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  1. Individual Identifiability Predicts Population Identifiability in Forensic Microsatellite Markers.

    PubMed

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B; Edge, Michael D; Kim, Jaehee; Li, Jun Z; Rosenberg, Noah A

    2016-04-04

    Highly polymorphic genetic markers with significant potential for distinguishing individual identity are used as a standard tool in forensic testing [1, 2]. At the same time, population-genetic studies have suggested that genetically diverse markers with high individual identifiability also confer information about genetic ancestry [3-6]. The dual influence of polymorphism levels on ancestry inference and forensic desirability suggests that forensically useful marker sets with high levels of individual identifiability might also possess substantial ancestry information. We study a standard forensic marker set-the 13 CODIS loci used in the United States and elsewhere [2, 7-9]-together with 779 additional microsatellites [10], using direct population structure inference to test whether markers with substantial individual identifiability also produce considerable information about ancestry. Despite having been selected for individual identification and not for ancestry inference [11], the CODIS markers generate nontrivial model-based clustering patterns similar to those of other sets of 13 tetranucleotide microsatellites. Although the CODIS markers have relatively low values of the F(ST) divergence statistic, their high heterozygosities produce greater ancestry inference potential than is possessed by less heterozygous marker sets. More generally, we observe that marker sets with greater individual identifiability also tend toward greater population identifiability. We conclude that population identifiability regularly follows as a byproduct of the use of highly polymorphic forensic markers. Our findings have implications for the design of new forensic marker sets and for evaluations of the extent to which individual characteristics beyond identification might be predicted from current and future forensic data.

  2. Inflammation markers in individuals with history of mental health crisis.

    PubMed

    Justo, Dan; Arbel, Yaron; Altberg, Gal; Kinori, Michael; Shirom, Arie; Melamed, Samuel; Shapira, Itzhak; Rogowski, Ori

    2008-08-01

    The association between temporary emotional states and systemic inflammation has never been studied. We measured the levels of systemic inflammation markers in the peripheral blood of individuals with history of mental health crisis. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen plasma level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) serum level, and white blood cell count (WBCC) were measured for each individual during routine screening examinations. History of mental health crisis was self-reported. Individuals taking psychotropic agents were excluded. A total of 4,669 males and 2,576 females were included. One hundred forty-eight (2.0%) individuals (77 males and 71 females) reported a history of mental health crisis, and 7,097 (98.0%) individuals (4,592 males and 2,505 females) did not report a history of mental health crisis. After adjustment for multiple confounders which had been associated with elevated systemic inflammation markers, the levels of systemic inflammation markers were significantly higher among males with history of mental health crisis compared with males with no history of mental health crisis, including fibrinogen plasma levels (294+/-6.1 vs. 279+/-1.9 mg/dl, p=0.010), and WBCC (7.2+/-0.2 vs. 6.8+/-0.1 x 10(3) cells/dl, p=0.039). The levels of systemic inflammation markers were not significantly higher among females with history of mental health crisis compared with females with no history of mental health crisis. History of mental health crisis might be associated with systemic inflammation in males. This finding may be relevant to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease in males.

  3. Neural markers of individual differences in decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Kable, Joseph W.; Levy, Ifat

    2017-01-01

    In the last few years, neuroscientists have begun to identify associations between individual differences in decision-making and features of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. Different tendencies in decision making, such as tolerance for risk, delay or effort, have been linked to various neurobiological measures, such as morphometry, structural connectivity, functional connectivity or the function of neurotransmitter systems. Though far from immutable, these neural features may nonetheless be suitable as relatively stable biomarkers for different decision traits. The establishment of such markers would achieve one of the stated goals of neuroeconomics, which is to improve the prediction of economic behavior across different contexts.

  4. Individual Markers of Resilience in Train Traffic Control

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Julia C.; Pluyter, Kari R.; Meijer, Sebastiaan A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine individual markers of resilience and obtain quantitative insights into the understanding and the implications of variation and expertise levels in train traffic operators’ goals and strategic mental models and their impact on performance. Background: The Dutch railways are one of the world’s most heavy utilized railway networks and have been identified to be weak in system and organizational resilience. Method: Twenty-two train traffic controllers enacted two scenarios in a human-in-the-loop simulator. Their experience, goals, strategic mental models, and performance were assessed through questionnaires and simulator logs. Goals were operationalized through performance indicators and strategic mental models through train completion strategies. Results: A variation was found between operators for both self-reported primary performance indicators and completion strategies. Further, the primary goal of only 14% of the operators reflected the primary organizational goal (i.e., arrival punctuality). An incongruence was also found between train traffic controllers’ self-reported performance indicators and objective performance in a more disrupted condition. The level of experience tends to affect performance differently. Conclusion: There is a gap between primary organizational goals and preferred individual goals. Further, the relative strong diversity in primary operator goals and strategic mental models indicates weak resilience at the individual level. Application: With recent and upcoming large-scale changes throughout the sociotechnical space of the railway infrastructure organization, the findings are useful to facilitate future railway traffic control and the development of a resilient system. PMID:26721290

  5. Language Individuation and Marker Words: Shakespeare and His Maxwell's Demon

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, John; Budden, David; Craig, Hugh; Moscato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Background Within the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, all authors develop their own distinctive writing styles. Whether the relative occurrence of common words can be measured to produce accurate models of authorship is of particular interest. This work introduces a new score that helps to highlight such variations in word occurrence, and is applied to produce models of authorship of a large group of plays from the Shakespearean era. Methodology A text corpus containing 55,055 unique words was generated from 168 plays from the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries) of undisputed authorship. A new score, CM1, is introduced to measure variation patterns based on the frequency of occurrence of each word for the authors John Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton and William Shakespeare, compared to the rest of the authors in the study (which provides a reference of relative word usage at that time). A total of 50 WEKA methods were applied for Fletcher, Jonson and Middleton, to identify those which were able to produce models yielding over 90% classification accuracy. This ensemble of WEKA methods was then applied to model Shakespearean authorship across all 168 plays, yielding a Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC) performance of over 90%. Furthermore, the best model yielded an MCC of 99%. Conclusions Our results suggest that different authors, while adhering to the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, develop measurably distinct styles by the tendency to over-utilise or avoid particular common words and phrasings. Considering language and the potential of words as an abstract chaotic system with a high entropy, similarities can be drawn to the Maxwell's Demon thought experiment; authors subconsciously favour or filter certain words, modifying the probability profile in ways that could reflect their individuality and style. PMID:23826143

  6. Language Individuation and Marker Words: Shakespeare and His Maxwell's Demon.

    PubMed

    Marsden, John; Budden, David; Craig, Hugh; Moscato, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Within the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, all authors develop their own distinctive writing styles. Whether the relative occurrence of common words can be measured to produce accurate models of authorship is of particular interest. This work introduces a new score that helps to highlight such variations in word occurrence, and is applied to produce models of authorship of a large group of plays from the Shakespearean era. A text corpus containing 55,055 unique words was generated from 168 plays from the Shakespearean era (16th and 17th centuries) of undisputed authorship. A new score, CM1, is introduced to measure variation patterns based on the frequency of occurrence of each word for the authors John Fletcher, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton and William Shakespeare, compared to the rest of the authors in the study (which provides a reference of relative word usage at that time). A total of 50 WEKA methods were applied for Fletcher, Jonson and Middleton, to identify those which were able to produce models yielding over 90% classification accuracy. This ensemble of WEKA methods was then applied to model Shakespearean authorship across all 168 plays, yielding a Matthews' correlation coefficient (MCC) performance of over 90%. Furthermore, the best model yielded an MCC of 99%. Our results suggest that different authors, while adhering to the structural and grammatical bounds of a common language, develop measurably distinct styles by the tendency to over-utilise or avoid particular common words and phrasings. Considering language and the potential of words as an abstract chaotic system with a high entropy, similarities can be drawn to the Maxwell's Demon thought experiment; authors subconsciously favour or filter certain words, modifying the probability profile in ways that could reflect their individuality and style.

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness Among Individuals with Clinical Markers of Kidney Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura C.; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Jordan, Regina; Burrows, Nilka Ríos; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Yee, Jerry; Saran, Rajiv; Powe, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Awareness of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among providers and patients is low. Whether clinical cues prompt recognition of CKD is unknown. We examined whether markers of kidney disease that should trigger CKD recognition among providers are associated with higher individual CKD awareness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements CKD awareness was assessed in 1852 adults with an estimated GFR <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2 using 1999 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. CKD awareness was a “yes” answer to “Have you ever been told you have weak or failing kidneys?” Participants were grouped by distribution of the following abnormal markers of CKD: hyperkalemia, acidosis, hyperphosphatemia, elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, albuminuria, and uncontrolled hypertension. Odds of CKD awareness associated with each abnormal marker and groupings of markers were estimated by multivariable logistic regression. Results Among individuals with kidney disease, only those with albuminuria had greater odds of CKD awareness (adjusted odds ratio, 4.0, P < 0.01) than those without. Odds of CKD awareness increased with each additional manifested clinical marker of CKD (adjusted odds ratio, 1.3, P = 0.05). Nonetheless, 90% of individuals with two to four markers of CKD and 84% of individuals with ≥5 markers of CKD were unaware of their disease. Conclusions Although individuals who manifest many markers of kidney dysfunction are more likely to be aware of their CKD, their CKD awareness remains low. A better understanding of mechanisms of awareness is required to facilitate earlier detection of CKD and implement therapy to minimize associated complications. PMID:21784832

  8. Contribution of Frailty Markers in Explaining Differences Among Individuals in Five Samples of Older Persons

    PubMed Central

    Sourial, Nadia; Karunananthan, Sathya; Wolfson, Christina; Guralnik, Jack; Payette, Hélène; Gutierrez-Robledo, Luis; Deeg, Dorly J. H.; Fletcher, John D.; Puts, Maria T. E.; Zhu, Bin; Béland, François

    2012-01-01

    Background. There has been little research on the relative importance of frailty markers. The objective was to investigate the association among seven frailty domains (nutrition, physical activity, mobility, strength, energy, cognition, and mood) and their relative contribution in explaining differences among individuals in five samples of older persons. Methods. Data from five studies of aging were analyzed using multiple correspondence analysis. Aggregation of frailty markers was evaluated using graphical output. Decomposition of variability was used to assess the relative contribution of each marker in each sample. Results were combined across the samples to assess the average contribution. Results. Frailty markers were found to consistently aggregate in each sample, suggesting a possible underlying construct. Physical strength had the highest contribution on average in explaining differences among individuals. Mobility and energy also had large contributions. Nutrition and cognition had the smallest contributions. Conclusions. Our results provide further evidence supporting the notion that frailty domains may belong to a common construct. Physical strength may be the most important discriminating characteristic. PMID:22459619

  9. Individual, family, and community risk markers for domestic violence in Peru.

    PubMed

    Flake, Dallan F

    2005-03-01

    This study draws on an ecological framework in testing relationships between individual, family, and community characteristics and the likelihood of women experiencing domestic violence in Peru. The sample of 15,991 women was taken from the 2000 Peru Demographic and Health Survey. Logistic regression models revealed that at the individual level, low educational attainment, early union formation, and a violent family background increase a woman's likelihood of abuse. Family-level risk markers include cohabitation, large family size, partner alcohol consumption, employment, and a woman's having higher status than her husband. At the community level, living in a noncoastal area and having an urban residence increase the likelihood of abuse.

  10. Measuring individual inbreeding in the age of genomics: marker-based measures are better than pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Kardos, M; Luikart, G; Allendorf, F W

    2015-07-01

    Inbreeding (mating between relatives) can dramatically reduce the fitness of offspring by causing parts of the genome to be identical by descent. Thus, measuring individual inbreeding is crucial for ecology, evolution and conservation biology. We used computer simulations to test whether the realized proportion of the genome that is identical by descent (IBDG) is predicted better by the pedigree inbreeding coefficient (FP) or by genomic (marker-based) measures of inbreeding. Genomic estimators of IBDG included the increase in individual homozygosity relative to mean Hardy-Weinberg expected homozygosity (FH), and two measures (FROH and FE) that use mapped genetic markers to estimate IBDG. IBDG was more strongly correlated with FH, FE and FROH than with FP across a broad range of simulated scenarios when thousands of SNPs were used. For example, IBDG was more strongly correlated with FROH, FH and FE (estimated with ⩾10 000 SNPs) than with FP (estimated with 20 generations of complete pedigree) in populations with a recent reduction in the effective populations size (from Ne=500 to Ne=75). FROH, FH and FE generally explained >90% of the variance in IBDG (among individuals) when 35 K or more SNPs were used. FP explained <80% of the variation in IBDG on average in all simulated scenarios, even when pedigrees included 20 generations. Our results demonstrate that IBDG can be more precisely estimated with large numbers of genetic markers than with pedigrees. We encourage researchers to adopt genomic marker-based measures of IBDG as thousands of loci can now be genotyped in any species.

  11. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  12. Insula and somatosensory cortical myelination and iron markers underlie individual differences in empathy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Micah; Frank, Darya; Glen, James C.; Fardo, Francesca; Callaghan, Martina F.; Rees, Geraint

    2017-01-01

    Empathy is a key component of our ability to engage and interact with others. In recent years, the neural mechanisms underlying affective and cognitive empathy have garnered intense interest. This work demonstrates that empathy for others depends upon a distributed network of regions such as the insula, parietal cortex, and somatosensory areas, which are also activated when we ourselves experience an empathized-with emotion (e.g., pain). Individuals vary markedly in their ability to empathize with others, which predicts the tendency to help others and relates to individual differences in the neuroanatomy of these areas. Here, we use a newly developed, high-resolution (800 μm isotropic), quantitative MRI technique to better elucidate the neuroanatomical underpinnings of individual differences in empathy. Our findings extend previous studies of the neuroanatomical correlates of cognitive and affective empathy. In particular, individual differences in cognitive empathy were associated with markers of myeloarchitectural integrity of the insular cortex, while affective empathy was predicted by a marker of iron content in second somatosensory cortex. These results indicate potential novel biomarkers of trait empathy, suggesting that microstructural features of an empathy and body-related network are crucial for understanding the mental and emotional states of others. PMID:28256532

  13. Neurophysiological assessment of Alzheimer's disease individuals by a single electroencephalographic marker.

    PubMed

    Lizio, Roberta; Del Percio, Claudio; Marzano, Nicola; Soricelli, Andrea; Yener, Görsev G; Başar, Erol; Mundi, Ciro; De Rosa, Salvatore; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Ferri, Raffaele; Arnaldi, Dario; Nobili, Flavio Mariano; Cordone, Susanna; Lopez, Susanna; Carducci, Filippo; Santi, Giulia; Gesualdo, Loreto; Rossini, Paolo M; Cavedo, Enrica; Mauri, Margherita; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Babiloni, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Here we presented a single electroencephalographic (EEG) marker for a neurophysiological assessment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients already diagnosed by current guidelines. The ability of the EEG marker to classify 127 AD individuals and 121 matched cognitively intact normal elderly (Nold) individuals was tested. Furthermore, its relationship to AD patients' cognitive status and structural brain integrity was examined. Low-resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) freeware estimated cortical sources of resting state eyes-closed EEG rhythms. The EEG marker was defined as the ratio between the activity of parieto-occipital cortical sources of delta (2-4 Hz) and low-frequency alpha (8-10.5 Hz) rhythms. Results showed 77.2% of sensitivity in the recognition of the AD individuals; 65% of specificity in the recognition of the Nold individuals; and 0.75 of area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve. Compared to the AD subgroup with the EEG maker within one standard deviation of the Nold mean (EEG-), the AD subgroup with EEG+ showed lower global cognitive status, as revealed by Mini-Mental State Evaluation score, and more abnormal values of white-matter and cerebrospinal fluid normalized volumes, as revealed by structural magnetic resonance imaging. We posit that cognitive and functional status being equal, AD patients with EEG+ should receive special clinical attention due to a neurophysiological "frailty". EEG+ label can be also used in clinical trials (i) to form homogeneous groups of AD patients diagnosed by current guidelines and (ii) as end-point to evaluate intervention effects.

  14. Dissecting linkage disequilibrium in African-American genomes: roles of markers and individuals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhua; Huang, Wei; Wang, Haifeng; He, Yungang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Yi; Qian, Ji; Xiong, Momiao; Jin, Li

    2007-09-01

    Substantial increases of linkage disequilibrium (LD) both in magnitude and in range have been observed in recently admixed populations such as African-American (AfA). On the other hand, it has also been shown that LD in AfAs was very similar to that of African. In this study, we attempted to resolve these contradicting observations by conducting a systematic examination of the LD structure in AfAs by genotyping a sample of AfA individuals at 24,341 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning almost the entire chromosome 21, with an average density of 1.5 kb/SNP. The overall LD in AfAs is similar to that in African populations and much less than that in European populations. Even when the ancestry-informative markers (AIMs) were used, extended LD in AfA was found to be limited to certain magnitude range (0.2 < or = r(2) < or = 0.8) and certain distance range, that is, between-marker distance more than 200 kb. Furthermore, the inclusion of AfA individuals with predominant African ancestry was found to reduce the overall magnitude of LD. Elevation of LD in the AfA population, compared with its parental populations, can only be observed at the markers with large allele frequency differences between 2 parental populations at limited scenario. AfA individuals of wholly African ancestry contribute little to the extended LD in the AfA population, and further genotyping or association analysis conducted using only admixed individuals may lead to higher statistical power and possibly reduced cost.

  15. Experimental gingivitis induces systemic inflammatory markers in young healthy individuals: a single-subject interventional study.

    PubMed

    Eberhard, Jörg; Grote, Karsten; Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Schieffer, Bernhard; Stiesch, Meike

    2013-01-01

    We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, P<0.0001). This local inflammation was associated with a systemic increase in hsCRP (0.24 mg/L, P = 0.038), IL-6 (12.52 ng/L, P = 0.0002) and MCP-1 (9.10 ng/l, P = 0.124) in peripheral blood samples between baseline and day 21, which decreased at day 42. Monocytes showed an enhanced adherence to endothelial cells and increased foam cell formation after oxLDL uptake (P<0.050) at day 21 of gingivitis. Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http://apps.who.int/trialsearch/Default.aspx.

  16. Individualization of controlled ovarian stimulation in IVF using ovarian reserve markers: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Antonio; Sunkara, Sesh Kamal

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of individualization of treatment in IVF is to offer every single woman the best treatment tailored to her own unique characteristics, thus maximizing the chances of pregnancy and eliminating the iatrogenic and avoidable risks resulting from ovarian stimulation. Personalization of treatment in IVF should be based on the prediction of ovarian response for every individual. The starting point is to identify if a woman is likely to have a normal, poor or a hyper response and choose the ideal treatment protocol tailored to this prediction. The objective of this review is to summarize the predictive ability of ovarian reserve markers, such as antral follicle count (AFC) and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), and the therapeutic strategies that have been proposed in IVF after this prediction. A systematic review of the existing literature was performed by searching Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane library and Web of Science for publications in the English language related to AFC, AMH and their incorporation into controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) protocols in IVF. Literature available to May 2013 was included. The search generated 305 citations of which 41 and 25 studies, respectively, reporting the ability of AMH and AFC to predict response to COS were included in this review. The literature review demonstrated that AFC and AMH, the most sensitive markers of ovarian reserve identified to date, are ideal in planning personalized COS protocols. These sensitive markers permit prediction of the whole spectrum of ovarian response with reliable accuracy and clinicians may use either of the two markers as they can be considered interchangeable. Following the categorization of expected ovarian response to stimulation clinicians can adopt tailored therapeutic strategies for each patient. Current scientific trend suggests the elective use of the GnRH antagonist based regimen for hyper-responders, and probably also poor responders, as likely to be beneficial. The

  17. Individual behavioral and neurochemical markers of unadapted decision-making processes in healthy inbred mice.

    PubMed

    Pittaras, Elsa; Callebert, Jacques; Chennaoui, Mounir; Rabat, Arnaud; Granon, Sylvie

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of decision-making processes is the inter-individual variability between healthy subjects. These behavioral patterns could constitute risk factors for the development of psychiatric disorders. Therefore, finding predictive markers of safe or risky decision-making is an important challenge for psychiatry research. We set up a mouse gambling task (MGT)-adapted from the human Iowa gambling task with uncertain contingencies between response and outcome that furthermore enables the emergence of inter-individual differences. Mice (n = 54) were further individually characterized for locomotive, emotional and cognitive behavior. Individual basal rates of monoamines and brain activation after the MGT were assessed in brain regions related to reward, emotion or cognition. In a large healthy mice population, 44 % showed a balanced strategy with limited risk-taking and flexible choices, 29 % showed a safe but rigid strategy, while 27 % adopted risky behavior. Risky mice took also more risks in other apparatus behavioral devices and were less sensitive to reward. No difference existed between groups regarding anxiety, working memory, locomotion and impulsivity. Safe/rigid mice exhibited a hypoactivation of prefrontal subareas, a high level of serotonin in the orbitofrontal cortex combined with a low level of dopamine in the putamen that predicted the emergence of rigid behavior. By contrast, high levels of dopamine, serotonin and noradrenalin in the hippocampus predicted the emergence of more exploratory and risky behaviors. The coping of C57bl/6J mice in MGT enables the determination of extreme patterns of choices either safe/rigid or risky/flexible, related to specific neurochemical and behavioral markers.

  18. Individualization of controlled ovarian stimulation in vitro fertilization using ovarian reserve markers.

    PubMed

    Grisendi, Valentina; La Marca, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    In assisted reproduction technologies (ART) the controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) therapy is the starting point from which a good oocytes retrieval depends. Treatment individualization is based on ovarian response prediction, which largely depends on a woman's ovarian reserve. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and antral follicle count (AFC) are considered the most accurate and reliable markers of ovarian reserve. A literature search was carried out for studies that addressed the ability of AMH and AFC to predict poor and/or excessive ovarian response in IVF cycles. According to the predicted response to ovarian stimulation (poor- normal- or high-response) is today possible not only to personalize pre-treatment counseling with the couple, but also to individualize the ovarian stimulation protocol, choosing among GnRH-agonists or antagonists for endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) suppression and formulating the FSH starting dose most adequate for the single patients. In this review we discuss how to choose the best COS therapy for the single patient, on the basis of the markers-guided ovarian response prediction.

  19. Experimental Gingivitis Induces Systemic Inflammatory Markers in Young Healthy Individuals: A Single-Subject Interventional Study

    PubMed Central

    Luchtefeld, Maren; Heuer, Wieland; Schuett, Harald; Divchev, Dimitar; Scherer, Ralph; Schmitz-Streit, Ruth; Langfeldt, Daniela; Stumpp, Nico; Staufenbiel, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We here investigated whether experimental gingivitis enhances systemic markers of inflammation which are also known as surrogate markers of atherosclerotic plaque development. Background Gingivitis is a low-level oral infection induced by bacterial deposits with a high prevalence within Western populations. A potential link between the more severe oral disease periodontitis and cardiovascular disease has already been shown. Methods 37 non-smoking young volunteers with no inflammatory disease or any cardiovascular risk factors participated in this single-subject interventional study with an intra-individual control. Intentionally experimental oral inflammation was induced by the interruption of oral hygiene for 21 days, followed by a 21-days resolving phase after reinitiation of oral hygiene. Primary outcome measures at baseline, day 21 and 42 were concentrations of hsCRP, IL-6, and MCP-1, as well as adhesion capacity and oxLDL uptake of isolated blood monocytes. Results The partial cessation of oral hygiene procedures was followed by the significant increase of gingival bleeding (34.0%, P<0.0001). This local inflammation was associated with a systemic increase in hsCRP (0.24 mg/L, P = 0.038), IL-6 (12.52 ng/L, P = 0.0002) and MCP-1 (9.10 ng/l, P = 0.124) in peripheral blood samples between baseline and day 21, which decreased at day 42. Monocytes showed an enhanced adherence to endothelial cells and increased foam cell formation after oxLDL uptake (P<0.050) at day 21 of gingivitis. Conclusions Bacterial-induced gingival low-level inflammation induced a systemic increase in inflammatory markers. Dental hygiene almost completely reversed this experimental inflammatory process, suggesting that appropriate dental prophylaxis may also limit systemic markers of inflammation in subjects with natural gingivitis. International Clinical Trials Register Platform of the World Health Organization, registry number: DRKS00003366, URL: http

  20. Empirical Selection of Informative Microsatellite Markers within Co-ancestry Pig Populations Is Required for Improving the Individual Assignment Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Li, Y H; Chu, H P; Jiang, Y N; Lin, C Y; Li, S H; Li, K T; Weng, G J; Cheng, C C; Lu, D J; Ju, Y T

    2014-05-01

    The Lanyu is a miniature pig breed indigenous to Lanyu Island, Taiwan. It is distantly related to Asian and European pig breeds. It has been inbred to generate two breeds and crossed with Landrace and Duroc to produce two hybrids for laboratory use. Selecting sets of informative genetic markers to track the genetic qualities of laboratory animals and stud stock is an important function of genetic databases. For more than two decades, Lanyu derived breeds of common ancestry and crossbreeds have been used to examine the effectiveness of genetic marker selection and optimal approaches for individual assignment. In this paper, these pigs and the following breeds: Berkshire, Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire, Meishan and Taoyuan, TLRI Black Pig No. 1, and Kaohsiung Animal Propagation Station Black pig are studied to build a genetic reference database. Nineteen microsatellite markers (loci) provide information on genetic variation and differentiation among studied breeds. High differentiation index (FST) and Cavalli-Sforza chord distances give genetic differentiation among breeds, including Lanyu's inbred populations. Inbreeding values (FIS) show that Lanyu and its derived inbred breeds have significant loss of heterozygosity. Individual assignment testing of 352 animals was done with different numbers of microsatellite markers in this study. The testing assigned 99% of the animals successfully into their correct reference populations based on 9 to 14 markers ranking D-scores, allelic number, expected heterozygosity (HE) or FST, respectively. All miss-assigned individuals came from close lineage Lanyu breeds. To improve individual assignment among close lineage breeds, microsatellite markers selected from Lanyu populations with high polymorphic, heterozygosity, FST and D-scores were used. Only 6 to 8 markers ranking HE, FST or allelic number were required to obtain 99% assignment accuracy. This result suggests empirical examination of assignment-error rates is required if

  1. How good are systemic symptoms and blood inflammatory markers at detecting individuals with tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Breen, R A M; Leonard, O; Perrin, F M R; Smith, C J; Bhagani, S; Cropley, I; Lipman, M C I

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) may be rejected in the absence of symptoms such as fever, sweats or weight loss. To determine how frequently these features and blood test evidence of inflammation were absent in individuals with TB. Prospective cohort study of 175 unselected subjects diagnosed with TB at a UK TB service between 2003 and 2006. Eight (5%) subjects identified by screening and 24 (14%) without culture confirmation were excluded. Of the remaining 143, fever, sweats or weight loss were absent in respectively 37%, 39% and 38%. All three symptoms were absent in 25%. In 88 subjects with pulmonary disease, all three symptoms were absent in 20% (10% of smear-positive cases). Overall, C-reactive protein was normal in 15%, erythrocyte sedimentation rate in 21% and lactate dehydrogenase in 55%. In a multivariable model, factors associated with absent symptoms included drug-resistant TB (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.58, P = 0.004) and female sex (aOR 3.15, P = 0.004). In our population, TB, including pulmonary disease, frequently presented without fever, sweats or weight loss and with normal blood inflammatory markers. This information is of as much relevance to policy makers seeking to improve active case detection as to clinicians and the general public.

  2. Adult renal size is not a suitable marker for nephron numbers: an individual patient data meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bueters, Ruud Rg; van de Kar, Nicole Caj; Schreuder, Michiel F

    2013-01-01

    Renal size is often used as a marker for nephron numbers as estimation of glomerular numbers is not yet possible in vivo. However, the validity of an association between the two is questionable. As a proper marker for nephron number in an individual is needed in clinical practice, this study was designed to assess the association between renal size and nephron numbers. An individual patient data meta-analysis was performed on data retrieved with a PubMed and Embase search. Only studies were included that described individual human data on kidney size and nephron numbers determined by stereology, the gold standard methodology to estimate nephron numbers. As renal size increases until the end of puberty, and nephron numbers decline after the age of 60 years, only data from individuals aged 18-60 years without renal disease were included. Six papers were identified that provided data on renal weight and nephron numbers from 114 individuals. Backward linear regression identified kidney weight and race as the only 2 significant factors explaining nephron numbers (R square 0.085, p=0.007). Controlling for race, there was a significant correlation between nephron number and kidney weight (r=0.231, r square=0.053, p=0.01). These data indicate that only ∼5% of the variation in nephron numbers is explained by differences in renal size. Renal size in adulthood should not be used as a marker for nephron numbers in an individual. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Empirical Selection of Informative Microsatellite Markers within Co-ancestry Pig Populations Is Required for Improving the Individual Assignment Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y. H.; Chu, H. P.; Jiang, Y. N.; Lin, C. Y.; Li, S. H.; Li, K. T.; Weng, G. J.; Cheng, C. C.; Lu, D. J.; Ju, Y. T.

    2014-01-01

    The Lanyu is a miniature pig breed indigenous to Lanyu Island, Taiwan. It is distantly related to Asian and European pig breeds. It has been inbred to generate two breeds and crossed with Landrace and Duroc to produce two hybrids for laboratory use. Selecting sets of informative genetic markers to track the genetic qualities of laboratory animals and stud stock is an important function of genetic databases. For more than two decades, Lanyu derived breeds of common ancestry and crossbreeds have been used to examine the effectiveness of genetic marker selection and optimal approaches for individual assignment. In this paper, these pigs and the following breeds: Berkshire, Duroc, Landrace and Yorkshire, Meishan and Taoyuan, TLRI Black Pig No. 1, and Kaohsiung Animal Propagation Station Black pig are studied to build a genetic reference database. Nineteen microsatellite markers (loci) provide information on genetic variation and differentiation among studied breeds. High differentiation index (FST) and Cavalli-Sforza chord distances give genetic differentiation among breeds, including Lanyu’s inbred populations. Inbreeding values (FIS) show that Lanyu and its derived inbred breeds have significant loss of heterozygosity. Individual assignment testing of 352 animals was done with different numbers of microsatellite markers in this study. The testing assigned 99% of the animals successfully into their correct reference populations based on 9 to 14 markers ranking D-scores, allelic number, expected heterozygosity (HE) or FST, respectively. All miss-assigned individuals came from close lineage Lanyu breeds. To improve individual assignment among close lineage breeds, microsatellite markers selected from Lanyu populations with high polymorphic, heterozygosity, FST and D-scores were used. Only 6 to 8 markers ranking HE, FST or allelic number were required to obtain 99% assignment accuracy. This result suggests empirical examination of assignment-error rates is required if

  4. Individual and combined usefulness of lipid associated sialic acid, mucoid proteins and hexoses as tumor markers in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, P S; Baxi, B R; Adhvaryu, S G; Balar, D B

    1990-06-15

    Serum levels of lipid associated sialic acid (LASA), mucoid proteins (MP) and hexoses (galactose + mannose) were measured in 41 breast cancer patients, 14 patients with benign breast diseases and 36 healthy age matched female individuals. In breast carcinoma patients, we have observed significant increase in the levels of the three markers compared with the controls (P less than 0.001) and in MP and hexoses compared to the patients with benign breast diseases (P less than 0.001). LASA and hexoses levels were significantly higher in benign breast diseases with respect to controls (P less than 0.001 and P less than 0.01, respectively). We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of the markers individually and in combination. MP were most sensitive (71.8%) and specific (71.4%). Both sensitivity and specificity were increased when combinations of the markers were studied. Combination of MP with LASA was most sensitive (97.4%) while the combination of MP and hexoses was most specific (92.9%). LASA was significantly elevated in infiltrating duct carcinoma compared to lobular carcinoma (P less than 0.001). MP and hexoses also showed higher mean value in infiltrating duct carcinoma than lobular carcinoma. The present study suggests that the combination of the markers investigated might be useful for diagnosis and classification of breast carcinoma.

  5. A comparative analysis and guidance for individualized chemotherapy of stage II and III colorectal cancer patients based on pathological markers

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Lu, Su; Yu, Fudong; Liu, Xisheng; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Jingtao; Zhu, Xingwu; Lu, Huijun; Yue, Hao; Wang, Jing; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Chongzhi; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is considered the standard of care for patients with colorectal cancer after curative resection. Although current guidelines provide clear instructions for chemotherapy for stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer, it is insufficient to individualize therapy. We analyzed the outcomes of 902 patients with colorectal cancer treated with or without chemotherapy in our hospital. We found Chinese survival benefit for chemotherapy was consistent with current guidelines. Moreover, our data added to the evidence that chemotherapy might be used for elderly patients with stage II high-risk colorectal cancer. Pathological markers could predict response to individualize therapy in a convenient, fast and inexpensive way. We compared survivals of patients with stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer with chemotherapy in different pathological markers expression, and furthermore used 458 colon adenocarcinoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas to verify our preliminary results. We confirmed TOPIIα, EGFR and P170 may be sufficiently predictive markers to individualize chemotherapy. FOLFOX was the optimal adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage II high-risk and stage III colorectal cancer when TOPIIα was positive or EGFR or P170 was negative. PMID:27845412

  6. The renal protective effect of angiotensin receptor blockers depends on intra-individual response variation in multiple risk markers

    PubMed Central

    Schievink, Bauke; de Zeeuw, Dick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are renoprotective and targeted to blood pressure. However, ARBs have multiple other (off-target) effects which may affect renal outcome. It is unknown whether on-target and off-target effects are congruent within individuals. If not, this variation in short term effects may have important implications for the prediction of individual long term renal outcomes. Our aim was to assess intra-individual variability in multiple parameters in response to ARBs in type 2 diabetes. Methods Changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP), albuminuria, potassium, haemoglobin, cholesterol and uric acid after 6 months of losartan treatment were assessed in the RENAAL database. Improvement in predictive performance of renal outcomes (ESRD or doubling serum creatinine) for each individual using ARB-induced changes in all risk markers was assessed by the relative integrative discrimination index (RIDI). Results SBP response showed high variability (mean –5.7 mmHg, 5th to 95th percentile –36.5 to +24.0 mmHg) between individuals. Changes in off-target parameters also showed high variability between individuals. No congruency was observed between responses to losartan in multiple parameters within individuals. Using individual responses in all risk markers significantly improved renal risk prediction (RIDI 30.4%, P < 0.01) compared with using only SBP changes. Results were successfully replicated in two independent trials with irbesartan, IDNT and IRMA-2. Conclusions In this post hoc analysis we showed that ARBs have multiple off-target effects which vary between and within individuals. Combining all ARB-induced responses beyond SBP provides a more accurate prediction of who will benefit from ARB therapy. Prospective trials are required to validate these findings. PMID:25872610

  7. Assessing individual interethnic admixture and population substructure using a 48-insertion-deletion (INSEL) ancestry-informative marker (AIM) panel.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ney P C; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar M; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Andrea K C; Pereira, Rui; Gusmão, Leonor; Amorim, António; Guerreiro, Joáo F; Zago, Marco A; Matte, Cecília; Hutz, Mara H; Santos, Sidney E B

    2010-02-01

    Estimating the proportions of different ancestries in admixed populations is very important in population genetics studies, and it is particularly important for detecting population substructure effects in case-control association studies. In this work, a set of 48 ancestry-informative insertion-deletion polymorphisms (INDELs) were selected with the goal of efficiently measuring the proportions of three different ancestries (sub-Saharan African, European, and Native American) in mixed populations. All selected markers can be easily analyzed via multiplex PCR and detected with standard capillary electrophoresis. A total of 593 unrelated individuals representative of European, African, and Native American parental populations were typed, as were 380 individuals from three Brazilian populations with known admixture patterns. As expected, the interethnic admixture estimates show that individuals from southern Brazil present an almost exclusively European ancestry; Afro-descendant communities in the Amazon region, apart from the major African contribution, present some degree of admixture with Europeans and Native Americans; and a sample from Belém, in the northeastern Amazon, shows a significant contribution of the three ethnic groups, although with a greater European proportion. In summary, a panel of ancestry-informative INDELs was optimized and proven to be a valuable tool for estimating individual and global ancestry proportions in admixed populations. The ability to accurately infer interethnic admixtures highlights the usefulness of this marker set for assessing population substructure in association studies, particularly those conducted in Brazilian and other Latin American populations sharing trihybrid ancestry patterns.

  8. Polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers for forensic individual identification and parentage analyses of seven threatened species of parrots (family Psittacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The parrot family represents one of the bird group with the largest number of endangered species, as a result of habitat destruction and illegal trade. This illicit traffic involves the smuggling of eggs and animals, and the laundering through captive breeding facilities of wild-caught animals. Despite the huge potential of wildlife DNA forensics to determine with conclusive evidence illegal trade, current usage of DNA profiling approaches in parrots has been limited by the lack of suitable molecular markers specifically developed for the focal species and by low cross-species polymorphism. In this study, we isolated DNA microsatellite markers in seven parrot species threatened with extinction (Amazona brasiliensis, A. oratrix, A. pretrei, A. rhodocorytha, Anodorhynchus leari, Ara rubrogenys and Primolius couloni). From an enriched genomic library followed by 454 pyrosequencing, we characterized a total of 106 polymorphic microsatellite markers (mostly tetranucleotides) in the seven species and tested them across an average number of 19 individuals per species. The mean number of alleles per species and across loci varied from 6.4 to 8.3, with the mean observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Identity and parentage exclusion probabilities were highly discriminatory. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci demonstrates their potential utility to perform individual genotyping and parentage analyses, in order to develop a DNA testing framework to determine illegal traffic in these threatened species. PMID:27688959

  9. Individual Differences in the Alignment of Structural and Functional Markers of the V5/MT Complex in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Large, I.; Bridge, H.; Ahmed, B.; Clare, S.; Kolasinski, J.; Lam, W. W.; Miller, K. L.; Dyrby, T. B.; Parker, A. J.; Smith, J. E. T.; Daubney, G.; Sallet, J.; Bell, A. H.; Krug, K.

    2016-01-01

    Extrastriate visual area V5/MT in primates is defined both structurally by myeloarchitecture and functionally by distinct responses to visual motion. Myelination is directly identifiable from postmortem histology but also indirectly by image contrast with structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI). First, we compared the identification of V5/MT using both sMRI and histology in Rhesus macaques. A section-by-section comparison of histological slices with in vivo and postmortem sMRI for the same block of cortical tissue showed precise correspondence in localizing heavy myelination for V5/MT and neighboring MST. Thus, sMRI in macaques accurately locates histologically defined myelin within areas known to be motion selective. Second, we investigated the functionally homologous human motion complex (hMT+) using high-resolution in vivo imaging. Humans showed considerable intersubject variability in hMT+ location, when defined with myelin-weighted sMRI signals to reveal structure. When comparing sMRI markers to functional MRI in response to moving stimuli, a region of high myelin signal was generally located within the hMT+ complex. However, there were considerable differences in the alignment of structural and functional markers between individuals. Our results suggest that variation in area identification for hMT+ based on structural and functional markers reflects individual differences in human regional brain architecture. PMID:27371764

  10. Polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers for forensic individual identification and parentage analyses of seven threatened species of parrots (family Psittacidae).

    PubMed

    Jan, Catherine; Fumagalli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The parrot family represents one of the bird group with the largest number of endangered species, as a result of habitat destruction and illegal trade. This illicit traffic involves the smuggling of eggs and animals, and the laundering through captive breeding facilities of wild-caught animals. Despite the huge potential of wildlife DNA forensics to determine with conclusive evidence illegal trade, current usage of DNA profiling approaches in parrots has been limited by the lack of suitable molecular markers specifically developed for the focal species and by low cross-species polymorphism. In this study, we isolated DNA microsatellite markers in seven parrot species threatened with extinction (Amazona brasiliensis, A. oratrix, A. pretrei, A. rhodocorytha, Anodorhynchus leari, Ara rubrogenys and Primolius couloni). From an enriched genomic library followed by 454 pyrosequencing, we characterized a total of 106 polymorphic microsatellite markers (mostly tetranucleotides) in the seven species and tested them across an average number of 19 individuals per species. The mean number of alleles per species and across loci varied from 6.4 to 8.3, with the mean observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Identity and parentage exclusion probabilities were highly discriminatory. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci demonstrates their potential utility to perform individual genotyping and parentage analyses, in order to develop a DNA testing framework to determine illegal traffic in these threatened species.

  11. Genetic Effects on Postprandial Variations of Inflammatory Markers in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Kao, Wen-Hong L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Vogel, Robert A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Pollin, Toni I.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating levels of inflammatory markers predict the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), mediated perhaps in part by dietary fat intake, through mechanisms only partially understood. To evaluate post-fat load changes in inflammatory markers and genetic influences on these changes, we administered a standardized high-fat meal to 838 related Amish subjects as part of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study and measured a panel of inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-1 β (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -9 (MMP-1 and MMP-9), and white blood cell (WBC) count, before and 4 hours post-fat challenge (CRP pre-challenge only). Heritabilities (h2 ± SD) of basal inflammatory levels ranged from 16 ± 8% for MMP-9 (P = 0.02) to 90 ± 7% for MMP-1 (P < 0.0001). Post-fat load, circulating levels of WBC, MMP-1 and MMP-9 increased by 16%, 32% and 43% (all P < 0.0001), with no significant changes in IL-1β. Postprandial changes over the 4-hour period were modestly heritable for WBC (age- and sex-adjusted h2 = 14 ± 9%, P = 0.04), but the larger MMP-1 and MMP-9 changes appeared to be independent of additive genetic effects. These results reveal that a high fat meal induces a considerable inflammatory response. Genetic factors appear to play a significant role influencing basal inflammatory levels but to have minimal influence on post-fat intake inflammatory changes. PMID:19910936

  12. Characterization of microsatellites in wild and sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)--markers for individual identification and reproductive processes.

    PubMed

    Schueler, Silvio; Tusch, Alexandra; Schuster, Mirko; Ziegenhagen, Birgit

    2003-02-01

    Nuclear microsatellites were characterized in Prunus avium and validated as markers for individual and cultivar identification, as well as for studies of pollen- and seed-mediated gene flow. We used 20 primer pairs from a simple sequence repeat (SSR) library of Prunus persica and identified 7 loci harboring polymorphic microsatellite sequences in P. avium. In a natural population of 75 wild cherry trees, the number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 9 and expected heterozygosity from 0.39 to 0.77. The variability of the SSR markers allowed an unambiguous identification of individual trees and potential root suckers. Additionally, we analyzed 13 sweet cherry cultivars and differentiated 12 of them. An exclusion probability of 0.984 was calculated, which indicates that the seven loci are suitable markers for paternity analysis. The woody endocarp was successfully used for resolution of all microsatellite loci and exhibited the same multilocus genotype as the mother tree, as shown in a single seed progeny. Hence, SSR fingerprinting of the purely maternal endocarp was also successful in this Prunus species, allowing the identification of the mother tree of the dispersed seeds. The linkage of microsatellite loci with PCR-amplified alleles of the self-incompatibility locus was tested in two full-sib families of sweet cherry cultivars. From low recombination frequencies, we inferred that two loci are linked with the S locus. The present study provides markers that will significantly facilitate studies of spatial genetic variation and gene flow in wild cherry, as well as breeding programs in sweet cherry.

  13. Markers of inflammation and stress distinguish subsets of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fillman, S G; Sinclair, D; Fung, S J; Webster, M J; Shannon Weickert, C

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share a number of common features, both symptomatically and biologically. Abnormalities in the neuroimmune and the stress-signaling pathways have been previously identified in brains of individuals with both diseases. However, the possible relationship between abnormalities in stress and neuroimmune signaling within the cortex of people with psychotic illness has not been defined. To test the hypothesis that combined alterations in brain stress responsiveness and neuroimmune/inflammatory status are characteristic of some individuals suffering from major mental illness, we examined gene expression in the Stanley Array Cohort of 35 controls, 35 individuals with schizophrenia and 34 individuals with bipolar disorder. We used levels of 8 inflammatory-related transcripts, of which SERPINA3 was significantly elevated in individuals with schizophrenia (F(2,88)=4.137, P<0.05), and 12 glucocorticoid receptor signaling (stress) pathway transcripts previously examined, to identify two clusters of individuals: a high inflammation/stress group (n=32) and a low (n=68) inflammation/stress group. The high inflammation/stress group has a significantly greater number of individuals with schizophrenia (n=15), and a trend toward having more bipolar disorder individuals (n=11), when compared with controls (n=6). Using these subgroups, we tested which microarray-assessed transcriptional changes may be associated with high inflammatory/stress groups using ingenuity analysis and found that an extended network of gene expression changes involving immune, growth factors, inhibitory signaling and cell death factors also distinguished these groups. Our work demonstrates that some of the heterogeneity in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be partially explained by inflammation/stress interactions, and that this biological subtype cuts across Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-defined categories. PMID:24569695

  14. Markers of inflammation and stress distinguish subsets of individuals with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fillman, S G; Sinclair, D; Fung, S J; Webster, M J; Shannon Weickert, C

    2014-02-25

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share a number of common features, both symptomatically and biologically. Abnormalities in the neuroimmune and the stress-signaling pathways have been previously identified in brains of individuals with both diseases. However, the possible relationship between abnormalities in stress and neuroimmune signaling within the cortex of people with psychotic illness has not been defined. To test the hypothesis that combined alterations in brain stress responsiveness and neuroimmune/inflammatory status are characteristic of some individuals suffering from major mental illness, we examined gene expression in the Stanley Array Cohort of 35 controls, 35 individuals with schizophrenia and 34 individuals with bipolar disorder. We used levels of 8 inflammatory-related transcripts, of which SERPINA3 was significantly elevated in individuals with schizophrenia (F(2,88)=4.137, P<0.05), and 12 glucocorticoid receptor signaling (stress) pathway transcripts previously examined, to identify two clusters of individuals: a high inflammation/stress group (n=32) and a low (n=68) inflammation/stress group. The high inflammation/stress group has a significantly greater number of individuals with schizophrenia (n=15), and a trend toward having more bipolar disorder individuals (n=11), when compared with controls (n=6). Using these subgroups, we tested which microarray-assessed transcriptional changes may be associated with high inflammatory/stress groups using ingenuity analysis and found that an extended network of gene expression changes involving immune, growth factors, inhibitory signaling and cell death factors also distinguished these groups. Our work demonstrates that some of the heterogeneity in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may be partially explained by inflammation/stress interactions, and that this biological subtype cuts across Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-defined categories.

