investigated how the virioplankton community responded to increased levels of nutrients (N and P) and CO2. We applied a combination of flow cytometry, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and degenerated PCR primers to categorize and quantify individual viral populations, and to investigate their temporal dynamics. Species specific and degenerated primers enabled us to identify two specific large dsDNA viruses, EhV and CeV, infecting the haptophytes Emiliania huxleyi and Crysochromulina ericina, respectively. Some of the viral populations detected and enumerated by flow cytometry did not respond to altered CO2-levels, but the abundance of EhV and an unidentified dsDNA virus decreased with increasing CO2 levels. Our results thus indicate that CO2 conditions may affect the marine pelagic food web at the viral level. Our results also demonstrate that in order to unravel ecological problems as how CO2 and nutrient levels affect the relationship between marine algal viruses and their hosts, we need to continue the effort to develop molecular markers used to identify both hosts and viruses.

  10. Reticulate Evolution and Marine Organisms: The Final Frontier?

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Michael L.; Fogarty, Nicole D.

    2009-01-01

    The role that reticulate evolution (i.e., via lateral transfer, viral recombination and/or introgressive hybridization) has played in the origin and adaptation of individual taxa and even entire clades continues to be tested for all domains of life. Though falsified for some groups, the hypothesis of divergence in the face of gene flow is becoming accepted as a major facilitator of evolutionary change for many microorganisms, plants and animals. Yet, the effect of reticulate evolutionary change in certain assemblages has been doubted, either due to an actual dearth of genetic exchange among the lineages belonging to these clades or because of a lack of appropriate data to test alternative hypotheses. Marine organisms represent such an assemblage. In the past half-century, some evolutionary biologists interested in the origin and trajectory of marine organisms, particularly animals, have posited that horizontal transfer, introgression and hybrid speciation have been rare. In this review, we provide examples of such genetic exchange that have come to light largely as a result of analyses of molecular markers. Comparisons among these markers and between these loci and morphological characters have provided numerous examples of marine microorganisms, plants and animals that possess the signature of mosaic genomes. PMID:19865522

  11. An Improved DNA Extraction Method for Efficient and Quantitative Recovery of Phytoplankton Diversity in Natural Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are highly diverse with different species possessing different cell coverings, posing challenges for thoroughly breaking the cells in DNA extraction yet preserving DNA integrity. While quantitative molecular techniques have been increasingly used in phytoplankton research, an effective and simple method broadly applicable to different lineages and natural assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we developed a bead-beating protocol based on our previous experience and tested it against 9 species of phytoplankton representing different lineages and different cell covering rigidities. We found the bead-beating method enhanced the final yield of DNA (highest as 2 folds) in comparison with the non-bead-beating method, while also preserving the DNA integrity. When our method was applied to a field sample collected at a subtropical bay located in Xiamen, China, the resultant ITS clone library revealed a highly diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other micro-eukaryotes, including Archaea, Amoebozoa, Chlorophyta, Ciliphora, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Fungi, Metazoa, etc. The appearance of thecate dinoflagellates, thin-walled phytoplankton and “naked” unicellular organisms indicates that our method could obtain the intact DNA of organisms with different cell coverings. All the results demonstrate that our method is useful for DNA extraction of phytoplankton and environmental surveys of their diversity and abundance. PMID:26218575

  12. An Improved DNA Extraction Method for Efficient and Quantitative Recovery of Phytoplankton Diversity in Natural Assemblages.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jian; Li, Meizhen; Lin, Senjie

    2015-01-01

    Marine phytoplankton are highly diverse with different species possessing different cell coverings, posing challenges for thoroughly breaking the cells in DNA extraction yet preserving DNA integrity. While quantitative molecular techniques have been increasingly used in phytoplankton research, an effective and simple method broadly applicable to different lineages and natural assemblages is still lacking. In this study, we developed a bead-beating protocol based on our previous experience and tested it against 9 species of phytoplankton representing different lineages and different cell covering rigidities. We found the bead-beating method enhanced the final yield of DNA (highest as 2 folds) in comparison with the non-bead-beating method, while also preserving the DNA integrity. When our method was applied to a field sample collected at a subtropical bay located in Xiamen, China, the resultant ITS clone library revealed a highly diverse assemblage of phytoplankton and other micro-eukaryotes, including Archaea, Amoebozoa, Chlorophyta, Ciliphora, Bacillariophyta, Dinophyta, Fungi, Metazoa, etc. The appearance of thecate dinoflagellates, thin-walled phytoplankton and "naked" unicellular organisms indicates that our method could obtain the intact DNA of organisms with different cell coverings. All the results demonstrate that our method is useful for DNA extraction of phytoplankton and environmental surveys of their diversity and abundance.

  13. High production of nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) in a massive marine phytoplankton culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florez-Leiva, L.; Tarifeño, E.; Cornejo, M.; Kiene, R.; Farías, L.

    2010-09-01

    The production of large amounts of algal biomass for different purposes such as aquaculture or biofuels, may cause impacts on the marine environment. One such impact is the production of radiatively active trace gases and aerosols with climate cooling (dimethyl sulfide DMS and its precursor DMSP) and warming (N2O and CH4) effects. Total and dissolved DMSP, N2O and CH4, together with other environmental variables were monitored daily for 46 days within a massive microalgae monoculture of Nannochloris (Chlorophyceae) in an open pond system. The growth of this green microalgae was stimulated by the addition of N- and P-rich salts, resulting in exponential growth (growth phase) during the first 17 days observed by cell abundance (1 × 106 to 4.4 × 106 cell mL-1) and Chl-a levels (from 1.4 to 96 mg Chl-a m-3) followed by a decrease in both Chl-a and cell abundance (senescence phase). Total DMSP (from 6.3 to 142 μmol m-3), dissolved DMSP i.e. 5.8 to 137 μmol m-3 and N2O (from 8 to 600 μmol m-3) abruptly peaked during the senescence phase, whereas CH4 steadily increased between 2 and 10 μmol m-3 during the growth phase. Different ratios between tracers and Chl-a during both phases reveal different biochemical processes involved in the cycling of these gases and tracers. Our results show that despite the consumption of large quantities of CO2 by the massive algal culture, a minor amount of DMS and huge amounts of greenhouse gases were produced, in particular N2O, which has a greater radiative effect per molecule than CO2. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical studies and for environmental management of aquaculture activities.

  14. Evaluation of recycled plastic lumber for marine applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Levie, B.

    1993-09-01

    The report presents an evaluation of the recycled plastic materials (RPM) produced by California Recycling Company (CRC). The lumber is produced from difficult-to-market post consumer plastic materials which have been recovered from a mixed municipal solid waste stream at CR Transfer's New Stanton material recovery facility (MRF). A battery of tests was performed on the RPM to determine strength, creep, serviceability, biological compatibility, and toxicity of the plastic lumber. These tests were selected to characterize the behavior of the material for marine application. The findings show that the plastic lumber produced by CRC has significant creep characteristics which must be adequately addressed by appropriate architectural design when using this material. Flexural stiffness properties are less than 1/10 that of wood. Biological testing has indicated a far lower toxicity for the plastic than for chromium copper arsenate (CCA) treated wood.

  15. Techniques for Quantifying Phytoplankton Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Zackary I.; Martiny, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    The biodiversity of phytoplankton is a core measurement of the state and activity of marine ecosystems. In the context of historical approaches, we review recent major advances in the technologies that have enabled deeper characterization of the biodiversity of phytoplankton. In particular, high-throughput sequencing of single loci/genes, genomes, and communities (metagenomics) has revealed exceptional phylogenetic and genomic diversity whose breadth is not fully constrained. Other molecular tools—such as fingerprinting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization—have provided additional insight into the dynamics of this diversity in the context of environmental variability. Techniques for characterizing the functional diversity of community structure through targeted or untargeted approaches based on RNA or protein have also greatly advanced. A wide range of techniques is now available for characterizing phytoplankton communities, and these tools will continue to advance through ongoing improvements in both technology and data interpretation.

  16. Techniques for quantifying phytoplankton biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Zackary I; Martiny, Adam C

    2015-01-01

    The biodiversity of phytoplankton is a core measurement of the state and activity of marine ecosystems. In the context of historical approaches, we review recent major advances in the technologies that have enabled deeper characterization of the biodiversity of phytoplankton. In particular, high-throughput sequencing of single loci/genes, genomes, and communities (metagenomics) has revealed exceptional phylogenetic and genomic diversity whose breadth is not fully constrained. Other molecular tools-such as fingerprinting, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and fluorescence in situ hybridization-have provided additional insight into the dynamics of this diversity in the context of environmental variability. Techniques for characterizing the functional diversity of community structure through targeted or untargeted approaches based on RNA or protein have also greatly advanced. A wide range of techniques is now available for characterizing phytoplankton communities, and these tools will continue to advance through ongoing improvements in both technology and data interpretation.

  17. Fire safety of LPG in marine transportation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martinsen, W.E.; Johnson, D.W.; Welker, J.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report contains an analytical examination of cargo spill and fire hazard potential associated with the marine handling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as cargo. Principal emphasis was on cargo transfer operations for ships unloading at receiving terminals, and barges loading or unloading at a terminal. Major safety systems, including emergency shutdown systems, hazard detection systems, and fire extinguishment and control systems were included in the analysis. Spill probabilities were obtained from fault tree analyses utilizing composite LPG tank ship and barge designs. Failure rates for hardware in the analyses were generally taken from historical data on similar generic classes of hardware, there being very little historical data on the specific items involved. Potential consequences of cargo spills of various sizes are discussed and compared to actual LPG vapor cloud incidents. The usefulness of hazard mitigation systems (particularly dry chemical fire extinguishers and water spray systems) in controlling the hazards posed by LPG spills and spill fires is also discussed. The analysis estimates the probability of fatality for a terminal operator is about 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -5/ per cargo transfer operation. The probability of fatality for the general public is substantially less.

  18. On the impacts of phytoplankton-derived organic matter on the properties of the primary marine aerosol - Part 1: Source fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; de Leeuw, G.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-10-01

    The effect of biogenic dissolved and colloidal organic matter on the production of submicron primary sea-spray aerosol was investigated via the simulation of bubble bursting in seawater enriched with phytoplankton-released organics. Seawater samples collected along a transect off the West African coast during the RHaMBLe cruise (RRS Discovery cruise D319), conducted as part of the SOLAS UK program, were analysed in order to identify the dominant oceanic algal species in a region of high biological activity. Cultures of microalgal strains representative of the species found in the collected seawater were grown in order to produce natural bioexudate. Colloidal plus dissolved organic fraction in this material remaining after <0.2 μm filtration was employed to prepare organic-enriched seawater proxies for the laboratory production of marine aerosol using a plunging-waterjet system as an aerosol generator. Submicron size distributions of aerosols generated from different organic monolayers and seawater proxies enriched with biogenic exudate were measured and compared with blanks performed with artificial seawater devoid of marine organics. A shift of the aerosol submicron size distribution toward smaller sizes and an increase in the production of particles with dry diameter (Dp0)<100 nm was repeatedly observed with increasing amounts of diatomaceous bioexudate in the seawater proxies used for aerosol generation. The effect was found to be sensitive to the organic carbon concentration in seawater and the algal exudate type. Diatomaceous exudate with organic carbon concentration (OC<0.2 μm) >175 μM was required to observe a significant impact on the size distribution, which implies that effects are expected to be substantial only in high biological activity areas abundant with diatom algal populations. The laboratory findings were in agreement with analogous bubble-bursting experiments conducted with unfiltered oceanic seawater collected during the RHaMBLe cruise

  19. On the impacts of phytoplankton-derived organic matter on the properties of the primary marine aerosol - Part 1: Source fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, E.; Coe, H.; Green, D.; de Leeuw, G.; McFiggans, G.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of biogenic dissolved and colloidal organic matter on the production of submicron primary sea-spray aerosol was investigated via the simulation of bubble bursting in seawater enriched with phytoplankton-released organics. Seawater samples collected along a transect off the West African coast during the RHaMBLe cruise (RRS Discovery cruise D319), conducted as part of the SOLAS UK program, were analysed in order to identify the dominant oceanic algal species in a region of high biological activity. Cultures of microalgal strains representative of the species found in the collected seawater were grown in order to produce natural bioexudate. Colloidal plus dissolved organic fraction in this material remaining after <0.2 μm filtration (hereafter referred to as OC<0.2μm) was employed to prepare organic-enriched seawater proxies for the laboratory production of marine aerosol using a plunging-waterjet system as an aerosol generator. Submicron size distributions of aerosols generated from different organic monolayers and seawater proxies enriched with biogenic exudate were measured and compared with blanks performed with artificial seawater devoid of marine organics. A shift of the aerosol submicron size distribution toward smaller sizes and an increase in the production of particles with dry diameter (Dp0)<100 nm was repeatedly observed with increasing amounts of diatomaceous bioexudate in the seawater proxies used for aerosol generation. The effect was found to be sensitive to the organic carbon concentration in seawater and the algal exudate type. Diatomaceous exudate concentration >175 μM (OC<0.2μm) was required to observe a significant impact on the size distribution, which implies that effects are expected to be substantial only in high biological activity areas abundant with diatom algal populations. The laboratory findings were in agreement with analogous bubble-bursting experiments conducted with unfiltered oceanic seawater collected during the RHa

  20. The stationary distribution and ergodicity of a stochastic phytoplankton allelopathy model under regime switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Yuan, Sanling; Zhang, Tonghua

    2016-08-01

    The effect of toxin-producing phytoplankton and environmental stochasticity are interesting problems in marine plankton ecology. In this paper, we develop and analyze a stochastic phytoplankton allelopathy model, which takes both white and colored noises into account. We first prove the existence of the global positive solution of the model. And then by using the stochastic Lyapunov functions, we investigate the positive recurrence and ergodic property of the model, which implies the existence of a stationary distribution of the solution. Moreover, we obtain the mean and variance of the stationary distribution. Our results show that both the two kinds of environmental noises and toxic substances have great impacts on the evolution of the phytoplankton populations. Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate our theoretical results.

  1. Phytoplankton niche generation by interspecific stoichiometric variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GöThlich, L.; Oschlies, A.

    2012-06-01

    For marine biogeochemical models used in simulations of climate change scenarios, the ability to account for adaptability of marine ecosystems to environmental change becomes a concern. The potential for adaptation is expected to be larger for a diverse ecosystem compared to a monoculture of a single type of (model) algae, such as typically included in biogeochemical models. Recent attempts to simulate phytoplankton diversity in global marine ecosystem models display remarkable qualitative agreement with observed patterns of species distributions. However, modeled species diversity tends to be systematically lower than observed and, in many regions, is smaller than the number of potentially limiting nutrients. According to resource competition theory, the maximum number of coexisting species at equilibrium equals the number of limiting resources. By simulating phytoplankton communities in a chemostat model and in a global circulation model, we show here that a systematic underestimate of phytoplankton diversity may result from the standard modeling assumption of identical stoichiometry for the different phytoplankton types. Implementing stoichiometric variation among the different marine algae types in the models allows species to generate different resource supply niches via their own ecological impact. This is shown to increase the level of phytoplankton coexistence both in a chemostat model and in a global self-assembling ecosystem model.

  2. [Ecological characteristics of phytoplankton in Shenzhen Bay].

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin-Shui; Wai, Onyx Wing-Hong; Dai, Ji-Cui; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2010-01-01

    Based on the data of surface phytoplankton investigated by Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in Shenzhen Bay in 2006, variation characteristics of phytoplankton communities and the relationship between the phytoplankton diversity indices and environmental factors were analyzed in the present paper. Results showed that a total of 27 genera and 34 species of phytoplankton were identified. Of these, 18 were diatoms (52.94%), 10 were dinoflagellates (29.41%), 6 were from other minor groups (17.65%). The cell abundance was estimated to be from 2.13 x 10(6) to 4.15 x 10(6) cells/L, with an average of 2.92 x 10(6) cells/L. The maximum cell abundance appeared in the autumn (October), followed in spring (May). The cell abundance showed double abundance peaks annually. The cell abundance of phytoplankton decreased from the middle bay to the bay mouth. In the marine area, the diversity index of the phytoplankton ranged from 0.76 to 2.52; the evenness of phytoplankton ranged from 0.29 to 0.74; the diversity and evenness of phytoplankton community were rather low, which indicated that the relative abundances of the species diverged from evenness, phytoplankton community were not steady, and only few dominant species increased rapidly. The species richness index ranged from 0.57 to 2.17, the high eutrophic water body caused the species richness index declined. Better relationship was found between phytoplankton diversity indices and nutrient, salinity, dissolved oxygen.

  3. Marine Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  4. 76 FR 56973 - Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Final Policy and Permit Guidance for Submarine Cable Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 15 CFR Part 922 Office of National Marine Sanctuaries Final... adheres to the National Marine Sanctuaries Act and ONMS regulations (15 CFR part 922). The ONMS...

  5. Assessment of chronic toxicity of petroleum and produced water components to marine organisms. Final technical summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cherr, G.N.; Higashi, R.M.; Shenker, J.M.

    1993-05-31

    The objectives of the report were: (1) to determine the effects of produced water exposure in early life stages of marine plants and animals, at the cellular, subcellular, and physiological levels; (2) to determine the effects of produced water exposure on reproduction in marine organisms; and (3) to develop non-invasive approaches for assessing reproductive impairment. The effects of produced water (PW) was assessed on development in three ecologically and economically important species, the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), the giant kelp (macrocystis pyrifera), and tsahe California mussel (Mytilus califonrnianus). To determine the basis for effects of PW on these developing organisms, some fundamental studies were prerequisite. Furthermore, eggs and embryos from adults which were outplanted near the discharge were also studied. Finally, the biochemical response of embryos to PW was also defined.

  6. Observing and modelling phytoplankton community structure in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, David A.; van der Molen, Johan; Hyder, Kieran; Bacon, John; Barciela, Rosa; Creach, Veronique; McEwan, Robert; Ruardij, Piet; Forster, Rodney

    2017-03-01

    Phytoplankton form the base of the marine food chain, and knowledge of phytoplankton community structure is fundamental when assessing marine biodiversity. Policy makers and other users require information on marine biodiversity and other aspects of the marine environment for the North Sea, a highly productive European shelf sea. This information must come from a combination of observations and models, but currently the coastal ocean is greatly under-sampled for phytoplankton data, and outputs of phytoplankton community structure from models are therefore not yet frequently validated. This study presents a novel set of in situ observations of phytoplankton community structure for the North Sea using accessory pigment analysis. The observations allow a good understanding of the patterns of surface phytoplankton biomass and community structure in the North Sea for the observed months of August 2010 and 2011. Two physical-biogeochemical ocean models, the biogeochemical components of which are different variants of the widely used European Regional Seas Ecosystem Model (ERSEM), were then validated against these and other observations. Both models were a good match for sea surface temperature observations, and a reasonable match for remotely sensed ocean colour observations. However, the two models displayed very different phytoplankton community structures, with one better matching the in situ observations than the other. Nonetheless, both models shared some similarities with the observations in terms of spatial features and inter-annual variability. An initial comparison of the formulations and parameterizations of the two models suggests that diversity between the parameter settings of model phytoplankton functional types, along with formulations which promote a greater sensitivity to changes in light and nutrients, is key to capturing the observed phytoplankton community structure. These findings will help inform future model development, which should be coupled

  7. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara ); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt )

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions

  8. Production of volatile organohalogens by phytoplankton cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, R.; Moore, R.M. )

    1994-02-15

    The authors report on laboratory experiments which have demonstrated that types of unialgal cultures of marine phytoplankton can produce a range of halocarbons, including CHBr[sub 3], CHBr[sub 2]Cl, CH[sub 2]Br[sub 2]. In the laboratory environment the production rate is shown to be dependent upon the species of phytoplankton, and the development stage. Such volatile halocarbons, coming from natural sources in the seas, are thought to be important sources of reactive halogens in the troposphere, and perhaps even in the stratosphere, if the compounds are stable enough.

  9. Interactions between mercury and phytoplankton: speciation, bioavailability, and internal handling.

    PubMed

    Le Faucheur, Séverine; Campbell, Peter G C; Fortin, Claude; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2014-06-01

    The present review describes and discusses key interactions between mercury (Hg) and phytoplankton to highlight the role of phytoplankton in the biogeochemical cycle of Hg and to understand direct or indirect Hg effects on phytoplankton. Phytoplankton are exposed to various Hg species in surface waters. Through Hg uptake, phytoplankton affect the concentration, speciation, and fate of Hg in aquatic systems. The mechanisms by which phytoplankton take up Hg are still not well known, but several studies have suggested that both facilitated transport and passive diffusion could be involved. Once internalized, Hg will impact several physiological processes, including photosynthesis. To counteract these negative effects, phytoplankton have developed several detoxification strategies, such as the reduction of Hg to elemental Hg or its sequestration by intracellular ligands. Based on the toxicological studies performed so far in the laboratory, Hg is unlikely to be toxic to phytoplankton when they are exposed to environmentally relevant Hg concentrations. However, this statement should be taken with caution because questions remain as to which Hg species control Hg bioavailability and about Hg uptake mechanisms. Finally, phytoplankton are primary producers, and accumulated Hg will be transferred to higher consumers. Phytoplankton are a key component in aquatic systems, and their interactions with Hg need to be further studied to fully comprehend the biogeochemical cycle of Hg and the impact of this ubiquitous metal on ecosystems.

  10. Sea Soup: Phytoplankton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerullo, Mary M.

    This guide, designed for students in grades 3-7, answers intriguing questions about phytoplankton, tiny drifters that have shaped our world. Invisible to the naked eye, phytoplankton are the source of our atmosphere, our climate, our ocean food chain, much of our oil supply, and more. They're also food for zooplankton. Photomicroscopy serves up…

  11. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, L.; Whiting, J.; Geerlofs, S.; Grear, M.; Blake, K.; Coffey, A.; Massaua, M.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Battey, H.

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  12. Phytoplankton Bloom in North Sea off Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The northern and western highlands of Scotland were still winter-brown and even dusted with snow in places, but the waters of the North Sea were blooming with phytoplankton on May 8, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this image. The tiny, plant-like organisms swirled in the waters off the country's east coast, coloring the shallow coastal waters shades of bright blue and green. Phytoplankton are tiny organisms--many are just a single cell--that use chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light for photosynthesis. Because these pigments absorb sunlight, they change the color of the light reflected from the sea surface back to the satellite. Scientists have used observations of 'ocean color' from satellites for more than 20 years to track worldwide patterns in phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton are important to the Earth system for a host of reasons, including their status as the base of the ocean food web. In the North Sea, they are the base of the food web that supports Scotland's commercial fisheries, including monkfish and herring. As photosynthesizers, they also play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Some oceanographers are concerned that rising ocean temperatures will slow phytoplankton growth rates, harming marine ecosystems and causing carbon dioxide to accumulate more rapidly in the atmosphere.

  13. Global phytoplankton decline over the past century.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Daniel G; Lewis, Marlon R; Worm, Boris

    2010-07-29

    In the oceans, ubiquitous microscopic phototrophs (phytoplankton) account for approximately half the production of organic matter on Earth. Analyses of satellite-derived phytoplankton concentration (available since 1979) have suggested decadal-scale fluctuations linked to climate forcing, but the length of this record is insufficient to resolve longer-term trends. Here we combine available ocean transparency measurements and in situ chlorophyll observations to estimate the time dependence of phytoplankton biomass at local, regional and global scales since 1899. We observe declines in eight out of ten ocean regions, and estimate a global rate of decline of approximately 1% of the global median per year. Our analyses further reveal interannual to decadal phytoplankton fluctuations superimposed on long-term trends. These fluctuations are strongly correlated with basin-scale climate indices, whereas long-term declining trends are related to increasing sea surface temperatures. We conclude that global phytoplankton concentration has declined over the past century; this decline will need to be considered in future studies of marine ecosystems, geochemical cycling, ocean circulation and fisheries.

  14. Phytoplankton and sediments in Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Affected both by terrestrial factors like agriculture, deforestation, and erosion, and by marine factors like salinity levels, ocean temperature and water pollution, coastal environments are the dynamic interface between land and sea. In this MODIS image from January 15, 2002, the Gulf of Mexico is awash in a mixture of phytoplankton and sediment. Tan-colored sediment is flowing out into the Gulf from the Mississippi River, whose floodplain cuts a pale, wide swath to the right of center in the image, and also from numerous smaller rivers along the Louisiana coast (center). Mixing with the sediment are the multi-colored blue and green swirls that reveal the presence of large populations of marine plants called phytoplankton. Phytoplankton populations bloom and then fade, and these cycles affect fish and mammals-including humans-higher up the food chain. Certain phytoplankton are toxic to both fish and humans, and coastal health departments must monitor ecosystems carefully, often restricting fishing or harvesting of shellfish until the blooms have subsided.

  15. Phytoplankton adapt to changing ocean environments.

    PubMed

    Irwin, Andrew J; Finkel, Zoe V; Müller-Karger, Frank E; Troccoli Ghinaglia, Luis

    2015-05-05

    Model projections indicate that climate change may dramatically restructure phytoplankton communities, with cascading consequences for marine food webs. It is currently not known whether evolutionary change is likely to be able to keep pace with the rate of climate change. For simplicity, and in the absence of evidence to the contrary, most model projections assume species have fixed environmental preferences and will not adapt to changing environmental conditions on the century scale. Using 15 y of observations from Station CARIACO (Carbon Retention in a Colored Ocean), we show that most of the dominant species from a marine phytoplankton community were able to adapt their realized niches to track average increases in water temperature and irradiance, but the majority of species exhibited a fixed niche for nitrate. We do not know the extent of this adaptive capacity, so we cannot conclude that phytoplankton will be able to adapt to the changes anticipated over the next century, but community ecosystem models can no longer assume that phytoplankton cannot adapt.

  16. Do phytoplankton communities evolve through a self-regulatory abundance-diversity relationship?

    PubMed

    Roy, Shovonlal

    2009-02-01

    A small group of phytoplankton species that produce toxic or allelopathic chemicals has a significant effect on plankton dynamics in marine ecosystems. The species of non-toxic phytoplankton, which are large in number, are affected by the toxin-allelopathy of those species. By analysis of the abundance data of marine phytoplankton collected from the North-West coast of the Bay of Bengal, an empirical relationship between the abundance of the potential toxin-producing species and the species diversity of the non-toxic phytoplankton is formulated. A change-point analysis demonstrates that the diversity of non-toxic phytoplankton increases with the increase of toxic species up to a certain level. However, for a massive increase of the toxin-producing species the diversity of phytoplankton at species level reduces gradually. Following the results, a deterministic relationship between the abundance of toxic phytoplankton and the diversity of non-toxic phytoplankton is developed. The abundance-diversity relationship develops a unimodal pathway through which the abundance of toxic species regulates the diversity of phytoplankton. These results contribute to the current understanding of the coexistence and biodiversity of phytoplankton, the top-down vs. bottom-up debate, and to that of abundance-diversity relationship in marine ecosystems.

  17. Marine Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS) Field Development System-1 (FDS-1) assessment: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, L.W.; Hunt, S.T.; Savage, S.F. ); McLaughlin, P.D.; Shepdard, A.P.; Worl, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    The United State Marine Corps (USMC) is continuing the development and fielding of the Marine Corps Tactical Command and Control System (MTACCS), a system which exists in varying states of development, fielding, or modernization. MTACCS is currently composed of the following components: Tactical Combat Operations System (TCO) for ground command and control (C2), Intelligence Analysis System (IAS) with a Genser terminal connected to a TCO workstation for intelligence C2, Marine Integrated Personnel System (MIPS) and a TCO workstation using the Marine Combat Personnel System (MCPERS) software for personnel C2, Marine Integrated Logistics System (MILOGS) which is composed of the Landing Force Asset Distribution System (LFADS), the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) II, and a TCO terminal using the Marine Combat Logistics System (MCLOG) for logistics C2, Marine Corps Fire Support System (MCFSS) for fire support C2, and Advanced Tactical Air Command Central (ATACC) and the Improved Direct Air Support Central for aviation C2.

  18. [Tools for determining health of phytoplankton cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The primary purpose of the proposed research is to develop molecular tools for determining the health of marine phytoplankton on an individual cell basis. Since the definition of healthy in phytoplankton cells is elusive, we propose to develop markers for several different metabolic processes indicative of physiological state: photosynthetic activity, esterase activity, membrane permeability, and mitochondrial activity. One underlying motivation is to develop methods which will allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that, while healthy cells release very little dissolved organic carbon (DOC), many phytoplankton communities are comprised of unhealthy or physiologically stressed cells which release a large proportion of total photosynthate directly into the pool of labile DOC. This is proposed to be especially true in continental shelf and coastal environments where zones of productivity are patchy and phytoplankton populations adapted to one regime can be easily transported into waters which differ in salinity, nutrient supply, and/or turbidity. The significance of the work, however, extends beyond this immediate goal since there are presently relatively few methods which allow us to estimate the physiological state of phytoplankton cells.When we evaluate population sizes of phytoplankton in the water column or examine fecal pellets, particulate aggregates, or other material, we generally work in ignorance of the activity of the cells except as the average cell-specific activity is estimated from bulk measurements. This approach effectively hides any differences in the relative contribution of different taxa or individuals to overall productivity eventhough most flux processes are sensitive to physiological and taxonomically determined differences among members of the community.

  19. [Tools for determining health of phytoplankton cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The primary purpose of the proposed research is to develop molecular tools for determining the health of marine phytoplankton on an individual cell basis. Since the definition of healthy in phytoplankton cells is elusive, we propose to develop markers for several different metabolic processes indicative of physiological state: photosynthetic activity, esterase activity, membrane permeability, and mitochondrial activity. One underlying motivation is to develop methods which will allow us to evaluate the hypothesis that, while healthy cells release very little dissolved organic carbon (DOC), many phytoplankton communities are comprised of unhealthy or physiologically stressed cells which release a large proportion of total photosynthate directly into the pool of labile DOC. This is proposed to be especially true in continental shelf and coastal environments where zones of productivity are patchy and phytoplankton populations adapted to one regime can be easily transported into waters which differ in salinity, nutrient supply, and/or turbidity. The significance of the work, however, extends beyond this immediate goal since there are presently relatively few methods which allow us to estimate the physiological state of phytoplankton cells.When we evaluate population sizes of phytoplankton in the water column or examine fecal pellets, particulate aggregates, or other material, we generally work in ignorance of the activity of the cells except as the average cell-specific activity is estimated from bulk measurements. This approach effectively hides any differences in the relative contribution of different taxa or individuals to overall productivity eventhough most flux processes are sensitive to physiological and taxonomically determined differences among members of the community.

  20. Phytoplankton and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moisan, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Ocean phytoplankton supply about half of the oxygen that humans utilize to sustain life. In this lecture, we will explore how phytoplankton plays a critical role in modulating the Earth's climate. These tiny organisms are the base of the Ocean's food web. They can modulate the rate at which solar heat is absorbed by the ocean, either through direct absorption or through production of highly scattering cellular coverings. They take up and help sequester carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas that modulated the Earth's climate. They are the source of cloud nucleation gases that are key to cloud formation/processes. They are also able to modify the nutrient budgets of the ocean through active uptake of inert atmospheric nitrogen. Climate variations have a pronounced impact on phytoplankton dynamics. Long term variations in the climate have been studied through geological interpretations on its influence on phytoplankton populations. The presentation will focus on presenting the numerous linkages that have been observed between climate and phytoplankton and further discuss how present climate change scenarios are likely to impact phytoplankton populations as well as present findings from several studies that have tried to understand how the climate might react to the feedbacks from these numerous climate-phytop|ankton linkages.

  1. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Prize Lecture: Phytoplankton in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, William M.

    2012-11-01

    Phytoplankton are small, unicellular organisms that form the base of the marine food web and are cumulatively responsible for half the global oxygen production. While phytoplankton live in an environment characterized by ubiquitous fluid flow, the impact of hydrodynamic conditions on their ecology remain poorly understood. In this talk, I report on two novel biophysical mechanisms based on the interaction between phytoplankton motility and fluid shear. First, I will consider ``thin phytoplankton layers,'' important hotspots of ecological activity that are found meters beneath the ocean surface and contain cell concentrations up to two orders of magnitude above ambient. Using a combination of experiments, individual-based simulations, and continuum modeling, we have shown that layers can form when the vertical migration of phytoplankton is disrupted by hydrodynamic shear. This mechanism which we call ``gyrotactic trapping'' is capable of triggering thin phytoplankton layers under hydrodynamic conditions typical of the environments that often harbor thin layers. Second, I will discuss the potential for turbulent shear to produce patchiness in the spatial distribution of motile phytoplankton. Field measurements have revealed that motile phytoplankton form aggregations at the Kolmogorov scale, whereas non-motile cells do not. We propose a new mechanism for the formation of this small-scale patchiness based on the interplay of gyrotactic motility and turbulent shear. Using laboratory experiments, an analytical model of vortical flow, and isotropic turbulence generated via Direct Numerical Simulations, we found that motile phytoplankton rapidly aggregate, whereas non-motile cells remain randomly distributed. Taken together, these two mechanisms demonstrate that the interaction of cell motility with flow plays a fundamental role in phytoplankton ecology and, as a consequence, can contribute to shape macroscale characteristics of the ocean.

  2. Programmed Cell Death in Unicellular Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Bidle, Kay D

    2016-07-11

    Unicellular, planktonic, prokaryotic and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) have an ancient evolutionary history on Earth during which time they have played key roles in the regulation of marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Since they represent the basis of aquatic ecosystems, the manner in which phytoplankton die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining nutrient flow. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of abiotic (nutrient, light, osmotic) and biotic (virus infection, allelopathy) environmental stresses, have an integral grip on cell fate, and have shaped the ecological success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages. A combination of physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques in model algal systems has demonstrated a conserved molecular and mechanistic framework of stress surveillance, signaling, and death activation pathways, involving collective and coordinated participation of organelles, redox enzymes, metabolites, and caspase-like proteases. This mechanistic understanding has provided insight into the integration of sensing and transduction of stress signals into cellular responses, and the mechanistic interfaces between PCD, cell stress and virus infection pathways. It has also provided insight into the evolution of PCD in unicellular photoautotrophs, the impact of PCD on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages and its role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles.

  3. Ecotoxicology of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ana R; Richardson, Tammi L; Pinckney, James L

    2015-11-01

    Bromoacetic acid is formed when effluent containing chlorine residuals react with humics in natural waters containing bromide. The objective of this research was to quantify the effects of bromoacetic acid on estuarine phytoplankton as a proxy for ecosystem productivity. Bioassays were used to measure the EC50 for growth in cultured species and natural marine communities. Growth inhibition was estimated by changes in chlorophyll a concentrations measured by fluorometry and HPLC. The EC50s for cultured Thalassiosira pseudonana were 194 mg L(-1), 240 mg L(-1) for Dunaliella tertiolecta and 209 mg L(-1) for Rhodomonas salina. Natural phytoplankton communities were more sensitive to contamination with an EC50 of 80 mg L(-1). Discriminant analysis suggested that bromoacetic acid additions cause an alteration of phytoplankton community structure with implications for higher trophic levels. A two-fold EC50 decrease in mixed natural phytoplankton populations affirms the importance of field confirmation for establishing water quality criteria.

  4. Amplified Arctic warming by phytoplankton under greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Yeon; Kug, Jong-Seong; Bader, Jürgen; Rolph, Rebecca; Kwon, Minho

    2015-05-12

    Phytoplankton have attracted increasing attention in climate science due to their impacts on climate systems. A new generation of climate models can now provide estimates of future climate change, considering the biological feedbacks through the development of the coupled physical-ecosystem model. Here we present the geophysical impact of phytoplankton, which is often overlooked in future climate projections. A suite of future warming experiments using a fully coupled ocean-atmosphere model that interacts with a marine ecosystem model reveals that the future phytoplankton change influenced by greenhouse warming can amplify Arctic surface warming considerably. The warming-induced sea ice melting and the corresponding increase in shortwave radiation penetrating into the ocean both result in a longer phytoplankton growing season in the Arctic. In turn, the increase in Arctic phytoplankton warms the ocean surface layer through direct biological heating, triggering additional positive feedbacks in the Arctic, and consequently intensifying the Arctic warming further. Our results establish the presence of marine phytoplankton as an important potential driver of the future Arctic climate changes.

  5. Assessing impacts of invasive phytoplankton: the Baltic Sea case.

    PubMed

    Olenina, Irina; Wasmund, Norbert; Hajdu, Susanna; Jurgensone, Iveta; Gromisz, Sławomira; Kownacka, Janina; Toming, Kaire; Vaiciūte, Diana; Olenin, Sergej

    2010-10-01

    There is an increasing understanding and requirement to take into account the effects of invasive alien species (IAS) in environmental quality assessments. While IAS are listed amongst the most important factors threatening marine biodiversity, information on their impacts remains unquantified, especially for phytoplankton species. This study attempts to assess the impacts of invasive alien phytoplankton in the Baltic Sea during 1980-2008. A bioinvasion impact assessment method (BPL - biopollution level index) was applied to phytoplankton monitoring data collected from eleven sub-regions of the Baltic Sea. BPL takes into account abundance and distribution range of an alien species and the magnitude of the impact on native communities, habitats and ecosystem functioning. Of the 12 alien/cryptogenic phytoplankton species recorded in the Baltic Sea only one (the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum) was categorized as an IAS, causing a recognizable environmental effect.

  6. Fluid dynamical niches of phytoplankton types

    PubMed Central

    De Monte, Silvia; Alvain, Séverine; Dandonneau, Yves; Lévy, Marina

    2010-01-01

    The biogeochemical role of phytoplanktonic organisms strongly varies from one plankton type to another, and their relative abundance and distribution have fundamental consequences at the global and climatological scales. In situ observations find dominant types often associated to specific physical and chemical water properties. However, the mechanisms and spatiotemporal scales by which marine ecosystems are organized are largely not known. Here we investigate the spatiotemporal organization of phytoplankton communities by combining multisatellite data, notably high-resolution ocean-color maps of dominant types and altimetry-derived Lagrangian diagnostics of the surface transport. We find that the phytoplanktonic landscape is organized in (sub-)mesoscale patches (10–100 km) of dominant types separated by physical fronts induced by horizontal stirring. These physical fronts delimit niches supported by water masses of similar history and whose lifetimes are comparable with the timescale of the bloom onset (few weeks). The resonance between biological activity and physical processes suggest that the spatiotemporal (sub-)mesoscales associated to stirring are determinant in the observation and modeling of marine ecosystems. PMID:20974927

  7. Closely related phytoplankton species produce similar suites of dissolved organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jamie W.; Berube, Paul M.; Follett, Christopher L.; Waterbury, John B.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; DeLong, Edward F.; Repeta, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Production of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by marine phytoplankton supplies the majority of organic substrate consumed by heterotrophic bacterioplankton in the sea. This production and subsequent consumption converts a vast quantity of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus between organic and inorganic forms, directly impacting global cycles of these biologically important elements. Details regarding the chemical composition of DOM produced by marine phytoplankton are sparse, and while often assumed, it is not currently known if phylogenetically distinct groups of marine phytoplankton release characteristic suites of DOM. To investigate the relationship between specific phytoplankton groups and the DOM they release, hydrophobic phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic matter (DOMP) from eight axenic strains was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Identification of DOM features derived from Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, Thalassiosira, and Phaeodactylum revealed DOMP to be complex and highly strain dependent. Connections between DOMP features and the phylogenetic relatedness of these strains were identified on multiple levels of phylogenetic distance, suggesting that marine phytoplankton produce DOM that in part reflects its phylogenetic origin. Chemical information regarding the size and polarity ranges of features from defined biological sources was also obtained. Our findings reveal DOMP composition to be partially conserved among related phytoplankton species, and implicate marine DOM as a potential factor influencing microbial diversity in the sea by acting as a link between autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial community structures. PMID:24748874

  8. Randall Aerospace and Marine Science Project (RAMS): An Evaluation Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Isadore

    This report of the Aerospace and Marine Science Program for students in the Washington, D.C. Public Schools is intended to provide direction to unmotivated students through an interdisciplinary curriculum based on marine and aerospace science themes. The program emphasizes career development and a competency based curriculum. An evaluation design…

  9. Instrumentation for Monitoring around Marine Renewable Energy Converters: Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Polagye, B. L.; Copping, A. E.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Suryan, R.; Kramer, S.; Smith, C.

    2014-01-14

    To better understand the state of instrumentation and capabilities for monitoring around marine energy converters, the U.S. Department of Energy directed Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Washington to convene an invitation-only workshop of experts from around the world to address instrumentation needs.

  10. National Data Program for the Marine Environment Technical Development Plan. Final Report, Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    A national data program for the marine environment is recommended. Volume 2 includes: (1) objectives, scope, and methodology; (2) summary of the technical development plan; (3) agency development plans - Great Lakes and coastal development and (4) marine data network development plans. (Author)

  11. Phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Ireland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Irish Sea (right) is full of phytoplankton in this true-color image from January 15, 2002. The Irish Sea separates Ireland (center) from the United Kingdom (right). In this image the water of both the Irish and Celtic (lower right) Seas appears quite turbid, being a milky blue-green compared to the clearer waters of the open Atlantic (left). This milky appearance is likely due to the growth of marine plants called phytoplankton. Despite the fact that Ireland is at the same latitude as southern Hudson Bay, Canada, it remains green year round, thanks to the moderating effect on temperatures of the Atlantic Ocean. The Gulf Stream bring warmer waters up from the tropics, and southwesterly winds bring warmer air to the country, thus moderating seasonal temperature extremes.

  12. Global Ocean Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, B. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Siegel, D. A.; Werdell, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton are free-floating algae that grow in the euphotic zone of the upper ocean, converting carbon dioxide, sunlight, and available nutrients into organic carbon through photosynthesis. Despite their microscopic size, these photoautotrophs are responsible for roughly half the net primary production on Earth (NPP; gross primary production minus respiration), fixing atmospheric CO2 into food that fuels our global ocean ecosystems. Phytoplankton thus play a critical role in the global carbon cycle, and their growth patterns are highly sensitive to environmental changes such as increased ocean temperatures that stratify the water column and prohibit the transfer of cold, nutrient richwaters to the upper ocean euphotic zone.

  13. 75 FR 36064 - Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary Final Revised Management Plan: Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ....noaa.gov . For a hard copy or data CD of the plan contact the sanctuary office at the contact number... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Anne Smrcina, Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary, 175 Edward...

  14. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

    2013-12-20

    This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

  15. Regulation of phytoplankton dynamics by vitamin B12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sañudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Gobler, C. J.; Okbamichael, M.; Taylor, G. T.

    2006-02-01

    Despite the biological necessity of vitamin B12 (cobalamin), its importance in phytoplankton ecology has been ignored for nearly three decades. Here we report strong and selective responses of phytoplankton communities to varying low levels (5-87 pM) of dissolved B12 in several coastal embayments. The ecological importance of this vitamin is inferred from observed declines in dissolved B12 levels as field populations of large (>5 μm) phytoplankton increased. In contrast, biomass of small (<5 μm) phytoplankton varied independently of B12 concentrations. These observations were corroborated by field-based nutrient amendment experiments, in which B12 additions stimulated growth of large phytoplankton taxa 6-fold over unamended controls. In contrast, small taxa (<5 μm) were largely unaffected. This study provides the first evidence of vitamin B12's influence on phytoplankton field population dynamics based on direct chemical measurements of cobalamin, and implicates B12 as an important organic regulator of photoautotrophic fertility in marine systems.