  15. Preoperative serum markers for individual patient prognosis in stage I-III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Giessen-Jung, Clemens; Nagel, Dorothea; Glas, Maria; Spelsberg, Fritz; Lau-Werner, Ulla; Modest, Dominik Paul; Schulz, Christoph; Heinemann, Volker; Di Gioia, Dorit; Stieber, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) remains the only recommended biomarker for follow-up care of colorectal cancer (CRC), but besides CEA, several other serological parameters have been proposed as prognostic markers for CRC. The present retrospective analysis investigates a comprehensive set of serum markers with regard to cancer-specific survival (CSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). A total of 472 patients with colon cancer underwent surgery for curative intent between January 1988 and June 2007. Preoperative serum was analyzed for the following parameters: albumin, alkaline phosphatase (aP), beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (βhCG), bilirubin, cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), cancer antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), CA 72-4, CEA, C-reactive protein (CRP), cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), ferritin, gamma-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), hemoglobin, haptoglobin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, creatinine, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), serum amyloid A (SAA), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D. After a median follow-up period of 5.9 years, the overall 3- and 5-year CSS was 91.7 and 84.9 % and DFS rates were 82.7 % (3 years) and 77.6 % (5 years). Multivariate analyses confirmed preoperative CEA as an independent prognostic factor with regard to CSS and DFS. CA 19-9 and γGT also provided prognostic value for CSS and DFS, respectively. Younger age was negatively associated with DFS. According to UICC stage, CEA provided significant prognostic value with regard to CSS and DFS, while CA 19-9 was only prognostic for CSS. Combined analysis is able to identify patients with favorable prognosis. In addition to tumor baseline parameters, preoperative CEA could be confirmed as prognostic marker in colon cancer. CA 19-9 and γGT also provide additional prognostic value with regard to survival and recurrence in stage III and stage I disease, respectively. The combined use of CEA together with CA 19-9 and γGT improve

  16. Workflow for high-content, individual cell quantification of fluorescent markers from universal microscope data, supported by open source software.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Simon R; Mittnacht, Sibylle

    2014-12-16

    Advances in understanding the control mechanisms governing the behavior of cells in adherent mammalian tissue culture models are becoming increasingly dependent on modes of single-cell analysis. Methods which deliver composite data reflecting the mean values of biomarkers from cell populations risk losing subpopulation dynamics that reflect the heterogeneity of the studied biological system. In keeping with this, traditional approaches are being replaced by, or supported with, more sophisticated forms of cellular assay developed to allow assessment by high-content microscopy. These assays potentially generate large numbers of images of fluorescent biomarkers, which enabled by accompanying proprietary software packages, allows for multi-parametric measurements per cell. However, the relatively high capital costs and overspecialization of many of these devices have prevented their accessibility to many investigators. Described here is a universally applicable workflow for the quantification of multiple fluorescent marker intensities from specific subcellular regions of individual cells suitable for use with images from most fluorescent microscopes. Key to this workflow is the implementation of the freely available Cell Profiler software(1) to distinguish individual cells in these images, segment them into defined subcellular regions and deliver fluorescence marker intensity values specific to these regions. The extraction of individual cell intensity values from image data is the central purpose of this workflow and will be illustrated with the analysis of control data from a siRNA screen for G1 checkpoint regulators in adherent human cells. However, the workflow presented here can be applied to analysis of data from other means of cell perturbation (e.g., compound screens) and other forms of fluorescence based cellular markers and thus should be useful for a wide range of laboratories.

  17. Individual differences in the motivation to communicate relate to levels of midbrain and striatal catecholamine markers in male European starlings.

    PubMed

    Heimovics, Sarah A; Salvante, Katrina G; Sockman, Keith W; Riters, Lauren V

    2011-11-01

    Individuals display dramatic differences in social communication even within similar social contexts. Across vertebrates dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and midbrain central gray (GCt) strongly influence motivated, reward-directed behaviors. Norepinephrine is also rich in these areas and may alter dopamine neuronal activity. The present study was designed to provide insight into the roles of dopamine and norepinephrine in VTA and GCt and their efferent striatal target, song control region area X, in the regulation of individual differences in the motivation to sing. We used high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection to measure dopamine, norepinephrine and their metabolites in micropunched samples from VTA, GCt, and area X in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We categorized males as sexually motivated or non-sexually motivated based on individual differences in song produced in response to a female. Dopamine markers and norepinephrine in VTA and dopamine in area X correlated positively with sexually-motivated song. Norepinephrine in area X correlated negatively with non-sexually-motivated song. Dopamine in GCt correlated negatively with sexually-motivated song, and the metabolite DOPAC correlated positively with non-sexually-motivated song. Results highlight a role for evolutionarily conserved dopaminergic projections from VTA to striatum in the motivation to communicate and highlight novel patterns of catecholamine activity in area X, VTA, and GCt associated with individual differences in sexually-motivated and non-sexually-motivated communication. Correlations between dopamine and norepinephrine markers also suggest that norepinephrine may contribute to individual differences in communication by modifying dopamine neuronal activity in VTA and GCt. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Individual differences in the motivation to communicate relate to levels of midbrain and striatal catecholamine markers in male European starlings

    PubMed Central

    Heimovics, Sarah A; Salvante, Katrina G; Sockman, Keith W; Riters, Lauren V

    2013-01-01

    Individuals display dramatic differences in social communication even within similar social contexts. Across vertebrates dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and midbrain central gray (GCt) strongly influence motivated, reward-directed behaviors. Norepinephrine is also rich in these areas and may alter dopamine neuronal activity. The present study was designed to provide insight into the roles of dopamine and norepinephrine in VTA and GCt and their efferent striatal target, song control region area X, in the regulation of individual differences in the motivation to sing. We used high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection to measure dopamine, norepinephrine and their metabolites in micropunched samples from VTA, GCt, and area X in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris). We categorized males as sexually motivated or non-sexually motivated based on individual differences in song produced in response to a female. Dopamine markers and norepinephrine in VTA and dopamine in area X correlated positively with sexually-motivated song. Norepinephrine in area X correlated negatively with non-sexually-motivated song. Dopamine in GCt correlated negatively with sexually-motivated song, and the metabolite DOPAC correlated positively with non-sexually-motivated song. Results highlight a role for evolutionarily conserved dopaminergic projections from VTA to striatum in the motivation to communicate and highlight novel patterns of catecholamine activity in area X, VTA, and GCt associated with individual differences in sexually-motivated and non-sexually-motivated communication. Correlations between dopamine and norepinephrine markers also suggest that norepinephrine may contribute to individual differences in communication by modifying dopamine neuronal activity in VTA and GCt. PMID:21907203

  19. Endothelial Dysfunction: An Early Cardiovascular Risk Marker in Asymptomatic Obese Individuals with Prediabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Alok K.; Ravussin, Eric; Johannsen, Darcy L.; Stull, April J.; Cefalu, William T.; Johnson, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Aims To elucidate if endothelial dysfunction is an early CV risk marker in obese men and women with prediabetes. Study Design Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study Clinical Research Unit, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA. United States. Methodology Overweight and obese status denotes an increasing adipose tissue burden which spills over into ectopic locations, including the visceral compartment, muscle and liver. Associated co-morbidities enhance cardiovascular (CV) risk. Endothelium which is the largest receptor-effector end-organ in our bodies, while responding to numerous physical and chemical stimuli maintains vascular homeostasis. Endothelial dysfunction (ED) is the initial perturbation, which precedes fatty streak known to initiate atherosclerosis: insidious process which often culminates as sudden catastrophic CV adverse event. Asymptomatic men and women; [n=42] coming in after an overnight fast had demographic, anthropometric, clinical chemistry and resting endothelial function [EF: increased test finger peripheral arterial tone (PAT) relative to control; expressed as relative hyperemia index (RHI)] assessments. Results Adults with desirable weight [n=12] and overweight [n=8] state, had normal fasting plasma glucose [Mean(SD)]: FPG [91.1(4.5), 94.8(5.8) mg/dL], insulin [INS, 2.3(4.4), 3.1(4.8) μU/ml], insulin sensitivity by homeostasis model assessment [HOMA-IR, 0.62(1.2), 0.80(1.2)] and desirable resting clinic blood pressure [SBP/DBP, 118(12)/74(5), 118(13)/76(8) mmHg]. Obese adults [n=22] had prediabetes [FPG, 106.5(3.5) mg/dL], hyperinsulinemia [INS 18.0(5.2) μU/ml], insulin resistance [HOMA-IR 4.59(2.3)], prehypertension [PreHTN; SBP/DBP 127(13)/81(7) mmHg] and endothelial dysfunction [ED; reduced RHI 1.7(0.3) vs. 2.4(0.3); all p<0.05]. Age-adjusted RHI correlated with BMI [r=−0.53; p<0.001]; however, BMI-adjusted RHI was not correlated with age [r=−0.01; p=0.89]. Conclusion Endothelial dysfunction reflective of

  20. Individuation in Slovene emerging adults: its associations with demographics, transitional markers, achieved criteria for adulthood, and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Maja; Komidar, Luka; Levpušček, Melita Puklek

    2014-12-01

    The study investigated associations of Slovene emerging adults' age, gender, living situation, romantic relationship, and employment status with aspects of individuation in relation to mother and father. Controlling for demographic variables and transitional markers of adulthood, we further explored the contribution of individuation measures to individuals' perceptions of achieved criteria for adulthood and life satisfaction. The participants provided self-reports on the Individuation Test for Emerging Adults, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, and the list of Achieved Criteria for Adulthood. Age and living out of parental home were positively associated with self-reliance in relation to both parents, whereas female gender was related to higher levels of connectedness and seeking parental support. Along with age and involvement in a romantic relationship, connectedness and self-reliance predicted adulthood criteria attainment and life satisfaction. The results support the models of individuation that emphasize growing autonomy and retaining connectedness to parents as pathways towards personal adjustments. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Longitudinal evolution of bone mineral density and bone markers in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Mondy, Kristin; Yarasheski, Kevin; Powderly, William G; Whyte, Michael; Claxton, Sherry; DeMarco, Debra; Hoffmann, Mary; Tebas, Pablo

    2003-02-15

    The underlying mechanisms of several bone disorders in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons and any relation to antiretroviral therapy have yet to be defined. A longitudinal study was conducted to estimate the prevalence of osteopenia or osteoporosis in HIV-infected persons; to assess bone mineralization, metabolism, and histomorphometry over time; and to evaluate predisposing factors. A total of 128 patients enrolled the study, and 93 were observed for 72 weeks. "Classic" risk factors (low body mass index, history of weight loss, steroid use, and smoking) for low bone mineral density (BMD) and duration of HIV infection were strongly associated with osteopenia. There was a weak association between low BMD and receipt of treatment with protease inhibitors; this association disappeared after controlling for the above factors. Markers of bone turnover tended to be elevated in the whole cohort but were not associated with low BMD. BMD increased slightly during follow-up. Traditional risk factors and advanced HIV infection play a more significant pathogenic role in the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis associated with HIV infection than do treatment-associated factors.

  2. Relationship between physical activity and markers of oxidative stress in independent community-living elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Fraile-Bermúdez, A B; Kortajarena, M; Zarrazquin, I; Maquibar, A; Yanguas, J J; Sánchez-Fernández, C E; Gil, J; Irazusta, A; Ruiz-Litago, F

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between objective data of physical activity and markers of oxidative stress in older men and women. Participants were old adults, aged≥60years (61 women and 34 men) who were all capable of performing basic daily activities by themselves and lived on their own. To describe physical activity we used objective data measured by accelerometers which record active and sedentary periods during everyday life for five days. Determination of oxidative stress was conducted from three perspectives: determination plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), plasma antioxidant enzyme activities, i.e., glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and membrane lipid peroxidation (TBARS). In the group of women, those who met physical activity recommendations (WR) had lower level of TAS. In addition, the moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was negatively correlated with TAS. Simultaneously, MVPA was correlated with increase in the GPx antioxidant enzyme activity, and the counts per minute were positively correlated with CAT activity. In the group of men, the cpm and the MVPA were negatively correlated with lipid peroxidation while lifestyle physical activity was positively correlated with CAT activity. These findings suggest that MVPA in the elderly although it is related to a decrease in the TAS in women, induces adaptive increase in antioxidant enzyme activity and decreases lipid peroxidation in both women and men. These results suggest that at this time of life, it is not only the amount of physical activity performed that is important but also its intensity.

  3. Early Markers of Atherosclerotic Disease in Individuals with Excess Weight and Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Menti, Eduardo; Zaffari, Denise; Galarraga, Thais; Lessa, João Regis da Conceição e; Pontin, Bruna; Pellanda, Lucia Campos; Portal, Vera Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Background Excessive weight is a cardiovascular risk factor since it generates a chronic inflammatory process that aggravates the endothelial function. Objective To evaluate the endothelial function in individuals with excess weight and mild dyslipidemia using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD), and the association of endothelial function with anthropometric and biochemical variables. Methods Cross-sectional study that included 74 individuals and evaluated anthropometric variables (body mass index [BMI], waist-hip ratio [WHR], waist circumference [AC], and percentage of body fat [PBF]), biochemical (blood glucose, insulinemia, ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL-cholesterol) and endothelial function (BAFMD, evaluated by ultrasound). The statistical analysis was performed with SPSS, version 16.0. To study the association between the variables, we used chi-square, Student's t and Mann-Whitney tests, and Pearson's correlation. Logistic regression analyzed the independent influence of the factors. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results The participants had a mean age of 50.8 years, and 57% were female. BMI, WC, WHR, and PBF showed no significant association with BAFMD. The male gender (p = 0.02) and higher serum levels of fibrinogen (p = 0.02) were significantly and independently associated with a BAFMD below 8%. Conclusions In individuals with excess weight and mild untreated dyslipidemia, male gender and higher levels of fibrinogen were independently associated with worse BAFMD. PMID:27142650

  4. Is there a genetic contribution to cultural differences? Collectivism, individualism and genetic markers of social sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Way, Baldwin M; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2010-06-01

    Genes and culture are often thought of as opposite ends of the nature-nurture spectrum, but here we examine possible interactions. Genetic association studies suggest that variation within the genes of central neurotransmitter systems, particularly the serotonin (5-HTTLPR, MAOA-uVNTR) and opioid (OPRM1 A118G), are associated with individual differences in social sensitivity, which reflects the degree of emotional responsivity to social events and experiences. Here, we review recent work that has demonstrated a robust cross-national correlation between the relative frequency of variants in these genes and the relative degree of individualism-collectivism in each population, suggesting that collectivism may have developed and persisted in populations with a high proportion of putative social sensitivity alleles because it was more compatible with such groups. Consistent with this notion, there was a correlation between the relative proportion of these alleles and lifetime prevalence of major depression across nations. The relationship between allele frequency and depression was partially mediated by individualism-collectivism, suggesting that reduced levels of depression in populations with a high proportion of social sensitivity alleles is due to greater collectivism. These results indicate that genetic variation may interact with ecological and social factors to influence psychocultural differences.

  5. A genetic marker of risk in HIV-infected individuals with a history of hazardous drinking.

    PubMed

    Barker, David H; Nugent, Nicole R; Delgado, Jeanne R; Knopik, Valerie S; Brown, Larry K; Lally, Michelle A; McGeary, John E

    2017-09-01

    Impulsivity and sensation seeking have been linked to hazardous drinking, increased sexual risk behaviors, and lower treatment adherence among persons living with HIV (PLH). The dopamine active transporter1 (DAT1or SLC6A3) gene has been linked to impulsivity and sensation seeking in several populations but has not been investigated among populations of PLH. This study used data from 201 PLH who report a recent history of heavy episodic drinking. Results indicate that DAT1*10R vs DAT1*9R genotype was related to higher propensity for risk taking (standardized difference score (d) = 0.30 [95% CI: 0.02;0.59]), more hazardous drinking (d = 0.35 [0.05;0.64]), and more condomless sex (rate ratio (RR)= 2.35[1.94; 2.85]), but were counter-intuitively associated with fewer sexual partners (RR = 0.65[0.43;0.91]) and possibly better treatment adherence (d = 0.32 [-0.01;0.65]). Results are consistent with the suggested associations between DAT1 and risk-taking behavior. The counter-intuitive finding for partner selection and treatment adherence may be evidence of additional factors that place PLH at risk for engaging in hazardous drinking as well as relationship difficulties and problems with treatment adherence (e.g., depressive symptoms, avoidant coping, trauma history). Caution is required when using a single gene variant as a marker of complex behaviors and these findings need to be replicated using larger samples and additional variants.

  6. Expression of substance P, neurokinin-1 receptor and immune markers in the brains of individuals with HIV-associated neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Spitsin, Sergei; Stevens, Kathleen E; Douglas, Steven D

    2013-11-15

    The tachykinin neuropeptide substance P (SP) has an important signaling role in both the nervous and the immune systems. Two naturally occurring variants of the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) mediate the effects of SP, full-length receptor (NK1R-F) and a truncated form (NK1R-T) that lacks 96 amino acid residues at the C-terminus. We previously reported decreased expression of the NK1R-F in the CNS of HIV-positive individuals in comparison to HIV-negative control subjects. There were no differences in the expression of the NK1R-T in the same groups. In the current study, we quantified the expressions of SP precursor mRNA preprotachykinin (TAC1), NK1R (full and truncated forms), viral load (HIV-gag) and several proinflammatory and immune markers (CD4, CCR5, CXCR4, fractalkine, IL-6, IL-10, CCL2, CCL20 and CD163) in the frontal cortex of autopsied brains from HIV-1-positive individuals with or without HIV-associated neuropathology. The expressions of SP and, to lesser extent, NK1R-F were decreased while the expressions of CXCR4, CCR5 and CCL2 were increased in CNS of individuals with HIV-associated neuropathology. There was no change in HIV loads associated with neuropathology; however, we found a positive correlation between viral loads and the expression of haptoglobin-hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163. An analysis of CSF from corresponding samples demonstrated an increase in proinflammatory markers (CCL2 MIP-1α and MIP-1β) associated with neuropathology. Although our data confirm the overall inflammatory nature of HIV-associated neuropathology, we observed a decrease in the expression of SP and NK1R-F, which is also associated with other forms of neuroinflammation.

  7. Effects of exposure to biomass burning on pulmonary inflammatory markers and pulmonary function in individuals with COPD.

    PubMed

    Ramos, D; Proença, M; Leite, M R; Ferreira, A D; Trevisan, I B; Brígida, G F S; Tacao, G Y; Ramos, E M C

    2017-06-15

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) has many benefits for individuals with COPD. However, it is not clear whether PR could prevent the hazards of air pollution exposure. This study aimed to analyze the effects of biomass burning exposure on pulmonary inflammatory markers and pulmonary function in individuals with COPD, participants and non-participants of PR. 35 subjects were divided into three groups: individuals with COPD who received PR (G1, n=15), those who did not (G2, n=10), and a control group composed of healthy individuals without COPD (CG, n=10). Measurements of lung function and concentrations of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in exhaled breath condensate samples were collected. The assessment and concentrations of particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), temperature (T), and relative air humidity (RAH) were recorded in biomass burning and non-burning periods. There was a significant increase in the concentrations of air pollutants in the biomass burning period. In this period, an increase in IL-6 (G1p=0.041, G2 p=.012), and a reduction in the FEV1/FVC ratio (G1p=0.021, G2 p=.007) were observed in individuals with COPD. In G1, the increase in IL-6 concentrations correlated positively with O3 (r=0.693; p=.006), and negatively with RAH (r=-0.773; p=.003) in the burning period. Individuals with COPD exposed to biomass burning demonstrated increased pulmonary inflammation and a reduction in the FEV1/FVC ratio, regardless of their engagement in PR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  8. Vitamin D Levels and Markers of Inflammation and Metabolism in HIV-Infected Individuals on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Jordan E.; Wilhalme, Holly M.; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Currier, Judith S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on vitamin D insufficiency as a cause of inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in HIV-infected individuals are conflicting. We examined the relationships between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and biomarkers of inflammation and metabolism in stored blood samples from a prospective trial of vitamin D repletion. Blood samples from HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) with HIV-1 RNA <200 copies/ml enrolled in a prospective study were analyzed for 25(OH)D levels, a broad panel of cytokines, highly sensitive C-reactive protein, D-dimer, adiponectin, leptin, and insulin. Correlations between markers and 25(OH)D levels were determined. The Wilcoxon Rank Sum test was used to compare markers between individuals 25(OH)D insufficient and sufficient at baseline and before and after repletion among those who were insufficient and repleted to ≥30 ng/ml after 12 weeks. Of 106 subjects with stored plasma [66 with 25(OH)D <30 ng/ml and 40 ≥ 30 ng/ml], the median age was 50, the CD4 count was 515 cells/mm3, 94% were male, and the median baseline 25(OH)D was 27 ng/ml. Higher 25(OH)D levels were associated with lower tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (r = −0.20, p = 0.04) and higher adiponectin levels (r = 0.30, p = 0.002). Following successful repletion to 25(OH)D ≥30 ng/ml there were no significant changes in inflammatory or metabolic parameters. Our study found associations between low 25(OH)D levels and TNF-α and adiponectin. Repletion did not result in changes in markers of inflammation or metabolism. These data support continued study of the relationship between vitamin D, inflammation, and metabolism in treated HIV infection. PMID:26569649

  9. Short-term effects of air temperature on blood markers of coagulation and inflammation in potentially susceptible individuals.

    PubMed

    Schäuble, Claudia Luise; Hampel, Regina; Breitner, Susanne; Rückerl, Regina; Phipps, Richard; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Devlin, Robert B; Carter, Jacqueline D; Soukup, Joleen; Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa; Koenig, Wolfgang; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Belcredi, Petra; Kraus, Ute; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra E

    2012-09-01

    Changes in air temperature are associated with an increase in cardiovascular events, but the role of procoagulant and proinflammatory blood markers is still poorly understood. The authors investigated the association between air temperature and fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, interleukin-6 and high-sensitivity C reactive protein in two potentially susceptible groups. This prospective panel study was conducted between March 2007 and December 2008 in Augsburg, Germany. The study population comprised 187 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance and 87 participants with genetic polymorphisms on the detoxification and inflammation pathways. Overall, 1766 repeated blood measurements were collected. Hourly meteorology data were available from a central measurement site. The association between temperature and blood markers was analysed with additive mixed models. For type 2 diabetes mellitus and impaired glucose tolerance participants, the authors observed immediate, lagged and cumulative increases in fibrinogen (range of percentage changes in geometric mean: 0.6%-0.8%) and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (6.0%-10.1%) in association with a 5°C temperature decrement. Participants with a body mass index above 30 kg/m(2) as well as females showed particularly strong fibrinogen effects. In participants with the special genetic background, 5°C decreases in the 5-day average of temperature led to a change of 8.0% (95% CI 0.5% to 16.2%) in interleukin-6 and of -8.4% (95% CI -15.8% to -0.3%) in high-sensitivity C reactive protein, the latter driven by physically active individuals. The authors observed different temperature effects on blood markers in two potentially susceptible groups probably indicating varying underlying biological mechanisms. This study results might provide a link between temperature and cardiovascular events.

  10. Exercise-modulated epigenetic markers and inflammatory response in COPD individuals: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ivy Reichert Vital; de Araujo, Cintia Laura Pereira; Dorneles, Gilson Pires; Peres, Alessandra; Bard, Andreia Luciana; Reinaldo, Gustavo; Teixeira, Paulo José Zimermann; Lago, Pedro Dal; Elsner, Viviane Rostirola

    2017-08-01

    The study investigated the effects of exercise on epigenetic signals and systemic cytokine levels in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) individuals. Ten participants of a pulmonary rehabilitation program were submitted to 24 sessions of a supervisioned exercise protocol thrice-weekly (90min/session). Blood samples were collected at baseline, after the 1st session, before and after the 24th session. A DNA hypomethylation status was observed after the 1st session when compared at baseline, while global histone H4 acetylation status was unaltered in any time-points evaluated. No significant changes were observed on cytokine levels after the 1st session. A significant enhancement on interleukin 6 (IL-6) and a decrease on transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) levels were found after the 24th session when compared to the pre 24th session. Moreover, 23 sessions of exercise were able to diminish significantly the basal levels of IL-6 and interleukin 8 (IL-8). These data suggest a potential role of epigenetic machinery in mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise in COPD patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Scanning electron microscopy of individual nanoparticle bio-markers in liquid.

    PubMed

    Liv, Nalan; Lazić, Ivan; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P

    2014-08-01

    We investigated SEM imaging of nanoparticle biomarkers suspended below a thin membrane, with the ultimate goal of integrating functional fluorescence and structural SEM measurements of samples kept at ambient or hydrated conditions. In particular, we investigated how resolving power in liquid SEM is affected by the interaction of the electron beam with the membrane. Simulations with the Geant4-based Monte Carlo scheme developed by Kieft and Bosch (2008) [1] are compared to experimental results with suspended nanoparticles. For 20 nm and 50 nm thin membranes, we found a beam broadening of 1.5 nm and 3 nm, respectively, with an excellent agreement between simulations and experiments. 15 nm Au nanoparticles and bio-functionalized core-shell quantum dots can be individually resolved in denser clusters. We demonstrated the imaging of single EGF-conjugated quantum dots docked at filopodia during cellular uptake with both fluorescence microscopy and SEM simultaneously. These results open novel opportunities for correlating live fluorescence microscopy with structural electron microscopy.

  12. Is there a genetic contribution to cultural differences? Collectivism, individualism and genetic markers of social sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    Genes and culture are often thought of as opposite ends of the nature–nurture spectrum, but here we examine possible interactions. Genetic association studies suggest that variation within the genes of central neurotransmitter systems, particularly the serotonin (5-HTTLPR, MAOA-uVNTR) and opioid (OPRM1 A118G), are associated with individual differences in social sensitivity, which reflects the degree of emotional responsivity to social events and experiences. Here, we review recent work that has demonstrated a robust cross-national correlation between the relative frequency of variants in these genes and the relative degree of individualism–collectivism in each population, suggesting that collectivism may have developed and persisted in populations with a high proportion of putative social sensitivity alleles because it was more compatible with such groups. Consistent with this notion, there was a correlation between the relative proportion of these alleles and lifetime prevalence of major depression across nations. The relationship between allele frequency and depression was partially mediated by individualism–collectivism, suggesting that reduced levels of depression in populations with a high proportion of social sensitivity alleles is due to greater collectivism. These results indicate that genetic variation may interact with ecological and social factors to influence psychocultural differences. PMID:20592043

  13. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals.

  14. Transcriptomic, biochemical and individual markers in transplanted Daphnia magna to characterize impacts in the field.

    PubMed

    Rivetti, Claudia; Campos, Bruno; Faria, Melissa; De Castro Català, Nuria; Malik, Amrita; Muñoz, Isabel; Tauler, Romà; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Osorio, Victoria; Pérez, Sandra; Gorga, Marina; Petrovic, Mira; Mastroianni, Nicola; de Alda, Miren López; Masiá, Ana; Campo, Julian; Picó, Yolanda; Guasc, Helena; Barceló, Damià; Barata, Carlos

    2015-01-15

    Daphnia magna individuals were transplanted across 12 sites from three Spanish river basins (Llobregat, Ebro, Jucar) showing different sources of pollution. Gene transcription, feeding and biochemical responses in the field were assessed and compared with those obtained in re-constituted water treatments spiked with organic eluates obtained from water samples collected at the same locations and sampling periods. Up to 166 trace contaminants were detected in water and classified by their mode of action into 45 groups that included metals, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, illicit drugs, and other industrial compounds. Physicochemical water parameters differentiated the three river basins with Llobregat having the highest levels of conductivity, metals and pharmaceuticals, followed by Ebro, whereas the Jucar river had the greatest levels of illicit drugs. D. magna grazing rates and cholinesterase activity responded similarly than the diversity of riparian benthic communities. Transcription patterns of 13 different genes encoding for general stress, metabolism and energy processes, molting and xenobiotic transporters corroborate phenotypic responses differentiated sites within and across river basins. Principal Component Analysis and Partial Least Square Projections to Latent Structures regression analyses indicated that measured in situ responses of most genes and biomarkers and that of benthic macroinvertebrate diversity indexes were affected by distinct environmental factors. Conductivity, suspended solids and fungicides were negatively related with the diversity of macroinvertebrates cholinesterase, and feeding responses. Gene transcripts of heat shock protein and metallothionein were positively related with 11 classes of organic contaminants and 6 metals. Gene transcripts related with signaling paths of molting and reproduction, sugar, protein and xenobiotic metabolism responded similarly in field and lab exposures and were related with high residue concentrations of

  15. Chromic and iron oxides as fecal markers to identify individual whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Megan E.; Doyle, Robert; Chandler, Jane N.; Olsen, Glenn H.; French, John B.; Wildt, David E; Converse, Sarah J.; Keefer, Carol L; Songsasen, Nucharin; Aborn, David; Urbanek, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    The whooping crane (Grus americana) is listed as endangered under the IUCN Red List, the United States Endangered Species Act, and the Canadian Species at Risk Act (BirdLife International 2012, CWS and USFWS 2007). A major focus of recovery efforts for this endangered species is reintroduction to establish new populations (CWS and USFWS 2007). Captive populations are critical as a source of individuals for reintroduction efforts and also serve as insurance populations. Currently, there are a total of 157 whooping cranes held in captive breeding centers across North America, with the largest at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) in Laurel, Maryland. Birds produced in this facility are currently being released as part of efforts to establish the Eastern Migratory Population (EMP, Urbanek et al. 2005) and in an effort to establish a non-migratory population in Louisiana. In the past decade, PWRC has produced and released annually an average of 18 birds into the wild; however, reproductive performance of birds at this facility is lower than desired. PWRC had a 60% fertility rate for eggs laid from 2000 through 2010 (J. N. Chandler, personal communication, 2011). Furthermore, reproductive onset in this captive population appears to be delayed compared to wild populations. In wild populations, reproductive onset (production of sperm and eggs) normally occurs ~5 years of age in both males and females, ~2 years after initial pair formation occurs (Ellis et al., 1996), while some females in the EMP have laid eggs earlier than 5 years of age (Converse et al. 2011). However, PWRC females in some cases do not start to lay eggs until 7 years of age (Mirande et al. 1996). Currently, the PWRC population consists of a total of 74 whooping cranes, including 22 pairs. Six of these pairs (27%) are consistently infertile (i.e., no production of fertile eggs) and 3 other pairs (14%) have low fertility (30- 45% fertility in eggs laid), which is variable from year to year

  16. Biochemical and proteomic analyses of the physiological response induced by individual housing in gilts provide new potential stress markers.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ramell, Anna; Arroyo, Laura; Peña, Raquel; Pato, Raquel; Saco, Yolanda; Fraile, Lorenzo; Bendixen, Emøke; Bassols, Anna

    2016-11-25

    The objective assessment of animal stress and welfare requires proper laboratory biomarkers. In this work, we have analyzed the changes in serum composition in gilts after switching their housing, from pen to individual stalls, which is generally accepted to cause animal discomfort. Blood and saliva samples were collected a day before and up to four days after changing the housing system. Biochemical analyses showed adaptive changes in lipid and protein metabolism after the housing switch, whereas cortisol and muscular markers showed a large variability between animals. 2D-DIGE and iTRAQ proteomic approaches revealed variations in serum protein composition after changing housing and diet of gilts. Both techniques showed alterations in two main homeostatic mechanisms: the innate immune and redox systems. The acute phase proteins haptoglobin, apolipoprotein A-I and α1-antichymotrypsin 3, and the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin 2 were found differentially expressed by 2D-DIGE. Other proteins related to the innate immune system, including lactotransferrin, protegrin 3 and galectin 1 were also identified by iTRAQ, as well as oxidative stress enzymes such as peroxiredoxin 2 and glutathione peroxidase 3. Proteomics also revealed the decrease of apolipoproteins, and the presence of intracellular proteins in serum, which may indicate physical injury to tissues. Housing of gilts in individual stalls and diet change increase lipid and protein catabolism, oxidative stress, activate the innate immune system and cause a certain degree of tissue damage. We propose that valuable assays for stress assessment in gilts may be based on a score composed by a combination of salivary cortisol, lipid metabolites, innate immunity and oxidative stress markers and intracellular proteins.

  17. The chronic effects of whey proteins on blood pressure, vascular function, and inflammatory markers in overweight individuals.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Ellis, Vanessa

    2010-07-01

    Limited evidence suggests that dairy whey protein may be the major dairy component that is responsible for health benefits currently associated with increased dairy consumption. Whey proteins may reduce blood pressure and improve cardiovascular health. This study evaluated the effects of whey protein supplementation on blood pressure, vascular function and inflammatory markers compared to casein and glucose (control) supplementation in overweight/obese individuals. The subjects were randomized to either whey protein, casein or glucose supplementation for 12 weeks according to a parallel design. In all, 70 men and women with a mean (+/-s.e.m.) BMI (kg/m(2)) of 31.3 +/- 0.8 completed the study. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased significantly at week 6 compared to baseline in the whey and casein groups, (P = 0.028 and P = 0.020, respectively) and at week 12 (P = 0.020, and P = 0.017, respectively). Diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decreased significantly compared to baseline in the whey and casein groups (P = 0.038 and P = 0.042, respectively) at week 12. DBP decreased significantly in the whey and casein groups (P = 0.025, P = 0.038, respectively) at week 12 compared to the control group. Augmentation index (AI) was significantly lower from baseline at 12 weeks (P = 0.021) in the whey group. AI decreased significantly in the whey group at 12 weeks compared to control (P = 0.006) and casein (P = 0.006). There were no significant changes in inflammatory markers within or between groups. This study demonstrated that supplementation with whey protein improves blood pressure and vascular function in overweight and obese individuals.

  18. Metaproteomics of saliva identifies human protein markers specific for individuals with periodontitis and dental caries compared to orally healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Jensen, Lars J.; Holmstrup, Palle

    2016-01-01

    Background The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. To identify characteristics of diseased and healthy saliva we thus wanted to compare saliva metaproteomes from patients with periodontitis and dental caries to healthy individuals. Methods Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. The proteins in the saliva samples were subjected to denaturing buffer and digested enzymatically with LysC and trypsin. The resulting peptide mixtures were cleaned up by solid-phase extraction and separated online with 2 h gradients by nano-scale C18 reversed-phase chromatography connected to a mass spectrometer through an electrospray source. The eluting peptides were analyzed on a tandem mass spectrometer operated in data-dependent acquisition mode. Results We identified a total of 35,664 unique peptides from 4,161 different proteins, of which 1,946 and 2,090 were of bacterial and human origin, respectively. The human protein profiles displayed significant overexpression of the complement system and inflammatory markers in periodontitis and dental caries compared to healthy controls. Bacterial proteome profiles and functional annotation were very similar in health and disease. Conclusions Overexpression of proteins related to the complement system and inflammation seems to correlate with oral disease status. Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity. PMID:27672500

  19. Sex differences in soluble markers vary before and after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy in chronically HIV infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    KREBS, Shelly J.; SLIKE, Bonnie M.; SITHINAMSUWAN, Pasiri; ALLEN, Isabel E.; CHALERMCHAI, Thep; TIPSUK, Somporn; PHANUPHAK, Nittaya; JAGODZINSKI, Linda; KIM, Jerome H.; ANANWORANICH, Jintanat; MAROVICH, Mary A.; VALCOUR, Victor G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate differences in soluble inflammatory markers between chronically HIV-infected men and women, with or without cognitive impairment, and in response to treatment. Design Soluble biomarkers were measured in cryopreserved plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 60 treatment-naïve individuals (25 males and 35 females) with chronic HIV infection and 18 HIV-uninfected controls (9 males and 9 females) from Thailand. Following enrollment, participants began combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and were evaluated for expression of these markers after 48 weeks. Methods Plasma and CSF levels of 19 soluble biomarkers (IFN-γ, TNFα, TNF-RII, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-15, MCP-1, t-Tau, IP-10, neopterin, IFNα, I-FABP, and sCD14) were measured using either a multi-parameter or standard ELISA assay. Results Prior to cART, females with impaired cognition had elevated levels of neopterin and TNF-RII compared to females with normal cognition in both the plasma and CSF, however levels did not differ between cognitively impaired or normal males. In a secondary outcome-hypothesis generating analysis, sex differences were also pronounced in plasma levels of MCP-1, IL-10, I-FABP, and sCD14 in response to treatment. Neopterin, IP-10, TNFα, TNF-RII, IFNα, MCP-1, IL-8, I-FABP, and sCD14 plasma levels remained elevated following 48 weeks of therapy in both sexes compared to uninfected controls. Conclusions We provide evidence of sustained immune activation after 48 weeks of treatment and identify possible sex differences in biomarkers previously linked to cognitive impairment, chronic inflammation, and gut integrity that may contribute to immunological differences between sexes in relationship to disease progression and response to therapy. PMID:26990631

  20. Effects of an exercise therapy protocol on inflammatory markers, perception of pain, and physical performance in individuals with knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Grazielle Cordeiro; Do Nascimento, Marcela Rêgo; De Miranda, Aline Silva; Rocha, Natalia Pessoa; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Scalzo, Paula Luciana

    2015-03-01

    Establishing prevention and therapeutic strategies for osteoarthritis (OA) is necessary to minimize functional disability and the impact of the disease on society. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of an exercise therapy protocol on inflammatory markers, perception of pain, and physical performance in individuals with OA of the knee. The protocol consisted of flexibility training and muscle strengthening over 12 weeks with three 80-min sessions per week. Peripheral blood was collected to determine serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and soluble forms of the TNF-α receptor (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2). A clinical assessment of the musculoskeletal system and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) questionnaire were applied to evaluate the specific symptoms of knee OA. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS). All measurements were taken before and after the intervention. Twenty-two individuals (mean age 58.8 ± 6.4 years) completed the protocol. A decrease in the perception of pain was evident on VAS (p < 0.001) and pain subscale of the WOMAC (p < 0.001). In addition, there was a reduction in serum levels of IL-6 (p < 0.001). However, changes in the levels of the TNF-α and its soluble receptors were not statistically significant. Physical function subscale score and the WOMAC global score improved significantly (p < 0.001). The training also promoted an increase in the progression load for all muscles groups analyzed (p < 0.001). Our data suggest that the exercise therapy protocol could be a strategy for reducing IL-6 levels, managing pain, and improving function in individuals with OA of the knee. However, more studies are necessary to investigate the issue.

  1. Using genotyping data to assign markers to their chromosome type and to infer the sex of individuals: a Bayesian model-based classifier.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2014-11-01

    The recent democratization of next-generation-sequencing-based approaches towards nonmodel species has made it cost-effective to produce large genotyping data sets for a wider range of species. However, when no detailed genome assembly is available, poor knowledge about the organization of the markers within the genome might hamper the optimal use of this abundant information. At the most basic level of genomic organization, the type of chromosome (autosomes, sex chromosomes, mitochondria or chloroplast in plants) may remain unknown for most markers which might be limiting or even misleading in some applications, particularly in population genetics. Conversely, the characterization of sex-linked markers allows molecular sexing of the individuals. In this study, we propose a Bayesian model-based classifier named detsex, to assign markers to their chromosome type and/or to perform sexing of individuals based on genotyping data. The performance of detsex is further evaluated by a comprehensive simulation study and by the analysis of real data sets from various origins (microsatellite and SNP data derived from genotyping assay designs and NGS experiments). Irrespective of the origin of the markers or the size of the data set, detsex was proved efficient (i) to identify the sex-linked markers, (ii) to perform molecular sexing of the individuals and (iii) to perform basic quality check of the genotyping data sets. The underlying structure of the model also allows to consider each of these potential applications either separately or jointly.

  2. Markers of cutaneous human papillomavirus infection in individuals with tumor-free skin, actinic keratoses, and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Struijk, Linda; Hall, Lisa; van der Meijden, Els; Wanningen, Patrick; Bavinck, Jan Nico Bouwes; Neale, Rachel; Green, Adèle C; Ter Schegget, Jan; Feltkamp, Mariet C W

    2006-03-01

    Separately, actinic keratosis (AK) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have been associated with cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. To further explore the association between HPV infection and SCC development, we determined markers of cutaneous HPV infection within a single population in persons with precursor lesions (AK), cancerous lesions (SCC), and without. Serum and plucked eyebrow hairs were collected from 57 tumor-free controls, 126 AK, and 64 SCC cases. Presence of HPV L1 and E6 seroreactivity and viral DNA were determined for HPV types 5, 8, 15, 16, 20, 24, and 38. Significant positive associations with increasing severity of the lesions (controls, AK, and SCC, respectively) were observed for overall HPV L1 seropositivity (13%, 26%, and 37%) and for HPV8 (4%, 17%, and 30%). In parallel, the proportion of L1 seropositive individuals against multiple HPV types increased from 14% to 39% and 45%. The overall E6 seroreactivity, however, tended to decline with AK and SCC, especially for HPV8 (21%, 11%, and 2%). HPV DNA positivity was most prevalent in the AK cases (54%) compared with the SCC cases (44%) and the tumor-free controls (40%). Among all participants, there was a positive trend between overall HPV DNA positivity and L1 seropositivity, but not E6 seropositivity. Taken together, our data suggest that cutaneous HPV infections accompanied by detectable HPV DNA in eyebrow hairs and HPV L1 seropositivity, but not E6 seropositivity, are associated with an increased risk of AK and SCC.

  3. Phylogeny of Valerianaceae based on matK and ITS markers, with reference to matK individual polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Oriane; Garnatje, Teresa; Susanna, Alfonso; Mathez, Joel

    2004-03-01

    The monophyly of Valerianaceae and the precise delimitation of the family are not totally resolved. Our knowledge on the phylogeny of the group is only partial: on a morphological basis, some contradicting taxonomic proposals have been published, which demonstrates the difficulties in establishing a natural classification of the family and especially in proposing a relevant treatment of the large genus Valeriana. The aims of this study are to contribute to the phylogeny and generic delineation of the Valerianaceae on the basis of molecular data. A cladistic analysis of the sequences of one plastid (matK) and one nuclear (ITS) molecular marker was carried out, both individually and in combination. The results of the analyses of both regions confirm that the family is monophyletic, with the exclusion of Triplostegia. The tribe Patrinieae is monophyletic, and the tribe Valerianeae is also a natural group. Two of the subtribes of Valerianeae, Fediinae and Centranthinae, are also monophyletic, with the exclusion of the genus Plectritis from Fediinae. The subtribe Valerianinae, on the other hand, is paraphyletic. Our results confirm, for the first time on a molecular basis, the suggested paraphyly of Valeriana in its present circumscription, with profound nomenclatural and taxonomic implications. The correlation between molecular phylogeny and biogeography is close. In the course of the plastid DNA sequencing, a polymorphism concerning the matK gene was found, a fact that should be carefully evaluated in phylogenetic analyses.

  4. Efficient development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers based on polymorphic repeats in transcriptome sequences of multiple individuals.

    PubMed

    Vukosavljev, M; Esselink, G D; van 't Westende, W P C; Cox, P; Visser, R G F; Arens, P; Smulders, M J M

    2015-01-01

    The first hurdle in developing microsatellite markers, cloning, has been overcome by next-generation sequencing. The second hurdle is testing to differentiate polymorphic from nonpolymorphic loci. The third hurdle, somewhat hidden, is that only polymorphic markers with a large effective number of alleles are sufficiently informative to be deployed in multiple studies. Both steps are laborious and still performed manually. We have developed a strategy in which we first screen reads from multiple genotypes for repeats that show the most length variants, and only these are subsequently developed into markers. We validated our strategy in tetraploid garden rose using Illumina paired-end transcriptome sequences of 11 roses. Of 48 tested two markers failed to amplify, but all others were polymorphic. Ten loci amplified more than one locus, indicating duplicated genes or gene families. Completely avoiding duplicated loci will be difficult because the range of numbers of predicted alleles of highly polymorphic single- and multilocus markers largely overlapped. Of the remainder, half were replicate markers (i.e. multiple primer pairs for one locus), indicating the difficulty of correctly filtering short reads containing repeat sequences. We subsequently refined the approach to eliminate multiple primer sets to the same loci. The remaining 18 markers were all highly polymorphic, amplifying on average 11.7 alleles per marker (range = 6-20) in 11 tetraploid roses, exceeding the 8.2 alleles per marker of the 24 most polymorphic markers genotyped previously. This strategy therefore represents a major step forward in the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers.

  5. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules.

  6. Analyses of several seed viability markers in individual recalcitrant seeds of Eugenia stipitata McVaugh with totipotent germination.

    PubMed

    Calvi, G P; Aud, F F; Ferraz, I D K; Pritchard, H W; Kranner, I

    2017-01-01

    The use of biochemical seed viability markers is often compromised by the unknown partitioning of analytes in bulk seed lots consisting of inseparable populations of viable and nonviable seeds. We took advantage of an unusual morphological syndrome found in the recalcitrant, undifferentiated seeds of Eugenia stipitata: one seed can be cut into several parts, each of which can germinate and develop into seedlings. We used four seed parts from one individual seed to analyse seed moisture content (MC), seed viability and the antioxidant glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH), glutathione disulphide (GSSG) and intermediates of glutathione synthesis and breakdown. Seeds were exposed to different environmental MC to induce various levels of desiccation stress. Upon storage at high seed MC, seed viability was maintained, while GSH concentration increased and the glutathione half-cell reduction potential (EGSSG/2GSH ) was less negative than -215 mV, indicating GSH production and highly reducing conditions. Storage at low seed MC led to loss of GSH, resulting in a shift in EGSSG/2GSH , and seed death. In contrast, the cyst(e)ine half-cell reduction potential (ECySS/2CYS ) could not distinguish between the viability categories. Previous studies on seed populations revealed that the probability for a seed being alive is 50% at EGSSG/2GSH values between -180 and -160 mV. The single seed approach revealed that the window in which seed viability was lost could be slightly shifted towards more negative values. We discuss the contribution of cellular pH to EGSSG/2GSH and recommend E. stipitata as a recalcitrant seed model to study stress response on a single seed basis. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  7. Impact of minocycline on cerebrospinal fluid markers of oxidative stress, neuronal injury, and inflammation in HIV-seropositive individuals with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Sacktor, Ned; Miyahara, Sachiko; Evans, Scott; Schifitto, Giovanni; Cohen, Bruce; Haughey, Norman; Drewes, Julia L; Graham, David; Zink, M Christine; Anderson, Caroline; Nath, Avindra; Pardo, Carlos A; McCarthy, Sean; Hosey, Lara; Clifford, David

    2014-12-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of markers of oxidative stress, neuronal injury, and inflammation and decreased neurotransmitter levels have been reported in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Minocycline may have a neuroprotective effect by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase, which produces nitric oxide, a compound that induces oxygen free radical production. In A5235, "Phase II, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study of Minocycline in the Treatment of HIV-Associated Cognitive Impairment," minocycline was not associated with cognitive improvement, but the effect on the above CSF measures was not examined previously. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of minocycline on markers of oxidative stress, neuronal injury, neurotransmitter levels, and inflammation from CSF in participants in A5235. One hundred seven HIV+ individuals received either minocycline 100 mg or placebo orally every 12 h for 24 weeks. Twenty-one HIV+ individuals received the optional lumbar punctures. Lipid and protein markers of oxidative stress (e.g., ceramides and protein carbonyls), glutamate, neurotransmitter precursors, kynurenine metabolites, neurofilament heavy chain, and inflammatory cytokines were measured in the CSF before and after treatment. The 24-week change in ceramides was larger in a beneficial direction in the minocycline group compared to the placebo group. The two groups did not differ in the 24-week changes for other markers.These results suggest that minocycline may decrease lipid markers of oxidative stress (ceramides) in individuals with HAND; however, an effect of minocycline on other CSF markers was not observed. A larger sample size is needed to further validate these results.

  8. Impact of minocycline on cerebrospinal fluid markers of oxidative stress, neuronal injury, and inflammation in HIV seropositive individuals with cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Sacktor, Ned; Miyahara, Sachiko; Evans, Scott; Schifitto, Giovanni; Cohen, Bruce; Haughey, Norman; Drewes, Julia L.; Graham, David; Zink, M. Christine; Anderson, Caroline; Nath, Avindra; Pardo, Carlos A.; McCarthy, Sean; Hosey, Lara; Clifford, David

    2014-01-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of markers of oxidative stress, neuronal injury, and inflammation, and decreased neurotransmitter levels have been reported in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Minocycline may have a neuroprotective effect by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase, which produces nitric oxide, a compound that induces oxygen free radical production. In A5235, “Phase II, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Study of Minocycline in the Treatment of HIV-associated Cognitive Impairment”, minocycline was not associated with cognitive improvement, but the effect on the above CSF measures was not examined previously. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of minocycline on markers of oxidative stress, neuronal injury, neurotransmitter levels, and inflammation from CSF in participants in A5235. 107 HIV+ individuals received either minocycline 100 mg or placebo orally every 12 hours for 24 weeks. 21 HIV+ individuals received the optional lumbar punctures. Lipid and protein markers of oxidative stress (e.g., ceramides and protein carbonyls), glutamate, neurotransmitter precursors, kynurenine metabolites, neurofilament heavy chain and inflammatory cytokines were measured in the CSF before and after treatment. The 24-week change in ceramides was larger in a beneficial direction in the minocycline group compared to the placebo group. The two groups did not differ in the 24-week changes for other markers. These results suggest that minocycline may decrease lipid markers of oxidative stress (ceramides) in individuals with HAND; however, an effect of minocycline on other CSF markers was not observed. A larger sample size is needed to further validate these results. PMID:25377444

  9. Impaired Cytokine but Enhanced Cytotoxic Marker Expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Induced CD8+ T Cells in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes and Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; George, Parakkal Jovvian; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) is a risk factor for tuberculosis among individuals with latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. To explore the influence of DM on CD8(+) T-cell responses during latent M. tuberculosis infection, we estimated the cytokine and cytotoxic marker expression pattern in individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection with DM and those with latent M. tuberculosis infection without DM. Among individuals with latent M. tuberculosis infection, those with DM had diminished frequencies of CD8(+) T-helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, and Th17 cells following stimulation by M. tuberculosis antigen and enhanced frequencies of CD8(+) T cells expressing cytotoxic markers, compared with those without DM. Thus, our results suggest that coincident DM modulates CD8(+) T-cell function during latent M. tuberculosis infection.

  10. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees and whole-genome-based data

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J. D.; Baldo, A. M.; Mueller, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining datasets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data and molecular marker fragment size data. Rice research has benefited from early adoption and extensive use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers; however, the majority of rice SSR markers were developed prior to the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. Interpretation of new research using SNPs in the context of literature citing SSRs requires a common coordinate system. A new pipeline, using a stepwise relaxation of stringency, was used to map SSR primers onto the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. The SSR markers and experimentally assayed amplicon sizes are presented in a relational database with a web-based front end, and are available as a track loaded in a genome browser with links connecting the browser and database. The combined capabilities of Ricebase link genetic markers, genome context, allele states across rice germplasm and potentially user curated phenotypic interpretations as a community resource for genetic discovery and breeding in rice. PMID:27515824

  11. Ricebase: a breeding and genetics platform for rice, integrating individual molecular markers, pedigrees and whole-genome-based data.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J D; Baldo, A M; Mueller, L A

    2016-01-01

    Ricebase (http://ricebase.org) is an integrative genomic database for rice (Oryza sativa) with an emphasis on combining datasets in a way that maintains the key links between past and current genetic studies. Ricebase includes DNA sequence data, gene annotations, nucleotide variation data and molecular marker fragment size data. Rice research has benefited from early adoption and extensive use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers; however, the majority of rice SSR markers were developed prior to the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. Interpretation of new research using SNPs in the context of literature citing SSRs requires a common coordinate system. A new pipeline, using a stepwise relaxation of stringency, was used to map SSR primers onto the latest rice pseudomolecule assembly. The SSR markers and experimentally assayed amplicon sizes are presented in a relational database with a web-based front end, and are available as a track loaded in a genome browser with links connecting the browser and database. The combined capabilities of Ricebase link genetic markers, genome context, allele states across rice germplasm and potentially user curated phenotypic interpretations as a community resource for genetic discovery and breeding in rice. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  12. Short-term Effects of Air Temperature on Blood Markers of Coagulation and Inflammation in Potentially Susceptible Individuals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: Changes in air temperature are associated with an increase in cardiovascular events, but the role of pro-coagulant and pro-inflammatory blood markers is still poorly understood. We investigated the association between air temperature and fibrinogen, plasminogen act...

  13. Short-term Effects of Air Temperature on Blood Markers of Coagulation and Inflammation in Potentially Susceptible Individuals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objectives: Changes in air temperature are associated with an increase in cardiovascular events, but the role of pro-coagulant and pro-inflammatory blood markers is still poorly understood. We investigated the association between air temperature and fibrinogen, plasminogen act...

  14. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of 17 Individuals of Pest Species Jacobaea vulgaris: SNPs, Microsatellites and Barcoding Markers for Population and Phylogenetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Doorduin, Leonie; Gravendeel, Barbara; Lammers, Youri; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Chin-A-Woeng, Thomas; Vrieling, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    Invasive individuals from the pest species Jacobaea vulgaris show different allocation patterns in defence and growth compared with native individuals. To examine if these changes are caused by fast evolution, it is necessary to identify native source populations and compare these with invasive populations. For this purpose, we are in need of intraspecific polymorphic markers. We therefore sequenced the complete chloroplast genomes of 12 native and 5 invasive individuals of J. vulgaris with next generation sequencing and discovered single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and microsatellites. This is the first study in which the chloroplast genome of that many individuals within a single species was sequenced. Thirty-two SNPs and 34 microsatellite regions were found. For none of the individuals, differences were found between the inverted repeats. Furthermore, being the first chloroplast genome sequenced in the Senecioneae clade, we compared it with four other members of the Asteraceae family to identify new regions for phylogentic inference within this clade and also within the Asteraceae family. Five markers (ndhC-trnV, ndhC-atpE, rps18-rpl20, clpP and psbM-trnD) contained parsimony-informative characters higher than 2%. Finally, we compared two procedures of preparing chloroplast DNA for next generation sequencing. PMID:21444340

  15. Can HB vaccine yield a booster effect on individuals with positive serum anti-HBs and anti-HBc markers ?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ru-Xiang; Guo, Ying; Yang, Chang-Hong; Song, Yu; Chen, Juan; Pang, Fu-Sheng; Lei, Shao-Ping; Jia, Xiao-Ming; Wen, Jin-Ying; Shi, Christina Y.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate if HB vaccination can yield a booster effect on the anti-HBs level of those naturally acquired HBV positive markers. METHODS: Sera were collected from 1399 newly enrolled university students aged between 18-20 years at the entrance medical examination in 2001. Forty-four students (28 males and 16 females) with positive serum anti-HBs and anti-HBc markers served as an observation group and another 44 students (24 males and 20 females) without any HBV markers as the control. HB vaccination was given to all the students without positive serum HBsAg according to 0, 1, 6 month regimen and the peripheral venous blood was sampled from those of both observation and control groups for anti-HBs detection one month after the second and third doses. Anti-HBs levels were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: The seroconversion rate of anti-HBs in the control group was 100% after the second dose, but the geometric mean titers (GMTs) were low. The tendency of serum anti-HBs changes after the 3rd dose was completely different between the two groups. Although more than half of those with positive anti-HBs and anti-HBc showed a mild increase of anti-HBs levels after the 2nd boosting dose (mean anti-HBs level was 320:198 mIU), but the increase of serum anti-HBs titer was much smaller than that in the control group. The averages of their initial serum anti-HBs levels and the levels after the 2nd and 3rd doses were 198, 320 and 275 mIU respectively. All the subjects from the control group had an obvious increase in their serum anti-HBs levels which was nearly 4 times the baseline level (302:78 mIU). CONCLUSION: HB vaccination can not enhance anti-HBs levels in those with positive serum anti-HBs and anti-HBc markers. PMID:14716846

  16. Race/ethnicity determines the relationships between oxidative stress markers and blood pressure in individuals with high cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Kapuku, G; Treiber, F; Raouane, F; Halbert, J; Davis, H; Young-Mayes, S; Robinson, V; Harshfield, G

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) and cardiovascular (CV) reactivity are related to CV morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the relationships between these CV risk factors and their confounders. We hypothesize that higher OS is linked to higher blood pressure (BP) reactivity to acute laboratory stressors and in the natural setting. We studied 137 subjects with a family history of hypertension and early myocardial infarction. There were 63 European Americans (EAs) (38 males) and 74 African Americans (AAs) (35 males), aged 19-36 (27.6±3.1). The protocol included a competitive video game, cold stressor and ambulatory BP recording. Blood samples were drawn six times for OS markers (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-Isoprostane) assay. Repeated measures analyses of covariance were used to test for mean differences and Pearson correlations were used to test OS and BP associations. There were no significant race/ethnicity differences in BP reactivity to either stressor (both P's>0.48). 8-OHdG levels were significantly lower across all time points for AAs than for EAs (P<0.05), while levels of 8-isoprostane did not differ significantly (P>0.10). Averaged 8-OHdG levels significantly correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) reactivity (r=0.45, <0.01) and 24-h, daytime and nighttime SBP (r range=0.37-0.42, all P's<0.02) for EAs but not for AAs, whereas 8-isoprostane levels were significantly correlated with reactive SBP and nighttime diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (both r's=0.38, P<0.01) for AAs but not for EAs. These findings suggest a link between OS and BP changes in subjects at high risk for CV disease (CVD). Further, race/ethnicity determines which OS marker will impact BP variation implying race/ethnicity differences in OS-related mechanisms of CVD.

  17. Validating the use of colouration patterns for individual recognition in the worm pipefish using a novel set of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, N M; Silva, R M; Cunha, M; Antunes, A; Jones, A G; Vieira, M N

    2014-01-01

    In studies of behaviour, ecology and evolution, identification of individual organisms can be an invaluable tool, capable of unravelling otherwise cryptic information regarding group structure, movement patterns, population size and mating strategies. The use of natural markings is arguably the least invasive method for identification. However, to be truly useful natural markings must be sufficiently variable to allow for unique identification, while being stable enough to permit long-term studies. Non-invasive marking techniques are especially important in fishes of the Family Syngnathidae (pipefishes, seahorses and seadragons), as many of these taxa are of conservation concern or used extensively in studies of sexual selection. Here, we assessed the reliability of natural markings as a character for individual identification in a wild population of Nerophis lumbriciformis by comparing results from natural markings to individual genetic assignments based on eight novel microsatellite loci. We also established a minimally invasive method based on epithelial cell swabbing to sample DNA. All pipefish used in the validation of natural markings, independently of sex or time between recaptures, were individually recognized through facial colouration patterns. Their identities were verified by the observation of the same multilocus genotype at every sampling event for each individual that was identified on the basis of natural markings. Successful recaptures of previously swabbed pipefish indicated that this process probably did not induce an elevated rate of mortality. Also, the recapture of newly pregnant males showed that swabbing did not affect reproductive behaviour.

  18. Neuroanatomical and Neuropsychological Markers of Amnestic MCI: A Three-Year Longitudinal Study in Individuals Unaware of Cognitive Decline

    PubMed Central

    Goerlich, Katharina S.; Votinov, Mikhail; Dicks, Ellen; Ellendt, Sinika; Csukly, Gábor; Habel, Ute

    2017-01-01

    Structural brain changes underlying mild cognitive impairment (MCI) have been well-researched, but most previous studies required subjective cognitive complaints (SCC) as a diagnostic criterion, diagnosed MCI based on a single screening test or lacked analyses in relation to neuropsychological impairment. This longitudinal voxel-based morphometry study aimed to overcome these limitations: The relationship between regional gray matter (GM) atrophy and behavioral performance was investigated over the course of 3 years in individuals unaware of cognitive decline, identified as amnestic MCI based on an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Region of interest analyses revealed GM atrophy in the left amygdala, hippocampus, and parahippocampus in MCI individuals compared to normally aging participants, which was specifically related to verbal memory impairment and evident already at the first measurement point. These findings demonstrate that GM atrophy is detectable in individuals with amnestic MCI despite unawareness of beginning cognitive decline. Thus, individuals with GM atrophy in regions associated with verbal memory impairment do not necessarily need to experience SCC before meeting neuropsychological criteria for MCI. These results have important implications for future research and diagnostic procedures of MCI. PMID:28275349

  19. Sorting single satellite cells from individual myofibers reveals heterogeneity in cell-surface markers and myogenic capacity.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Matthew R; Balakrishnan, Karthik R; Li, Ju; Conboy, Michael J; Huang, Haiyan; Mohanty, Swomitra K; Jabart, Eric; Hack, James; Conboy, Irina M; Sohn, Lydia L

    2013-04-01

    Traditional cell-screening techniques such as FACS and MACS are better suited for large numbers of cells isolated from bulk tissue and cannot easily screen stem or progenitor cells from minute populations found in their physiological niches. Furthermore, these techniques rely upon irreversible antibody binding, potentially altering cell properties, including gene expression and regenerative capacity. To address these challenges, we have developed a novel, label-free stem-cell analysis and sorting platform capable of quantifying cell-surface marker expression of single functional organ stem cells directly isolated from their micro-anatomical niche. Using our unique platform, we have discovered a remarkable heterogeneity in both the regenerative capacity and expression of CXCR4, β1-integrin, Sca-1, M-cadherin, Syndecan-4, and Notch-1 in freshly isolated muscle stem (satellite) cells residing on different, single myofibers and have identified a small population of Sca-1(+)/Myf5(+) myogenic satellite cells. Our results demonstrate the utility of our single-cell platform for uncovering and functionally characterizing stem-cell heterogeneity in the organ microniche.

  20. The dose of hazelnuts influences acceptance and diet quality but not inflammatory markers and body composition in overweight and obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Tey, Siew Ling; Gray, Andrew R; Chisholm, Alexandra W; Delahunty, Conor M; Brown, Rachel C

    2013-08-01

    Regular nut consumption may improve markers of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. The quantity of nuts required to achieve these health benefits without compromising body weight and acceptance is unknown. This study compared the effects of incorporating hazelnuts at 2 different doses with a diet without nuts on inflammatory markers, cell adhesion molecules, and body composition in 107 overweight and obese individuals. This was a randomized, controlled, parallel 12-wk intervention including 3 treatment arms: no nuts (control group), 30 g/d of hazelnuts, or 60 g/d of hazelnuts. Blood pressure, body composition, plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), lipid, and apolipoprotein (apo) profiles were assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 wk. "Desire" and "liking" for nuts were assessed during the intervention. Results showed no significant differences in follow-up clinical outcomes between groups after adjusting for baseline values, age, sex, and BMI (all P ≥ 0.10), except for a tendency toward improvement in VCAM-1 concentration in the 60-g/d nut group (P = 0.07). Hazelnut consumption significantly improved diet quality in a dose-response manner. Desire and liking for nuts remained stable in the 30-g/d group, whereas these ratings decreased significantly over time in the 60-g/d group (both P < 0.001). In conclusion, 12 wk of hazelnut consumption appears to have minimal effect on inflammatory markers and cell adhesion molecules in this group of healthy, normocholesterolemic overweight and obese individuals. Nut consumption improves diet quality without adversely affecting body composition. Consuming 30 g/d of nuts regularly is achievable, whereas 60 g/d appears to compromise desire and liking.

  1. Selenium concentrations in serum of individuals with liver diseases (cirrhosis or hepatitis): relationship with some nutritional and biochemical markers.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Alarcón, M; López-Ga de la Serrana, H; Pérez-Valero, V; López-Martínez, M C

    2002-05-27

    Serum concentrations were measured in individuals (n = 50) with liver diseases (cirrhosis and hepatitis) by hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry in a cross-sectional study. Mean serum selenium levels determined in patients with cirrhosis (n = 12) or with hepatitis (n = 38) were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those measured in control groups mainly due to a decreased liver function. Mean serum selenium concentrations were significantly lower in cirrhotic individuals when compared with patients with hepatitis (P<0.05). Therefore, the severity of the live injury is a factor conditioning the impairment in the selenium body status observed in individuals with hepatopathies. In hepatic patients serum total cholesterol levels showed a significant correlation with serum selenium concentrations (r=0.912, P<0.05) demonstrating the important role of selenium as an antioxidant agent; similarly, gamma-glutamic-transferase levels were significantly correlated with the serum selenium levels (r=-0.803, P<0.05) indicating that when the intensity of the hepatic injury increases (enhancement in serum GGT levels) concomitantly the serum selenium levels decrease significantly. No significant relationships between serum selenium levels and sex or age of patients were observed.

  2. Study of genetic markers of CODIS and ESS systems in a population of individuals from Cabo Verde living in Lisboa.

    PubMed

    Resende, Ana; Amorim, António; da Silva, Cláudia Vieira; Ribeiro, Teresa; Porto, Maria João; Costa Santos, Jorge; Afonso Costa, Heloísa

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-two autosomal short tandem repeats included in the PowerPlex® Fusion System Amplification kit (Promega Corporation) were genotyped in a population sample of 500 unrelated individuals from Cabo Verde living in Lisboa. Allelic frequency data and forensic and statistical parameters were calculated and evaluated in this work. The genetic relationship among immigrant population from Cabo Verde living in Lisboa and other populations, such as Brazilian and Angola immigrants living in Lisboa; Afro-Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics and Asians living in the USA and the population from Lisboa was assessed, and a multidimensional scaling plot was drown to show these results.

  3. Identification of HLA-DRPheβ47 as the susceptibility marker of hypersensitivity to beryllium in individuals lacking the berylliosis-associated supratypic marker HLA-DPGluβ69

    PubMed Central

    Amicosante, Massimo; Berretta, Floriana; Rossman, Milton; Butler, Richard H; Rogliani, Paola; van den Berg-Loonen, Ella; Saltini, Cesare

    2005-01-01

    Background Susceptibility to beryllium (Be)-hypersensitivity (BH) has been associated with HLA-DP alleles carrying a glutamate at position 69 of the HLA-DP β-chain (HLA-DPGlu69) and with several HLA-DP, -DQ and -DR alleles and polymorphisms. However, no genetic associations have been found between BH affected subjects not carrying the HLA-DPGlu69 susceptibility marker. Methods In this report, we re-evaluated an already described patient populations after 7 years of follow-up including new 29 identified BH subjects. An overall population 36 berylliosis patients and 38 Be-sensitization without lung granulomas and 86 Be-exposed controls was analysed to assess the role of the individual HLA-class II polymorphisms associated with BH-susceptibility in HLA-DPGlu69 negative subjects by univariate and multivariate analysis. Results As previously observed in this population the HLA-DPGlu69 markers was present in higher frequency in berylliosis patients (31 out of 36, 86%) than in Be-sensitized (21 out of 38, 55%, p = 0.008 vs berylliosis) and 41 out of 86 (48%, p < 0.0001 vs berylliosis, p = 0.55 vs Be-sensitized) Be-exposed controls. However, 22 subjects presenting BH did not carry the HLA-DPGlu69 marker. We thus evaluated the contribution of all the HLA-DR, -DP and -DQ polymorphisms in determining BH susceptibility in this subgroup of HLA-Glu69 subjects. In HLA-DPGlu69-negatives a significant association with BH was found for the HLA-DQLeu26, for the HLA-DRB1 locus residues Ser13, Tyr26, His32, Asn37, Phe47 and Arg74 and for the HLA-DRB3 locus clusterized residues Arg11, Tyr26, Asp28, Leu38, Ser60 and Arg74. HLA-DRPhe47 (OR 2.956, p < 0.05) resulting independently associated with BH. Further, Be-stimulated T-cell proliferation in the HLA-DPGlu69-negative subjects (all carrying HLA-DRPhe47) was inhibited by the anti-HLA-DR antibody (range 70–92% inhibition) significantly more than by the anti-HLA-DP antibody (range: 6–29%; p < 0.02 compared to anti-HLA-DR) while it was

  4. Demerelate: calculating inter-individual relatedness for kinship analysis based on co-dominant diploid genetic markers using R.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Philipp; Gerlach, Gabriele

    2017-03-09

    The Demerelate package offers algorithms to calculate different inter-individual relatedness measurements. Three different allele sharing indices, five pairwise weighted estimates of relatedness and four pairwise weighted estimates with sample size correction are implemented to analyze kinship structures within populations. Statistics are based on randomization tests; modeling relatedness coefficients by logistic regression, modeling relatedness with geographic distance by mantel correlation and comparing mean relatedness between populations using pairwise t-tests. Demerelate provides an advance on previous software packages by including some estimators not available in R to date, along with FIS , as well as combining analysis of relatedness and spatial structuring. An UPGMA tree visualizes genetic relatedness among individuals. Additionally, Demerelate summarizes information on datasets (allele vs. genotype frequencies; heterozygosity; FIS -values). Demerelate is - to our knowledge - the first R-package implementing basic allele sharing indices such as Blouin's Mxy relatedness, the estimator of Wang corrected for sample size (wangxy ), estimators based on Morans I adapted to genetic relatedness as well as combining all estimators with geographic information. The R environment enables users to better understand relatedness within populations due to the flexibility of Demerelate of accepting different datasets as empirical data, reference data, geographical data and by providing intermediate results. Each statistic and tool can be used separately, which helps to understand the suitability of the data for relatedness analysis, and can be easily implemented in custom pipelines. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Lipid metabolites as markers of fattening rate in a non-migratory passerine: effects of ambient temperature and individual variation.

    PubMed

    Devost, Isabelle; Hallot, Fanny; Milbergue, Myriam; Petit, Magali; Vézina, François

    2014-11-01

    Plasma lipid metabolites triglycerides (TRIG) and glycerol (GLY) are used as indicators of fattening rate and nutritional condition in migratory birds. Requiring only one blood sample, they could also be used for studying daily and seasonal fattening rates in relation with habitat quality or weather variations in species wintering in cold climates. Using black-capped chickadees exposed to three experimental temperatures (0 °C, 15 °C, and 30 °C), the goal of this experiment was to determine the relationship between plasma levels of TRIG and GLY and fattening rate measured over periods from a few hours to the previous two days. Results showed that birds maintained in the cold had metabolite levels 39-81% higher than those at thermoneutrality, likely reflecting the size of their fat reserves, and that TRIG and total GLY were highly correlated across treatments. Fattening rate was also higher at 0 °C (+35%) and 30 °C (+24%) relative to that measured at 15 °C and, as expected, was positively correlated with metabolite levels across treatments. However, despite fattening rates similar to that observed at the other temperatures, the relationships were uncoupled at 30 °C, implying that the technique may not be easily applicable at temperatures within or close to thermoneutrality. We also found a strong individual effect in the relationships between fattening rate and TRIG levels, suggesting high individual consistency in these parameters in conditions of unrestricted food access such as in captivity. Our study confirms that plasma TRIG and GLY levels can be used as relative indexes of condition and fattening rates in wintering passerines.

  6. Effects of omega-3 PUFA on immune markers in adolescent individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis - Results of the randomized controlled Vienna omega-3 study.

    PubMed

    Smesny, Stefan; Milleit, Berko; Schaefer, Miriam R; Hesse, Jana; Schlögelhofer, Monika; Langbein, Kerstin; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Berger, Maximus; Cotter, David R; Sauer, Heinrich; McGorry, Patrick D; Amminger, G Paul

    2017-01-23

    Alterations of immune function have been reported in ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis patients causing expectations in terms of predictive meaningfulness and benefits of anti-inflammatory agents. According to a RCT in UHR-patients supplementation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) was effective in reducing transition to psychosis risk and to improve symptomatology. Based on preclinical findings, we now investigated state marker properties of and the influence of PUFA on immune markers in a RCT (clinical trials.gov Identifier: NCT00396643). In a longitudinal design we measured plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory interleukin 6 (IL-6), the soluble alpha (Tac) subunit of the interleukin 2 receptor (sIL-2r), and the circulating soluble form of the intercellular adhesion molecule one (sICAM-1), in 79 help-seeking UHR individuals (13-25years of age). Using linear mixed model (LMM) analysis, we investigated the effects of 12weeks supplementation of either 1.2g/d PUFA (n=38) or Placebo (n=41). At baseline, inflammatory markers were not altered in patients who later suffered transition to psychosis within one year (n=12; 11 PUFA-group, 1 PL-group). IL-6 was weakly inverse associated with omega-6 PUFA, and highly increased in nicotine users. In univariate tests of the LMM omega-3 PUFA caused a significant increase of sICAM-1 (p=0.022). PUFA did not significantly influence IL-6 or sIL-2r. The enhancement of sICAM-1 in the PUFA condition is suggestive for supportive effects on vascular immune response and immediate Th1 helper cell mediated immune answer, which was found disturbed in manifest schizophrenia, e.g. by facilitating the leukocyte adhesion and migration across the endothelium.

  7. Healthy Eating Index is associated with certain markers of inflammation and insulin resistance but not with lipid profile in individuals at cardiometabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Monfort-Pires, Milena; Folchetti, Luciana Dias; Previdelli, Agatha Nogueira; Siqueira-Catania, Antonela; de Barros, Camila Risso; Ferreira, Sandra Roberta Gouvea

    2014-04-01

    Eating habits may influence inflammatory status and insulin resistance, both involved in the genesis of cardiometabolic diseases; an index of overall diet quality may be useful to identify risk for these diseases. We investigated whether the Healthy Eating Index (HEI-2005), adapted to Brazilian habits (B-HEI), was associated with markers of inflammation, insulin resistance and lipid profile in individuals at cardiometabolic risk. Two hundred and four prediabetic individuals (64.7% women) were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements, 24-h dietary recalls used to calculate the B-HEI, and blood samples were collected. ANOVA was used for comparisons of clinical variables across the B-HEI tertiles and multiple linear regressions employed to test associations between clinical variables and B-HEI total score. Significant trends to decrease mean values of body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.03) and C-reactive protein concentrations (p = 0.02) across the tertiles of B-HEI, but not other biomarkers, were observed. Waist circumference, HOMA-IR and C-reactive protein were inversely associated with the B-HEI (p < 0.05), after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, and physical activity level. Also, a direct association of adiponectin concentrations with B-HEI was detected after adjustments (p = 0.001). Data from this study indicate that the B-HEI may be useful to identify the body adiposity-induced pro-inflammatory status and insulin resistance in individuals at cardiometabolic risk.

  8. Individual Markers of Resilience in Train Traffic Control: The Role of Operators' Goals and Strategic Mental Models and Implications for Variation, Expertise, and Performance.

    PubMed

    Lo, Julia C; Pluyter, Kari R; Meijer, Sebastiaan A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine individual markers of resilience and obtain quantitative insights into the understanding and the implications of variation and expertise levels in train traffic operators' goals and strategic mental models and their impact on performance. The Dutch railways are one of the world's most heavy utilized railway networks and have been identified to be weak in system and organizational resilience. Twenty-two train traffic controllers enacted two scenarios in a human-in-the-loop simulator. Their experience, goals, strategic mental models, and performance were assessed through questionnaires and simulator logs. Goals were operationalized through performance indicators and strategic mental models through train completion strategies. A variation was found between operators for both self-reported primary performance indicators and completion strategies. Further, the primary goal of only 14% of the operators reflected the primary organizational goal (i.e., arrival punctuality). An incongruence was also found between train traffic controllers' self-reported performance indicators and objective performance in a more disrupted condition. The level of experience tends to affect performance differently. There is a gap between primary organizational goals and preferred individual goals. Further, the relative strong diversity in primary operator goals and strategic mental models indicates weak resilience at the individual level. With recent and upcoming large-scale changes throughout the sociotechnical space of the railway infrastructure organization, the findings are useful to facilitate future railway traffic control and the development of a resilient system. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  9. Comparing the cost-effectiveness of four novel risk markers for screening asymptomatic individuals to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the US population.

    PubMed

    van Kempen, Bob J H; Ferket, Bart S; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Max, Wendy; Myriam Hunink, M G; Fleischmann, Kirsten E

    2016-01-15

    High sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), coronary artery calcification on CT (CT calcium), carotid artery intima media thickness on ultrasound (cIMT) and ankle-brachial index (ABI) improve prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, but the benefit of screening with these novel risk markers in the U.S. population is unclear. A microsimulation model evaluating lifelong cost-effectiveness for individuals aged 40-85 at intermediate risk of CVD, using 2003-2004 NHANES-III (N=3736), Framingham Heart Study, U.S. Vital Statistics, meta-analyses of independent predictive effects of the four novel risk markers and treatment effects was constructed. Using both an intention-to-treat (assumes adherence <100% and incorporates disutility from taking daily medications) and an as-treated (100% adherence and no disutility) analysis, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), lifetime costs (2014 US $), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER in $/QALY gained) of screening with hsCRP, CT coronary calcium, cIMT and ABI were established compared with current practice, full adherence to current guidelines, and ubiquitous statin therapy. In the intention-to-treat analysis in men, screening with CT calcium was cost effective ($32,900/QALY) compared with current practice. In women, screening with hsCRP was cost effective ($32,467/QALY). In the as-treated analysis, statin therapy was both more effective and less costly than all other strategies for both men and women. When a substantial disutility from taking daily medication is assumed, screening men with CT coronary calcium is likely to be cost-effective whereas screening with hsCRP has value in women. The individual perceived disutility for taking daily medication should play a key role in the decision. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of an exercise challenge on mobilization and surface marker expression of monocyte subsets in individuals with normal vs. elevated blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hong, Suzi; Mills, Paul J

    2008-05-01

    High blood pressure (BP) and monocyte activation are associated with atherogenic processes. Especially, CD16 expressing monocytes are shown to be activated in many inflammatory conditions but their characteristics in hypertension is unknown. We compared CD16(++), CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocyte populations and their cellular adhesion molecule (CAM), chemokine receptor, and activation marker expression in response to a moderate 20-min treadmill exercise bout at 65-70% V O(2peak) in 44 participants with elevated (EBP) or normal BP (NBP). Blood was drawn before, immediately after, and 10min after exercise. Phenotyping of monocytes and detection of surface markers were done by flow cytometry. Monocyte subset by exercise [pre, post, 10-min post] repeated measures ANOVA and group [EBP vs. NBP] by exercise repeated measures of ANCOVA with age, BMI, and fitness as covariates were employed. Circulating numbers of all the three monocyte subsets increased after exercise (p<0.001), with the largest % increase for CD16(+)CD14(++). Percents of CD16(++)CD14(+) and CD16(+)CD14(++) increased, whereas % CD16(-)CD14(++) decreased (p<0.001). Also, pre to post exercise changes in CD62L, CD11b, CXCR2, and HLA-DR expression were different among the monocyte subsets (p's<0.001). BP status did not significantly affect monocyte subset trafficking, although post-exercise changes in CD62L and CXCR2 levels were greater in EBP individuals (p<0.05). We conclude that exercise leads to a different mobilization among monocyte subsets based on CD16 expression. Individuals with high BP showed greater responses to a physical challenge in some monocyte chemokine receptors and selectins, but its clinical implications need further examination.

  11. The impact of decreases in air temperature and increases in ozone on markers of endothelial function in individuals having type-2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Stefanie; Breitner, Susanne; Neas, Lucas; Cascio, Wayne; Diaz-Sanchez, David; Hinderliter, Alan; Peters, Annette; Devlin, Robert B; Schneider, Alexandra

    2014-10-01

    Several studies have reported an association between air pollution and endothelial dysfunction, especially in individuals having diabetes. However, very few studies have examined the impact of air temperature on endothelial function. The objective of this analysis was to investigate short-term effects of temperature and ozone on endothelial function in individuals having diabetes. Moreover, we investigated interactive effects between air temperature and air pollution on markers of endothelial function. Between November 2004 and December 2005 flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), nitroglycerin-mediated dilatation (NTGMD) and several blood markers representing endothelial function were measured using brachial artery ultrasound on four consecutive days in 22 individuals with type-2 diabetes mellitus in Chapel Hill, North Carolina (USA). Daily measurements of meteorological parameters, ozone and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5) were obtained from fixed monitoring sites. We used additive mixed-models adjusting for time trend, day of the week, relative humidity and barometric pressure to assess temperature and ozone associations with endothelial function. A 1 °C decrease in the 24-h temperature average was associated with a decrease in mean FMD on the same day (-2.2% (95%-confidence interval:[-4.7;0.3%])) and with a delay of one and four days. A temperature decrement also led to an immediate (-1.7%[-3.3;-0.04]) decrease in NTGMD. Moreover, we observed an immediate (-14.6%[-26.3;-2.9%]) and a one day delayed (-13.5%[-27.0; 0.04%]) decrease in FMD in association with a 0.01 ppm increase in the maximum 8-h moving average of ozone. Temperature effects on FMD strengthened when PM2.5 and ozone concentrations were high. The associations were similar during winter and summer. We detected an association between temperature decreases and ozone increases on endothelial dysfunction in individuals having diabetes. We conclude that endothelial dysfunction

  12. Transcript level of erythroid differentiation-related factor, a candidate surrogate marker for transmissible spongiform encephalopathy diseases in blood, shows a broad range of variation in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Glock, Barbara; Winter, Maya; Rennhofer, Simone O; Brunhölzl, Elisabeth; Tröscher, Doris; Reisacher, Rosemarie B K; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2003-12-01

    In 2001, it was demonstrated that the expression of the erythroid differentiation-related factor (EDRF) is reduced in lymphatic tissues of rodents and cattle as well as in whole blood of sheep that suffer from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. To determine whether the normal range of EDRF expression varies in healthy individuals, mRNA levels were measured in whole blood samples from 106 healthy blood donors by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, the correlations of transcript levels with individual physical characteristics were analyzed. In addition, EDRF expression was examined in total RNA samples from a lymph node and the intestine. The data show that EDRF mRNA levels in healthy persons vary within a total range of 2 log units as well as they display a weak correlation with body height. Furthermore, it was found that EDRF is also expressed in lymph nodes and the intestine. Owing to its broad range of variation, measuring the EDRF expression does not seem to be a good surrogate marker, unless an altered expression is distinctively different from the varying level in healthy humans.

  13. The Association Between Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Markers of Inflammation and Immune Activation in HIV-Infected Individuals With Controlled Viremia.

    PubMed

    Siyahhan Julnes, Peter; Auh, Sungyoung; Krakora, Rebecca; Withers, Keenan; Nora, Diana; Matthews, Lindsay; Steinbach, Sally; Snow, Joseph; Smith, Bryan; Nath, Avindra; Morse, Caryn; Kapetanovic, Suad

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may be associated with chronic immune dysregulation and a proinflammatory state. Among HIV-infected individuals, PTSD is associated with greater morbidity and mortality, but the association with immune dysfunction has not been evaluated. This study explores the association between PTSD and selected markers of inflammation and immune activation in a cohort of HIV-infected, virally-suppressed individuals. HIV-infected adults who were virologically controlled on antiretroviral medications were recruited through a screening protocol for studies of HIV-related neurocognitive disorders. Each participant underwent blood draws, urine toxicology screen, and completed the Client Diagnostic Questionnaire, a semistructured psychiatric interview. Of 114 eligible volunteers, 72 (63%) were male, 77 (68%) African American, and 34 (30%) participants met criteria for PTSD. Participants with PTSD were more likely to be current smokers (79%) than those without (60%) (p = 0.05). The PTSD cohort had significantly higher total white blood cell counts (5318 and 6404 cells/uL, p = 0.03), absolute neutrophil count (2767 and 3577 cells/uL, p = 0.02), CD8% (43 and 48, p = 0.05), and memory CD8% (70 and 78%, p = 0.04); lower naïve CD8% (30 and 22%, p = 0.04) and higher rate of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein >3mg/L (29 and 20, p = 0.03). A high prevalence of PTSD was identified in this cohort of HIV-infected adults who were virally suppressed. These results suggest that PTSD may be associated with immune dysregulation even among antiretroviral therapy-adherent HIV-infected individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Inherited mosaicism for the supernumerary marker chromosome in cat eye syndrome: inter- and intra-individual variation and correlation to the phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kvarnung, Malin; Lindstrand, Anna; Malmgren, Helena; Thåström, Anders; Jacobson, Lena; Dahl, Niklas; Lundin, Johanna; Blennow, Elisabeth

    2012-05-01

    We have studied a family with repeated transmission of mosaicism for a supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC), giving rise to varying symptoms of the cat eye syndrome (CES) in the offspring. The frequency of the SMC was investigated using FISH with probes from the CES critical region on lymphocytes as well as buccal cells. The same probes were used to study the frequency of the SMC in spermatozoa from the father. The SMC was characterized in detail using array-CGH and was found to correspond to a symmetrical cat eye SMC type I, with two extra copies of the most proximal part of 22q11, not extending into the classical 22q11.2 deletion region. Mosaicism for the SMC was detected in 4 out of 7 family members, the father and all his three children. The degree of mosaicism varied greatly between individuals as well as between tissues, with twice as many cells with the SMC in epithelial cells compared to blood. The highest frequency (almost 50%) was found in spermatozoa from the father. There was a direct correlation between the degree of mosaicism and the symptoms, varying from no obvious symptoms to classical CES. The study confirms the occurrence of direct transmission of SMC-mosaicism in CES. The results indicate that examination of parental epithelial cells should be preferred compared to blood cells in order to exclude a recurrence risk in parents of a child with CES. Interphase FISH analysis of spermatozoa is the most sensitive method to exclude paternal germ line mosaicsm.

  15. Markers of Serotonergic Function in the Orbitofrontal Cortex and Dorsal Raphé Nucleus Predict Individual Variation in Spatial-Discrimination Serial Reversal Learning

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Rebecca L; Alsiö, Johan; Jupp, Bianca; Rabinovich, Rebecca; Shrestha, Saurav; Roberts, Angela C; Robbins, Trevor W; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) impairs the ability of individuals to flexibly adapt behavior to changing stimulus-reward (S-R) contingencies. Impaired flexibility also results from interventions that alter serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) transmission in the OFC and dorsomedial striatum (DMS). However, it is unclear whether similar mechanisms underpin naturally occurring variations in behavioral flexibility. In the present study, we used a spatial-discrimination serial reversal procedure to investigate interindividual variability in behavioral flexibility in rats. We show that flexibility on this task is improved following systemic administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor citalopram and by low doses of the DA reuptake inhibitor GBR12909. Rats in the upper quintile of the distribution of perseverative responses during repeated S-R reversals showed significantly reduced levels of the 5-HT metabolite, 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, in the OFC. Additionally, 5-HT2A receptor binding in the OFC of mid- and high-quintile rats was significantly reduced compared with rats in the low-quintile group. These perturbations were accompanied by an increase in the expression of monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) and MAO-B in the lateral OFC and by a decrease in the expression of MAO-A, MAO-B, and tryptophan hydroxylase in the dorsal raphé nucleus of highly perseverative rats. We found no evidence of significant differences in markers of DA and 5-HT function in the DMS or MAO expression in the ventral tegmental area of low- vs high-perseverative rats. These findings indicate that diminished serotonergic tone in the OFC may be an endophenotype that predisposes to behavioral inflexibility and other forms of compulsive behavior. PMID:25567428

  16. Validity and reliability of skin markers for measurement of intersegmental mobility at L2-3 and L3-4 during lateral bending in healthy individuals: a fluoroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Hashemirad, Fahimeh; Hatef, Boshra; Jaberzadeh, Shapour; Ale Agha, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    It is clinically important to assess kinematic parameters of lumbar spine movement to increase our understanding of lumbar mobility impairments in patients with low back pain. This is the first step for restoration of motor function. The use of non-invasive surface markers has currently attracted the interests of many researchers but scientific utilization of this technique for clinical research requires validity and reliability studies. The aim of the present study was to examine whether skin markers can be used to measure lumbar motions during lateral bending. Twelve healthy individuals were lying in prone position on the video fluoroscopy table and skin markers were attached over their spinous processes. Fluoroscopy images were taken in two positions of neutral and right lateral bending (RLB). The correlation of the L2-3 and L3-4 angles and lumbar curvature between markers and vertebrae measurements in the neutral and RLB positions was determined by Pearson Correlation Coefficient. The Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to measure inter-examiner reliability of measurement in five participants. The results showed high reliability (ranging from 0.94 to 0.99) for angular measurements at L2-3 and L3-4 and lumbar curvature and also significant correlation between angular measurement derived from markers and vertebrae at L2-3 (r = 0.7, p = 0.015), L3-4 and lumbar curvature (r = 0.91 p = 0.001). The results showed that motions of skin markers follow the motions of the assigned underlying lumbar vertebrae. Therefore, skin markers can be confidently used for estimation of lumbar movements during lateral bending. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  18. Inflammatory markers and extent and progression of early atherosclerosis: Meta-analysis of individual-participant-data from 20 prospective studies of the PROG-IMT collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Willeit, Peter; Thompson, Simon G; Agewall, Stefan; Bergström, Göran; Bickel, Horst; Catapano, Alberico L; Chien, Kuo-Liong; de Groot, Eric; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Etgen, Thorleif; Franco, Oscar H; Iglseder, Bernhard; Johnsen, Stein H; Kavousi, Maryam; Lind, Lars; Liu, Jing; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Norata, Giuseppe D; Olsen, Michael H; Papagianni, Aikaterini; Poppert, Holger; Price, Jackie F; Sacco, Ralph L; Yanez, David N; Zhao, Dong; Schminke, Ulf; Bülbül, Alpaslan; Polak, Joseph F; Sitzer, Matthias; Hofman, Albert; Grigore, Liliana; Dörr, Marcus; Su, Ta-Chen; Ducimetière, Pierre; Xie, Wuxiang; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kiechl, Stefan; Rundek, Tatjana; Robertson, Christine; Fagerberg, Björn; Bokemark, Lena; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Ikram, M Arfan; Völzke, Henry; Lin, Hung-Ju; Plichart, Matthieu; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Desvarieux, Moise; McLachlan, Stela; Schmidt, Caroline; Kauhanen, Jussi; Willeit, Johann; W Lorenz, Matthias; Sander, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Background Large-scale epidemiological evidence on the role of inflammation in early atherosclerosis, assessed by carotid ultrasound, is lacking. We aimed to quantify cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of inflammatory markers with common-carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) in the general population. Methods Information on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, leucocyte count and CCA-IMT was available in 20 prospective cohort studies of the PROG-IMT collaboration involving 49,097 participants free of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Estimates of associations were calculated within each study and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Results Mean baseline CCA-IMT amounted to 0.74mm (SD = 0.18) and mean CCA-IMT progression over a mean of 3.9 years to 0.011 mm/year (SD = 0.039). Cross-sectional analyses showed positive linear associations between inflammatory markers and baseline CCA-IMT. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, mean differences in baseline CCA-IMT per one-SD higher inflammatory marker were: 0.0082mm for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (p < 0.001); 0.0072mm for fibrinogen (p < 0.001); and 0.0025mm for leucocyte count (p = 0.033). ‘Inflammatory load’, defined as the number of elevated inflammatory markers (i.e. in upper two quintiles), showed a positive linear association with baseline CCA-IMT (p < 0.001). Longitudinal associations of baseline inflammatory markers and changes therein with CCA-IMT progression were null or at most weak. Participants with the highest ‘inflammatory load’ had a greater CCA-IMT progression (p = 0.015). Conclusion Inflammation was independently associated with CCA-IMT cross-sectionally. The lack of clear associations with CCA-IMT progression may be explained by imprecision in its assessment within a limited time period. Our findings for ‘inflammatory load’ suggest important combined effects of the three inflammatory markers on early

  19. Inflammatory markers and extent and progression of early atherosclerosis: Meta-analysis of individual-participant-data from 20 prospective studies of the PROG-IMT collaboration.