  16. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn; Smith, Courtney; Gilman, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  17. Direct Heme Uptake by Phytoplankton-Associated Roseobacter Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brahamsha, Bianca; Barbeau, Katherine A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron is an essential micronutrient and can limit the growth of both marine phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacterioplankton. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of heme transport, an organic iron acquisition pathway, in phytoplankton-associated Roseobacter bacteria and explored the potential role of bacterial heme uptake in the marine environment. We searched 153 Roseobacter genomes and found that nearly half contained putative complete heme transport systems with nearly the same synteny. We also examined a publicly available coculture transcriptome and found that Roseobacter strain Sulfitobacter sp. strain SA11 strongly downregulated a putative heme transport gene cluster during mutualistic growth with a marine diatom, suggesting that the regulation of heme transport might be influenced by host cues. We generated a mutant of phytoplankton-associated Roseobacter strain Ruegeria sp. strain TM1040 by insertionally inactivating its homolog of the TonB-dependent heme transporter hmuR and confirmed the role of this gene in the uptake of heme and hemoproteins. We performed competition experiments between iron-limited wild-type and mutant TM1040 strains and found that the wild type maintains a growth advantage when competing with the mutant for iron compounds derived solely from lysed diatom cells. Heme transport systems were largely absent from public marine metagenomes and metatranscriptomes, suggesting that marine bacteria with the potential for heme transport likely have small standing populations in the free-living bacterioplankton. Heme transport is likely a useful strategy for phytoplankton-associated bacteria because it provides direct access to components of the host intracellular iron pool after lysis. IMPORTANCE Ecosystem productivity in large regions of the surface ocean is fueled by iron that has been microbially regenerated from biomass. Currently, the specific microbes and molecules that mediate the transfer of recycled iron between

  18. Seabird guano enhances phytoplankton production in the Southern Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatova, Olga; Wing, Stephen; Hoffmann, Linn; Jack, Lucy; Gault-Ringold, Melanie

    2015-04-01

    Great congregations of seabirds in sub-Antarctic and Antarctic coastal areas result in delivery of nutrient-rich guano to marine ecosystems that potentially enhances productivity and supports biodiversity in the region. Guano-derived bio-available micronutrients and macronutrients might be utilized by marine phytoplankton for photosynthetic production, however, mechanisms and significance of guano fertilization in the Southern Ocean are largely understudied. Over austral summers of 2012 and 2013 we performed a series of guano-enrichment phytoplankton incubation experiments with water samples collected from three different water masses in the Southern Ocean: Antarctic waters of the Ross sea and sub-Antarctic waters offshore the Otago Peninsula, both showing iron limitation of phytoplankton productivity in summer, and in the subtropical frontal zone offshore from the Snares Islands, which is generally micronutrient-repleted. Samples were enriched with known concentrations of guano-derived nutrients. Phytoplankton biomass increased significantly in guano-treated samples during all three incubation experiments (7-10 fold increase), while remained low in control samples. This response indicates that seabird guano provides nutrients that limit primary production in the Southern Ocean and that these nutrients are readily taken up by phytoplankton. Guano additions were compared to Fe and Macronutrient treatments (both added in quantities similar to those in the guano treatment). Phytoplankton biomass increased significantly in response to the Macronutrient treatment in the subtropical frontal zone, however, the response had a smaller magnitude compared to the guano treatment (2.8 µgL-1 vs 5.2 µgL-1) ; there was no significant effect of Fe on phytoplankton growth. This suggests the potential importance of synergistic effects of nutrients in guano. Incubation with sub-Antarctic waters showed that Fe and Macronutrients might be equally important for enhancement of

  19. Vocational Exploration and Skill Building in Marine and Related Occupations. Final Report, 1979-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaefer, Larry; And Others

    The first year of a project to train high school aged handicapped and/or disadvantaged youth for employment in marine and related trades was considered successful. Specific areas of training included motor mechanics, electrical, woodworking, refinishing, restoration, fiberglass work, and blueprint reading under the direction of skilled…

  20. Phytoplankton Succession in Recurrently Fluctuating Environments

    PubMed Central

    Roelke, Daniel L.; Spatharis, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Coastal marine systems are affected by seasonal variations in biogeochemical and physical processes, sometimes leading to alternating periods of reproductive growth limitation within an annual cycle. Transitions between these periods can be sudden or gradual. Human activities, such as reservoir construction and interbasin water transfers, influence these processes and can affect the type of transition between resource loading conditions. How such human activities might influence phytoplankton succession is largely unknown. Here, we employ a multispecies, multi-nutrient model to explore how nutrient loading switching mode might affect phytoplankton succession. The model is based on the Monod-relationship, predicting an instantaneous reproductive growth rate from ambient inorganic nutrient concentrations whereas the limiting nutrient at any given time was determined by Liebig’s Law of the Minimum. When these relationships are combined with population loss factors, such as hydraulic displacement of cells associated with inflows, a characterization of a species’ niche can be achieved through application of the R* conceptual model, thus enabling an ecological interpretation of modeling results. We found that the mode of reversal in resource supply concentrations had a profound effect. When resource supply reversals were sudden, as expected in systems influenced by pulsed inflows or wind-driven mixing events, phytoplankton were characterized by alternating succession dynamics, a phenomenon documented in inland water bodies of temperate latitudes. When resource supply reversals were gradual, as expected in systems influenced by seasonally developing wet and dry seasons, or annually occurring periods of upwelling, phytoplankton dynamics were characterized by mirror-image succession patterns. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in plankton systems but has been observed in some terrestrial plant systems. These findings suggest that a transition from

  1. Phytoplankton succession in recurrently fluctuating environments.

    PubMed

    Roelke, Daniel L; Spatharis, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Coastal marine systems are affected by seasonal variations in biogeochemical and physical processes, sometimes leading to alternating periods of reproductive growth limitation within an annual cycle. Transitions between these periods can be sudden or gradual. Human activities, such as reservoir construction and interbasin water transfers, influence these processes and can affect the type of transition between resource loading conditions. How such human activities might influence phytoplankton succession is largely unknown. Here, we employ a multispecies, multi-nutrient model to explore how nutrient loading switching mode might affect phytoplankton succession. The model is based on the Monod-relationship, predicting an instantaneous reproductive growth rate from ambient inorganic nutrient concentrations whereas the limiting nutrient at any given time was determined by Liebig's Law of the Minimum. When these relationships are combined with population loss factors, such as hydraulic displacement of cells associated with inflows, a characterization of a species' niche can be achieved through application of the R* conceptual model, thus enabling an ecological interpretation of modeling results. We found that the mode of reversal in resource supply concentrations had a profound effect. When resource supply reversals were sudden, as expected in systems influenced by pulsed inflows or wind-driven mixing events, phytoplankton were characterized by alternating succession dynamics, a phenomenon documented in inland water bodies of temperate latitudes. When resource supply reversals were gradual, as expected in systems influenced by seasonally developing wet and dry seasons, or annually occurring periods of upwelling, phytoplankton dynamics were characterized by mirror-image succession patterns. This phenomenon has not been reported previously in plankton systems but has been observed in some terrestrial plant systems. These findings suggest that a transition from alternating

  2. Phytoplankton. The fate of photons absorbed by phytoplankton in the global ocean.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hanzhi; Kuzminov, Fedor I; Park, Jisoo; Lee, SangHoon; Falkowski, Paul G; Gorbunov, Maxim Y

    2016-01-15

    Solar radiation absorbed by marine phytoplankton can follow three possible paths. By simultaneously measuring the quantum yields of photochemistry and chlorophyll fluorescence in situ, we calculate that, on average, ~60% of absorbed photons are converted to heat, only 35% are directed toward photochemical water splitting, and the rest are reemitted as fluorescence. The spatial pattern of fluorescence yields and lifetimes strongly suggests that photochemical energy conversion is physiologically limited by nutrients. Comparison of in situ fluorescence lifetimes with satellite retrievals of solar-induced fluorescence yields suggests that the mean values of the latter are generally representative of the photophysiological state of phytoplankton; however, the signal-to-noise ratio is unacceptably low in extremely oligotrophic regions, which constitute 30% of the open ocean.

  3. Final Report: Transport and its regulation in Marine Microorganisms: A Genomic Based Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Palenik; Bianca Brahamsha; Ian Paulsen

    2009-09-03

    This grant funded the analysis and annotation of the genomes of Synechococcus and Ostreococcus, major marine primary producers. Particular attention was paid to the analysis of transporters using state of the art bioinformatics analyses. During the analysis of the Synechococcus genome, some of the components of the unique bacterial swimming apparatus of one species of Synechococcus (Clade III, strain WH8102) were determined and these included transporters, novel giant proteins and glycosyltransferases. This grant funded the analysis of gene expression in Synechococcus using whole genome microarrays. These analyses revealed the strategies by which marine cyanobacteria respond to environmental conditions such as the absence of phosphorus, a common limiting nutrient, and the interaction of Synechococcus with other microbes. These analyses will help develop models of gene regulation in cyanobacteria and thus help predict their responses to changes in environmental conditions.

  4. National Marine Pollution Program: Summary of Federal Programs and Projects FY 1987 update. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    This Summary of Federal Programs and Projects presents descriptions of 542 projects in 47 programs funded by the 11 Federal departments and independent agencies involved in the National Marine Pollution Program. The update reviews the marine-pollution programs undertaken by each of these departments and agencies by describing program goals, objectives, recent accomplishments, future milestones, funding for Fiscal Years 1986 through 1989, and legislative mandates. In addition, the update includes information on Federal personnel, facilities, vessels, and other equipment currently assigned to ocean pollution programs. Projects included are limited to efforts that focus primarily on pollution problems in the oceans and Great Lakes. Projects that exclusively address inland pollution are excluded, as are industrial, regulatory, and management activities such as development of waste-treatment methods or assessment of fisheries stocks. The FY 1987 update of the Summary presents information on projects and programs that were funded or underway during FY 1987.

  5. Field test of ultra-low head hydropower package based on marine thrusters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The project includes the design, fabrication, assembly, installation, and field test of the first full-scale operating hydropower package (turbine, transmission, and generator) based on a design which incorporates a marine-thruster as the hydraulic prime mover. Included here are: the project overview; engineering design; ultra-low head hydropower package fabrication; component procurement, cost control, and scheduling; thruster hydraulic section installation; site modeling and resulting recommended modifications; testing; and baseline environmental conditions at Stone Drop. (MHR)

  6. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    SciTech Connect

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  7. Exploring the Link between Micronutrients and Phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean during the 2007 Austral Summer

    PubMed Central

    Hassler, Christel S.; Sinoir, Marie; Clementson, Lesley A.; Butler, Edward C. V.

    2012-01-01

    Bottle assays and large-scale fertilization experiments have demonstrated that, in the Southern Ocean, iron often controls the biomass and the biodiversity of primary producers. To grow, phytoplankton need numerous other trace metals (micronutrients) required for the activity of key enzymes and other intracellular functions. However, little is known of the potential these other trace elements have to limit the growth of phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. This study, investigates whether micronutrients other than iron (Zn, Co, Cu, Cd, Ni) need to be considered as parameters for controlling the phytoplankton growth from the Australian Subantarctic to the Polar Frontal Zones during the austral summer 2007. Analysis of nutrient disappearance ratios, suggested differential zones in phytoplankton growth control in the study region with a most intense phytoplankton growth limitation between 49 and 50°S. Comparison of micronutrient disappearance ratios, metal distribution, and biomarker pigments used to identify dominating phytoplankton groups, demonstrated that a complex interaction between Fe, Zn, and Co might exist in the study region. Although iron remains the pivotal micronutrient for phytoplankton growth and community structure, Zn and Co are also important for the nutrition and the growth of most of the dominating phytoplankton groups in the Subantarctic Zone region. Understanding of the parameters controlling phytoplankton is paramount, as it affects the functioning of the Southern Ocean, its marine resources and ultimately the global carbon cycle. PMID:22787456

  8. In situ study on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junlei; Sun, Xiaoxia; Zheng, Shan

    2016-08-01

    In situ studies on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton were important for the analysis of changes in community structure and for the prediction and control of algal blooms, but such studies of phytoplankton in offshore China were few. In this study, the detailed distribution of photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the summer of 2013 in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea was measured using Phyto-PAM (Pulse Amplitude Modulation). The phytoplankton community structure and the environmental parameters were also investigated to estimate the relationship between the distribution of the photochemical competence of phytoplankton and ecological factors. The total average Fv/Fm (the potential maximum quantum yield) value of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea in summer 2013 was less than 0.5, reflecting that the photosynthetic activity of phytoplankton was relatively low. Fv/Fm of phytoplankton in summer was significantly positively associated with nitrate content (NO2-), which reflects relationship between metabolism and photosynthesis of phytoplankton: accompanied by NO2- metabolism, photosynthesis and photosynthetic capacity may be enhanced simultaneously, so the Fv/Fm value would increase with the NO2- released by phytoplankton. Through the in situ study on photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea, we come to the conclusion that photosynthetic characteristics and activity of phytoplankton are influenced by its biological characteristics and surrounding ecological factors, such as irradiance, nutrients and phytoplankton community. Meanwhile, the thermally stratified structure and the movement of water masses, such as the Yangtze River diluted water, the Yellow Sea cold water mass and other different water system, also have an important impact on phytoplankton photosynthetic activity and characteristics. Greater understanding of the detailed photosynthetic characteristics of phytoplankton

  9. The Marine Biogeochemistry of Zinc Isotopes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    hydrothermal fluids and minerals, cultured marine phytoplankton , natural plankton, and seawater. By measuring Zn isotopes in a diverse array of...chemical processes that have acted upon Zn atoms. The growth of phytoplankton in the oceans, chemical adsorption to sinking particles, the circulation of...Dolgopolova et al., 2006), cultured phytoplankton (G6labert et al., 2006), and seawater (Bermin et al., 2006). 1.2 Zinc stable isotope analysis Zinc has

  10. Marine Ice Nuclei Collections – MAGIC (MAGIC-IN) Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeMott, Paul J.; Hill, Thomas C. J.

    2016-02-01

    This campaign augmented measurements obtained via deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) in the Marine ARM GPCI1 Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. The measurements, comprised of shipboard aerosol collections obtained during the five legs of the summer 2013 cruises, were sent for offline processing to measure ice nucleating particle (INP) number concentrations. The forty-three sample periods each represented, nominally, 24-hour segments during outbound and inbound transits of the Horizon Spirit. The samples were collected at locations between Los Angeles and Hawaii. Eight samples have been analyzed for immersion freezing temperature spectra thus far, using funding from other grants. Remaining samples are being frozen until support for further processing is obtained. Future analyses will investigate the inorganic/organic proportions of ice nuclei, in addition to determining the genetic composition of the overall biological community associated with INPs. Resulting correlations will be compared with other archived aerosol quantities, meteorological and ocean data (e.g., temperature, wind speed, sea surface temperature, etc…) and satellite ocean color products. These findings will ultimately aid in parameterizing oceanic (e.g., sea spray) INP emissions in regional and global scale models, when illustrating aerosol connections to cloud phases and properties. Independent future analyses of frozen filter samples, as proposed by collaborating investigators at the time of this report, will include single particle analyses of marine boundary layer aerosol compositions and morphology. The MAGIC-IN data are considered representative of the oligotrophic, low Chlorophyll-a (with the exception of near-shore) ocean regions, which exist along the MAGIC transect. Current analyses suggest that INP numbers in the marine boundary layer over this region are typically low, compared to existing

  11. 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

  12. Phytoplankton Bloom Off Portugal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Turquoise and greenish swirls marked the presence of a large phytoplankton bloom off the coast of Portugal on April 23, 2002. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite. There are also several fires burning in northwest Spain, near the port city of A Coruna. Please note that the high-resolution scene provided here is 500 meters per pixel. For a copy of this scene at the sensor's fullest resolution, visit the MODIS Rapidfire site.

  13. Algorithm development for predicting biodiversity based on phytoplankton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, Tiffany A. H.; Moisan, John R.; Linkswiler, Matthew A.; Steinhardt, Rachel A.

    2013-03-01

    Ocean color remote sensing has provided the scientific community with unprecedented global coverage of chlorophyll a, an indicator of phytoplankton biomass. Together, satellite-derived chlorophyll a and knowledge of Phytoplankton Functional Types (PFTs) will improve our limited understanding of marine ecosystem responses to physiochemical climate drivers involved in carbon cycle dynamics and linkages. Using cruise data from the Gulf of Maine and the Middle Atlantic Bight (N=269 pairs of HPLC and phytoplankton absorption samples), two modeling approaches were utilized to predict phytoplankton absorption and pigments. Algorithm I predicts the chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficient (aph* (m2 mg chl a-1)) using inputs of temperature, light, and chlorophyll a. Modeled r2 values (400-700 nm) ranged from 0.79 to 0.99 when compared to in situ observations with ˜25% lower r2 values in the UV region. Algorithm II-a utilizes matrix inversion analysis to predict a(m-1, 400-700 nm) and r2 values ranged from 0.89 to 0.99. The prediction of phytoplankton pigments with Algorithm II-b produced r2 values that ranged from 0.40 to 0.93. When used in combination, Algorithm I, and Algorithm II-a are able to use satellite products of SST, PAR, and chlorophyll a (Algorithm I) to predict pigment concentrations and ratios to describe the phytoplankton community. The results of this study demonstrate that the spatial variation in modeled pigment ratios differ significantly from the 10-year SeaWiFS average chlorophyll a data set. Contiguous observations of chlorophyll a and phytoplankton biodiversity will elucidate ecosystem responses with unprecedented complexity.

  14. Design of low cost, ultra-low head hydropower package based on marine thrusters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The object of this investigation was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using marine thrusters as hydraulic turbines in ultralow head (3 meters or less) hyro power plants. Marine thrusters are primarily used in large ships for propulsion and maneuvering, i.e., as axial flow pumps that move through water. As fixed units in a dam, a thruster, acting as a turbine, would have its output shaft mechanically linked by a belt drive to a generator drive shaft. The design of this ultralow head power system is shown. The results of performance and cost analyses are presented. Eleven distinctively sized applications were developed and casted. Package costs, less civil works and installation, ranged from approximately $25,000 to slightly over $120,000. The corresponding range of predicted power outputs at 3 m (9.84 ft) head is 40 KW to 630 KW per package. Average cost of the ER and A-designed ULHH package is about $260/KW at three meters. Each unit was further characterized for operation between 6 and 15 feet of head. Based on the enginering results of the project and promise for significant cost-reduction, the fabrication, installation and testing of a full-scale unit at an appropriate site is proposed. (LpromieL)

  15. Saccharides enhance iron bioavailability to Southern Ocean phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Hassler, Christel S.; Nichols, Carol Mancuso; Butler, Edward C. V.; Boyd, Philip W.

    2011-01-01

    Iron limits primary productivity in vast regions of the ocean. Given that marine phytoplankton contribute up to 40% of global biological carbon fixation, it is important to understand what parameters control the availability of iron (iron bioavailability) to these organisms. Most studies on iron bioavailability have focused on the role of siderophores; however, eukaryotic phytoplankton do not produce or release siderophores. Here, we report on the pivotal role of saccharides—which may act like an organic ligand—in enhancing iron bioavailability to a Southern Ocean cultured diatom, a prymnesiophyte, as well as to natural populations of eukaryotic phytoplankton. Addition of a monosaccharide (>2 nM of glucuronic acid, GLU) to natural planktonic assemblages from both the polar front and subantarctic zones resulted in an increase in iron bioavailability for eukaryotic phytoplankton, relative to bacterioplankton. The enhanced iron bioavailability observed for several groups of eukaryotic phytoplankton (i.e., cultured and natural populations) using three saccharides, suggests it is a common phenomenon. Increased iron bioavailability resulted from the combination of saccharides forming highly bioavailable organic associations with iron and increasing iron solubility, mainly as colloidal iron. As saccharides are ubiquitous, present at nanomolar to micromolar concentrations, and produced by biota in surface waters, they also satisfy the prerequisites to be important constituents of the poorly defined “ligand soup,” known to weakly bind iron. Our findings point to an additional type of organic ligand, controlling iron bioavailability to eukaryotic phytoplankton—a key unknown in iron biogeochemistry. PMID:21169217

  16. Statistical analyses to support guidelines for marine avian sampling. Final report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinlan, Brian P.; Zipkin, Elise; O'Connell, Allan F.; Caldow, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Interest in development of offshore renewable energy facilities has led to a need for high-quality, statistically robust information on marine wildlife distributions. A practical approach is described to estimate the amount of sampling effort required to have sufficient statistical power to identify species-specific “hotspots” and “coldspots” of marine bird abundance and occurrence in an offshore environment divided into discrete spatial units (e.g., lease blocks), where “hotspots” and “coldspots” are defined relative to a reference (e.g., regional) mean abundance and/or occurrence probability for each species of interest. For example, a location with average abundance or occurrence that is three times larger the mean (3x effect size) could be defined as a “hotspot,” and a location that is three times smaller than the mean (1/3x effect size) as a “coldspot.” The choice of the effect size used to define hot and coldspots will generally depend on a combination of ecological and regulatory considerations. A method is also developed for testing the statistical significance of possible hotspots and coldspots. Both methods are illustrated with historical seabird survey data from the USGS Avian Compendium Database. Our approach consists of five main components: 1. A review of the primary scientific literature on statistical modeling of animal group size and avian count data to develop a candidate set of statistical distributions that have been used or may be useful to model seabird counts. 2. Statistical power curves for one-sample, one-tailed Monte Carlo significance tests of differences of observed small-sample means from a specified reference distribution. These curves show the power to detect "hotspots" or "coldspots" of occurrence and abundance at a range of effect sizes, given assumptions which we discuss. 3. A model selection procedure, based on maximum likelihood fits of models in the candidate set, to determine an appropriate statistical

  17. Use of marine fouling communities to evaluate the ecological effects of pollution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.K.

    1990-06-01

    The ecological consequences of pollution were evaluated by measuring the biological responses of marine fouling communities to increasing levels of pollution in San Diego Bay, California. Measurements of a gradient of increasing levels of copper and organotin compounds were made using anodic stripping voltammetry and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy for copper and hydride derivation with atomic spectroscopy detection for the organotin compounds tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin, and monobutyltin. The copper gradient increased by a factor of 4.2 and the TBT gradient increased by a factor of 8.75. Differences in community structures were correlated with distinctly higher concentrations of toxic chemicals present at locations along the gradient. A portable microcosm system was used to study the community responses to different concentrations of TBT in controlled environments. The microcosm study was inconclusive because there was very low settlement of fouling organisms in the microcosm tanks relative to their settlement and colonization in the bay.

  18. Multiwell Experiment: I, The marine interval of the Mesaverde Formation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment is a field laboratory in the Piceance Basin of Colorado which has two overall objectives: to characterize the low permeability gas reservoirs in the Mesaverde Formation and to develop technology for their production. Different depositional environments have created distinctly different reservoirs in the Mesaverde, and MWX has addressed each of these in turn. This report presents a comprehensive summary of results from the lowermost interval: the marine interval which lies between 7450 and 8250 ft at the MWX site. Separate sections of this report are background and summary; site description and operations; geology; log analysis; core analysis; in situ stress; well testing, analysis and reservoir evaluation; and a bibliography. Additional detailed data, results, and data file references are given on microfiche in several appendices.

  19. Safety aspects of liquefied natural gas in the marine environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This study evaluates the safety issues associated with the marine transportation, handling, and storage of LNG. The panel concluded that the first concern should be the prevention of an accident that would lead to a large, uncontrolled release of LNG in or near populated areas. This concern was addressed by reviewing the design principles of LNG transportation systems, the operational principles involved in the shipment of LNG, and other factors that might reasonably be expected to improve further the safety of the system. The panel concluded that the second concern was the development of ways to mitigate the consequences of potentially hazardous LNG releases in the event that, contrary to all expectations, measures to maintain tank integrity should fail. Development of these methods requires an understanding of the underlying physical and chemical principles governing large LNG release, including spill dynamics, dispersion on water as well as on land, ignition, and resulting fire and blast effects.

  20. Global Yearly Observation of Different Phytoplankton Groups Using PhytoDOAS on SCIMANCHY Data: Validation and First Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, A.; Dinter, T.; Schmitt, B.; Sadeghi, A.; Peeken, I.; Rottgers, R.; Vontas, M.; Ye, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Global information on the quantitative distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFTs) of the world ocean is important for understanding the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem. This study shows global biomass distributions from 2008 of different dominant PFTs analysed with PhytoDOAS, a method of Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) currently specialized for diatoms and cyanobacteria [1] from satellite data of SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Cartography) on ENVISAT. PhytoDOAS global maps of phytoplankton distribution are validated with collocated pigment water samples analyzed via HPLC. The global PFT satellite data sets are used as input data for and for validation of a biogeochemical model.

  1. 78 FR 10606 - Final Management Plan and Environmental Assessment for Monitor National Marine Sanctuary: Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Sanctuaries (ONMS), National Ocean Service (NOS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of public availability. SUMMARY: NOAA is releasing the final... 23606; (757) 591-7328; or via email at Monitor@noaa.gov . Copies can also be downloaded from the...

  2. The Turbulent Life of Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, S.; Rogers, M.; Wray, A.

    2000-01-01

    Phytoplankton is a generic name for photosynthesizing microscopic organisms that inhabit the upper sunlit layer (euphotic zone) of almost all oceans and bodies of freshwater. They are agents for "primary production," the incorporation of carbon from the environment into living organisms, a process that, sustains the aquatic food web. It is estimated that phytoplankton contribute about half of the global primary production, the other half being due to terrestrial plants. By sustaining the aquatic food web and controlling the biogeochemical cycles through primary production, phytoplankton exert a dominant influence on life on earth. Turbulence influences this process in three very important ways. First, essential mineral nutrients are transported from the deeper layers to the euphotic zone through turbulence. Second, turbulence helps to suspend phytoplankton in the euphotic zone since in still water, the phytoplankton, especially the larger species, tend to settle out of the sunlit layers. Third, turbulence transports phytoplankton from the surface to the dark sterile waters, and this is an important mechanism of loss. Thus, stable phytoplankton populations are maintained through a delicate dynamic balance between the processes of turbulence, reproduction, and sinking. The first quantitative model for this was introduced by Riley, Stommel and Bumpus in 1949. This is an attempt to extend their efforts through a combination of analysis and computer simulation in order to better understand the principal qualitative aspects of the physical/biological coupling of this natural system.

  3. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  4. AUV Measured Variability in Phytoplankton Fluorescence within the ETM of the Columbia River during Summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, C. L.; Shcherbina, A.; Litchendorf, T. M.; Sanford, T. B.; Martin, D.; Baptista, A. M.; Lopez, J.; Crump, B. C.; Peterson, T. D.; Prahl, F. G.; Cravo, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present highly resolved observations of fluorescence and optical backscatter taken in the estuarine turbidity maxima (ETM) of the North Channel of the Columbia River estuary (USA) during summer 2013. Measurements were made using two REMUS-100 autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with ECO Puck triplets. Concentrations of three phytoplankton pigments were measured by fluorescence emission at wavelengths of 695 nm for chlorophyll, 570 nm for phycoerythrin, and 680 nm for phycocyanin. We use phycocyanin to indicate the presence of freshwater phytoplankton. Optical backscatter at wavelengths of 700 nm and 880 nm are used to characterize turbidity. During flood tide, high phycocyanin concentrations were associated with a strong ETM event which had relatively low salinity waters of approximately 6 psu. These data indicate that this low salinity ETM event contained large concentrations of freshwater phytoplankton. Since freshwater phytoplankton are known to lyse in saltwater, the brackish ETM event may have formed by the accumulation of lysed freshwater phytoplankton that settled out from the river as it mixed in the lower estuary. As the flood tide proceeded, it brought high concentrations of marine phytoplankton into the north channel at mid-depth as indicated by high chlorophyll levels with significantly lower phycoerythrin concentrations in high salinity waters of approximately 30 psu. The data set highlights the potential for large variability in phytoplankton species composition and concentrations within the ETM depending on mixing rates and phytoplankton bloom dynamics. Visualization of the 4-D data is aided by generating interpolated data movies.

  5. Impact of ocean acidification on the structure of future phytoplankton communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Morris, J. Jeffrey; Follows, Michael J.; Scott, Jeffery; Levitan, Orly; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Berman-Frank, Ilana

    2015-11-01

    Phytoplankton form the foundation of the marine food web and regulate key biogeochemical processes. These organisms face multiple environmental changes, including the decline in ocean pH (ocean acidification) caused by rising atmospheric pCO2 (ref. ). A meta-analysis of published experimental data assessing growth rates of different phytoplankton taxa under both ambient and elevated pCO2 conditions revealed a significant range of responses. This effect of ocean acidification was incorporated into a global marine ecosystem model to explore how marine phytoplankton communities might be impacted over the course of a hypothetical twenty-first century. Results emphasized that the differing responses to elevated pCO2 caused sufficient changes in competitive fitness between phytoplankton types to significantly alter community structure. At the level of ecological function of the phytoplankton community, acidification had a greater impact than warming or reduced nutrient supply. The model suggested that longer timescales of competition- and transport-mediated adjustments are essential for predicting changes to phytoplankton community structure.

  6. Phytoplankton bloom all along the coast of Southeast United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    All along the eastern and southern coasts of the United States, marine plants seem impervious to the onslaught of winter weather further north. In this true-color image from January 9, 2002, phytoplankton can be seen growing in the nation's coastal waters; their characteristic blue-green swirls are especially visible off the west coast of Florida. Fire locations are marked with red dots. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  7. Maintenance and operation of a small wind generator in the marine environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heerlein, W.

    1986-07-01

    This report discusses the maintenance and operation of a wind-turbine generator that has been undergoing tests as a source of energy for remote Coast Guard lighthouses. The report documents both the effects of operating the wind machine in the marine environment and the maintenance that it required. Design parameters and performance records of the generator are also evaluated. The HR2 is a horizontal-axis, upwind-oriented, three-bladed wind machine. It is equipped with a direct-drive system that allows the kinetic force captured by the propeller to be converted directly into rotational force driving the main shaft. The HR2 alternator and blade/hub system are allowed to tilt out of a near-vertical plane about a shaft and bearing mechanism. The VARCS is a torsion spring- and hinge-mechanism that acts against the lifting dynamics of the spinning blades. As high winds or gusts tilt the alternator about the hinge, the VARCS's spring opposes this force and regulates the blades angle of attack into the wind; the propeller's RPM drop when tilted because of the feathering action. If the wind subsides, the force of the VARCS spring drives the alternator assembly down and presents the blades back into the wind.

  8. Marine biology: Polar merry-go-round

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Marcel

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of polar marine ecosystems are poorly understood. A laser-based space-borne sensor captures annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass in seasonally ice-free polar waters, and provides clues on how growth drives these cycles.

  9. The physiology of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) production in phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, M.D.; Bellows, W.K. )

    1990-06-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is the precursor of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), the primary volatile organic sulfur compound released from the world's oceans. DMS flux from the oceans is estimated currently at {approximately}1.2 Tmol S.y{sup {minus}1}, or about half the amount of sulfur resulting from anthroprogenic activities, and has been implicated in important global atmospheric processes. Significant production of DMSP is confined to a few classes of marine phytoplankton, primarily the Dinophyceae and Prymnesiophyceae. In these groups, DMSP can account for up to 80% of total organic sulfur. DMSP remains intracellular and fairly constant over the growth cycle until late stationary phase when extracellular levels begin to rise, suggesting leakage. We have examined the effects of a number of environmental variables on DMSP production and release in several marine phytoplankton. In particular the effects of perturbations in light, temperature and nutrient status have been determined. These results will be discussed in relation to marine sulfur chemistry, with ancillary comments on freshwater phytoplankton.

  10. Dynamic model of flexible phytoplankton nutrient uptake

    PubMed Central

    Bonachela, Juan A.; Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic machinery of marine microbes can be remarkably plastic, allowing organisms to persist under extreme nutrient limitation. With some exceptions, most theoretical approaches to nutrient uptake in phytoplankton are largely dominated by the classic Michaelis–Menten (MM) uptake functional form, whose constant parameters cannot account for the observed plasticity in the uptake apparatus. Following seminal ideas by earlier researchers, we propose a simple cell-level model based on a dynamic view of the uptake process whereby the cell can regulate the synthesis of uptake proteins in response to changes in both internal and external nutrient concentrations. In our flexible approach, the maximum uptake rate and nutrient affinity increase monotonically as the external nutrient concentration decreases. For low to medium nutrient availability, our model predicts uptake and growth rates larger than the classic MM counterparts, while matching the classic MM results for large nutrient concentrations. These results have important consequences for global coupled models of ocean circulation and biogeochemistry, which lack this regulatory mechanism and are thus likely to underestimate phytoplankton abundances and growth rates in oligotrophic regions of the ocean. PMID:22143781

  11. Sinking rates of phytoplankton in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary: A comparative study between Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shujin; Sun, Jun; Zhao, Qibiao; Feng, Yuanyuan; Huang, Daji; Liu, Sumei

    2016-02-01

    Sinking rates of phytoplankton community with variable taxonomic composition in the offshore Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary were measured during two cruises in spring and summer, 2011. A homogenous-sample method SETCOL was used to determine the sinking rates. Phytoplankton community was dominated by dinoflagellates in spring and diatoms in summer, and two species Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii formed algal blooms in the survey area during the two cruises, respectively. Phytoplankton sinking rates ranged from 0.13 to 1.04 m day- 1 (average = 0.61 ± 0.24 m day- 1) in spring and 0.28 to 1.71 m day- 1 (average = 0.80 ± 0.34 m day- 1) in summer. In the surface layer, phytoplankton sinking rates at the P. dentatum bloom stations in spring were lower than that at the S. dorhnii bloom stations in summer. No significant correlation was found between phytoplankton sinking rates and most of the environmental parameters during the two cruises, except for temperature and nitrite concentration in summer. A significant correlation was observed between phytoplankton sinking rates and phytoplankton community structure in the surface layers: the higher dominance of diatom in the phytoplankton community corresponded to higher phytoplankton sinking rate. Therefore, the phytoplankton community structure other than the environmental parameters, is the important factor to affect the sinking rates greatly. The consequent carbon flux caused by phytoplankton sinking was estimated, and results suggested that the carbon flux to bottom water during the S. dorhnii bloom (average = 63.13 ± 48.16 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in summer was about 2.4 fold of that during the P. dentatum bloom (average = 26.10 ± 26.25 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in spring. These findings provide us some insight in understanding the carbon export contributed by marine phytoplankton in the coastal sea, where frequent phytoplankton blooms and high following carbon export occur.

  12. Distributional shifts in size structure of phytoplankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waga, H.; Hirawake, T.; Fujiwara, A.; Nishino, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Increased understanding on how marine species shift their distribution is required for effective conservation of fishery resources under climate change. Previous studies have often predicted distributional shifts of fish using satellite derived sea surface temperature (SST). However, SST may not fully represent the changes in species distribution through food web structure and as such this remains an open issue due to lack of ecological perspective on energy transfer process in the earlier studies. One of the most important factors in ecosystem is composition of phytoplankton community, and its size structure determines energy flow efficiency from base to higher trophic levels. To elucidate spatiotemporal variation in phytoplankton size structure, chlorophyll-a size distribution (CSD) algorithm was developed using spectral variance of phytoplankton absorption coefficient through principal component analysis. Slope of CSD (CSD slope) indicates size structure of phytoplankton community where, strong and weak magnitudes of CSD slope indicate smaller and larger phytoplankton structure, respectively. Shifts in CSD slope and SST were derived as the ratio of temporal trend over the 12-year period (2003-2014) to 2-dimensional spatial gradient and the resulting global median velocity of CSD slope and SST were 0.361 and 0.733 km year-1, respectively. In addition, the velocity of CSD slope monotonically increases with increasing latitude, while relatively complex latitudinal pattern for SST emerged. Moreover, angle of shifts suggest that species are required to shift their distribution toward not limited to simple pole-ward migration, and some regions exhibit opposite direction between the velocity of CSD slope and SST. These findings further imply that combined phytoplankton size structure and SST may contribute for more accurate prediction of species distribution shifts relative to existing studies which only considering variations in thermal niches.

  13. Estimating Phytoplankton Biomass and Productivity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Identlfy by block nuusbet) -Estimates of phytoplankton biomass and rates of production can provide a manager with some insight into questions concerning...and growth. Phytoplankton biomass is the amount of algal material present, whereas productivity is the rate at which algal cell material is produced...biomass and productivity parameters. Munawar et al. (1974) reported that cell volume was better correlated to chlorophyll a and photosynthe- sis rates

  14. Modelling phytoplankton succession and nutrient transfer along the Scheldt estuary (Belgium, The Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gypens, N.; Delhez, E.; Vanhoutte-Brunier, A.; Burton, S.; Thieu, V.; Passy, P.; Liu, Y.; Callens, J.; Rousseau, V.; Lancelot, C.

    2013-12-01

    The freshwater (RIVE) and the marine (MIRO) biogeochemical models were coupled to a 1D hydro-sedimentary model to describe contemporary phytoplankton succession and nutrient transfers in the macrotidal Scheldt estuary (BE/NL) affected by anthropogenic nutrient loads. The 1D-RIVE-MIRO model simulations are performed between Ghent and Vlissingen and the longitudinal estuarine profiles are validated by visual and statistical comparison with physico-chemical and phytoplankton observations available for the year 2006. Results show the occurrence of two distinct spatial phytoplankton blooms in the upper and lower estuary, suggesting that neither the freshwater nor the marine phytoplankton gets over the maximum turbidity zone (MTZ) at the saline transition. Sensitivity tests performed to understand how changing conditions (salinity, turbidity and nutrients) along the estuary are controlling this bimodal spatial phytoplankton distribution identify salinity and light availability as the key drivers while the grazing pressure and nutrient limitation play a negligible role. Additional tests with varying salinity-resistant (euryhaline) species in the freshwater assemblage conclude that the presence (or absence) of euryhalines determines the magnitude and the spreading of freshwater and marine phytoplankton blooms in the estuary. Annual nutrient budgets estimated from 1D-RIVE-MIRO simulations show that biological activities have a negligible impact on nutrient export but modify the speciation of nutrients exported to the coastal zone towards inorganic forms, thus directly available to phytoplankton. The implementation of nutrient reduction options (upgrading of waste water treatment plants, conversion to organic farming) on the Scheldt watershed influences the whole estuary and affects both the magnitude and the speciation of nutrients exported to the coastal zone with expected impact on coastal phytoplankton dynamic.

  15. Phytoplankton bloom in the Black Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Brightly colored waters in the Black Sea give evidence of the growth of tiny marine plants called phytoplankton, which contain chlorophyll and other pigments that reflect light different ways, producing the colorful displays. The very bright blue waters could be an organism called a coccolithophores, which has a highly reflective calcium carbonate coating that appears bright blue (or sometimes white) in true-color (visible) imagery. However, other organisms, such as cyanobacteria can also appear that color, and so often scientists will compare the ratios of reflectance at one wavelength of light to another to decide what organisms might be present. This series of images shows a bloom occurring in the Black Sea from May 11, 2002, to May 18.

  16. Genomic insights into photosynthesis in eukaryotic phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Finazzi, Giovanni; Moreau, Hervé; Bowler, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The evolution of photosynthesis completely altered the biogeochemistry of our planet and permitted the evolution of more complex multicellular organisms. Curiously, terrestrial photosynthesis is carried out largely by green algae and their descendents the higher plants, whereas in the ocean the most abundant photosynthetic eukaryotes are microscopic and have red algal affiliations. Although primary productivity is approximately equal between the land and the ocean, the marine microbes represent less than 1% of the photosynthetic biomass found on land. This review focuses on this highly successful and diverse group of organisms collectively known as phytoplankton and reviews how insights from whole genome analyses have improved our understanding of the novel innovations employed by them to maximize photosynthetic efficiency in variable light environments.

  17. Phytoplankton-Fluorescence-Lifetime Vertical Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.; St. Louis, Ernest

    2004-01-01

    A battery-operated optoelectronic instrument is designed to be lowered into the ocean to measure the intensity and lifetime of fluorescence of chlorophyll A in marine phytoplankton as a function of depth from 0 to 300 m. Fluorescence lifetimes are especially useful as robust measures of photosynthetic productivity of phytoplankton and of physical and chemical mechanisms that affect photosynthesis. The knowledge of photosynthesis in phytoplankton gained by use of this and related instruments is expected to contribute to understanding of global processes that control the time-varying fluxes of carbon and associated biogenic elements in the ocean. The concentration of chlorophyll in the ocean presents a major detection challenge because in order to obtain accurate values of photosynthetic parameters, the intensity of light used to excite fluorescence must be kept very low so as not to disturb the photosynthetic system. Several innovations in fluorometric instrumentation were made in order to make it possible to reach the required low detection limit. These innovations include a highly efficient optical assembly with an integrated flow-through sample interface, and a high-gain, low-noise electronic detection subsystem. The instrument also incorporates means for self-calibration during operation, and electronic hardware and software for control, acquisition and analysis of data, and communications. The electronic circuitry is highly miniaturized and designed to minimize power demand. The instrument is housed in a package that can withstand the water pressure at the maximum depth of 300 m. A light-emitting diode excites fluorescence in the sample flow cell, which is placed at one focal point of an ellipsoidal reflector. A photomultiplier tube is placed at the other focal point. This optical arrangement enables highly efficient collection of fluorescence emitted over all polar directions. Fluorescence lifetime is measured indirectly, by use of a technique based on the

  18. Using bio-optical parameters as a tool for detecting changes in the phytoplankton community (SW Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goela, Priscila C.; Icely, John; Cristina, Sónia; Danchenko, Sergei; Angel DelValls, T.; Newton, Alice

    2015-12-01

    Upwelling events off the Southwest coast of Portugal can trigger phytoplankton blooms that are important for the fisheries and aquaculture sectors in this region. However, climate change scenarios forecast fluctuations in the intensity and frequency of upwelling events, thereby potentially impacting these sectors. Shifts in the phytoplankton community were analysed from the end of 2008 until the beginning of 2012 by examining the bio-optical properties of the water column, namely the absorption coefficients for phytoplankton, non-algal particles and coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The phytoplankton community was assessed by microscopy, with counts from an inverted microscope, and by chemotaxonomic methodologies, using pigment concentrations determined by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Results both from microscopy and from chemotaxonomic methods showed a shift from diatom dominance related to bloom conditions matching upwelling events, to small flagellate dominance related to no-bloom conditions matching relaxation of upwelling. During bloom conditions, light absorption from phytoplankton increased markedly, while non-algal particles and CDOM absorption remained relatively constant. The dynamics of CDOM in the study area was attributed to coastal influences rather than from phytoplankton origin. Changes in phytoplankton biomass and consequent alterations in phytoplankton absorption coefficients were attributed to upwelling regimes in the area. Bio-optical parameters can contribute to environmental monitoring of coastal and oceanic waters, which in the case of the European Union, involves the implementation of the Water Framework, Marine Strategy Framework and Marine Spatial Planning Directives.