    PubMed

    Willeit, Peter; Thompson, Simon G; Agewall, Stefan; Bergström, Göran; Bickel, Horst; Catapano, Alberico L; Chien, Kuo-Liong; de Groot, Eric; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Etgen, Thorleif; Franco, Oscar H; Iglseder, Bernhard; Johnsen, Stein H; Kavousi, Maryam; Lind, Lars; Liu, Jing; Mathiesen, Ellisiv B; Norata, Giuseppe D; Olsen, Michael H; Papagianni, Aikaterini; Poppert, Holger; Price, Jackie F; Sacco, Ralph L; Yanez, David N; Zhao, Dong; Schminke, Ulf; Bülbül, Alpaslan; Polak, Joseph F; Sitzer, Matthias; Hofman, Albert; Grigore, Liliana; Dörr, Marcus; Su, Ta-Chen; Ducimetière, Pierre; Xie, Wuxiang; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kiechl, Stefan; Rundek, Tatjana; Robertson, Christine; Fagerberg, Björn; Bokemark, Lena; Steinmetz, Helmuth; Ikram, M Arfan; Völzke, Henry; Lin, Hung-Ju; Plichart, Matthieu; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka; Desvarieux, Moise; McLachlan, Stela; Schmidt, Caroline; Kauhanen, Jussi; Willeit, Johann; Lorenz, Matthias W; Sander, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale epidemiological evidence on the role of inflammation in early atherosclerosis, assessed by carotid ultrasound, is lacking. We aimed to quantify cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of inflammatory markers with common-carotid-artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) in the general population. Information on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, leucocyte count and CCA-IMT was available in 20 prospective cohort studies of the PROG-IMT collaboration involving 49,097 participants free of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. Estimates of associations were calculated within each study and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Mean baseline CCA-IMT amounted to 0.74 mm (SD = 0.18) and mean CCA-IMT progression over a mean of 3.9 years to 0.011 mm/year (SD = 0.039). Cross-sectional analyses showed positive linear associations between inflammatory markers and baseline CCA-IMT. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, mean differences in baseline CCA-IMT per one-SD higher inflammatory marker were: 0.0082 mm for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (p < 0.001); 0.0072 mm for fibrinogen (p < 0.001); and 0.0025 mm for leucocyte count (p = 0.033). 'Inflammatory load', defined as the number of elevated inflammatory markers (i.e. in upper two quintiles), showed a positive linear association with baseline CCA-IMT (p < 0.001). Longitudinal associations of baseline inflammatory markers and changes therein with CCA-IMT progression were null or at most weak. Participants with the highest 'inflammatory load' had a greater CCA-IMT progression (p = 0.015). Inflammation was independently associated with CCA-IMT cross-sectionally. The lack of clear associations with CCA-IMT progression may be explained by imprecision in its assessment within a limited time period. Our findings for 'inflammatory load' suggest important combined effects of the three inflammatory markers on early atherosclerosis

  20. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis markers in individuals with and without a CHD event during pravastatin therapy: insights from the PROSPER trial

    PubMed Central

    Matthan, Nirupa R.; Resteghini, Nancy; Robertson, Michele; Ford, Ian; Shepherd, James; Packard, Chris; Buckley, Brendan M.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Lichtenstein, Alice H.; Schaefer, Ernst J.

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis, defined as the balance between absorption and synthesis, influences circulating cholesterol concentrations and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Statin therapy targets the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis and is efficacious in lowering CHD events and mortality. Nonetheless, CHD events still occur in some treated patients. To address differences in outcome during pravastatin therapy (40 mg/day), plasma markers of cholesterol synthesis (desmosterol, lathosterol) and fractional cholesterol absorption (campesterol, sitosterol) were measured, baseline and on treatment, in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk trial participants with (cases, n = 223) and without (controls, n = 257) a CHD event. Pravastatin therapy decreased plasma LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides and increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations to a similar extent in cases and controls. Decreased concentrations of the cholesterol synthesis markers desmosterol (−12% and −11%) and lathosterol (−50% and −56%) and increased concentrations of the cholesterol absorption markers campesterol (48% and 51%) and sitosterol (25% and 26%) were observed on treatment, but the magnitude of change was similar between cases and controls. These data suggest that decreases in cholesterol synthesis in response to pravastatin treatment were accompanied by modest compensatory increases in fractional cholesterol absorption. The magnitude of these alterations were similar between cases and controls and do not explain differences in outcomes with pravastatin treatment. PMID:19578163

  1. Cholesterol absorption and synthesis markers in individuals with and without a CHD event during pravastatin therapy: insights from the PROSPER trial.

    PubMed

    Matthan, Nirupa R; Resteghini, Nancy; Robertson, Michele; Ford, Ian; Shepherd, James; Packard, Chris; Buckley, Brendan M; Jukema, J Wouter; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis, defined as the balance between absorption and synthesis, influences circulating cholesterol concentrations and subsequent coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Statin therapy targets the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis and is efficacious in lowering CHD events and mortality. Nonetheless, CHD events still occur in some treated patients. To address differences in outcome during pravastatin therapy (40 mg/day), plasma markers of cholesterol synthesis (desmosterol, lathosterol) and fractional cholesterol absorption (campesterol, sitosterol) were measured, baseline and on treatment, in the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk trial participants with (cases, n = 223) and without (controls, n = 257) a CHD event. Pravastatin therapy decreased plasma LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides and increased HDL-cholesterol concentrations to a similar extent in cases and controls. Decreased concentrations of the cholesterol synthesis markers desmosterol (-12% and -11%) and lathosterol (-50% and -56%) and increased concentrations of the cholesterol absorption markers campesterol (48% and 51%) and sitosterol (25% and 26%) were observed on treatment, but the magnitude of change was similar between cases and controls. These data suggest that decreases in cholesterol synthesis in response to pravastatin treatment were accompanied by modest compensatory increases in fractional cholesterol absorption. The magnitude of these alterations were similar between cases and controls and do not explain differences in outcomes with pravastatin treatment.

  2. Changes in HDL cholesterol and in the inflammatory markers of atherogenesis after an oral fat load in type-2 diabetic patients and normal individuals.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Eponina R; Macedo, Geísa M; Campos, Florisbela S; Bandeira, Francisco A

    2008-06-01

    Type-2 diabetic patients exhibit postprandial hypertriglyceridemia, a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Several inflammatory markers are also risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (CRP) and number of leukocytes. There is a relationship between the increase in triglycerides and that of leukocytes in the postprandial period. Our objective was to evaluate whether the lipid changes in the postprandial period are related to changes in the inflammatory markers of atherogenesis in type-2 diabetic patients. Lipids, ultrasensitive CRP, and leukocyte count were analyzed during fasting and after a meal containing 56 g of fat. There was a decrease in HDL-cholesterol at five hours in the control group and at three and five hours in the diabetic group, and an increase in triglycerides at both three and five hours in the two groups, the latter being more evident at five hours in the diabetic patients. The decrease in HDL-cholesterol in the diabetic patients was inversely proportional to waist circumference, waist hip ratio, and body mass index (BMI). The number of leukocytes showed an increase in both groups at both times, being more apparent at five hours. There were no differences in lipids or markers between the groups. The fall in postprandial HDL-cholesterol correlated with visceral obesity in the group with type-2 diabetes. Hypertriglyceridemia and lowered HDL-cholesterol in the postprandial period were accompanied by a rise in the number of leukocytes in both healthy and type-2 diabetic subjects.

  3. Assessing Cortisol Reactivity to a Linguistic Task as a Marker of Stress in Individuals with Left-Hemisphere Stroke and Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laures-Gore, Jacqueline; Heim, Christine M.; Hsu, Yu-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors explore a method of measuring physiologic and perceived stress in individuals with aphasia by investigating salivary cortisol reactivity and subjectively perceived stress in response to a standardized linguistic task. Method: Fifteen individuals with aphasia and 15 age-matched healthy controls participated in a…

  4. Assessing Cortisol Reactivity to a Linguistic Task as a Marker of Stress in Individuals with Left-Hemisphere Stroke and Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laures-Gore, Jacqueline; Heim, Christine M.; Hsu, Yu-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors explore a method of measuring physiologic and perceived stress in individuals with aphasia by investigating salivary cortisol reactivity and subjectively perceived stress in response to a standardized linguistic task. Method: Fifteen individuals with aphasia and 15 age-matched healthy controls participated in a…

  5. Marker chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  6. The Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration: analysis of individual data on lipid, inflammatory and other markers in over 1.1 million participants in 104 prospective studies of cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Danesh, J; Erqou, S; Walker, M; Thompson, S G; Tipping, R; Ford, C; Pressel, S; Walldius, G; Jungner, I; Folsom, A R; Chambless, L E; Knuiman, M; Whincup, P H; Wannamethee, S G; Morris, R W; Willeit, J; Kiechl, S; Santer, P; Mayr, A; Wald, N; Ebrahim, S; Lawlor, D A; Yarnell, J W G; Gallacher, J; Casiglia, E; Tikhonoff, V; Nietert, P J; Sutherland, S E; Bachman, D L; Keil, J E; Cushman, M; Psaty, B M; Tracy, R P; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Nordestgaard, B G; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Giampaoli, S; Palmieri, L; Panico, S; Vanuzzo, D; Pilotto, L; Simons, L; McCallum, J; Friedlander, Y; Fowkes, F G R; Lee, A J; Smith, F B; Taylor, J; Guralnik, J; Phillips, C; Wallace, R; Blazer, D; Khaw, K T; Jansson, J H; Donfrancesco, C; Salomaa, V; Harald, K; Jousilahti, P; Vartiainen, E; Woodward, M; D'Agostino, R B; Wolf, P A; Vasan, R S; Pencina, M J; Bladbjerg, E M; Jorgensen, T; Moller, L; Jespersen, J; Dankner, R; Chetrit, A; Lubin, F; Rosengren, A; Wilhelmsen, L; Lappas, G; Eriksson, H; Bjorkelund, C; Cremer, P; Nagel, D; Tilvis, R; Strandberg, T; Rodriguez, B; Bouter, L M; Heine, R J; Dekker, J M; Nijpels, G; Stehouwer, C D A; Rimm, E; Pai, J; Sato, S; Iso, H; Kitamura, A; Noda, H; Goldbourt, U; Salomaa, V; Salonen, J T; Nyyssönen, K; Tuomainen, T-P; Deeg, D; Poppelaars, J L; Meade, T; Cooper, J; Hedblad, B; Berglund, G; Engstrom, G; Döring, A; Koenig, W; Meisinger, C; Mraz, W; Kuller, L; Selmer, R; Tverdal, A; Nystad, W; Gillum, R; Mussolino, M; Hankinson, S; Manson, J; De Stavola, B; Knottenbelt, C; Cooper, J A; Bauer, K A; Rosenberg, R D; Sato, S; Naito, Y; Holme, I; Nakagawa, H; Miura, H; Ducimetiere, P; Jouven, X; Crespo, C; Garcia-Palmieri, M; Amouyel, P; Arveiler, D; Evans, A; Ferrieres, J; Schulte, H; Assmann, G; Shepherd, J; Packard, C; Sattar, N; Cantin, B; Lamarche, B; Després, J-P; Dagenais, G R; Barrett-Connor, E; Wingard, D; Bettencourt, R; Gudnason, V; Aspelund, T; Sigurdsson, G; Thorsson, B; Trevisan, M; Witteman, J; Kardys, I; Breteler, M; Hofman, A; Tunstall-Pedoe, H; Tavendale, R; Lowe, G D O; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Howard, B V; Zhang, Y; Best, L; Umans, J; Onat, A; Meade, T W; Njolstad, I; Mathiesen, E; Lochen, M L; Wilsgaard, T; Gaziano, J M; Stampfer, M; Ridker, P; Ulmer, H; Diem, G; Concin, H; Rodeghiero, F; Tosetto, A; Brunner, E; Shipley, M; Buring, J; Cobbe, S M; Ford, I; Robertson, M; He, Y; Ibanez, A M; Feskens, E J M; Kromhout, D; Collins, R; Di Angelantonio, E; Kaptoge, S; Lewington, S; Orfei, L; Pennells, L; Perry, P; Ray, K; Sarwar, N; Scherman, M; Thompson, A; Watson, S; Wensley, F; White, I R; Wood, A M

    2007-01-01

    Many long-term prospective studies have reported on associations of cardiovascular diseases with circulating lipid markers and/or inflammatory markers. Studies have not, however, generally been designed to provide reliable estimates under different circumstances and to correct for within-person variability. The Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration has established a central database on over 1.1 million participants from 104 prospective population-based studies, in which subsets have information on lipid and inflammatory markers, other characteristics, as well as major cardiovascular morbidity and cause-specific mortality. Information on repeat measurements on relevant characteristics has been collected in approximately 340,000 participants to enable estimation of and correction for within-person variability. Re-analysis of individual data will yield up to approximately 69,000 incident fatal or nonfatal first ever major cardiovascular outcomes recorded during about 11.7 million person years at risk. The primary analyses will involve age-specific regression models in people without known baseline cardiovascular disease in relation to fatal or nonfatal first ever coronary heart disease outcomes. This initiative will characterize more precisely and in greater detail than has previously been possible the shape and strength of the age- and sex-specific associations of several lipid and inflammatory markers with incident coronary heart disease outcomes (and, secondarily, with other incident cardiovascular outcomes) under a wide range of circumstances. It will, therefore, help to determine to what extent such associations are independent from possible confounding factors and to what extent such markers (separately and in combination) provide incremental predictive value.

  7. Highly bioavailable micellar curcuminoids accumulate in blood, are safe and do not reduce blood lipids and inflammation markers in moderately hyperlipidemic individuals.

    PubMed

    Kocher, Alexa; Bohnert, Laura; Schiborr, Christina; Frank, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Curcuminoids are poorly bioavailable, but potentially lipid- and inflammation-lowering phytochemicals. We hypothesized that curcuminoids, when administered as a micellar formulation with hundredfold enhanced bioavailability, decrease blood lipids and inflammation in subjects with moderately elevated cholesterol and C-reactive protein concentrations. We carried out a randomized, double-blind, crossover study (4-wk washout phase) with 42 subjects consuming 294 mg curcuminoids per day (as micelles) or placebo for 6 wk. At the beginning, after 3 wk and at the end (6 wk) of each intervention, we collected fasting blood samples to determine curcuminoids, blood lipids, and markers of inflammation, glucose and iron homeostasis, and liver toxicity. Daily ingestion of 98 mg micellar curcuminoids with each principal meal for as little as 3 wk resulted in fasting curcuminoid plasma concentrations of 49 nmol/L. Neither blood lipids, nor markers of inflammation, glucose and iron homeostasis, or liver enzymes differed between curcuminoid and placebo interventions. Consumption of 98 mg of highly bioavailable curcuminoids with each principal meal sufficed to achieve curcuminoid accumulation in the blood, was safe, and did not alter blood lipids, inflammation, glucose, or iron homeostasis in healthy subjects with slightly elevated blood cholesterol and C-reactive protein. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The impact of decreases in air temperature and increases in ozone on markers of endothelial function in individuals having type-2 diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have reported an association between air pollution and endothelial dysfunction, especially in individuals having diabetes. However, very few studies have examined the impact of air temperature on endothelial function. The objective of this analysis was to investig...

  9. The impact of decreases in air temperature and increases in ozone on markers of endothelial function in individuals having type-2 diabetes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have reported an association between air pollution and endothelial dysfunction, especially in individuals having diabetes. However, very few studies have examined the impact of air temperature on endothelial function. The objective of this analysis was to investig...

  10. Utility of Nontraditional Risk Markers in Individuals Ineligible for Statin Therapy According to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Yeboah, Joseph; Polonsky, Tamar S; Young, Rebekah; McClelland, Robyn L; Delaney, Joseph C; Dawood, Farah; Blaha, Michael J; Miedema, Michael D; Sibley, Christopher T; Carr, J Jeffrey; Burke, Gregory L; Goff, David C; Psaty, Bruce M; Greenland, Philip; Herrington, David M

    2015-09-08

    In the general population, the majority of cardiovascular events occur in people at the low to moderate end of population risk distribution. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on the treatment of blood cholesterol recommends consideration of statin therapy for adults with an estimated 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk ≥7.5% based on traditional risk factors. Whether use of nontraditional risk markers can improve risk assessment in those below this threshold for statin therapy is unclear. Using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a population sample free of clinical CVD at baseline, we calibrated the Pooled Cohort Equations (cPCE). ASCVD was defined as myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, or fatal or nonfatal stroke. Adults with an initial cPCE <7.5% and elevated levels of additional risk markers (abnormal test) whose new calculated risk was ≥7.5% were considered statin eligible: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≥160 mg/dL; family history of ASCVD; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ≥2 mg/dL; coronary artery calcium score ≥300 Agatston units or ≥75th percentile for age, sex, and ethnicity; and ankle-brachial index <0.9. We compared the absolute and relative ASCVD risks among those with versus without elevated posttest estimated risk. We calculated the number needed to screen to identify 1 person with abnormal test for each risk marker, defined as the number of participants with baseline cPCE risk <7.5% divided by the number with an abnormal test reclassified as statin eligible. Of 5185 participants not taking statins with complete data (age, 45-84 years), 4185 had a cPCE risk <7.5%. During 10 years of follow-up, 57% of the ASCVD events (183 of 320) occurred among adults with a cPCE risk <7.5%. When people with diabetes mellitus were excluded, the coronary artery calcium criterion reclassified 6.8% upward, with an event rate of 13.3%, absolute

  11. Dopamine and the Management of Attentional Resources: Genetic Markers of Striatal D2 Dopamine Predict Individual Differences in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Slagter, Heleen A.; de Rover, Mischa; Hommel, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB)--a deficit in reporting the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession in a rapid sequence of distracters--has been related to processing limitations in working memory. Given that dopamine (DA) plays a crucial role working memory, the present study tested whether individual differences in the size of the…

  12. Dopamine and the Management of Attentional Resources: Genetic Markers of Striatal D2 Dopamine Predict Individual Differences in the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Slagter, Heleen A.; de Rover, Mischa; Hommel, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    The attentional blink (AB)--a deficit in reporting the second of two target stimuli presented in close succession in a rapid sequence of distracters--has been related to processing limitations in working memory. Given that dopamine (DA) plays a crucial role working memory, the present study tested whether individual differences in the size of the…

  13. The levels of inflammatory markers and oxidative stress in individuals occupationally exposed to municipal solid waste in Ogun State, South West Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Odewabi, Adesina O; Ogundahunsi, Omobola A; Ebesunu, Maria O; Ekor, Martins

    2013-10-01

    Airway inflammation and related respiratory complaints are common symptoms among waste management workers (WMWs). This study investigated the relationship between exposure to municipal solid waste (MSW) and the levels of inflammatory markers and oxidative stress among WMW of Ogun State, South West Nigeria. A total of 280 subjects consisting of 180 WMW and 100 controls were recruited. Ten millilitres of blood were collected from antecubital vein of the subjects for analysis. Results reveal that exposure to MSW is associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress. Significant (p < 0.001) elevation of ceruloplasmin (Cp) and C-reactive protein was associated with marked decreases in superoxide dismutase (p < 0.01), catalase (p < 0.001), and glutathione (p < 0.05) and significant (p < 0.001) increases in malondialdehyde (MDA) and uric acid when compared with control. Haematological disorders include significant (p < 0.05) decreases in haemoglobin, packed cell volume, and mean corpuscular volume and significant (p < 0.01) increase in total leucocyte count. Apart from decreased albumin (p < 0.05) and elevated aspartate aminotransferase (p < 0.05) activity observed in WMW, other markers of hepatic (alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, total cholesterol and triglycerides) and renal (urea and creatinine) functions did not change significantly (p > 0.05) when compared with the control. A positive correlation between leucocytes (r = 0.195, p < 0.01), Cp (r = 0.210, p < 0.01) and job duration and between Cp and MDA (r = 0.200, p < 0.01) and Cp and leucocytes (r = 0.260, p < 0.001) were observed in WMW. Overall, exposure to MSW predisposes to systemic inflammation and oxidative stress and Cp may be a useful biomarker for monitoring health status of Nigerian WMWs.

  14. Geographic variation and within-individual correlations of physiological stress markers in a widespread reptile, the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis).

    PubMed

    Gangloff, Eric J; Sparkman, Amanda M; Holden, Kaitlyn G; Corwin, Caitlyn J; Topf, Madeline; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2017-03-01

    Characterizing the baseline and stress-induced hormonal, metabolite, and immune profiles of wild animals is important to assess the impacts of variable environments, including human-induced landscape changes, on organismal health. Additionally, the extent to which these profiles are coordinated across physiological systems within individuals remains an important question in understanding how stressors can differentially affect aspects of an individual's physiology. Here, we present data from wild populations of the common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) on both baseline and stress-induced biomarkers: plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration, plasma glucose concentration, and whole blood heterophil:lymphocyte ratio. Using a standardized restraint protocol with individuals from populations in disparate portions of this species' range - the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California and the plains of Iowa - we collected blood plasma samples at nine time points over three days. Both CORT and glucose response curves differed between georegions, with Iowa snakes attaining higher glucose concentration and maintaining elevated CORT and glucose levels for a longer duration. Additionally, both the total amount and proportional increases of CORT and glucose were lower in larger and therefore older snakes, suggesting ontogenetic shifts in stress perception or response. Within-individual correlation among the three physiological indicators was significant at the time of capture, absent after 3h in captivity, and partially restored after 3days in captivity, demonstrating the effect of stress on the relationships among these physiological systems. Together, these results provide further evidence for the great physiological flexibility of ectothermic tetrapods in maintaining homeostasis across a range of factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Factors associated with the frequency of monitoring of liver enzymes, renal function and lipid laboratory markers among individuals initiating combination antiretroviral therapy: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Jennifer; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Burchell, Ann N; Cooper, Curtis; Klein, Marina B; Loutfy, Mona; Machouf, Nima; Montaner, Julio Sg; Tsoukas, Chris; Hogg, Robert S; Raboud, Janet

    2015-10-26

    As the average age of the HIV-positive population increases, there is increasing need to monitor patients for the development of comorbidities as well as for drug toxicities. We examined factors associated with the frequency of measurement of liver enzymes, renal function tests, and lipid levels among participants of the Canadian Observational Cohort (CANOC) collaboration which follows people who initiated HIV antiretroviral therapy in 2000 or later. We used zero-inflated negative binomial regression models to examine the associations of demographic and clinical characteristics with the rates of measurement during follow-up. Generalized estimating equations with a logit link were used to examine factors associated with gaps of 12 months or more between measurements. Electronic laboratory data were available for 3940 of 7718 CANOC participants. The median duration of electronic follow-up was 3.5 years. The median (interquartile) rates of tests per year were 2.76 (1.60, 3.73), 2.55 (1.44, 3.38) and 1.42 (0.50, 2.52) for liver, renal and lipid parameters, respectively. In multivariable zero-inflated negative binomial regression models, individuals infected through injection drug use (IDU) were significantly less likely to have any measurements. Among participants with at least one measurement, rates of measurement of liver, renal and lipid tests were significantly lower for younger individuals and Aboriginal Peoples. Hepatitis C co-infected individuals with a history of IDU had lower rates of measurement and were at greater risk of having 12 month gaps between measurements. Hepatitis C co-infected participants infected through IDU were at increased risk of gaps in testing, despite publicly funded health care and increased risk of comorbid conditions. This should be taken into consideration in analyses examining factors associated with outcomes based on laboratory parameters.

  16. Effects of whole and refined grains in a weight-loss diet on markers of metabolic syndrome in individuals with increased waist circumference: a randomized controlled-feeding trial123

    PubMed Central

    Harris Jackson, Kristina; West, Sheila G; Vanden Heuvel, John P; Jonnalagadda, Satya S; Ross, Alastair B; Hill, Alison M; Grieger, Jessica A; Lemieux, Susan K; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Higher whole-grain (WG) intake is associated with a lower prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS); however, there is inconsistent clinical evidence with regard to the benefit of WGs compared with refined grains (RGs) on MetS. Objective: We hypothesized that consuming WGs in the place of RGs would improve MetS criteria in individuals with or at risk of MetS. Design: A randomized, controlled, open-label parallel study was conducted in 50 overweight and obese individuals with increased waist circumference and one or more other MetS criteria. Participants consumed a controlled weight-loss diet containing either WG or RG (control) products for 12 wk. Body composition, MetS criteria and related markers, and plasma alkylresorcinols (compliance marker of WG intake) were measured at baseline and at 6 and 12 wk. A subgroup (n = 28) underwent magnetic resonance imaging to quantify subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (AT). Results: Baseline variables were not significantly different between groups; however, the RG group tended to have higher triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P = 0.06). Alkylresorcinols increased with consumption of the WG diet and did not change with consumption of the RG diet (time × treatment, P < 0.0001), which showed dietary compliance. There were no differences in anthropometric changes between groups; however, weight, body mass index, and percentage of body AT decreased at both 6 and 12 wk (P < 0.05), and reductions in percentage of abdominal AT occurred by 6 wk and did not change between 6 and 12 wk (P = 0.09). Both glucose (P = 0.02) and HDL cholesterol (P = 0.04) were lower with the consumption of the WG compared with the RG diet. However, when noncompliant individuals (n = 3) were removed, the glucose effect was stronger (P = 0.01) and the HDL-cholesterol effect was no longer significant (P = 0.14). Conclusions: Replacing RGs with WGs within a weight-loss diet does not beneficially affect abdominal

  17. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers contain...

  18. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47 Radioactive markers. The licensee may use radioactive markers in wells only if the individual markers contain...

  19. Expression of monocyte markers in HIV-1 infected individuals with or without HIV associated dementia and normal controls in Bangkok Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Pulliam, Lynn; Paris, Robert; Sukwit, Suchitra; Gongwon, Siriphan; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Nidhinandana, Samart; Thitivichianlert, Sataporn; Shiramizu, Bruce T; de Souza, Mark S; Chitpatima, Suwicha T; Sun, Bing; Rempel, Hans; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Williams, Kenneth; Kim, Jerome H; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Valcour, Victor G

    2008-03-01

    HIV Associated Dementia (HAD) is a complication of HIV infection in developed countries and is still poorly defined in resource-limited settings. In this study we investigated the expression of the monocyte phenotype CD14CD16HLADR and the inflammatory profiles in monocytes supernatants by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry in a cohort of HAD and non-HAD Thai volunteers prior to the initiation of ARV. The CD14CD16HLADR phenotype was significantly increased in monocytes from HAD and non-HAD versus negative controls, but there was no difference in phenotype and in the secretion protein profiles between the two seropositive groups. In addition, monocytes supernatants from HAD and non-HAD did not induced apoptosis or cell death in brain aggregate culture. In conclusion it appears that HAD in Thai individuals has a different immunological profile then in North America cohorts.

  20. Expression of monocyte markers in HIV-1 infected individuals with or without HIV associated dementia and normal controls in Bangkok Thailand☆

    PubMed Central

    Ratto-Kim, Silvia; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Pulliam, Lynn; Paris, Robert; Sukwit, Suchitra; Gongwon, Siriphan; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Nidhinandana, Samart; Thitivichianlert, Sataporn; Shiramizu, Bruce T.; de Souza, Mark S.; Chitpatima, Suwicha T.; Sun, Bing; Rempel, Hans; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Williams, Kenneth; Kim, Jerome H.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Valcour, Victor G.

    2013-01-01

    HIV Associated Dementia (HAD) is a complication of HIV infection in developed countries and is still poorly defined in resource-limited settings. In this study we investigated the expression of the monocyte phenotype CD14CD16HLADR and the inflammatory profiles in monocytes supernatants by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry in a cohort of HAD and non-HAD Thai volunteers prior to the initiation of ARV. The CD14CD16HLADR phenotype was significantly increased in monocytes from HAD and non-HAD versus negative controls, but there was no difference in phenotype and in the secretion protein profiles between the two seropositive groups. In addition, monocytes supernatants from HAD and non-HAD did not induced apoptosis or cell death in brain aggregate culture. In conclusion it appears that HAD in Thai individuals has a different immunological profile then in North America cohorts. PMID:18191233

  1. Three-dimensional morphometric analysis of craniofacial shape in the unaffected relatives of individuals with nonsyndromic orofacial clefts: a possible marker for genetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Seth M; Neiswanger, Katherine; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Maher, Brion S; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I; Marazita, Mary L

    2008-02-15

    Numerous studies have described altered patterns of craniofacial form in the unaffected relatives of individuals with nonsyndromic clefts. Unfortunately, results from such studies have been highly variable and have failed to provide a reliable method for differentiating "at-risk" relatives from controls. In the present study, we compared craniofacial shape between a sample of unaffected relatives (33 females; 14 males) from cleft multiplex families and an equal number of age/sex/ethnicity-matched controls. Sixteen x,y,z facial landmark coordinates derived from 3D photogrammetry were analyzed via Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis, while 14 additional linear distances were analyzed via t tests. A subset of variables was then entered into a discriminant function analysis (DFA). Compared to controls, female unaffected relatives demonstrated increased upper facial width, midface reduction and lateral displacement of the alar cartilage. DFA correctly classified 70% of female unaffected relatives and 73% of female controls. Male unaffected relatives demonstrated increased upper facial and cranial base width, increased lower facial height and decreased upper facial height compared with controls. DFA correctly classified 86% of male unaffected relatives and 93% of male controls. In both sexes, upper facial width contributed most to group discrimination. Following DFA, unaffected relatives were assigned to risk/liability classes based on the degree of phenotypic divergence from controls. Results indicate that craniofacial shape differences characterizing unaffected relatives are partly sex-specific and are in broad agreement with previous reports. These findings further suggest that a quantitative assessment of the craniofacial phenotype may allow for the identification of susceptible individuals within nonsyndromic cleft families.

  2. Influence of diet on leukocyte telomere length, markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in individuals with varied glucose tolerance: a Chinese population study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meicen; Zhu, Lixin; Cui, Xiangli; Feng, Linbo; Zhao, Xuefeng; He, Shuli; Ping, Fan; Li, Wei; Li, Yuxiu

    2016-04-12

    .125, p = 0.006;IL-6: r = 0.092, p =0.04). Fat, carbohydrate proportions were positively associated with TNF-ɑ (fat: r = 0.119, p = 0.008 ; carbohydrate: r = 0.094, p = 0.043). Seaweeds and dairy intake were negatively associated with 8-oxo-dG (seaweed: r = -0.496, p = 0.001;dairy: r = -0.246, p = 0.046 ), vegetables and fruits were positively associated with GR ( vegetables: r = 0.101, p = 0.034;fruits: r = 0.125, p = 0.045). Cereal, meat were positively associated with TNF-ɑ ( cereal: r = 0.091, p = 0.048 ; meat: r = 0.405, p = 0.009). Diabetes patients with better plasma glucose (HbA1c < 7 %) had longer LTL, LTL could reflect plasma glucose status in diabetes patients. LTL were probably not influenced by diet carbohydrates/fat proportions but was associated with diet ingredients. Diet ingredients significantly impacted on markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, which probably had an effect on LTL.

  3. Relationship between Bone Density and Biochemical Markers of Bone among Two Groups Taking Carbamazepine and Sodium Valproate for Epilepsy in Comparison with Healthy Individuals in Yazd

    PubMed Central

    Rahimdel, Abolghasem; Dehghan, Ali; Moghadam, Mahboubeh Abolhassani; Ardekani, Ali Mellat

    2016-01-01

    anti-epileptic drug treatment either with CBZ and VPA which has unknown effects on skeletal mineralization and induces a state of decreased bone mineral density BMD values at femoral neck were significant in CBZ group Therefore regular screening for monitoring of biochemical markers of bone turnover and BMD with DXA during the treat period is recommended. In addition, Ca supplement could be considered for all patients with epilepsy upon initiation of CBZ and VPA therapy. PMID:28070260

  4. Magnesium supplementation, metabolic and inflammatory markers, and global genomic and proteomic profiling: a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover trial in overweight individuals123

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Sara A; Sul, James; Song, Yiqing; Li, Xinmin; LeBlanc, James; You, Yuko; Butch, Anthony; Liu, Simin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dietary magnesium intake has been favorably associated with reduced risk of metabolic outcomes in observational studies; however, few randomized trials have introduced a systems-biology approach to explore molecular mechanisms of pleiotropic metabolic actions of magnesium supplementation. Objective: We examined the effects of oral magnesium supplementation on metabolic biomarkers and global genomic and proteomic profiling in overweight individuals. Design: We undertook this randomized, crossover, pilot trial in 14 healthy, overweight volunteers [body mass index (in kg/m2) ≥25] who were randomly assigned to receive magnesium citrate (500 mg elemental Mg/d) or a placebo for 4 wk with a 1-mo washout period. Fasting blood and urine specimens were collected according to standardized protocols. Biochemical assays were conducted on blood specimens. RNA was extracted and subsequently hybridized with the Human Gene ST 1.0 array (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA). Urine proteomic profiling was analyzed with the CM10 ProteinChip array (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Hercules, CA). Results: We observed that magnesium treatment significantly decreased fasting C-peptide concentrations (change: −0.4 ng/mL after magnesium treatment compared with +0.05 ng/mL after placebo treatment; P = 0.004) and appeared to decrease fasting insulin concentrations (change: −2.2 μU/mL after magnesium treatment compared with 0.0 μU/mL after placebo treatment; P = 0.25). No consistent patterns were observed across inflammatory biomarkers. Gene expression profiling revealed up-regulation of 24 genes and down-regulation of 36 genes including genes related to metabolic and inflammatory pathways such as C1q and tumor necrosis factor–related protein 9 (C1QTNF9) and pro-platelet basic protein (PPBP). Urine proteomic profiling showed significant differences in the expression amounts of several peptides and proteins after treatment. Conclusion: Magnesium supplementation for 4 wk in overweight

  5. DNA isolation from teeth by organic extraction and identification of sex of the individual by analyzing the AMEL gene marker using PCR

    PubMed Central

    Praveen Kumar, Subramanian Thangaraj; Aswath, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify the sex of the deceased individual from dental hard tissue such as enamel and dentine. Objective: To isolate the DNA from dental hard tissue (enamel and dentin) from teeth extracted for prophylactic purpose, to assess the quality and purity of DNA and to identify the sex using polymerized chain reactor (PCR). Materials and Methods: DNA was extracted following phenol/chloroform (organic) extraction from 20 male and 20 female teeth. The samples that contain the amelogenin gene (amel) were amplified by PCR. The products of the PCR were run on agarose gel with ethidium bromide staining on gel documentation system. Results: The results on the gel showed the presence of X-specific bands at 212 bp and Y-specific bands at 218 bp. Males were distinguished from females by the presence of two bands whereas female samples showed only one, that is, X-specific band on the gel. The gender from the known samples was determined with complete accuracy, and the results were analyzed statistically by the Chi-square test. Conclusion: In our study, the PCR-based method showed 100% specificity and sensitivity. PMID:27051218

  6. [Indirect evaluation of respiratory muscle strength with the help of markers of maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure in the mouth of healthy individuals].

    PubMed

    Adamiak-Kardas, Magdalena

    2002-03-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of respiratory muscle strength by measurement of maximal inspiratory (PImax) and expiratory (PEmax) pressures values. Results for 166 clinically normal subjects (79 female and 87 male) were obtained. The results were as follow: in woman PImax ranged 38-104 cm H2O, average 60 cm H2O, PEmax ranged 46-140 cm H2O average 87.5 cm H2O, in men PImax was 40-120 cm H2O, average 73.2 cm H2O, PEmax ranged 46-140 cm H2O, average 115.9 cm H2O. PImax was negatively correlated with age in both groups. There was no correlation between age and PImax or PEmax in both groups (p > 0.05). There was no correlation between PImax and PEmax and height in women group and men group treated apart. The correlation was found between PImax as well as PEmax and height for whole group (p = 0.00019). There were observed positive correlation between PImax, PEmax and weight in both (male and female) groups. The comparison of results of present study with those obtained in former studies reveals important differences of norms for different populations. The normal values of maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures in the mouth (PImax, PEmax) should be qualified individually for studied population. The normal values recommended by producers of medical equipment might be inadequate for studied population.

  7. Impact of exercise on diurnal and nocturnal markers of glycaemic variability and oxidative stress in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Farabi, Sarah S; Carley, David W; Smith, Donald; Quinn, Lauretta

    2015-09-01

    We measured the effects of a single bout of exercise on diurnal and nocturnal oxidative stress and glycaemic variability in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance versus obese healthy controls. Subjects (in random order) performed either a single 30-min bout of moderate-intensity exercise or remained sedentary for 30 min at two separate visits. To quantify glycaemic variability, standard deviation of glucose (measured by continuous glucose monitoring system) and continuous overlapping net glycaemic action of 1-h intervals (CONGA-1) were calculated for three 12-h intervals during each visit. Oxidative stress was measured by 15-isoprostane F(2t) levels in urine collections for matching 12-h intervals. Exercise reduced daytime glycaemic variability (ΔCONGA-1 = -12.62 ± 5.31 mg/dL, p = 0.04) and urinary isoprostanes (ΔCONGA-1 = -0.26 ± 0.12 ng/mg, p = 0.04) in the type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance group. Daytime exercise-induced change in urinary 15-isoprostane F(2t) was significantly correlated with both daytime standard deviation (r = 0.68, p = 0.03) and with subsequent overnight standard deviation (r = 0.73, p = 0.027) in the type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance group. Exercise significantly impacts the relationship between diurnal oxidative stress and nocturnal glycaemic variability in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus/impaired glucose tolerance. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Grave Markers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuro, Ted

    1985-01-01

    Junior high school students studied the cultural uses, symbolic meanings, and general physical forms of tombs and tombstones and then used basic slab building techniques to construct large clay grave markers. (RM)

  9. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the amino terminal end of the protein matrix; another marker used to monitor therapy. Deoxypyridinoline (DPD) – a collagen breakdown product with a ring structure. Pyridinium Crosslinks – a group of collagen breakdown products ...

  10. Increased cell-free mitochondrial DNA is a marker of ongoing inflammation and better neurocognitive function in virologically suppressed HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Santiago, Josué; De Oliveira, Michelli F; Var, Susanna R; Day, Tyler R C; Woods, Steven P; Gianella, Sara; Mehta, Sanjay R

    2017-04-01

    Cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly immunogenic molecule that is associated with several inflammatory conditions and with neurocognitive impairment during untreated HIV infection. Here, we investigate how cell-free mtDNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with inflammation, neuronal damage, and neurocognitive functioning in the context of long-term suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). We quantified the levels of cell-free mtDNA in the CSF from 41 HIV-infected individuals with completely suppressed HIV RNA levels in blood plasma (<50 copies/mL) by droplet digital PCR. We measured soluble CD14, soluble CD163, interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 8 (IL-8), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), neopterin, and neurofilament light chain (NFL) by immunoassays in CSF supernatant or blood plasma. Higher levels of mtDNA in CSF were associated with higher levels of MCP-1 (r = 0.56, p < 0.01) in CSF and TNF-α (r = 0.43, p < 0.01) and IL-8 (r = 0.44, p < 0.01) in blood plasma. Subjects with a previous diagnosis of AIDS showed significantly higher levels of mtDNA (p < 0.01) than subjects without AIDS. The associations between mtDNA and MCP-1 in CSF and TNF-α in blood remained significant after adjusting for previous diagnosis of AIDS (p < 0.01). Additionally, higher levels of mtDNA were associated with a lower CD4 nadir (r = -0.41, p < 0.01) and lower current CD4% (r = -0.34, p = 0.03). Paradoxically, higher levels of mtDNA in CSF were significantly associated with better neurocognitive performance (r = 0.43, p = 0.02) and with less neuronal damage (i.e. lower NFL). Higher cell-free mtDNA is associated with inflammation during treated HIV infection, but the impact on neurocognitive functioning and neuronal damage remains unclear and may differ in the setting of suppressive ART.

  11. [Genomic markers and anticancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko

    2008-02-01

    Worldwide research on the human genome exerts a major impact on medical science. The growing evidence that genetic polymorphisms in the metabolism, the disposition, and the targets of drugs can have an even greater influence on the efficacy and the toxicity led to the creation of a novel chemotherapeutic strategy, personalized medicine. Much effort has been directed toward identifying the indicators of individual response to drugs, and these studies have provided a variety of potent predictive markers of individual drug response, which include some significant markers in clinical practice with sufficient evidence. Personalized medicine based on the response prediction using genomic marker is increasingly being recognized as a practical treatment approach in cancer chemotherapy, and to be indispensable when molecular targeted drugs are involved in the therapy. Even so, the ingenious and intricate mechanism of individual drug response creates obstacles in predicting chemotherapeutic response: Multiple factors are involved in the mechanisms, and key factors for drug response vary significantly among individuals. DNA chip technology enables us to overview a huge number of gene expressions simultaneously, but gene expression profiles of drug sensitivity vary considerably even for the same drug, which shows the limited value of a static microarray-expression profile as a marker aimed at individualizing patient therapy. Selection of a set of truly significant genomic markers and understanding of their interplay are of key importance in prediction of individual response to drug therapies. Challenges to such biological complexity are now started to identify a better genomic marker. The contribution of genomic marker research to anticancer chemotherapy and problems of the day were reviewed.

  12. Understanding muscle markers: lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elizabeth

    2004-11-01

    Musculoskeletal markers are frequently used to reconstruct past lifestyles and activity patterns. Yet the reliability of muscle marker measurements has been called into question because they may be confounded by body size. In this study, an aggregate muscle marker variable was calculated using 20 insertion sites (14 femoral, 6 tibial), and I examined their effects on lower limb size (as a proxy for body size), age, and sex. Analyses were made of a sample of 77 (57 males, 20 females) Native British Columbians (3,500-1,500 years BP) and 18th century Quebec prisoners. Muscle markers were measured using two-point observer rating scales; size was measured by standard methods; and age and sex were determined through pelvic, cranial, and dental morphology. Lower limb muscle markers correlated with: age, r=0.61; lower limb size, r=0.52; and sex, r=0.49; P <0.001. Older individuals had higher muscle marker scores, as did larger individuals and males. Based on partial correlations and regression analyses, age was the best overall predictor of lower limb muscle markers. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. A multi-nutrient supplement reduced markers of inflammation and improved physical performance in active individuals of middle to older age: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Kraemer, William J; Kupchak, Brian R; Kelly, Neil A; Creighton, Brent A; Luk, Hui-Ying; Ballard, Kevin D; Comstock, Brett A; Szivak, Tunde K; Hooper, David R; Denegar, Craig R; Volek, Jeff S

    2011-09-07

    42.1 ± 5.9 to 48.5 ± 4.9 kg). A multi-nutrient supplement is effective in improving inflammatory status in both men and women, markers of pain, joint pain, strength, and power in men only, and both anxiety and balance (a risk factor for hip fracture) in women. Therefore, a multi-nutrient supplement may help middle-aged individuals to prolong physical function and maintain a healthy, active lifestyle.

  14. Effects of D-003, a mixture of high-molecular-weight sugar cane wax acids, on lipid peroxidation markers in older individuals: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Yohani; Menéndez, Roberto; Ferrer, José I.; Lopez, Ernesto; Castaño, Gladys; Fernández, Julio; Ferreiro, Rosa M.; Fernández, Lilia; Mendoza, Sarahí; González, Rosa; Mesa, Melbis

    2008-01-01

    Background: Aging is associated with increased lipid peroxidation (LP). D-003, a mixture of long-chain aliphatic primary acids purified from sugar cane wax, has been found to inhibit LP in experimental models and in healthy subjects. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of D-003 on LP markers and the lipid profile of older individuals. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted at the Plaza Veterans' House, Havana City, Cuba. Male and female patients aged ≥60 years with total cholesterol values of <6.1 mmol/L were eligible for inclusion in the study. After a 3-week lead-in and baseline assessment period, patients were randomized to receive PO D-003 5 mg/d, D-003 10 mg/d, or placebo for 8 weeks. The effect on copper-induced LP of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles was the primary variable, and the effects on plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, plasma antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) activities, and the lipid profile were secondary variables. A clinical examination was performed at each visit (baseline, weeks 4 and 8). A clinical examination, LP, and blood tests (lipid profile, hematologic, and blood biochemistry safety indicators) were performed at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment. Compliance and adverse events (AEs) were assessed at weeks 4 and 8. A 2-tailed P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant for comparisons of both continuous and categoric variables. Results: Fifty-four patients aged ≥60 years were assessed for inclusion in the study, and 51 patients (40 women, 11 men; mean [SD] age, 67 [6] years) were included in the study. The lag phase of conjugated diene formation increased significantly and in a dose-dependent manner in the group treated with D-003 5 mg (24.7%; P < 0.01) and in the group treated with D-003 10 mg (29.3%; P < 0.01) compared with placebo. The maximal rate of conjugated diene

  15. WIPP marker development

    SciTech Connect

    1994-04-01

    This article discusses the development of permanent, passive markers for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and presents some preliminary concepts in drawings and a table of components for the markers. The panel, convened by Sandia National Laboratories, was charged with developing design characteristics for permanent markers and judging the efficacy of markers in deterring inadvertent human intrusion. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  17. 38 CFR 38.630 - Headstones and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... marker, the phrase “In Memory Of” is mandatory. (1) Eligible individuals. An eligible individual for...) Types of Government headstones and markers and inscriptions will be in accordance with policies approved... in accordance with policies and specifications of the Under Secretary for Memorial Affairs. (c...

  18. 38 CFR 38.630 - Headstones and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... marker, the phrase “In Memory Of” is mandatory. (1) Eligible individuals. An eligible individual for...) Types of Government headstones and markers and inscriptions will be in accordance with policies approved... in accordance with policies and specifications of the Under Secretary for Memorial Affairs. (c...

  19. comK prophage junction fragments as markers for Listeria monocytogenes genotypes unique to individual meat and poultry processing plants and a model for rapid niche-specific adaptation, biofilm formation, and persistence.

    PubMed

    Verghese, Bindhu; Lok, Mei; Wen, Jia; Alessandria, Valentina; Chen, Yi; Kathariou, Sophia; Knabel, Stephen

    2011-05-01

    Different strains of Listeria monocytogenes are well known to persist in individual food processing plants and to contaminate foods for many years; however, the specific genotypic and phenotypic mechanisms responsible for persistence of these unique strains remain largely unknown. Based on sequences in comK prophage junction fragments, different strains of epidemic clones (ECs), which included ECII, ECIII, and ECV, were identified and shown to be specific to individual meat and poultry processing plants. The comK prophage-containing strains showed significantly higher cell densities after incubation at 30°C for 48 h on meat and poultry food-conditioning films than did strains lacking the comK prophage (P < 0.05). Overall, the type of strain, the type of conditioning film, and the interaction between the two were all highly significant (P < 0.001). Recombination analysis indicated that the comK prophage junction fragments in these strains had evolved due to extensive recombination. Based on the results of the present study, we propose a novel model in which the concept of defective comK prophage was replaced with the rapid adaptation island (RAI). Genes within the RAI were recharacterized as "adaptons," as these genes may allow L. monocytogenes to rapidly adapt to different food processing facilities and foods. If confirmed, the model presented would help explain Listeria's rapid niche adaptation, biofilm formation, persistence, and subsequent transmission to foods. Also, comK prophage junction fragment sequences may permit accurate tracking of persistent strains back to and within individual food processing operations and thus allow the design of more effective intervention strategies to reduce contamination and enhance food safety.

  20. comK Prophage Junction Fragments as Markers for Listeria monocytogenes Genotypes Unique to Individual Meat and Poultry Processing Plants and a Model for Rapid Niche-Specific Adaptation, Biofilm Formation, and Persistence ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Bindhu; Lok, Mei; Wen, Jia; Alessandria, Valentina; Chen, Yi; Kathariou, Sophia; Knabel, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Different strains of Listeria monocytogenes are well known to persist in individual food processing plants and to contaminate foods for many years; however, the specific genotypic and phenotypic mechanisms responsible for persistence of these unique strains remain largely unknown. Based on sequences in comK prophage junction fragments, different strains of epidemic clones (ECs), which included ECII, ECIII, and ECV, were identified and shown to be specific to individual meat and poultry processing plants. The comK prophage-containing strains showed significantly higher cell densities after incubation at 30°C for 48 h on meat and poultry food-conditioning films than did strains lacking the comK prophage (P < 0.05). Overall, the type of strain, the type of conditioning film, and the interaction between the two were all highly significant (P < 0.001). Recombination analysis indicated that the comK prophage junction fragments in these strains had evolved due to extensive recombination. Based on the results of the present study, we propose a novel model in which the concept of defective comK prophage was replaced with the rapid adaptation island (RAI). Genes within the RAI were recharacterized as “adaptons,” as these genes may allow L. monocytogenes to rapidly adapt to different food processing facilities and foods. If confirmed, the model presented would help explain Listeria's rapid niche adaptation, biofilm formation, persistence, and subsequent transmission to foods. Also, comK prophage junction fragment sequences may permit accurate tracking of persistent strains back to and within individual food processing operations and thus allow the design of more effective intervention strategies to reduce contamination and enhance food safety. PMID:21441318

  1. Cross-species amplification of microsatellite markers in the Great Horned Owl Bubo virginianus, Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus and Snowy Owl B. scandiacus for use in population genetics, individual identification and parentage studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dial, Cody R.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Sage, George K.; Seidensticker, M.T.; Holt, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Using DNA from blood and feathers, we screened twenty-four microsatellite primer pairs initially developed for six strigid owls, and four primer pairs shown to be polymorphic across avian taxa, for their utility in Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus), Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus), and Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus). Eight of these primers reliably amplified polymorphic fragments in Great Horned Owl, eleven in Short-eared owl, and ten in Snowy Owl. Analyses of results from presumably unrelated owls demonstrate the utility of these loci for individual identification, parentage assignment, and population genetics studies.

  2. Social Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornille, Thomas A.; Harrigan, John

    Relationships between individuals and society have often been presented from the perspective of the social institution. Social psychology has addressed the variables that affect the individual in relationships with larger groups. Social individualism is a conceptual framework that explores the relationship of the individual and society from the…

  3. [Markers of prostatic carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Safarík, L

    1998-08-31

    Author gives the survey of markers at prostate carcinoma, that has been known so far, their origin and the use in experiment and clinical praxis. He discusses their sensitivity and specificity and shows the perspective of new markers discovered and used in the praxis on basis of molecular genetics.

  4. Evaluating surrogate marker information using censored data.

    PubMed

    Parast, Layla; Cai, Tianxi; Tian, Lu

    2017-01-15

    Given the long follow-up periods that are often required for treatment or intervention studies, the potential to use surrogate markers to decrease the required follow-up time is a very attractive goal. However, previous studies have shown that using inadequate markers or making inappropriate assumptions about the relationship between the primary outcome and surrogate marker can lead to inaccurate conclusions regarding the treatment effect. Currently available methods for identifying and validating surrogate markers tend to rely on restrictive model assumptions and/or focus on uncensored outcomes. The ability to use such methods in practice when the primary outcome of interest is a time-to-event outcome is difficult because of censoring and missing surrogate information among those who experience the primary outcome before surrogate marker measurement. In this paper, we propose a novel definition of the proportion of treatment effect explained by surrogate information collected up to a specified time in the setting of a time-to-event primary outcome. Our proposed approach accommodates a setting where individuals may experience the primary outcome before the surrogate marker is measured. We propose a robust non-parametric procedure to estimate the defined quantity using censored data and use a perturbation-resampling procedure for variance estimation. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed procedures perform well in finite samples. We illustrate the proposed procedures by investigating two potential surrogate markers for diabetes using data from the Diabetes Prevention Program. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Comparison of a retrotransposon-based marker with microsatellite markers for discriminating accessions of Vitis vinifera.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, G C; Ferreira, J L; Rocha, H S; Borém, A; Pasqual, M; Cançado, G M A

    2012-05-21

    Identification and knowledge concerning genetic diversity are fundamental for efficient management and use of grapevine germplasm. Recently, new types of molecular markers have been developed, such as retrotransposon-based markers. Because of their multilocus pattern, retrotransposon-based markers might be able to differentiate grapevine accessions with just one pair of primers. In order to evaluate the efficiency of this type of marker, we compared retrotransposon marker Tvv1 with seven microsatellite markers frequently used for genotyping of the genus Vitis (VVMD7, VVMD25, VVMD5, VVMD27, VVMD31, VVS2, and VZAG62). The reference population that we used consisted of 26 accessions of Vitis, including seven European varieties of Vitis vinifera, four North American varieties and hybrids of Vitis labrusca, and 15 rootstock hybrids obtained from crosses of several Vitis species. Individually, the Tvv1 and the group of seven SSR markers were capable of distinguishing all accessions except 'White Niagara' compared to 'Red Niagara'. Using the Structure software, the retrotransposon marker Tvv1 generated two clusters: one with V. vinifera plus North American varieties and the other comprising rootstocks. The seven SSR markers generated five clusters: V. vinifera, the North American varieties, and three groups of rootstock hybrids. The percentages of variation explained by the first two components in the principal coordinate analysis were 65.21 (Tvv1) and 50.42 (SSR markers) while the Mantel correlation between the distance matrixes generated by the two types of markers was 42.5%. We conclude that the Tvv1 marker is useful for DNA fingerprinting, but it lacks efficiency for discrimination of structured groups.

  6. Genetic markers in alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lareu, M V; Alvarez-Prechous, A; Pardiñas, C; Concheiro, L; Carracedo, A

    1992-01-01

    11 genetic markers were typed in 157 individuals suffering from alcoholic cirrhosis, and compared with a random sample of healthy individuals. No significant differences were found for transferrin, specific group component, orosomucoid, esterase D, phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and adenylate kinase. Strong associations between alcoholic cirrhosis and alpha-1-antitrypsin PI*Z allele, haptoglobin HP*1 allele and acid phosphatase ACP AC phenotype were observed. The biological significance of these associations and their relationships with the development of alcoholic cirrhosis are also discussed.

  7. Fiducial Marker Placement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body General Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Proton Therapy Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Images related to Fiducial Marker Placement Sponsored by ...

  8. Individual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  9. Individual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsini, Raymond

    1981-01-01

    Paper presented at the 66th Convention of the International Association of Pupil Personnel Workers, October 20, 1980, Baltimore, Maryland, describes individual education based on the principles of Alfred Adler. Defines six advantages of individual education, emphasizing student responsibility, mutual respect, and allowing students to progress at…

  10. Alcoholism: Current Marker Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    genetically determined characteristics such as color blindness and blood type . GENETIC MARKER STUDIES In 1966 Dr. Cruz-Coke and Dr. Varela reported that...and recovery from severe alcoholism symptoms. ■󈧒:584-587) Blood - typing marker studies have produced similar mixed results. One study published in...1959 showed a high correlation among 939 alcoholics and blood type A. (20:4 60-4 61) A similar study in 1973 reported no blood type distribution

  11. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice.

  12. Classification of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M R

    1996-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first tumor markers more than a century ago (Bence-Jones proteins), a vast array of molecules have been described as being associated with cancer. These are generally naturally occurring biomolecules with the exception of neo-antigens expressed in certain tumors induced by viruses. Tumor markers can be broadly classified into tumor specific antigens and tumor-associated markers. Most tumor markers were often heralded as highly tumor specific but subsequent studies demonstrated their presence in normal tissues of the adult or in various stages of ontogeny. As a result, very few tumor-specific antigens can be recognized. The idiotypes of immunoglobulins of B cell tumors and certain neo-antigens of virus induced tumors are two examples that are strictly tumor specific. The vast majority of tumor markers are in reality tumor-associated antigens and can be classified into two types based on their size. The low-molecular weight tumor markers (approximately < 1000 Daltons) include some nucleosides, lipid associated sialic acid, polyamines, pseudouridine, pigment derivatives, and other metabolites. The macromolecular tumor antigens are the most important sub-type useful in the clinical management of cancer patients. The large cancer antigens are either enzymes, growth factors, hormones, receptors, biological response modifiers, oncogenes and their products, or glycoconjugates which include glycoproteins and glycolipids. Collectively all the commercial tumor marker assays available to the oncologist for cancer patient management amount to an annual sales of > $1 billion world wide. The demonstrated clinical usefulness and commercial success of tumor markers have continued to fuel exciting research into the discovery and novel uses of new analytes.

  13. Algorithms for selecting informative marker panels for population assignment.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Noah A

    2005-11-01

    Given a set of potential source populations, genotypes of an individual of unknown origin at a collection of markers can be used to predict the correct source population of the individual. For improved efficiency, informative markers can be chosen from a larger set of markers to maximize the accuracy of this prediction. However, selecting the loci that are individually most informative does not necessarily produce the optimal panel. Here, using genotypes from eight species--carp, cat, chicken, dog, fly, grayling, human, and maize--this univariate accumulation procedure is compared to new multivariate "greedy" and "maximin" algorithms for choosing marker panels. The procedures generally suggest similar panels, although the greedy method often recommends inclusion of loci that are not chosen by the other algorithms. In seven of the eight species, when applied to five or more markers, all methods achieve at least 94% assignment accuracy on simulated individuals, with one species--dog--producing this level of accuracy with only three markers, and the eighth species--human--requiring approximately 13-16 markers. The new algorithms produce substantial improvements over use of randomly selected markers; where differences among the methods are noticeable, the greedy algorithm leads to slightly higher probabilities of correct assignment. Although none of the approaches necessarily chooses the panel with optimal performance, the algorithms all likely select panels with performance near enough to the maximum that they all are suitable for practical use.

  14. Markers of erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Kelvin P.; Melman, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    With the development and marketing of oral pharmacotherapy that is both noninvasive and successful in treating erectile dysfunction (ED), the quest to identify markers of organic ED lost ground. Indeed, the multi-factorial nature of ED may have led many researchers to conclude that searching for a universal marker of ED was futile. However, the realization that ED is strongly correlated with the overall health of men, and may act as a predictor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, has stimulated interest in identifying genes that can distinguish organic ED. In addition, the potential ability to suggest to the patient that ED is reversible (i.e., psychogenic) with a simple test would be of significance to both the physician and patient, as well as for reimbursement issues for therapy by insurance companies. Such a marker may also act as a non-subjective measure of the degree of ED and the efficacy of treatment. This review discusses the importance of identifying such markers and recent work identifying potential markers in human patients. PMID:19468461

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF CODOMINANT MARKERS FOR IDENTIFYING SPECIES HYBRIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein we describe a simple method for developing species-diagnostic markers that would permit the rapid identification of hybrid individuals. Our method relies on amplified length polymorphism (AFLP) and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technologies, both of which...

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF CODOMINANT MARKERS FOR IDENTIFYING SPECIES HYBRIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Herein we describe a simple method for developing species-diagnostic markers that would permit the rapid identification of hybrid individuals. Our method relies on amplified length polymorphism (AFLP) and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technologies, both of which...

  17. Individualizing Medicare.

    PubMed

    Chollet, D J

    1999-05-01

    Despite the enactment of significant changes to the Medicare program in 1997, Medicare's Hospital Insurance trust fund is projected to be exhausted just as the baby boom enters retirement. To address Medicare's financial difficulties, a number of reform proposals have been offered, including several to individualize Medicare financing and benefits. These proposals would attempt to increase Medicare revenues and reduce Medicare expenditures by having individuals bear risk--investment market risk before retirement and insurance market risk after retirement. Many fundamental aspects of these proposals have yet to be worked out, including how to guarantee a baseline level of saving for health insurance after retirement, how retirees might finance unanticipated health insurance price increases after retirement, the potential implications for Medicaid of inadequate individual saving, and whether the administrative cost of making the system fair and adequate ultimately would eliminate any rate-of-return advantages from allowing workers to invest their Medicare contributions in corporate stocks and bonds.

  18. [Individualizing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, William J.

    The individually guided education (IGE) program developed by the Kettering Foundation was implemented in September of 1973 at the John F. Kennedy Memorial Junior High School in Woburn, Massachusetts. The components of the program described in this speech include pupil and teacher scheduling, physical layout, pupil selection and adjustment,…

  19. Fluid markers of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when an external force traumatically injures the brain. Whereas severe TBI can be diagnosed using a combination of clinical signs and standard neuroimaging techniques, mild TBI (also called concussion) is more difficult to detect. This is where fluid markers of injury to different cell types and subcellular compartments in the central nervous system come into play. These markers are often proteins, peptides or other molecules with selective or high expression in the brain, which can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid or blood as they leak out or get secreted in response to the injury. Here, we review the literature on fluid markers of neuronal, axonal and astroglial injury to diagnose mild TBI and to predict clinical outcome in patients with head trauma. We also discuss chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a progressive neurodegenerative disease in individuals with a history of multiple mild TBIs in a biomarker context. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Traumatic Brain Injury'.

  20. Cutaneous markers of coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Jhamb, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is rapidly increasing in prevalence across the world and particularly in south Asians at a relatively younger age. As atherosclerosis starts in early childhood, the process of risk evaluation must start quite early. The present review addresses the issue of cutaneous markers associated with atherosclerosis, and the strengths and weaknesses of the markers in identifying early coronary atherosclerosis. A diligent search for such clinical markers, namely xanthelasma, xanthoma, arcus juvenilis, acanthosis nigricans, skin tags, ear lobe crease, nicotine stains, premature graying in smokers, hyperpigmented hands in betel quid sellers, central obesity, and signs of peripheral vascular disease may prove to be a rewarding exercise in identifying asymptomatic CAD in high risk individuals. PMID:21160602

  1. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  2. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  3. Stennis historical marker

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-25

    Stennis Space Center Director Patrick Scheuermann (second from left) stands at the historical marker erected by the state of Mississippi in honor of the 50th anniversary of the NASA facility. Joining Scheuermann are: (l to r) Ron Magee, Al Watkins, Tish Williams and Ken P'Pool.

  4. Twenty microsatellite markers for the endangered Vatica mangachapoi (Dipterocarpaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Shang, Shuai-Bin; Wang, Chun-Sheng; Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Zeng, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Vatica mangachapoi (Dipterocarpaceae), an endangered species indigenous to Southeast Asia and southern China. Methods and Results: Twenty microsatellite markers, including 12 polymorphic markers, were identified from V. mangachapoi using high-throughput sequencing. Polymorphism at each marker was evaluated using 87 individuals from three natural populations. The number of alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from six to 15, and the observed and expected heterozygosity varied from 0.000 to 0.926 and from 0.177 to 0.864, respectively. These markers were transferred successfully to the endangered species V. guangxiensis. Conclusions: These markers may be used to investigate the genetic diversity and gene flow of V. mangachapoi and V. guangxiensis. PMID:28224060

  5. Metabolic markers in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Colombini, Alessandra; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lubkowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Physical exercise induces adaptations in metabolism considered beneficial for health. Athletic performance is linked to adaptations, training, and correct nutrition in individuals with genetic traits that can facilitate such adaptations. Intense and continuous exercise, training, and competitions, however, can induce changes in the serum concentrations of numerous laboratory parameters. When these modifications, especially elevated laboratory levels, result outside the reference range, further examinations are ordered or participation in training and competition is discontinued or sports practice loses its appeal. In order to correctly interpret commonly used laboratory data, laboratory professionals and sport physicians need to know the behavior of laboratory parameters during and after practice and competition. We reviewed the literature on liver, kidney, muscle, heart, energy, and bone parameters in athletes with a view to increase the knowledge about clinical chemistry applied to sport and to stimulate studies in this field. In liver metabolism, the interpretation of serum aminotransferases concentration in athletes should consider the release of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) from muscle and of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) mainly from the liver, when bilirubin can be elevated because of continuous hemolysis, which is typical of exercise. Muscle metabolism parameters such as creatine kinase (CK) are typically increased after exercise. This parameter can be used to interpret the physiological release of CK from muscle, its altered release due to rhabdomyolysis, or incomplete recovery due to overreaching or trauma. Cardiac markers are released during exercise, and especially endurance training. Increases in these markers should not simply be interpreted as a signal of cardiac damage or wall stress but rather as a sign of regulation of myocardial adaptation. Renal function can be followed in athletes by measuring serum creatinine concentration, but it should

  6. Individualized Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    IntelliWeb and IntelliPrint, products from MicroMass Communications, utilize C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS), a development and delivery expert systems tool developed at Johnson Space Center. IntelliWeb delivers personalized messages by dynamically creating single web pages or entire web sites based on information provided by each website visitor. IntelliPrint is a product designed to create tailored, individualized messages via printed media. The software uses proprietary technology to generate printed messages that are personally relevant and tailored to meet each individual's needs. Intelliprint is in use in many operations including Brystol-Myers Squibb's personalized newsletter, "Living at Your Best," geared to each recipient based on a health and lifestyle survey taken earlier; and SmithKline Beecham's "Nicorette Committed Quitters Program," in which customized motivational materials support participants in their attempt to quit smoking.

  7. Identifying Predictive Markers for Personalized Treatment Selection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuanyuan

    2017-01-01

    Summary It is now well recognized that the effectiveness and potential risk of a treatment often vary by patient subgroups. Although trial-and-error and one-size-fits-all approaches to treatment selection remains a common practice, much recent focus has been placed on individualized treatment selection based on patient information (La Thangue and Kerr, 2011; Ong et al., 2012). Genetic and molecular markers are becoming increasingly available to guide treatment selection for various diseases including HIV and breast cancer (Mallal et al., 2008; Zujewski and Kamin, 2008). In recent years, many statistical procedures for developing individualized treatment rules (ITRs) have been proposed. However, less focus has been given to efficient selection of predictive biomarkers for treatment selection. The standard Wald test for interactions between treatment and the set of markers of interest may not work well when the marker effects are non-linear. Furthermore, interaction based test is scale dependent and may fail to capture markers useful for predicting individualized treatment differences. In this paper, we propose to overcome these difficulties by developing a kernel machine (KM) score test that can efficiently identify markers predictive of treatment difference. Simulation studies show that our proposed KM based score test is more powerful than the Wald test when there is non-linear effect among the predictors and when the outcome is binary with non-linear link functions. Furthermore, when there is high-correlation among predictors and when the number of predictors is not small, our method also over-performs Wald test. The proposed method is illustrated with two randomized clinical trials. PMID:26999054

  8. Associations between STR autosomal markers and longevity.

    PubMed

    Bediaga, N G; Aznar, J M; Elcoroaristizabal, X; Albóniga, O; Gómez-Busto, F; Artaza Artabe, I; Rocandio, Ana; de Pancorbo, M M

    2015-10-01

    Life span is a complex and multifactorial trait, which is shaped by genetic, epigenetic, environmental, and stochastic factors. The possibility that highly hypervariable short tandem repeats (STRs) associated with longevity has been largely explored by comparing the genotypic pools of long lived and younger individuals, but results so far have been contradictory. In view of these contradictory findings, the present study aims to investigate whether HUMTHO1 and HUMCSF1PO STRs, previously associated with longevity, exert a role as a modulator of life expectancy, as well as to assess the extent to which other autosomal STR markers are associated with human longevity in population from northern Spain. To that end, 21 autosomal microsatellite markers have been studied in 304 nonagenarian individuals (more than 90 years old) and 516 younger controls of European descent. Our results do not confirm the association found in previous studies between longevity and THO1 and CSF1PO loci. However, significant association between longevity and autosomal STR markers D12S391, D22S1045, and DS441 was observed. Even more, when we compared allelic frequency distribution of the 21 STR markers between cases and controls, we found that 6 out of the 21 STRs studied showed different allelic frequencies, thus suggesting that the genomic portrait of the human longevity is far complex and probably shaped by a high number of genomic loci.

  9. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  10. Referential Markers and Agreement Markers in Functional Discourse Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hengeveld, Kees

    2012-01-01

    It follows from the ordering principles that are applied in Functional Discourse Grammar that the positional possibilities of markers of agreement and those of cross-reference are different. Markers of cross reference are predicted to occur closer to the verb stem, while markers of agreement would occupy peripheral positions. This paper tests…

  11. Evaluation of approaches for identifying population informative markers from high density SNP Chips

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic markers can be used to identify and verify the origin of individuals. Motivation for the inference of ancestry ranges from conservation genetics to forensic analysis. High density assays featuring Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers can be exploited to create a reduced panel containing the most informative markers for these purposes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate methods of marker selection and determine the minimum number of markers from the BovineSNP50 BeadChip required to verify the origin of individuals in European cattle breeds. Delta, Wright's FST, Weir & Cockerham's FST and PCA methods for population differentiation were compared. The level of informativeness of each SNP was estimated from the breed specific allele frequencies. Individual assignment analysis was performed using the ranked informative markers. Stringency levels were applied by log-likelihood ratio to assess the confidence of the assignment test. Results A 95% assignment success rate for the 384 individually genotyped animals was achieved with < 80, < 100, < 140 and < 200 SNP markers (with increasing stringency threshold levels) across all the examined methods for marker selection. No further gain in power of assignment was achieved by sampling in excess of 200 SNP markers. The marker selection method that required the lowest number of SNP markers to verify the animal's breed origin was Wright's FST (60 to 140 SNPs depending on the chosen degree of confidence). Certain breeds required fewer markers (< 100) to achieve 100% assignment success. In contrast, closely related breeds require more markers (~200) to achieve > 95% assignment success. The power of assignment success, and therefore the number of SNP markers required, is dependent on the levels of genetic heterogeneity and pool of samples considered. Conclusions While all SNP selection methods produced marker panels capable of breed identification, the power of assignment varied markedly among

  12. Serum tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Greg L; Slater, Evan D; Sanders, Georganne K; Prichard, John G

    2003-09-15

    Monoclonal antibodies are used to detect serum antigens associated with specific malignancies. These tumor markers are most useful for monitoring response to therapy and detecting early relapse. With the exception of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), tumor markers do not have sufficient sensitivity or specificity for use in screening. Cancer antigen (CA) 27.29 most frequently is used to follow response to therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Carcinoembryonic antigen is used to detect relapse of colorectal cancer, and CA 19-9 may be helpful in establishing the nature of pancreatic masses. CA 125 is useful for evaluating pelvic masses in postmenopausal women, monitoring response to therapy in women with ovarian cancer, and detecting recurrence of this malignancy. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), a marker for hepatocellular carcinoma, sometimes is used to screen highly selected populations and to assess hepatic masses in patients at particular risk for developing hepatic malignancy. Testing for the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is an integral part of the diagnosis and management of gestational trophoblastic disease. Combined AFP and beta-hCG testing is an essential adjunct in the evaluation and treatment of nonseminomatous germ cell tumors, and in monitoring the response to therapy. AFP and beta-hCG also may be useful in evaluating potential origins of poorly differentiated metastatic cancer. PSA is used to screen for prostate cancer, detect recurrence of the malignancy, and evaluate specific syndromes of adenocarcinoma of unknown primary.

  13. [Considerations in rational use of tumor markers in breast carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Crombach, G

    1998-04-22

    The objective of this review is to determine clinical practical guidelines for the use of serum tumor markers in the care of breast cancer patients outside of clinical trials. Mucin antigens (CA 15-3, MCA, CA 549) and CEA are established markers in breast cancer. Owing to their low sensitivity, none of these markers can be recommended for screening, diagnosis or staging. During follow-up, increasing marker levels may indicate recurrence 3-6 months earlier than clinical and radiological examinations in about 40-50% of patients. However, the clinical benefit of this lead-time is not established. Tumor markers are able to monitor response to treatment in 70-80% of patients with metastatic breast cancer. However, paradoxical changes of the markers especially in the beginning of treatment, the insufficient concordance with tumor activity in 20-30% of the women, and the lack of curative therapy regimens limit the prospective clinical use of the markers in the individual patient. Therefore, marker changes require confirmation by radiological methods in most cases. The present data are insufficient to recommend routine use of tumor markers alone for monitoring breast cancer patients after primary treatment or during palliative therapy. However, in the absence of readily measurable disease (e. g. bone metastases) continuously increasing marker levels may be used to indicate treatment failure. If high-dose chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer renders to be effective, the clinical impact of tumor markers will increase considerably. Until that time, the analytical performance and the sensitivity of the established marker assays should be improved, and the clinical role of newer marker tests (TPS, CA 27.29) should be evaluated.

  14. Marker formation vs. marker offset - on the resolution potential of tectono-geomorphic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the recurrence and actual size of large and damaging earthquakes is an important step towards mitigating the hazard of future seismic events. Coseismically displaced geomorphic and stratigraphic markers are commonly utilized to constrain the recurrence history of surface-rupturing events. An underlying assumption of this approach is that the formation of new geomorphic markers is (distinctly) more frequent than the occurrence of surface-rupturing earthquakes that will disrupt and offset them (the markers). If this assumption is valid, then the offsets that are caused by individual earthquakes can be distinguished, providing valuable information on the causative earthquake size and its variability. Many of the currently existing earthquake recurrence models, such as the characteristic, the uniform-slip, and the variable-slip earthquake model were formulated following this general approach and the underlying assumption. However, whether this assumption is valid or not is essentially never tested or questioned. How sensitive are those recurrence models with regards to the validity of the afore-mentioned assumption that marker formation is more frequent than marker offset? Could it be that the observed recurrence characteristics represent the properties of climatic forcing rather than tectonic activity? To address this question, I utilize a statistical model in which I create markers and then displace them by sampling from a number of different probability distributions for marker formation and offset. In doing so, I create a library of recurrence patterns in which the corresponding patterns depend on timing and relative strength of marker formation and marker offset events. In my presentation I compare these model results with reported earthquake recurrence data (i.e., slip accumulation patterns). This comparison indicates that the surface displacement of ground-rupturing earthquakes is required to exhibit some form of "characteristic" behavior (with

  15. MACD: an imaging marker for cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganz, Melanie; de Bruijne, Marleen; Nielsen, Mads

    2010-03-01

    Despite general acceptance that a healthy lifestyle and the treatment of risk factors can prevent the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), CVD are the most common cause of death in Europe and the United States. It has been shown that abdominal aortic calcifications (AAC) correlate strongly with coronary artery calcifications. Hence an early detection of aortic calcified plaques helps to predict the risk of related coronary diseases. Also since two thirds of the adverse events have no prior symptoms, possibilities to screen for risk in low cost imaging are important. To this end the Morphological Atherosclerotic Calcification Distribution (MACD) index was developed. In the following several potential severity scores relating to the geometrical outline of the calcified deposits in the lumbar aortic region are introduced. Their individual as well as their combined predictive power is examined and a combined marker, MACD, is constructed. This is done using a Cox regression analysis, also known as survival analysis. Furthermore we show how a Cox regression yields MACD to be the most efficient marker. We also demonstrate that MACD has a larger individual predictive power than any of the other individual imaging markers described. Finally we present that the MACD index predicts cardiovascular death with a hazard ratio of approximately four.

  16. Markers of exposure to carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Wogan, G.N. )

    1989-05-01

    Methods have been developed for the detection of exposure to carcinogens and other DNA damaging agents in experimental animals and man through the detection of carcinogens or their metabolic derivatives in body fluids, or through adducts bound covalently to DNA or hemoglobin. The successful use of urinary markers of genotoxic exposures has been reported with respect to nitrosoproline as an indicator of exposure to N-nitroso compounds. The same approach has been used to detect AFB1 and AFB1-N7-Gua as markers of exposure to aflatoxin B1; of 3-methyladenine produced as a result of exposure to methylating agents; and thymine glycol as an indicator of exposure to agents causing oxidative damage to DNA. Detection of adducts formed between genotoxic agents and hemoglobin has been reported in studies of populations occupationally exposed to ethylene oxide, in which 3-hydroxyhistidine and 3-hydroxyvaline have been measured, and in smokers, whose hemoglobin has been found to contain levels of 4-aminobiphenyl and 3-hydroxyvaline that were correlated with the frequency of cigarette smoking. Detection of DNA adducts of genotoxic agents in the cells and tissues of exposed individuals has also been accomplished through the use of several types of analytical methods. Immunoassays and physicochemical methods have been applied to detect adducts formed through the major intermediate in the activation of benzo(a)pyrene, the 7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE). This adduct has been found in the DNA of peripheral leukocytes of workers in foundries, aluminum manufacturing plants, roofers, and coke oven plants, and also in cigarette smokers. 36 references.

  17. Microsatellite markers and polymorphism in cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.)

    Treesearch

    Alisa P. Ramakrishnan; Craig E. Coleman; Susan E. Meyer; Daniel J. Fairbanks

    2001-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) individuals were genetically characterized using polymorphic microsatellite markers. Through analysis of alleles of five polymorphic loci, genotypes were constructed of individuals from four populations in Utah and Nevada. There were 15 different genotypes: Whiterocks, UT, had nine genotypes, Hobble Creek, UT, had seven genotypes,...

  18. 38 CFR 38.630 - Headstones and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... marker, the phrase “In Memory Of” is mandatory. (1) Eligible individuals. An eligible individual for... if the child is under the age of 21 years, or under the age of 23 years if pursuing a course of... before reaching the age of 21 years, or before reaching the age of 23 years if pursuing a course of...

  19. 38 CFR 38.630 - Headstones and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... marker, the phrase “In Memory Of” is mandatory. (1) Eligible individuals. An eligible individual for... if the child is under the age of 21 years, or under the age of 23 years if pursuing a course of... before reaching the age of 21 years, or before reaching the age of 23 years if pursuing a course of...

  20. 38 CFR 38.630 - Headstones and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... marker, the phrase “In Memory Of” is mandatory. (1) Eligible individuals. An eligible individual for... if the child is under the age of 21 years, or under the age of 23 years if pursuing a course of... before reaching the age of 21 years, or before reaching the age of 23 years if pursuing a course of...

  1. The Marker State Space (MSS) method for classifying clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Brian P; Curnutte, Bryan; Maupin, Kevin A; Partyka, Katie; Choi, Sunguk; Brand, Randall E; Langmead, Christopher J; Tembe, Waibhav; Haab, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    The development of accurate clinical biomarkers has been challenging in part due to the diversity between patients and diseases. One approach to account for the diversity is to use multiple markers to classify patients, based on the concept that each individual marker contributes information from its respective subclass of patients. Here we present a new strategy for developing biomarker panels that accounts for completely distinct patient subclasses. Marker State Space (MSS) defines "marker states" based on all possible patterns of high and low values among a panel of markers. Each marker state is defined as either a case state or a control state, and a sample is classified as case or control based on the state it occupies. MSS was used to define multi-marker panels that were robust in cross validation and training-set/test-set analyses and that yielded similar classification accuracy to several other classification algorithms. A three-marker panel for discriminating pancreatic cancer patients from control subjects revealed subclasses of patients based on distinct marker states. MSS provides a straightforward approach for modeling highly divergent subclasses of patients, which may be adaptable for diverse applications.

  2. [Individual consciousness].

    PubMed

    Chaĭlakhian, L M

    2009-01-01

    The main modern concepts on the consciousness nature are considered. Together with the dualistic concepts, there exist concepts the adherents of which find it possible to get to know the origin of consciousness on the basis of natural science. A critical analysis of those concepts brings the author to the conclusion that they do not solve the main problem of individual consciousness: how subjective elements of consciousness arise in the brain as a result of objectively registered processes. The main reason of failures to solve said problem is considered by the author in the fact that the subjective categories of consciousness are not really subject to science. Nevertheless, it does not mean the dualism is to be inevitably accepted. In fact, the subjective categories arise in the limits of a life the area of which is substantially wider than that of science. An original information and physical hypothesis is being set up that provides for necessary premises and conditions enabling the origination of subjective categories of consciousness during the progressive natural evolution of living systems.

  3. Variable Pathogenicity Determines Individual Lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Blanco, Adolfo; Kim, Stuart K.

    2011-01-01

    A common property of aging in all animals is that chronologically and genetically identical individuals age at different rates. To unveil mechanisms that influence aging variability, we identified markers of remaining lifespan for Caenorhabditis elegans. In transgenic lines, we expressed fluorescent reporter constructs from promoters of C. elegans genes whose expression change with age. The expression levels of aging markers in individual worms from a young synchronous population correlated with their remaining lifespan. We identified eight aging markers, with the superoxide dismutase gene sod-3 expression being the best single predictor of remaining lifespan. Correlation with remaining lifespan became stronger if expression from two aging markers was monitored simultaneously, accounting for up to 49% of the variation in individual lifespan. Visualizing the physiological age of chronologically-identical individuals allowed us to show that a major source of lifespan variability is different pathogenicity from individual to individual and that the mechanism involves variable activation of the insulin-signaling pathway. PMID:21533182

  4. Iterative marker excision system.

    PubMed

    Myronovskyi, Maksym; Rosenkränzer, Birgit; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-05-01

    The deletions of large genomic DNA fragments and consecutive gene knockouts are prerequisites for the generation of organisms with improved properties. One of the key issues in this context is the removal of antibiotic resistance markers from engineered organisms without leaving an active recombinase recognition site. Here, we report the establishment of an iterative marker excision system (IMES) that solves this problem. Based on the phiC31 integrase and its mutant att sites, IMES can be used for highly effective deletion of DNA fragments between inversely oriented B-CC and P-GG sites. The B-CC and P-GG sites are derived from attB and attP by substitution of the central core TT dinucleotide with CC and GG, respectively. An unnatural RR site that resides in the chromosome following deletion is the joining product of the right shoulders of B-CC and P-GG. We show that the RR sites do not recombine with each other as well as the RR site recombines with B-CC. The recombination efficiencies between RR and P-GG or RR and LL are only 0.1 % and 1 %, respectively. Thus, IMES can be used for multistep genomic engineering without risking unwanted DNA recombination. The fabrication of multi-purpose antibiotic cassettes and examples of the utilisation of IMES are described.

  5. A strategy for using multiple linked markers for genetic counseling.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, A; Buetow, K H

    1985-01-01

    A strategy for using multiple linked markers for genetic counseling is to test sequentially individual markers until a diagnosis can be made. We show that in order to minimize the number of tests performed per case while diagnosing all informative cases the order in which the markers are to be tested is critical. We describe an algorithm to obtain this order using the parameter "I," the frequency of informative cases. The I value for a specific locus used depends on the marker frequency, association with the disease locus, and also on the informativeness of the marker loci already tested. Realizing that a direct assay for the beta S gene already exists, and that most cases of beta-thalassemia in Mediterraneans can be directly diagnosed using synthetic oligonucleotide probes, we illustrate the above technique by examining nine DNA polymorphisms in the human beta-globin cluster for their ability to diagnose sickle-cell anemia in American blacks and beta-thalassemia in Mediterraneans. This analysis shows that 95.39% of all sickle-cell pregnancies can be diagnosed by testing a subset of only six markers chosen by our algorithm. Furthermore, six markers can also diagnose 88.03% of beta-thalassemia in Greeks and 83.56% of beta-thalassemia in Italians. The test set is different from that suggested by the individual informative frequencies due to nonrandom associations between the restriction sites. PMID:2996337

  6. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae).

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhiwu; Pan, Lei; Ke, Weidong; Ding, Yi

    2009-01-01

    Eleven polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated and identified in the aquatic plant Euryale ferox Salisb. (Nymphaeaceae). This species, which belongs to basal Magnoliophyta, reproduces sexually. All of these 11 microsatellite markers yielded 25 alleles in a survey of a wild population of 34 individuals. Two or three alleles per locus were detected, with expected heterozygosity ranging from 0.056 to 0.634 and observed heterozygosity from 0.000 to 0.088. These simple sequence repeat markers will be useful for evaluating the genetic structure of the E. ferox population in the future. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Instantiated mixed effects modeling of Alzheimer's disease markers.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, R; Schmidt-Richberg, A; Ledig, C; Tong, T; Wolz, R; Rueckert, D

    2016-11-15

    The assessment and prediction of a subject's current and future risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease are of great interest in both the design of clinical trials as well as in clinical decision making. Exploring the longitudinal trajectory of markers related to neurodegeneration is an important task when selecting subjects for treatment in trials and the clinic, in the evaluation of early disease indicators and the monitoring of disease progression. Given that there is substantial intersubject variability, models that attempt to describe marker trajectories for a whole population will likely lack specificity for the representation of individual patients. Therefore, we argue here that individualized models provide a more accurate alternative that can be used for tasks such as population stratification and a subject-specific prognosis. In the work presented here, mixed effects modeling is used to derive global and individual marker trajectories for a training population. Test subject (new patient) specific models are then instantiated using a stratified "marker signature" that defines a subpopulation of similar cases within the training database. From this subpopulation, personalized models of the expected trajectory of several markers are subsequently estimated for unseen patients. These patient specific models of markers are shown to provide better predictions of time-to-conversion to Alzheimer's disease than population based models.

  8. Design III with Marker Loci

    PubMed Central

    Cockerham, C. C.; Zeng, Z. B.

    1996-01-01

    Design III is an experimental design originally proposed by R. E. COMSTOCK and H. F. ROBINSON for estimating genetic variances and the average degree of dominance for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and has recently been extended for mapping QTL. In this paper, we first extend COMSTOCK and ROBINSON's analysis of variance to include linkage, two-locus epistasis and the use of F(3) parents. Then we develop the theory and statistical analysis of orthogonal contrasts and contrast X environment interaction for a single marker locus to characterize the effects of QTL. The methods are applied to the maize data of C. W. STUBER. The analyses strongly suggest that there are multiple linked QTL in many chromosomes for several traits examined. QTL effects are largely environment-independent for grain yield, ear height, plant height and ear leaf area and largely environment dependent for days to tassel, grain moisture and ear number. There is significant QTL epistasis. The results are generally in favor of the hypothesis of dominance of favorable genes to explain the observed heterosis in grain yield and other traits, although epistasis could also play an important role and overdominance at individual QTL level can not be ruled out. PMID:8807314

  9. Predictive markers of honey bee colony collapse.

    PubMed

    Dainat, Benjamin; Evans, Jay D; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Across the Northern hemisphere, managed honey bee colonies, Apis mellifera, are currently affected by abrupt depopulation during winter and many factors are suspected to be involved, either alone or in combination. Parasites and pathogens are considered as principal actors, in particular the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, associated viruses and the microsporidian Nosema ceranae. Here we used long term monitoring of colonies and screening for eleven disease agents and genes involved in bee immunity and physiology to identify predictive markers of honeybee colony losses during winter. The data show that DWV, Nosema ceranae, Varroa destructor and Vitellogenin can be predictive markers for winter colony losses, but their predictive power strongly depends on the season. In particular, the data support that V. destructor is a key player for losses, arguably in line with its specific impact on the health of individual bees and colonies.

  10. Predictive Markers of Honey Bee Colony Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Dainat, Benjamin; Evans, Jay D.; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Across the Northern hemisphere, managed honey bee colonies, Apis mellifera, are currently affected by abrupt depopulation during winter and many factors are suspected to be involved, either alone or in combination. Parasites and pathogens are considered as principal actors, in particular the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, associated viruses and the microsporidian Nosema ceranae. Here we used long term monitoring of colonies and screening for eleven disease agents and genes involved in bee immunity and physiology to identify predictive markers of honeybee colony losses during winter. The data show that DWV, Nosema ceranae, Varroa destructor and Vitellogenin can be predictive markers for winter colony losses, but their predictive power strongly depends on the season. In particular, the data support that V. destructor is a key player for losses, arguably in line with its specific impact on the health of individual bees and colonies. PMID:22384162

  11. Heterosis, marker mutational processes and population inbreeding history.

    PubMed Central

    Tsitrone, A; Rousset, F; David, P

    2001-01-01

    Genotype-fitness correlations (GFC) have previously been studied using allozyme markers and have often focused on short-term processes such as recent inbreeding. Thus, models of GFC usually neglect marker mutation and only use heterozygosity as a genotypic index. Recently, GFC have also been reported (i) with DNA markers such as microsatellites, characterized by high mutation rates and specific mutational processes and (ii) using new individual genotypic indices assumed to be more precise than heterozygosity. The aim of this article is to evaluate the theoretical impact of marker mutation on GFC. We model GFC due to short-term processes generated by the current breeding system (partial selfing) and to long-term processes generated by past population history (hybridization). Various mutation rates and mutation models corresponding to different kinds of molecular markers are considered. Heterozygosity is compared to other genotypic indices designed for specific marker types. Highly mutable markers (such as microsatellites) are particularly suitable for the detection of GFC that evolve in relation to short-term processes, whereas GFC due to long-term processes are best observed with intermediate mutation rates. Irrespective of the marker type and population scenario, heterozygosity usually provides higher correlations than other genotypic indices under most biologically plausible conditions. PMID:11779819

  12. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Brandon T.; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A.; Grady, William M.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT) and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma→carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA, and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumor cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimization in DNA stabilization, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multi-target stool DNA (MT-sDNA) test, which combines both mutant and methylated DNA markers and a fecal immunochemical test (FIT), recently performed favorably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the screening of asymptomatic, average risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations. PMID:25994221

  13. Molecular markers for colorectal cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon T; Kisiel, John; Ahlquist, David A; Grady, William M

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), although a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, has seen a declining incidence and mortality in countries with programmatic screening. Faecal occult blood testing and endoscopic approaches are the predominant screening methods currently. The discovery of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence and a greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes that drive the formation of CRC have contributed to innovative research to identify molecular markers for highly accurate, non-invasive screening tests for CRC. DNA, proteins, messenger RNA and micro-RNA have all been evaluated. The observation of tumour cell exfoliation into the mucocellular layer of the colonic epithelium and proven stability of DNA in a harsh stool environment make stool DNA a particularly promising marker. The development of a clinically useful stool DNA test has required numerous technical advances, including optimisation in DNA stabilisation, the development of assays with high analytical sensitivity, and the identification of specific and broadly informative molecular markers. A multitarget stool DNA test, which combines mutant and methylated DNA markers and a faecal immunochemical test, recently performed favourably in a large cross-sectional validation study and has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the screening of asymptomatic, average-risk individuals. The ultimate way in which molecular marker screening assays will be used in clinical practice will require additional studies to determine optimal screening intervals, factors affecting compliance, management of false-positive results, and the use of these assays in high-risk populations, as well as other considerations.