  19. Impact of climate change on phytoplankton dynamics in an oligotrophic Mediterranean coastal area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goffart, A.; Legendre, L.; Hecq, J. H.

    2003-04-01

    A long-term phytoplankton study was initiated in 1979 in an oligotrophic coastal station of the Western Mediterranean, at one fixed station. The sampling station (42^o34'85N, 08^o43'60E) is situated near the coast, in the northern part of the Bay of Calvi (Western Corsica, France). Purposes of the study are to establish baseline data on phytoplankton population in relation with water masses characteristics, and to determine patterns and trends in phytoplankton populations. Observations of the development of the winter-spring phytoplankton bloom in the Bay of Calvi evidenced a drastic reduction of phytoplankton biomass and biodiversity over the last two decades. Between 1979 and 1998, the monthly averaged chlorophyll α concentrations at 1 m decreased by about 80% during February, March and April. Simultaneously, major changes to hydrodynamic conditions include warmer water, overall decrease of salinity at 10 m depth, longer periods of bright sunshine and lower wind stress. The changes in environmental conditions were large enough to reduce nutrient replenishment of the surface layer prior to the usual period of phytoplankton growth. Decreasing Si availability led to Si limitation, which caused a reduction in diatom abundance. This resulted in the disappearance of the diatom-dominated pulses and in lower phytoplankton biomass and was accompanied by a shift toward non-siliceous phytoplankton (Goffart et al., 2002). Other, associated changes in benthos assemblages are presented. Relationships between phytoplankton fluctuations and NAO index are examined. Reference Goffart A., Hecq J.H., Legendre L. (2002). Changes in the development of the winter-spring phytoplankton bloom in the Bay of Calvi (Northwestern Mediterranean) over the last two decades: a response to the changing climate? Marine Ecology Progress Series, 236: 45-60.

  20. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Aaron W. E.; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting diatoms

  1. Partitioning the Relative Importance of Phylogeny and Environmental Conditions on Phytoplankton Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Aaron W E; Winder, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Essential fatty acids (EFA), which are primarily generated by phytoplankton, limit growth and reproduction in diverse heterotrophs. The biochemical composition of phytoplankton is well-known to be governed both by phylogeny and environmental conditions. Nutrients, light, salinity, and temperature all affect both phytoplankton growth and fatty acid composition. However, the relative importance of taxonomy and environment on algal fatty acid content has yet to be comparatively quantified, thus inhibiting predictions of changes to phytoplankton food quality in response to global environmental change. We compiled 1145 published marine and freshwater phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, consisting of 208 species from six major taxonomic groups, cultured in a wide range of environmental conditions, and used a multivariate distance-based linear model to quantify the total variation explained by each variable. Our results show that taxonomic group accounts for 3-4 times more variation in phytoplankton fatty acids than the most important growth condition variables. The results underscore that environmental conditions clearly affect phytoplankton fatty acid profiles, but also show that conditions account for relatively low variation compared to phylogeny. This suggests that the underlying mechanism determining basal food quality in aquatic habitats is primarily phytoplankton community composition, and allows for prediction of environmental-scale EFA dynamics based on phytoplankton community data. We used the compiled dataset to calculate seasonal dynamics of long-chain EFA (LCEFA; ≥C20 ɷ-3 and ɷ-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid) concentrations and ɷ-3:ɷ-6 EFA ratios in Lake Washington using a multi-decadal phytoplankton community time series. These analyses quantify temporal dynamics of algal-derived LCEFA and food quality in a freshwater ecosystem that has undergone large community changes as a result of shifting resource management practices, highlighting diatoms

  2. Predator-induced fleeing behaviors in phytoplankton: a new mechanism for harmful algal bloom formation?

    PubMed

    Harvey, Elizabeth L; Menden-Deuer, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    In the plankton, heterotrophic microbes encounter and ingest phytoplankton prey, which effectively removes >50% of daily phytoplankton production in the ocean and influences global primary production and biochemical cycling rates. Factors such as size, shape, nutritional value, and presence of chemical deterrents are known to affect predation pressure. Effects of movement behaviors of either predator or prey on predation pressure, and particularly fleeing behaviors in phytoplankton are thus far unknown. Here, we quantified individual 3D movements, population distributions, and survival rates of the toxic phytoplankton species, Heterosigma akashiwo in response to a ciliate predator and predator-derived cues. We observed predator-induced defense behaviors previously unknown for phytoplankton. Modulation of individual phytoplankton movements during and after predator exposure resulted in an effective separation of predator and prey species. The strongest avoidance behaviors were observed when H. akashiwo co-occurred with an actively grazing predator. Predator-induced changes in phytoplankton movements resulted in a reduction in encounter rate and a 3-fold increase in net algal population growth rate. A spatially explicit population model predicted rapid phytoplankton bloom formation only when fleeing behaviors were incorporated. These model predictions reflected field observations of rapid H. akashiwo harmful algal bloom (HAB) formation in the coastal ocean. Our results document a novel behavior in phytoplankton that can significantly reduce predation pressure and suggests a new mechanism for HAB formation. Phytoplankton behaviors that minimize predatory losses, maximize resource acquisition, and alter community composition and distribution patterns could have major implications for our understanding and predictive capacity of marine primary production and biochemical cycling rates.

  3. Development and application of a sublethal toxicity test to PAH using marine harpacticoid copepods. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fleeger, J.W.; Lotufo, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    This research project was designed to improve the understanding of the acute and sublethal effects of PAHs to benthic invertebrates. Sublethal bioassay protocols for benthic harpacticoid copepods were developed, and two species of harpacticoids were exposed to a range of concentrations of sediment-amended PAHs; the single compounds fluoranthene and phenanthrene as well as a complex mixture (diesel fuel). The harpacticoid copepods Schizopera knabeni and Nitocra lacustris were tested using several bioassay approaches. Reproductive assays, feeding assays and avoidance tests were conducted in addition to lethal tests for S. knabeni. Species-specific differences in sensitivity were detected. Early life history stages were much more sensitive than adults in one species but not in the other. Concentrations of PAH as low as 26 micrograms PAH decreased copepod offspring production, egg hatching success, and embryonic and early-stage development, demonstrating the high sensitivity of life history-related endpoints. In addition, grazing on microalgae was significantly impaired at concentrations as low as 20 micrograms/g PAH after short exposures (<30 h). Finally it was demonstrated that harpacticoids can actively avoid contamination.

  4. DNA Analyses of Phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Gonzalez, M. F.; Bench, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is experiencing the fastest climate warming of any marine environment on Earth, with a 6°C rise in mean winter temperature over the past 60 years (Vaughan et al., 2003). Though poorly understood, these changes may have profound effects on local Antarctic ecosystems. This research project aims to identify these changes through the compositional analysis of Antarctic phytoplankton using DNA sequencing supported by fluorescent microscopy. During the 2013 and 2014 blooming seasons, December to March, water samples were obtained from Palmer Station (located on the WAP) and filtered through 3 μm/0.8 μm filters. DNA was extracted from the water samples using the Qiagen Plant Kit, quantified through use of both Nanodrop and Picogreen technology, quality-checked by gel electrophoresis, and sent to be sequenced. Additionally, major phytoplankton species were identified through microscope imaging and preliminary counts were made for four important dates, two located at the peaks of phytoplankton blooms. From these four samples alone, it appeared that cryptomonads dominated the primary bloom whereas diatoms, both centric and pennate, were more abundant during the second bloom. In the future, these results will be tested against sequencing data. Through continued year-by-year analysis of Antarctic phytoplankton abundance levels, it will be possible to identify trends that may be crucial to understanding the dynamic Antarctic ecosystem.

  5. Self-sedimentation of fossil phytoplankton blooms, laminated hemipelagic sediments and the oceanic carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.A.; Lange, C.B.

    1996-12-31

    The flux of phytoplankton-derived organic carbon from the surface ocean to the deep sea and underlying sediments is a nonuniform process that significantly impacts biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric pCO{sub 2} / O{sub 2} and organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. Some marine phytoplankton actively drive the sedimentation process by the formation of sticky transparent gels which facilitate aggregation, rapid sinking and efficient export flux. Here we present fossil evidence of unfragmented, low-diversity phytoplankton assemblages preserved as sedimentary laminations and as preserved aggregates that are attributable to a similar phytoplankton-driven sedimentary mechanism, here termed {open_quotes}self-sedimentation{close_quotes}. Heterogeneities in the texture and/or composition of sediment supply are necessary for the production of laminatedhemipelagic sediments; the absence of hydraulic and biological reworking permits preservation of these sedimentary laminae. Distinctly-laminated core intervals are characterized by large compositional contrasts between adjacent laminae; many such high-bimodality couplets are attributable to self-sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms. Self-sedimentation propels the formation of some conspicuous hemipelagic sedimentary laminations and results in efficient carbon and opal flux to the sediments. These records suggest that phytoplankton-mediated changes in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump may govern many accumulations of organic-rich hydrocarbon source rock as well as many abrupt changes in atmospheric pCO{sub 2} and climate.

  6. Self-sedimentation of fossil phytoplankton blooms, laminated hemipelagic sediments and the oceanic carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.A. ); Lange, C.B. )

    1996-01-01

    The flux of phytoplankton-derived organic carbon from the surface ocean to the deep sea and underlying sediments is a nonuniform process that significantly impacts biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric pCO[sub 2] / O[sub 2] and organic carbon enrichment in marine sediments. Some marine phytoplankton actively drive the sedimentation process by the formation of sticky transparent gels which facilitate aggregation, rapid sinking and efficient export flux. Here we present fossil evidence of unfragmented, low-diversity phytoplankton assemblages preserved as sedimentary laminations and as preserved aggregates that are attributable to a similar phytoplankton-driven sedimentary mechanism, here termed [open quotes]self-sedimentation[close quotes]. Heterogeneities in the texture and/or composition of sediment supply are necessary for the production of laminatedhemipelagic sediments; the absence of hydraulic and biological reworking permits preservation of these sedimentary laminae. Distinctly-laminated core intervals are characterized by large compositional contrasts between adjacent laminae; many such high-bimodality couplets are attributable to self-sedimentation of phytoplankton blooms. Self-sedimentation propels the formation of some conspicuous hemipelagic sedimentary laminations and results in efficient carbon and opal flux to the sediments. These records suggest that phytoplankton-mediated changes in the efficiency of the biological carbon pump may govern many accumulations of organic-rich hydrocarbon source rock as well as many abrupt changes in atmospheric pCO[sub 2] and climate.

  7. Disassembling iron availability to phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO(2) drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability - the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton - and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute "all or nothing." We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species.

  8. Disassembling Iron Availability to Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability – the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton – and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute “all or nothing.” We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species. PMID:22529839

  9. Historical variability in past phytoplankton abundance and composition in Doubtful Sound, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüller, Susanne E.; Allison, Mead A.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Tian, Feng; Savage, Candida

    2013-10-01

    Doubtful Sound, New Zealand, provides an exceptional opportunity to study a 'baseline' coastal ecosystem with an intact watershed. We present the first data on historical changes in phytoplankton abundance and community composition for three sites in Doubtful Sound using sediment records. Profiles of sedimentary concentrations of β-carotene (a proxy of total algal abundance, 0.021-1.345 mmol g organic carbon-1) and carotenoids were generally depleted, indicating low autochthonous production. Phytoplankton pigments and diatom frustules in Doubtful Sound indicate that diatoms have been prevalent for at least the last ca. 350 years; however, the relative importance of marine and freshwater diatoms has varied through time. Further, the timing of change in phytoplankton biomass and community composition differed among the sites within Doubtful Sound. This finding highlights the need to use multiple sites and complementary biomarkers when studying historical changes in phytoplankton communities in complex ecosystems with strong physicochemical gradients such as fjords.

  10. Phytoplankton and the balance of nature: An opinion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowen, Richard J.; Tett, Paul; Smayda, Theodore J.

    2012-11-01

    Recent European Court rulings in the context of eutrophication viewed proliferation of a particular species of algae as a disturbance to the balance of aquatic ecosystems and the proliferation of one or more species as a cause of a reduction in other species. We discuss the scientific basis for this opinion in relation to the growth of marine primary producers and current debates about ecosystem stability. Opposing views in this debate are those of (a) the 'balance of nature' paradigm, in which communities of organisms tend towards a stable climax composition, and (b) communities as dynamic systems that may be governed by 'basins of attraction' in state space. We use data from the Irish Sea and Narragansett Bay, together with a review of the literature, to show that: the dynamics of temperate marine phytoplankton, with seasonal successions, corresponds more to (b) than to (a); the temporary dominance of any one species of micro-alga or cyanobacterium is part of the natural dynamics of phytoplankton communities and does not permanently impact on other species. Understanding the phytoplankton as a dynamic system suggests its status should not be assessed against a 'climax' model and that eutrophication should be diagnosed from fundamental (nutrient-induced) perturbations of ecosystem state and function rather than from changes in fixed assemblages of species and thresholds of abundance.

  11. Interactions of aquaculture, marine coastal ecosystems, and near-shore waters: A bibliography. Bibliographies and literature of agriculture (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Hanfman, D.T.; Coleman, D.E.; Tibbitt, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    The bibliography contains selected literature citations on the interactions of aquaculture and marine coastal ecosystems. The focus is on aquaculture effluents and their impact on marine coastal ecosystems and waterways as well as the impact of pollutants on aquaculture development. Factors affecting these issues include domestic and industrial wastes, thermal discharges, acid rain, heavy metals, oil spills, and microbial contamination of marine waters and aquatic species. Coastal zone management, environmenal impact of aquaculture, and water quality issues are also included in the bibliography.

  12. Interaction and signalling between a cosmopolitan phytoplankton and associated bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, S. A.; Hmelo, L. R.; van Tol, H. M.; Durham, B. P.; Carlson, L. T.; Heal, K. R.; Morales, R. L.; Berthiaume, C. T.; Parker, M. S.; Djunaedi, B.; Ingalls, A. E.; Parsek, M. R.; Moran, M. A.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between primary producers and bacteria impact the physiology of both partners, alter the chemistry of their environment, and shape ecosystem diversity. In marine ecosystems, these interactions are difficult to study partly because the major photosynthetic organisms are microscopic, unicellular phytoplankton. Coastal phytoplankton communities are dominated by diatoms, which generate approximately 40% of marine primary production and form the base of many marine food webs. Diatoms co-occur with specific bacterial taxa, but the mechanisms of potential interactions are mostly unknown. Here we tease apart a bacterial consortium associated with a globally distributed diatom and find that a Sulfitobacter species promotes diatom cell division via secretion of the hormone indole-3-acetic acid, synthesized by the bacterium using both diatom-secreted and endogenous tryptophan. Indole-3-acetic acid and tryptophan serve as signalling molecules that are part of a complex exchange of nutrients, including diatom-excreted organosulfur molecules and bacterial-excreted ammonia. The potential prevalence of this mode of signalling in the oceans is corroborated by metabolite and metatranscriptome analyses that show widespread indole-3-acetic acid production by Sulfitobacter-related bacteria, particularly in coastal environments. Our study expands on the emerging recognition that marine microbial communities are part of tightly connected networks by providing evidence that these interactions are mediated through production and exchange of infochemicals.

  13. THE RESPONSE OF MARINE ECOSYSTEMS TO CLIMATE VARIABILITY ASSOCIATED WITH THE NORTH ATLANTIC OSCILLATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A strong association is documented between variability of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and changes in various trophic levels of the marine ecosystems of the North Atlantic. Examples are presented for phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, fish, marine diseases, whales and s...

  14. Millimeter scale profiles of chlorophyll fluorescence: Deciphering the microscale spatial structure of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubell, Mark J.; Prairie, Jennifer C.; Yamazaki, Hidekatsu

    2014-03-01

    Marine food webs and biogeochemical cycles are driven by interactions between individual phytoplankton and other micro-organisms embedded within turbulent flows. Understanding the causes and ecological consequences of these interactions requires measurement of the spatial distribution of organisms across sub-meter scales relevant to their activities. However, estimates of many microscale processes (e.g., encounter rates, competition) are implicitly based on a random distribution of plankton despite increasing evidence of patchy distributions of turbulence and phytoplankton at the oceans microscale. Further complicating our understanding of microscale phytoplankton ecology, recent studies have suggested that the high levels of fluorescence variability measured at sub-centimeter scales may be due to the detection of separate, large phytoplankton particles (i.e. large cells, chains and aggregates) rather than 'patches' of increased cell abundances. By comparing coincident fluorescence estimates measured with millimeter (μL) and centimeter (mL) scale resolution, we show that estimates of phytoplankton biomass made at centimeter scales are consistent with averaging discrete variations in fluorescence measured at millimeter scales and that a critical scale exists where measures of fluorescence variability transitions from representing an individual to a patch. Application of nearest neighbor analysis to the discrete fluorescence patterns showed deviations from complete spatial randomness towards clustering across scales of millimeters to tens of centimeters. The strength of the deviation from random increased significantly in regions of elevated phytoplankton concentrations. No relationship was observed between fluorescent particle concentrations or nearest neighbor distances with the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. Our results provide empirical evidence that the scale at which phytoplankton distributions are estimated by chlorophyll fluorescence may be

  15. Phytoplankton in the ocean use non-phosphorus lipids in response to phosphorus scarcity.

    PubMed

    Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Fredricks, Helen F; Pedler, Byron E; Dyhrman, Sonya T; Karl, David M; Koblízek, Michal; Lomas, Michael W; Mincer, Tracy J; Moore, Lisa R; Moutin, Thierry; Rappé, Michael S; Webb, Eric A

    2009-03-05

    Phosphorus is an obligate requirement for the growth of all organisms; major biochemical reservoirs of phosphorus in marine plankton include nucleic acids and phospholipids. However, eukaryotic phytoplankton and cyanobacteria (that is, 'phytoplankton' collectively) have the ability to decrease their cellular phosphorus content when phosphorus in their environment is scarce. The biochemical mechanisms that allow phytoplankton to limit their phosphorus demand and still maintain growth are largely unknown. Here we show that phytoplankton, in regions of oligotrophic ocean where phosphate is scarce, reduce their cellular phosphorus requirements by substituting non-phosphorus membrane lipids for phospholipids. In the Sargasso Sea, where phosphate concentrations were less than 10 nmol l-1, we found that only 1.3 +/- 0.6% of phosphate uptake was used for phospholipid synthesis; in contrast, in the South Pacific subtropical gyre, where phosphate was greater than 100 nmol l-1, plankton used 17 6% (ref. 6). Examination of the planktonic membrane lipids at these two locations showed that classes of sulphur- and nitrogen-containing membrane lipids, which are devoid of phosphorus, were more abundant in the Sargasso Sea than in the South Pacific. Furthermore, these non-phosphorus, 'substitute lipids' were dominant in phosphorus-limited cultures of all of the phytoplankton species we examined. In contrast, the marine heterotrophic bacteria we examined contained no substitute lipids and only phospholipids. Thus heterotrophic bacteria, which compete with phytoplankton for nutrients in oligotrophic regions like the Sargasso Sea, appear to have a biochemical phosphorus requirement that phytoplankton avoid by using substitute lipids. Our results suggest that phospholipid substitutions are fundamental biochemical mechanisms that allow phytoplankton to maintain growth in the face of phosphorus limitation.

  16. Quantifying the impact of submesoscale processes on the spring phytoplankton bloom in a turbulent upper ocean using a Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brody, Sarah R.; Lozier, M. Susan; Mahadevan, Amala

    2016-05-01

    The spring phytoplankton bloom in the subpolar North Atlantic and the mechanisms controlling its evolution and onset have important consequences for marine ecosystems and carbon cycling. Submesoscale mixed layer eddies (MLEs) play a role in the onset of the bloom by creating localized stratification and alleviating phytoplankton light limitation; however, the importance of MLEs for phytoplankton in a turbulent surface mixed layer has not yet been examined. We explore the effect of MLEs on phytoplankton by simulating their trajectories with Lagrangian particles subject to turbulent vertical displacements in an MLE-resolving model. By tracking the light exposure of the simulated phytoplankton, we find that MLEs can advance the timing of the spring bloom by 1 to 2 weeks, depending on surface forcing conditions. The onset of the bloom is linked with the onset of positive heat fluxes, whether or not MLEs are present.

  17. Seasonal variations in phytoplankton community structure in the Sanggou, Ailian, and Lidao Bays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Mingli; Zhang, Cuixia; Jiang, Zengjie; Guo, Shujin; Sun, Jun

    2014-12-01

    , phosphate level was the major factor that limited the occurrence of P. sulcata and C. oculus-iridis, whereas optimal temperature and low salinity were responsible for Prorocentrum blooms in summer. The detailed description of seasonal variations in phytoplankton community structure in the three bays provide reference data for future studies on marine ecosystems and mariculture in adjacent areas.

  18. Assessment of phytoplankton diversity as an indicator of water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Yergeau, S.E.; Lang, A.; Teeters, R.

    1997-08-01

    For the measurement of water quality in freshwater systems, there are established indices using macroinvertebrate larvae. There is no such comparable measure for marine and estuarine environments. A phytoplankton diversity index (PDI), whose basic form was conceived by Dr. Ruth Gyure of Save the Sound, Inc., is being investigated as a possible candidate to rectify this situation. Phytoplankton were chosen as the indicators of water quality since algae have short generation times and respond quickly to changing water quality conditions. The methodologies involved in this initial assessment of the PDI are incorporated into the Adopt-a-Harbor water quality monitoring program and its associated laboratory. The virtues of the procedures are that they are simple and quick to use, suitable for trained volunteers to carry out, easily reproducible, and amenable to quality assurance checks.

  19. Microscale patches of nonmotile phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Arrieta, Jorge; Barreira, Ana; Tuval, Idan

    2015-03-27

    Phytoplankton cells have evolved sophisticated strategies for actively responding to environmental signals, most notably to mechanical stresses of hydrodynamic origin. A largely unanswered question, however, is the significance of these cellular responses for the largely heterogeneous spatial distribution of cells found in the oceans. Motivated by the physiological regulation of buoyancy prevalent in nonmotile phytoplankton species, we solve here a minimal model for "active" sinking that incorporates these cellular responses. Within this model, we show how buoyancy regulation leads to intense patchiness for nonmotile species as compared to passive tracers, resulting in important variations in settling speeds and, as a consequence, determining escape rates to the deep ocean.

  20. SynSen PFT: Synergistic Retrieval of Phytoplankton Functional Types from Space From Hyper-and Multispectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soppa, Mariana A.; Loza, Svetlana N.; Dinter, Tilman; Wolanin, Aleksandra; Bricaud, Annick; Brewein, Robert; Rozanov, Vladimir; Barcher, Astrid

    2016-08-01

    To gain knowledge on the role of marine phytoplankton in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles, information on the global distribution of major phytoplankton functional types is essential. The Synergistic Retrieval of Phytoplankton Functional Types from Space from Hyper- and Multispectral Measurements project (SynSenPFT) aims to improve the retrieval of phytoplankton types (PFTs) from space by exploring the synergistic use of low-spatial-hyper- spectral and high-spatial-multi-spectral satellite data. Three PFTs are investigated: diatoms, coccolithophores and cyanobacteria. The work involves the improvement/revision of existing PFT algorithms based on hyper- (PhytoDOAS, [1]) and multi-spectral (OC- PFT, [2]) datasets, development of synergistic PFT products combining the retrievals of these two algorithms and intercomparison of the synergistic PFT products with those derived from other methods [3,4,5].

  1. Dimethylsulphide, clouds, and phytoplankton: Insights from a simple plankton ecosystem feedback model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropp, Roger; Norbury, John; Braddock, Roger

    2007-06-01

    The hypothesis that marine plankton ecosystems may effectively regulate climate by the production of dimethylsulphide (DMS) has attracted substantial research effort over recent years. This hypothesis suggests that DMS produced by marine ecosystems can affect cloud properties and hence the averaged irradiance experienced by the phytoplankton that produce DMS's precursor dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP). This paper describes the use of a simple model to examine the effects of such a biogenic feedback on the ecosystem that initiates it. We compare the responses to perturbation of a simple marine nitrogen-phytoplankton-zooplankton (NPZ) ecosystem model with and without biogenic feedback. Our analysis of this heuristic model reveals that the addition of the feedback can increase the model's resilience to perturbation and hence stabilize the model ecosystem. This result suggests the hypothesis that DMS may play a role in stabilizing marine plankton ecosystem dynamics through its effect on the atmosphere.

  2. A marine biogenic source of atmospherically relevant ice nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Theodore W.; Ladino, Luis A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Chance, Rosie; Whale, Thomas F.; Vergara Temprado, Jesús; Burrows, Susannah M.; Breckels, Mark N.; Kilthau, Wendy P.; Browse, Jo; Bertram, Allan K.; Miller, Lisa A.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Hamilton, Jacqui F.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Brooks, Ian M.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Aller, Josephine Y.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2016-04-01

    There are limited observations describing marine sources of ice nucleating particles (INPs), despite sea spray aerosol being one of the dominant sources of atmospheric particles globally. Evidence indicates that some marine aerosol particles act as INPs, but the source of these particles is unclear. The sea surface microlayer is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea-spray aerosol. We show that the sea surface microlayer is enriched in INPs that nucleate ice under conditions pertinent to both high-altitude ice clouds and low to mid-altitude mixed-phase clouds. The INPs pass through 0.2 μm pore filters, are heat sensitive and spectroscopic analysis indicates the presence of material consistent with phytoplankton exudates. Mass spectrometric analysis of solid phase extracted dissolved organic material from microlayer and sub-surface water samples showed that the relative abundance of certain ions correlated with microlayer ice nucleation activity. However, these ions were not themselves directly responsible for ice nucleation. We propose that material associated with phytoplankton exudates is a candidate for the observed activity of the microlayer samples. We show that laboratory produced exudate from a ubiquitous marine diatom contains INPs despite its separation from diatom cells. Finally we use a parameterisation of our field data to estimate the atmospheric INP contribution from primary marine organic emissions using a global model and test the model against existing INP measurements in the remote oceans. We find that biogenic marine INPs can be dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean.

  3. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of

  4. Phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cloern, James E.; Foster, S.Q.; Kleckner, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land – estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m−2 yr−1, but the range is large: from −105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m−2 yr−1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year to year (but we only found eight APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods reported in the literature can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148

  5. A NEW HPLC METHOD FOR SEPARATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON PIGMENTS IN NATURAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method was developed to analyze, in a single run, most polar and non-polar chlorophylls and carotenoids from marine phytoplankton. The method is based on a reverse-phase amide C16 (RP-amide C16) column and an elution gradient o...

  6. High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Analysis of Phytoplankton Pigments Using a C16-Amide Column

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method was developed to analyze in a single run, most polar and non-polar chlorophylls and carotenoids from marine phytoplankton. The method is based on a RP-C16-Amide column and a ternary gradient system consistin...

  7. Stoichiometric regulation of phytoplankton toxins.

    PubMed

    Van de Waal, Dedmer B; Smith, Val H; Declerck, Steven A J; Stam, Eva C M; Elser, James J

    2014-06-01

    Ecological Stoichiometry theory predicts that the production, elemental structure and cellular content of biomolecules should depend on the relative availability of resources and the elemental composition of their producer organism. We review the extent to which carbon- and nitrogen-rich phytoplankton toxins are regulated by nutrient limitation and cellular stoichiometry. Consistent with theory, we show that nitrogen limitation causes a reduction in the cellular quota of nitrogen-rich toxins, while phosphorus limitation causes an increase in the most nitrogen-rich paralytic shellfish poisoning toxin. In addition, we show that the cellular content of nitrogen-rich toxins increases with increasing cellular N : P ratios. Also consistent with theory, limitation by either nitrogen or phosphorus promotes the C-rich toxin cell quota or toxicity of phytoplankton cells. These observed relationships may assist in predicting and managing toxin-producing phytoplankton blooms. Such a stoichiometric regulation of toxins is likely not restricted to phytoplankton, and may well apply to carbon- and nitrogen-rich secondary metabolites produced by bacteria, fungi and plants.

  8. Final Report Recommended Actions to Reduce Electrical Peak Loads at the Marine Corps Air Station at Camp Pendleton, California

    SciTech Connect

    Hail, John C.; Brown, Daryl R.; McCullough, Jeffrey J.; Underhill, Ronald M.

    2001-05-08

    PNNL conducted a walk-through audit of Marine Corps Air Station at Camp Pendleton. The audit inspected a significant portion of the site and identified a large number of similar energy saving opportunities across all building types.

  9. Suitability of Phytosterols Alongside Fatty Acids as Chemotaxonomic Biomarkers for Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Taipale, Sami J.; Hiltunen, Minna; Vuorio, Kristiina; Peltomaa, Elina

    2016-01-01

    The composition and abundance of phytoplankton is an important factor defining ecological status of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Chemotaxonomic markers (e.g., pigments and fatty acids) are needed for monitoring changes in a phytoplankton community and to know the nutritional quality of seston for herbivorous zooplankton. Here we investigated the suitability of sterols along with fatty acids as chemotaxonomic markers using multivariate statistics, by analyzing the sterol and fatty acid composition of 10 different phytoplankton classes including altogether 37 strains isolated from freshwater lakes. We were able to detect a total of 47 fatty acids and 29 sterols in our phytoplankton samples, which both differed statistically significantly between phytoplankton classes. Due to the high variation of fatty acid composition among Cyanophyceae, taxonomical differentiation increased when Cyanophyceae were excluded from statistical analysis. Sterol composition was more heterogeneous within class than fatty acids and did not improve separation of phytoplankton classes when used alongside fatty acids. However, we conclude that sterols can provide additional information on the abundance of specific genera within a class which can be generated by using fatty acids. For example, whereas high C16 ω-3 PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acid) indicates the presence of Chlorophyceae, a simultaneous high amount of ergosterol could specify the presence of Chlamydomonas spp. (Chlorophyceae). Additionally, we found specific 4α-methyl sterols for distinct Dinophyceae genera, suggesting that 4α-methyl sterols can potentially separate freshwater dinoflagellates from each other. PMID:26973664

  10. Bioassay for assessing marine contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lapota, D.; Copeland, H.; Mastny, G.; Rosenberger, D.; Duckworth, D.

    1996-03-01

    The Qwiklite bioassay, developed by the laboratory at NCCOSC, is used as a biological tool to gauge the extent of environmental contamination. Some species of marine phytoplankton produce bioluminescence. The Qwiklite bioassay determines acute response and chronic effects of a wide variety of toxicants upon bioluminescent dinotlagellates by measuring their light output after exposure.

  11. Seasonal dynamics of phytoplankton and its relationship with the environmental factors in Dongping Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang; Lu, Xuetang; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Xie, Jun

    2013-03-01

    Dongping Lake is the final adjusting and storing lake in the east route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project in China, and there has been serious concern regarding the water quality. Understanding the process of phytoplankton variation can be particularly useful in water quality improvement and management decisions. In this study, the phytoplankton taxonomic composition, abundance, temporal variations, spatial distribution, and diversity were studied based on a monthly sampling campaign from three sampling stations between May 2010 and May 2011. A total of 132 species (8 phyla, 72 genera), including 64 species of Chlorophyta, 26 species of Bacillariophyta, 21 species of Cyanophyta, 12 species of Euglenophyta, 3 species of Cryptophyta, 2 species of Xanthophyta, 1 species of Pyrrophyta, and 3 species of Chrysophyta were identified. Average phytoplankton diversity index and evenness values were 3.83 and 0.77, respectively, revealing a high biodiversity of phytoplankton community. The phytoplankton abundance averaged 5.11 × 10(6) cells/L, with Bacillariophyta dominant in winter and spring, but Cyanophyta in summer and autumn. There were 14 predominant species including Pseudanabaena limnetica, Chlamydomonas simplex, Cyclotella stelligera, and Chroomonas acuta. Phytoplankton community structure and water quality variables changed substantially over the survey period; redundancy analysis, Pearson correlations, and regression analysis as an integrated approach were applied to analyze the relationships among them. Total phosphorus and ammonium played governing roles in the phytoplankton dynamics of Dongping Lake during all periods investigated.

  12. Latitudinal variation in virus-induced mortality of phytoplankton across the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Mojica, Kristina D A; Huisman, Jef; Wilhelm, Steven W; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2016-02-01

    Viral lysis of phytoplankton constrains marine primary production, food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Yet, little is known about the biogeographical distribution of viral lysis rates across the global ocean. To address this, we investigated phytoplankton group-specific viral lysis rates along a latitudinal gradient within the North Atlantic Ocean. The data show large-scale distribution patterns of different virus groups across the North Atlantic that are associated with the biogeographical distributions of their potential microbial hosts. Average virus-mediated lysis rates of the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were lower than those of the picoeukaryotic and nanoeukaryotic phytoplankton (that is, 0.14 per day compared with 0.19 and 0.23 per day, respectively). Total phytoplankton mortality (virus plus grazer-mediated) was comparable to the gross growth rate, demonstrating high turnover rates of phytoplankton populations. Virus-induced mortality was an important loss process at low and mid latitudes, whereas phytoplankton mortality was dominated by microzooplankton grazing at higher latitudes (>56°N). This shift from a viral-lysis-dominated to a grazing-dominated phytoplankton community was associated with a decrease in temperature and salinity, and the decrease in viral lysis rates was also associated with increased vertical mixing at higher latitudes. Ocean-climate models predict that surface warming will lead to an expansion of the stratified and oligotrophic regions of the world's oceans. Our findings suggest that these future shifts in the regional climate of the ocean surface layer are likely to increase the contribution of viral lysis to phytoplankton mortality in the higher-latitude waters of the North Atlantic, which may potentially reduce transfer of matter and energy up the food chain and thus affect the capacity of the northern North Atlantic to act as a long-term sink for CO2.

  13. Latitudinal variation in virus-induced mortality of phytoplankton across the North Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Mojica, Kristina D A; Huisman, Jef; Wilhelm, Steven W; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2016-01-01

    Viral lysis of phytoplankton constrains marine primary production, food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Yet, little is known about the biogeographical distribution of viral lysis rates across the global ocean. To address this, we investigated phytoplankton group-specific viral lysis rates along a latitudinal gradient within the North Atlantic Ocean. The data show large-scale distribution patterns of different virus groups across the North Atlantic that are associated with the biogeographical distributions of their potential microbial hosts. Average virus-mediated lysis rates of the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were lower than those of the picoeukaryotic and nanoeukaryotic phytoplankton (that is, 0.14 per day compared with 0.19 and 0.23 per day, respectively). Total phytoplankton mortality (virus plus grazer-mediated) was comparable to the gross growth rate, demonstrating high turnover rates of phytoplankton populations. Virus-induced mortality was an important loss process at low and mid latitudes, whereas phytoplankton mortality was dominated by microzooplankton grazing at higher latitudes (>56°N). This shift from a viral-lysis-dominated to a grazing-dominated phytoplankton community was associated with a decrease in temperature and salinity, and the decrease in viral lysis rates was also associated with increased vertical mixing at higher latitudes. Ocean-climate models predict that surface warming will lead to an expansion of the stratified and oligotrophic regions of the world's oceans. Our findings suggest that these future shifts in the regional climate of the ocean surface layer are likely to increase the contribution of viral lysis to phytoplankton mortality in the higher-latitude waters of the North Atlantic, which may potentially reduce transfer of matter and energy up the food chain and thus affect the capacity of the northern North Atlantic to act as a long-term sink for CO2. PMID:26262815

  14. Photosynthetic efficiency predicts toxic effects of metal nanomaterials in phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J; Muller, Erik B; Cole, Bryan; Martin, Tyronne; Nisbet, Roger; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Keller, Arturo A; Cherr, Gary; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2017-02-01

    High Throughput Screening (HTS) using in vitro assessments at the subcellular level has great promise for screening new chemicals and emerging contaminants to identify high-risk candidates, but their linkage to ecological impacts has seldom been evaluated. We tested whether a battery of subcellular HTS tests could be used to accurately predict population-level effects of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) on marine phytoplankton, important primary producers that support oceanic food webs. To overcome well-known difficulties of estimating ecologically meaningful toxicity parameters, we used novel Dynamic Energy Budget and Toxicodynamic (DEBtox) modeling techniques to evaluate impacts of ENPs on population growth rates. Our results show that population growth was negatively impacted by all four ENPs tested, but the HTS tests assessing many cell/physiological functions lacked predictive power at the population level. However, declining photosynthetic efficiency, a traditional physiological endpoint for photoautotrophs, was a good predictor of population level effects in phytoplankton. DEBtox techniques provided robust estimates of EC10 for population growth rates in exponentially growing batch cultures of phytoplankton, and should be widely useful for ecotoxicological testing. Adoption of HTS approaches for ecotoxicological assessment should carefully evaluate the predictive power of specific assays to minimize the risk that effects at higher levels of biological organization may go undetected.

  15. Resolving Phytoplankton Diversity, Growth and Mortality in an Eastern Boundary Upwelling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. Z.; Jimenez, V.

    2015-12-01

    Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems are highly productive marine regions. Primary production in these systems is performed by a complex array of phytoplankton, many of which are in the picophytoplankton size class (≤2 µM diameter). Because morphological features in these small cells are limited and difficult to visualize, our understanding of their distributions and activities is poor. Even at broad levels, such as cyanobacteria versus picoeukaryotes, contributions to primary production are not well resolved. However, laboratory experiments show that the biology of species within each of these groups is highly differentiated. Hence, to develop predictive understanding of primary production in these regions, its transfer to higher trophic levels and key export terms, it is necessary to understand which taxa are present and their in situ activities. Here, we report results from multi-year expeditions along a transect (Line 67) that extends from Monterey Bay, California (USA) to the North Pacific Gyre and is also part of the California Cooperative Oceanic Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI). We explore the diversity of phytoplankton in the coastal zone, the upwelling-transition zone and subtropical gyre-like waters to gain insights into controls acting on primary producers in each. Our Line 67 results on primary producer dynamics are underlain by a comprehensive suite of genomic, metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and molecular analyses. Statistical approaches have helped us to define temperature maxima, nutrient thresholds and important remineralization processes that influence dominance by specific eukaryotic algae. First-ever species-specific growth and grazing mortality rates provide an unprecedented view of contributions to biomass production and its consumption by higher trophic levels. Finally, by investigating the entire microbial community including heterotrophic taxa, we are able to establish baselines for community interactions that are affiliated with

  16. Phytoplankton fuels Delta food web

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jassby, Alan D.; Cloern, James E.; Muller-Solger, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of certain fishes and invertebrates in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta have declined in abundance in recent decades and there is evidence that food supply is partly responsible. While many sources of organic matter in the Delta could be supporting fish populations indirectly through the food web (including aquatic vegetation and decaying organic matter from agricultural drainage), a careful accounting shows that phytoplankton is the dominant food source. Phytoplankton, communities of microscopic free-floating algae, are the most important food source on a Delta-wide scale when both food quantity and quality are taken into account. These microscopic algae have declined since the late 1960s. Fertilizer and pesticide runoff do not appear to be playing a direct role in long-term phytoplankton changes; rather, species invasions, increasing water transparency and fluctuations in water transport are responsible. Although the potential toxicity of herbicides and pesticides to plank- ton in the Delta is well documented, the ecological significance remains speculative. Nutrient inputs from agricultural runoff at current levels, in combination with increasing transparency, could result in harmful al- gal blooms. 

  17. Estimating solar radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton from satellite ocean-color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, Robert J.; Ruddorff, Natalia M.; Kampel, Milton

    2014-11-01

    Primary production, PP, or the quantity of organic matter synthesized by phytoplankton per unit of surface and time, depends on the photo-synthetically available radiation absorbed by live phytoplankton, APAR. Computing APAR requires knowledge of the absorption coefficient of live phytoplankton and the total absorption coefficient, quantities that are difficult to retrieve accurately from satellite ocean-color data. In the proposed approach, APAR is estimated directly from a linear combination of marine reflectance in the PAR spectral range. Feasibility is demonstrated theoretically from simulations using a marine reflectance model, and experimentally using data collected at 19 biooptical stations during the February-March 2011 R/V Melville oceanographic cruise in the Southern Atlantic and Southeastern Pacific. Improvements in APAR accuracy are quantified in comparisons with estimates obtained from absorption coefficients or chlorophyll concentration determined from marine reflectance via standard satellite algorithms. The linear combination of marine reflectance is fairly robust to atmospheric correction errors. Due to the linear nature of the algorithm, their impact may be further reduced when using space- or time-averaged reflectance. The methodology is applied to actual MODIS imagery over the Southern Atlantic, and variability in the resulting APAR field is analyzed. The study suggests that determining APAR directly from marine reflectance has the potential to improve PP estimates from space.

  18. Marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Blunt, John W; Copp, Brent R; Keyzers, Robert A; Munro, Murray H G; Prinsep, Michèle R

    2015-02-01

    This review covers the literature published in 2013 for marine natural products (MNPs), with 982 citations (644 for the period January to December 2013) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1163 for 2013), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Reviews, biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included.

  19. Marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Blunt, John W; Copp, Brent R; Keyzers, Robert A; Munro, Murray H G; Prinsep, Michèle R

    2014-01-17

    This review covers the literature published in 2012 for marine natural products, with 1035 citations (673 for the period January to December 2012) referring to compounds isolated from marine microorganisms and phytoplankton, green, brown and red algae, sponges, cnidarians, bryozoans, molluscs, tunicates, echinoderms, mangroves and other intertidal plants and microorganisms. The emphasis is on new compounds (1241 for 2012), together with the relevant biological activities, source organisms and country of origin. Biosynthetic studies, first syntheses, and syntheses that lead to the revision of structures or stereochemistries, have been included.

  20. Effect of local hydroclimate on phytoplankton groups in the Charente estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesdon, Stéphane; Stachowski-Haberkorn, Sabine; Lambert, Christophe; Beker, Beatriz; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Auger, Dominique; Béchemin, Christian

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to describe seasonal variations of phytoplankton abundances in relation to the physical and chemical (nutrients and metals) environment under the influence of freshwater input in the Charente river estuary (Marennes-Oléron bay, France) over three years, from 2011 to 2014. Phytoplankton abundances were determined using microscopy and flow cytometry. Considering high frequency temperature and salinity data, breakpoints in each series led to the identification of two local hydroclimatic periods: the first (2011 and early 2012) being warmer and higher in salinity than the second (from spring 2012 to the beginning of 2014). A multiblock PLS analysis highlighted the significant contribution of the physical environment (temperature, salinity and Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR)) on phytoplankton abundances. Two partial triadic analyses (PTA) were run in order to visualize seasonal variations of i) phytoplankton groups and ii) nutrients and trace elements, irrespective of spatial gradient: picoeukaryote occurrence showed a difference between year 2011 and the years 2012 and 2013 (as did cadmium, nickel and silica levels). However, both PTA revealed greater differences between year 2013 and the years 2011 and 2012, as shown by occurrences of cryptophytes, dinoflagellates and nanoeukaryotes, as well as copper and phosphate levels. These results showed a shift between the hydroclimate breakpoint and some phytoplankton responses, suggesting that their development and succession might depend on conditions early in the year. Finally, a STATICO analysis was performed on the paired PTA in order to examine the relations of phytoplankton with nutrients and metals more closely. Most phytoplankton groups were represented on the first axis, together with cadmium on the one hand, and nitrates, silica and nickel on the other. This analysis revealed the separation of phytoplankton groups on the second axis that represented phosphates and copper. Hydroclimatic

  1. US Coast Guard/US Maritime Administration Cooperative Research on marine engine exhaust emissions. Marine exhaust emissions measurement of the M/V Kings Pointer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, S.J.; Bentz, A.P.

    1996-07-01

    This report presents the results of emissions testing conducted on board the M/V KINGS POINTER in May 1995. The objective of this testing was to conduct baseline instrumentation, monitoring, and evaluation of the engine exhaust emissions as part of joint U.S. Coast Guard/Maritime Administration cooperative research on controlling air pollution from ships. The U.S. Coast Guard`s interest in emissions testing arises from both its desire to meet all federal and state air quality regulations and the fact that in the future it may be called upon to enforce regulations in the marine environment. The U.S. Maritime Administration`s interest in this and related research is based on its efforts to assure that its vessels and those of the privately-owned U.S. Flag Merchant Marine can comply with future air pollution control requirements. Underway tests were conducted of the 224-foot M/V KINGS POINTER in which two of its four diesel-electric generators were sampled for NO, NO2, CO, and SO2 in the exhaust. Additional data on fuel flow and power output were collected at five speeds over the full range of vessel operating ranges. NOx values were calculated and compared with standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Results showed that average NOx values were 9.4 g/kWh which is slightly below the 10.9 g/kWh upper limit or cap that is being proposed by the IMO for a diesel engine with a rated speed of 1200 RPM. Additional conclusions and recommendations on the technique of portable emissions monitoring instrumentation are made.

  2. Marine High Voltage Power Conditioning and Transmission System with Integrated Storage DE-EE0003640 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Hoffmann, PhD; Aspinall, Rik

    2012-12-10

    Design, Development, and test of the three-port power converter for marine hydrokinetic power transmission. Converter provides ports for AC/DC conversion of hydrokinetic power, battery storage, and a low voltage to high voltage DC port for HVDC transmission to shore. The report covers the design, development, implementation, and testing of a prototype built by PPS.

  3. Appendix A of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the first appendix to the report, the workshop agenda.

  4. Evaluation of the Program: Randall Aerospace and Marine Science Program. A Title III Evaluation Project, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Isadore

    An interdisciplinary program related to aerospace and marine topics was created for students in the ninth and tenth grades in Washington, D.C. The curriculum and staff development focused upon the development of experiences incorporated within science, mathematics, communication skills, career education, and physical education. Objectives of the…

  5. Appendix E of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fifth appendix to the report, the bibliography of references.

  6. Appendix C of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the third appendix to the report, the compendium of pre-workshop answers.

  7. Phosphorus Availability, Phytoplankton Community Dynamics, and Taxon-Specific Phosphorus Status in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, K. R.; Labiosa, R. G.; Calhoun, M.; Street, J. H.; Post, A. F.; Paytan, A.

    2006-12-01

    The relationships among phytoplankton taxon-specific phosphorus-status, phytoplankton community composition, and nutrient levels were assessed over three seasons in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea. During summer and fall, stratified surface waters were depleted of nutrients and picophytoplankton populations comprised the majority of cells (80% and 88% respectively). In winter, surface nutrient concentrations were higher and larger phytoplankton were more abundant (63%). Cell specific alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) derived from enzyme labeled fluorescence was consistently low (less than 5%) in the picophytoplankton throughout the year, whereas larger cells expressed elevated APA during the summer and fall but less in the winter. A nutrient addition bioassay during the fall showed that, relative to control, APA was reduced by half in larger cells following addition of orthophosphate, whereas the APA of picophytoplankton remained low (less than 1%) across all treatments and the control. These results indicate that the most abundant phytoplankton are not limited by orthophosphate and only some subpopulations (particularly of larger cells) exhibit orthophosphate-limitation throughout the year. Our results indicate that orthophosphate availability influences phytoplankton ecology, correlating with shifts in phytoplankton community structure and the nutrient status of individual cells. The role of dissolved organic phosphorus as an important phosphorus source for marine phytoplankton in oligotrophic settings and the need for evaluating nutrient limitation at the taxa and/or single cell level (rather than inferring it from nutrient concentrations and ratios or bulk enzyme activity measurements) are highlighted.

  8. Global relationship between phytoplankton diversity and productivity in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Vallina, S M; Follows, M J; Dutkiewicz, S; Montoya, J M; Cermeno, P; Loreau, M

    2014-07-01

    The shape of the productivity-diversity relationship (PDR) for marine phytoplankton has been suggested to be unimodal, that is, diversity peaking at intermediate levels of productivity. However, there are few observations and there has been little attempt to understand the mechanisms that would lead to such a shape for planktonic organisms. Here we use a marine ecosystem model together with the community assembly theory to explain the shape of the unimodal PDR we obtain at the global scale. The positive slope from low to intermediate productivity is due to grazer control with selective feeding, which leads to the predator-mediated coexistence of prey. The negative slope at high productivity is due to seasonal blooms of opportunist species that occur before they are regulated by grazers. The negative side is only unveiled when the temporal scale of the observation captures the transient dynamics, which are especially relevant at highly seasonal latitudes. Thus selective predation explains the positive side while transient competitive exclusion explains the negative side of the unimodal PDR curve. The phytoplankton community composition of the positive and negative sides is mostly dominated by slow-growing nutrient specialists and fast-growing nutrient opportunist species, respectively.

  9. Global relationship between phytoplankton diversity and productivity in the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Vallina, S. M.; Follows, M. J.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Montoya, J. M.; Cermeno, P.; Loreau, M.

    2014-01-01

    The shape of the productivity–diversity relationship (PDR) for marine phytoplankton has been suggested to be unimodal, that is, diversity peaking at intermediate levels of productivity. However, there are few observations and there has been little attempt to understand the mechanisms that would lead to such a shape for planktonic organisms. Here we use a marine ecosystem model together with the community assembly theory to explain the shape of the unimodal PDR we obtain at the global scale. The positive slope from low to intermediate productivity is due to grazer control with selective feeding, which leads to the predator-mediated coexistence of prey. The negative slope at high productivity is due to seasonal blooms of opportunist species that occur before they are regulated by grazers. The negative side is only unveiled when the temporal scale of the observation captures the transient dynamics, which are especially relevant at highly seasonal latitudes. Thus selective predation explains the positive side while transient competitive exclusion explains the negative side of the unimodal PDR curve. The phytoplankton community composition of the positive and negative sides is mostly dominated by slow-growing nutrient specialists and fast-growing nutrient opportunist species, respectively. PMID:24980772

  10. Icecolors`93: Biological weighting function for the ultraviolet inhibition of carbon fixation in a natural antarctic phytoplankton community

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, N.; Prezelin, B.B.; Evens, T.

    1994-12-31

    The goals of the Icecolors 1993 expedition were (1) to develop a space/time climatology of incident and penetrating spectral irradiance for the southern oceans, (2) to quantify the ultraviolet (UV) dependency of primary production for pelagic and substrate-associated antarctic phytoplankton communities, and (3) to determine the UV inhibition effects on key target sites. The study was conducted at Palmer Station, Antarctica, prior to the opening of the ozone `hole` and during the onset of depletion of ozone, the most severe ever recorded over the Antarctic Peninsula. This paper discusses results from an experiment designed to estimate a biological weight function for primary production inhibition in Antarctic phytoplankton under natural irradiance. The newly derived function is presented and it is shown that the sensitivity of in situ phytoplankton to ambient UV-B at the end of winter was greater than that measured under artificial light conditions for temperate marine phytoplankton and terrestrial plants. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Phytoplankton assemblage characteristics in recurrently fluctuating environments.

    PubMed

    Roelke, Daniel L; Spatharis, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Annual variations in biogeochemical and physical processes can lead to nutrient variability and seasonal patterns in phytoplankton productivity and assemblage structure. In many coastal systems river inflow and water exchange with the ocean varies seasonally, and alternating periods can arise where the nutrient most limiting to phytoplankton growth switches. Transitions between these alternating periods can be sudden or gradual and this depends on human activities, such as reservoir construction and interbasin water transfers. How such activities might influence phytoplankton assemblages is largely unknown. Here, we employed a multispecies, multi-nutrient model to explore how nutrient loading switching mode might affect characteristics of phytoplankton assemblages. The model is based on the Monod-relationship, predicting an instantaneous growth rate from ambient inorganic nutrient concentrations whereas the limiting nutrient at any given time was determined by Liebig's Law of the Minimum. Our simulated phytoplankton assemblages self-organized from species rich pools over a 15-year period, and only the surviving species were considered as assemblage members. Using the model, we explored the interactive effects of complementarity level in trait trade-offs within phytoplankton assemblages and the amount of noise in the resource supply concentrations. We found that the effect of shift from a sudden resource supply transition to a gradual one, as observed in systems impacted by watershed development, was dependent on the level of complementarity. In the extremes, phytoplankton species richness and relative overyielding increased when complementarity was lowest, and phytoplankton biomass increased greatly when complementarity was highest. For low-complementarity simulations, the persistence of poorer-performing phytoplankton species of intermediate R*s led to higher richness and relative overyielding. For high-complementarity simulations, the formation of phytoplankton

  12. Phytoplankton Assemblage Characteristics in Recurrently Fluctuating Environments

    PubMed Central

    Roelke, Daniel L.; Spatharis, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Annual variations in biogeochemical and physical processes can lead to nutrient variability and seasonal patterns in phytoplankton productivity and assemblage structure. In many coastal systems river inflow and water exchange with the ocean varies seasonally, and alternating periods can arise where the nutrient most limiting to phytoplankton growth switches. Transitions between these alternating periods can be sudden or gradual and this depends on human activities, such as reservoir construction and interbasin water transfers. How such activities might influence phytoplankton assemblages is largely unknown. Here, we employed a multispecies, multi-nutrient model to explore how nutrient loading switching mode might affect characteristics of phytoplankton assemblages. The model is based on the Monod-relationship, predicting an instantaneous growth rate from ambient inorganic nutrient concentrations whereas the limiting nutrient at any given time was determined by Liebig’s Law of the Minimum. Our simulated phytoplankton assemblages self-organized from species rich pools over a 15-year period, and only the surviving species were considered as assemblage members. Using the model, we explored the interactive effects of complementarity level in trait trade-offs within phytoplankton assemblages and the amount of noise in the resource supply concentrations. We found that the effect of shift from a sudden resource supply transition to a gradual one, as observed in systems impacted by watershed development, was dependent on the level of complementarity. In the extremes, phytoplankton species richness and relative overyielding increased when complementarity was lowest, and phytoplankton biomass increased greatly when complementarity was highest. For low-complementarity simulations, the persistence of poorer-performing phytoplankton species of intermediate R*s led to higher richness and relative overyielding. For high-complementarity simulations, the formation of phytoplankton

  13. Installation of a Marine Thruster as a Hydroelectric Turbine at Eagle Creek National Fish Hatchery : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Resource Engineering

    1986-11-15

    A 70kW hydroelectric plant utilizing a marine thruster and an induction generator was commissioned on May 15, 1985 at the Eagle Creek National Fish Hatchery near Estacada, OR as a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) demonstration project. The marine thruster, normally used to maneuver large ships, was run ''backwards'' to produce electricity. The plant was completed and tested by J.F. Sato and Associates, Inc. (JFSA). The marine thruster was seen as a method for reducing the capital cost of small, low head hydro projects by utilizing readily available, off-the-shelf equipment. The owner of the hatchery, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USF and WS), has an active energy conservation program and looked hopefully at a match of inexpensive hydroelectric technology and an available site at the hatchery to offset their annual 650,000-kWh usage. The preliminary results of the testing program indicated a water-to-wire efficiency in the mid-70 percent range and a turbine efficiency in the low-80 percent range. Total gross head was 19 feet with a maximum flow of 65 cubic feet per second. The unit was tested at four different speeds by varying sheave diameters on the drive system. Flow measurements were taken using the Venturi principle at a reducer in the penstock. A downstream weir was constructed to correct low tailwater conditions. 7 refs., 44 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Phytoplankton community structure in local water types at a coastal site in north-western Bay of Bengal.

    PubMed

    Baliarsingh, S K; Srichandan, Suchismita; Lotliker, Aneesh A; Sahu, K C; Srinivasa Kumar, T

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive analysis on seasonal distribution of phytoplankton community structure and their interaction with environmental variables was carried out in two local water types (type 1 < 30 m isobath and Type 2 > 30 m isobath) at a coastal site in north-western Bay of Bengal. Phytoplankton community was represented by 211 taxa (146 marine, 37 fresh, 2 brackish, 20 marine-fresh, and 6 marine-brackish-fresh) belonging to seven major groups including 45 potential bloom forming and 22 potential toxin producing species. The seasonal variability depicted enrichment of phytoplankton during pre-monsoon in both water types. Total phytoplankton abundance pattern observed with inter-annual shift during monsoon and post-monsoon period at both water types. In both water types, diatom predominance was observed in terms of species richness and abundance comprising of centric (82 sp.) and pennate (58 sp.) forms. Pennate diatoms, Thalassiothrix longissima and Skeletonema costatum preponderated in both the water types. The diatom abundance was higher in type 1 in comparison to type 2. In general, SiO4 found to fuel growth of the dominant phytoplankton group, diatom in both the water types despite comparative lower concentration of other macronutrients in type 2.

  15. Monitoring and toxicity evaluation of phytoplankton on lithium manganese oxide adsorbents at lithium recovery pilot plant field.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Kim, J. C.; Chung, K. S.; Ryu, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    For recovery of rare mineral resources such as lithium or boron from seawater, the lithium adsorbent material have been made by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and pilot plant was conducted in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea. The application of lithium adsorbent in pilot plant, it is important to consider the impact on the marine environment. Especially phytoplankton communities are important marine microorganism to represent marine primary product. At the same time, phytoplankton is possible to induce the decrease of lithium recovery rate due to cause of biofouling to surfaces of lithium adsorbents. Therefore long-term and periodic monitoring of phytoplankton is necessary to understand the environmental impact and biofouling problems near the lithium pilot plant. The abundance and biomass of phytoplankton have been evaluated through monthly interval sampling from February 2013 to May 2015. Abundance and species diversity of phytoplankton went up to summer from winter. When lithium adsorbents were immersing to seawater, eco-toxicities of released substances were determined using Microtox with bioluminescence bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The adsorbents were soaked in sterilized seawater and aeration for 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14 days intervals under controlled temperature. Maximum EC50 concentration was 61.4% and this toxicity was showed in more than 10 days exposure.

  16. Phytoplankton can actively diversify their migration strategy in response to turbulent cues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Anupam; Carrara, Francesco; Stocker, Roman

    2017-03-01

    Marine phytoplankton inhabit a dynamic environment where turbulence, together with nutrient and light availability, shapes species fitness, succession and selection. Many species of phytoplankton are motile and undertake diel vertical migrations to gain access to nutrient-rich deeper layers at night and well-lit surface waters during the day. Disruption of this migratory strategy by turbulence is considered to be an important cause of the succession between motile and non-motile species when conditions turn turbulent. However, this classical view neglects the possibility that motile species may actively respond to turbulent cues to avoid layers of strong turbulence. Here we report that phytoplankton, including raphidophytes and dinoflagellates, can actively diversify their migratory strategy in response to hydrodynamic cues characteristic of overturning by Kolmogorov-scale eddies. Upon experiencing repeated overturning with timescales and statistics representative of ocean turbulence, an upward-swimming population rapidly (5–60 min) splits into two subpopulations, one swimming upward and one swimming downward. Quantitative morphological analysis of the harmful-algal-bloom-forming raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo together with a model of cell mechanics revealed that this behaviour was accompanied by a modulation of the cells’ fore–aft asymmetry. The minute magnitude of the required modulation, sufficient to invert the preferential swimming direction of the cells, highlights the advanced level of control that phytoplankton can exert on their migratory behaviour. Together with observations of enhanced cellular stress after overturning and the typically deleterious effects of strong turbulence on motile phytoplankton, these results point to an active adaptation of H. akashiwo to increase the chance of evading turbulent layers by diversifying the direction of migration within the population, in a manner suggestive of evolutionary bet-hedging. This migratory

  17. Factors affecting phytoplankton distribution and production in the Elephant Island area, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Helbling, E.W.

    1993-01-01

    During the austral summer of four years, 1990 to 1993, studies on phytoplankton were performed in the Elephant Island area as one component of the US Antarctica Marine Living Resources program. In addition to continuous measurements (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, beam attenuation) made on ship's intake water, a profiling CTD-rosette unit was used to obtain water column characteristics (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a, attenuation of solar radiation, beam attenuation) from the surface to 750m depth and also water samples from at least 10 depths for chemical and biological analyses. The sampling grid consisted of an average of 70 stations, all of which were occupied two times each year. The Elephant Island area is a transition zone between the rich coastal areas, where phytoplankton can develop dense blooms, and pelagic waters where the phytoplankton biomass is in general very low. A frontal zone was usually found to the north of Elephant Island and over the continental slope, and high phytoplankton biomass was in general associated with this frontal region. Although the location of this frontal system showed seasonal movement in a north-south direction, it seems to be a consistent feature from year to year. There seems to be considerable year-to-year variability in physical (water temperatures and salinity) and phytoplankton characteristics within the study area, in regard to both distributional patterns in surface waters and to profile characteristics in the upper 100m of the water column. With shallow upper mixed layer depths of less than 50 m, phytoplankton can attain relatively high concentrations. Optimum light conditions for growth occurred when the mixed layer was less than 55% of the euphotic zone. As the area around Elephant Island is characterized by relatively strong and frequent winds, the depth of the upper mixed layer at many stations approached the depth of the euphotic zone, with the result that growth of phytoplankton was light limited.

  18. Phytoplankton and sediments in Yellow Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Sediment and phytoplankton cloud the waters of the Yellow Sea in this true-color MODIS image acquired March 18, 2002. The swirls of sediment appear as a murky brownish blue color, while the phytoplankton are purely blue green and are concentrated around the small island in the lower right corner of the image.

  19. Iron bioavailability to phytoplankton: an empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Lis, Hagar; Shaked, Yeala; Kranzler, Chana; Keren, Nir; Morel, François M M

    2015-03-17

    Phytoplankton are often limited by iron in aquatic environments. Here we examine Fe bioavailability to phytoplankton by analyzing iron uptake from various Fe substrates by several species of phytoplankton grown under conditions of Fe limitation and comparing the measured uptake rate constants (Fe uptake rate/ substrate concentration). When unchelated iron, Fe', buffered by an excess of the chelating agent EDTA is used as the Fe substrate, the uptake rate constants of all the eukaryotic phytoplankton species are tightly correlated and proportional to their respective surface areas (S.A.). The same is true when FeDFB is the substrate, but the corresponding uptake constants are one thousand times smaller than for Fe'. The uptake rate constants for the other substrates we examined fall mostly between the values for Fe' and FeDFB for the same S.A. These two model substrates thus empirically define a bioavailability envelope with Fe' at the upper and FeDFB at the lower limit of iron bioavailability. This envelope provides a convenient framework to compare the relative bioavailabilities of various Fe substrates to eukaryotic phytoplankton and the Fe uptake abilities of different phytoplankton species. Compared with eukaryotic species, cyanobacteria have similar uptake constants for Fe' but lower ones for FeDFB. The unique relationship between the uptake rate constants and the S.A. of phytoplankton species suggests that the uptake rate constant of Fe-limited phytoplankton has reached a universal upper limit and provides insight into the underlying uptake mechanism.

  20. Iron bioavailability to phytoplankton: an empirical approach

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Hagar; Shaked, Yeala; Kranzler, Chana; Keren, Nir; Morel, François M M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton are often limited by iron in aquatic environments. Here we examine Fe bioavailability to phytoplankton by analyzing iron uptake from various Fe substrates by several species of phytoplankton grown under conditions of Fe limitation and comparing the measured uptake rate constants (Fe uptake rate/ substrate concentration). When unchelated iron, Fe′, buffered by an excess of the chelating agent EDTA is used as the Fe substrate, the uptake rate constants of all the eukaryotic phytoplankton species are tightly correlated and proportional to their respective surface areas (S.A.). The same is true when FeDFB is the substrate, but the corresponding uptake constants are one thousand times smaller than for Fe′. The uptake rate constants for the other substrates we examined fall mostly between the values for Fe′ and FeDFB for the same S.A. These two model substrates thus empirically define a bioavailability envelope with Fe′ at the upper and FeDFB at the lower limit of iron bioavailability. This envelope provides a convenient framework to compare the relative bioavailabilities of various Fe substrates to eukaryotic phytoplankton and the Fe uptake abilities of different phytoplankton species. Compared with eukaryotic species, cyanobacteria have similar uptake constants for Fe′ but lower ones for FeDFB. The unique relationship between the uptake rate constants and the S.A. of phytoplankton species suggests that the uptake rate constant of Fe-limited phytoplankton has reached a universal upper limit and provides insight into the underlying uptake mechanism. PMID:25350155

  1. Observation of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton groups from space using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy on SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, Astrid; Dinter, Tilman; Burrows, John P.; Vountas, Marco; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Peeken, Ilka

    In order to understand the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles it is necessary to derive global information on the distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFT) in the world oceans. In our study we use instead of the common ocean color sensors such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, with rather low spectral resolution, the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to study the retrieval of phytoplankton distribution and absorption with the satellite sensor Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). SCIAMACHY measures back scattered solar radiation in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral region with a high spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm). We used in-situ measured phytoplankton absorption spectra from two different RV Polarstern expeditions where different phytoplankton groups were representing or dominating the phytoplankton composition in order to identify these characteristic absorption spectra in SCIAMACHY data in the range of 430 to 500 nm and also to identify absorption from cyanobacterial photosynthetic pigment phycoerythrin. Our results show clearly these absorptions in the SCIAMACHY data. The conversion of these differential absorptions by including the information of the light penetration depth (according to Vountas et al., Ocean Science, 2007) globally distributed pigment concentrations for these characteristic phytoplankton groups for two monthly periods (Feb-March 2004, Oct-Nov 2005 and Oct-Nov 2007) are derived. The satellite retrieved information on cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. and Prochlorococcus sp.) and diatoms distribution matches well with the concentration measured from collocated water samples with HPLC technique and also to global model analysis with the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM from http://reason.gsfc.nasa.gov/OPS/Giovanni/) according to Gregg and Casey 2006 and Gregg 2006. Results are of great importance for global modelling of

  2. Structure of phytoplankton communities in the Yenisei estuary and over the adjacent Kara Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, I. N.; Flint, M. V.; Sergeeva, V. M.; Druzhkova, E. I.; Nedospasov, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Material was collected in the Yenisei estuary and over the adjacent Kara Sea shelf at a quasimeridional transect from 71°49'70″ to 75°59'93″ N in September 2011. The structural characteristics of the phytoplankton community were determined by latitudinal zonality of environmental conditions. Two well-distinguished phytocenoses—freshwater and marine—were found in this region. Phytoplankton in the freshwater part of the estuary was composed solely of the freshwater algae species and was distinguished by the highest numbers (up to 2 × 106 cell/L) and biomass (up to 1.4 mg/L). The marine phytocenoses over the Yenisei shoal was composed of marine neritic species; the abundance and biomass of phytoplankton in this area were significantly lower (0.2 × 106 cell/L and 0.4 mg/L, respectively). The area of intensive interaction of riverine and marine waters—the estuarine frontal zone, with ~130 km latitudinal extension (from 72° to 74° N)—was characterized by a sharp halocline, which separated the desalinated upper layer from the underlying marine water. Freshwater algal species predominated above the halocline, whereas marine species predominated below. The lower border of the euphotic layer was located 8 to 15 m below the halocline. The niche between the halocline and the lower border of the euphotic layer was characterized by high nutrient concentrations, which together with sufficient illumination determined the intensive development of phytoplankton and high values of primary production.

  3. Use of phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic carbon by different types of bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, Hugo; Gasol, Josep M

    2012-09-01

    Phytoplankton and heterotrophic prokaryotes are major components of the microbial food web and interact continuously: heterotrophic prokaryotes utilize the dissolved organic carbon derived from phytoplankton exudation or cell lysis (DOCp), and mineralization by heterotrophic prokaryotes provides inorganic nutrients for phytoplankton. For this reason, these communities are expected to be closely linked, although the study of the interactions between them is still a major challenge. Recent studies have presented interactions between phytoplankton and heterotrophic prokaryotes based on coexistence or covariation throughout a time-series. However, a real quantification of the carbon flow within these networks (defined as the interaction strength, IS) has not been achieved yet. This is critical to understand the selectivity degree of bacteria responding to specific algal DOCp. Here we used microautoradiography to quantify the preferences of the major heterotrophic prokaryote phylogenetic groups on DOC derived from several representative phytoplankton species, and expressed these preferences as an IS value. The distribution of the ISs was not random but rather skewed towards weak interactions, in a similar way as the distributions described for stable complex non-microbial ecosystems, indicating that there are some cases of high specificity on the use of specific algal DOCp by some bacterial groups, but weak interactions are more common and may be relevant as well. The variety of IS patterns observed supports the view that the vast range of different resources (different types of organic molecules) available in the sea selects and maintains the high levels of diversity described for marine bacterioplankton.

  4. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment.

    PubMed

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Weber, Peter K; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Mayali, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  5. Environmental influence on coastal phytoplankton and zooplankton diversity: a multivariate statistical model analysis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wei-Rung; Fang, Lee-Shing; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Tew, Kwee Siong

    2012-09-01

    In a marine ecosystem, the diversity of phytoplankton can influence the diversity of zooplankton, or vice versa, and both can be affected by the environmental factors. In this study, we used principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the major sources of influence on the coastal water near an industrial park, following by construction of structural equation model (SEM) to determine the direct and indirect effect of the factors on phytoplankton and zooplankton diversity. PCA results indicated that the coastal area was mainly affected by riverine discharge (represented by high PC factor loadings of transparency and turbidity) and seasonal change (represented by temperature). SEM further suggested that both riverine discharge and seasonal influences can directly affect phytoplankton diversity, but indirectly affected zooplankton diversity via changes in phytoplankton. Using PCA to determine the sources of influence followed by construction of SEM allowed us to understand the relative importance of the environmental factors, direct or indirect, on phytoplankton and zooplankton diversity. When environmental changes occur, a new SEM could be constructed using the same category of physical and biological data and then compared to the current model to verify whether the environmental changes were the cause of alterations in planktonic communities in the area.

  6. A global seasonal surface ocean climatology of phytoplankton types based on CHEMTAX analysis of HPLC pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, Chantal M.; Vogt, Meike; Gruber, Nicolas; Laufkoetter, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    Much advancement has been made in recent years in field data assimilation, remote sensing and ecosystem modeling, yet our global view of phytoplankton biogeography beyond chlorophyll biomass is still a cursory taxonomic picture with vast areas of the open ocean requiring field validations. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pigment data combined with inverse methods offer an advantage over many other phytoplankton quantification measures by way of providing an immediate perspective of the whole phytoplankton community in a sample as a function of chlorophyll biomass. Historically, such chemotaxonomic analysis has been conducted mainly at local spatial and temporal scales in the ocean. Here, we apply a widely tested inverse approach, CHEMTAX, to a global climatology of pigment observations from HPLC. This study marks the first systematic and objective global application of CHEMTAX, yielding a seasonal climatology comprised of ~1500 1°×1° global grid points of the major phytoplankton pigment types in the ocean characterizing cyanobacteria, haptophytes, chlorophytes, cryptophytes, dinoflagellates, and diatoms, with results validated against prior regional studies where possible. Key findings from this new global view of specific phytoplankton abundances from pigments are a) the large global proportion of marine haptophytes (comprising 32±5% of total chlorophyll), whose biogeochemical functional roles are relatively unknown, and b) the contrasting spatial scales of complexity in global community structure that can be explained in part by regional oceanographic conditions. The results are publically accessible via

  7. "Trophic overyielding": phytoplankton diversity promotes zooplankton productivity.

    PubMed

    Striebel, Maren; Singer, Gabriel; Stibor, Herwig; Andersen, Tom

    2012-12-01

    Diversity-productivity relationships at the primary producer level have been extensively studied, especially for terrestrial systems. Here, we explore whether the diversity of aquatic primary producers (phytoplankton) has effects on higher trophic levels (zooplankton). We investigated the effect of phytoplankton diversity on an artificial zooplankton community in a laboratory experiment where phytoplankton biomass and elemental composition (carbon-to-phosphorus ratio) were kept constant. Phytoplankton diversity increased the means of both zooplankton growth rate and abundance while suppressing their variability, and sustained higher zooplankton diversity. Likely explanations include resource complementarity effects among phytoplankton species as food entities, as well as niche complementarity effects among Daphnia species as competitors. By affecting the productivity as well as the variability of the next trophic level, biodiversity of primary producers may have far-reaching consequences in aquatic food webs.

  8. Phytoplankton strategies for photosynthetic energy allocation.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Kimberly H; Jones, Bethan M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton physiology is dynamic and highly responsive to the environment. Phytoplankton acclimate to changing environmental conditions by a complex reallocation of carbon and energy through metabolic pathways to optimize growth. Considering the tremendous diversity of phytoplankton, it is not surprising that different phytoplankton taxa use different strategies to partition carbon and energy resources. It has therefore been satisfying to discover that general principles of energetic stoichiometry appear to govern these complex processes and can be broadly applied to interpret phytoplankton distributions, productivity, and food web dynamics. The expectation of future changes in aquatic environments brought on by climate change warrants gathering knowledge about underlying patterns of photosynthetic energy allocation and their impacts on community structure and ecosystem productivity.

  9. Retention time generates short-term phytoplankton blooms in a shallow microtidal subtropical estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odebrecht, Clarisse; Abreu, Paulo C.; Carstensen, Jacob

    2015-09-01

    In this study it was hypothesised that increasing water retention time promotes phytoplankton blooms in the shallow microtidal Patos Lagoon estuary (PLE). This hypothesis was tested using salinity variation as a proxy of water retention time and chlorophyll a for phytoplankton biomass. Submersible sensors fixed at 5 m depth near the mouth of PLE continuously measured water temperature, salinity and pigments fluorescence (calibrated to chlorophyll a) between March 2010 and 12th of December 2011, with some gaps. Salinity variations were used to separate alternating patterns of outflow of lagoon water (salinity <8; 46% of the time) and inflow of marine water (salinity >24; 35% of the time). The two transition phases represented a rapid change from lagoon water outflow to marine water inflow and a more gradually declining salinity between the dominating inflow and outflow conditions. During the latter of these, a significant chlorophyll a increase relative to that expected from a linear mixing relationship was observed at intermediate salinities (10-20). The increase in chlorophyll a was positively related to the duration of the prior coastal water inflow in the PLE. Moreover, chlorophyll a increase was significantly higher during austral spring-summer than autumn-winter, probably due to higher light and nutrient availability in the former. Moreover, the retention time process operating on time scales of days influences the long-term phytoplankton variability in this ecosystem. Comparing these results with monthly data from a nearby long-term water quality monitoring station (1993-2011) support the hypothesis that chlorophyll a accumulations occur after marine inflow events, whereas phytoplankton does not accumulate during high water outflow, when the water residence time is short. These results suggest that changing hydrological pattern is the most important mechanism underlying phytoplankton blooms in the PLE.

  10. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa

  11. Size-selective toxicity effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on estuarine phytoplankton communities.

    PubMed

    Kline, Allison; Pinckney, James L

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the lethal and sublethal effects of the antimicrobial tylosin on natural estuarine phytoplankton communities. Bioassays were used in experimental treatments with final concentrations of 5 to 1000 μg tylosin l(-1). Maximum percent inhibition ranged from 57 to 85% at concentrations of 200-400 μg tylosin l(-1). Half maximum inhibition concentrations of tylosin were ca. 5x lower for small phytoplankton (<20 μm) relative to larger phytoplankton (>20 μm) and suggests that small phytoplankton are more sensitive to tylosin exposure. Sublethal effects occurred at concentrations as low as 5 μg tylosin l(-1). Environmental concentrations of tylosin (e.g., 0.2-3 μg l(-1)) may have a significant sublethal effect that alters the size structure and composition of phytoplankton communities. The results of this study highlight the potential importance of cell size on toxicity responses of estuarine phytoplankton.

  12. Mind the gap: The impact of missing data on the calculation of phytoplankton phenology metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Harriet; Henson, Stephanie; Martin, Adrian; Yool, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    Annual phytoplankton blooms are key events in marine ecosystems and interannual variability in bloom timing has important implications for carbon export and the marine food web. The degree of match or mismatch between the timing of phytoplankton and zooplankton annual cycles may impact larval survival with knock-on effects at higher trophic levels. Interannual variability in phytoplankton bloom timing may also be used to monitor changes in the pelagic ecosystem that are either naturally or anthropogenically forced. Seasonality metrics that use satellite ocean color data have been developed to quantify the timing of phenological events which allow for objective comparisons between different regions and over long periods of time. However, satellite data sets are subject to frequent gaps due to clouds and atmospheric aerosols, or persistent data gaps in winter due to low sun angle. Here we quantify the impact of these gaps on determining the start and peak timing of phytoplankton blooms. We use the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model that assimilates SeaWiFS data as a gap-free time series and derive an empirical relationship between the percentage of missing data and error in the phenology metric. Applied globally, we find that the majority of subpolar regions have typical errors of 30 days for the bloom initiation date and 15 days for the peak date. The errors introduced by intermittent data must be taken into account in phenological studies.

  13. Adaptive evolution of a key phytoplankton species to ocean acidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohbeck, Kai T.; Riebesell, Ulf; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2012-05-01

    Ocean acidification, the drop in seawater pH associated with the ongoing enrichment of marine waters with carbon dioxide from fossil fuel burning, may seriously impair marine calcifying organisms. Our present understanding of the sensitivity of marine life to ocean acidification is based primarily on short-term experiments, in which organisms are exposed to increased concentrations of CO2. However, phytoplankton species with short generation times, in particular, may be able to respond to environmental alterations through adaptive evolution. Here, we examine the ability of the world's single most important calcifying organism, the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, to evolve in response to ocean acidification in two 500-generation selection experiments. Specifically, we exposed E. huxleyi populations founded by single or multiple clones to increased concentrations of CO2. Around 500 asexual generations later we assessed their fitness. Compared with populations kept at ambient CO2 partial pressure, those selected at increased partial pressure exhibited higher growth rates, in both the single- and multiclone experiment, when tested under ocean acidification conditions. Calcification was partly restored: rates were lower under increased CO2 conditions in all cultures, but were up to 50% higher in adapted compared with non-adapted cultures. We suggest that contemporary evolution could help to maintain the functionality of microbial processes at the base of marine food webs in the face of global change.

  14. Application of Bayesian structural equation modeling for examining phytoplankton dynamics in the Neuse River Estuary (North Carolina, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhonditsis, G. B.; Paerl, H. W.; Valdes-Weaver, L. M.; Stow, C. A.; Steinberg, L. J.; Reckhow, K. H.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a Bayesian structural equation modeling framework to explore the spatiotemporal phytoplankton community patterns in the Neuse River Estuary (study period 1995-2001). The initial hypothesized model considered the influence of the physical environment (flow, salinity, and light availability), nitrogen (dissolved oxidized inorganic nitrogen, and total dissolved inorganic nitrogen), and temperature on total phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton community structure. Generally, the model gave plausible results and enabled the identification of the longitudinal role of the abiotic factors on the observed phytoplankton dynamics. River flow fluctuations and the resulting salinity and light availability changes (physical environment) dominate the up-estuary processes and loosen the coupling between nitrogen and phytoplankton. Further insights into the phytoplankton community response were provided by the positive path coefficients between the physical environment and diatoms, chlorophytes, and cryptophytes in the down-estuary sections. The latter finding supports an earlier hypothesis that these three groups dominate the phytoplankton community during high freshwater conditions as a result of their faster nutrient uptake and growth rates and their tolerance on low salinity conditions. The relationship between dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations and phytoplankton community becomes more apparent as we move to the down-estuary sections. A categorization of the phytoplankton community into cyanobacteria, dinoflagellates and an assemblage that consists of diatoms, chlorophytes, and cryptophytes provided the best results in the upper and middle segments of the estuary. Finally, the optimal down-estuary grouping aggregates diatoms and chlorophytes, lumps together dinoflagellates with cryptophytes, while cyanobacteria are treated separately. These structural shifts in the temporal phytoplankton community patterns probably result from combined bottom-up and top

  15. Organic Nitrogen Utilization by Phytoplankton: The Role of Cell-Surface Deaminases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    inhibited by cell-impermeable protein Marler 1966: Zika 1984). This highly re- modification reagents. A cell-surface redox en- active species may have a...from wet and dry deposition ( Zika sured in cultures of I. carterae could be et al. 1982; Thompson and Zafiriou 1983), generalized, marine phytoplankton...would be an is generated in photochemical reactions important sourceofthe hydrogen peroxide found (Cooper and Zika 1983), and can also be in the manne

  16. Spatial dynamics of a nutrient-phytoplankton system with toxic effect on phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Tiwari, P K; Misra, A K; Chattopadhyay, J

    2015-06-01

    The production of toxins by some species of phytoplankton is known to have several economic, ecological, and human health impacts. However, the role of toxins on the spatial distribution of phytoplankton is not well understood. In the present study, the spatial dynamics of a nutrient-phytoplankton system with toxic effect on phytoplankton is investigated. We analyze the linear stability of the system and obtain the condition for Turing instability. In the presence of toxic effect, we find that the distribution of nutrient and phytoplankton becomes inhomogeneous in space and results in different patterns, like stripes, spots, and the mixture of them depending on the toxicity level. We also observe that the distribution of nutrient and phytoplankton shows spatiotemporal oscillation for certain toxicity level.

  17. Phytoplankton bloom in Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    There is a large amount of sediment clearly visible in the true-color image of the Persian Gulf, acquired on November 1, 2001, by MODIS. Carried by the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers (at center), the sediment-laden waters appear light brown where they enter the northern end of the Persian Gulf and then gradually dissipate into turquoise swirls as they drift southward. The nutrients these sediments carry are helping to support a phytoplankton bloom in the region, which adds some darker green hues in the rich kaleidoscope of colors on the surface (see the high resolution image). The confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers marks the southernmost boundary between Iran (upper right) and Iraq (upper left). South of Iraq are the countries of Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. The red dots indicate the probable locations of fires burning at oil refineries. Thin black plumes of smoke can be seen streaming away from several of these.

  18. Massive phytoplankton blooms under Arctic sea ice.

    PubMed

    Arrigo, Kevin R; Perovich, Donald K; Pickart, Robert S; Brown, Zachary W; van Dijken, Gert L; Lowry, Kate E; Mills, Matthew M; Palmer, Molly A; Balch, William M; Bahr, Frank; Bates, Nicholas R; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Bowler, Bruce; Brownlee, Emily; Ehn, Jens K; Frey, Karen E; Garley, Rebecca; Laney, Samuel R; Lubelczyk, Laura; Mathis, Jeremy; Matsuoka, Atsushi; Mitchell, B Greg; Moore, G W K; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Pal, Sharmila; Polashenski, Chris M; Reynolds, Rick A; Schieber, Brian; Sosik, Heidi M; Stephens, Michael; Swift, James H

    2012-06-15

    Phytoplankton blooms over Arctic Ocean continental shelves are thought to be restricted to waters free of sea ice. Here, we document a massive phytoplankton bloom beneath fully consolidated pack ice far from the ice edge in the Chukchi Sea, where light transmission has increased in recent decades because of thinning ice cover and proliferation of melt ponds. The bloom was characterized by high diatom biomass and rates of growth and primary production. Evidence suggests that under-ice phytoplankton blooms may be more widespread over nutrient-rich Arctic continental shelves and that satellite-based estimates of annual primary production in these waters may be underestimated by up to 10-fold.

  19. Estuarine Phytoplankton Monitoring to Meet Undergraduate and Faculty Research Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pride, C. J.; Wilson, J. J.; Butterbaugh, T.

    2004-12-01

    Phytoplankton monitoring is being used at Savannah State University to provide research experience for all upper-level marine science majors, to provide in-depth senior research projects, to engage lower-level students in marine science activities beyond the classroom, and to collect baseline data for faculty research proposals. The framework is built around a commitment to maintain a tidal creek monitoring site for larger phytoplankton (diatoms and dinoflagellates >20 microns) as part of the Southeast Phytoplankton Monitoring Network (SEPMN). Field supplies and on-going training are supported by SEPMN. Marine science majors monitor a series of Wilmington River estuary sites as part of a group research project in an upper-level course offered each spring. The group research assignment includes the writing of a full research report with citations from the primary literature and peer review of drafts. A few students are encouraged to pursue their senior research project in this field and maintain sampling over the remainder of the year. They have freedom to design their own project in the broader context of eutrophication, high frequency temporal variability, seasonality, drought/flood cycles, comparisons between estuaries of differing river discharge or extension of sampling offshore. Senior researchers help to train freshmen/sophomore field assistants to insure consistency in the monitoring from one year to the next. Student data from the Wilmington River estuary cover the greatest portion of an annual cycle. Diatoms far outnumbered dinoflagellates at all estuarine sampling locations under both winter and summer conditions. There is a seasonal transition in this estuary from dominance of Asterionella sp. in February to Chaetoceros sp. in June. Chaetoceros sp. were also dominant in the lower Savannah River estuary in June. Dominance of diatoms in these estuaries rather than dinoflagellates is a sign of a relatively healthy ecosystem. These diatoms, however, did

  20. Remote sensing the phytoplankton seasonal succession of the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Raitsos, Dionysios E; Pradhan, Yaswant; Brewin, Robert J W; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The Red Sea holds one of the most diverse marine ecosystems, primarily due to coral reefs. However, knowledge on large-scale phytoplankton dynamics is limited. Analysis of a 10-year high resolution Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) dataset, along with remotely-sensed sea surface temperature and wind, provided a detailed description of the spatiotemporal seasonal succession of phytoplankton biomass in the Red Sea. Based on MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data, four distinct Red Sea provinces and seasons are suggested, covering the major patterns of surface phytoplankton production. The Red Sea Chl-a depicts a distinct seasonality with maximum concentrations seen during the winter time (attributed to vertical mixing in the north and wind-induced horizontal intrusion of nutrient-rich water in the south), and minimum concentrations during the summer (associated with strong seasonal stratification). The initiation of the seasonal succession occurs in autumn and lasts until early spring. However, weekly Chl-a seasonal succession data revealed that during the month of June, consistent anti-cyclonic eddies transfer nutrients and/or Chl-a to the open waters of the central Red Sea. This phenomenon occurs during the stratified nutrient depleted season, and thus could provide an important source of nutrients to the open waters. Remotely-sensed synoptic observations highlight that Chl-a does not increase regularly from north to south as previously thought. The Northern part of the Central Red Sea province appears to be the most oligotrophic area (opposed to southern and northern domains). This is likely due to the absence of strong mixing, which is apparent at the northern end of the Red Sea, and low nutrient intrusion in comparison with the southern end. Although the Red Sea is considered an oligotrophic sea, sporadic blooms occur that reach mesotrophic levels. The water temperature and the prevailing winds control the nutrient concentrations within the euphotic zone

  1. Remote Sensing the Phytoplankton Seasonal Succession of the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Brewin, Robert J. W.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The Red Sea holds one of the most diverse marine ecosystems, primarily due to coral reefs. However, knowledge on large-scale phytoplankton dynamics is limited. Analysis of a 10-year high resolution Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) dataset, along with remotely-sensed sea surface temperature and wind, provided a detailed description of the spatiotemporal seasonal succession of phytoplankton biomass in the Red Sea. Based on MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data, four distinct Red Sea provinces and seasons are suggested, covering the major patterns of surface phytoplankton production. The Red Sea Chl-a depicts a distinct seasonality with maximum concentrations seen during the winter time (attributed to vertical mixing in the north and wind-induced horizontal intrusion of nutrient-rich water in the south), and minimum concentrations during the summer (associated with strong seasonal stratification). The initiation of the seasonal succession occurs in autumn and lasts until early spring. However, weekly Chl-a seasonal succession data revealed that during the month of June, consistent anti-cyclonic eddies transfer nutrients and/or Chl-a to the open waters of the central Red Sea. This phenomenon occurs during the stratified nutrient depleted season, and thus could provide an important source of nutrients to the open waters. Remotely-sensed synoptic observations highlight that Chl-a does not increase regularly from north to south as previously thought. The Northern part of the Central Red Sea province appears to be the most oligotrophic area (opposed to southern and northern domains). This is likely due to the absence of strong mixing, which is apparent at the northern end of the Red Sea, and low nutrient intrusion in comparison with the southern end. Although the Red Sea is considered an oligotrophic sea, sporadic blooms occur that reach mesotrophic levels. The water temperature and the prevailing winds control the nutrient concentrations within the euphotic zone

  2. Decrease in the abundance and viability of oceanic phytoplankton due to trace levels of complex mixtures of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Echeveste, Pedro; Dachs, Jordi; Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Agustí, Susana

    2010-09-01

    Long range atmospheric transport and deposition is a significant introduction pathway of organic pollutants to remote oceanic regions, leading to their subsequent accumulation in marine organisms. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) bioconcentrate in planktonic food webs and these exert a biogeochemical control on the regional and global cycling of POPs. Therefore, an important issue is to determine whether the anthropogenic chemical perturbation of the biosphere introduced by the myriad of organic pollutants present in seawater influences phytoplankton abundance and productivity. The results reported here from five sets of experiments performed in the NE Atlantic Ocean show that there is a toxic effect induced by trace levels of complex mixtures of organic pollutants on phytoplankton oceanic communities. The levels of single pollutant, such as phenanthrene and pyrene, at which lethality of phytoplankton is observed are high in comparison to field levels. Complex mixtures of organic pollutants, however, have an important toxic effect on phytoplankton abundances, viability and concentrations of Chlorophyll a at pollutant concentrations 20-40 folds those found in the open ocean. The toxicity of these complex mixtures of organic pollutants exceeds by 10(3) times the toxicity expected for a single pollutant. Therefore, our results point out the need for a systematic investigation of the influence of complex mixtures of organic hydrophobic pollutants to oceanic phytoplankton communities, a perturbation not accounted for on previous assessments of anthropogenic pressures in the marine environment.