  14. Urinary markers for bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Zachary L.

    2013-01-01

    Bladder cancer has the fifth highest incidence of all malignancies in the United States, with a propensity to recur, requiring lifelong surveillance after diagnosis. Urinary markers of disease have been of extreme interest in this field in an effort to simplify surveillance schedules and improve early detection of tumors. Many markers have been described, but most remain investigational. However, some markers have undergone clinical trials and are approved for clinical use. In this review, urinary markers and their application for screening and surveillance of bladder cancer are discussed. PMID:23864929

  15. Marker evaluation of human breast and bladder cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Mayall, B.H.; Carroll, P.R.; Chen, Ling-Chun; Cohen, M.B.; Goodson, W.H. III; Smith, H.S.; Waldman, F.M. )

    1990-11-02

    We are investigating multiple markers in human breast and bladder cancers. Our aim is to identify markers that are clinically relevant and that contribute to our understanding of the disease process in individual patients. Good markers accurately assess the malignant potential of a cancer in an individual patient. Thus, they help identify those cancers that will recur, and they may be used to predict more accurately time to recurrence, response to treatment, and overall prognosis. Therapy and patient management may then be optimized to the individual patient. Relevant markers reflect the underlying pathobiology of individual tumors. As a tissue undergoes transformation from benign to malignant, the cells lose their differentiated phenotype. As a generalization, the more the cellular phenotype, cellular proliferation and cellular genotype depart from normal, the more advanced is the tumor in its biological evolution and the more likely it is that the patient has a poor prognosis. We use three studies to illustrate our investigation of potential tumor markers. Breast cancers are labeled in vivo with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) to give a direct measure of the tumor labeling index. Bladder cancers are analyzed immunocytochemically using an antibody against proliferation. Finally, the techniques of molecular genetics are used to detect allelic loss in breast cancers. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Oral cancer risk and molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; Font-Costa, Imma; López-López, José

    2004-01-01

    The clinical appearance and, especially, the degree of dysplasia that may be shown by pre-cancerous lesions in the oral cavity suggest a potential for malignisation. An increasing number of studies are seeking new, more specific markers that would help to determine the degree of cell alteration and enable a better understanding of the degree of malignant degeneration of these cells. The present review considers the most recent findings for these markers, grouping them into families: tumour growth markers; markers of tumour suppression and anti-tumour response; angiogenesis markers; markers of tumour invasion and metastatic potential; cell surface markers; intracellular markers; markers derived from arachidonic acid; and enzymatic markers.

  17. Blueberry Microsatellite Markers Identify Cranberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Forty-six blueberry simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers or microsatellites were tested for the ability to amplify a polymorphic marker in eight American cranberry accessions. Sixteen SSRs resulted in informative and polymorphic SSR primer pairs and were used to fingerprint 16 economically important...

  18. [Progress in individual identification of burned bones].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-dong; Ren, Fu; Xing, Rui-xian; Pei, Lin-guo

    2009-02-01

    The burned bone DNA test have became more and more important in identifying the individuals and paternity involved in the fire, explosion disasters as well as burn corpse crimes. As an important genetic marker system, STR has been widely used in forensic individual identification, paternity test and other fields. In this article, the influence of burned temperature and time to STR typing was reviewed, the choice of STR locus and DNA extraction methods were discussed about burned bones.

  19. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization.

  20. Genetics and biological markers of risk for alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, B; Hoffman, P L

    1988-01-01

    Substantial scientific evidence has accumulated that both genetic and environmental factors predispose the development of alcoholism in certain individuals. Evidence has accumulated to indicate that alcoholism is a heterogeneous entity arising from multiple etiologies. The demonstrated role of genetics in increasing the risk of alcoholism has promoted the search for biological markers that could objectively identify individuals who are genetically predisposed to alcoholism. Identifying such markers could allow for early diagnosis, focused prevention, and differential and type-specific treatment of alcoholism. Promising markers have been provided by research in electrophysiology, endocrinology, and biochemistry. Recent advances in molecular genetics are offering prospects for direct analysis of the human genome to determine elements that provide predisposition to, and protection from, alcoholism. Recent advances in research and new knowledge gained by the alcoholism treatment community and the lay public are helping to diminish the societal damage caused by alcohol abuse and alcoholism and to change prevailing attitudes about them. PMID:3141966

  1. Development and characterization of 37 novel EST-SSR markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiaofeng; McPhee, Kevin E; Coram, Tristan E; Peever, Tobin L; Chilvers, Martin I

    2013-01-01

    Simple sequence repeat markers were developed based on expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR) and screened for polymorphism among 23 Pisum sativum individuals to assist development and refinement of pea linkage maps. In particular, the SSR markers were developed to assist in mapping of white mold disease resistance quantitative trait loci. • Primer pairs were designed for 46 SSRs identified in EST contiguous sequences assembled from a 454 pyrosequenced transcriptome of the pea cultivar, 'LIFTER'. Thirty-seven SSR markers amplified PCR products, of which 11 (30%) SSR markers produced polymorphism in 23 individuals, including parents of recombinant inbred lines, with two to four alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.43 and from 0.31 to 0.83, respectively. • These EST-SSR markers for pea will be useful for refinement of pea linkage maps, and will likely be useful for comparative mapping of pea and as tools for marker-based pea breeding.

  2. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers

    PubMed Central

    Cuckle, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs), chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application in public health settings, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker marker tests. The established screening methods can be readily applied in the first trimester to identify pregnancies at high risk of pre-eclampsia and offer prevention though aspirin treatment. Prenatal screening for fragile X syndrome might be adopted more widely if the test was to be framed as a form of maternal marker screening. PMID:26237388

  3. Use of microsatellite markers to assign goats to their breeds.

    PubMed

    Aljumaah, R S; Alobre, M M; Al-Atiyat, R M

    2015-08-07

    We investigated the potential of 17 microsatellite markers for assigning Saudi goat individuals to their breeds. Three local breeds, Bishi, Jabali, and Tohami were genotyped using these markers, and Somali goats were used as a reference breed. The majority of alleles were shared between the breeds, except for some that were specific to each breed. The Garza-Williamson index was lowest in the Bishi breed, indicating that a recent bottleneck event occurred. The overall results assigned the goat individuals (based on their genotypes) to the same breeds from which they were sampled, except in a few cases. The individuals' genotypes were sufficient to provide a clear distinction between the Somali goat breed and the others. In three factorial dimensions, the results of a correspondence analysis indicated that the total variation for the first and second factors was 48.85 and 31.43%, respectively. Consequently, Jabali, Bishi, and Tohami goats were in separate groups. The Jabali goat was closely related to the Bishi goat. Somali goats were distinguished from each other and from individuals of the other three goat breeds. The markers were successful in assigning individual goats to their breeds, based on the likelihood of a given individual's genotype.

  4. Breast cancer statistics and markers.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  5. Evaluating Markers for Guiding Treatment.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stuart G; Bonetti, Marco

    2016-09-01

    The subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot (STEPP) is an appealing method for assessing the clinical impact of a predictive marker on patient outcomes and identifying a promising subgroup for further study. However, its original formulation lacked a decision analytic justification and applied only to a single marker. We derive a decision-analytic result that motivates STEPP. We discuss the incorporation of multiple predictive markers into STEPP using risk difference, cadit, and responders-only benefit functions. Applying STEPP to data from a breast cancer treatment trial with multiple markers, we found that none of the three benefit functions identified a promising subgroup for further study. Applying STEPP to hypothetical data from a trial with 100 markers, we found that all three benefit functions identified promising subgroups as evidenced by the large statistically significant treatment effect in these subgroups. Because the method has desirable decision-analytic properties and yields an informative plot, it is worth applying to randomized trials on the chance there is a large treatment effect in a subgroup determined by the predictive markers. Published by Oxford University Press 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  6. Temporal binding of interval markers

    PubMed Central

    Derichs, Christina; Zimmermann, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    How we estimate the passage of time is an unsolved mystery in neuroscience. Illusions of subjective time provide an experimental access to this question. Here we show that time compression and expansion of visually marked intervals result from a binding of temporal interval markers. Interval markers whose onset signals were artificially weakened by briefly flashing a whole-field mask were bound in time towards markers with a strong onset signal. We explain temporal compression as the consequence of summing response distributions of weak and strong onset signals. Crucially, temporal binding occurred irrespective of the temporal order of weak and strong onset markers, thus ruling out processing latencies as an explanation for changes in interval duration judgments. If both interval markers were presented together with a mask or the mask was shown in the temporal interval center, no compression occurred. In a sequence of two intervals, masking the middle marker led to time compression for the first and time expansion for the second interval. All these results are consistent with a model view of temporal binding that serves a functional role by reducing uncertainty in the final estimate of interval duration. PMID:27958311

  7. Detection of quantitative trait loci in outbred populations with incomplete marker data.

    PubMed Central

    Bink, M C; Van Arendonk, J A

    1999-01-01

    Augmentation of marker genotypes for ungenotyped individuals is implemented in a Bayesian approach via the use of Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. Marker data on relatives and phenotypes are combined to compute conditional posterior probabilities for marker genotypes of ungenotyped individuals. The presented procedure allows the analysis of complex pedigrees with ungenotyped individuals to detect segregating quantitative trait loci (QTL). Allelic effects at the QTL were assumed to follow a normal distribution with a covariance matrix based on known QTL position and identity by descent probabilities derived from flanking markers. The Bayesian approach estimates variance due to the single QTL, together with polygenic and residual variance. The method was empirically tested through analyzing simulated data from a complex granddaughter design. Ungenotyped dams were related to one or more sons or grandsires in the design. Heterozygosity of the marker loci and size of QTL were varied. Simulation results indicated a significant increase in power when ungenotyped dams were included in the analysis. PMID:9872977

  8. Ethnic-Difference Markers for Use in Mapping by Admixture Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Collins-Schramm, Heather E.; Phillips, Carolyn M.; Operario, Darwin J.; Lee, Jane S.; Weber, James L.; Hanson, Robert L.; Knowler, William C.; Cooper, Richard; Li, Hongzhe; Seldin, Michael F.

    2002-01-01

    Mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD) is a potentially powerful technique for the mapping of complex genetic diseases. The practical requirements of this method include (a) a set of markers spanning the genome that have large allele-frequency differences between the parental ethnicities contributing to the admixed population and (b) an understanding of the extent of admixture in the study population. To this end, a DNA-pooling technique was used to screen microsatellite and diallelic insertion/deletion markers for allele-frequency differences between putative representatives of the parental populations of the admixed Mexican American (MA) and African American (AA) populations. Markers with promising pooled differences were then confirmed by individual genotyping in both the parental and admixed populations. For the MA population, screening of >600 markers identified 151 ethnic-difference markers (EDMs) with δ>0.30 (where δ is the absolute value of each allele-frequency difference between two populations, summed over all marker alleles and divided by two) that are likely to be useful for MALD analysis. For the AA population, analysis of >400 markers identified 97 EDMs. In addition, individual genotyping of these markers in Pima Amerindians, Yavapai Amerindians, European American (EA) individuals, Africans from Zimbabwe, MA individuals, and AA individuals, as well as comparison to the CEPH genotyping set, suggests that the differences between subpopulations of an ethnicity are small for many markers with large interethnic differences. Estimates of admixture that are based on individual genotyping of these markers are consistent with a 60% EA:40% Amerindian contribution to MA populations and with a 20% EA:80% African contribution to AA populations. Taken together, these data suggest that EDMs with large interpopulation and small intrapopulation differences can be readily identified for MALD studies in both AA and MA populations. PMID:11845411

  9. Ethnic-difference markers for use in mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Collins-Schramm, Heather E; Phillips, Carolyn M; Operario, Darwin J; Lee, Jane S; Weber, James L; Hanson, Robert L; Knowler, William C; Cooper, Richard; Li, Hongzhe; Seldin, Michael F

    2002-03-01

    Mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD) is a potentially powerful technique for the mapping of complex genetic diseases. The practical requirements of this method include (a) a set of markers spanning the genome that have large allele-frequency differences between the parental ethnicities contributing to the admixed population and (b) an understanding of the extent of admixture in the study population. To this end, a DNA-pooling technique was used to screen microsatellite and diallelic insertion/deletion markers for allele-frequency differences between putative representatives of the parental populations of the admixed Mexican American (MA) and African American (AA) populations. Markers with promising pooled differences were then confirmed by individual genotyping in both the parental and admixed populations. For the MA population, screening of >600 markers identified 151 ethnic-difference markers (EDMs) with delta>0.30 (where delta is the absolute value of each allele-frequency difference between two populations, summed over all marker alleles and divided by two) that are likely to be useful for MALD analysis. For the AA population, analysis of >400 markers identified 97 EDMs. In addition, individual genotyping of these markers in Pima Amerindians, Yavapai Amerindians, European American (EA) individuals, Africans from Zimbabwe, MA individuals, and AA individuals, as well as comparison to the CEPH genotyping set, suggests that the differences between subpopulations of an ethnicity are small for many markers with large interethnic differences. Estimates of admixture that are based on individual genotyping of these markers are consistent with a 60% EA:40% Amerindian contribution to MA populations and with a 20% EA:80% African contribution to AA populations. Taken together, these data suggest that EDMs with large interpopulation and small intrapopulation differences can be readily identified for MALD studies in both AA and MA populations.

  10. Evaluation of a multi-marker immunomagnetic enrichment assay for the quantification of circulating melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) are thought to be valuable in improving measures of prognosis in melanoma patients and may be a useful marker of residual disease to identify non-metastatic patients requiring adjuvant therapy. We investigated whether immunomagnetic enrichment targeting multiple markers allows more efficient enrichment of CMCs from patient peripheral blood than targeting a single marker. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether the number of CMCs in patient blood was associated with disease stage. Methods We captured CMCs by targeting the melanoma associated markers MCSP and MCAM as well as the melanoma stem cell markers ABCB5 and CD271, both individually and in combination, by immunomagnetic enrichment. CMCs were enriched and quantified from the peripheral blood of 10 non-metastatic and 13 metastatic melanoma patients. Results Targeting all markers in combination resulted in the enrichment of more CMCs than when any individual marker was targeted (p < 0.001-0.028). Furthermore, when a combination of markers was targeted, a greater number of CMCs were enriched in metastatic patients compared with non-metastatic patients (p = 0.007). Conclusions Our results demonstrated that a combination of markers should be targeted for optimal isolation of CMCs. In addition, there are significantly more CMCs in metastatic patients compared with non-metastatic patients and therefore quantification of CMCs may prove to be a useful marker of disease progression. PMID:22978632

  11. Evaluation of a multi-marker immunomagnetic enrichment assay for the quantification of circulating melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Freeman, James B; Gray, Elin S; Millward, Michael; Pearce, Robert; Ziman, Melanie

    2012-09-15

    Circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) are thought to be valuable in improving measures of prognosis in melanoma patients and may be a useful marker of residual disease to identify non-metastatic patients requiring adjuvant therapy. We investigated whether immunomagnetic enrichment targeting multiple markers allows more efficient enrichment of CMCs from patient peripheral blood than targeting a single marker. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether the number of CMCs in patient blood was associated with disease stage. We captured CMCs by targeting the melanoma associated markers MCSP and MCAM as well as the melanoma stem cell markers ABCB5 and CD271, both individually and in combination, by immunomagnetic enrichment. CMCs were enriched and quantified from the peripheral blood of 10 non-metastatic and 13 metastatic melanoma patients. Targeting all markers in combination resulted in the enrichment of more CMCs than when any individual marker was targeted (p < 0.001-0.028). Furthermore, when a combination of markers was targeted, a greater number of CMCs were enriched in metastatic patients compared with non-metastatic patients (p = 0.007). Our results demonstrated that a combination of markers should be targeted for optimal isolation of CMCs. In addition, there are significantly more CMCs in metastatic patients compared with non-metastatic patients and therefore quantification of CMCs may prove to be a useful marker of disease progression.

  12. Polymorphic microsatellite markers in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Candeias, Rui; Casado-Amezúa, Pilar; Pearson, Gareth A; Serrão, Ester A; Teixeira, Sara

    2015-03-08

    Fucus vesiculosus is a brown seaweed dominant on temperate rocky shores of the northern hemisphere and, is typically distributed in the mid-upper intertidal zone. It is an external fertilizer that reproduces sexually, providing an excellent model to address conflicting theories related to mating systems and sexual selection. Microsatellite markers have been reported for several Fucus species, however the genomic libraries from where these markers have been isolated, have originated from two or more species pooled together (F. vesiculosus and F. serratus in one library; F. vesiculosus, F. serratus and Ascophyllum nodosum in a second library), or when the genomic DNA originated from only one species it was from Fucus spiralis. Although these markers cross-amplify F. vesiculosus individuals, the level of polymorphism has been low for relatedness studies. The microsatellite markers described here were obtained from an enriched genomic library, followed by 454 pyrosequencing. A total of 9 microsatellite markers were tested across 44 individuals from the North of Portugal. The mean number of alleles across loci was 8.7 and the gene diversity 0.67. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci should be useful for paternity analysis, assessing variance of reproductive success and in estimations of genetic variation within and between populations.

  13. Biochemical markers of spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ronna L

    2014-01-01

    Preterm birth is a delivery that occurs at less than 37 completed weeks of gestation and it is associated with perinatal morbidity and mortality. Spontaneous preterm birth accounts for up to 75% of all preterm births. A number of maternal or fetal characteristics have been associated with preterm birth, but the use of individual or group biochemical markers have advanced some of the understanding on the mechanisms leading to spontaneous preterm birth. This paper provides a summary on the current literature on the use of biochemical markers in predicting spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women. Evidence from the literature suggests fetal fibronectin, cervical interleukin-6, and α-fetoprotein as promising biochemical markers in predicting spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women. The role of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, as well as epigenetics, has the potential to further elucidate and improve understanding of the underlying mechanisms or pathways of spontaneous preterm birth. Refinement in study design and methodology is needed in future research for the development and validation of individual or group biochemical marker(s) for use independently or in conjunction with other potential risk factors such as genetic variants and environmental and behavioral factors in predicting spontaneous preterm birth across diverse populations.

  14. Imaging markers for Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Bocchetta, Martina; Chételat, Gael; Rabinovici, Gil D.; de Leon, Mony J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Reiman, Eric M.; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Black, Sandra E.; Brooks, David J.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Fox, Nick C.; Herholz, Karl; Nordberg, Agneta; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Thies, William; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Weiner, Michael W.; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; DeCarli, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Revised diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) acknowledge a key role of imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy depends on which marker (i.e., amyloid imaging, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG]-PET, SPECT, MRI) as well as how it is measured (“metric”: visual, manual, semiautomated, or automated segmentation/computation). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of marker vs metric in separating AD from healthy and prognostic accuracy to predict progression in mild cognitive impairment. The outcome measure was positive (negative) likelihood ratio, LR+ (LR−), defined as the ratio between the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in patients and the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in healthy controls. Diagnostic LR+ of markers was between 4.4 and 9.4 and LR− between 0.25 and 0.08, whereas prognostic LR+ and LR− were between 1.7 and 7.5, and 0.50 and 0.11, respectively. Within metrics, LRs varied up to 100-fold: LR+ from approximately 1 to 100; LR− from approximately 1.00 to 0.01. Markers accounted for 11% and 18% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+ and 16% and 24% of LR−. Across all markers, metrics accounted for an equal or larger amount of variance than markers: 13% and 62% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+, and 29% and 18% of LR−. Within markers, the largest proportion of diagnostic LR+ and LR− variability was within 18F-FDG-PET and MRI metrics, respectively. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of imaging AD biomarkers is at least as dependent on how the biomarker is measured as on the biomarker itself. Standard operating procedures are key to biomarker use in the clinical routine and drug trials. PMID:23897875

  15. 40 CFR 80.582 - What are the sampling and testing methods for the fuel marker?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... available marker solvent yellow 124 standard in the range of 0.10 to 1 milligrams per liter shall not differ... continuous series of at least 10 tests performed on a commercially available marker solvent yellow 124... method, following guidelines under A 1.5.1 for individual observation charts and A 1.5.2 for moving...

  16. A population 'consensus', partial linkage map of Picea abies Karst. based on RAPD markers

    Treesearch

    G. Bucci; Thomas L. Kubisiak; W.L. Nance; P. Menozzi

    1997-01-01

    The authors built a "consensus" partial linkage map based on RAPD markers using 48 sibships of eight megagametophytes each from a natural population of Norway spruce. A RAPD linkage map for a single individual from the same population had previously been constructed. Using 30 random decamers that had yielded 83 RAPD markers in the single-tree map, eight...

  17. Salivary markers of oxidative stress in oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Kamodyová, Natália; Červenka, Tomáš; Celec, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is an interesting alternative diagnostic body fluid with several specific advantages over blood. These include non-invasive and easy collection and related possibility to do repeated sampling. One of the obstacles that hinders the wider use of saliva for diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases is its composition, which is affected by local oral status. However, this issue makes saliva very interesting for clinical biochemistry of oral diseases. Periodontitis, caries, oral precancerosis, and other local oral pathologies are associated with oxidative stress. Several markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species can be measured in saliva. Clinical studies have shown an association with oral pathologies at least for some of the established salivary markers of oxidative stress. This association is currently limited to the population level and none of the widely used markers can be applied for individual diagnostics. Oxidative stress seems to be of local oral origin, but it is currently unclear whether it is caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species due to inflammation or by the lack of antioxidants. Interventional studies, both, in experimental animals as well as humans indicate that antioxidant treatment could prevent or slow-down the progress of periodontitis. This makes the potential clinical use of salivary markers of oxidative stress even more attractive. This review summarizes basic information on the most commonly used salivary markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant status, and carbonyl stress and the studies analyzing these markers in patients with caries or periodontitis. PMID:26539412

  18. Evaluation of algorithms used to order markers on genetic maps.

    PubMed

    Mollinari, M; Margarido, G R A; Vencovsky, R; Garcia, A A F

    2009-12-01

    When building genetic maps, it is necessary to choose from several marker ordering algorithms and criteria, and the choice is not always simple. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of algorithms try (TRY), seriation (SER), rapid chain delineation (RCD), recombination counting and ordering (RECORD) and unidirectional growth (UG), as well as the criteria PARF (product of adjacent recombination fractions), SARF (sum of adjacent recombination fractions), SALOD (sum of adjacent LOD scores) and LHMC (likelihood through hidden Markov chains), used with the RIPPLE algorithm for error verification, in the construction of genetic linkage maps. A linkage map of a hypothetical diploid and monoecious plant species was simulated containing one linkage group and 21 markers with fixed distance of 3 cM between them. In all, 700 F(2) populations were randomly simulated with 100 and 400 individuals with different combinations of dominant and co-dominant markers, as well as 10 and 20% of missing data. The simulations showed that, in the presence of co-dominant markers only, any combination of algorithm and criteria may be used, even for a reduced population size. In the case of a smaller proportion of dominant markers, any of the algorithms and criteria (except SALOD) investigated may be used. In the presence of high proportions of dominant markers and smaller samples (around 100), the probability of repulsion linkage increases between them and, in this case, use of the algorithms TRY and SER associated to RIPPLE with criterion LHMC would provide better results.

  19. [Biochemical markers of bone metabolism and their importance].

    PubMed

    Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Schwetz, V

    2016-06-01

    Laboratory analyses of biochemical markers for bone and mineral metabolism can play a key role in the assessment of patients with osteoporosis. They may help to assess bone turnover in the diagnostic work-up and aid decision-making as well as selection of pharmaceutical therapy options. Recent publications on therapy response have shown that biochemical markers of bone turnover are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy success in individual osteoporosis patients and the assessment of bone mineral density gain during therapy.

  20. Multiple Brain Markers are Linked to Age-Related Variation in Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P.; Rieckmann, Anna; Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related alterations in brain structure and function have been challenging to link to cognition due to potential overlapping influences of multiple neurobiological cascades. We examined multiple brain markers associated with age-related variation in cognition. Clinically normal older humans aged 65–90 from the Harvard Aging Brain Study (N = 186) were characterized on a priori magnetic resonance imaging markers of gray matter thickness and volume, white matter hyperintensities, fractional anisotropy (FA), resting-state functional connectivity, positron emission tomography markers of glucose metabolism and amyloid burden, and cognitive factors of processing speed, executive function, and episodic memory. Partial correlation and mediation analyses estimated age-related variance in cognition shared with individual brain markers and unique to each marker. The largest relationships linked FA and striatum volume to processing speed and executive function, and hippocampal volume to episodic memory. Of the age-related variance in cognition, 70–80% was accounted for by combining all brain markers (but only ∼20% of total variance). Age had significant indirect effects on cognition via brain markers, with significant markers varying across cognitive domains. These results suggest that most age-related variation in cognition is shared among multiple brain markers, but potential specificity between some brain markers and cognitive domains motivates additional study of age-related markers of neural health. PMID:25316342

  1. Multiple Brain Markers are Linked to Age-Related Variation in Cognition.

    PubMed

    Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P; Rieckmann, Anna; Mormino, Elizabeth C; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Buckner, Randy L

    2016-04-01

    Age-related alterations in brain structure and function have been challenging to link to cognition due to potential overlapping influences of multiple neurobiological cascades. We examined multiple brain markers associated with age-related variation in cognition. Clinically normal older humans aged 65-90 from the Harvard Aging Brain Study (N = 186) were characterized on a priori magnetic resonance imaging markers of gray matter thickness and volume, white matter hyperintensities, fractional anisotropy (FA), resting-state functional connectivity, positron emission tomography markers of glucose metabolism and amyloid burden, and cognitive factors of processing speed, executive function, and episodic memory. Partial correlation and mediation analyses estimated age-related variance in cognition shared with individual brain markers and unique to each marker. The largest relationships linked FA and striatum volume to processing speed and executive function, and hippocampal volume to episodic memory. Of the age-related variance in cognition, 70-80% was accounted for by combining all brain markers (but only ∼20% of total variance). Age had significant indirect effects on cognition via brain markers, with significant markers varying across cognitive domains. These results suggest that most age-related variation in cognition is shared among multiple brain markers, but potential specificity between some brain markers and cognitive domains motivates additional study of age-related markers of neural health.

  2. Markers of bile duct tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Giordano, Maria; Paladina, Isabella; Rando, Alessandra; Uccello, Mario; Basile, Francesco; Biondi, Antonio; Carnazzo, Santo; Alessandria, Innocenza; Mazzarino, Clorinda

    2011-01-01

    Biliary tract carcinomas are relatively rare, representing less than 1% of cancers. However, their incidence has increased in Japan and in industrialized countries like the USA. Biliary tract tumors have a poor prognosis and a high mortality rate because they are usually detected late in the course of the disease; therapeutic treatment options are often limited and of minimal utility. Recent studies have shown the importance of serum and molecular markers in the diagnosis and follow up of biliary tract tumors. This review aims to introduce the main features of the most important serum and molecular markers of biliary tree tumors. Some considerable tumor markers are cancer antigen 125, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen, chromogranin A, mucin 1, mucin 5, alpha-fetoprotein, claudins and cytokeratins. PMID:21528090

  3. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  4. Marker imputation in barley association studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Association mapping requires higher marker density than linkage mapping, potentially leading to more missing marker data and to higher genotyping costs. In human genetics, methods exist to impute missing marker data and whole markers that were typed in a reference panel but not in the experimental d...

  5. Urine markers of interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R

    2001-06-01

    This article describes the current state of the art with regard to urine markers of interstitial cystitis (IC), and describes the areas that need continuing research. Articles referenced in MEDLINE that describe urine alterations in IC were reviewed. Additional articles were identified by cross-referencing. The different marker alterations were tabulated. The relevant articles were discussed, considering different purposes for urine markers including: (1) diagnosing IC; (2) confirming a specific pathophysiology for IC; and (3) predicting or following response to a specific treatment. Currently, 2 markers (glycoprotein-51 and antiproliferative factor [APF]) clearly separate IC and control subjects, with minimal overlap. Markers that correlate with specific bladder biopsy features include 1,4-methylimidazole acetic acid and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which correlate with mast cell density, and interleukin (IL)-6, which correlates with mononuclear inflammation. Markers that changed after treatment were as follows: (1) nitric oxide synthase and cyclic guanosine monophosphate increased with oral L-arginine; (2) ECP decreased with subcutaneous heparin; (3) prostaglandin E(2) and kallikrein decreased after bladder distention; (4) neutrophil chemotactic activity decreased after dimethyl sulfoxide; (5) IL-2 inhibitor decreased after oral nifedipine; (6) IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 decreased after bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine; and (7) APF and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor changed to or toward normal levels after bladder distention or sacral nerve stimulation. A larger number of urine alterations have been reported, and a few are being pursued further by correlating with bladder biopsy findings or treatment responses. Further research is needed.

  6. Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-10

    AD VIRULENCE MARKERS OF DENGUE VIRUSES 00 ANNUAL REPORT 0 James L. Hardy and Srisakul C. Kliks June 10, 1988 Supported by U.S. ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH...Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) James L. Hardy ind Sriqakul.C. Klik,,q 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF...TERMS (Continue on reverse it necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Dengue viruses, dengue hemorrhagic fever, virulence, U3

  7. Development of nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers for the endangered conifer Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Sakaguchi, Shota; Lannuzel, Guillaume; Fogliani, Bruno; Wulff, Adrien S.; L’Huillier, Laurent; Kurata, Seikan; Ueno, Saneyoshi; Isagi, Yuji; Tsumura, Yoshihiko; Ito, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were developed for Callitris sulcata (Cupressaceae), an endangered conifer species in New Caledonia. Methods and Results: Using sequencing by synthesis (SBS) of an RNA-Seq library, 15 polymorphic nuclear and chloroplast microsatellite markers were developed. When evaluated with 48 individuals, these markers showed genetic variations ranging from two to 15 alleles and expected heterozygosity ranging from 0 to 0.881. Conclusions: These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity and structure of remaining wild populations and improving the genetic status of ex situ populations. PMID:26312198

  8. Psychophysiological risk markers of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Mark; Malan, Leone

    2010-09-01

    Acute psychophysiological stress testing, involving measurement of cardiovascular and biological responses to laboratory-induced mental stress, is an important tool to investigate mechanisms that might account for the association between psychosocial stress and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated associations of disturbed psychophysiological responses with sub-clinical measures of atherosclerosis, hypertension, and metabolic risk. The complex pattern of stress responding is influenced by individual differences, such as coping style, race and ethnicity, genetics, background stress, and lifestyle habits, which should be taken into account when interpreting results. For example, an unique interplay between cardiac and vascular responses in black Africans and African Americans is thought to contribute towards a heightened risk of hypertension in this group. Whether or not psychophysiological risk markers provide prognostic information over and above that of established risk markers is not clear. In summary, controlled trials that examine if the modification of psychophysiological responses through lifestyle and psychosocial interventions can reduce the risk of CVD outcomes are needed to establish causality. Further work is also required that examines the associations of ambulatory responses to real life stress in relation to risk of CVD.

  9. Uniparental genetic markers in South Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Bisso-Machado, Rafael; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A comprehensive review of uniparental systems in South Amerindians was undertaken. Variability in the Y-chromosome haplogroups were assessed in 68 populations and 1,814 individuals whereas that of Y-STR markers was assessed in 29 populations and 590 subjects. Variability in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup was examined in 108 populations and 6,697 persons, and sequencing studies used either the complete mtDNA genome or the highly variable segments 1 and 2. The diversity of the markers made it difficult to establish a general picture of Y-chromosome variability in the populations studied. However, haplogroup Q1a3a* was almost always the most prevalent whereas Q1a3* occurred equally in all regions, which suggested its prevalence among the early colonizers. The STR allele frequencies were used to derive a possible ancient Native American Q-clade chromosome haplotype and five of six STR loci showed significant geographic variation. Geographic and linguistic factors moderately influenced the mtDNA distributions (6% and 7%, respectively) and mtDNA haplogroups A and D correlated positively and negatively, respectively, with latitude. The data analyzed here provide rich material for understanding the biological history of South Amerindians and can serve as a basis for comparative studies involving other types of data, such as cultural data. PMID:22888284

  10. Marker-trait association analysis of functional gene markers for provitamin A levels across diverse tropical yellow maize inbred lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biofortification of staple crops is a cost effective and sustainable approach that can help combat vitamin A and other micronutrient deficiencies in developing countries. PCR -based DNA markers distinguishing alleles of three key genes of maize endosperm carotenoid biosynthesis (PSY1, lcyE and crtRB1) have been developed to facilitate maize provitamin A biofortification via marker assisted selection. Previous studies of these functional DNA markers revealed inconsistent effects. The germplasm previously employed for discovering and validating these functional markers was mainly of temperate origin containing low frequencies of the favourable allele of the most significant polymorphism, crtRB1-5′TE. Here, we investigate the vitamin A biofortification potential of these DNA markers in a germplasm panel of diverse tropical yellow maize inbred lines, with mixed genetic backgrounds of temperate and tropical germplasm to identify the most effective diagnostic markers for vitamin A biofortification. Results The functional DNA markers crtRB1-5′TE and crtRB1-3′TE were consistently and strongly associated with provitamin A content across the tropical maize inbred lines tested. The alleles detected by these two functional markers were in high linkage disequilibrium (R2 = 0.75) and occurred in relatively high frequency (18%). Genotypes combining the favourable alleles at the two loci (N = 20) displayed a 3.22 fold average increase in β-carotene content compared to those genotypes lacking the favourable alleles (N = 106). The PSY1 markers were monomorphic across all of the inbred lines. The functional DNA markers for lcyE were associated with lutein, and with the ratio of carotenoids in the alpha and beta branches, but not with provitamin A levels. However, the combined effects of the two genes were stronger than their individual effects on all carotenoids. Conclusions Tropical maize inbred lines harbouring the favourable alleles of the crtRB1-5

  11. An update of biochemical markers of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    AlSalloom, Abdulaziz Ajlan M.

    2016-01-01

    The definition of a tumor marker is broad, which covers a wide spectrum of biomacromolecules synthesized in excess concentration by a wide variety of neoplastic cells. Tumor markers can be normal endogenous products that are produced at a greater rate in cancer cells or the products of newly switched on genes that remained inactive in the normal cells. These markers consist of any products of either tumor itself or the host in reaction to tumor’s presence that distinguishes malignant tissues from benign and is measurable in body fluids or tissues. They increase with progressive or recurrent disease, decrease with response to treatment, and normalize with remission. Clinical applications include screening in asymptomatic individuals, confirming a suspected diagnosis, assisting in tumor classification and staging, prognosis, monitoring treatment response, surveillance for residual disease, and early detection of recurrent disease. PMID:27004063

  12. Isolation of nuclear microsatellite markers for Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Böckelmann, Jörg; Wieser, David; Tremetsberger, Karin; Šumberová, Kateřina; Bernhardt, Karl-Georg

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: Microsatellite markers were characterized in the extremely specialized ephemeral wetland plant species Cyperus fuscus (Cyperaceae). The markers will be used for studying population genetics in natural vs. anthropogenic habitats, on a European scale, and the role of the soil seed bank in the life cycle of this ephemeral species. Methods and Results: Twenty-one microsatellite loci were established and scored in two populations, with mean number of alleles of 2.6 and 2.9 and mean expected heterozygosity of 0.405 and 0.470, respectively. Forty-four additional loci with the number of alleles ranging from one to four (mean = 2.1) were successfully amplified in seven individuals. Conclusions: The novel microsatellite markers will be useful for studying the genetic structure of populations of this ephemeral plant as well as their seed bank. PMID:26649269

  13. Development of fluorescent markers using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with vaseline.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Shoji; Hirano, Haruo; Nagai, Masatoshi

    2002-03-01

    Identifiable fluorescent markers were developed as tracers to tail suspects using phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, perylene, and coronene in vaseline. Vaseline was used as a carrier of the marker. Of the six compounds in the vaseline, perylene and fluoranthene were readily observed under ultraviolet (UV) light at a wavelength of 365 nm. All six compounds were identified selectively and sensitively without interference of vaseline using a high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) with a fluorescence detector. The detection limit was much less than 1 ng, corresponding to that of the observation behavior under UV light. The results showed that each component with vaseline was more effective than the individual component for the delay in degradation. The case examples of the fluorescent markers are shown.

  14. TWO ASPECT MARKERS IN MANDARIN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WANG, WILLIAM S-Y.

    TWO ASPECT MARKERS IN MANDARIN CHINESE ARE STUDIED WITHIN THE GENERAL FRAMEWORK OF A TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR. THEY ARE COMMONLY REPRESENTED AS "-LE," INDICATING COMPLETION OF ACTION, AND "-GUO," INDICATING THAT AN ACTION HAS TAKEN PLACE AT LEAST ONCE. THE PROBLEM INVOLVES SEVERAL SEEMING IRREGULARITIES IN THE FORMATION OF…

  15. Physiological Markers of Local Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Rector, David M.; Schei, Jennifer L.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.; Belenky, Gregory; Krueger, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that brain regions that have been disproportionately used during waking will require a greater intensity and/or duration of subsequent sleep. For example, rats use their whiskers in the dark and their eyes during the light which manifests as a greater magnitude of electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity in the somatosensory and visual cortex during sleep in the corresponding light and dark periods respectively. The parsimonious interpretation of such findings is that sleep is distributed across local brain regions and is use-dependent. The fundamental properties of sleep can also be experimentally defined locally at the level of small neural assemblies such as cortical columns. In this view, sleep is orchestrated, but not fundamentally driven, by central mechanisms. We explore two physiological markers of local, use-dependent sleep, namely, an electrical marker apparent as a change in the size and shape of an electrical evoked response, and a metabolic marker evident as an evoked change in blood volume and oxygenation delivered to activated tissue. Both markers, applied to cortical columns, provide a means to investigate physiological mechanisms for the distributed homeostatic regulation of sleep, and may yield new insights into the consequences of sleep loss and sleep pathologies on waking brain function. PMID:19473232

  16. Minimal marker: an algorithm and computer program for the identification of minimal sets of discriminating DNA markers for efficient variety identification.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Hiroshi; Ogata, Tatsushi; Shimada, Takehiko; Endo, Tomoko; Iketani, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Tokurou; Yamamoto, Toshiya; Omura, Mitsuo

    2013-04-01

    DNA markers are frequently used to analyze crop varieties, with the coded marker data summarized in a computer-generated table. Such summary tables often provide extraneous data about individual crop genotypes, needlessly complicating and prolonging DNA-based differentiation between crop varieties. At present, it is difficult to identify minimal marker sets--the smallest sets that can distinguish between all crop varieties listed in a marker-summary table--due to the absence of algorithms capable of such characterization. Here, we describe the development of just such an algorithm and MinimalMarker, its accompanying Perl-based computer program. MinimalMarker has been validated in variety identification of fruit trees using published datasets and is available for use with both dominant and co-dominant markers, regardless of the number of alleles, including SSR markers with numeric notation. We expect that this program will prove useful not only to genomics researchers but also to government agencies that use DNA markers to support a variety of food-inspection and -labeling regulations.

  17. Expert judgment on markers to deter inadvertent human intrusion into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Trauth, K.M.; Hora, S.C.; Guzowski, R.V.

    1993-11-01

    The expert panel identified basic principles to guide current and future marker development efforts: (1) the site must be marked, (2) message(s) must be truthful and informative, (3) multiple components within a marker system, (4) multiple means of communication (e.g., language, pictographs, scientific diagrams), (5) multiple levels of complexity within individual messages on individual marker system elements, (6) use of materials with little recycle value, and (7) international effort to maintain knowledge of the locations and contents of nuclear waste repositories. The efficacy of the markers in deterring inadvertent human intrusion was estimated to decrease with time, with the probability function varying with the mode of intrusion (who is intruding and for what purpose) and the level of technological development of the society. The development of a permanent, passive marker system capable of surviving and remaining interpretable for 10,000 years will require further study prior to implementation.

  18. Individualized Training and the Training of Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, William A.

    Two current instructional research efforts relating to the problem of an individual student's learning and personal needs are reported. Characteristics of individualized instruction (e.g., terminal course objectives, remedial materials, measurement procedures), administrative constraints (e.g., fixed time, cost of equipment, lack of skilled…

  19. The advantages of dense marker sets for linkage analysis with very large families.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Russell; Quinn, Stephen; McKay, James; Silver, Jeremy; Bahlo, Melanie; FitzGerald, Liesel; Foote, Simon; Dickinson, Jo; Stankovich, Jim

    2007-05-01

    Dense sets of hundreds of thousands of markers have been developed for genome-wide association studies. These marker sets are also beneficial for linkage analysis of large, deep pedigrees containing distantly related cases. It is impossible to analyse jointly all genotypes in large pedigrees using the Lander-Green Algorithm, however, as marker density increases it becomes less crucial to analyse all individuals' genotypes simultaneously. In this report, an approximate multipoint non-parametric technique is described, where large pedigrees are split into many small pedigrees, each containing just two cases. This technique is demonstrated, using phased data from the International Hapmap Project to simulate sets of 10,000, 50,000 and 250,000 markers, showing that it becomes increasingly accurate as more markers are genotyped. This method allows routine linkage analysis of large families with dense marker sets and represents a more easily applied alternative to Monte Carlo Markov Chain methods.

  20. Pancreatic cancer stem cell markers and exosomes - the incentive push

    PubMed Central

    Heiler, Sarah; Wang, Zhe; Zöller, Margot

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PaCa) has the highest death rate and incidence is increasing. Poor prognosis is due to late diagnosis and early metastatic spread, which is ascribed to a minor population of so called cancer stem cells (CSC) within the mass of the primary tumor. CSC are defined by biological features, which they share with adult stem cells like longevity, rare cell division, the capacity for self renewal, differentiation, drug resistance and the requirement for a niche. CSC can also be identified by sets of markers, which for pancreatic CSC (Pa-CSC) include CD44v6, c-Met, Tspan8, alpha6beta4, CXCR4, CD133, EpCAM and claudin7. The functional relevance of CSC markers is still disputed. We hypothesize that Pa-CSC markers play a decisive role in tumor progression. This is fostered by the location in glycolipid-enriched membrane domains, which function as signaling platform and support connectivity of the individual Pa-CSC markers. Outside-in signaling supports apoptosis resistance, stem cell gene expression and tumor suppressor gene repression as well as miRNA transcription and silencing. Pa-CSC markers also contribute to motility and invasiveness. By ligand binding host cells are triggered towards creating a milieu supporting Pa-CSC maintenance. Furthermore, CSC markers contribute to the generation, loading and delivery of exosomes, whereby CSC gain the capacity for a cell-cell contact independent crosstalk with the host and neighboring non-CSC. This allows Pa-CSC exosomes (TEX) to reprogram neighboring non-CSC towards epithelial mesenchymal transition and to stimulate host cells towards preparing a niche for metastasizing tumor cells. Finally, TEX communicate with the matrix to support tumor cell motility, invasion and homing. We will discuss the possibility that CSC markers are the initial trigger for these processes and what is the special contribution of CSC-TEX. PMID:27468191

  1. Inheritance of random amplified polymorphic DNA markers in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Gomez, R; Angel, F; Bonierbale, M W; Rodriguez, F; Tohme, J; Roca, W M

    1996-10-01

    The informativeness and inheritance of randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were investigated in an intraspecific F1 progeny derived from two heterozygous parents. The analysis confirmed the utility of RAPD markers for comparing candidate parents for the development of a molecular genetic map, and provided numerous markers for linkage analysis in a crop with a very limited history of classical or molecular genetic studies. Six potential parental lines (themselves F1 hybrid clones) showed between 1.82 and 0.62 segregating bands per primer in three hybrid families. Forty-three percent (309) of 722 primers produced polymorphic products in the most informative of these three crosses, revealing 328 single-dose (SD) markers segregating 1:1 for presence/absence in a progeny of 90 individuals. A second class of informative markers were those present in both parents but segregating in the progeny. Fifty-seven or 67% of the monomorphic but segregating markers exhibited the 3:1 ratio expected for SD dominant markers in a cross between heterozygotes. Linkage groups were constructed from the segregation of SD RAPD markers originating in the female (TMS 30572) and the male (CM2177-2) parent. Key words : RAPDs, molecular markers, genetic segregation, Manihot, single-dose markers.

  2. Identification of Putative Molecular Markers Associated with Root Traits in Coffea canephora Pierre ex Froehner

    PubMed Central

    Achar, Devaraja; Awati, Mallikarjuana G.; Udayakumar, M.; Prasad, T. G.

    2015-01-01

    Coffea canephora exhibit poor root system and are very sensitive to drought stress that affects growth and production. Deeper root system has been largely empirical as better avoidance to soil water limitation in drought condition. The present study aimed to identify molecular markers linked to high root types in Coffea canephora using molecular markers. Contrasting parents, L1 valley with low root and S.3334 with high root type, were crossed, and 134 F1 individuals were phenotyped for root and associated physiological traits (29 traits) and genotyped with 41 of the 320 RAPD and 9 of the 55 SSR polymorphic primers. Single marker analysis was deployed for detecting the association of markers linked to root associated traits by SAS software. There were 13 putative RAPD markers associated with root traits such as root length, secondary roots, root dry weight, and root to shoot ratio, in which root length associated marker OPS1850 showed high phenotypic variance of 6.86%. Two microsatellite markers linked to root length (CPCM13400) and root to shoot ratio (CM211300). Besides, 25 markers were associated with more than one trait and few of the markers were associated with positively related physiological traits and can be used in marker assisted trait selection. PMID:25821599

  3. SSR markers: a tool for species identification in Psidium (Myrtaceae).

    PubMed

    Tuler, A C; Carrijo, T T; Nóia, L R; Ferreira, A; Peixoto, A L; da Silva Ferreira, M F

    2015-11-01

    Molecular DNA markers are used for detection of polymorphisms in individuals. As they are independent of developmental stage of the plant and environmental influences, they can be useful tools in taxonomy. The alleles of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers (or microsatellites) are traditionally used to identify taxonomic units. This application demands the laborious and costly delimitation of exclusive alleles in order to avoid homoplasy. Here, we propose a method for identification of species based on the amplification profile of groups of SSR markers obtained by a transferability study. The approach considers that the SSR are conserved among related species. In this context, using Psidium as a model, 141 SSR markers developed for Psidium guajava were transferred to 13 indigenous species of Psidium from the Atlantic Rainforest. Transferability of the markers was high and 28 SSR were conserved in all species. Four SSR groups were defined and they can help in the identification of all 13 Psidium species studied. A group of 31 SSR was genotyped, with one to six alleles each. The H0 varied from 0.0 to 0.46, and PIC from 0.0 to 0.74. Cluster analysis revealed shared alleles among species. The high percentage of SSR transferability found in Psidium evidences the narrow phylogenetic relationship existing among these species since transferability occurs by the preservation of the microsatellites and anchoring regions. The proposed method was useful for distinguishing the species of Psidium, being useful in taxonomic studies.

  4. Carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world and the sixth in Europe. Pancreatic cancer is more frequent in males than females. Worldwide, following diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, <2% of patients survive for 5 years, 8% survive for 2 years and <50% survive for only approx. 3 months. The biggest risk factor in pancreatic cancer is age, with a peak of morbidity at 65 years. Difficulty in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer causes a delay in its detection. It is one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose and therefore to treat successfully. Additional detection of carbohydrate markers may offer a better diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate markers of cancer may be produced by the cancer itself or by the body in response to cancer, whose presence in body fluids suggests the presence and growth of the cancer. The most widely used, and best-recognized, carbohydrate marker of pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9 [CA (carbohydrate antigen) 19-9]. However, the relatively non-specific nature of CA 19-9 limits its routine use in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but it may be useful in monitoring treatment of pancreatic cancer (e.g. the effectiveness of chemotherapy), as a complement to other diagnostic methods. Some other carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer may be considered, such as CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), CA 50 and CA 242, and the mucins MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC, but enzymes involved in the processing of glycoconjugates could also be involved. Our preliminary research shows that the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases, including HEX (N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase), GAL (β-D-galactosidase), FUC (α-L-fucosidase) and MAN (α-D-mannosidase), in serum and urine may be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Biologic markers of chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Pidala, J; Sarwal, M; Roedder, S; Lee, S J

    2014-03-01

    Biologic markers of chronic GVHD may provide insight into the pathogenesis of the syndrome, identify molecular targets for novel interventions, and facilitate advances in clinical management. Despite extensive work performed to date largely focused on prediction and diagnosis of the syndrome, little synthesis of findings and validation of promising candidate markers in independent populations has been performed. Studies suggest that risk for subsequent chronic GVHD development may be associated with donor-recipient genetic polymorphism, deficiency in regulatory immune cell populations (NK, Treg, DC2), and variation in inflammatory and immunoregulatory mediators post-HCT (increased TNFα, IL-10 and BAFF, and decreased TGFβ and IL-15). Established chronic GVHD is associated with alteration in immune cell populations (increased CD3(+) T cells, Th17, CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector memory cells, monocytes, CD86 expression, BAFF/B cell ratio, and deficiency of Treg, NK cells, and naïve CD8(+) T cells). Inflammatory and immunomodulatory factors (TNFα, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, sIL-2R, and IL-1Ra, BAFF, anti-dsDNA, sIL-2Rα, and sCD13) are also perturbed. Little is known about biologic markers of chronic GVHD phenotype and severity, response to therapy, and prognosis.

  6. Apoptotic markers in protozoan parasites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The execution of the apoptotic death program in metazoans is characterized by a sequence of morphological and biochemical changes that include cell shrinkage, presentation of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface, mitochondrial alterations, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, membrane blebbing and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Methodologies for measuring apoptosis are based on these markers. Except for membrane blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, all other events have been observed in most protozoan parasites undergoing cell death. However, while techniques exist to detect these markers, they are often optimised for metazoan cells and therefore may not pick up subtle differences between the events occurring in unicellular organisms and multi-cellular organisms. In this review we discuss the markers most frequently used to analyze cell death in protozoan parasites, paying special attention to changes in cell morphology, mitochondrial activity, chromatin structure and plasma membrane structure/permeability. Regarding classical regulators/executors of apoptosis, we have reviewed the present knowledge of caspase-like and nuclease activities. PMID:21062457

  7. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence.

  8. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  9. CHEMICAL MARKERS OF HUMAN WASTE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Giving public water authorities another tool to monitor and measure levels of human waste contamination of waters simply and rapidly would enhance public protection. Most of the methods used today detect such contamination by quantifying microbes occurring in feces in high enough densities that they can be measured easily. However, most of these microbes, for example E. coli, do not serve as specific markers for any one host species and many can have origins other than feces. As an alternative, chemicals shed in feces and urine might be used to detect human waste contamination of environmental waters. One potential chemical marker of human waste is the compound urobilin. Urobilin is one of the final by-products of hemoglobin breakdown. Urobilin is excreted in both the urine and feces from many mammals, particularly humans. Source waters from 21 sites in New England, Nevada, and Michigan were extracted using hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) cartridges and then analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ES-MS). As a marker of human waste, urobilin was detected in many of the source waters at concentrations ranging from not detectable to 300 ng/L. Besides urobilin, zithromycin, an antibiotic widely prescribed for human-use only in the US, was also detected in many of these waters, with concentrations ranging from not detectable to 77 ng/L. This methodology, using both urobilin and azithromycin (or any other human-use

  10. Lessons from mouse chimaera experiments with a reiterated transgene marker: revised marker criteria and a review of chimaera markers.

    PubMed

    Keighren, Margaret A; Flockhart, Jean; Hodson, Benjamin A; Shen, Guan-Yi; Birtley, James R; Notarnicola-Harwood, Antonio; West, John D

    2015-08-01

    Recent reports of a new generation of ubiquitous transgenic chimaera markers prompted us to consider the criteria used to evaluate new chimaera markers and develop more objective assessment methods. To investigate this experimentally we used several series of fetal and adult chimaeras, carrying an older, multi-copy transgenic marker. We used two additional independent markers and objective, quantitative criteria for cell selection and cell mixing to investigate quantitative and spatial aspects of developmental neutrality. We also suggest how the quantitative analysis we used could be simplified for future use with other markers. As a result, we recommend a five-step procedure for investigators to evaluate new chimaera markers based partly on criteria proposed previously but with a greater emphasis on examining the developmental neutrality of prospective new markers. These five steps comprise (1) review of published information, (2) evaluation of marker detection, (3) genetic crosses to check for effects on viability and growth, (4) comparisons of chimaeras with and without the marker and (5) analysis of chimaeras with both cell populations labelled. Finally, we review a number of different chimaera markers and evaluate them using the extended set of criteria. These comparisons indicate that, although the new generation of ubiquitous fluorescent markers are the best of those currently available and fulfil most of the criteria required of a chimaera marker, further work is required to determine whether they are developmentally neutral.

  11. A clinical audit of anatomical side marker use in a paediatric medical imaging department.

    PubMed

    Barry, Kate; Kumar, Saravana; Linke, Rebecca; Dawes, Emma

    2016-09-01

    The gold standard in general radiography is to place a radiopaque anatomical side marker in the field of view for each radiographic image prior to exposure. The advent of digital radiography has allowed for anatomical side markers to be digitally added to films as part of post-processing. The aim of this audit was to identify whether general X-ray images performed in a tertiary Women's and Children's Hospital were being appropriately annotated with a definitive side marker, and to identify factors that may contribute to inappropriately labelled images. Four hundred images from 201 patients' examinations occurring within a randomly selected time period were assessed to ascertain whether radiographic anatomical side markers were visible when images were viewed via the hospitals main viewing platform. The audit occurred in January 2014. The scope included both mobile and in-department general X-ray examinations, with the patient age range extending from 1 day to 18 years. Of the 400 images evaluated, 88 (22%) were found to have a lead marker that matched the anatomy being imaged within the primary beam; 289 (72.3%) images contained a correct digital marker inserted as part of the post-processing of the image. In total, 377 (94.2%) images were appropriately marked. Of the 23 (5.8%) images not marked correctly, 22 images had no marker and 1 was incorrectly marked with a digital marker. There was a noticeable relationship between absent anatomical markers and chest X-rays performed outside of the medical imaging department. While it is encouraging that the majority of the images assessed were correctly annotated, with only a small number of missing markers, there are opportunities for further improvement. The audit findings suggest that reduced access to lead markers influences marker use. Strategies that may improve compliance at an individual level include distribution of personalised anatomical side markers, and targeted staff education sessions. At a department level

  12. Speech acoustic markers of early stage and prodromal Huntington's disease: a marker of disease onset?

    PubMed

    Vogel, Adam P; Shirbin, Christopher; Churchyard, Andrew J; Stout, Julie C

    2012-12-01

    Speech disturbances (e.g., altered prosody) have been described in symptomatic Huntington's Disease (HD) individuals, however, the extent to which speech changes in gene positive pre-manifest (PreHD) individuals is largely unknown. The speech of individuals carrying the mutant HTT gene is a behavioural/motor/cognitive marker demonstrating some potential as an objective indicator of early HD onset and disease progression. Speech samples were acquired from 30 individuals carrying the mutant HTT gene (13 PreHD, 17 early stage HD) and 15 matched controls. Participants read a passage, produced a monologue and said the days of the week. Data were analysed acoustically for measures of timing, frequency and intensity. There was a clear effect of group across most acoustic measures, so that speech performance differed in-line with disease progression. Comparisons across groups revealed significant differences between the control and the early stage HD group on measures of timing (e.g., speech rate). Participants carrying the mutant HTT gene presented with slower rates of speech, took longer to say words and produced greater silences between and within words compared to healthy controls. Importantly, speech rate showed a significant correlation to burden of disease scores. The speech of early stage HD differed significantly from controls. The speech of PreHD, although not reaching significance, tended to lie between the performance of controls and early stage HD. This suggests that changes in speech production appear to be developing prior to diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Marker Systems for Oenothera Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Rauwolf, Uwe; Golczyk, Hieronim; Meurer, Jörg; Herrmann, Reinhold G.; Greiner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The genus Oenothera has an outstanding scientific tradition. It has been a model for studying aspects of chromosome evolution and speciation, including the impact of plastid nuclear co-evolution. A large collection of strains analyzed during a century of experimental work and unique genetic possibilities allow the exchange of genetically definable plastids, individual or multiple chromosomes, and/or entire haploid genomes (Renner complexes) between species. However, molecular genetic approaches for the genus are largely lacking. In this study, we describe the development of efficient PCR-based marker systems for both the nuclear genome and the plastome. They allow distinguishing individual chromosomes, Renner complexes, plastomes, and subplastomes. We demonstrate their application by monitoring interspecific exchanges of genomes, chromosome pairs, and/or plastids during crossing programs, e.g., to produce plastome–genome incompatible hybrids. Using an appropriate partial permanent translocation heterozygous hybrid, linkage group 7 of the molecular map could be assigned to chromosome 9·8 of the classical Oenothera map. Finally, we provide the first direct molecular evidence that homologous recombination and free segregation of chromosomes in permanent translocation heterozygous strains is suppressed. PMID:18791241

  14. Online social network data as sociometric markers.

    PubMed

    Binder, Jens F; Buglass, Sarah L; Betts, Lucy R; Underwood, Jean D M

    2017-10-01

    Data from online social networks carry enormous potential for psychological research, yet their use and the ethical implications thereof are currently hotly debated. The present work aims to outline in detail the unique information richness of this data type and, in doing so, to support researchers when deciding on ethically appropriate ways of collecting, storing, publishing, and sharing data from online sources. Focusing on the very nature of social networks, their structural characteristics, and depth of information, we provide a detailed and accessible account of the challenges associated with data management and data storage. In particular, the general nonanonymity of network data sets is discussed, and an approach is developed to quantify the level of uniqueness that a particular online network bestows upon the individual maintaining it. Using graph enumeration techniques, we show that comparatively sparse information on a network is suitable as a sociometric marker that allows for the identification of an individual from the global population of online users. The impossibility of anonymizing specific types of network data carries implications for ethical guidelines and research practice. At the same time, network uniqueness opens up opportunities for novel research in psychology. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Identifying marker typing incompatibilities in linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stringham, H.M.; Boehnke, M.

    1996-10-01

    A common problem encountered in linkage analyses is that execution of the computer program is halted because of genotypes in the data that are inconsistent with Mendelian inheritance. Such inconsistencies may arise because of pedigree errors or errors in typing. In some cases, the source of the inconsistencies is easily identified by examining the pedigree. In others, the error is not obvious, and substantial time and effort are required to identify the responsible genotypes. We have developed two methods for automatically identifying those individuals whose genotypes are most likely the cause of the inconsistencies. First, we calculate the posterior probability of genotyping error for each member of the pedigree, given the marker data on all pedigree members and allowing anyone in the pedigree to have an error. Second, we identify those individuals whose genotypes could be solely responsible for the inconsistency in the pedigree. We illustrate these methods with two examples: one a pedigree error, the second a genotyping error. These methods have been implemented as a module of the pedigree analysis program package MENDEL. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. CD25+CD4+ Regulatory T Cells from the Peripheral Blood of Asymptomatic HIV-infected Individuals Regulate CD4+ and CD8+ HIV-specific T Cell Immune Responses In Vitro and Are Associated with Favorable Clinical Markers of Disease Status

    PubMed Central

    Kinter, Audrey L.; Hennessey, Margaret; Bell, Alicia; Kern, Sarah; Lin, Yin; Daucher, Marybeth; Planta, Maria; McGlaughlin, Mary; Jackson, Robert; Ziegler, Steven F.; Fauci, Anthony S.

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease is associated with loss of CD4+ T cells, chronic immune activation, and progressive immune dysfunction. HIV-specific responses, particularly those of CD4+ T cells, become impaired early after infection, before the loss of responses directed against other antigens; the basis for this diminution has not been elucidated fully. The potential role of CD25+CD4+ regulatory T cells (T reg cells), previously shown to inhibit immune responses directed against numerous pathogens, as suppressors of HIV-specific T cell responses was investigated. In the majority of healthy HIV-infected individuals, CD25+CD4+ T cells significantly suppressed cellular proliferation and cytokine production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in response to HIV antigens/peptides in vitro; these effects were cell contact dependent and IL-10 and TGF-β independent. Individuals with strong HIV-specific CD25+ T reg cell function in vitro had significantly lower levels of plasma viremia and higher CD4+: CD8+ T cell ratios than did those individuals in whom this activity could not be detected. These in vitro data suggest that CD25+CD4+ T reg cells may contribute to the diminution of HIV-specific T cell immune responses in vivo in the early stages of HIV disease. PMID:15280419

  17. Circulating serum markers and QRS scar score in Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Clark, Eva H; Marks, Morgan A; Gilman, Robert H; Fernandez, Antonio B; Crawford, Thomas C; Samuels, Aaron M; Hidron, Alicia I; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Menacho-Mendez, Gilberto Silvio; Bozo-Gutierrez, Ricardo W; Martin, Diana L; Bern, Caryn

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 8 million people have Trypanosoma cruzi infection, and nearly 30% will manifest Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC). Identification of reliable early indicators of CC risk would enable prioritization of treatment to those with the highest probability of future disease. Serum markers and electrocardiogram (EKG) changes were measured in 68 T. cruzi-infected individuals in various stages of cardiac disease and 17 individuals without T. cruzi infection or cardiac disease. T. cruzi-infected individuals were assigned to stage A (normal EKG/chest x-ray [CXR]), B (abnormal EKG/normal CXR), or C (abnormal EKG/cardiac structural changes). Ten serum markers were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)/Luminex, and QRS scores were calculated. Higher concentrations of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFβ1), and TGFβ2 were associated with stage B compared with stage A. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2), Tissue Inhibitors of MMP 1, QRS score, and Brain Natriuretic Protein rose progressively with increasing CC severity. Elevated levels of several markers of cardiac damage and inflammation are seen in early CC and warrant additional evaluation in longitudinal studies. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Development of a transposon-based marker system for mutation breeding in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.).

    PubMed

    Im, S B; Kwon, S-J; Ryu, J; Jeong, S W; Kim, J B; Ahn, J-W; Kim, S H; Jo, Y D; Choi, H-I; Kang, S-Y

    2016-09-16

    Under certain circumstances, transposable elements (TE) can create or reverse mutations and alter the genome size of a cell. Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) is promising for plant transposon tagging due to its small genome size and its low content of repetitive DNA. We developed a marker system based on targeted region amplification polymorphisms (TE-TRAP) that uses the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of transposons. A total of 3816 class 2 transposons belonging to the PIF/Harbinger family were identified from the whole sorghum genome that produced five primers, including eight types of TIRs. To define the applicability and utilization of TE-TRAP, we used 21 individuals that had been bred after ɤ-ray irradiation. In total, 31 TE-TRAP, 16 TD, and 21 AFLP primer combinations generated 1133, 223, and 555 amplicons, respectively. The percent polymorphic marker was 62.8, 51.1, and 59.3% for the TE-TRAP, TD, and AFLP markers, respectively. Phylogenetic and principal component analyses revealed that TE-TRAP divided the 21 individuals into three groups. Analysis of molecular variance suggested that TE-TRAP had a higher level of genetic diversity than the other two marker systems. After verifying the efficiency of TE-TRAP, 189 sorghum individuals were used to investigate the associations between the markers and the ɤ-ray doses. Two significant associations were found among the polymorphic markers. This TE-based method provides a useful marker resource for mutation breeding research.

  19. Bivariate Marker Measurements and ROC Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mei-Cheng; Li, Shanshan

    2012-01-01

    Summary This paper considers receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for bivariate marker measurements. The research interest is to extend tools and rules from univariate marker to bivariate marker setting for evaluating predictive accuracy of markers using a tree-based classification rule. Using an and-or classifier, an ROC function together with a weighted ROC function (WROC) and their conjugate counterparts are proposed for examining the performance of bivariate markers. The proposed functions evaluate the performance of and-or classifiers among all possible combinations of marker values, and are ideal measures for understanding the predictability of biomarkers in target population. Specific features of ROC and WROC functions and other related statistics are discussed in comparison with those familiar properties for univariate marker. Nonparametric methods are developed for estimating ROC-related functions, (partial) area under curve and concordance probability. With emphasis on average performance of markers, the proposed procedures and inferential results are useful for evaluating marker predictability based on a single or bivariate marker (or test) measurements with different choices of markers, and for evaluating different and-or combinations in classifiers. The inferential results developed in this paper also extend to multivariate markers with a sequence of arbitrarily combined and-or classifier. PMID:23005264

  20. The effect of using approximate gametic variance covariance matrices on marker assisted selection by BLUP.

    PubMed

    Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Dekkers, Jack C M; Fernández, Soledad A; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt

    2004-01-01

    Under additive inheritance, the Henderson mixed model equations (HMME) provide an efficient approach to obtaining genetic evaluations by marker assisted best linear unbiased prediction (MABLUP) given pedigree relationships, trait and marker data. For large pedigrees with many missing markers, however, it is not feasible to calculate the exact gametic variance covariance matrix required to construct HMME. The objective of this study was to investigate the consequences of using approximate gametic variance covariance matrices on response to selection by MABLUP. Two methods were used to generate approximate variance covariance matrices. The first method (Method A) completely discards the marker information for individuals with an unknown linkage phase between two flanking markers. The second method (Method B) makes use of the marker information at only the most polymorphic marker locus for individuals with an unknown linkage phase. Data sets were simulated with and without missing marker data for flanking markers with 2, 4, 6, 8 or 12 alleles. Several missing marker data patterns were considered. The genetic variability explained by marked quantitative trait loci (MQTL) was modeled with one or two MQTL of equal effect. Response to selection by MABLUP using Method A or Method B were compared with that obtained by MABLUP using the exact genetic variance covariance matrix, which was estimated using 15,000 samples from the conditional distribution of genotypic values given the observed marker data. For the simulated conditions, the superiority of MABLUP over BLUP based only on pedigree relationships and trait data varied between 0.1% and 13.5% for Method A, between 1.7% and 23.8% for Method B, and between 7.6% and 28.9% for the exact method. The relative performance of the methods under investigation was not affected by the number of MQTL in the model.

  1. Rethinking evolutionary individuality.

    PubMed

    Ereshefsky, Marc; Pedroso, Makmiller

    2015-08-18

    This paper considers whether multispecies biofilms are evolutionary individuals. Numerous multispecies biofilms have characteristics associated with individuality, such as internal integrity, division of labor, coordination among parts, and heritable adaptive traits. However, such multispecies biofilms often fail standard reproductive criteria for individuality: they lack reproductive bottlenecks, are comprised of multiple species, do not form unified reproductive lineages, and fail to have a significant division of reproductive labor among their parts. If such biofilms are good candidates for evolutionary individuals, then evolutionary individuality is achieved through other means than frequently cited reproductive processes. The case of multispecies biofilms suggests that standard reproductive requirements placed on individuality should be reconsidered. More generally, the case of multispecies biofilms indicates that accounts of individuality that focus on single-species eukaryotes are too restrictive and that a pluralistic and open-ended account of evolutionary individuality is needed.

  2. HaploPOP: a software that improves population assignment by combining markers into haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Gattepaille, Lucie M; Blum, Michael G B; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2015-07-31

    In ecology and forensics, some population assignment techniques use molecular markers to assign individuals to known groups. However, assigning individuals to known populations can be difficult if the level of genetic differentiation among populations is small. Most assignment studies handle independent markers, often by pruning markers in Linkage Disequilibrium (LD), ignoring the information contained in the correlation among markers due to LD. To improve the accuracy of population assignment, we present an algorithm, implemented in the HaploPOP software, that combines markers into haplotypes, without requiring independence. The algorithm is based on the Gain of Informativeness for Assignment that provides a measure to decide if a pair of markers should be combined into haplotypes, or not, in order to improve assignment. Because complete exploration of all possible solutions for constructing haplotypes is computationally prohibitive, our approach uses a greedy algorithm based on windows of fixed sizes. We evaluate the performance of HaploPOP to assign individuals to populations using a split-validation approach. We investigate both simulated SNPs data and dense genotype data from individuals from Spain and Portugal. Our results show that constructing haplotypes with HaploPOP can substantially reduce assignment error. The HaploPOP software is freely available as a command-line software at www.ieg.uu.se/Jakobsson/software/HaploPOP/.

  3. Statistical Methods for Evaluating DNA Methylation as a Marker for Early Detection or Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Todd A.; Siegmund, Kimberly D.

    2007-01-01

    We summarize standard and novel statistical methods for evaluating the classification accuracy of DNA methylation markers. The choice of method will depend on the type of marker studied (qualitative/quantitative), the number of markers, and the type of outcome (time-invariant/time-varying). A minimum of two error rates are needed for assessing marker accuracy: the true-positive fraction and the false-positive fraction. Measures of association that are computed from the combination of these error rates, such as the odds ratio or relative risk, are not informative about classification accuracy. We provide an example of a DNA methylation marker that is strongly associated with time to death (logrank p = 0.0003) that is not a good classifier as evaluated by the true-positive and false-positive fractions. Finally, we would like to emphasize the importance of study design. Markers can behave differently in different groups of individuals. It is important to know what factors may affect the accuracy of a marker and in which subpopulations the marker may be more accurate. Such an understanding is extremely important when comparing marker accuracy in two groups of subjects. PMID:17325431

  4. Meiotic recombination shapes precision of pedigree- and marker-based estimates of inbreeding.

    PubMed

    Knief, U; Kempenaers, B; Forstmeier, W

    2017-03-01

    The proportion of an individual's genome that is identical by descent (GWIBD) can be estimated from pedigrees (inbreeding coefficient 'Pedigree F') or molecular markers ('Marker F'), but both estimators come with error. Assuming unrelated pedigree founders, Pedigree F is the expected proportion of GWIBD given a specific inbreeding constellation. Meiotic recombination introduces variation around that expectation (Mendelian noise) and related pedigree founders systematically bias Pedigree F downward. Marker F is an estimate of the actual proportion of GWIBD but it suffers from the sampling error of markers plus the error that occurs when a marker is homozygous without reflecting common ancestry (identical by state). We here show via simulation of a zebra finch and a human linkage map that three aspects of meiotic recombination (independent assortment of chromosomes, number of crossovers and their distribution along chromosomes) contribute to variation in GWIBD and thus the precision of Pedigree and Marker F. In zebra finches, where the genome contains large blocks that are rarely broken up by recombination, the Mendelian noise was large (nearly twofold larger s.d. values compared with humans) and Pedigree F thus less precise than in humans, where crossovers are distributed more uniformly along chromosomes. Effects of meiotic recombination on Marker F were reversed, such that the same number of molecular markers yielded more precise estimates of GWIBD in zebra finches than in humans. As a consequence, in species inheriting large blocks that rarely recombine, even small numbers of microsatellite markers will often be more informative about inbreeding and fitness than large pedigrees.

  5. The neurobiology of individuality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bivort, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Individuals often display conspicuously different patterns of behavior, even when they are very closely related genetically. These differences give rise to our sense of individuality, but what is their molecular and neurobiological basis? Individuals that are nominally genetically identical differ at various molecular and neurobiological levels: cell-to-cell variation in somatic genomes, cell-to-cell variation in expression patterns, individual-to-individual variation in neuronal morphology and physiology, and individual-to-individual variation in patterns of brain activity. It is unknown which of these levels is fundamentally causal of behavioral differences. To investigate this problem, we use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whose genetic toolkit allows the manipulation of each of these mechanistic levels, and whose rapid lifecycle and small size allows for high-throughput automation of behavioral assays. This latter point is crucial; identifying inter-individual behavioral differences requires high sample sizes both within and across individual animals. Automated behavioral characterization is at the heart of our research strategy. In every behavior examined, individual flies have individual behavioral preferences, and we have begun to identify both neural genes and circuits that control the degree of behavioral variability between individuals.

  6. Explicating Individual Training Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Marcel; Mueller, Normann

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explicate individual training decisions. For this purpose, we propose a framework based on instrumentality theory, a psychological theory of motivation that has frequently been applied to individual occupational behavior. To test this framework, we employ novel German individual data and estimate the effect of subjective expected…

  7. Individual tree control

    Treesearch

    Harvey A. Holt

    1989-01-01

    Controlling individual unwanted trees in forest stands is a readily accepted method for improving the value of future harvests. The practice is especially important in mixed hardwood forests where species differ considerably in value and within species individual trees differ in quality. Individual stem control is a mechanical or chemical weeding operation that...

  8. Carbohydrate Markers in Colon Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneously mutated multiple oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes in colon epithelial cell and its progeny, may cause proliferation out of control and create benign colon neoplasm (colon polyp). If additional mutations involve genes responsible for cell adhesion and movement, aberrant epithelial cells may become malignant (colon cancer) and invade surrounding and remote tissues, creating secondary tumors called metastases. Incidence of colorectal cancer dramatically increases at 50–65 year of age. In Europe in 2006 colorectal cancer consisted 12.9% of all cancers and caused 207 400 deaths. To laboratory detection and monitoring of colon cancer are used tumor markers. Tumor markers are substances produced by the body in response to cancer, or by cancer tissue itself. Glycoconjugate markers for colon cancer include aberrant: mucins covering the surface of the colon epithelial cells, cadherins, selectins and Ig –like adhesion molecules mediating cell-cell adhesion, integrins and integral membrane proteoglycans responsible for adhesion of colon epithelial cells to extracellular matrix, glycoconjugate components of ECM, as well as lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and exoglycosidases. Detection of colon cancer at early non malignant stage is crucial in its prevention and eradication. As colon cancer is the effect of accumulation many somatic mutations in oncogens, supressors, mismatch repair genes and many genes responsible for posttranslational modifications of proteins, multidirectional approach should be applied for its detection. A glycobiological approach to diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer should be directed to detection changes in glycosylation accompanying every step of colon cancer progression, and correlation between changes in glycosylation and tumor progression. PMID:19126967

  9. Carbohydrate markers in colon carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Jankowska, Anna; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneously mutated multiple oncogenes and/or tumor suppressor genes in colon epithelial cell and its progeny, may cause proliferation out of control and create benign colon neoplasm (colon polyp). If additional mutations involve genes responsible for cell adhesion and movement, aberrant epithelial cells may become malignant (colon cancer) and invade surrounding and remote tissues, creating secondary tumors called metastases. Incidence of colorectal cancer dramatically increases at 50-65 year of age. In Europe in 2006 colorectal cancer consisted 12.9% of all cancers and caused 207,400 deaths. To laboratory detection and monitoring of colon cancer are used tumor markers. Tumor markers are substances produced by the body in response to cancer, or by cancer tissue itself. Glycoconjugate markers for colon cancer include aberrant: mucins covering the surface of the colon epithelial cells, cadherins, selectins and Ig-like adhesion molecules mediating cell-cell adhesion, integrins and integral membrane proteoglycans responsible for adhesion of colon epithelial cells to extracellular matrix, glycoconjugate components of ECM, as well as lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and exoglycosidases. Detection of colon cancer at early non malignant stage is crucial in its prevention and eradication. As colon cancer is the effect of accumulation many somatic mutations in oncogens, supressors, mismatch repair genes and many genes responsible for posttranslational modifications of proteins, multidirectional approach should be applied for its detection. A glycobiological approach to diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer should be directed to detection changes in glycosylation accompanying every step of colon cancer progression, and correlation between changes in glycosylation and tumor progression.

  10. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  11. Development and Characterization of 15 Polymorphic Dinucleotide Microsatellite Markers for Tule Elk Using HiSeq3000.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Benjamin N; Lounsberry, Zachary T; Kalani, Tatyana; Meredith, Erin P; Langner, Cristen

    2016-01-01

    The tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) experienced a severe bottleneck in the 1800s, resulting in low genetic diversity. There is a need for high-resolution genetic assays that can be used to differentiate individual elk, including close relatives, with high confidence. An efficient assay requires multiple markers both polymorphic and that can be amplified in concert with other markers in multiplex reactions. To develop such markers, we employed 150-bp paired-end whole genome shotgun sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq3000 platform to discover dinucleotide microsatellite markers. After preliminary screening of these markers, we selected and screened 15 candidate loci and 5 existing tetra nucleotide markers in 56 tule elk. We combined these markers in 2 multiplex reactions and report primer concentrations and PCR conditions enabling their efficient amplification.

  12. Aqueous marker penetration into ion irradiated polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D.; Müller, M.; Petrov, A.; Klett, R.; Palmetshofer, L.; Hnatowicz, V.; Vacik, J.; Cervena, J.; Chadderton, L. T.

    2002-05-01

    The penetration of aqueous 6Li + markers into low energy ion irradiated polyimide (PI) foils was examined by the neutron depth profiling technique in combination with a modified tomographic approach. The ion irradiation always leads to an enhancement in marker uptake. After irradiation at low fluence the marker profiles follow the nuclear damage distribution even in three dimensions. At elevated fluences saturation in the marker uptake is clearly seen. The polymer's penetrant uptake can be described well by regular diffusion, with nuclear damage centres acting as saturable traps. These observations are strikingly different from the marker penetration into high-energy heavy-ion irradiated PI.

  13. Genetic markers as instrumental variables

    PubMed Central

    von Hinke, Stephanie; Davey Smith, George; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Propper, Carol; Windmeijer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The use of genetic markers as instrumental variables (IV) is receiving increasing attention from economists, statisticians, epidemiologists and social scientists. Although IV is commonly used in economics, the appropriate conditions for the use of genetic variants as instruments have not been well defined. The increasing availability of biomedical data, however, makes understanding of these conditions crucial to the successful use of genotypes as instruments. We combine the econometric IV literature with that from genetic epidemiology, and discuss the biological conditions and IV assumptions within the statistical potential outcomes framework. We review this in the context of two illustrative applications. PMID:26614692

  14. Extension and contraction of faulted marker planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Marie D.; Delaney, Paul T.

    1985-08-01

    We present graphical and analytical methods to determine the extensional or contractional separation of a faulted planar marker using commonly measured field data: fault attitude, slip direction, and bedding or other marker-plane attitude. This determination is easily accomplished for horizontal markers. Faults with normal components of slip extend the markers and indicate extensional tectonics; those with reverse components are contractional. Although the methods quantify this simple relation for horizontal markers, they are most useful in rocks with planar fabrics of steep dip where marker separation cannot be uniquely determined from map or outcrop patterns alone and where faults with normal components of dip slip can contract markers and those with reverse components can extend them. The methods rely on two parameters: (1) the angle between normals to the marker and fault planes and (2) the angle between the slip direction and intersection of the marker and fault. This second parameter measures the obliquity of slip relative to the directions of maximum extensional or contractional separation of the marker, and for a horizontal marker, it is equivalent to the rake of the slip direction. The graphical method requires stereographic projections routinely used for faulting data; the analytical method is programmable on a calculator. *Present address: Department of Applied Earth Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94035

  15. MGDB: crossing the marker genes of a user microarray with a database of public-microarrays marker genes.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Mario; Munyi, Marc; Expósito, David; Querol, Enric; Cedano, Juan

    2014-06-15

    The microarrays performed by scientific teams grow exponentially. These microarray data could be useful for researchers around the world, but unfortunately they are underused. To fully exploit these data, it is necessary (i) to extract these data from a repository of the high-throughput gene expression data like Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and (ii) to make the data from different microarrays comparable with tools easy to use for scientists. We have developed these two solutions in our server, implementing a database of microarray marker genes (Marker Genes Data Base). This database contains the marker genes of all GEO microarray datasets and it is updated monthly with the new microarrays from GEO. Thus, researchers can see whether the marker genes of their microarray are marker genes in other microarrays in the database, expanding the analysis of their microarray to the rest of the public microarrays. This solution helps not only to corroborate the conclusions regarding a researcher's microarray but also to identify the phenotype of different subsets of individuals under investigation, to frame the results with microarray experiments from other species, pathologies or tissues, to search for drugs that promote the transition between the studied phenotypes, to detect undesirable side effects of the treatment applied, etc. Thus, the researcher can quickly add relevant information to his/her studies from all of the previous analyses performed in other studies as long as they have been deposited in public repositories. Marker-gene database tool: http://ibb.uab.es/mgdb © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Plasmatic markers in hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Marginean, I C; Stanca, D M; Vacaras, V; Soritau, O; Margiean, M; Muresanu, D F

    2011-05-15

    Stroke is the third most common cause of death in the United States and it is the leading cause of disability. Early diagnosis and immediate therapeutic interventions are important factors to reduce the extent of brain tissue damage and the risk of stroke-related death. A rapid blood test that can confirm the clinical or imaging diagnosis or that can add to the stratification of the risk would be very useful. Such a test has to be validated in large studies and has to be based on a simple and low-cost technology. Many biological markers were tested for their ability to serve as 'would-be' stroke biological markers; some of them appear to have a place in the diagnostic work-up of stroke patients. These molecules include Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA), APO C-III, APO C-I, PARK7, nucleoside diphosphate kinase A (NDKA), S100B, B-type neurotrophic growth factor, von Willebrand factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. There are obvious limitations to this study, among them the fact that disability does not necessarily correlate with the amount of cerebral tissue lost (the site of stroke may be more important) and the role of the blood-brain barrier in delaying the release of the neuronal proteins in the blood stream. Further studies are awaited to confirm the role of these molecules in the management of acute stroke patients.

  17. Genic microsatellite markers in Brassica rapa: development, characterization, mapping, and their utility in other cultivated and wild Brassica relatives.

    PubMed

    Ramchiary, Nirala; Nguyen, Van Dan; Li, Xiaonan; Hong, Chang Pyo; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Yu, Ge; Piao, Zhong Yun; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2011-10-01

    Genic microsatellite markers, also known as functional markers, are preferred over anonymous markers as they reveal the variation in transcribed genes among individuals. In this study, we developed a total of 707 expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat markers (EST-SSRs) and used for development of a high-density integrated map using four individual mapping populations of B. rapa. This map contains a total of 1426 markers, consisting of 306 EST-SSRs, 153 intron polymorphic markers, 395 bacterial artificial chromosome-derived SSRs (BAC-SSRs), and 572 public SSRs and other markers covering a total distance of 1245.9 cM of the B. rapa genome. Analysis of allelic diversity in 24 B. rapa germplasm using 234 mapped EST-SSR markers showed amplification of 2 alleles by majority of EST-SSRs, although amplification of alleles ranging from 2 to 8 was found. Transferability analysis of 167 EST-SSRs in 35 species belonging to cultivated and wild brassica relatives showed 42.51% (Sysimprium leteum) to 100% (B. carinata, B. juncea, and B. napus) amplification. Our newly developed EST-SSRs and high-density linkage map based on highly transferable genic markers would facilitate the molecular mapping of quantitative trait loci and the positional cloning of specific genes, in addition to marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies of B. rapa with other related species.

  18. Genic Microsatellite Markers in Brassica rapa: Development, Characterization, Mapping, and Their Utility in Other Cultivated and Wild Brassica Relatives

    PubMed Central

    Ramchiary, Nirala; Nguyen, Van Dan; Li, Xiaonan; Hong, Chang Pyo; Dhandapani, Vignesh; Choi, Su Ryun; Yu, Ge; Piao, Zhong Yun; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Genic microsatellite markers, also known as functional markers, are preferred over anonymous markers as they reveal the variation in transcribed genes among individuals. In this study, we developed a total of 707 expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeat markers (EST-SSRs) and used for development of a high-density integrated map using four individual mapping populations of B. rapa. This map contains a total of 1426 markers, consisting of 306 EST-SSRs, 153 intron polymorphic markers, 395 bacterial artificial chromosome-derived SSRs (BAC-SSRs), and 572 public SSRs and other markers covering a total distance of 1245.9 cM of the B. rapa genome. Analysis of allelic diversity in 24 B. rapa germplasm using 234 mapped EST-SSR markers showed amplification of 2 alleles by majority of EST-SSRs, although amplification of alleles ranging from 2 to 8 was found. Transferability analysis of 167 EST-SSRs in 35 species belonging to cultivated and wild brassica relatives showed 42.51% (Sysimprium leteum) to 100% (B. carinata, B. juncea, and B. napus) amplification. Our newly developed EST-SSRs and high-density linkage map based on highly transferable genic markers would facilitate the molecular mapping of quantitative trait loci and the positional cloning of specific genes, in addition to marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies of B. rapa with other related species. PMID:21768136

  19. Analysis of chromosome 22 markers in nine schizophrenia pedigrees

    SciTech Connect

    Coon, H.; Holik, J.; Reimherr, F.

    1994-03-15

    Previous results of a genome-wide survey for schizophrenia susceptibility genes in nine multiplex families indicated a possible region of linkage on chromosome 22. We therefore tested for linkage using ten highly polymorphic chromosome 22 DNA markers. Lod score analyses were suggestive of linkage for several markers on the distal end of the chromosome; however, no lod score exceeded 3 assuming either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive transmission. The highest lod score was 2.09 (theta = 0.10) for marker D22S276 assuming autosomal recessive inheritance. Based on simulation analyses, this result is unlikely to represent a false positive. Analyses using information from affected individuals only resulted in reduced lod scores, with a maximum of 1.40 (theta = 0.05) for D22S276 assuming autosomal recessive inheritance. Two nonparametric methods, sib pair analysis and the Affected-Pedigree-Member method, also yielded suggestive but inconclusive findings; results were positive, but strict thresholds of significance were not met. Additionally, we tested one candidate gene, the Arylsulfatase A gene, located in the region of 22q13.31-qter. Results were again inconclusive, though the DNA marker available for this gene was a 2-allele RFLP with heterozygosity of 0.5, and therefore not maximally informative. Further investigation of this chromosomal region and this and other candidate genes may be warranted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Serum and tissue markers in colorectal cancer: State of art.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Massimiliano; Alessandrini, Lara; De Divitiis, Chiara; Nasti, Guglielmo; Lleshi, Arben; Di Francia, Raffaele; Facchini, Gaetano; Cavaliere, Carla; Buonerba, Carlo; Canzonieri, Vincenzo

    2017-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) represents one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. It is the second leading cause of cancer death in Western Countries. In the last decade, the survival of patients with metastatic CRC has improved dramatically. Due to the advent of new drugs (irinotecan and oxaliplatin) and target therapies (i.e. bevacizumab, cetuximab, panitumab, aflibercept and regorafenib), the median overall survival has risen from about 12 mo in the mid nineties to 30 mo recently. Molecular studies have recently widened the opportunity for testing new possible markers, but actually, only few markers can be recommended for practical use in clinic. In the next future, the hope is to have a complete panel of clinical biomarkers to use in every setting of CRC disease, and at the same time: 1) to receive information about prognostic significance by their expression and 2) to be oriented in the choice of the adequate treatment. Moreover, molecular analyses have shown that the natural history of all CRCs is not the same. Individual patients with same stage tumors may have different long-term prognosis and response to therapy. In addition, some prognostic variables are likely to be more important than others. Here we review the role of serum and tissue markers according to the recently published English literature. This paper is an extension of the article "Biological and clinical markers in colorectal cancer: state of art" by Cappellani A published in Jan 2010.

  1. Discovery and development of integrative biological markers for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Bittner, Robert A; Knöchel, Christian; Prvulovic, David; Hampel, Harald

    2011-12-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most disabling forms of mental illness. One of the most important challenges is to establish biological markers which can accurately identify at-risk individuals in preclinical stages and thus improve the effects of early intervention strategies. Here, we review recent findings in the field of molecular genetics, CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) based markers as well as structural and functional neuroimaging in the light of their relevance for schizophrenia biomarker research. We also examine evidence supporting the hypothesis that schizophrenia and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease may share certain pathophysiological features, e.g. chronic inflammation and oxidative stress, and discuss their possible role in schizophrenia. The heterogeneous, multifaceted and multifactorial nature of the traditionally clinically operationalized entity "schizophrenia" presents an enormous challenge towards the identification of single diagnostic or surrogate markers. We propose that abnormal neural coordination is a major point of convergence of a number of crucial pathophysiological pathways. Therefore, functional markers reflecting disturbed neural coordination might be particularly attractive biomarker candidates, because of their ability to integrate the influence of diverse pathophysiological mechanisms. Similarly, combinatorial and multimodal approaches may be a promising way to more accurately capture the complex biological underpinnings schizophrenia. We consider the development of such integrative biomarkers to be essential in order to facilitate a timely diagnosis of schizophrenia. They should also advance our understanding of the subtle and intricate biological nature of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Ventricular repolarization markers for predicting malignant arrhythmias in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Torres, Yaniel; Carmona-Puerta, Raimundo; Katholi, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cardiac arrhythmias which result in sudden cardiac death may be present in individuals apparently healthy or be associated with other medical conditions. The way to predict their appearance represents a challenge for the medical community due to the tragic outcomes in most cases. In the last two decades some ventricular repolarization (VR) markers have been found to be useful to predict malignant cardiac arrhythmias in several clinical conditions. The corrected QT, QT dispersion, Tpeak-Tend, Tpeak-Tend dispersion and Tp-e/QT have been studied and implemented in clinical practice for this purpose. These markers are obtained from 12 lead surface electrocardiogram. In this review we discuss how these markers have demonstrated to be effective to predict malignant arrhythmias in medical conditions such as long and short QT syndromes, Brugada syndrome, early repolarization syndrome, acute myocardial ischemia, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity and highly trained athletes. Also the main pathophysiological mechanisms that explain the arrhythmogenic predisposition in these diseases and the basis for the VR markers are discussed. However, the same results have not been found in all conditions. Further studies are needed to reach a global consensus in order to incorporate these VR parameters in risk stratification of these patients. PMID:26301231

  3. Development of microsatellite markers for Suriana maritima (Surianaceae) using next-generation sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, W S; Zhao, G; Jian, S G; Wang, Z F

    2015-10-30

    Our objective was to develop microsatellite markers for use in assessing genetic variation in the small shrub or tree species Suriana maritima (Surianaceae). In China, this species is found only as a few fragmented populations and individuals on the Paracel Islands. Using next-generation genome sequencing methodology, we developed 17 novel microsatellite markers for S. maritima. Fifty-four individuals from six populations of S. maritima were examined for polymorphisms; only one allele was detected for each of the markers. Microsatellite loci developed indicate a complete absence of genetic diversity for S. maritima on the Paracel Islands in China. These markers will be useful for examining genetic variation among S. maritima populations in other areas of the world.

  4. Increased homozygosity at four microsatellite marker loci in Pima Indian DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sell, S.M.; Knowler, W.C.; Bogardus, C.

    1994-09-01

    Using 100 Marshfield-derived (MFD) microsatellite markers (screening set v.2) and DNA from 13 Pima Indians, none of whom were first degree relatives, we observed 4 marker loci on 3 different chromosomes which showed marked deviation from the reported heterozygosities for the Caucasian CEPH families. These 4 markers were also tested in 60 individuals from 8 different multigenerational pedigrees. For the marker MFD77, only a single allele was observed for all individuals tested. Our results indicate that a high degree of genetic homogeneity occurs in limited regions of the genome in the Pima Indian population. We are investigating the possibility that these regions of homogeneity might be associated with disease susceptibility in this population with a high prevalence of obesity, gallstones and diabetes mellitus.