  3. Warming and Ocean Acidification Effects on Phytoplankton--From Species Shifts to Size Shifts within Species in a Mesocosm Experiment.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ulrich; Paul, Carolin; Moustaka-Gouni, Maria

    2015-01-01

    While the isolated responses of marine phytoplankton to climate warming and to ocean acidification have been studied intensively, studies on the combined effect of both aspects of Global Change are still scarce. Therefore, we performed a mesocosm experiment with a factorial combination of temperature (9 and 15 °C) and pCO2 (means: 439 ppm and 1040 ppm) with a natural autumn plankton community from the western Baltic Sea. Temporal trajectories of total biomass and of the biomass of the most important higher taxa followed similar patterns in all treatments. When averaging over the entire time course, phytoplankton biomass decreased with warming and increased with CO2 under warm conditions. The contribution of the two dominant higher phytoplankton taxa (diatoms and cryptophytes) and of the 4 most important species (3 diatoms, 1 cryptophyte) did not respond to the experimental treatments. Taxonomic composition of phytoplankton showed only responses at the level of subdominant and rare species. Phytoplankton cell sizes increased with CO2 addition and decreased with warming. Both effects were stronger for larger species. Warming effects were stronger than CO2 effects and tended to counteract each other. Phytoplankton communities without calcifying species and exposed to short-term variation of CO2 seem to be rather resistant to ocean acidification.

  4. Anthropogenic climate change drives shift and shuffle in North Atlantic phytoplankton communities.

    PubMed

    Barton, Andrew D; Irwin, Andrew J; Finkel, Zoe V; Stock, Charles A

    2016-03-15

    Anthropogenic climate change has shifted the biogeography and phenology of many terrestrial and marine species. Marine phytoplankton communities appear sensitive to climate change, yet understanding of how individual species may respond to anthropogenic climate change remains limited. Here, using historical environmental and phytoplankton observations, we characterize the realized ecological niches for 87 North Atlantic diatom and dinoflagellate taxa and project changes in species biogeography between mean historical (1951-2000) and future (2051-2100) ocean conditions. We find that the central positions of the core range of 74% of taxa shift poleward at a median rate of 12.9 km per decade (km⋅dec(-1)), and 90% of taxa shift eastward at a median rate of 42.7 km⋅dec(-1) The poleward shift is faster than previously reported for marine taxa, and the predominance of longitudinal shifts is driven by dynamic changes in multiple environmental drivers, rather than a strictly poleward, temperature-driven redistribution of ocean habitats. A century of climate change significantly shuffles community composition by a basin-wide median value of 16%, compared with seasonal variations of 46%. The North Atlantic phytoplankton community appears poised for marked shift and shuffle, which may have broad effects on food webs and biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Anthropogenic climate change drives shift and shuffle in North Atlantic phytoplankton communities

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Andrew D.; Finkel, Zoe V.; Stock, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has shifted the biogeography and phenology of many terrestrial and marine species. Marine phytoplankton communities appear sensitive to climate change, yet understanding of how individual species may respond to anthropogenic climate change remains limited. Here, using historical environmental and phytoplankton observations, we characterize the realized ecological niches for 87 North Atlantic diatom and dinoflagellate taxa and project changes in species biogeography between mean historical (1951–2000) and future (2051–2100) ocean conditions. We find that the central positions of the core range of 74% of taxa shift poleward at a median rate of 12.9 km per decade (km⋅dec−1), and 90% of taxa shift eastward at a median rate of 42.7 km⋅dec−1. The poleward shift is faster than previously reported for marine taxa, and the predominance of longitudinal shifts is driven by dynamic changes in multiple environmental drivers, rather than a strictly poleward, temperature-driven redistribution of ocean habitats. A century of climate change significantly shuffles community composition by a basin-wide median value of 16%, compared with seasonal variations of 46%. The North Atlantic phytoplankton community appears poised for marked shift and shuffle, which may have broad effects on food webs and biogeochemical cycles. PMID:26903635

  6. Generalized receptor law governs phototaxis in the phytoplankton Euglena gracilis

    PubMed Central

    Giometto, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian; Maritan, Amos; Stocker, Roman; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Phototaxis, the process through which motile organisms direct their swimming toward or away from light, is implicated in key ecological phenomena (including algal blooms and diel vertical migration) that shape the distribution, diversity, and productivity of phytoplankton and thus energy transfer to higher trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems. Phototaxis also finds important applications in biofuel reactors and microbiopropellers and is argued to serve as a benchmark for the study of biological invasions in heterogeneous environments owing to the ease of generating stochastic light fields. Despite its ecological and technological relevance, an experimentally tested, general theoretical model of phototaxis seems unavailable to date. Here, we present accurate measurements of the behavior of the alga Euglena gracilis when exposed to controlled light fields. Analysis of E. gracilis’ phototactic accumulation dynamics over a broad range of light intensities proves that the classic Keller–Segel mathematical framework for taxis provides an accurate description of both positive and negative phototaxis only when phototactic sensitivity is modeled by a generalized “receptor law,” a specific nonlinear response function to light intensity that drives algae toward beneficial light conditions and away from harmful ones. The proposed phototactic model captures the temporal dynamics of both cells’ accumulation toward light sources and their dispersion upon light cessation. The model could thus be of use in integrating models of vertical phytoplankton migrations in marine and freshwater ecosystems, and in the design of bioreactors. PMID:25964338

  7. Generalized receptor law governs phototaxis in the phytoplankton Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Giometto, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian; Maritan, Amos; Stocker, Roman; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2015-06-02

    Phototaxis, the process through which motile organisms direct their swimming toward or away from light, is implicated in key ecological phenomena (including algal blooms and diel vertical migration) that shape the distribution, diversity, and productivity of phytoplankton and thus energy transfer to higher trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems. Phototaxis also finds important applications in biofuel reactors and microbiopropellers and is argued to serve as a benchmark for the study of biological invasions in heterogeneous environments owing to the ease of generating stochastic light fields. Despite its ecological and technological relevance, an experimentally tested, general theoretical model of phototaxis seems unavailable to date. Here, we present accurate measurements of the behavior of the alga Euglena gracilis when exposed to controlled light fields. Analysis of E. gracilis' phototactic accumulation dynamics over a broad range of light intensities proves that the classic Keller-Segel mathematical framework for taxis provides an accurate description of both positive and negative phototaxis only when phototactic sensitivity is modeled by a generalized "receptor law," a specific nonlinear response function to light intensity that drives algae toward beneficial light conditions and away from harmful ones. The proposed phototactic model captures the temporal dynamics of both cells' accumulation toward light sources and their dispersion upon light cessation. The model could thus be of use in integrating models of vertical phytoplankton migrations in marine and freshwater ecosystems, and in the design of bioreactors.

  8. Determining the Population Size of Pond Phytoplankton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummer, Paul J.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses methods for determining the population size of pond phytoplankton, including water sampling techniques, laboratory analysis of samples, and additional studies worthy of investigation in class or as individual projects. (CS)

  9. Resilience of estuarine phytoplankton and their temporal variability along salinity gradients during drought and hypersalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nche-Fambo, F. A.; Scharler, U. M.; Tirok, K.

    2015-06-01

    In South African estuaries, there is no knowledge on the resilience and variability in phytoplankton communities under conditions of hypersalinity, extended droughts and reverse salinity gradients. Phytoplankton composition, abundance and biomass vary with changes in environmental variables and taxa richness declines specifically under hypersaline conditions. This research thus investigated the phytoplankton community composition, its resilience and variability under highly variable and extreme environmental conditions in an estuarine lake system (Lake St. Lucia, South Africa) over one year. The lake system was characterised by a reverse salinity gradient with hypersalinity furthest from the estuarine inlet during the study period. During this study, 78 taxa were recorded: 56 diatoms, eight green algae, one cryptophyte, seven cyanobacteria and six dinoflagellates. Taxon variability and resilience depended on their ability to tolerate high salinities. Consequently, the phytoplankton communities as well as total abundance and biomass differed along the salinity gradient and over time with salinity as the main determinant. Cyanobacteria were dominant in hypersaline conditions, dinoflagellates in marine-brackish salinities, green algae and cryptophytes in lower salinities (brackish) and diatoms were abundant in marine-brackish salinities but survived in hypersaline conditions. Total abundance and biomass ranged from 3.66 × 103 to 1.11 × 109 Cells/L and 1.21 × 106 to 1.46 × 1010 pgC/L respectively, with the highest values observed under hypersaline conditions. Therefore, even under highly variable, extreme environmental conditions and hypersalinity the phytoplankton community as a whole was resilient enough to maintain a relatively high biomass throughout the study period. The resilience of few dominant taxa, such as Cyanothece, Spirulina, Protoperidinium and Nitzschia and the dominance of other common genera such as Chlamydomonas, Chroomonas, Navicula, Gyrosigma

  10. Influence of vitamin B auxotrophy on nitrogen metabolism in eukaryotic phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Allen, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    While nitrogen availability is known to limit primary production in large parts of the ocean, vitamin starvation amongst eukaryotic phytoplankton is becoming increasingly recognized as an oceanographically relevant phenomenon. Cobalamin (B12) and thiamine (B1) auxotrophy are widespread throughout eukaryotic phytoplankton, with over 50% of cultured isolates requiring B12 and 20% requiring B1. The frequency of vitamin auxotrophy in harmful algal bloom species is even higher. Instances of colimitation between nitrogen and B vitamins have been observed in marine environments, and interactions between these nutrients have been shown to impact phytoplankton species composition. This review surveys available data, including relevant gene expression patterns, to evaluate the potential for interactive effects of nitrogen and vitamin B12 and B1 starvation in eukaryotic phytoplankton. B12 plays essential roles in amino acid and one-carbon metabolism, while B1 is important for primary carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and likely useful as an anti-oxidant. Here we will focus on three potential metabolic interconnections between vitamin, nitrogen, and sulfur metabolism that may have ramifications for the role of vitamin and nitrogen scarcities in driving ocean productivity and species composition. These include: (1) B12, B1, and N starvation impacts on osmolyte and antioxidant production, (2) B12 and B1 starvation impacts on polyamine biosynthesis, and (3) influence of B12 and B1 starvation on the diatom urea cycle and amino acid recycling through impacts on the citric acid cycle. We evaluate evidence for these interconnections and identify oceanographic contexts in which each may impact rates of primary production and phytoplankton community composition. Major implications include that B12 and B1 deprivation may impair the ability of phytoplankton to recover from nitrogen starvation and that changes in vitamin and nitrogen availability may synergistically impact harmful

  11. Unveiling a phytoplankton hotspot at a narrow boundary between coastal and offshore waters.

    PubMed

    Ribalet, Francois; Marchetti, Adrian; Hubbard, Katherine A; Brown, Kristina; Durkin, Colleen A; Morales, Rhonda; Robert, Marie; Swalwell, Jarred E; Tortell, Philippe D; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2010-09-21

    In terrestrial ecosystems, transitional areas between different plant communities (ecotones) are formed by steep environmental gradients and are commonly characterized by high species diversity and primary productivity, which in turn influences the foodweb structure of these regions. Whether comparable zones of elevated diversity and productivity characterize ecotones in the oceans remains poorly understood. Here we describe a previously hidden hotspot of phytoplankton diversity and productivity in a narrow but seasonally persistent transition zone at the intersection of iron-poor, nitrate-rich offshore waters and iron-rich, nitrate-poor coastal waters of the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Novel continuous measurements of phytoplankton cell abundance and composition identified a complex succession of blooms of five distinct size classes of phytoplankton populations within a 100-km-wide transition zone. The blooms appear to be fueled by natural iron enrichment of offshore communities as they are transported toward the coast. The observed succession of phytoplankton populations is likely driven by spatial gradients in iron availability or time since iron enrichment. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, the resulting communities have a strong impact on the regional biogeochemistry as evidenced by the low partial pressure of CO(2) and the nearly complete depletion of nutrients. Enhanced phytoplankton productivity and diversity associated with steep environmental gradients are expected wherever water masses with complementary nutrient compositions mix to create a region more favorable for phytoplankton growth. The ability to detect and track these important but poorly characterized marine ecotones is critical for understanding their impact on productivity and ecosystem structure in the oceans.

  12. The relationship between phytoplankton distribution and water column characteristics in North West European shelf sea waters.

    PubMed

    Fehling, Johanna; Davidson, Keith; Bolch, Christopher J S; Brand, Tim D; Narayanaswamy, Bhavani E

    2012-01-01

    Phytoplankton underpin the marine food web in shelf seas, with some species having properties that are harmful to human health and coastal aquaculture. Pressures such as climate change and anthropogenic nutrient input are hypothesized to influence phytoplankton community composition and distribution. Yet the primary environmental drivers in shelf seas are poorly understood. To begin to address this in North Western European waters, the phytoplankton community composition was assessed in light of measured physical and chemical drivers during the "Ellett Line" cruise of autumn 2001 across the Scottish Continental shelf and into adjacent open Atlantic waters. Spatial variability existed in both phytoplankton and environmental conditions, with clear differences not only between on and off shelf stations but also between different on shelf locations. Temperature/salinity plots demonstrated different water masses existed in the region. In turn, principal component analysis (PCA), of the measured environmental conditions (temperature, salinity, water density and inorganic nutrient concentrations) clearly discriminated between shelf and oceanic stations on the basis of DIN:DSi ratio that was correlated with both salinity and temperature. Discrimination between shelf stations was also related to this ratio, but also the concentration of DIN and DSi. The phytoplankton community was diatom dominated, with multidimensional scaling (MDS) demonstrating spatial variability in its composition. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was used to investigate the link between environment and the phytoplankton community. This demonstrated a significant relationship between community composition and water mass as indexed by salinity (whole community), and both salinity and DIN:DSi (diatoms alone). Diatoms of the Pseudo-nitzschia seriata group occurred at densities potentially harmful to shellfish aquaculture, with the potential for toxicity being elevated by the likelihood of DSi limitation of

  13. Phytoplankton bloom along the coast of Namibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS true-color image, acquired March 4, 2002, shows a phytoplankton bloom along the coast of Namibia. Phytoplankton is a microscopic organism that utilizes chlorophyll, which sunlight reflects off of to create this intense blue-green color in the water. Also prominent in this image is the Skeleton Coast Game Park, which runs along Namibia's northern coast and here glows a beautiful coral-orange color.

  14. Effects of sea surface warming on marine plankton.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Aleksandra M; Boyce, Daniel G; Hofmann, Matthias; Matthiessen, Birte; Sommer, Ulrich; Worm, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Ocean warming has been implicated in the observed decline of oceanic phytoplankton biomass. Some studies suggest a physical pathway of warming via stratification and nutrient flux, and others a biological effect on plankton metabolic rates; yet the relative strength and possible interaction of these mechanisms remains unknown. Here, we implement projections from a global circulation model in a mesocosm experiment to examine both mechanisms in a multi-trophic plankton community. Warming treatments had positive direct effects on phytoplankton biomass, but these were overcompensated by the negative effects of decreased nutrient flux. Zooplankton switched from phytoplankton to grazing on ciliates. These results contrast with previous experiments under nutrient-replete conditions, where warming indirectly reduced phytoplankton biomass via increased zooplankton grazing. We conclude that the effect of ocean warming on marine plankton depends on the nutrient regime, and provide a mechanistic basis for understanding global change in marine ecosystems.

  15. Copper sensitivity of Oregon coastal phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The copper sensitivity of natural populations of Oregon coastal phytoplankton was studied using both additions of ionic copper and Cu-TRIS free ion activity buffers in coastal seawater. Phytoplankton growth rate, taxonomic composition and copper content were examined in treatment additions. The growth rate results suggested that the deficiency of another trace metal increased the apparent toxicity of copper to phytoplankton, especially in TRIS-free ion activity buffered seawater. Laboratory experiments with isolated coastal phytoplankton species indicated that manganese deficiency exacerbated copper toxicity, and that manganese deficiency was induced in TRIS buffered seawater by a TRIS-catalyzed oxidation of Mn. When manganese additions to natural populations were employed inconjunction with ionic copper additions and TRIS-free ion regulated seawater, they showed that ambient manganese concentrations were low enough to shift the onset of copper toxicity to lower copper concentrations. The results suggest that while acute toxicity to phytoplankton by ambient concentrations of copper is unlikely, the interactions of copper and other metals, especially manganese, may influence natural coastal phytoplankton populations in more subtle ways, such as taxonomic composition.

  16. Nearshore phytoplankton of Hammond Bay, Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Charles L.; Manny, Bruce A.

    1983-01-01

    To predict the effects of increased nutrient loading on nearshore phytoplankton populations in northern Lake Huron, we collected phytoplankton from a small, nearshore water intake at Hammond Bay four times per week from August 1973 to July 1975. Phytoplankton density, taxonomic composition, and biomass in the nearshore waters followed predictable, seasonal fluctuations during each of two 12-month periods. The density of total phytoplankton was high (450600 cells/mL) in June and low (60 to 210 cells/mL) from January to April each year. The mean annual composition of the phytoplankton assemblage by number for the study period was 33% cryptomonads, 24% diatoms, 16% chrysophytes, 16% blue-green algae, and 10% green algae. Phytoplankton biomass was low through each year (range, 0.09 to 0.66 g/m3), resembling values previously reported from Lake Superior. Pennate diatoms contributed 60 to 80% of the total biomass from December to April and in July. Phytoflagellates consisting of chrysophytes and cryptomonads accounted for 35% of the biomass throughout the 2-year study.

  17. Ozone depletion - Ultraviolet radiation and phytoplankton biology in Antarctic waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.; Prezelin, B. B.; Baker, K. S.; Bidigare, R. R.; Boucher, N. P.; Coley, T.; Karentz, D.; Macintyre, S.; Matlick, H. A.; Menzies, D.

    1992-01-01

    The near-50-percent thinning of the stratospheric ozone layer over the Antarctic, with increased passage of mid-UV radiation to the surface of the Southern Ocean, has prompted concern over possible radiation damage to the near-surface phytoplankton communities that are the bases of Antarctic marine ecosystems. As the ozone layer thinned, a 6-week study of the marginal ice zone of the Bellingshousen Sea in the austral spring of 1990 noted sea-surface and depth-dependent ratios of mid-UV irradiance to total irradiance increased, and mid-UV inhibition of photosynthesis increased. A 6-12 percent reduction in primary production associated with ozone depletion was estimated to have occurred over the course of the present study.

  18. Increased exposure of Southern Ocean phytoplankton to ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Arrigo, Kevin R.; van Dijken, Gert L.

    2004-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing of both surface solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and chlorophyll over two decades shows that biologically significant ultraviolet radiation increases began to occur over the Southern Ocean three years before the ozone ``hole'' was discovered. Beginning in October 1983, the most frequent occurrences of enhanced UVR over phytoplankton-rich waters occurred in the Weddell Sea and Indian Ocean sectors of the Southern Ocean, impacting 60% of the surface biomass by the late 1990s. These results suggest two reasons why more serious impacts to the base of the marine food web may not have been detected by field experiments: (1) the onset of UVR increases several years before dedicated field work began may have impacted the most sensitive organisms long before such damage could be detected, and (2) most biological field work has so far not taken place in Antarctic waters most extensively subjected to enhanced UVR.

  19. Understanding the contribution of phytoplankton phase functions to uncertainties in the water colour signal.

    PubMed

    Lain, Lisl Robertson; Bernard, Stewart; Matthews, Mark W

    2017-02-20

    The accurate description of a water body's volume scattering function (VSF), and hence its phase functions, is critical to the determination of the constituent inherent optical properties (IOPs), the associated spectral water-leaving reflectance, and consequently the retrieval of phytoplankton functional type (PFT) information. The equivalent algal populations (EAP) model has previously been evaluated for phytoplankton-dominated waters, and offers the ability to provide phytoplankton population-specific phase functions, unveiling a new opportunity to further understanding of the causality of the PFT signal. This study presents and evaluates the wavelength dependent, spectrally variable EAP particle phase functions and the subsequent effects on water-leaving reflectance. Comparisons are made with frequently used phase function approximations e.g. the Fournier Forand formulation, as well as with phase functions inferred from measured VSFs in coastal waters. Relative differences in shape and magnitude are quantified. Reflectance modelled with the EAP phase functions is then compared against measured reflectance data from phytoplankton-dominated waters. Further examples of modelled phytoplankton-dominated waters are discussed with reference to choice of phase function for two PFTs (eukaryote and prokaryote) across a range of biomass. Finally a demonstration of the sensitivity of reflectance due to the choice of phase function is presented. The EAP model phase functions account for both spectral and angular variability in phytoplankton backscattering i.e. they display variability which is both spectral and shape-related. It is concluded that phase functions modelled in this way are necessary for investigating the effects of assemblage variability on the ocean colour signal, and should be considered for model closure even in relatively low scattering conditions where phytoplankton dominate the IOPs.

  20. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on CCQM-K43.1: As, Hg, Se and methylmercury content in marine fish (swordfish)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroiwa, Takayoshi; Chiba, Koichi

    2009-01-01

    The comparison CCQM-K43.1, arsenic, mercury, selenium and methylmercury in marine fish (swordfish), was organized by the inorganic analysis working group (IAWG) of CCQM as a subsequent key comparison of CCQM-K43. The National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) is the coordinating laboratory for this subsequent key comparison. Nine NMIs and one unofficial institute participated in CCQM-K43.1. The data of the unofficial institute were treated as reference data. All participants were allowed to choose the measurands (arsenic, mercury, selenium and methylmercury) of their interest. For measurement of arsenic, mercury and selenium, different measurement methods (IDMS, ICP-MS, AAS and INAA) were used and all participants with one exception used microwave digestion methods. For measurement of methylmercury, all participants used IDMS and different extraction methods (microwave, mechanical shaker and ultrasonic) were used. Most results agreed well with one or two apparent outlier(s) for arsenic and selenium. The agreement of measurement results between NMIs is very good for mercury and methylmercury. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  1. Modeled Chl:C ratio and derived estimates of phytoplankton carbon biomass and its contribution to total particulate organic carbon in the global surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Chlorophyll (Chl) is a distinctive component of autotrophic organisms, often used as an indicator of phytoplankton biomass in the ocean. However, assessment of phytoplankton biomass from Chl relies on the accurate estimation of the Chl:carbon(C) ratio. Here we present global patterns of Chl:C ratios in the surface ocean obtained from a phytoplankton growth model that accounts for the optimal acclimation of phytoplankton to ambient nutrient, light, and temperature conditions. The model agrees largely with observed/expected global patterns of Chl:C. Combining our Chl:C estimates with satellite Chl and particulate organic carbon (POC), we infer phytoplankton C concentration in the surface ocean and its contribution to the total POC pool. Our results suggest that the portion of POC corresponding to living phytoplankton is higher in subtropical latitudes and less productive regions (˜30-70%) and decreases to ˜10-30% toward high latitudes and productive regions. An important caveat of our model is the lack of iron limiting effects on phytoplankton physiology. Comparison of our predicted phytoplankton biomass with an independent estimate of total POC reveals a positive correlation between nitrate concentrations and nonphotosynthetic POC in the surface ocean. This correlation disappears when a constant Chl:C is applied. Our analysis is not constrained by assumptions of constant Chl:C or phytoplankton:POC ratio, providing a novel independent analysis of phytoplankton biomass in the surface ocean. These results highlight the importance of accounting for the variability in Chl:C and its application in distinguishing the autotrophic and heterotrophic components in the assemblage of the marine plankton ecosystem.

  2. Effects of UV radiation on phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Cullen, John J.

    1995-07-01

    et al., 1986; Worrest, 1986; NOAA, 1987; Smith, 1989; Smith and Baker, 1989; Voytek, 1990; Häder, 1993; Acevedo and Nolan, 1993; Holm-Hansen et al., 1993; Vincent and Roy, 1993; Biggs and Joyner, 1994; Williamson and Zagarese, 1994; Karentz, 1994; Cullen and Neale, 1993; Cullen and Neale, 1994]. As Hader et al. have summarized [UNEP, 1989; UNEP, 1991], "UV-B radiation in aquatic systems: 1) affects adaptive strategies (e.g., motility, orientation); 2) impairs important physiological functions (e.g., photosynthesis and enzymatic reactions); and 3) threatens marine organisms during their developmental stages (e.g., the young of finfish, shrimp larvae, crab larvae)". Possible consequences to aquatic systems include: reduced biomass production; changes in species composition and biodiversity; and alterations of aquatic ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles associated with the above changes. Within the past four years, our knowledge with respect to the environmental effects of ozone-related increased levels of UV-B has increased significantly, and numerous efforts have been directed toward process-oriented studies of UV responses in plants and animals. Consensus is building toward the view that current levels of UV play a major role as an ecological determinant, influencing both survival and distribution, and are thus deserving of increased study independent of ozone-related UV-B increases. This review outlines U.S. research subsequent to 1991 and emphasizes studies concerned with phytoplankton.

  3. Seasonal distribution and succession of dominant phytoplankton groups in the global ocean: A satellite view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvain, S.; Moulin, C.; Dandonneau, Y.; Loisel, H.

    2008-09-01

    Phytoplankton plays an important role in the global carbon cycle via the fixation of inorganic carbon during photosynthesis. However, the efficiency of this "biological pump of carbon" strongly depends on the nature of the phytoplankton. Monitoring spatial and temporal variations of the distribution of dominant phytoplankton groups at the global scale is thus of critical importance. Recently, an algorithm has been developed to detect the major dominant phytoplankton groups from anomalies of the marine signal measured by ocean color satellites. This method, called PHYSAT, allows to identify nanoeucaryotes, Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and diatoms. In this paper, PHYSAT has been improved to detect an additional group, named phaeocystis-like, by analyzing specific signal anomalies in the Southern Ocean during winter months. This new version of PHYSAT was then used to process daily global SeaWiFS GAC data between 1998 and 2006. The global distribution of major phytoplankton groups is presented in this study as a monthly climatology of the most frequent phytoplankton group. The contribution of nanoeucaryotes-dominated waters to the global ocean varies from 45 to 70% depending on the season, whereas both diatoms and phaeocystis-like contributions exhibit a stronger seasonal variability mostly due to the large blooms that occur during winter in the Southern Ocean. Three regions of particular interest are also studied in more details: the Southern Ocean, the North Atlantic, and the Equatorial Pacific. The North Atlantic diatom bloom shows a large interannual variability. Large blooms of both diatoms and phaeocystis-like are observed during winter in the Southern Ocean, with a larger contribution from diatoms. Their respective geographical distribution is shown to be tightly related to the depth of the mixed-layer, with diatoms prevailing in stratified waters. Synechococcus and Prochloroccocus prevail in the Equatorial Pacific, but our data show also sporadic diatoms

  4. The role of noise on the steady state distributions of phytoplankton populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenti, D.; Denaro, G.; Conversano, F.; Brunet, C.; Bonanno, A.; Basilone, G.; Mazzola, S.; Spagnolo, B.

    2016-05-01

    The spatio-temporal behaviour of total chlorophyll concentration is investigated in the middle of the Tyrrhenian Sea by using a stochastic approach. The study is based on a reaction-diffusion-taxis model, which is used to analyse the dynamics of five phytoplankton groups, responsible for about 80% of the total chlorophyll a inside the euphotic zone of the water column. The analysis is performed by considering: (i) the intraspecific competition of the phytoplanktonic groups for limiting factors, i.e. light intensity and nutrient concentration, (ii) the seasonal changes of environmental variables, and (iii) the random fluctuations of the components of the velocity field and temperature. Specifically, we investigate the effects of external perturbations, both deterministic and random, on the dynamics of phytoplankton populations, by inserting a term of multiplicative noise into the differential equation of the nutrient dynamics. The theoretical results of the phytoplankton abundances obtained by the stochastic model are converted in chlorophyll a concentrations, and compared with the experimental findings. The statistical checks, based on the chi-square test, show that the vertical distributions of total chlorophyll concentration are in a good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, we observe that the high intensity of environmental noise strongly modifies the steady spatial distributions of two phytoplankton groups usually localized in deeper layers, causing algal blooms in surface water.

  5. Modeling phytoplankton community in reservoirs. A comparison between taxonomic and functional groups-based models.

    PubMed

    Di Maggio, Jimena; Fernández, Carolina; Parodi, Elisa R; Diaz, M Soledad; Estrada, Vanina

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we address the formulation of two mechanistic water quality models that differ in the way the phytoplankton community is described. We carry out parameter estimation subject to differential-algebraic constraints and validation for each model and comparison between models performance. The first approach aggregates phytoplankton species based on their phylogenetic characteristics (Taxonomic group model) and the second one, on their morpho-functional properties following Reynolds' classification (Functional group model). The latter approach takes into account tolerance and sensitivity to environmental conditions. The constrained parameter estimation problems are formulated within an equation oriented framework, with a maximum likelihood objective function. The study site is Paso de las Piedras Reservoir (Argentina), which supplies water for consumption for 450,000 population. Numerical results show that phytoplankton morpho-functional groups more closely represent each species growth requirements within the group. Each model performance is quantitatively assessed by three diagnostic measures. Parameter estimation results for seasonal dynamics of the phytoplankton community and main biogeochemical variables for a one-year time horizon are presented and compared for both models, showing the functional group model enhanced performance. Finally, we explore increasing nutrient loading scenarios and predict their effect on phytoplankton dynamics throughout a one-year time horizon.

  6. Spatio-temporal variability of phytoplankton dimensional classes in the Mediterranean Sea from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sammartino, Michela; Di Cicco, Annalisa; Marullo, Salvatore; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton contributes to fix half of the carbon dioxide released on Earth, becoming a key component not only in the carbon cycle, but also in several biogeochemical cycles. It is involved in the control of greenhouse gases and, consequently, in the effect of climate change on marine system. Therefore, phytoplankton is often considered one of the most common bio-indicator for any environmental changes, which, in turn, can affect the algal community composition and structure. The alteration of the biological, physical and chemical conditions in the ocean can be reflected in the algal assemblage structure, in terms of variation of dominant size class and taxonomic composition. In this work, the seasonal and year-to-year variability of the phytoplankton size class (PSC) spatial distribution has been examined in the Mediterranean Sea using ten year of satellite observations. The estimation of PSCs from space is based on relationship between chlorophyll a (Chl a) and diagnostic pigments that should be verified at regional scales. Our analysis shows that the Mediterranean pigments ratios differs from the global ones; therefore, we regionalized the mathematical relation existing between the Chl a and the diagnostic pigments, used in the in situ PSC identification. This regionally tuned relation allowed to improve the estimation of PSCs from space by reducing the observed bias between modelled and measured PSCs. The analysis of PSC satellite time series allowed, for the first time, to have a quantitative description of the seasonal and inter-annual variability of the spatial distribution of the algal community in the Mediterranean Sea. The results demonstrated that the pico-phytoplankton contributes with high values to the total Chl a, especially in summer and in ultra-oligotrophic environments, such as the Levantine basin. Micro-phytoplankton contribution results high during spring bloom period in offshore areas, characterized by a strong water mixing; while, in

  7. Bacterioplankton and phytoplankton biomass and production during summer stratification in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; Calderón-Paz, Juan-Isidro; Guixa-Boixereu, Núria; Estrada, Marta; Gasol, Josep M.

    1999-06-01

    We examined bacterioplankton biomass and heterotrophic production (BHP) during summer stratification in the northwestern Mediterranean in four successive stratification seasons (June-July of 1993-1996). Values of phytoplankton biomass and primary production were determined simultaneously so that the data sets for autotrophic and heterotrophic microbial plankton could be compared. Three standard stations were set along a transect from Barcelona to the channel between Mallorca and Menorca, representing coastally influenced shelf waters, frontal waters over the slope front, and open sea waters. Conversion factors from 3H-leucine incorporation to BHP were empirically determined and varied between 0.29 and 3.25 kg C mol -1. Bacterial biomass values were among the lowest found in any marine environment. BHP values (between 0.02 and 2.5 μg C L -1 d -1) were larger than those of low nutrient low chlorophyll areas such as the Sargasso Sea and lower than those from high nutrient low chlorophyll areas such as the equatorial Pacific. Growth rates of bacterioplankton were highest at the slope front (0.20 d -1) and lowest at the open sea station (0.04 d -1). Phytoplankton growth rates were similar at the three stations (˜0.50 d -1). Integrated values of bacterioplankton biomass, BHP and bacterial growth rates did not show significant differences among years, but differences between the three stations were clearly significant. Phytoplankton biomass, primary production, and phytoplankton growth rates did not show significant differences either with year or with station. As a consequence the bacterioplankton to phytoplankton biomass (BB/BPHY) and production (BHP/PP) ratios varied from the coastal to the open sea stations. The BB/BPHY ratio was 0.98 at the coast and ˜0.70 at the other two stations. These ratios are similar to those found in other oligotrophic marine environments. The BHP/PP ratio was 0.83 at the coast, 0.36 at the slope and 0.09 at the open sea station. The last

  8. Categorical mapping of marine eutrophication based on ecological indices.

    PubMed

    Kitsiou, D; Karydis, M

    2000-06-08

    The present work is concerned with the development of methodological procedures for studying the spatial distribution of eutrophication in the marine environment. Seven ecological indices (S, number of phytoplankton species; N, total number of individuals; D(Mg), Margalef's index; D(Mn), Menhinick's index; D(Od), Odum's species per thousand individuals; H', Shannon's Diversity index; E, Evenness index), based on phytoplankton community data collected from Saronicos Gulf, Greece were used for describing the eutrophication state of the sea environment. A representation of the spatial distribution for each ecological index was developed using the Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) interpolation method. A eutrophication scale for each index was also developed for indicating four different trophic levels in the marine environment (eutrophic, upper-mesotrophic, lower-mesotrophic, oligotrophic); categorization of the interpolated values of each index resulted in a clear illustration of these trophic levels on seven thematic maps. Two methodological procedures were finally applied for synthesizing the information of these thematic maps. The purpose was the development of a final map illustrating the spatial distribution of eutrophication in the study area. The first procedure was based on the integration of unsupervised and supervised classification methods, widely used in the field of remote sensing, while the second one on the overlay technique, simply carried out within the frame of a Geographical Information System (GIS). The hybrid unsupervised/supervised classification method can assess the optimal number of classes in which data values from simultaneously considered parameters could be allocated, while the overlay technique is an additive procedure not taking into account existing trends in the dataset. The advantages and disadvantages of each procedure are further discussed.

  9. Halogenated Compounds from Marine Algae

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Rauter, Amélia Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Marine algae produce a cocktail of halogenated metabolites with potential commercial value. Structures exhibited by these compounds go from acyclic entities with a linear chain to complex polycyclic molecules. Their medical and pharmaceutical application has been investigated for a few decades, however other properties, such as antifouling, are not to be discarded. Many compounds were discovered in the last years, although the need for new drugs keeps this field open as many algal species are poorly screened. The ecological role of marine algal halogenated metabolites has somehow been overlooked. This new research field will provide valuable and novel insight into the marine ecosystem dynamics as well as a new approach to comprehending biodiversity. Furthermore, understanding interactions between halogenated compound production by algae and the environment, including anthropogenic or global climate changes, is a challenging target for the coming years. Research of halogenated metabolites has been more focused on macroalgae than on phytoplankton. However, phytoplankton could be a very promising material since it is the base of the marine food chain with quick adaptation to environmental changes, which undoubtedly has consequences on secondary metabolism. This paper reviews recent progress on this field and presents trends on the role of marine algae as producers of halogenated compounds. PMID:20948909

  10. Halogenated compounds from marine algae.

    PubMed

    Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Rauter, Amélia Pilar

    2010-08-09

    Marine algae produce a cocktail of halogenated metabolites with potential commercial value. Structures exhibited by these compounds go from acyclic entities with a linear chain to complex polycyclic molecules. Their medical and pharmaceutical application has been investigated for a few decades, however other properties, such as antifouling, are not to be discarded. Many compounds were discovered in the last years, although the need for new drugs keeps this field open as many algal species are poorly screened. The ecological role of marine algal halogenated metabolites has somehow been overlooked. This new research field will provide valuable and novel insight into the marine ecosystem dynamics as well as a new approach to comprehending biodiversity. Furthermore, understanding interactions between halogenated compound production by algae and the environment, including anthropogenic or global climate changes, is a challenging target for the coming years. Research of halogenated metabolites has been more focused on macroalgae than on phytoplankton. However, phytoplankton could be a very promising material since it is the base of the marine food chain with quick adaptation to environmental changes, which undoubtedly has consequences on secondary metabolism. This paper reviews recent progress on this field and presents trends on the role of marine algae as producers of halogenated compounds.

  11. Visible absorbance spectra: A basis for in situ and passive remote sensing of phytoplankton concentration and community composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, F. H.; Jarrett, O., Jr.; Brown, C. A., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The concentration and composition of phytoplankton populations are measured by an optical method which can be used either in situ or remotely. This method is based upon the in vivo light absorption characteristics of phytoplankton. To provide a data base for testing assumptions relative to the proposed method, visible absorbance spectra of pure cultures of 20 marine phytoplankton were obtained under laboratory conditions. Descriptive and analytical statistics were computed for the absorbance spectra and were used to make comparisons between members of major taxonomic groups and between groups. Spectral variation between the members of the major taxonomic groups was observed to be considerably less than the spectral variation between these groups. In several cases the differences between the mean absorbance spectra of major taxonomic groups are significant enough to be detected with passive remote sensing techniques.

  12. CMOS based image cytometry for detection of phytoplankton in ballast water

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, J. M.; Jofre, M.; Martínez, P.; Yáñez, M. A.; Catalan, V.; Parker, A.; Veldhuis, M.; Pruneri, V.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an image cytometer (I-CYT) for the analysis of phytoplankton in fresh and marine water environments. A linear quantification of cell numbers was observed covering several orders of magnitude using cultures of Tetraselmis and Nannochloropsis measured by autofluorescence in a laboratory environment. We assessed the functionality of the system outside the laboratory by phytoplankton quantification of samples taken from a marine water environment (Dutch Wadden Sea, The Netherlands) and a fresh water environment (Lake Ijssel, The Netherlands). The I-CYT was also employed to study the effects of two ballast water treatment systems (BWTS), based on chlorine electrolysis and UV sterilization, with the analysis including the vitality of the phytoplankton. For comparative study and benchmarking of the I-CYT, a standard flow cytometer was used. Our results prove a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 cells/ml with an accuracy between 0.7 and 0.5 log, and a correlation of 88.29% in quantification and 96.21% in vitality, with respect to the flow cytometry results. PMID:28271014

  13. CMOS based image cytometry for detection of phytoplankton in ballast water.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J M; Jofre, M; Martínez, P; Yáñez, M A; Catalan, V; Parker, A; Veldhuis, M; Pruneri, V

    2017-02-01

    We introduce an image cytometer (I-CYT) for the analysis of phytoplankton in fresh and marine water environments. A linear quantification of cell numbers was observed covering several orders of magnitude using cultures of Tetraselmis and Nannochloropsis measured by autofluorescence in a laboratory environment. We assessed the functionality of the system outside the laboratory by phytoplankton quantification of samples taken from a marine water environment (Dutch Wadden Sea, The Netherlands) and a fresh water environment (Lake Ijssel, The Netherlands). The I-CYT was also employed to study the effects of two ballast water treatment systems (BWTS), based on chlorine electrolysis and UV sterilization, with the analysis including the vitality of the phytoplankton. For comparative study and benchmarking of the I-CYT, a standard flow cytometer was used. Our results prove a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 cells/ml with an accuracy between 0.7 and 0.5 log, and a correlation of 88.29% in quantification and 96.21% in vitality, with respect to the flow cytometry results.

  14. Study of phytoplankton group distribution in the NW African upwelling system and its relation with hydrographical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Moreno, Daura; Llerandi-García, C.; Pérez-Marrero, J.; Rueda, M. J.; Llinás, O.

    2010-05-01

    Phytoplankton is one important factor in biogeochemical cycles in the ocean, controlling partly the carbon cycle in the ocean. The CO2 captured by phytoplankton in shallow waters is transported to deeper layers in the ocean (Anderson, 2005). This only happens when microplankton or nanoplankton is formed due to their bigger size contributes their sinking to deeper layers. In the case of picoplankton the carbon is recycled in the same zone where is produced. The type of phytoplankton predominant can vary according to hydrographical and chemical properties present (Jeffrey et al., 2005). Pigment speciation can provide valuable ecological information in the form of classification of phytoplanktonic biomass in different groups (chlorophyta, diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophorids or silicoflagellates) organized in different sizes: microphytoplankton (20-200 µm), nanophytoplankton (2-20 µm) and picophytoplankton (0.2-2 µm). There are different data processing methodologies for obtaining these classifications, one of the most accepted is the procedure taken by NASA (Hooker et al., 2005) developed by Vidussi et al. (2001), and also the use of CHEMTAX program (Mackey, 1996). It was studied pigment composition of phytoplankton and several physical and chemical properties, focused in the Northwestern African Upwelling area, including Senegal area, Mauritanian and Cape Blanc area and Morroco area. Pigment composition was analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and determined in different samples in the studied area, with this composition it was obtained phytoplankton classification, according to their size and to the different phytoplankton groups. These results have been related with marine biogeochemical factors presents in studied zone. References: - Anderson, T. Plankton functional type modelling: running before we can walk? Journal of Plankton Research, 2005, 27, 1073-7081 - Hooker, S.; Heukelem, L.; Thomas, C.; Claustre, H.; Ras, J.; Barlow, R.; Sessions

  15. Phytoplankton Communities in Louisiana coastal waters and the continental shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Louisiana coastal waters and the adjacent continental shelf receive large freshwater and nutrient inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, creating favorable conditions for increased phytoplankton productivity. To examine inshore-offshore patterns in phytoplankton comm...

  16. Nutrient and phytoplankton analysis of a Mediterranean coastal area.

    PubMed

    Sebastiá, M T; Rodilla, M

    2013-01-01

    Identifying and quantifying the key anthropogenic nutrient input sources are essential to adopting management measures that can target input for maximum effect in controlling the phytoplankton biomass. In this study, three systems characterized by distinctive main nutrient sources were sampled along a Mediterranean coast transect. These sources were groundwater discharge in the Ahuir area, the Serpis river discharge in the Venecia area, and a submarine wastewater outfall 1,900 m from the coast. The study area includes factors considered important in determining a coastal area as a sensitive area: it has significant nutrient sources, tourism is a major source of income in the region, and it includes an area of high water residence time (Venecia area) which is affected by the harbor facilities and by wastewater discharges. We found that in the Ahuir and the submarine wastewater outfall areas, the effects of freshwater inputs were reduced because of a greater water exchange with the oligotrophic Mediterranean waters. On the other hand, in the Venecia area, the highest levels of nutrient concentration and phytoplankton biomass were attributed to the greatest water residence time. In this enclosed area, harmful dinoflagellates were detected (Alexandrium sp. and Dinophysis caudata). If the planned enlargement of the Gandia Harbor proceeds, it may increase the vulnerability of this system and provide the proper conditions of confinement for the dinoflagellate blooms' development. Management measures should first target phosphorus inputs as this is the most potential-limiting nutrient in the Venecia area and comes from a point source that is easier to control. Finally, we recommend that harbor environmental management plans include regular monitoring of water quality in adjacent waters to identify adverse phytoplankton community changes.

  17. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    PubMed Central

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics. PMID:24240981

  18. Bioprospecting marine plankton.

    PubMed

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-11-14

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  19. Marine biodiversity characteristics.

    PubMed

    Boeuf, Gilles

    2011-05-01

    Oceans contain the largest living volume of the "blue" planet, inhabited by approximately 235-250,000 described species, all groups included. They only represent some 13% of the known species on the Earth, but the marine biomasses are really huge. Marine phytoplankton alone represents half the production of organic matter on Earth while marine bacteria represent more than 10%. Life first appeared in the oceans more than 3.8 billion years ago and several determining events took place that changed the course of life, ranging from the development of the cell nucleus to sexual reproduction going through multi-cellular organisms and the capture of organelles. Of the 31 animal phyla currently listed, 12 are exclusively marine phyla and have never left the ocean. An interesting question is to try to understand why there are so few marine species versus land species? This pattern of distribution seems pretty recent in the course of Evolution. From an exclusively marine world, since the beginning until 440 million years ago, land number of species much increased 110 million years ago. Specific diversity and ancestral roles, in addition to organizational models and original behaviors, have made marine organisms excellent reservoirs for identifying and extracting molecules (>15,000 today) with pharmacological potential. They also make particularly relevant models for both fundamental and applied research. Some marine models have been the source of essential discoveries in life sciences. From this diversity, the ocean provides humankind with renewable resources, which are highly threatened today and need more adequate management to preserve ocean habitats, stocks and biodiversity.

  20. Imaging flow cytometry for phytoplankton analysis.

    PubMed

    Dashkova, Veronika; Malashenkov, Dmitry; Poulton, Nicole; Vorobjev, Ivan; Barteneva, Natasha S

    2017-01-01

    This review highlights the concepts and instrumentation of imaging flow cytometry technology and in particular its use for phytoplankton analysis. Imaging flow cytometry, a hybrid technology combining speed and statistical capabilities of flow cytometry with imaging features of microscopy, is rapidly advancing as a cell imaging platform that overcomes many of the limitations of current techniques and contributed significantly to the advancement of phytoplankton analysis in recent years. This review presents the various instrumentation relevant to the field and currently used for assessment of complex phytoplankton communities' composition and abundance, size structure determination, biovolume estimation, detection of harmful algal bloom species, evaluation of viability and metabolic activity and other applications. Also we present our data on viability and metabolic assessment of Aphanizomenon sp. cyanobacteria using Imagestream X Mark II imaging cytometer. Herein, we highlight the immense potential of imaging flow cytometry for microalgal research, but also discuss limitations and future developments.

  1. The species concept in phytoplankton ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, A.M.; Leatham, T. )

    1992-12-01

    The authors discuss the broad aspects and difficulties of phytoplankton species identification. Phytoplankton ecology relies heavily on the use of taxon-insensitive indicies like chlorophyll a concentration, [sup 14]C incubations, and light-dark bottles for measurement of abundance and productivity. Numerous excellent studies have been done in comparative algal physiology, but none of them actually demonstrate species level differences in the traits of interest. Many of the studies underestimate genetic diversity within taxa because they rely on genotypes that can be cultured and maintained in the laboratory. Significant interclonal variablity is found every time that strains from the same putative taxon are compared, and the magnitude of these differences is not trivial. The authors follow this discussion by detailing several specific ways of approaching speciation in phytoplankton including identifying the ecological significance of morphological traits and ecologically important traits consistently correlated with mprphological features used to distinguish among speiceis or sub-species. 82 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Iron–Nutrient Interactions within Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Schoffman, Hanan; Lis, Hagar; Shaked, Yeala; Keren, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Iron limits photosynthetic activity in up to one third of the world’s oceans and in many fresh water environments. When studying the effects of Fe limitation on phytoplankton or their adaptation to low Fe environments, we must take into account the numerous cellular processes within which this micronutrient plays a central role. Due to its flexible redox chemistry, Fe is indispensable in enzymatic catalysis and electron transfer reactions and is therefore closely linked to the acquisition, assimilation and utilization of essential resources. Iron limitation will therefore influence a wide range of metabolic pathways within phytoplankton, most prominently photosynthesis. In this review, we map out four well-studied interactions between Fe and essential resources: nitrogen, manganese, copper and light. Data was compiled from both field and laboratory studies to shed light on larger scale questions such as the connection between metabolic pathways and ambient iron levels and the biogeographical distribution of phytoplankton species. PMID:27588022

  3. Grazing by meso- and microzooplankton on phytoplankton in the upper reaches of the Schelde estuary (Belgium/The Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionard, M.; Azémar, F.; Boulêtreau, S.; Muylaert, K.; Tackx, M.; Vyverman, W.

    2005-09-01

    In contrast with the marine reaches of estuaries, few studies have dealt with zooplankton grazing on phytoplankton in the upper estuarine reaches, where freshwater zooplankton species tend to dominate the zooplankton community. In spring and early summer 2003, grazing by micro- and mesozooplankton on phytoplankton was investigated at three sites in the upper Schelde estuary. Grazing by mesozooplankton was evaluated by monitoring growth of phytoplankton in 200 μm filtered water in the presence or absence of mesozooplankton. In different experiments, the grazing impact was tested of the calanoïd copepod Eurytemora affinis, the cyclopoid copepods Acanthocyclops robustus and Cyclops vicinus and the cladocera Chydorus sphaericus, Moina affinis and Daphnia magna/ pulex. No significant grazing impact of mesozooplankton in any experiment was found despite the fact that mesozooplankton densities used in the experiments (20 or 40 ind. l -1) were higher than densities in the field (0.1-6.9 ind. l -1). Grazing by microzooplankton was evaluated by comparing growth of phytoplankton in 30 and 200 μm filtered water. Microzooplankton in the 30-200 μm size range included mainly rotifers of the genera Brachionus, Trichocerca and Synchaeta, which were present from 191 to 1777 ind. l -1. Microzooplankton had a significant grazing impact in five out of six experiments. They had a community grazing rate of 0.41-1.83 day -1 and grazed up to 84% of initial phytoplankton standing stock per day. Rotifer clearance rates estimated from microzooplankton community grazing rates and rotifer abundances varied from 8.3 to 41.7 μl ind. -1 h -1. CHEMTAX analysis of accessory pigment data revealed a similar phytoplankton community composition after incubation with and without microzooplankton, indicating non-selective feeding by rotifers on phytoplankton.

  4. Analysis of phytoplankton distribution and community structure in the German Bight with respect to the different size classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollschläger, Jochen; Wiltshire, Karen Helen; Petersen, Wilhelm; Metfies, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Investigation of phytoplankton biodiversity, ecology, and biogeography is crucial for understanding marine ecosystems. Research is often carried out on the basis of microscopic observations, but due to the limitations of this approach regarding detection and identification of picophytoplankton (0.2-2 μm) and nanophytoplankton (2-20 μm), these investigations are mainly focused on the microphytoplankton (20-200 μm). In the last decades, various methods based on optical and molecular biological approaches have evolved which enable a more rapid and convenient analysis of phytoplankton samples and a more detailed assessment of small phytoplankton. In this study, a selection of these methods (in situ fluorescence, flow cytometry, genetic fingerprinting, and DNA microarray) was placed in complement to light microscopy and HPLC-based pigment analysis to investigate both biomass distribution and community structure of phytoplankton. As far as possible, the size classes were analyzed separately. Investigations were carried out on six cruises in the German Bight in 2010 and 2011 to analyze both spatial and seasonal variability. Microphytoplankton was identified as the major contributor to biomass in all seasons, followed by the nanophytoplankton. Generally, biomass distribution was patchy, but the overall contribution of small phytoplankton was higher in offshore areas and also in areas exhibiting higher turbidity. Regarding temporal development of the community, differences between the small phytoplankton community and the microphytoplankton were found. The latter exhibited a seasonal pattern regarding number of taxa present, alpha- and beta-diversity, and community structure, while for the nano- and especially the picophytoplankton, a general shift in the community between both years was observable without seasonality. Although the reason for this shift remains unclear, the results imply a different response of large and small phytoplankton to environmental influences.

  5. The annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winder, M.; Cloern, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial plants are powerful climate sentinels because their annual cycles of growth, reproduction and senescence are finely tuned to the annual climate cycle having a period of one year. Consistency in the seasonal phasing of terrestrial plant activity provides a relatively low-noise background from which phenological shifts can be detected and attributed to climate change. Here, we ask whether phytoplankton biomass also fluctuates over a consistent annual cycle in lake, estuarine-coastal and ocean ecosystems and whether there is a characteristic phenology of phytoplankton as a consistent phase and amplitude of variability. We compiled 125 time series of phytoplankton biomass (chloro-phyll a concentration) from temperate and subtropical zones and used wavelet analysis to extract their dominant periods of variability and the recurrence strength at those periods. Fewer than half (48%) of the series had a dominant 12-month period of variability, commonly expressed as the canonical spring-bloom pattern. About 20 per cent had a dominant six-month period of variability, commonly expressed as the spring and autumn or winter and summer blooms of temperate lakes and oceans. These annual patterns varied in recurrence strength across sites, and did not persist over the full series duration at some sites. About a third of the series had no component of variability at either the six-or 12-month period, reflecting a series of irregular pulses of biomass. These findings show that there is high variability of annual phytoplankton cycles across ecosystems, and that climate-driven annual cycles can be obscured by other drivers of population variability, including human disturbance, aperiodic weather events and strong trophic coupling between phytoplankton and their consumers. Regulation of phytoplankton biomass by multiple processes operating at multiple time scales adds complexity to the challenge of detecting climate-driven trends in aquatic ecosystems where the noise to

  6. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  7. Phytoplankton dynamics with a special emphasis on harmful algal blooms in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Caroppo, Carmela; Cerino, Federica; Auriemma, Rocco; Cibic, Tamara

    2016-07-01

    The response of phytoplankton assemblages to the closure of urban sewage outfalls (USOs) was examined for the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Mediterranean Sea), a productive semi-enclosed coastal marine ecosystem devoted to shellfish farming. Phytoplankton dynamics were investigated in relation to environmental variables, with a particular emphasis on harmful algal blooms (HABs). Recent analyses evidenced a general reduction of the inorganic nutrient loads, except for nitrates and silicates. Also phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a) and abundances were characterized by a decrease of the values, except for the inner area of the basin (second inlet). The phytoplankton composition changed, with nano-sized species, indicators of oligotrophic conditions, becoming dominant over micro-sized species. If the closure of the USOs affected phytoplankton dynamics, however, it did not preserve the Mar Piccolo from HABs and anoxia crises. About 25 harmful species have been detected throughout the years, such as the potentially domoic acid producers Pseudo-nitzschia cf. galaxiae and P seudo-nitzschia cf. multistriata, identified for the first time in these waters. The presence of HABs represents a threat for human health and aquaculture. Urgent initiatives are needed to improve the communication with authorities responsible for environmental protection, economic development, and public health for a sustainable mussel culture in the Mar Piccolo.

  8. Remote sensing of ALGAL pigments to determine coastal phytoplankton dynamics in Florida Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, L.L.; Ambrosia, V.G.

    1997-06-01

    An important component of remote sensing of marine and coastal environments is the detection of phytoplankton to estimate biological activity. Traditionally the focus has been on detection of chlorophyll a, a photosynthetic pigment common to all algal groups. Recent advances in remote sensing instrumentation, in particular the development of hyperspectral imaging sensors, allow detection of additional algal pigments that include taxonomically significant photosynthetic and photoprotective accessory pigments. We are working with the hyperspectral imaging sensor AVIRIS (the Airborne Visible-Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) to characterize phytoplankton blooms in Florida Bay. Our data analysis focuses on intersection of image data (and image-derived spectral data) with our in-house library of algal pigment signatures.

  9. Responses of phytoplankton community to the input of different aerosols in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, X.; Chen, Y.; Wang, B.; Ma, Q. W.; Wang, F. J.

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric deposition can affect marine phytoplankton by supplying macronutrients and trace elements. We conducted mesocosm experiments by adding aerosols with different composition (dominated by mineral dust, biomass burning and high Cu, and secondary aerosol, respectively) to the surface seawater of the East China Sea. Chlorophyll a concentrations were found to be the highest and lowest after adding aerosols containing the highest Fe and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), respectively. The relative abundance of Haptophyceae increased significantly after adding mineral dust, whereas diatom, Dinophyceae and Cryptophyceae reached the maximum accompanied with the highest DIN. Our results suggest that Fe may be more important than DIN in promoting primary productivity in the sampled seawater. The input of mineral dust and anthropogenic aerosols may result in distinct changes of phytoplankton community structure.

  10. Biological weighting function for the inhibition of phytoplankton photosynthesis by ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, John J.; Neale, Patrick J.; Lesser, Michael P.

    1992-01-01

    Severe reduction of stratospheric ozone over Antarctica has focused increasing concern on the biological effects of ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation (280 to 320 nanometers). Measurements of photosynthesis from an experimental system, in which phytoplankton are exposed to a broad range of irradiance treatments, are fit to an analytical model to provide the spectral biological weighting function that can be used to predict the short-term effects of ozone depletion on aquatic photosynthesis. Results show that UVA (320 to 400 nanometers) significantly inhibits the photosynthesis of a marine diatom and a dinoflagellate, and that the effects of UVB are even more severe. Application of the model suggests that the Antarctic ozone hole might reduce near-surface photosynthesis by 12 to 15 percent, but less so at depth. The experimental system makes possible routine estimation of spectral weightings for natural phytoplankton.

  11. Phytoplankton Productivity and Community Structure Changes in the Northern South China Sea during the Last 260 Ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Zhao, M.; Li, L.; Wang, P.

    2010-12-01

    Here we present a molecular organic geochemistry study with core MD05-2904 (19°27.32’N, 116°15.15’E) located in the northern South China Sea. A multi-biomarkers-based approach was applied to assess the paleo-phytoplankton productivity and its community structure, with alkenones, dinosterol, brassicasterol, C30 alkyl diols and cholesterol representing haptophytes, dinoglagellates, diatoms, eustigmatophytes, and zooplankton respectively. The contents of the biomarkers indicate that the productivity of the individual phytoplankton groups generally follow glacial/ interglacial patterns with high values in glacials, and low values in interglacials. The relative abundance of each phytoplanktonic biomarker demonstrates that the community structure of phytoplankton was relatively stable, showing no major glacial-interglacial changes. Diatoms, dinoflagellates and eustigmatophytes, differing from haptophytes, changed similarly. And the phenomenon was prominent over the last 125 ka. Despite the high contents of haptophytes and eustigmatophytes in the sediments, diatoms and dinoflagellates were the main primary producer in the planktonic ecosystem during the last 260 ka. And the spectrum analysis of these biomarkers show strong precession period (23.8ka). These results demonstrate close link between records of paleo-productivity, winter monsoon and insolation. During glacials, strong winter monsoon led to a development of deep-mixing surface layer conditions and a more efficient nutrient cycling, which enhanced marine productivity. While in the interglacials, weaker winter monsoon winds resulted in a more stratified water column and reduced marine productivity. In addition, changes of terrestrial material input may also play a role in marine productivity. However, the mechanisms that control the productivities of individual phytoplankton varieties are still unknown.

  12. Effects and implications of trophic transfer and accumulation of CeO2 nanoparticles in a marine mussel.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jon R; Hanna, Shannon K; Lenihan, Hunter S; Keller, Arturo A

    2014-01-01

    Bivalves are hypothesized to be key organisms in the fate and transport of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in aquatic environments due to their ability to filter and concentrate particles from water, but how different exposure pathways influence their interactions with ENMs is not well understood. In a five-week experiment, we tested how interactions between CeO2 ENMs and a marine mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, are affected through two exposure methods, direct and through sorption to phytoplankton. We found that phytoplankton sorbed ENMs in <1 h. The exposure methods used did not result in significantly different mussel tissue or pseudofeces Ce concentrations. Approximately 99% of CeO2 was captured and excreted in pseudofeces and average pseudofeces mass doubled in response to CeO2 exposure. Final mean dry tissue Ce concentration (±SE) for treatments exposed to 3 mg L(-1) CeO2 directly was 33 ± 9 μg g(-1) Ce, and 0 ± 0, 19 ± 4, 21 ± 3, and 28 ± 5 μg g(-1) for treatments exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 3 mg L(-1) CeO2 sorbed to phytoplankton. Clearance rates increased with CeO2 concentration but decreased over time in groups exposed to CeO2 directly, indicating stress. These results show the feedback between ENM toxicity and transport and the likelihood of biological mediation in the fate and transport of ENMs in aquatic environments.

  13. Diversity of the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase form I gene (rbcL) in natural phytoplankton communities.

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, S L; Campbell, L; Paul, J H

    1997-01-01

    The phytoplankton of the world's oceans play an integral part in global carbon cycling and food webs by conversion of carbon dioxide into organic carbon. They accomplish this task through the action of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). Here we have investigated the phylogenetic diversity in the form I rbcL locus in natural phytoplankton communities of the open ocean and representative clones of marine autotrophic picoplankton by mRNA or DNA amplification and sequencing of a 480 to 483 bp internal fragment of this gene. Five gene sequences were recovered from nucleic acids of natural phytoplankton communities of the Gulf of Mexico. The rbcL genes of two Prochlorococcus isolates and one Synechococcus strain (WH8007) were also sequenced. Sequences were aligned with the database of rbcL genes and subjected to both neighbor-joining and parsimony analyses. The five sequences from the natural phytoplankton community spanned nearly the entire diversity of characterized form I rbcL genes, with some sequences closely related to isolates such as Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus (forms IA and I) and prymnesiophyte algae (form ID), while other sequences were deeply rooted. Unexpectedly, the deep euphotic zone contained an organism that possesses a transcriptionally active rbcL gene closely related to that of a recently characterized manganese-oxidizing bacterium, suggesting that such chemoautotrophs may contribute to the diversity of carbon-fixing organisms in the marine euphotic zone. PMID:9293012

  14. Patterns and multi-scale drivers of phytoplankton species richness in temperate peri-urban lakes.

    PubMed

    Catherine, Arnaud; Selma, Maloufi; Mouillot, David; Troussellier, Marc; Bernard, Cécile

    2016-07-15

    Local species richness (SR) is a key characteristic affecting ecosystem functioning. Yet, the mechanisms regulating phytoplankton diversity in freshwater ecosystems are not fully understood, especially in peri-urban environments where anthropogenic pressures strongly impact the quality of aquatic ecosystems. To address this issue, we sampled the phytoplankton communities of 50 lakes in the Paris area (France) characterized by a large gradient of physico-chemical and catchment-scale characteristics. We used large phytoplankton datasets to describe phytoplankton diversity patterns and applied a machine-learning algorithm to test the degree to which species richness patterns are potentially controlled by environmental factors. Selected environmental factors were studied at two scales: the lake-scale (e.g. nutrients concentrations, water temperature, lake depth) and the catchment-scale (e.g. catchment, landscape and climate variables). Then, we used a variance partitioning approach to evaluate the interaction between lake-scale and catchment-scale variables in explaining local species richness. Finally, we analysed the residuals of predictive models to identify potential vectors of improvement of phytoplankton species richness predictive models. Lake-scale and catchment-scale drivers provided similar predictive accuracy of local species richness (R(2)=0.458 and 0.424, respectively). Both models suggested that seasonal temperature variations and nutrient supply strongly modulate local species richness. Integrating lake- and catchment-scale predictors in a single predictive model did not provide increased predictive accuracy; therefore suggesting that the catchment-scale model probably explains observed species richness variations through the impact of catchment-scale variables on in-lake water quality characteristics. Models based on catchment characteristics, which include simple and easy to obtain variables, provide a meaningful way of predicting phytoplankton species

  15. Review: phytoplankton primary production in the world's estuarine-coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloern, J. E.; Foster, S. Q.; Kleckner, A. E.

    2013-11-01

    Estuaries are biogeochemical hot spots because they receive large inputs of nutrients and organic carbon from land and oceans to support high rates of metabolism and primary production. We synthesize published rates of annual phytoplankton primary production (APPP) in marine ecosystems influenced by connectivity to land - estuaries, bays, lagoons, fjords and inland seas. Review of the scientific literature produced a compilation of 1148 values of APPP derived from monthly incubation assays to measure carbon assimilation or oxygen production. The median value of median APPP measurements in 131 ecosystems is 185 and the mean is 252 g C m-2 yr-1, but the range is large: from -105 (net pelagic production in the Scheldt Estuary) to 1890 g C m-2 yr-1 (net phytoplankton production in Tamagawa Estuary). APPP varies up to 10-fold within ecosystems and 5-fold from year-to-year (but we only found 8 APPP series longer than a decade so our knowledge of decadal-scale variability is limited). We use studies of individual places to build a conceptual model that integrates the mechanisms generating this large variability: nutrient supply, light limitation by turbidity, grazing by consumers, and physical processes (river inflow, ocean exchange, and inputs of heat, light and wind energy). We consider method as another source of variability because the compilation includes values derived from widely differing protocols. A simulation model shows that different methods can yield up to 3-fold variability depending on incubation protocols and methods for integrating measured rates over time and depth. Although attempts have been made to upscale measures of estuarine-coastal APPP, the empirical record is inadequate for yielding reliable global estimates. The record is deficient in three ways. First, it is highly biased by the large number of measurements made in northern Europe (particularly the Baltic region) and North America. Of the 1148 reported values of APPP, 958 come from sites

  16. Protist community composition during early phytoplankton blooms in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area (Southern Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, C.; Monchy, S.; Genitsaris, S.; Christaki, U.

    2014-10-01

    Microbial eukaryotic community composition was examined by 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing, during the early phase of spring phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization, off Kerguelen Island in the Southern Ocean (KEOPS2 cruise). A total of 999 operational taxonomical units (OTUs), affiliated to 30 known high-level taxonomic groups, were retrieved from 16 samples collected in the upper 300 m water column. The alveolata group was the most abundant in terms of sequence number and diversity (696 OTUs). The majority of alveolata sequences were affiliated to Dinophyceae and to two major groups of marine alveolates (MALV-I and MALV-II). In the upper 180 m, only 13% of the OTUs were shared between of the fertilized stations and the reference site characterized by high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters. Fungi and Cercozoa were present in iron-fertilized waters, but almost absent in the HNLC samples, while Haptophyta and Chlorophyta characterized the HNLC sample. Finally, the 300 m depth samples of all stations were differentiated by the presence of MALV-II and Radiolaria. Multivariate analysis, examining the level of similarity between different samples, showed that protistan assemblages differed significantly between the HNLC and iron-fertilized stations, but also between the diverse iron-fertilized blooms.

  17. Protist community composition during early phytoplankton blooms in the naturally iron-fertilized Kerguelen area (Southern Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georges, C.; Monchy, S.; Genitsaris, S.; Christaki, U.

    2014-07-01

    Microbial eukaryotic community composition was examined by 18S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing, during the early phase of spring phytoplankton blooms induced by natural iron fertilization, off Kerguelen Island in the Southern Ocean (KEOPS2 cruise). A total of 999 operational taxonomical units (OTUs), affiliated to 30 known high-level taxonomic groups, were retrieved from 16 samples collected in the upper 300 m water column. The alveolata group was the most abundant in terms of sequence number and diversity (696 OTUs). The majority of alveolata sequences were affiliated to Dinophyceae and to two major groups of marine alveolates (MALV-I and MALV-II). In the upper 180 m, only 13% of the OTUs were shared between of the fertilized stations and the reference site characterized by high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters. Fungi and Cercozoa were present in iron-fertilized waters, but almost absent in the HNLC samples, while Haptophyta and Chlorophyta characterized the HNLC sample. Finally, the 300 m depth samples of all stations were differentiated by the presence of MALV-II and Radiolaria. Multivariate analysis, examining the level of similarity between different samples, showed that protistan assemblages differed significantly between the HNLC and iron-fertilized stations, but also between the diverse iron-fertilized blooms.

  18. Investigating the Benthic Foraminiferal Stilostomellid Extinction and Mid Pleistocene Phytoplankton Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kender, S.; Elmore, A.; McClymont, E.; Elderfield, H.; Emmanuel, D.

    2014-12-01

    As global climate cooled during the Mid Pleistocene Transition (MPT, ~1.1-0.6 Ma), the last great extinction of benthic foraminifera occurred. The so-called 'Stilostomella Extinction' saw the disappearance of almost two families of elongated uniserial species with distinctive apertural architecture. The stepwise extinction consisted of a gradual disappearance at different water depths and ocean basins over successive glacials. Understanding the causes of this extinction has proven difficult, in part because ecological preferences are not well known, and because their extinction has not been documented in high resolution along with other paleoenvironmental proxies. For instance, one hypothesis for the extinction is lowering bottom water temperature. We present new high-resolution (~5 ka time step) benthic foraminiferal data from ODP Site 593 in the Tasman Sea (~1068 m water depth) through the MPT, and compare with new intermediate water temperature (benthic Mg/Ca) and surface water productivity proxies (nannofossil assemblages and sediment pigment analyses). Extinction group occurrences do not correlate with intermediate water temperature. There are, however, clear changes in surface water productivity associated with the final phase of the extinction, at ~0.85 Ma. Pigments increase in abundance, indicating elevated glacial productivity across the MPT. Coccolith assemblages shift towards small Gephyrocapsa spp., and extinction occurs within the Reticulofenestra, both of which are global events. Comparisons with the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean extinction data indicates 0.85 Ma as a critical time interval in the global Stilostomella Extinction. This evidence strengthens the hypothesis that changes in the type of organic carbon reaching the sea floor, driven by reorganization within marine phytoplankton communities, may have been linked to the disappearance of the extinction group.

  19. Persistent marine debris in the North Sea, Northwest Atlantic Ocean, Wider Caribbean Area, and the West Coast of Baja California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heneman, B.

    1988-07-01

    Information on persistent marine debris (including plastics, glass, metal, and tar) in four study areas (North Sea, northwest Atlantic Ocean, Wider Caribbean Area, and the west coast of Baja California) was obtained through literature searches, a mailed survey, correspondence, interviews, and personal observations. All of the study areas except Baja California were found to have severe marine debris problems.

  20. Using phytoplankton`s fluorescence for remote detection of radioactive pollutions in the ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Tsipenyuk, D.Yu.

    1996-08-01

    One of important ecological problems of our world is unfortunately radioactive pollutions in the ocean from sources of different types. For successful solving this problem it is important to locate precisely pollution areas using remote sensing methods. In the experiments performed we investigated the changes in fluorescence spectra of phytoplankton under an action of radiation. For this purpose we compared fluorescence spectra of samples of phytoplankton`s that were grown and maintained under the same conditions (light temperature, etc.) and the only difference between these samples was different radioactive doze obtained. Gamma irradiations of the samples was performed by bremsstrahlung of 30 Mev electrons or gamma-rays from (Ra-Be)- neutron source. To obtain reliable quantitative results the samples were simultaneously irradiated at different distances from the bremsstrahlung target or radioactive source. In such a way we could avoid possible errors due to different state of phytoplankton and temporal changes of gamma-radiation. The fluorescence spectra of phytoplankton were exited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. An optical system focused fluorescence onto the entry slit of the polychromator of optical multichannel spectrum analyzer. A diffraction grating with a relatively weak dispersion (150 lines/mm) was used to record simultaneously spectra in a rather wide range of wavelengths (370-720 nm). We found in our experiments that very characteristic changes were relevant in fluorescence spectra of phytoplankton under radioactive influence in registered range of wavelength. Thus it is possible to use active and passive remote sensing methods of registration of phytoplankton`s fluorescence for express remote location areas of radioactive pollutions in the ocean from satellites or aircrafts.

  1. Remote sensing of phytoplankton using laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Babichenko, S.; Poryvkina, L.; Arikese, V. ); Kaitala, S. ); Kuosa, H. )

    1993-06-01

    The results of remote laser sensing of brackish-water phytoplankton on board a research vessel are presented. Field data of laser-induced fluorescence of phytoplankton obtained during the several cruises in the mouth of tile Gulf of Finland are compared with the results of standard chlorophyll a analysis of water samples and phytoplankton species determination by microscopy. The approach of fluorescence excitation by tunable laser radiation is applied to study the spatial distribution of a natural phytoplankton community. The remote analysis of the pigment composition of a phytoplankton community using the method of selective pigment excitation is described. The possibility of elaborating methods of quantitative laser remote biomonitoring is discussed.

  2. Phytoplankton off the West Coast of Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Just off the coast of West Africa, persistent northeasterly trade winds often churn up deep ocean water. When the nutrients in these deep waters reach the ocean's surface, they often give rise to large blooms of phytoplankton. This image of the Mauritanian coast shows swirls of phytoplankton fed by the upwelling of nutrient-rich water. The scene was acquired by the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) aboard the European Space Agency's ENVISAT. MERIS will monitor changes in phytoplankton across Earth's oceans and seas, both for the purpose of managing fisheries and conducting global change research. NASA scientists will use data from this European instrument in the Sensor Intercomparison and Merger for Biological and Interdisciplinary Oceanic Studies (SIMBIOS) program. The mission of SIMBIOS is to construct a consistent long-term dataset of ocean color (phytoplankton abundance) measurements made by multiple satellite instruments, including the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). For more information about MERIS and ENVISAT, visit the ENVISAT home page. Image copyright European Space Agency

  3. Phytoplankton in the northwestern Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanova, I. N.; Flint, M. V.; Druzhkova, E. I.; Sazhin, A. F.; Sergeeva, V. M.

    2015-07-01

    Studies were conducted in the northwestern Kara Sea in late September of 2007 and 2011. The assessment of species, size, structure, abundance, and biomass of phytoplankton and the role of autotrophic and heterotrophic components in phytocenoses was conducted. The abundance of autotrophic micro-, nanoand picoplankton increased by more than an order of magnitude in each of the following smaller-sized groups of algae. Microphytoplankton dominated in the total biomass of autotrophic phytoplankton. The wet biomass of microphytoplankton was 2.5 times higher than the wet biomass of nanophytoplankton and 5 times higher than that of picoplankton. Nanophytoplankton dominated in abundance and biomass in the heterotrophic component of phytoplankton. The ratio of the total abundance of autotrophic and heterotrophic phytotoplankton was 7: 1, the ratio of the wet biomass of the both groups was 2.5: 1, and the proportion of the carbon biomass was 2: 1. Three biotopes were distinguished in the area of the outer shelf, the continental slope, and the deepwater area adjacent to the St. Anna Trough, which differed in composition and quantitative characteristics of phytocenoses. Frontal zones dividing the biotopes are characterized by high phytoplankton biomass and the dominance of diatoms in the community (more than 40% of the total biomass), which indicates the local availability of "new" nutrients for planktonic algae.

  4. Color Difference in Bering Sea Phytoplankton Blooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    There is considerable color variation in the phytoplankton blooms in the Bering Sea -- from the aquamarine west of Nunivak Island to the almost reddish patch west of St. Matthew Island to the green eddy astride the International dateline at 60 North latitude and 178 East longitude. Credit: Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  5. Earth's Most Important Producers: Meet the Phytoplankton!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrero, Meghan E.; Stevens, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The ocean is home to some of Earth's most important producers. Single-celled organisms in the ocean are responsible for more than half of Earth's productivity, as well as most of its oxygen. Phytoplankton are single-celled, plantlike organisms. That is, they have chloroplasts and perform photosynthesis, but are not true plants, which are typically…

  6. Effect of Phytoplankton Richness on Phytoplankton Biomass Is Weak Where the Distribution of Herbivores is Patchy

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Jerome J.

    2016-01-01

    Positive effects of competitor species richness on competitor productivity can be more pronounced at a scale that includes heterogeneity in ‘bottom-up’ environmental factors, such as the supply of limiting nutrients. The effect of species richness is not well understood in landscapes where variation in ‘top-down’ factors, such as the abundance of predators or herbivores, has a strong influence competitor communities. I asked how phytoplankton species richness directly influenced standing phytoplankton biomass in replicate microcosm regions where one patch had a population of herbivores (Daphnia pulicaria) and one patch did not have herbivores. The effect of phytoplankton richness on standing phytoplankton biomass was positive but weak and not statistically significant at this regional scale. Among no-Daphnia patches, there was a significant positive effect of phytoplankton richness that resulted from positive selection effects for two dominant and productive species in polycultures. Among with-Daphnia patches there was not a significant effect of phytoplankton richness. The same two species dominated species-rich polycultures in no- and with-Daphnia patches but both species were relatively vulnerable to consumption by Daphnia. Consistent with previous studies, this experiment shows a measurable positive influence of primary producer richness on biomass when herbivores were absent. It also shows that given the patchy distribution of herbivores at a regional scale, a regional positive effect was not detected. PMID:27196376

  7. Temperature influence on phytoplankton community growth rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Elliot; Moore, J. Keith; Primeau, Francois; Tanouye, David

    2016-04-01

    A large database of field estimates of phytoplankton community growth rates in natural populations was compiled and analyzed to determine the apparent temperature effect on phytoplankton community growth rate. We conducted an ordinary least squares regression to optimize the parameters in two commonly used growth-temperature relations (Arrhenius and Q10 models). Both equations fit the observational data equally with the optimized parameter values. The optimum apparent Q10 value was 1.47 ± 0.08 (95% confidence interval, CI). Microzooplankton grazing rates closely matched the temperature trends for phytoplankton growth. This likely reflects a dynamic adjustment of biomass and grazing rates by the microzooplankton to match their available food source, illustrating tight coupling of phytoplankton growth and microzooplankton grazing rates. The field-measured temperature effect and growth rates were compared with estimates from the satellite Carbon-based Productivity Model (CbPM) and three Earth System Models (ESMs), with model output extracted at the same month and sampling locations as the observations. The optimized, apparent Q10 value calculated for the CbPM was 1.51, with overestimation of growth rates. The apparent Q10 value in the Community Earth System Model (V1.0) was 1.65, with modest underestimation of growth rates. The GFDL-ESM2M and GFDL-ESM2G models produced apparent Q10 values of 1.52 and 1.39, respectively. Models with an apparent Q10 that is significantly greater than ~1.5 will overestimate the phytoplankton community growth response to the ongoing climate warming and will have spatial biases in estimated growth rates for the current era.

  8. Mixotrophy in the Marine Plankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoecker, Diane K.; Hansen, Per Juel; Caron, David A.; Mitra, Aditee

    2017-01-01

    Mixotrophs are important components of the bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and (sometimes) zooplankton in coastal and oceanic waters. Bacterivory among the phytoplankton may be important for alleviating inorganic nutrient stress and may increase primary production in oligotrophic waters. Mixotrophic phytoflagellates and dinoflagellates are often dominant components of the plankton during seasonal stratification. Many of the microzooplankton grazers, including ciliates and Rhizaria, are mixotrophic owing to their retention of functional algal organelles or maintenance of algal endosymbionts. Phototrophy among the microzooplankton may increase gross growth efficiency and carbon transfer through the microzooplankton to higher trophic levels. Characteristic assemblages of mixotrophs are associated with warm, temperate, and cold seas and with stratification, fronts, and upwelling zones. Modeling has indicated that mixotrophy has a profound impact on marine planktonic ecosystems and may enhance primary production, biomass transfer to higher trophic levels, and the functioning of the biological carbon pump.

  9. Phytoplankton Productivity Across Prairie Saline Lakes of the Great Plains (USA): A Step Toward Deciphering Patterns Through Lake Classification Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-20

    chromatography ( Dionex ICS-90). In the field, whole water samples were collected for total P and total N and acidified with H2SO4. Samples for total dissolved...explanatory power to model phytoplankton re- sponse in these chemically complex systems. Unlike marine systems, the dominant ions in saline lakes...subsaline). Lakes were se- lected to maximize variation in conductivity, ion composi- tion, and nutrient concentrations. In the spring, these lakes were

  10. Sensitivity of Ocean Reflectance Inversion Models for Identifying and Discriminating Between Phytoplankton Functional Groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werdell, P. Jeremy; Ooesler, Collin S.

    2012-01-01

    The daily, synoptic images provided by satellite ocean color instruments provide viable data streams for observing changes in the biogeochemistrY of marine ecosystems. Ocean reflectance inversion models (ORMs) provide a common mechanism for inverting the "color" of the water observed a satellite into marine inherent optical properties (lOPs) through a combination of empiricism and radiative transfer theory. lOPs, namely the spectral absorption and scattering characteristics of ocean water and its dissolved and particulate constituents, describe the contents of the upper ocean, information critical for furthering scientific understanding of biogeochemical oceanic processes. Many recent studies inferred marine particle sizes and discriminated between phytoplankton functional groups using remotely-sensed lOPs. While all demonstrated the viability of their approaches, few described the vertical distributions of the water column constituents under consideration and, thus, failed to report the biophysical conditions under which their model performed (e.g., the depth and thickness of the phytoplankton bloom(s)). We developed an ORM to remotely identifY Noctiluca miliaris and other phytoplankton functional types using satellite ocean color data records collected in the northern Arabian Sea. Here, we present results from analyses designed to evaluate the applicability and sensitivity of the ORM to varied biophysical conditions. Specifically, we: (1) synthesized a series of vertical profiles of spectral inherent optical properties that represent a wide variety of bio-optical conditions for the northern Arabian Sea under aN Miliaris bloom; (2) generated spectral remote-sensing reflectances from these profiles using Hydrolight; and, (3) applied the ORM to the synthesized reflectances to estimate the relative concentrations of diatoms and N Miliaris for each example. By comparing the estimates from the inversion model to those from synthesized vertical profiles, we were able to

  11. Numerical Modeling of the Effects of Nutrient-rich Coastal-water Input on the Phytoplankton in the Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, A.; Rivas, D.

    2015-12-01

    Phytoplankton bloom dynamics depends on the interactions of favorable physical, chemical, and biotic conditions, particularly on the available nutrients that enhance phytoplankton growth, like nitrogen. Costal and estuarine environments are heavily influenced by exogenous sources of nitrogen; the anthropogenic inputs include urban and rural wastewater coming from agricultural activities (i.e., fertilizers and animal waste). In response, new production is often enhanced, leading eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms, including harmful taxa. These events have become more frequent, and with it the interest to evaluate their effects on marine ecosystems and the impact on human health. In the Gulf of California the harmful algal blooms (HABs) had affected aquaculture, fisheries, and even tourism, thereby it is important to generate information about biological and physical factors that can influence their appearance. A numerical model is a tool that may bring key information about the origin and distribution of phytoplankton blooms. Herein the analysis is based on a three-dimensional, hydrodynamical numerical model, coupled to a Nitrogen-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model. Several numerical simulations using different forcing and scenarios are carried out in order to evaluate the processes that influence the phytoplankton growth. These numerical results are compared to available observations. Thus, the main environmental factors triggering the generation of HABs can be identified.

  12. Growth and Phenomenology of Phytoplankton Thin Layers in the Gulf of Maine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Phytoplankton Thin Layers in the Gulf of Maine 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Maine,School of Marine Sciences,193 Clark? s Cove Road...Walpole,ME,04573-3307 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S

  13. An Inverse Modeling Approach to Estimating Phytoplankton Pigment Concentrations from Phytoplankton Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moisan, John R.; Moisan, Tiffany A. H.; Linkswiler, Matthew A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplankton absorption spectra and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigment observations from the Eastern U.S. and global observations from NASA's SeaBASS archive are used in a linear inverse calculation to extract pigment-specific absorption spectra. Using these pigment-specific absorption spectra to reconstruct the phytoplankton absorption spectra results in high correlations at all visible wavelengths (r(sup 2) from 0.83 to 0.98), and linear regressions (slopes ranging from 0.8 to 1.1). Higher correlations (r(sup 2) from 0.75 to 1.00) are obtained in the visible portion of the spectra when the total phytoplankton absorption spectra are unpackaged by multiplying the entire spectra by a factor that sets the total absorption at 675 nm to that expected from absorption spectra reconstruction using measured pigment concentrations and laboratory-derived pigment-specific absorption spectra. The derived pigment-specific absorption spectra were further used with the total phytoplankton absorption spectra in a second linear inverse calculation to estimate the various phytoplankton HPLC pigments. A comparison between the estimated and measured pigment concentrations for the 18 pigment fields showed good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.5) for 7 pigments and very good correlations (r(sup 2) greater than 0.7) for chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin. Higher correlations result when the analysis is carried out at more local geographic scales. The ability to estimate phytoplankton pigments using pigment-specific absorption spectra is critical for using hyperspectral inverse models to retrieve phytoplankton pigment concentrations and other Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) from passive remote sensing observations.

  14. Control of phytoplankton in a shelf sea: Determination of the main drivers based on the Helgoland Roads Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire, Karen H.; Boersma, Maarten; Carstens, Kristine; Kraberg, Alexandra C.; Peters, Silvia; Scharfe, Mirco

    2015-11-01

    Studies on what controls phytoplankton in shallow coastal seas are increasingly important in the context of current climate change. We analysed the daily long term data for Helgoland Roads, since 1962, to determine the main drivers of phytoplankton growth. Helgoland Roads is one of the few marine time series with an unbroken, highly resolved (work-daily) record of abiotic, biotic and hydrological parameters. All data for 50 years (1962-2011) of phytoplankton, diatoms, flagellates, zooplankton, nutrients, temperature and salinity, as well as light were analysed. The dominating factors, both with regard to timing and diatom numbers were light availability (Secchi depth), temperature and zooplankton. Annual patterns of temperature, Secchi, radiation and sunshine hours were found to be related. Salinity reduction in spring was attributed to riverine input in late winter. Secchi depth is driven mainly by meteorological and hydrographic conditions. We found that with a shift from low to high Secchi between weeks 12-18, the diatom spring bloom usually starts. The timing of phytoplankton occurrence was significantly correlated to Secchi values. Cumulative abundance growth patterns of microalgae are low/high with low/high temperatures and Secchi. In the early weeks of the year high temperatures lead to lower phytoplankton abundance. Zooplankton growth was found to follow diatom growth. Cumulative algal abundance growth patterns were low/high with high/low zooplankton. In the early and late weeks of the year, low zooplankton leads to longer algal growing periods. High zooplankton in spring results in a later start of algal growth. Nutrients were taken up from the water column in the following order: Silicate, phosphate, and nitrate, and this uptake follows the algal growth curves. Different algal species show different growth requirements for underwater light and temperature. The overall phytoplankton growth has shifted in 2001-2011 to longer growing periods with a less

  15. Constraints on values of biological parameters by observed turbulence in a quasi-2D phytoplankton model of the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn-Woernle, Lisa; Dijkstra, Henk A.; van der Woerd, Hans J.

    2013-04-01

    Constraints on values of biological parameters by observed turbulence in a quasi-2D phytoplankton model of the North Atlantic Session and Session Number: Scaling and complex Physical and Biogeophysical Processes in the Atmosphere, Ocean and climate (NP3.1) Preferred Mode of Presentation: Oral Lisa Hahn-Woernle¹, Henk A. Dijkstra¹ & Hans J. van der Woerd² 1. Institute for Marine and Atmospheric research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht, The Netherlands. 2. Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands. During the STRATIPHYT cruises in Summer 2009 and Spring 2011 in-situ plankton and nutrient concentrations as well as upper-ocean turbulence characteristics were measured from Las Palmas to Reykjavik [1,2]. The measurements agree with previous findings that the incoming light intensity and the stratification of the upper ocean set important conditions for the initiation of the phytoplankton bloom close to the surface and also for a possible shift to a deep chlorophyll maximum below the mixed layer. These strong characteristic spatial patterns and temporal cycles of phytoplankton surface concentration are also observed in satellite images of chlorophyll-a concentration in the Northern Atlantic. To understand the meridional depth (upper 200 m) variation of the phytoplankton distributions, a quasi-2D phytoplankton model was used. The results indicate that with the given profiles of the turbulent vertical mixing coefficient, only a very limited interval for the biological model parameters leads to the observed depth of the phytoplankton maximum. [1] E. Jurado, H. van der Woerd and H. A. Dijkstra, Microstructure measurements along a quasi-meridional transect in the North Atlantic, J. Geophysical Res. Oceans, 117, C04016, doi:10.1029/2011JC007137, (2012). [2] E. Jurado, H. A. Dijkstra and H. van der Woerd, Microstructure observations during the spring 2011 STRATIPHYT-II cruise in the

  16. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years

    PubMed Central

    Crampton, James S.; Cody, Rosie D.; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate “baseline” variability on glacial–interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations. PMID:27274061

  17. Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice

    PubMed Central

    Assmy, Philipp; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Duarte, Pedro; Meyer, Amelie; Randelhoff, Achim; Mundy, Christopher J.; Olsen, Lasse M.; Kauko, Hanna M.; Bailey, Allison; Chierici, Melissa; Cohen, Lana; Doulgeris, Anthony P.; Ehn, Jens K.; Fransson, Agneta; Gerland, Sebastian; Hop, Haakon; Hudson, Stephen R.; Hughes, Nick; Itkin, Polona; Johnsen, Geir; King, Jennifer A.; Koch, Boris P.; Koenig, Zoe; Kwasniewski, Slawomir; Laney, Samuel R.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Provost, Christine; Rösel, Anja; Sandbu, Marthe; Spreen, Gunnar; Smedsrud, Lars H.; Sundfjord, Arild; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef; Wagner, Penelope M.; Wold, Anette; Steen, Harald; Granskog, Mats A.

    2017-01-01

    The Arctic icescape is rapidly transforming from a thicker multiyear ice cover to a thinner and largely seasonal first-year ice cover with significant consequences for Arctic primary production. One critical challenge is to understand how productivity will change within the next decades. Recent studies have reported extensive phytoplankton blooms beneath ponded sea ice during summer, indicating that satellite-based Arctic annual primary production estimates may be significantly underestimated. Here we present a unique time-series of a phytoplankton spring bloom observed beneath snow-covered Arctic pack ice. The bloom, dominated by the haptophyte algae Phaeocystis pouchetii, caused near depletion of the surface nitrate inventory and a decline in dissolved inorganic carbon by 16 ± 6 g C m−2. Ocean circulation characteristics in the area indicated that the bloom developed in situ despite the snow-covered sea ice. Leads in the dynamic ice cover provided added sunlight necessary to initiate and sustain the bloom. Phytoplankton blooms beneath snow-covered ice might become more common and widespread in the future Arctic Ocean with frequent lead formation due to thinner and more dynamic sea ice despite projected increases in high-Arctic snowfall. This could alter productivity, marine food webs and carbon sequestration in the Arctic Ocean. PMID:28102329

  18. Interannual Variation in Phytoplankton Concentration and Community in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseaux, C. S.; Gregg, W. W.

    2011-01-01

    Climate events such as El Nino have been shown to have an effect on the biology of our ocean. Because of the lack of data, we still have very little knowledge about the spatial and temporal effect these climate events may have on biological marine systems. In this study, we used the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM) to assess the interannual variability in phytoplankton community in the Pacific Ocean between 1998 and 2005. In the North Central and Equatorial Pacific Ocean, changes in the Multivariate El Nino Index were associated with changes in phytoplankton composition. The model identified an increase in diatoms of approx.33 % in the equatorial Pacific in 1999 during a La Nina event. This increase in diatoms coincided with a decrease of approx.11 % in cyanobacteria concentration. The inverse relationship between cyanobacteria and diatoms concentration was significant (p<0.05) throughout the period of study. The use of a numerical model allows us to assess the impact climate variability has on key phytoplankton groups known to lead to contrasting food chain at a spatial and temporal resolution unachievable when relying solely on in-situ observations.

  19. Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assmy, Philipp; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Duarte, Pedro; Meyer, Amelie; Randelhoff, Achim; Mundy, Christopher J.; Olsen, Lasse M.; Kauko, Hanna M.; Bailey, Allison; Chierici, Melissa; Cohen, Lana; Doulgeris, Anthony P.; Ehn, Jens K.; Fransson, Agneta; Gerland, Sebastian; Hop, Haakon; Hudson, Stephen R.; Hughes, Nick; Itkin, Polona; Johnsen, Geir; King, Jennifer A.; Koch, Boris P.; Koenig, Zoe; Kwasniewski, Slawomir; Laney, Samuel R.; Nicolaus, Marcel; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Polashenski, Christopher M.; Provost, Christine; Rösel, Anja; Sandbu, Marthe; Spreen, Gunnar; Smedsrud, Lars H.; Sundfjord, Arild; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef; Wagner, Penelope M.; Wold, Anette; Steen, Harald; Granskog, Mats A.

    2017-01-01

    The Arctic icescape is rapidly transforming from a thicker multiyear ice cover to a thinner and largely seasonal first-year ice cover with significant consequences for Arctic primary production. One critical challenge is to understand how productivity will change within the next decades. Recent studies have reported extensive phytoplankton blooms beneath ponded sea ice during summer, indicating that satellite-based Arctic annual primary production estimates may be significantly underestimated. Here we present a unique time-series of a phytoplankton spring bloom observed beneath snow-covered Arctic pack ice. The bloom, dominated by the haptophyte algae Phaeocystis pouchetii, caused near depletion of the surface nitrate inventory and a decline in dissolved inorganic carbon by 16 ± 6 g C m‑2. Ocean circulation characteristics in the area indicated that the bloom developed in situ despite the snow-covered sea ice. Leads in the dynamic ice cover provided added sunlight necessary to initiate and sustain the bloom. Phytoplankton blooms beneath snow-covered ice might become more common and widespread in the future Arctic Ocean with frequent lead formation due to thinner and more dynamic sea ice despite projected increases in high-Arctic snowfall. This could alter productivity, marine food webs and carbon sequestration in the Arctic Ocean.

  20. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years.

    PubMed

    Crampton, James S; Cody, Rosie D; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R

    2016-06-21

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate "baseline" variability on glacial-interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations.

  1. Unusual phytoplankton bloom phenology in the northern Greenland Sea during 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Bo; Gabric, Albert J.; Lu, Zhifeng; Li, Hehe; Zhao, Li

    2016-12-01

    Arctic marine ecosystems are disproportionately impacted by global warming. Sea ice plays an important role in the regional climate system and the loss of perennial sea ice has diverse ecological implications. Here we investigate the causes of an unusually early and strong phytoplankton bloom in the northern Greenland Sea (20°W-10°E, 75°N-80°N) during the 2010 season. In order to better understand the anomalous bloom in 2010, we examine the correlation between satellite-derived biomass and several possible environmental factors for the period 2003-2012. Results show that the timing of sea ice melt played an important role in promoting the growth of phytoplankton. Multivariate lagged regression analysis shows that phytoplankton biomass (CHL) is correlated with ice concentration (ICE) and ice melting, as well as sea surface temperature (SST) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). During 2010, the spring peak in biomass came much earlier and achieved a higher value than most other years in the satellite archive record, which was due to earlier and more extensive sea ice melt in that year. Relative lower SST and PAR in spring and early summer in year 2010 associated with a persistent negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index were possible drivers of the bloom. Wind direction changed from the southeast to southwest direction in spring, possibly transporting nutrient enriched melt runoff from glaciers on Greenland and other sources from the south to northern coastal regions.

  2. Southern Ocean phytoplankton turnover in response to stepwise Antarctic cooling over the past 15 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampton, James S.; Cody, Rosie D.; Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; McKay, Robert; Naish, Tim R.

    2016-06-01

    It is not clear how Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities, which form the base of the marine food web and are a crucial element of the carbon cycle, respond to major environmental disturbance. Here, we use a new model ensemble reconstruction of diatom speciation and extinction rates to examine phytoplankton response to climate change in the southern high latitudes over the past 15 My. We identify five major episodes of species turnover (origination rate plus extinction rate) that were coincident with times of cooling in southern high-latitude climate, Antarctic ice sheet growth across the continental shelves, and associated seasonal sea-ice expansion across the Southern Ocean. We infer that past plankton turnover occurred when a warmer-than-present climate was terminated by a major period of glaciation that resulted in loss of open-ocean habitat south of the polar front, driving non-ice adapted diatoms to regional or global extinction. These findings suggest, therefore, that Southern Ocean phytoplankton communities tolerate “baseline” variability on glacial-interglacial timescales but are sensitive to large-scale changes in mean climate state driven by a combination of long-period variations in orbital forcing and atmospheric carbon dioxide perturbations.

  3. Phytoplankton blooms on the western shelf of Tasmania: evidence of a highly productive ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kämpf, J.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite-derived chlorophyll a data using the standard NASA-OC3 (ocean colour) algorithm are strongly biased by coloured dissolved organic matter and suspended sediment of river discharges, which is a particular problem for the western Tasmanian shelf. This work reconstructs phytoplankton blooms in the study region using a quadratic regression between OC3 data and chlorophyll fluorescence based on the fluorescence line height (FLH) data. This regression is derived from satellite data of the nearby Bonney upwelling region, which is devoid of river influences. To this end, analyses of 10 years of MODIS-aqua satellite data reveal the existence of a highly productive ecosystem on the western Tasmanian shelf. The region normally experiences two phytoplankton blooms per annum. The first bloom occurs during late austral summer months as a consequence of upwelling-favourable coastal winds. Hence, the western Tasmanian shelf forms a previously unknown upwelling centre of the regional upwelling system, known as Great South Australian Coastal Upwelling System. The second phytoplankton bloom is a classical spring bloom also developing in the adjacent Tasman Sea. The author postulates that this region forms another important biological hot spot for the regional marine ecosystem.

  4. Biostratigraphic utility of organic-walled phytoplankton, Upper Ordovician-Lower Silurian of Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Colbath, G.K.

    1986-05-01

    Upper Ordovician-Lower Silurian marine mudstones in the Appalachian basin, which have not been subjected to extensive heating or oxidation, contain abundant organic-walled phytoplankton (prasinophycean algal phycomata and acritarchs). In most areas graptolites and conodonts have not been recovered from these rocks, making the phytoplankton particularly important for biostratigraphic correlation. Recent advances have improved the precision with which these microfossils can be used. By tabulating relative abundance data carefully, an abrupt change in the composition of phytoplankton associations can be recognized at the Ordovician-Silurian boundary can be located with greater precision and confidence than is possible using the stratigraphic ranges of individual species. Many supposedly long-ranging species have relatively short stratigraphic ranges, and thus greater utility, as a result of detailed taxonomic studies. Therefore, type and comparative material are important considerations. Also, vesicle wall architecture and dehiscent structures are valuable taxonomic characters. Scanning electron microscopy examination has improved our understanding of small forms (less than 20 ..mu..m in diameter), and has thus increased the number of taxa available for use in biostratigraphy. Further study of samples from vertically extensive stratigraphic sections of established age should help workers refine the biostratigraphy of these microfossils.

  5. Leads in Arctic pack ice enable early phytoplankton blooms below snow-covered sea ice.

    PubMed

    Assmy, Philipp; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Duarte, Pedro; Meyer, Amelie; Randelhoff, Achim; Mundy, Christopher J; Olsen, Lasse M; Kauko, Hanna M; Bailey, Allison; Chierici, Melissa; Cohen, Lana; Doulgeris, Anthony P; Ehn, Jens K; Fransson, Agneta; Gerland, Sebastian; Hop, Haakon; Hudson, Stephen R; Hughes, Nick; Itkin, Polona; Johnsen, Geir; King, Jennifer A; Koch, Boris P; Koenig, Zoe; Kwasniewski, Slawomir; Laney, Samuel R; Nicolaus, Marcel; Pavlov, Alexey K; Polashenski, Christopher M; Provost, Christine; Rösel, Anja; Sandbu, Marthe; Spreen, Gunnar; Smedsrud, Lars H; Sundfjord, Arild; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Wiktor, Jozef; Wagner, Penelope M; Wold, Anette; Steen, Harald; Granskog, Mats A

    2017-01-19

    The Arctic icescape is rapidly transforming from a thicker multiyear ice cover to a thinner and largely seasonal first-year ice cover with significant consequences for Arctic primary production. One critical challenge is to understand how productivity will change within the next decades. Recent studies have reported extensive phytoplankton blooms beneath ponded sea ice during summer, indicating that satellite-based Arctic annual primary production estimates may be significantly underestimated. Here we present a unique time-series of a phytoplankton spring bloom observed beneath snow-covered Arctic pack ice. The bloom, dominated by the haptophyte algae Phaeocystis pouchetii, caused near depletion of the surface nitrate inventory and a decline in dissolved inorganic carbon by 16 ± 6 g C m(-2). Ocean circulation characteristics in the area indicated that the bloom developed in situ despite the snow-covered sea ice. Leads in the dynamic ice cover provided added sunlight necessary to initiate and sustain the bloom. Phytoplankton blooms beneath snow-covered ice might become more common and widespread in the future Arctic Ocean with frequent lead formation due to thinner and more dynamic sea ice despite projected increases in high-Arctic snowfall. This could alter productivity, marine food webs and carbon sequestration in the Arctic Ocean.

  6. Responding to flow: How phytoplankton adapt migration strategies to tackle turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Anupam; Carrara, Francesco; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Phytoplankton are among the ocean's most important organisms and it has long been recognized that turbulence is a primary determinant of their fitness. Yet, mechanisms by which phytoplankton may adapt to turbulence have remained unknown. We present experiments that demonstrate how phytoplankton are capable of rapid adaptive behavior in response to fluid flow disturbances that mimic turbulence. Our study organism was the toxic marine alga Heterosigma akashiwo, known to exhibit ``negative gravitaxis,'' i . e . , to frequently migrate upwards against gravity. To mimic the effect of Kolmogorov-scale turbulent eddies, which expose cells to repeated reorientations, we observed H. akashiwo in a ``flip chamber,'' whose orientation was periodically flipped. Tracking of single cells revealed a striking, robust behavioral adaptation, whereby within tens of minutes half of the population reversed its direction of migration to swim downwards, demonstrating an active response to fluid flow. Using confocal microscopy, we provide a physiological rationalization of this behavior in terms of the redistribution of internal organelles, and speculate on the motives for this bet-hedging-type strategy. This work suggests that the effects of fluid flow - not just passive but also active - on plankton represents a rich area of investigation with considerable implications for some of earth's most important organisms.

  7. Determination of domoic acid in seawater and phytoplankton by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihong; King, Kristen L; Ramsdell, John S; Doucette, Gregory J

    2007-09-07

    Domoic acid (DA) is an algal neurotoxin produced by diatoms primarily of the genus Pseudo-nitzschia and is responsible for the human intoxication syndrome known as amnesic shellfish poisoning. A method has been developed to determine DA in seawater and phytoplankton matrices by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for both quantitation and confirmation purposes. Sample extraction and clean-up was achieved on a C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. An acidic condition is critical for retaining hydrophilic DA on the cartridge. Direct injection of SPE eluate for analysis is recommended in order to avoid loss of DA by drying with heat prior to resuspension and injection. DA was quantified using the fragments produced from the protonated DA ion through multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). Recoveries exceeded 90% for all seawater samples spiked with DA and approximated 98% of toxin standard added to cultured phytoplankton material. Acceptable reproducibility (ca. 5% or less) was obtained for all intra-day and inter-day samples. The detection limit was 30 pg/ml level with a 20 microl injection volume, which demonstrated the value of this method for not only confirming DA production by minimally toxic phytoplankton species, but also for investigating the potentially important role of dissolved DA in marine food webs.

  8. Assessing phytoplankton realized niches using a French national phytoplankton monitoring network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Fariñas, Tania; Bacher, Cédric; Soudant, Dominique; Belin, Catherine; Barillé, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    Relating environmental factors to species occurrence is a fundamental step in a better understanding of the community structure, the spatial and temporal dynamics of populations and how species may respond to environmental changes. In this paper, we used phytoplankton occurrence data, from a French national phytoplankton monitoring network, and environmental variables with the aim of characterizing the realized ecological niches of phytoplankton groups. We selected 35 phytoplankton taxa representing the most important taxa in terms of occurrence frequency and abundance along the French coast of the eastern English Channel, the Southern Bight of the North Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. We show that environmental variables such as nutrient concentration, water temperature, irradiance and turbidity can be considered key factors controlling phytoplankton dynamics and influencing the community structure. By using a statistical framework based on an ordination technique the community structure was analyzed and interpreted in terms of niche overlap, marginality and tolerance. The most marginal taxon was Dactyliosolen and the most tolerant was Skeletonema. Non-marginal taxonomic units could be generalist and specialist, while marginal taxa were rather specialist. Specialist and marginal taxa globally showed lower values of overlap.

  9. Optical determination of phytoplankton floristic composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P. S. D.; Bowers, D. G.; Mitchelson-Jacob, E. G.

    1997-02-01

    Radiance and irradiance measurements are collected using a seven channel profiling radiometer and a four channel moored irradiance sensor which both use Sea-viewing Wide Field-of- View Sensor (SeaWiFS) wavebands. The instruments were deployed as part of the Land-Ocean Interaction Study, shelf edge study on the Malin Shelf, off the west coast of Scotland, during spring and simmer 1995 and 1996. Changes in in-situ reflectance ratios, calculated from the blue, cyan and green wavebands of the moored color sensors, suggest a diatom-dominated spring bloom, followed by an early summer coccolithophore bloom, with a flagellate-dominated phytoplankton population during the summer. Similar changes are also seen in attenuance ratios and specific attenuation coefficients calculated from the profiling radiometer data. The use of these optical properties to determine phytoplankton floristic composition is discussed.

  10. B Vitamins as Regulators of Phytoplankton Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzeca, Caterina; Tovar-Sanchez, Antonio; Agustí, Susana; Reche, Isabel; Duarte, Carlos M.; Taylor, Gordon T.; Sañudo-Wilhelmy, Sergio A.

    2006-12-01

    Without an adequate supply of dissolved vitamins, many species of phytoplankton do not grow. Additions of inorganic nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen, and trace metals like iron, are not alone adequate to sustain life-a practical lesson learned quickly by experimental biologists when they try to keep eukaryotic phytoplankton cultures alive in their labs. The reason is that coenzymes such as B vitamins are also required for many metabolic pathways. For example, vitamin B1 serves as a cofactor for a large number of enzymatic systems, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex required for the metabolism of carbohydrates (glycolysis) and amino acid synthesis [Vandamme, 1989]. Vitamin B12 is used primarily to assist two enzymes: methionine synthase, which is involved in DNA synthesis, and methylmalonyl CoA mutase, which is required for inorganic carbon assimilation [Lindemans and Abels, 1985].

  11. Salient region detection for phytoplankton microscopic image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jingjing; Ji, Guangrong; Zheng, Haiyong; Yu, Kun; Lu, Hongguang

    2013-07-01

    IG method is an excellent salient region detection method as its good generality and well-defined boundaries. In this paper, an improved method based on IG method is proposed to generate saliency map for phytoplankton microscopic images. This method utilizes the characteristics of phytoplankton microscopic images, through Gaussian low-pass filter to reduce high frequency components corresponding to water stains and dust specks. On the basis of luminance and color used in IG method, saturation is added to determine saliency due to that the saturation of background is lower than that of cells. The experimental results show that the proposed method can not only improve visual quality significantly, but also obtain higher precision and better recall rates compared with IG method.

  12. Revaluating ocean warming impacts on global phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrenfeld, Michael J.; O'Malley, Robert T.; Boss, Emmanuel S.; Westberry, Toby K.; Graff, Jason R.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Milligan, Allen J.; Siegel, David A.; Brown, Matthew B.

    2016-03-01

    Global satellite observations document expansions of the low-chlorophyll central ocean gyres and an overall inverse relationship between anomalies in sea surface temperature and phytoplankton chlorophyll concentrations. These findings can provide an invaluable glimpse into potential future ocean changes, but only if the story they tell is accurately interpreted. Chlorophyll is not simply a measure of phytoplankton biomass, but also registers changes in intracellular pigmentation arising from light-driven (photoacclimation) and nutrient-driven physiological responses. Here, we show that the photoacclimation response is an important component of temporal chlorophyll variability across the global ocean. This attribution implies that contemporary relationships between chlorophyll changes and ocean warming are not indicative of proportional changes in productivity, as light-driven decreases in chlorophyll can be associated with constant or even increased photosynthesis. Extension of these results to future change, however, requires further evaluation of how the multifaceted stressors of a warmer, higher-CO2 world will impact plankton communities.

  13. Assessment of phytoplankton class abundance using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix by parallel factor analysis and nonnegative least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rongguo; Chen, Xiaona; Wu, Zhenzhen; Yao, Peng; Shi, Xiaoyong

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) along with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and nonnegative least squares (NNLS) method for the differentiation of phytoplankton taxonomic groups was investigated. Forty-one phytoplankton species belonging to 28 genera of five divisions were studied. First, the PARAFAC model was applied to EEMs, and 15 fluorescence components were generated. Second, 15 fluorescence components were found to have a strong discriminating capability based on Bayesian discriminant analysis (BDA). Third, all spectra of the fluorescence component compositions for the 41 phytoplankton species were spectrographically sorted into 61 reference spectra using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and then, the reference spectra were used to establish a database. Finally, the phytoplankton taxonomic groups was differentiated by the reference spectra database using the NNLS method. The five phytoplankton groups were differentiated with the correct discrimination ratios (CDRs) of 100% for single-species samples at the division level. The CDRs for the mixtures were above 91% for the dominant phytoplankton species and above 73% for the subdominant phytoplankton species. Sixteen of the 85 field samples collected from the Changjiang River estuary were analyzed by both HPLC-CHEMTAX and the fluorometric technique developed. The results of both methods reveal that Bacillariophyta was the dominant algal group in these 16 samples and that the subdominant algal groups comprised Dinophyta, Chlorophyta and Cryptophyta. The differentiation results by the fluorometric technique were in good agreement with those from HPLC-CHEMTAX. The results indicate that the fluorometric technique could differentiate algal taxonomic groups accurately at the division level.

  14. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Paerl, Hans W.; Wetz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    reflect taxa-specific responses nitrogen availability. Finally, this study demonstrates that under nitrogen-limiting conditions, the phytoplankton community and its various taxa are capable of using both urea and nitrate to support growth. PMID:27504970

  15. Spatiotemporal variations in phytoplankton biomass and community structure in a meridional transect of the East/Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, J. H.; Kang, C. K.; Kang, H.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the variations in phytoplankton biomass and community composition associated with water-column structure and environmental conditions in the East/Japan Sea (EJS), three cruses were carried out along a meridional transect in May 2007 (spring), July 2009 (summer), and October 2012 (fall). The subpolar front (SPF) was formed between warm and cold water mass (37-40 °N). Chlorophyll a concentration and phytoplankton community composition were studied using HPLC pigment and CHEMTAX analysis and the results showed no significant differences between warm and cold water masses. These results reject our initial hypothesis that different water masses between southern and northern parts of the EJS may lead to different phytoplankton community structure. During the study periods, isotherm layers (≤ 12 °C) fluctuated over 50 m depth between warm and cold water masses on the basis of the SPF. In contrast, the nitracline (i.e. 2.5 μM nitrate isopleths) depth was recorded within the limited depths ranged 20-40 m, 30-50 m, and 40-60 m in spring, summer, and fall, respectively. The chlorophyll a concentrations at the subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SCM) in spring and summer (356 ± 233 and 270 ± 182 ng L-1, respectively) were significantly higher than those in fall (117 ± 89 ng L-1). The relative contributions of phytoplankton groups to total chlorophyll a concentration reflected phytoplankton community composition in the SCM layer with showing a dominance of diatoms (58 ± 19, 48 ± 11, and 30 ± 20 % in spring, summer, and fall, respectively). High contribution of diatoms to total biomass may enhance the efficiency of biological pump in the EJS. In addition, canonical correspondence analysis revealed a clear distribution of phytoplankton groups associated with temperature and nutrient concentration which mean prevalence of vertical variation. Finally, our findings suggested that phytoplankton biomass and groups are regulated by surface mixed layer depth

  16. Rehabilitating the cyanobacteria - niche partitioning, resource use efficiency and phytoplankton community structure during diazotrophic cyanobacterial blooms.

    PubMed

    Olli, Kalle; Klais, Riina; Tamminen, Timo

    2015-09-01

    Blooms of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are recurrent phenomena in marine and freshwater habitats, and their supplying role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles is generally considered vital. The objective of this study was to analyse whether an increasing proportion of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria affects (i) the composition of the non-diazotrophic component of ambient phytoplankton communities and (ii) resource use efficiency (RUE; ratio of Chl a to total nutrients) - an important ecosystem function. We hypothesize that diazotrophs increase community P use and decrease N use efficiencies, as new N is brought into the system, relaxing N, and concomitantly aggravating P limitation. We test this by analysing an extensive data set from the Baltic Sea (> 3700 quantitative phytoplankton samples), known to harbour conspicuous and recurrent blooms of Nodularia spumigena and Aphanizomenon sp.System-level phosphorus use efficiency (RUEP) was positively related to high proportion of diazotrophic cyanobacteria, suggesting aggravation of phosphorus limitation. However, concomitant decrease of nitrogen use efficiency (RUEN) was not observed. Nodularia spumigena, a dominant diazotroph and a notorious toxin producer, had a significantly stronger relationship with RUEP, compared to the competing non-toxic Aphanizomenon sp., confirming niche differentiation in P acquisition strategies between the major bloom-forming cyanobacterial species in the Baltic Sea. Nodularia occurrences were associated with stronger temperature stratification in more offshore environments, indicating higher reliance on in situ P regeneration.By using constrained and unconstrained ordination, permutational multivariate analysis of variance and local similarity analysis, we show that diazotrophic cyanobacteria explained no more than a few percentage of the ambient phytoplankton community variation. The analyses furthermore yielded rather evenly distributed negative and positive effects on individual co

  17. Phytoplankton off the Coast of Portugal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A large phytoplankton bloom off of the coast of Portugal can be seen in this true-color image taken on April 23, 2002, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Terra satellite. The bloom is roughly half the size of Portugal and forms a bluish-green cloud in the water. The red spots in northwest Spain denote what are likely small agricultural fires. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  18. Phytoplankton dynamics in the NE subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip; Harrison, P. J.

    1999-11-01

    Ocean Station Papa (OSP, 50°N 145°W) in the NE subarctic Pacific is characterised as high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC). However, little is known about the spatial extent of these HNLC waters or the phytoplankton dynamics on the basin scale. Algal biomass, production and size-structure data are presented from winter, spring and summer between 1992 and 1997 for five stations ranging from coastal to open-ocean conditions. The inshore stations (P04-P16) are characterised by the classical seasonal cycle of spring and late summer blooms (production >3 g C m -2 d -1), diatoms are not Fe-stressed, and growth rate is probably controlled by macronutrient supply. The fate of the phytoplankton is likely sedimentation by diatom-dominated spring blooms, with a pelagic recycling system predominating at other times. The offshore stations (P20/OSP) display low seasonality in biomass and production (OSP, mean winter production 0.3 g C m -2 d -1, mean spring/summer production 0.85 g C m -2 d -1), and are dominated by small algal cells. Low Fe availability prevents the occurrence of diatom blooms observed inshore. The main fate of phytoplankton is probably recycling through the microbial food web, with relatively low sedimentation compared to inshore. However, the supply of macro- and micro-nutrients to the coastal and open ocean, respectively, may vary between years. Variability in macro-nutrient supply to the coastal ocean may result in decreased winter reserve nitrate, summer nitrate limitation, subsequent floristic shifts towards small cells, and reduced primary production. Offshore, higher diatom abundances are occasionally observed, perhaps indicating episodic Fe supply. The two distinct oceanic regimes have different phytoplankton dynamics resulting in different seasonality, community structure and fate of algal carbon. These differences will strongly influence the biogeochemical signatures of the coastal and open-oceanic NE subarctic Pacific.

  19. Interactive Effect of UVR and Phosphorus on the Coastal Phytoplankton Community of the Western Mediterranean Sea: Unravelling Eco-Physiological Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Presentación; Medina-Sánchez, Juan M.; Herrera, Guillermo; Durán, Cristina; Segovia, María; Cortés, Dolores; Salles, Soluna; Korbee, Nathalie; L. Figueroa, Félix; Mercado, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most important effects of global change on coastal marine systems include increasing nutrient inputs and higher levels of ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280–400 nm), which could affect primary producers, a key trophic link to the functioning of marine food webs. However, interactive effects of both factors on the phytoplankton community have not been assessed for the Mediterranean Sea. An in situ factorial experiment, with two levels of ultraviolet solar radiation (UVR+PAR vs. PAR) and nutrients (control vs. P-enriched), was performed to evaluate single and UVR×P effects on metabolic, enzymatic, stoichiometric and structural phytoplanktonic variables. While most phytoplankton variables were not affected by UVR, dissolved phosphatase (APAEX) and algal P content increased in the presence of UVR, which was interpreted as an acclimation mechanism of algae to oligotrophic marine waters. Synergistic UVR×P interactive effects were positive on photosynthetic variables (i.e., maximal electron transport rate, ETRmax), but negative on primary production and phytoplankton biomass because the pulse of P unmasked the inhibitory effect of UVR. This unmasking effect might be related to greater photodamage caused by an excess of electron flux after a P pulse (higher ETRmax) without an efficient release of carbon as the mechanism to dissipate the reducing power of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:26599583

  20. Phytoplankton global mapping from space with a support vector machine algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boissieu, Florian; Menkes, Christophe; Dupouy, Cécile; Rodier, Martin; Bonnet, Sophie; Mangeas, Morgan; Frouin, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years great progress has been made in global mapping of phytoplankton from space. Two main trends have emerged, the recognition of phytoplankton functional types (PFT) based on reflectance normalized to chlorophyll-a concentration, and the recognition of phytoplankton size class (PSC) based on the relationship between cell size and chlorophyll-a concentration. However, PFTs and PSCs are not decorrelated, and one approach can complement the other in a recognition task. In this paper, we explore the recognition of several dominant PFTs by combining reflectance anomalies, chlorophyll-a concentration and other environmental parameters, such as sea surface temperature and wind speed. Remote sensing pixels are labeled thanks to coincident in-situ pigment data from GeP&CO, NOMAD and MAREDAT datasets, covering various oceanographic environments. The recognition is made with a supervised Support Vector Machine classifier trained on the labeled pixels. This algorithm enables a non-linear separation of the classes in the input space and is especially adapted for small training datasets as available here. Moreover, it provides a class probability estimate, allowing one to enhance the robustness of the classification results through the choice of a minimum probability threshold. A greedy feature selection associated to a 10-fold cross-validation procedure is applied to select the most discriminative input features and evaluate the classification performance. The best classifiers are finally applied on daily remote sensing datasets (SeaWIFS, MODISA) and the resulting dominant PFT maps are compared with other studies. Several conclusions are drawn: (1) the feature selection highlights the weight of temperature, chlorophyll-a and wind speed variables in phytoplankton recognition; (2) the classifiers show good results and dominant PFT maps in agreement with phytoplankton distribution knowledge; (3) classification on MODISA data seems to perform better than on SeaWIFS data

  1. Warming accelerates termination of a phytoplankton spring bloom by fungal parasites.

    PubMed

    Frenken, Thijs; Velthuis, Mandy; de Senerpont Domis, Lisette N; Stephan, Susanne; Aben, Ralf; Kosten, Sarian; van Donk, Ellen; Van de Waal, Dedmer B

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is expected to favour infectious diseases across ecosystems worldwide. In freshwater and marine environments, parasites play a crucial role in controlling plankton population dynamics. Infection of phytoplankton populations will cause a transfer of carbon and nutrients into parasites, which may change the type of food available for higher trophic levels. Some phytoplankton species are inedible to zooplankton, and the termination of their population by parasites may liberate otherwise unavailable carbon and nutrients. Phytoplankton spring blooms often consist of large diatoms inedible for zooplankton, but the zoospores of their fungal parasites may serve as a food source for this higher trophic level. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on the fungal infection of a natural phytoplankton spring bloom and followed the response of a zooplankton community. Experiments were performed in ca. 1000 L indoor mesocosms exposed to a controlled seasonal temperature cycle and a warm (+4 °C) treatment in the period from March to June 2014. The spring bloom was dominated by the diatom Synedra. At the peak of infection over 40% of the Synedra population was infected by a fungal parasite (i.e. a chytrid) in both treatments. Warming did not affect the onset of the Synedra bloom, but accelerated its termination. Peak population density of Synedra tended to be lower in the warm treatments. Furthermore, Synedra carbon: phosphorus stoichiometry increased during the bloom, particularly in the control treatments. This indicates enhanced phosphorus limitation in the control treatments, which may have constrained chytrid development. Timing of the rotifer Keratella advanced in the warm treatments and closely followed chytrid infections. The chytrids' zoospores may thus have served as an alternative food source to Keratella. Our study thus emphasizes the importance of incorporating not only nutrient limitation and grazing, but also parasitism in understanding the

  2. Global patterns of phytoplankton nutrient and light colimitation inferred from an optimality-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteaga, Lionel; Pahlow, Markus; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The widely used concept of constant "Redfield" phytoplankton stoichiometry is often applied for estimating which nutrient limits phytoplankton growth in the surface ocean. Culture experiments, in contrast, show strong relations between growth conditions and cellular stoichiometry with often substantial deviations from Redfield stoichiometry. Here we investigate to what extent both views agree by analyzing remote sensing and in situ data with an optimality-based model of nondiazotrophic phytoplankton growth in order to infer seasonally varying patterns of colimitation by light, nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) in the global ocean. Our combined model-data analysis suggests strong N and N-P colimitation in the tropical ocean, seasonal light, and N-P colimitation in the Northern Hemisphere, and strong light limitation only during winter in the Southern Ocean. The eastern equatorial Pacific appears as the only ocean area that is essentially not limited by N, P, or light. Even though our optimality-based approach specifically accounts for flexible stoichiometry, inferred patterns of N and P limitation are to some extent consistent with those obtained from an analysis of surface inorganic nutrients with respect to the Redfield N:P ratio. Iron is not part of our analysis, implying that we cannot accurately predict N cell quotas in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions. Elsewhere, we do not expect a major effect of iron on the relative distribution of N, P, and light colimitation areas. The relative importance of N, P, and light in limiting phytoplankton growth diagnosed here by combining observations and an optimal growth model provides a useful constraint for models used to predict future marine biological production under changing environmental conditions. 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Diversity dynamics of marine planktonic diatoms across the Cenozoic.

    PubMed

    Rabosky, Daniel L; Sorhannus, Ulf

    2009-01-08

    Diatoms are the dominant group of phytoplankton in the modern ocean. They account for approximately 40% of oceanic primary productivity and over 50% of organic carbon burial in marine sediments. Owing to their role as a biological carbon pump and effects on atmospheric CO(2) levels, there is great interest in elucidating factors that influenced the rapid rise in diatom diversity during the past 40 million years. Two biotic controls on diversification have been proposed to explain this diversity increase: (1) geochemical coupling between terrestrial grasslands and marine ecosystems through the global silicon cycle; and (2) competitive displacement of other phytoplankton lineages. However, these hypotheses have not been tested using sampling-standardized fossil data. Here we show that reconstructions of species diversity in marine phytoplankton reject these proposed controls and suggest a new pattern for oceanic diatom diversity across the Cenozoic. Peak species diversity in marine planktonic diatoms occurred at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary and was followed by a pronounced decline, from which diversity has not recovered. Although the roles of abiotic and biotic drivers of diversification remain unclear, major features of oceanic diatom evolution are decoupled from both grassland expansion and competition among phytoplankton groups.

  4. Adaptive divergence in pigment composition promotes phytoplankton biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Stomp, Maayke; Huisman, Jef; De Jongh, Floris; Veraart, Annelies J; Gerla, Daan; Rijkeboer, Machteld; Ibelings, Bas W; Wollenzien, Ute I A; Stal, Lucas J

    2004-11-04

    The dazzling diversity of the phytoplankton has puzzled biologists for decades. The puzzle has been enlarged rather than solved by the progressive discovery of new phototrophic microorganisms in the oceans, including picocyanobacteria, pico-eukaryotes, and bacteriochlorophyll-based and rhodopsin-based phototrophic bacteria. Physiological and genomic studies suggest that natural selection promotes niche differentiation among these phototrophic microorganisms, particularly with respect to their photosynthetic characteristics. We have analysed competition for light between two closely related picocyanobacteria of the Synechococcus group that we isolated from the Baltic Sea. One of these two has a red colour because it contains the pigment phycoerythrin, whereas the other is blue-green because it contains high contents of the pigment phycocyanin. Here we report theory and competition experiments that reveal stable coexistence of the two picocyanobacteria, owing to partitioning of the light spectrum. Further competition experiments with a third marine cyanobacterium, capable of adapting its pigment composition, show that this species persists by investing in the pigment that absorbs the colour not used by its competitors. These results demonstrate the adaptive significance of divergence in pigment composition of phototrophic microorganisms, which allows an efficient utilization of light energy and favours species coexistence.

  5. Generation of reactive oxygen species by raphidophycean phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nakamura, A; Shikayama, M; Kawano, I; Ishimatsu, A; Muramatsu, T

    1997-10-01

    Chattonella marina, a raphidophycean flagellate, is one of the most toxic red tide phytoplankton and causes severe damage to fish farming. Recent studies demonstrated that Chattonella sp. generates superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (.OH), which may be responsible for the toxicity of C. marina. In this study, we found the other raphidophycean flagellates such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Olisthodiscus luteus, and Fibrocapsa japonica also produce O2- and H2O2 under normal growth condition. Among the flagellate species tested, Chattonella has the highest rates of production of O2- and H2O2 as compared on the basis of cell number. This seems to be partly due to differences in their cell sizes, since Chattonella is larger than other flagellate species. The generation of O2- by these flagellate species was also confirmed by a chemiluminescence assay by using 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one (MCLA). All these raphidophycean flagellates inhibited the proliferation of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, in a flagellates/bacteria co-culture system, and their toxic effects were suppressed by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase. Our results suggest that the generation of reactive oxygen species is a common feature of raphidophycean flagellates.

  6. Pan Genome of the Phytoplankton Emiliania Underpins its Global Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Read, Betsy A.; Kegel, Jessica; Klute, Mary J.; Kuo, Alan; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; Maumus, Florian; Mayer, Christoph; Miller, John; Monier, Adam; Salamov, Asaf; Young, Jeremy; Aguilar, Maria; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Gonzalez, Karina; Herman, Emily K.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Napier, Johnathan; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Sarno, Analissa F.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Schroeder, Declan; de Vargas, Columban; Verret, Frederic; von Dassow, Peter; Valentin, Klaus; Van de Peer, Yves; Wheeler, Glen; Annotation Consortium, Emiliania huxleyi; Dacks, Joel B.; Delwiche, Charles F.; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Glockner, Gernot; John, Uwe; Richards, Thomas; Worden, Alexandra Z.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2012-06-18

    Coccolithophores have influenced the global climate for over 200 million years1. These marine phytoplankton can account for 20 per cent of total carbon fixation in some systems2. They form blooms that can occupy hundreds of thousands of square kilometres and are distinguished by their elegantly sculpted calcium carbonate exoskeletons (coccoliths), rendering themvisible fromspace3.Although coccolithophores export carbon in the form of organic matter and calcite to the sea floor, they also release CO2 in the calcification process. Hence, they have a complex influence on the carbon cycle, driving either CO2 production or uptake, sequestration and export to the deep ocean4. Here we report the first haptophyte reference genome, from the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP1516, and sequences from 13 additional isolates. Our analyses reveal a pan genome (core genes plus genes distributed variably between strains) probably supported by an atypical complement of repetitive sequence in the genome. Comparisons across strains demonstrate thatE. huxleyi, which has long been considered a single species, harbours extensive genome variability reflected in different metabolic repertoires. Genome variability within this species complex seems to underpin its capacity both to thrive in habitats ranging from the equator to the subarctic and to form large-scale episodic blooms under a wide variety of environmental conditions.

  7. Effect of ammonium input over the distribution of iron in the seawater and the phytoplankton in a mesocosm experiment in a North Patagonian fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N.; Ardelan, M. V.; Bizsel, N.; Iriarte, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The distribution and concentration of iron in seawater and plankton were studied under different ammonium concentrations along a 22 day mesocosm experiment in order to assess possible effects of aquaculture over the phytoplankton and the biogeochemistry in fjords of Chile. Brackish and marine water were used in two different setups, each one with 1 control and 4 different NH4+ concentrations. Total Chelex labile (TFeCh), dissolved Chelex labile (DFeCh) and DGT labile (FeDGT) iron measurements were performed in seawater, wheile the particulate iron content was determined as total (PFe) and fractionated (PFeSF) for the plankton community. Average concentration per treatment showed higher concentrations for both TFeCh and DFeCh in the marine system compared to the brackish. TFeCh showed general increasing trend in time and with increasing ammonium concentration, exhibiting positive correlation to the chlorophyll and particulate organic carbon content, whereas DFeCh presented an inverse pattern as expected. FeDGT showed an average lower concentration compare to DFeCh with final concentrations significantly lower in treatments with artificial ammonium addition. PFe showed an increasing trend in time and with increasing ammonium in both systems. Yet, when normalized to Chlorophyll a or particulate organic carbon the trend inverted, showing that at higher ammonium loading the iron per Chlorophyll a or particulate organic carbon decreases. PFeSF major changes occurred in the marine system in the ratio between the 20-140 μm and the 2-20 μm fractions, suggesting possible community structure shift. Overall, ammonium input indicated an effect over iron in the seawater and the particulate matter, depending on the iron form and the microbial assemblage. The further changes over the microbial composition due to ammonium addition may affect the cycling of iron, having possible negative or positive feedbacks over major biogeochemical cycles.

  8. Biomass, production, and control of heterotrophic bacterioplankton during a late phytoplankton bloom in the Amundsen Sea Polynya, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kim, Sung-Han; Yang, Eun Jin; Choi, Ayeon; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the heterotrophic bacterial biomass and production in February 2012, in four habitats (a polynya, sea-ice zone, ice shelf, and the open sea) in the Amundsen Sea to determine the spatial distribution, controlling factors, and ecological role of the bacteria during a late phytoplankton bloom by Phaeocystis antarctica. Bacterial abundance (BA) and production (BP) were highest at the center of the polynya, and both were significantly correlated with phytoplankton biomass. BP accounted for average 17% of the organic carbon produced by phytoplankton primary production (PP), which is higher than the average BP:PP ratio reported in most open ocean. The abundance of heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) was correlated with the BA, and the average bacteria:HNF ratio (260) was lower than the values reported in most marine environments (400-1000), including the Ross Sea Polynya (800). Evidence for a tight coupling of bacteria and phytoplankton activities on the one hand and intense HNF grazing on bacteria on the other could be found in the high BP:PP and low bacteria:HNF ratios, respectively. Interestingly, these data were accompanied by low particulate carbon export fluxes measured during the late Phaeocystis bloom. Together, these results indicated that the microbial loop plays a significant role in the biogeochemical carbon cycle and food web processes in the Amundsen Sea Polynya.

  9. Interactions between phytoplankton organisms and key carbonate system properties in the southern Adriatic Sea: seasonal variability within an annual cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchetta, Anna; Boldrin, Alfredo; Langone, Leonardo; Socal, Giorgio; Bernardi Aubry, Fabrizio; Cantoni, Carolina

    2013-04-01

    Although the impact of CO2 uptake on ocean chemistry has been recognizing for the last decades, ocean acidification has emerged as a key issue of global concern in less than a decade. Studies of the impacts on marine organisms, ecosystems and biogeochemical processes are only at the beginning and the results are still contrasting. In open sea, the pool of particulate organic carbon is mainly determined by phytoplankton production (controlled by light and nutrient availabilities). However pH and key carbonate system properties (AT, DIC, calcium carbonate saturation states), influencing phytoplankton population and communities can play a fundamental role in determining the autothrophic production and its cycle. In the perspective of lighting possible impacts of climatic changes on natural phytoplankton communities of the Southern Adriatic open sea region, this contribute describes the relationships between pH/carbonate system and the phytoplankton during almost one year (Sept 2007-June 2008), with particular regard to calcareous phytoplankton. A few seasonal campaigns were conducted within the frame of the Italian VECTOR project, on a repeated section from Bari to Dubrovnik. The dynamics of phytoplankton community have been analyzed considering the export of particulate organic matter from the photic layer (collected in sediment traps at 150 m). The phytoplankton cycle from September 07 to late June 08 was determined analysing samples collected from CTD bottles. It appears to be characterized by short time blooms of different groups: in autumn the main component (62%) was represented by siliceous plankton (diatoms), in late winter calcareous plankton (coccolithophores) reached 31% of total biomass, whereas flagellates appeared the dominant group (84%) during summer. Downward fluxes of organic carbon (at 150 m), strictly depending on the upper layer autotrophic activity, were well correlated with carbonate fluxes. A succession of different dominant productive groups

  10. Synchronized Regulation of Different Zwitterionic Metabolites in the Osmoadaption of Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Gebser, Björn; Pohnert, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The ability to adapt to different seawater salinities is essential for cosmopolitan marine phytoplankton living in very diverse habitats. In this study, we examined the role of small zwitterionic metabolites in the osmoadaption of two common microalgae species Emiliania huxleyi and Prorocentrum minimum. By cultivation of the algae under salinities between 16‰ and 38‰ and subsequent analysis of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), glycine betaine (GBT), gonyol, homarine, trigonelline, dimethylsulfonioacetate, trimethylammonium propionate, and trimethylammonium butyrate using HPLC-MS, we could reveal two fundamentally different osmoadaption mechanisms. While E. huxleyi responded with cell size reduction and a nearly constant ratio between the major metabolites DMSP, GBT and homarine to increasing salinity, osmolyte composition of P. minimum changed dramatically. In this alga DMSP concentration remained nearly constant at 18.6 mM between 20‰ and 32‰ but the amount of GBT and dimethylsulfonioacetate increased from 4% to 30% of total investigated osmolytes. Direct quantification of zwitterionic metabolites via LC-MS is a powerful tool to unravel the complex osmoadaption and regulation mechanisms of marine phytoplankton. PMID:23774888

  11. Synchronized regulation of different zwitterionic metabolites in the osmoadaption of phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Gebser, Björn; Pohnert, Georg

    2013-06-17

    The ability to adapt to different seawater salinities is essential for cosmopolitan marine phytoplankton living in very diverse habitats. In this study, we examined the role of small zwitterionic metabolites in the osmoadaption of two common microalgae species Emiliania huxleyi and Prorocentrum minimum. By cultivation of the algae under salinities between 16‰ and 38‰ and subsequent analysis of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), glycine betaine (GBT), gonyol, homarine, trigonelline, dimethylsulfonioacetate, trimethylammonium propionate, and trimethylammonium butyrate using HPLC-MS, we could reveal two fundamentally different osmoadaption mechanisms. While E. huxleyi responded with cell size reduction and a nearly constant ratio between the major metabolites DMSP, GBT and homarine to increasing salinity, osmolyte composition of P. minimum changed dramatically. In this alga DMSP concentration remained nearly constant at 18.6 mM between 20‰ and 32‰ but the amount of GBT and dimethylsulfonioacetate increased from 4% to 30% of total investigated osmolytes. Direct quantification of zwitterionic metabolites via LC-MS is a powerful tool to unravel the complex osmoadaption and regulation mechanisms of marine phytoplankton.

  12. Phylogenetic diversity and biogeography of the Mamiellophyceae lineage of eukaryotic phytoplankton across the oceans.

    PubMed

    Monier, Adam; Worden, Alexandra Z; Richards, Thomas A

    2016-08-01

    High-throughput diversity amplicon sequencing of marine microbial samples has revealed that members of the Mamiellophyceae lineage are successful phytoplankton in many oceanic habitats. Indeed, these eukaryotic green algae can dominate the picoplanktonic biomass, however, given the broad expanses of the oceans, their geographical distributions and the phylogenetic diversity of some groups remain poorly characterized. As these algae play a foundational role in marine food webs, it is crucial to assess their global distribution in order to better predict potential changes in abundance and community structure. To this end, we analyzed the V9-18S small subunit rDNA sequences deposited from the Tara Oceans expedition to evaluate the diversity and biogeography of these phytoplankton. Our results show that the phylogenetic composition of Mamiellophyceae communities is in part determined by geographical provenance, and do not appear to be influenced - in the samples recovered - by water depth, at least at the resolution possible with the V9-18S. Phylogenetic classification of Mamiellophyceae sequences revealed that the Dolichomastigales order encompasses more sequence diversity than other orders in this lineage. These results indicate that a large fraction of the Mamiellophyceae diversity has been hitherto overlooked, likely because of a combination of size fraction, sequencing and geographical limitations.

  13. Appendix B of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the second appendix to the report, the workshop participants.

  14. Appendix D of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fourth appendix to the report, the presentations from the workshop.

  15. Nitrogen and phosphorus intake by phytoplankton in the Xiamen Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cai; Li, Hui; He, Qing; Xu, Kuncan; Wu, Shengsan; Zhang, Yuanbiao; Chen, Jinmin; Chen, Baohong; Lin, Libin; Lu, Meiluan; Chen, Weifen; Tang, Rongkun; Ji, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a time series experiment examining the nitrogen and phosphorus intake of natural phytoplankton communities by a microcosms approach. Seawater samples containing natural phytoplankton communities were collected from waters around Baozhu Islet in inner Xiamen Bay and around Qingyu Islet in the outer bay. The goal was to elucidate the relationship between phytoplankton population enhancement, the biological removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the seawater, and the phytoplankton nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratio based on nitrogen and phosphorus removal from seawater by phytoplankton, to provide a basis for detecting prewarning conditions for red tide and the assessment of red tide events. Two key results were obtained: 1. During the experiment, the nitrogen and phosphorus seawater concentrations in samples from these two sites were negatively and closely correlated to the logarithm of the phytoplankton cell concentration and to the value of the apparent oxygen increment. The ratio of the intake coefficients was 3.5:1 for phosphorus and 1.1:1 for nitrogen for the phytoplankton between these samples from around Baozhu Islet and Qingyu Islet, respectively. This indicates that the intake capabilities of phytoplankton for nitrogen in the two waters are essentially identical. However, for phosphorus, the capability was much higher in the Baozhu Islet waters than the Qingyu Islet waters. In other words, the phytoplankton in Qingyu Islet waters produced more biomass while consuming the same amount of phosphorus as the other waters; 2. The phytoplankton nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratio from the Baozhu Islet and Qingyu Islet waters was 20:1 and 36:1, respectively. The latter waters had a significantly higher ratio than the former and both were higher than the Redfield Ratio. These results indicate that nitrogen and phosphorus intake ratios by phytoplankton can vary significantly from region to region.

  16. Persistent halogenated compounds in two typical marine aquaculture zones of South China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huan-Yun; Guo, Ying; Bao, Lian-Jun; Qiu, Yao-Wen; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2011-01-01

    Samples of two seawater farmed fish (crimson snapper (Lutjanus erythopterus) and snubnose pompano (Trachinotus blochii)), water, air, sediment, fish feed, macroalgae and phytoplankton were collected from two estuarine bays (Daya Bay and Hailing Bay) in South China. The concentrations of persistent halogenated compounds (PHCs) including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) varied widely with the different sample matrices under investigation. The compositional patterns in fish, fish feed, macroalgae and phytoplankton, as well as the good correlations between the abundances of p,p'-DDT and BDE-209 and their metabolites (i.e., p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE for p,p'-DDT and BDE-47 for BDE-209) in fish indicated the occurrence of DDT and PBDE biotransformation in fish body. Finally, the marine aquaculture environment in South China is somewhat biologically impaired by DDT-contaminated water, sediment and fish feed, and there may be some cancer risk associated with fish consumption for humans, especially for urban residents.

  17. Stoichiometry is crucial for modelling phytoplankton coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göthlich, Lena; Oschlies, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Owing to global warming, conditions in the pelagial are expected to change significantly. Rising temperatures will trigger shoaling of mixed layer depths, leading to increased light intensity and decreased nutrient supply. Adaptations of the pelagic ecosystems may include shifts in phytoplankton community composition, such as shifting dominance towards species tolerating more light and heat and/or lower nutrient concentrations, as well as changes in the extents of biogeochemical provinces and corresponding distributions of species abundances. Modelling adaptive responses to climate change requires representing phytoplankton biodiversity in global biogeochemical models. Modelling several species over longer time scales has proven to be difficult, since one species will usually outcompete all others, especially in oligotrophic areas, where the system is almost in equilibrium, resembling a chemostat. The R* concept as part of Tilman's resource competition theory (D Tilman, Am. Nat. 1980, Vol 116(3) pp. 362-393) predicts that for any given limiting resource, only the species with the lowest requirement for that resource will survive: In equilibrium, a monoculture of any species will reduce the concentration of its limiting resource to the lowest concentration allowing for its survival (R*), such that growth rate equals losses. In a multi-species assemblage, the species requiring the lowest resource concentration to survive will set the equilibrium resource concentration to its R*, which however is too low to allow for any other species to survive. The R* concept implies that in equilibrium, there can be at maximum one species for every given limiting resource. Thus, including several potentially limiting resources and parameterising the phytoplankton species such that each species is limited by a different resource, i.e. each species has the highest requirement for one resource among all species, is a necessary condition for the existence of an equilibrium including

  18. Phytoplankton off the Coast of Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Clear weather over the Pacific Northwest yesterday gave the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) a good view of this mountain region of the United States. Also, there are several phytoplankton blooms visible offshore. The white areas hugging the California coastline toward the bottom of the image are low-level stratus clouds. SeaWiFS acquired this true-color scene on October 3, 2001. Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  19. Iron from melting glaciers fuels phytoplankton blooms in the Amundsen Sea (Southern Ocean): Phytoplankton characteristics and productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Mills, Matthew M.; van Dijken, Gert L.; Laan, Patrick; Thuróczy, Charles-Edouard; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Payne, Christopher D.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Buma, Anita G. J.; Arrigo, Kevin R.

    2012-09-01

    The phytoplankton community composition and productivity in waters of the Amundsen Sea and surrounding sea ice zone were characterized with respect to iron (Fe) input from melting glaciers. High Fe input from glaciers such as the Pine Island Glacier, and the Dotson and Crosson ice shelves resulted in dense phytoplankton blooms in surface waters of Pine Island Bay, Pine Island Polynya, and Amundsen Polynya. Phytoplankton biomass distribution was the opposite of the distribution of dissolved Fe (DFe), confirming the uptake of glacial DFe in surface waters by phytoplankton. Phytoplankton biomass in the polynyas ranged from 0.6 to 14 μg Chl a L-1, with lower biomass at glacier sites where strong upwelling of Modified Circumpolar Deep Water from beneath glacier tongues was observed. Phytoplankton blooms in the polynyas were dominated by the haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica, whereas the phytoplankton community in the sea ice zone was a mix of P. antarctica and diatoms, resembling the species distribution in the Ross Sea. Water column productivity based on photosynthesis versus irradiance characteristics averaged 3.00 g C m-2 d-1 in polynya sites, which was approximately twice as high as in the sea ice zone. The highest water column productivity was observed in the Pine Island Polynya, where both thermally and salinity stratified waters resulted in a shallow surface mixed layer with high phytoplankton biomass. In contrast, new production based on NO3 uptake was similar between different polynya sites, where a deeper UML in the weakly, thermally stratified Pine Island Bay resulted in deeper NO3 removal, thereby offsetting the lower productivity at the surface. These are the first in situ observations that confirm satellite observations of high phytoplankton biomass and productivity in the Amundsen Sea. Moreover, the high phytoplankton productivity as a result of glacial input of DFe is the first evidence that melting glaciers have the potential to increase phytoplankton

  20. PHYTOPLANKTON DEPOSITION TO CHESAPEAKE BAY SEDIMENTS DURING WINTER-SPRING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The often rapid deposition of phytoplankton to sediments at the conclusion of the spring phytoplankton bloom is an important component of benthic-pelagic coupling in temperate and high latitude estuaries and other aquatic systems. However, quantifying the flux is difficult, parti...

  1. Studies of marine macroalgae: saline desert water cultivation and effects of environmental stress on proximate composition. Final subcontract report. [Gracilaria tikvahiae; Ulva lactuca

    SciTech Connect

    Ryther, J.H.; DeBusk, T.A.; Peterson, J.E.

    1985-11-01

    The results presented in this report address the growth potential of marine macroalgae cultivated in desert saline waters, and the effects of certain environmental stresses (e.g., nitrogen, salinity, and temperature) on the proximate composition of several marine macroalgae. Two major desert saline water types were assayed for their ability to support the growth of Gracilaria, Ulva, and Caulerpa. Both water types supported short term growth, but long term growth was not supported. Carbohydrate levels in Gracilaria were increased by cultivation under conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and low nitrogen and phosphorous availability. Data suggests that it may be possible to maximize production of useful proximate constituents by cultivating the algae under optimum conditions for growth, and then holding the resulting biomass under the environmental conditions which favor tissue accumulation of the desired storage products. 16 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. Study of the effects of oil on marine turtles. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report, 30 September 1983-1 October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, S.; Lutz, P.; Odell, D.; Van Vleet, E.; Bossart, G.

    1986-09-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of oil on marine turtles. An experimental program was carried out on 3-20 month old loggerhead and 3-16 month old green turtles to determine behavioral and physiological effects of oil using South Louisiana Crude Oil (SLCO) preweathered for 48 hrs. The behavioral experiments indicated that both species of marine turtles had a limited ability to avoid oil slicks, but experiments to determine avoidance/attraction to floating tar balls were inconclusive. The physiological experiments showed that the respiration, skin, some aspects of blood chemistry and composition, and salt gland function of 15-18 month old loggerhead sea turtles were significantly affected.

  3. Study of the effects of oil on marine turtles. Volume 3. Appendices. Final report, 30 September 1983-1 October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, S.; Lutz, P.; Odell, D.; Van Vleet, E.; Bossart, G.

    1986-09-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of oil on marine turtles. An experimental program was carried out on 3-20 month old loggerhead and 3-16 month old green turtles to determine behavioral and physiological effects of oil using South Louisiana Crude Oil (SLCO) preweathered for 48 hrs. The behavioral experiments indicated that both species of marine turtles had a limited ability to avoid oil slicks, but experiments to determine avoidance/attraction to floating tar balls were inconclusive. The physiological experiments showed that the respiration, skin, some aspects of blood chemistry and composition, and salt gland function of 15-18 month old loggerhead sea turtles were significantly affected.

  4. Study of the effects of oil on marine turtles. Volume 2. Technical report. Final report, 30 September 1983-1 October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, S.; Lutz, P.; Odell, D.; Van Vleet, E.; Bossart, G.

    1986-09-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of oil on marine turtles. An experimental program was carried out on 3-20 month old loggerhead and 3-16 month old green turtles to determine behavioral and physiological effects of oil using South Louisiana Crude Oil (SLCO) preweathered for 48 hrs. The behavioral experiments indicated that both species of marine turtles had a limited ability to avoid oil slicks, but experiments to determine avoidance/attraction to floating tar balls were inconclusive. The physiological experiments showed that the respiration, skin, some aspects of blood chemistry and composition, and salt gland function of 15-18 month old loggerhead sea turtles were significantly affected. Spills in the vicinity of nesting beaches are of special concern.

  5. Aerial surveys of endangered cetaceans and other marine mammals in the northwestern Gulf of Alaska and southeastern Bering Sea. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brueggeman, J.J.; Green, G.A.; Grotefendt, R.A.; Chapman, D.G.

    1987-09-01

    Aerial surveys were conducted in the Northwestern Gulf of Alaska and southeastern Bering Sea to determine the abundance, distribution, and habitat use patterns of endangered cetaceans and other marine mammals. Four species of cetaceans listed by the Federal Government as endangered were observed: gray, humpback, finback, and sperm whales. Sightings were also made to seven nonendangered species of cetaceans: minke, Cuvier's beaked, Baird's beaked, belukha, and killer whales, and Dall and harbor porpoises. Results show that the project area is an important feeding ground for relatively large numbers of humpback and finback whales and lower numbers of gray whale migration route between seasonal ranges. The project area also supports a variety of other marine mammals both seasonally and annually.

  6. [Causes of jellyfish blooms and their influence on marine environment].

    PubMed

    Qu, Chang-feng; Song, Jin-ming; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    and finally made the ambient water become acidic and hypoxic. The pH decreased by 1.3, while the mean dissolved oxygen demand reached 32.8 micromol x kg(-1) x h(-1). Jellyfish blooms also influenced the marine organism community, which might reduce the biomass of some fish and zooplankton, increase the amount of bacterioplankton, indirectly .increase the quantity of phytoplankton and lead to abnormal primary production.

  7. [Early growth of phytoplankton community in Dianshan Lake].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Li, Xiao-Ping

    2011-11-01

    Seasonal variation of phytoplankton community biomass (Chla) in Dianshan Lake was simulated based on data of 2004-2009. The result showed that early growths of the phytoplankton community in spring and summer seasons could be well described by the Logistic growth model. General speaking, phytoplankton community dominated by diatom and green algae may enter its exponential phase in the late February, doubling its density within 18 days, and reaching its maximum growth rate of 29.4 microg x (L x month) (-1) in the middle of March, blooming in June. Phytoplankton community dominated by blue green algae may enter its exponential phase in the middle June, doubling its density within 26 days, and reaching its maximum growth rate of 22.8 microg x (L x month) (-1) in the middle of July, blooming during August-September. The general pattern of early growth of phytoplankton community may offer sound information for early warning and prevention of algal bloom.

  8. Climate warming is predicted to reduce omega-3, long-chain, polyunsaturated fatty acid production in phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Hixson, Stefanie M; Arts, Michael T

    2016-08-01

    Phytoplankton are the main source of energy and omega-3 (n-3) long-chain essential fatty acids (EFA) in aquatic ecosystems. Their growth and biochemical composition are affected by surrounding environmental conditions, including temperature, which continues to increase as a result of climate warming. Increasing water temperatures may negatively impact the production of EFA by phytoplankton through the process of homeoviscous adaptation. To investigate this, we conducted an exploratory data synthesis with 952 fatty acid (FA) profiles from six major groups of marine and freshwater phytoplankton. Temperature was strongly correlated with a decrease in the proportion of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated FA (LC-PUFA) and an increase in omega-6 FA and saturated FA. Based on linear regression models, we predict that global n-3 LC-PUFA production will be reduced by 8.2% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and 27.8% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with an increase in water temperature of 2.5 °C. Using a previously published estimate of the global production of EPA by diatoms, which contribute to most of the world's supply of EPA, we predict a loss of 14.2 Mt of EPA annually as a result of ocean warming. The n-3 LC-PUFA are vitally important for an array of key physiological functions in aquatic and terrestrial organisms, and these FA are mainly produced by phytoplankton. Therefore, reduced production of these EFA, as a consequence of climate warming, is predicted to negatively affect species that depend on these compounds for optimum physiological function. Such profound changes in the biochemical composition of phytoplankton cell membranes can lead to cascading effects throughout the world's ecosystems.

  9. Identifying distinct phytoplankton regions based on ocean colour data supplemented by in-situ and model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasen, Solva; Hátún, Hjálmar; Margretha Larsen, Karin; Hansen, Bogi

    2016-04-01

    The Faroe Shelf hosts a rich and diverse marine ecosystem, which sustains a large portion of the economy of the Islands. The primary production, even though often referred to as being important to the higher trophic levels, is still not thoroughly understood. A high resolution chlorophyll time series from coastal station S, dating back to 1997, has given valuable information about the phytoplankton concentrations on the central shelf, and interannual fluctuations (with a factor of 4-5) in this time series have been linked to several other biological indicators. However, with regards to phytoplankton and primary production farther off-shore, only CTD fluorescence observations from research cruises are available and a thorough analysis of these temporally and spatially scattered data is difficult to conduct and yet to be done. Thus, the spatial extent of the region, for which the station S phytoplankton concentrations are representative, is not well defined. In this study we compare satellite ocean colour data from 1998-2015 with in-situ data from station S and identify the region which station S represents. Moreover, we use the ocean colour data to identity biogeographical regions in which phytoplankton is uniquely and coherently varying and compare these with the breeding and feeding grounds of commercially important fish stocks. The surface chlorophyll pattern does not necessarily represent the primary production in the water column. We therefore supplement the results with hydrographic observations and model simulations and from these extract information about the total carbon production in the various regions. The ocean colour data are consistent with the in-situ observations and the results from combining these with the other data types have enhanced our understanding of timing and strength of the phytoplankton spring bloom farther off-shore and contribute to the understanding of the shelf ecosystem in general.

  10. The effects of CO2 on phytoplankton community structure in the Amazon River Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T. L.; Goes, J. I.; Gomes, H. R.; McKee, K. T.

    2013-12-01

    The Amazon River Plume results from an enormous discharge of freshwater and organic matter into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a unique environment with a natural pCO2 gradient in the surface waters of the plume that range from 130-950 μatm. The response of coastal marine phytoplankton to increased anthropogenic CO2 emission is still unknown, hence the Amazon River Plume gradient can serve as a natural laboratory to examine the potential influence of atmospheric CO2 increases and ocean acidification on phytoplankton community composition. A two pronged study was undertaken: the first in which shipboard samples from a 2010 cruise to the Amazon River Plume were analyzed to examine the distribution of 3 major phytoplankton groups (diatoms, diatom-diazotroph associations [DDAs], and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp.) with respect to the natural pCO2 gradient; the second in which the growth response of Thalassiosira weisflogii, a representative diatom species, was examined under experimentally manipulated CO2 conditions. Cruise data analysis showed that diatoms were found with higher cell counts around 150 μatm; DDAs seemed to dominate waters within the narrow range of 350-400 μatm CO2; and the diazotroph Trichodesmium spp. grew in a wide range of pCO2 conditions, but with higher cell counts at upwards of 500 μatm. Phytoplankton group distributions along the CO2 gradient may be due to differences in their carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCMs) efficiencies. The CO2 manipulation apparatus was assembled such that the cells were grown under three different CO2 environments. Differential growth of T. weisflogii was observed at 150, 400, and 800 ppm CO2 treatment. T. weisflogii grew at all three CO2 concentrations, reflecting diatoms' physiological flexibility and efficient CCMs. Absorption spectra analysis of pigments and Fast Repetition Rate Fluorometer analysis indicate potential changes in photosynthetic machinery with different CO2 treatments. Future CO2 manipulation

  11. Phytoplankton community structure in the Lena Delta (Siberia, Russia) in relation to hydrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraberg, A. C.; Druzhkova, E.; Heim, B.; Loeder, M. J. G.; Wiltshire, K. H.

    2013-02-01

    The Lena Delta in Northern Siberia is one of the largest river deltas in the world. During peak discharge, after the ice melt in spring, it delivers between 60-8000 m3s-1 of water and sediment into the Arctic Ocean. The Lena Delta and the Laptev Sea coast also constitute a~continuous permafrost region. Ongoing climate change, which is particularly pronounced in the Arctic, is leading to increased rates of permafrost thaw. This is likely to profoundly change the discharge rates of the Lena River and the chemistry of the river waters which are discharged into the coastal Laptev Sea, e.g. by increasing concentrations of inorganic nutrients, DOC and importantly methane. These physical and chemical changes will also affect the composition of and interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton communities, forming the basis of the food web. However, before potential consequences of climate change for coastal arctic plankton communities can be judged, the inherent status of the diversity and linked foodweb interactions within the delta need to be established. As part of the AWI Lena Delta Programme in 2010 the phyto- and microzooplankton community in three river channels as well as four coastal transects were investigated to capture the typical river phytoplankton communities and the transitional zone of brackish/marine conditions. Most CTD profiles from 23 coastal stations showed very strong stratification. The only exception to this was a small a shallow and mixed area running from the outflow of Bykovskaya channel in a northerly direction parallel to the shore (transect 3). Of the five stations in this area three had a salinity of close to zero. Two further stations had salinities of around 2 and 5 throughout the water column. In the remaining transects on the other hand salinities varied between 5-30 with depth. Phytoplankton counts from the outflow from the Lena were dominated by diatoms (Aulacoseira species) cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon, Pseudanabaena) and

  12. Title: Freshwater phytoplankton responses to global warming.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Fanesi, Andrea; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-09-20

    Global warming alters species composition and function of freshwater ecosystems. However, the impact of temperature on primary productivity is not sufficiently understood and water quality models need to be improved in order to assess the quantitative and qualitative changes of aquatic communities. On the basis of experimental data, we demonstrate that the commonly used photosynthetic and water chemistry parameters alone are not sufficient for modeling phytoplankton growth under changing temperature regimes. We present some new aspects of the acclimation process with respect to temperature and how contrasting responses may be explained by a more complete physiological knowledge of the energy flow from photons to new biomass. We further suggest including additional bio-markers/traits for algal growth such as carbon allocation patterns to increase the explanatory power of such models. Although carbon allocation patterns are promising and functional cellular traits for growth prediction under different nutrient and light conditions, their predictive power still waits to be tested with respect to temperature. A great challenge for the near future will be the prediction of primary production efficiencies under the global change scenario using a uniform model for phytoplankton assemblages.

  13. Marine Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Bernard L.

    The five papers in this publication on marine careers were selected so that science teachers, guidance councilors, and students could benefit from the experience and knowledge of individuals active in marine science. The areas considered are indicated by the titles: Professional Careers in Marine Science with the Federal Government, Marine Science…

  14. A compositional analysis approach to phytoplankton composition in coastal Mediterranean wetlands: Influence of salinity and nutrient availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Flores, Rocío; Quintana, Xavier D.; Romaní, Anna M.; Bañeras, Lluís; Ruiz-Rueda, Olaya; Compte, Jordi; Green, Andy J.; Egozcue, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Mediterranean wetland communities are strongly constrained by hydrological perturbations and the water flow regime. Salinity and nutrient availability have often been considered the most important variables determining changes in the phytoplankton community of coastal wetlands. Ratios between the main environmental variables often have more relevance than the absolute values of each variable; however, in most cases ratios are not suitable for use in multivariate models commonly used by limnologists. The main objective of the present work was to identify the main variables or variable ratios that are the driving forces of the major phytoplankton taxonomic groups in Mediterranean coastal wetlands, using compositional data analysis techniques (CoDa). With this aim, eleven shallow wetlands (6 in Empordà, 5 in Doñana, NE and SW of Spain respectively) were sampled in winter and spring 2007. Two approaches were used: the first one using raw data and the second one using CoDa techniques to transform data. Our results show that differences in hydrological patterns led to three main community assemblages, ranging from communities dominated by typical marine taxa (diatoms and dinoflagellates) when the marine influence was high, to communities dominated by cyanobacteria during confinement and when inorganic nitrogen was scarce. In freshwaters with a high turnover rate, the community was dominated by opportunistic chlorophytes and cryptophytes that need inorganic nitrogen availability. When the raw data and CoDa approaches were compared, the CoDa approach permitted a better ecological interpretation of the phytoplankton community and the main ecological processes. Salinity was the main environmental determinant with both approaches, while the second CoDa RDA axis was related with the balance between the peptidase and phosphatase enzyme activities, confirming the relevance of nutrient retrieval processes in determining phytoplankton composition. We recommend the use of Co

  15. Phytoplankton and the Macondo oil spill: A comparison of the 2010 phytoplankton assemblage to baseline conditions on the Louisiana shelf.

    PubMed

    Parsons, M L; Morrison, W; Rabalais, N N; Turner, R E; Tyre, K N

    2015-12-01

    The Macondo oil spill was likely the largest oil spill to ever occur in United States territorial waters. We report herein our findings comparing the available baseline phytoplankton data from coastal waters west of the Mississippi River, and samples collected monthly from the same sampling stations, during and after the oil spill (May-October, 2010). Our results indicate that overall, the phytoplankton abundance was 85% lower in 2010 versus the baseline, and that the species composition of the phytoplankton community moved towards diatoms and cyanobacteria and away from ciliates and phytoflagellates. The results of this study reaffirm the view that phytoplankton responses will vary by the seasonal timing of the oil spill and the specific composition of the spilled oil. The trophic impacts of the purported lower abundance of phytoplankton in 2010 coupled with the observed assemblage shift remain unknown.

  16. Marine Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  17. Hundred Years of Environmental Change and Phytoplankton Ecophysiological Variability Archived in Coastal Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Berge, Terje; Lundholm, Nina; Ellegaard, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Marine protist species have been used for several decades as environmental indicators under the assumption that their ecological requirements have remained more or less stable through time. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that marine protists, including several phytoplankton species, are in fact highly diverse and may quickly respond to changes in the environment. Predicting how future climate will impact phytoplankton populations is important, but this task has been challenged by a lack of time-series of ecophysiological parameters at time-scales relevant for climate studies (i.e. at least decadal). Here, we report on ecophysiological variability in a marine dinoflagellate over a 100-year period of well-documented environmental change, by using the sedimentary archive of living cysts from a Scandinavian fjord (Koljö Fjord, Sweden). During the past century, Koljö Fjord has experienced important changes in salinity linked to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). We revived resting cysts of Pentapharsodinium dalei preserved in the fjord sediments and determined growth rates for 18 strains obtained from 3 sediment core layers at salinity 15 and 30, which represent extreme sea-surface conditions during periods of predominantly negative and positive NAO phases, respectively. Upper pH tolerance limits for growth were also tested. In general, P. dalei grew at a higher rate in salinity 30 than 15 for all layers, but there were significant differences among strains. When accounting for inter-strain variability, cyst age had no effect on growth performance or upper pH tolerance limits for this species, indicating a stable growth response over the 100-year period in spite of environmental fluctuations. Our findings give some support for the use of morphospecies in environmental studies, particularly at decadal to century scales. Furthermore, the high intra-specific variability found down to sediment layers dated as ca. 50 years-old indicates that cyst-beds of P

  18. National marine pollution program: Summary of federal programs and projects: FY 1988 update. Final report, 1 October 1987-30 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The report is published annually by the National Ocean Pollution Program Office, created under P.L. 95-273 (as amended), which calls for the establishment of a comprehensive, coordinated, and effective Federal program for ocean pollution research, development, and monitoring. The report provides information on Federal marine pollution programs. It contains a discussion of agency missions and mandates; Federal personnel and facilities; program descriptions; and a listing of all Federal ocean pollution research, development, and monitoring projects including project descriptions and fiscal-year funding levels. Analyses of funding of Federal programs over time and of the research interest and regional scope of this year's funded projects are also made.

  19. Characterization of marine mammals and turtles in the mid- and north-Atlantic areas of the US Outer Continental Shelf: executive summary for 1979. Final report 1979-81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The program's objectives are as follows: (1) to determine which species of marine mammals and marine turtles inhabit and/or migrate through the study area; (2) to identify, delineate and describe areas of importance (feeding, breeding, calving, etc.) to marine mammals and marine turtles in the study area; (3) to determine the temporal and spatial distribution of marine mammals and marine turtles in the study area; (4) to estimate the size of and extent of marine mammal and marine turtle populations in the study area; and (5) to emphasize the above item 1-4 for those species classified as threatened or endangered by the Department of Interior and Department of Commerce.

  20. Observations on colony formation by the cosmopolitan phytoplankton genus Phaeocystis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verity, Peter G.; Medlin, Linda K.

    2003-12-01

    Few marine phytoplankton have heteromorphic life cycles and also often dominate the ecosystems in which they occur. The class Prymnesiophyceae contains a notable exception: the genus Phaeocystis includes three species that form gelatinous colonies but also occur within their ranges as solitary cells. Phaeocystis antarctica and P. pouchetii are exclusively high latitude taxa, and are notable for regionally tremendous blooms of the colony stage. P. globosa occurs circumglobally, yet its colony blooms primarily are confined to colder waters within its range. Three additional species are warm water forms that have been reported only as solitary cells or loose aggregations that bear little resemblance to the organized colonies of the other taxa. Interpretation of existing data indicates that resource availability (light, temperature and nutrients) by itself is not sufficient to explain this distinction between cold-water colony-forming taxa and warm water solitary cell taxa, nor why colony development in P. globosa is essentially a spatially restricted phenomenon within a much broader geographic range. Colony development by P. globosa in situ has been observed at temperatures ≥20 °C, but only rarely and generally under conditions of seasonally or anthropogenically elevated nutrient supply. Data presented here demonstrate colony development at 20-22 °C in natural plankton communities from oligotrophic waters that were pre-screened through 63 μm mesh (i.e. lacking mesozooplankton and large microzooplankton), but not in unscreened communities containing microzooplankton and >63 μm zooplankton. Reduction of colony proliferation at higher temperatures by mesozooplankton grazing remains as an intriguing possibility that is consistent with available evidence to help explain differences in latitudinal extent of in situ colony development. These data are interpreted within a theoretical framework regarding the potential advantages and disadvantages of the two life cycle

  1. Competition patterns among phytoplankton functional groups: How useful are the complex mathematical models?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jingyang; Ramin, Maryam; Cheng, Vincent; Arhonditsis, George B.

    2008-05-01

    Simple models have significant contribution to the development of ecological theory. However, these minimalistic modeling approaches usually focus on a small subset of the causes of a phenomenon and neglect important aspects of system dynamics. In this study, we use a complex aquatic biogeochemical model to examine competition patterns and structural shifts in the phytoplankton community under nutrient enrichment conditions. Our model simulates multiple elemental cycles (org. C, N, P, Si, O), multiple functional phytoplankton (diatoms, green algae and cyanobacteria) and zooplankton (copepods and cladocerans) groups. It also takes into account recent advances in stoichiometric nutrient recycling theory, and the zooplankton grazing term is reformulated to include algal food quality effects on zooplankton assimilation efficiency. The model provided a realistic platform to examine the functional properties (e.g., kinetics, growth strategies, intracellular storage capacity) and the abiotic conditions (temperature, nutrient loading) under which the different phytoplankton groups can dominate or can be competitively excluded in oligo, meso and eutrophic environments. Based on the results of our analysis, the intergroup variability in the minimum cell quota and maximum transport rate at the cell surface for phosphorus along with the group-specific metabolic losses can shape the structure of plankton communities. We also use classification tree analysis to elucidate aspects (e.g., relative differences in the functional group properties, critical values of the abiotic conditions, levels of the other plankton community residents) of the complex interplay among physical, chemical and biological factors that drive epilimnetic plankton dynamics. Finally, our study highlights the importance of improving the mathematical representation of phytoplankton adaptive strategies for resources procurement (e.g., regulation of transport kinetics, effects of transport kinetics on the

  2. Vertical distribution and composition of phytoplankton under the influence of an upper mixed layer.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Alexei B; Rudolf, Lars; Blasius, Bernd

    2010-03-07

    The vertical distribution of phytoplankton is of fundamental importance for the dynamics and structure of aquatic communities. Here, using an advection-reaction-diffusion model, we investigate the distribution and competition of phytoplankton species in a water column, in which inverse resource gradients of light and a nutrient can limit growth of the biomass. This problem poses a challenge for ecologists, as the location of a production layer is not fixed, but rather depends on many internal parameters and environmental factors. In particular, we study the influence of an upper mixed layer (UML) in this system and show that it leads to a variety of dynamic effects: (i) Our model predicts alternative density profiles with a maximum of biomass either within or below the UML, thereby the system may be bistable or the relaxation from an unstable state may require a long-lasting transition. (ii) Reduced mixing in the deep layer can induce oscillations of the biomass; we show that a UML can sustain these oscillations even if the diffusivity is less than the critical mixing for a sinking phytoplankton population. (iii) A UML can strongly modify the outcome of competition between different phytoplankton species, yielding bistability both in the spatial distribution and in the species composition. (iv) A light limited species can obtain a competitive advantage if the diffusivity in the deep layers is reduced below a critical value. This yields a subtle competitive exclusion effect, where the oscillatory states in the deep layers are displaced by steady solutions in the UML. Finally, we present a novel graphical approach for deducing the competition outcome and for the analysis of the role of a UML in aquatic systems.

  3. Phytoplankton size impact on export flux in the global ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouw, Colleen B.; Barnett, Audrey; McKinley, Galen A.; Gloege, Lucas; Pilcher, Darren

    2016-10-01

    Efficiency of the biological pump of carbon to the deep ocean depends largely on biologically mediated export of carbon from the surface ocean and its remineralization with depth. Global satellite studies have primarily focused on chlorophyll concentration and net primary production (NPP) to understand the role of phytoplankton in these processes. Recent satellite retrievals of phytoplankton composition now allow for the size of phytoplankton cells to be considered. Here we improve understanding of phytoplankton size structure impacts on particle export, remineralization, and transfer. A global compilation of particulate organic carbon (POC) flux estimated from sediment traps and 234Th are utilized. Annual climatologies of NPP, percent microplankton, and POC flux at four time series locations and within biogeochemical provinces are constructed. Parameters that characterize POC flux versus depth (export flux ratio, labile fraction, and remineralization length scale) are fit for time series locations, biogeochemical provinces, and times of the year dominated by small and large phytoplankton cells where phytoplankton cell size show enough dynamic range over the annual cycle. Considering all data together, our findings support the idea of high export flux but low transfer efficiency in productive regions and vice versa for oligotrophic regions. However, when parsing by dominant size class, we find periods dominated by small cells to have both greater export flux efficiency and lower transfer efficiency than periods when large cells comprise a greater proportion of the phytoplankton community.

  4. [Phytoplankton community structure and eutrophication risk assessment of Beijiang River].

    PubMed

    Gou, Ting; Ma, Qian-Li; Xu, Zhen-Cheng; Wang, Li; Li, Jie; Zhao, Xue-Min

    2015-03-01

    To study the distribution of phytoplankton and water quality of Beijiang River, the community structure of phytoplankton was investigated and analyzed in wet and dry seasons. The results showed that a total of 74 species belonging to six phyla, 29 family and 48 genera of phytoplankton were identified, including 58 species of five phyla, 23 family and 41 genera in wet season and 59 species of six phyla, 26 family and 40 genera in dry season. Phytoplankton community structure in Beijiang River was represented by Bacillariophyta, Chlorophyta and Cyanophyta. Bacillariophyta dominanted the phytoplankton, and the dominant species were Aulacoseira granulate, Fragilaria virescens, Surirella biseriata, Nitzschia amphibia, Navicula simplex, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Synedra ulna, Gomphonema angustatum and Cymbella tumida. There was little difference in phytoplankton density between both seasons with the mean values being 3.54 x 10(5) and 4.87 x 10(5) cells L(-1) in dry and wet seasons, respectively. Based on the RDA results, DO, permanganate index, nitrogen and phosphorus were the important environmental factors affecting the distribution of phytoplankton in Beijiang River. The water quality of Beijiang River was classified as oligo-mesotrophic level even if this river was subjected to nitrogen and phosphorus pollution mainly from agricultural non-point source.