  5. A Somatic Marker Perspective of Immoral and Corrupt Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, Mona; Bechara, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who engage in corrupt and immoral behavior are in some ways similar to psychopaths. Normal people refrain from engaging in such behaviors because they tie together the moral value of society and the risk for punishment when they violate social rules. What is it, then, that allows these immoral individuals to behave in this manner, and in some situations to even prosper? When there is a dysfunction of somatic markers, specific disadvantageous impairments in decision-making arise, for example in moral judgment, but paradoxically, under some circumstances, the damage can cause the patient to make optimal financial investment decisions. Interestingly, individuals with psychopathy, a personality disorder, share many of these same behavioral characteristics as those seen in VMPFC and amygdala lesion patients, suggesting that defective somatic markers may serve as a neural framework for explaining immoral and corrupt behaviors. While these sociopathic behaviors of sometimes famous and powerful individuals have long been discussed primarily within the realm of social science and psychology, here we offer a neurocognitive perspective on possible neural roots for immoral and corrupt behaviors. PMID:21919563

  6. Characterization of 10 microsatellite markers for the understorey Amazonian herb Heliconia acuminata.

    PubMed

    Côrtes, M C; Gowda, V; Kress, W J; Bruna, E M; Uriarte, M

    2009-07-01

    We characterized 10 microsatellite loci for the plant Heliconia acuminata from the Biological Dynamics of Forest Fragments Project (Manaus, Brazil). Markers were screened in 61 individuals from one population and were found to be polymorphic with an average of eight alleles per locus. We found moderate to high levels of polymorphic information content, and observed and expected heterozygosities. All 10 markers are suitable for spatial genetic structure and parentage analyses and will be used for understanding H. acuminata dynamics across a fragmented landscape.

  7. Systematic Review of Anthocyanins and Markers of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Taylor C.; Slavin, Margaret; Frankenfeld, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Anthocyanins are dietary flavonoids commonly consumed in the diet, which have been suggested to have a preventative effect on cardiovascular disease (CVD) development among epidemiological studies. We systematically reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing the effects of purified anthocyanins and anthocyanin-rich extracts on markers of CVD (triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and blood pressure) in both healthy and diseased populations. Eligible studies included RCTs of adults published in English. We searched PubMed, Web of Science Core Collection, and BIOSIS Previews for relevant articles from inception until 1 July 2014. Twelve RCTs representing 10 studies were included in this review. Supplementation with anthocyanins significantly improved LDL cholesterol among diseased individuals or those with elevated biomarkers. Supplementation did not significantly affect other markers of CVD in either healthy individuals or those with elevated markers. No adverse effects of anthocyanins were reported across studies at levels up to 640 mg/day. Limitations of trials in the qualitative analyses include short trial duration and large variability in the dose administered within the trials. Longer-duration trials assessing dose response are needed to adequately determine whether an effect of supplementation exists. PMID:26761031

  8. Free fatty acids as markers of death from hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Bańka, Krzysztof; Teresiński, Grzegorz; Buszewicz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The possibilities of using morphological markers of fatal hypothermia are limited; therefore, other diagnostic criteria of deaths from hypothermia are being researched. The initiation of protective mechanisms against adverse effects of low temperatures results in activation of hormonal systems and development of characteristic biochemical changes that can be impaired by alcohol intoxication. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of determinations of the profile of free fatty acid concentrations as potential markers of hypothermia-related deaths, particularly in intoxicated victims. The study group consisted of blood samples collected during autopsies of 23 victims of hypothermia. The control group included blood samples collected from 34 victims of sudden, violent deaths at the scene of an incident (hangings and traffic accidents) and 10 victims who died because of post-traumatic subdural hematomas with prolonged agony. The study and control groups were divided into three subgroups according to blood alcohol concentrations: 0.0-0.99; 1.0-2.99 and ≥3.0‰. Statistical analysis in the individual subgroups demonstrated significant increases in concentrations of palmitic, stearic and oleic acids (P<0.05), independent of blood ethanol concentration. Palmitic, stearic and oleic acids can be considered the potential markers of fatal hypothermia, including the cases of intoxicated individuals.

  9. Rapid SNP Discovery and Genetic Mapping Using Sequenced RAD Markers

    PubMed Central

    Atwood, Tressa S.; Currey, Mark C.; Shiver, Anthony L.; Lewis, Zachary A.; Selker, Eric U.; Cresko, William A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2008-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery and genotyping are essential to genetic mapping. There remains a need for a simple, inexpensive platform that allows high-density SNP discovery and genotyping in large populations. Here we describe the sequencing of restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) tags, which identified more than 13,000 SNPs, and mapped three traits in two model organisms, using less than half the capacity of one Illumina sequencing run. We demonstrated that different marker densities can be attained by choice of restriction enzyme. Furthermore, we developed a barcoding system for sample multiplexing and fine mapped the genetic basis of lateral plate armor loss in threespine stickleback by identifying recombinant breakpoints in F2 individuals. Barcoding also facilitated mapping of a second trait, a reduction of pelvic structure, by in silico re-sorting of individuals. To further demonstrate the ease of the RAD sequencing approach we identified polymorphic markers and mapped an induced mutation in Neurospora crassa. Sequencing of RAD markers is an integrated platform for SNP discovery and genotyping. This approach should be widely applicable to genetic mapping in a variety of organisms. PMID:18852878

  10. Embryonic markers of cone differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Helen M.; Belcastro, Marycharmain; Sokolov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Photoreceptor cells are born in two distinct phases of vertebrate retinogenesis. In the mouse retina, cones are born primarily during embryogenesis, while rod formation occurs later in embryogenesis and early postnatal ages. Despite this dichotomy in photoreceptor birthdates, the visual pigments and phototransduction machinery are not reactive to visual stimulus in either type of photoreceptor cell until the second postnatal week. Several markers of early cone formation have been identified, including Otx2, Crx, Blimp1, NeuroD, Trβ2, Rorβ, and Rxrγ, and all are thought to be involved in cellular determination. However, little is known about the expression of proteins involved in cone visual transduction during early retinogenesis. Therefore, we sought to characterize visual transduction proteins that are expressed specifically in photoreceptors during mouse embryogenesis. Methods Eye tissue was collected from control and phosducin-null mice at embryonic and early postnatal ages. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) were used to measure the spatial and temporal expression patterns of phosducin (Pdc) and cone transducin γ (Gngt2) proteins and transcripts in the embryonic and early postnatal mouse retina. Results We identified the embryonic expression of phosducin (Pdc) and cone transducin γ (Gngt2) that coincides temporally and spatially with the earliest stages of cone histogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry, the phosducin protein was first detected in the retina at embryonic day (E)12.5, and cone transducin γ was observed at E13.5. The phosducin and cone transducin γ proteins were seen only in the outer neuroblastic layer, consistent with their expression in photoreceptors. At the embryonic ages, phosducin was coexpressed with Rxrγ, a known cone marker, and with Otx2, a marker of photoreceptors. Pdc and Gngt2 mRNAs were detected as early as E10.5 with qPCR, although at low levels. Conclusions Visual transduction

  11. Monitoring training load and fatigue in soccer players with physiological markers.

    PubMed

    Djaoui, Léo; Haddad, Monoem; Chamari, Karim; Dellal, Alexandre

    2017-11-01

    The quantification and monitoring of training load (TL) has been the topic of many scientific works in the last fifteen years. TL monitoring helps coaches to individually prescribe, follow-up, analyse, adjust and programme training sessions. In particular, the aim of the present review was to provide a critical literature report regarding different physiological markers of TL monitoring, particularly in soccer, as the load is specific to individual sports. Therefore, the interests and limitations of heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and biochemical variables (blood, urinary and hormonal variations) were analysed, with a special focus on daily measures (before, during and after training) and monitoring throughout a whole season. It appears that the most relevant markers were the resting HR before training, HR reserve during training, HRV during rest days, blood lactate, and blood and salivary immunological status in follow-ups throughout the season. Urinary markers indicative of the players' hydration status also deserve attention. However, these objective markers should be considered with a subjective marker of TL such as the rating of perceived exertion to give a more precise quantification of TL and its perception. Future research could be directed towards urinary marker analysis and the analysis of specific markers of TL, which could be related to injury occurrence and to performance during competition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A CAPS marker to assist selection of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) resistance in pepper.

    PubMed

    Moury, B; Pflieger, S; Blattes, A; Lefebvre, V; Palloix, A

    2000-02-01

    The hypersensitive resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in pepper is determined by a single dominant gene (resistant allele: Tsw) in several Capsicum chinense genotypes. In order to facilitate the selection for this resistance, four RAPD (among 250 10-mer primers tested) were found linked to the Tsw locus using the bulked segregant analysis and 153 F2 individuals. A close RAPD marker was converted into a codominant cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) using specific PCR primers and restriction enzymes. This CAPS marker is tightly linked to Tsw (0.9 +/- 0.6 cM) and is helpful for marker-assisted selection in a wide range of genetic intercrosses.

  13. Development of microsatellite markers in the tetraploid fern Ceratopteris thalictroides (Parkeriaceae) using RAD tag sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yang, X Y; Long, Z C; Gichira, A W; Guo, Y H; Wang, Q F; Chen, J M

    2016-02-19

    To understand the genetic variability of the tetraploid fern Ceratopteris thalictroides (Parkeriaceae), we described 30 polymorphic microsatellite markers obtained using the restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) tag sequencing technique. A total of 26 individuals were genotyped for each marker. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 4 to 10, and the expected heterozygosity and the Shannon-Wiener index ranged from 0.264 to 0.852 and 0.676 to 2.032, respectively. Because these 30 microsatellite markers exhibit high degrees of genetic variation, they will be useful tools for studying the adaptive genetic variation and sustainable conservation of C. thalictroides.

  14. Comparison of the effects of maximal dose atorvastatin and rosuvastatin therapy on cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We measured plasma markers of cholesterol synthesis (lathosterol) and absorption (campesterol, sitosterol, and cholestanol) in order to compare the effects of maximal doses of rosuvastatin with atorvastatin and investigate the basis for the significant individual variation in lipid lowering response...

  15. Pooled Genotyping of Microsatellite Markers in Parent–Offspring Trios

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, George; Williams, Nigel; Sham, Pak; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the extent to which genotyping of simple sequence repeat polymorphisms (SSRs) in pooled DNA samples can be used to predict differences in allele frequencies between parents and their affected offspring. We also developed a simple method of correction for the effects of stutter and differential amplification on the analysis of SSRs in pooled DNA samples based on widely available software. We genotyped individually eight polymorphic microsatellite markers in 110 parent–offspring trios affected with bipolar affective disorder (BP). Analysis of pooled DNA samples predicted very accurately the differences in individual allele frequency distributions between children and their parents. The mean error was <1% (range 0%–3.2%) when marker-specific corrections for stutter and differential amplification were performed. We show that if an individual allele is significantly preferentially transmitted from parents to affected offspring, the difference in the frequency of that allele would be sufficiently large to be detected with pooling in most situations. We propose recommendations for disequilibrium mapping with pooling in which both case-control samples and trios are used in an initial screen and markers are genotyped individually only if they satisfy very relaxed criteria for statistical significance. The use of case-control samples should reduce the false-negative rate as the differences in allele frequencies between cases and controls are twice as high in the presence of the same genetic effect. The use of trios will confirm or reject any suggested differences, thus reducing the false-positive rate that can be created by hidden population stratification. PMID:10645955

  16. Auditory biological marker of concussion in children

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Nina; Thompson, Elaine C.; Krizman, Jennifer; Cook, Katherine; White-Schwoch, Travis; LaBella, Cynthia R.

    2016-01-01

    Concussions carry devastating potential for cognitive, neurologic, and socio-emotional disease, but no objective test reliably identifies a concussion and its severity. A variety of neurological insults compromise sound processing, particularly in complex listening environments that place high demands on brain processing. The frequency-following response captures the high computational demands of sound processing with extreme granularity and reliably reveals individual differences. We hypothesize that concussions disrupt these auditory processes, and that the frequency-following response indicates concussion occurrence and severity. Specifically, we hypothesize that concussions disrupt the processing of the fundamental frequency, a key acoustic cue for identifying and tracking sounds and talkers, and, consequently, understanding speech in noise. Here we show that children who sustained a concussion exhibit a signature neural profile. They have worse representation of the fundamental frequency, and smaller and more sluggish neural responses. Neurophysiological responses to the fundamental frequency partially recover to control levels as concussion symptoms abate, suggesting a gain in biological processing following partial recovery. Neural processing of sound correctly identifies 90% of concussion cases and clears 95% of control cases, suggesting this approach has practical potential as a scalable biological marker for sports-related concussion and other types of mild traumatic brain injuries. PMID:28005070

  17. Auditory biological marker of concussion in children.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Nina; Thompson, Elaine C; Krizman, Jennifer; Cook, Katherine; White-Schwoch, Travis; LaBella, Cynthia R

    2016-12-22

    Concussions carry devastating potential for cognitive, neurologic, and socio-emotional disease, but no objective test reliably identifies a concussion and its severity. A variety of neurological insults compromise sound processing, particularly in complex listening environments that place high demands on brain processing. The frequency-following response captures the high computational demands of sound processing with extreme granularity and reliably reveals individual differences. We hypothesize that concussions disrupt these auditory processes, and that the frequency-following response indicates concussion occurrence and severity. Specifically, we hypothesize that concussions disrupt the processing of the fundamental frequency, a key acoustic cue for identifying and tracking sounds and talkers, and, consequently, understanding speech in noise. Here we show that children who sustained a concussion exhibit a signature neural profile. They have worse representation of the fundamental frequency, and smaller and more sluggish neural responses. Neurophysiological responses to the fundamental frequency partially recover to control levels as concussion symptoms abate, suggesting a gain in biological processing following partial recovery. Neural processing of sound correctly identifies 90% of concussion cases and clears 95% of control cases, suggesting this approach has practical potential as a scalable biological marker for sports-related concussion and other types of mild traumatic brain injuries.

  18. Eryptosis as a marker of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Swanepoel, Albe C; Buys, Antoinette V; Vermeulen, Natasha; Duim, Wiebren; Kell, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    A major trend in recent Parkinson's disease (PD) research is the investigation of biological markers that could help in identifying at-risk individuals or to track disease progression and response to therapies. Central to this is the knowledge that inflammation is a known hallmark of PD and of many other degenerative diseases. In the current work, we focus on inflammatory signalling in PD, using a systems approach that allows us to look at the disease in a more holistic way. We discuss cyclooxygenases, prostaglandins, thromboxanes and also iron in PD. These particular signalling molecules are involved in PD pathophysiology, but are also very important in an aberrant coagulation/hematology system. We present and discuss a hypothesis regarding the possible interaction of these aberrant signalling molecules implicated in PD, and suggest that these molecules may affect the erythrocytes of PD patients. This would be observable as changes in the morphology of the RBCs and of PD patients relative to healthy controls. We then show that the RBCs of PD patients are indeed rather dramatically deranged in their morphology, exhibiting eryptosis (a kind of programmed cell death). This morphological indicator may have useful diagnostic and prognostic significance. PMID:25411230

  19. [Studies of marker screening efficiency and corresponding influencing factors in QTL composite interval mapping].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Ming; Wan, Ping

    2002-06-01

    Screening markers efficiently is the foundation of mapping QTLs by composite interval mapping. Main and interaction markers distinguished, besides using background control for genetic variation, could also be used to construct intervals of two-way searching for mapping QTLs with epistasis, which can save a lot of calculation time. Therefore, the efficiency of marker screening would affect power and precision of QTL mapping. A doubled haploid population with 200 individuals and 5 chromosomes was constructed, with 50 markers evenly distributed at 10 cM space. Among a total of 6 QTLs, one was placed on chromosome I, two linked on chromosome II, and the other three linked on chromosome IV. QTL setting included additive effects and epistatic effects of additive x additive, the corresponding QTL interaction effects were set if data were collected under multiple environments. The heritability was assumed to be 0.5 if no special declaration. The power of marker screening by stepwise regression, forward regression, and three methods for random effect prediction, e.g. best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP), linear unbiased prediction (LUP) and adjusted unbiased prediction (AUP), was studied and compared through 100 Monte Carlo simulations. The results indicated that the marker screening power by stepwise regression at 0.1, 0.05 and 0.01 significant level changed from 2% to 68%, the power changed from 2% to 72% by forward regression. The larger the QTL effects, the higher the marker screening power. While the power of marker screening by three random effect prediction was very low, the maximum was only 13%. That suggested that regression methods were much better than those by using the approaches of random effect prediction to identify efficient markers flanking QTLs, and forward selection method was more simple and efficient. The results of simulation study on heritability showed that heightening of both general heritability and interaction heritability of genotype x

  20. Imputation of Unordered Markers and the Impact on Genomic Selection Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Rutkoski, Jessica E.; Poland, Jesse; Jannink, Jean-Luc; Sorrells, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Genomic selection, a breeding method that promises to accelerate rates of genetic gain, requires dense, genome-wide marker data. Genotyping-by-sequencing can generate a large number of de novo markers. However, without a reference genome, these markers are unordered and typically have a large proportion of missing data. Because marker imputation algorithms were developed for species with a reference genome, algorithms suited for unordered markers have not been rigorously evaluated. Using four empirical datasets, we evaluate and characterize four such imputation methods, referred to as k-nearest neighbors, singular value decomposition, random forest regression, and expectation maximization imputation, in terms of their imputation accuracies and the factors affecting accuracy. The effect of imputation method on the genomic selection accuracy is assessed in comparison with mean imputation. The effect of excluding markers with a large proportion of missing data on the genomic selection accuracy is also examined. Our results show that imputation of unordered markers can be accurate, especially when linkage disequilibrium between markers is high and genotyped individuals are related. Of the methods evaluated, random forest regression imputation produced superior accuracy. In comparison with mean imputation, all four imputation methods we evaluated led to greater genomic selection accuracies when the level of missing data was high. Including rather than excluding markers with a large proportion of missing data nearly always led to greater GS accuracies. We conclude that high levels of missing data in dense marker sets is not a major obstacle for genomic selection, even when marker order is not known. PMID:23449944

  1. Nineteen polymorphic microsatellite markers developed for Trachinotus ovatus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Z Z; Huang, M W; Xu, W; Peng, C; He, J N; Meng, Z N; Zhang, Y; Li, S S; Lin, H R

    2014-12-12

    To evaluate the population genetic diversity of the ovate pompano, we isolated and characterized 19 microsatellite markers using a (CA)13-enriched genomic library. Polymorphism was assessed in 30 individuals from a single population collected from the Daya Bay Aquaculture Center, Guangdong, China. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 18 with an average of 7.8. The observed and expected heterozygosities varied from 0.2667 to 1.000 and from 0.3960 to 0.9435, respectively. Sixteen of 19 loci conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and no significant linkage disequilibrium was detected between any locus pairs. Our study supplies candidate microsatellite markers that can be useful for studying the population genetic structure of ovate pompano.

  2. Neutral Genetic Markers and Conservation Genetics: Simulated Germplasm Collections

    PubMed Central

    Bataillon, T. M.; David, J. L.; Schoen, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the use of neutral genetic markers to guide sampling from a large germplasm collection with the objective of establishing from it a smaller, but genetically representative sample. We simulated evolutionary change and germplasm sampling in a subdivided population of a diploid hermaphrodite annual plant to create an initially large collection. Several strategies of sampling from this collection were then compared. Our results show that a strategy based on information obtained from marker genes led to retention of the maximum number of neutral and nonneutral alleles in the smaller sample. This occurred when demes were composed of self-fertilizing individuals or when no migration occurred among demes, but not when demes of an outcrossing population were connected by high levels of migration. PMID:8878704

  3. Development of novel chloroplast microsatellite markers for Ginkgo biloba.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Xu, L A; Cao, F L; Zhang, H J; Yu, F X

    2015-07-13

    Ginkgo biloba is considered to be a living fossil that can be used to understand the ancient evolutionary history of gymnosperms, but little attention has been given to the study of its population genetics, molecular phylogeography, and genetic resources assessment. Chloroplast simple sequence repeat (cpSSR) markers are powerful tools for genetic studies of plants. In this study, a total of 30 perfect cpSSRs of Ginkgo were identified and characterized, including di-, tri, tetra-, penta-, and hexanucleotide repeats. Fifteen of 21 designed primer pairs were successfully amplified to yield specific polymerase chain reaction products from 16 Ginkgo cultivars. Polymorphic cpSSRs were further applied to determine the genetic variation of 116 individuals in 5 populations of G. biloba. The results showed that 24 and 76% genetic variation existed within and among populations of this species, respectively. These polymorphic and monomorphic cpSSR markers can be used to trace the origin and evolutionary history of Ginkgo.

  4. Can volatile organic compounds be markers of sea salt?

    PubMed

    Silva, Isabel; Coimbra, Manuel A; Barros, António S; Marriott, Philip J; Rocha, Sílvia M

    2015-02-15

    Sea salt is a handmade food product that is obtained by evaporation of seawater in saltpans. During the crystallisation process, organic compounds from surroundings can be incorporated into sea salt crystals. The aim of this study is to search for potential volatile markers of sea salt. Thus, sea salts from seven north-east Atlantic Ocean locations (France, Portugal, Continental Spain, Canary Islands, and Cape Verde) were analysed by headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A total of 165 compounds were detected, ranging from 32 to 71 compounds per salt. The volatile composition revealed the variability and individuality of each salt, and a set of ten compounds were detected in all samples. From these, seven are carotenoid-derived compounds that can be associated with the typical natural surroundings of ocean hypersaline environment. These ten compounds are proposed as potential volatile markers of sea salt.

  5. Isolation and characterization of new highly polymorphic DNA markers from the Huntington disease region

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.; Hedrick, A.; Andrew, S.; Riess, O.; Collins, C.; Kowbel, D.; Hayden, M.R. )

    1992-02-01

    The defect causing Huntington disease (HD) has been mapped to 4p16.3, distal to the DNA marker D4S10. Subsequently, additional polymorphic markers closer to the HD gene have been isolated, which has led to the establishment of predictive testing programs for individuals at risk for HD. Approximately 17% of persons presenting to the Canadian collaborative study for predictive testing for HD have not received any modification of risk, in part because of limited informativeness of currently available DNA markers. Therefore, more highly polymorphic DNA markers are needed, which well further increase the accuracy and availability of predictive testing, specifically for families with complex or incomplete pedigree structures. In addition, new markers are urgently needed in order to refine the breakpoints in the few known recombinant HD chromosomes, which could allow a more accurate localization of the HD gene within 4p16.3 and, therefore, accelerate the cloning of the disease gene. In this study, the authors present the identification and characterization of nine new polymorphic DNA markers, including three markers which detect highly informative multiallelic VNTR-like polymorphisms with PIC values of up to .84. These markers have been isolated from a cloned region of DNA which has been previously mapped approximately 1,000 kb from the 4p telomere.

  6. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species

    PubMed Central

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V.; Yu, John Z.; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C.

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum   EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps. PMID:22315588

  7. Development of New Candidate Gene and EST-Based Molecular Markers for Gossypium Species.

    PubMed

    Buyyarapu, Ramesh; Kantety, Ramesh V; Yu, John Z; Saha, Sukumar; Sharma, Govind C

    2011-01-01

    New source of molecular markers accelerate the efforts in improving cotton fiber traits and aid in developing high-density integrated genetic maps. We developed new markers based on candidate genes and G. arboreum EST sequences that were used for polymorphism detection followed by genetic and physical mapping. Nineteen gene-based markers were surveyed for polymorphism detection in 26 Gossypium species. Cluster analysis generated a phylogenetic tree with four major sub-clusters for 23 species while three species branched out individually. CAP method enhanced the rate of polymorphism of candidate gene-based markers between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense. Two hundred A-genome based SSR markers were designed after datamining of G. arboreum EST sequences (Mississippi Gossypium arboreum  EST-SSR: MGAES). Over 70% of MGAES markers successfully produced amplicons while 65 of them demonstrated polymorphism between the parents of G. hirsutum and G. barbadense RIL population and formed 14 linkage groups. Chromosomal localization of both candidate gene-based and MGAES markers was assisted by euploid and hypoaneuploid CS-B analysis. Gene-based and MGAES markers were highly informative as they were designed from candidate genes and fiber transcriptome with a potential to be integrated into the existing cotton genetic and physical maps.

  8. Use of DNA markers in forest tree improvement research

    Treesearch

    D.B. Neale; M.E. Devey; K.D. Jermstad; M.R. Ahuja; M.C. Alosi; K.A. Marshall

    1992-01-01

    DNA markers are rapidly being developed for forest trees. The most important markers are restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), polymerase chain reaction- (PCR) based markers such as random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and fingerprinting markers. DNA markers can supplement isozyme markers for monitoring tree improvement activities such as; estimating...

  9. Technology and Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavalier, Albert R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Six papers on special education technology and individual differences are introduced. The papers illustrate the growing influence of constructivist perspectives on the use of technology to accommodate individual differences among people. The papers recognize the importance of using technology to scaffold the client's construction of different…

  10. Classroom Demonstrations: Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Sandra M.

    These demonstrations stress individual differences, a concept becoming increasingly important in psychological research. Intended for use in undergraduate psychology courses, four demonstrations that illustrate common examples of human variation are described. The demonstrations deal with the following individual differences: taste blindness,…

  11. Transcending Cognitive Individualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerubavel, Eviatar; Smith, Eliot R.

    2010-01-01

    Advancing knowledge in many areas of psychology and neuroscience, underlined by dazzling images of brain scans, appear to many professionals and to the public to show that people are on the way to explaining cognition purely in terms of processes within the individual's head. Yet while such cognitive individualism still dominates the popular…

  12. Transcending Cognitive Individualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerubavel, Eviatar; Smith, Eliot R.

    2010-01-01

    Advancing knowledge in many areas of psychology and neuroscience, underlined by dazzling images of brain scans, appear to many professionals and to the public to show that people are on the way to explaining cognition purely in terms of processes within the individual's head. Yet while such cognitive individualism still dominates the popular…

  13. Technology and Individual Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavalier, Albert R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Six papers on special education technology and individual differences are introduced. The papers illustrate the growing influence of constructivist perspectives on the use of technology to accommodate individual differences among people. The papers recognize the importance of using technology to scaffold the client's construction of different…

  14. Social and Individual Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shneiderman, Ben

    1989-01-01

    This reprint from "Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction" (Shneiderman) discusses the impact of computers on individuals and society. Highlights include individual opportunities for learning, entertainment, and cooperation through networking; problems with the use of computer systems; and the…

  15. Problems of Individualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Clarence

    Due in part to the open enrollment policy in junior colleges, there is a great diversity in student reading ability that dictates a need to individualize reading instruction. Individualization, defined as personalized instruction, may be accomplished through helping the student to read course materials, helping him to read special materials, or…

  16. Elements of Individualized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svara, Ronald

    Although many schools claim to make use of individualized instruction, no common definition of this term has been agreed on. The author reviewed definitions of "individualized instruction" in five studies and then surveyed 30 community and junior colleges who claimed to be using this method of instruction to learn what their programs…

  17. GROUP VERSUS INDIVIDUAL MEASURES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TRISMEN, DONALD A.

    THE AUTHOR STATES THAT INFORMATION LOSS IN CURRICULUM EVALUATION IS RELATED TO THE ASSUMPTION THAT GROUP MEASURES AND AVERAGES OF INDIVIDUAL MEASURES ARE INTERCHANGEABLE IN YIELDING IDENTICAL INFORMATION. TYPES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL MEASURES ARE LISTED. THE AUTHOR DISCUSSES ONE OF THESE TYPES OF RELATIONSHIPS, SPECIFICALLY,…

  18. Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

    Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

  19. Individualized Adult Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, C. G.

    As the proceedings of a national seminar on individualized adult science education, a total of 13 articles is compiled in this volume concerning the theory and techniques of curriculum development and the individualization process in upgrading Canadian science courses. The topics include: The Characteristics and Formulation of Behavioral…

  20. Biological identification systems: genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, E P; Meghen, C M

    2001-08-01

    Individual animals differ from each other on a number of biological levels. At the most basic level, the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) of each animal is different, and transcription of the DNA code yields variations at the protein level, which in turn give rise to individual diversity at the physical level. In recent years, accessing the primary genetic code of individual animals has become straightforward. The authors briefly review the development of biological identification technologies and then consider in more detail the application of current DNA testing technologies to issues of traceability of live animals and derived products. Although largely focused on cattle and beef traceability, the principles described are relevant to ovine, porcine and equine traceability. The accelerating pace of innovation and development within the field of molecular genetics suggests that the technologies described may soon be superseded. However, the principles of genetic identification will remain unchanged.

  1. Topography of Lymphatic Markers in Human Iris and Ciliary Body.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schrödl, Falk; Trost, Andrea; Strohmaier, Clemens; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Motloch, Karolina; Bruckner, Daniela; Laimer, Martin; Schlereth, Simona L; Heindl, Ludwig M; Reitsamer, Herbert A

    2015-07-01

    Reports of lymphatics in the anterior human uvea are contradictory. This might be caused due to a certain topography, which has not been considered yet. Therefore, here we systematically analyze iris and adjacent ciliary body with immunohistochemistry by combining various lymphatic markers. Human iris and ciliary body were obtained from cornea donors and prepared for cryosectioning. Cross sections of tissue blocks at 12/3/6/9 o'clock position and at corresponding intersections (1:30/4:30/7:30/10:30) were processed for immunohistochemistry of LYVE-1, PDPN, PROX1, FOXC2, VEGFR3, and CCL21, and when necessary, these lymphatic markers were combined with CD31, α-smooth muscle-actin, CD68, and 4',6-diamidino-2 phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI). Double, triple, and quadruple marker combinations were documented using confocal microscopy. Numerous podoplanin+ cells were mainly located at the anterior border of the iris while LYVE-1+ cells were distributed throughout the nonpigmented part. Both cell populations were PROX1/FOXC2/CCL21/VEGFR3-. Blood vessels, iris smooth muscles, and individual cells were VEGFR3+. While PDPN+ cells were rarely detected posteriorly of the iris root, many LYVE-1+ cells were present within the ciliary body muscle and villi. Within the muscle, occasionally PDPN+ vessel-like structures were detectable, but these were never colocalized with LYVE-1. Similar vessel-like structures were VEGFR3+/PROX1-/CCL21-, but CD31+. Further, ciliary muscle fibers and ciliary epithelium were immunoreactive for VEGFR3/CCL21, but were LYVE-1/PDPN-. A certain topography of structures at the various uvea-positions investigated was not obvious. The majority of LYVE-1+ cells displayed immunoreactivity for CD68. Lymphatic vessels colocalizing for at least two lymphatic markers were not detectable. Therefore, if present, putative lymphatic channels of the anterior uvea might display a different marker panel than generally presumed.

  2. Identification of novel plasma glycosylation-associated markers of aging.

    PubMed

    Catera, Mariangela; Borelli, Vincenzo; Malagolini, Nadia; Chiricolo, Mariella; Venturi, Giulia; Reis, Celso A; Osorio, Hugo; Abruzzo, Provvidenza M; Capri, Miriam; Monti, Daniela; Ostan, Rita; Franceschi, Claudio; Dall'Olio, Fabio

    2016-02-16

    The pro- or anti-inflammatory activities of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) are controlled by the structure of the glycan N-linked to Asn297 of their heavy chain. The age-associated low grade inflammation (inflammaging) is associated with increased plasmatic levels of agalactosylated IgGs terminating with N-acetylglucosamine (IgG-G0) whose biogenesis has not been fully explained. Although the biosynthesis of glycans is in general mediated by glycosyltransferases associated with internal cell membranes, the extracellular glycosylation of circulating glycoproteins mediated by plasmatic glycosyltransferases has been recently demonstrated. In this study we have investigated the relationship between plasmatic glycosyltransferases, IgG glycosylation and inflammatory and aging markers. In cohorts of individuals ranging from infancy to centenarians we determined the activity of plasmatic β4 galactosyltransferase(s) (B4GALTs) and of α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6GAL1, the glycosylation of IgG, the GlycoAge test (a glycosylation-based marker of aging) and the plasma level of inflammatory and liver damage markers. Our results show that: 1) plasmatic B4GALTs activity is a new marker of aging, showing a linear increase throughout the whole age range. 2) plasmatic ST6GAL1 was high only in children and in people above 80, showing a quadratic relationship with age. 3) Neither plasmatic glycosyltransferase correlated with markers of liver damage. 4) plasmatic ST6GAL1 showed a positive association with acute phase proteins in offspring of short lived parents, but not in centenarians or in their offspring. 5) Although the glycosylation of IgGs was not correlated with the level of the two plasmatic glycosyltransferases, it showed progressive age-associated changes consistent with a shift toward a pro-inflammatory glycotype.

  3. Identification of novel plasma glycosylation-associated markers of aging

    PubMed Central

    Catera, Mariangela; Borelli, Vincenzo; Malagolini, Nadia; Chiricolo, Mariella; Venturi, Giulia; Reis, Celso A.; Osorio, Hugo; Abruzzo, Provvidenza M.; Capri, Miriam; Monti, Daniela; Ostan, Rita; Franceschi, Claudio; Dall'Olio, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The pro- or anti-inflammatory activities of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) are controlled by the structure of the glycan N-linked to Asn297 of their heavy chain. The age-associated low grade inflammation (inflammaging) is associated with increased plasmatic levels of agalactosylated IgGs terminating with N-acetylglucosamine (IgG-G0) whose biogenesis has not been fully explained. Although the biosynthesis of glycans is in general mediated by glycosyltransferases associated with internal cell membranes, the extracellular glycosylation of circulating glycoproteins mediated by plasmatic glycosyltransferases has been recently demonstrated. In this study we have investigated the relationship between plasmatic glycosyltransferases, IgG glycosylation and inflammatory and aging markers. In cohorts of individuals ranging from infancy to centenarians we determined the activity of plasmatic β4 galactosyltransferase(s) (B4GALTs) and of α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6GAL1, the glycosylation of IgG, the GlycoAge test (a glycosylation-based marker of aging) and the plasma level of inflammatory and liver damage markers. Our results show that: 1) plasmatic B4GALTs activity is a new marker of aging, showing a linear increase throughout the whole age range. 2) plasmatic ST6GAL1 was high only in children and in people above 80, showing a quadratic relationship with age. 3) Neither plasmatic glycosyltransferase correlated with markers of liver damage. 4) plasmatic ST6GAL1 showed a positive association with acute phase proteins in offspring of short lived parents, but not in centenarians or in their offspring. 5) Although the glycosylation of IgGs was not correlated with the level of the two plasmatic glycosyltransferases, it showed progressive age-associated changes consistent with a shift toward a pro-inflammatory glycotype. PMID:26840264

  4. Baseline series fragrance markers fail to predict contact allergy.

    PubMed

    Mann, Jack; McFadden, John P; White, Jonathan M L; White, Ian R; Banerjee, Piu

    2014-05-01

    Negative patch test results with fragrance allergy markers in the European baseline series do not always predict a negative reaction to individual fragrance substances. To determine the frequencies of positive test reactions to the 26 fragrance substances for which labelling is mandatory in the EU, and how effectively reactions to fragrance markers in the baseline series predict positive reactions to the fragrance substances that are labelled. The records of 1951 eczema patients, routinely tested with the labelled fragrance substances and with an extended European baseline series in 2011 and 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and eighty-one (14.4%) (71.2% females) reacted to one or more allergens from the labelled-fragrance substance series and/or a fragrance marker from the European baseline series. The allergens that were positive with the greatest frequencies were cinnamyl alcohol (48; 2.46%), Evernia furfuracea (44; 2.26%), and isoeugenol (40; 2.05%). Of the 203 patients who reacted to any of the 26 fragrances in the labelled-fragrance substance series, only 117 (57.6%) also reacted to a fragrance marker in the baseline series. One hundred and seven (52.7%) reacted to either fragrance mix I or fragrance mix II, 28 (13.8%) reacted to Myroxylon pereirae, and 13 (6.4%) reacted to hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde. These findings confirm that the standard fragrance markers fail to identify patients with contact allergies to the 26 fragrances. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Objective evaluation measures of genetic marker selection in large-scale SNP genotyping.

    PubMed

    Kaminuma, Eli; Masuya, Hiroshi; Miura, Ikuo; Motegi, Hiromi; Takahasi, Kenzi R; Nakazawa, Miki; Matsui, Minami; Gondo, Yoichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Wakana, Shigeharu; Toyoda, Tetsuro

    2008-10-01

    High-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping systems provide two kinds of fluorescent signals detected from different alleles. In current technologies, the process of genotype discrimination requires subjective judgments by expert operators, even when using clustering algorithms. Here, we propose two evaluation measures to manage fluorescent scatter data with nonclear plot aggregation. The first is the marker ranking measure, which provides a ranking system for the SNP markers based on the distance between the scatter plot distribution and a user-defined ideal distribution. The second measure, called individual genotype membership, uses the membership probability of each genotype related to an individual plot in the scatter data. In verification experiments, the marker ranking measure determined the ranking of SNP markers correlated with the subjective order of SNP markers judged by an expert operator. The experiment using the individual genotype membership measure clarified that the total number of unclassified individuals was remarkably reduced compared to that of manually unclassified ones. These two evaluation measures were implemented as the GTAssist software. GTAssist provides objective standards and avoids subjective biases in SNP genotyping workflows.

  6. Root trait diversity, molecular marker diversity, and trait-marker associations in a core collection of Lupinus angustifolius

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinglong; Shan, Fucheng; Nelson, Matthew N; Siddique, Kadambot HM; Rengel, Zed

    2016-01-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) is the predominant grain legume crop in southern Australia, contributing half of the total grain legume production of Australia. Its yield in Australia is hampered by a range of subsoil constraints. The adaptation of lupin genotypes to subsoil constraints may be improved by selecting for optimal root traits from new and exotic germplasm sources. We assessed root trait diversity and genetic diversity of a core collection of narrow-leafed lupin (111 accessions) using 191 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers. The genetic relationship among accessions was determined using the admixture model in STRUCTURE. Thirty-eight root-associated traits were characterized, with 21 having coefficient of variation values >0.5. Principal coordinate analysis and cluster analysis of the DArT markers revealed broad diversity among the accessions. An ad hoc statistics calculation resulted in 10 distinct populations with significant differences among and within them (P < 0.001). The mixed linear model test in TASSEL showed a significant association between all root traits and some DArT markers, with the numbers of markers associated with an individual trait ranging from 2 to 13. The percentage of phenotypic variation explained by any one marker ranged from 6.4 to 21.8%, with 15 associations explaining >10% of phenotypic variation. The genetic variation values ranged from 0 to 7994, with 23 associations having values >240. Root traits such as deeper roots and lateral root proliferation at depth would be useful for this species for improved adaptation to drier soil conditions. This study offers opportunities for discovering useful root traits that can be used to increase the yield of Australian cultivars across variable environmental conditions. PMID:27049020

  7. Root trait diversity, molecular marker diversity, and trait-marker associations in a core collection of Lupinus angustifolius.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinglong; Shan, Fucheng; Nelson, Matthew N; Siddique, Kadambot Hm; Rengel, Zed

    2016-06-01

    Narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) is the predominant grain legume crop in southern Australia, contributing half of the total grain legume production of Australia. Its yield in Australia is hampered by a range of subsoil constraints. The adaptation of lupin genotypes to subsoil constraints may be improved by selecting for optimal root traits from new and exotic germplasm sources. We assessed root trait diversity and genetic diversity of a core collection of narrow-leafed lupin (111 accessions) using 191 Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) markers. The genetic relationship among accessions was determined using the admixture model in STRUCTURE. Thirty-eight root-associated traits were characterized, with 21 having coefficient of variation values >0.5. Principal coordinate analysis and cluster analysis of the DArT markers revealed broad diversity among the accessions. An ad hoc statistics calculation resulted in 10 distinct populations with significant differences among and within them (P < 0.001). The mixed linear model test in TASSEL showed a significant association between all root traits and some DArT markers, with the numbers of markers associated with an individual trait ranging from 2 to 13. The percentage of phenotypic variation explained by any one marker ranged from 6.4 to 21.8%, with 15 associations explaining >10% of phenotypic variation. The genetic variation values ranged from 0 to 7994, with 23 associations having values >240. Root traits such as deeper roots and lateral root proliferation at depth would be useful for this species for improved adaptation to drier soil conditions. This study offers opportunities for discovering useful root traits that can be used to increase the yield of Australian cultivars across variable environmental conditions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Individual cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Stovel, R T; Sweet, R G

    1979-01-01

    Current cell sorting machines do not preserve the individual identity of processed cells; after analysis, the cells are assigned to a subpopulation where they are pooled with other similar cells. This paper reports progress on a system that sorts cells individually to precise locations on a microscope slide and preserves them for further observation with a light microscope while recording flow measurement data for each cell. Various electronic and mechanical modifications to an existing sorting machine are described that increase drop placement accuracy and permit individual cell sorting.

  9. Genetic characterization of Uruguayan Pampa Rocha pigs with microsatellite markers

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, M; Llambí, S; Castro, G; Barlocco, N; Vadell, A; Landi, V; Delgado, JV; Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we genetically characterized the Uruguayan pig breed Pampa Rocha. Genetic variability was assessed by analyzing a panel of 25 microsatellite markers from a sample of 39 individuals. Pampa Rocha pigs showed high genetic variability with observed and expected heterozygosities of 0.583 and 0.603, respectively. The mean number of alleles was 5.72. Twenty-four markers were polymorphic, with 95.8% of them in Hardy Weinberg equilibrium. The level of endogamy was low (FIS = 0.0475). A factorial analysis of correspondence was used to assess the genetic differences between Pampa Rocha and other pig breeds; genetic distances were calculated, and a tree was designed to reflect the distance matrix. Individuals were also allocated into clusters. This analysis showed that the Pampa Rocha breed was separated from the other breeds along the first and second axes. The neighbour-joining tree generated by the genetic distances DA showed clustering of Pampa Rocha with the Meishan breed. The allocation of individuals to clusters showed a clear separation of Pampa Rocha pigs. These results provide insights into the genetic variability of Pampa Rocha pigs and indicate that this breed is a well-defined genetic entity. PMID:25983624

  10. Altering Visual Perception Abnormalities: A Marker for Body Image Concern

    PubMed Central

    Duncum, Anna J. F.; Mundy, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    The body image concern (BIC) continuum ranges from a healthy and positive body image, to clinical diagnoses of abnormal body image, like body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). BDD and non-clinical, yet high-BIC participants have demonstrated a local visual processing bias, characterised by reduced inversion effects. To examine whether this bias is a potential marker of BDD, the visual processing of individuals across the entire BIC continuum was examined. Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire (DCQ; quantified BIC) scores were expected to correlate with higher discrimination accuracy and faster reaction times of inverted stimuli, indicating reduced inversion effects (occurring due to increased local visual processing). Additionally, an induced global or local processing bias via Navon stimulus presentation was expected to alter these associations. Seventy-four participants completed the DCQ and upright-inverted face and body stimulus discrimination task. Moderate positive associations were revealed between DCQ scores and accuracy rates for inverted face and body stimuli, indicating a graded local bias accompanying increases in BIC. This relationship supports a local processing bias as a marker for BDD, which has significant assessment implications. Furthermore, a moderate negative relationship was found between DCQ score and inverted face accuracy after inducing global processing, indicating the processing bias can temporarily be reversed in high BIC individuals. Navon stimuli were successfully able to alter the visual processing of individuals across the BIC continuum, which has important implications for treating BDD. PMID:27003715

  11. Identification of Japanese and chinese green tea cultivars by using simple sequence repeat markers to encourage proper labeling.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Tomomi; Ohta, Ryusuke; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Kohata, Katsunori; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi

    2009-01-01

    To identify commercial Japanese monovarietal green tea and imported green tea samples, leading Japanese cultivars were fingerprinted by using six simple sequence repeat markers analyzed by a capillary sequencer. Two well-authenticated imported Chinese monovarietal green tea samples were also fingerprinted by the same markers, one of which, was Fuyun, was a clonally propagated cultivar, and the other, Jiukengzhong, was seed-propagated. At least three markers used in this study identified 16 leading Japanese cultivars and Fuyun. Although Jiukengzhong was a mixed population with diverse genotypes, some individuals had a unique allele in one simple sequence repeat marker that was not detected in the 16 leading Japanese cultivars, an additional 39 cultivars, and Fuyun. This allele was effective as a detection marker for Jiukengzhong. These results support the use of simple sequence repeat markers for the identification of Japanese monovarietal green tea and also of imported green tea made from foreign cultivars.

  12. Stereotactic core needle breast biopsy marker migration: An analysis of factors contributing to immediate marker migration.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashali; Khalid, Maria; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Georgian-Smith, Dianne; Kaplan, Jonah A; Buch, Karen; Grinstaff, Mark W; Hirsch, Ariel E; Hines, Neely L; Anderson, Stephan W; Gallagher, Katherine M; Bates, David D B; Bloch, B Nicolas

    2017-05-19

    To evaluate breast biopsy marker migration in stereotactic core needle biopsy procedures and identify contributing factors. This retrospective study analyzed 268 stereotactic biopsy markers placed in 263 consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic biopsies using 9G vacuum-assisted devices from August 2010-July 2013. Mammograms were reviewed and factors contributing to marker migration were evaluated. Basic descriptive statistics were calculated and comparisons were performed based on radiographically-confirmed marker migration. Of the 268 placed stereotactic biopsy markers, 35 (13.1%) migrated ≥1 cm from their biopsy cavity. Range: 1-6 cm; mean (± SD): 2.35 ± 1.22 cm. Of the 35 migrated biopsy markers, 9 (25.7%) migrated ≥3.5 cm. Patient age, biopsy pathology, number of cores, and left versus right breast were not associated with migration status (P> 0.10). Global fatty breast density (P= 0.025) and biopsy in the inner region of breast (P = 0.031) were associated with marker migration. Superior biopsy approach (P= 0.025), locally heterogeneous breast density, and t-shaped biopsy markers (P= 0.035) were significant for no marker migration. Multiple factors were found to influence marker migration. An overall migration rate of 13% supports endeavors of research groups actively developing new biopsy marker designs for improved resistance to migration. • Breast biopsy marker migration is documented in 13% of 268 procedures. • Marker migration is affected by physical, biological, and pathological factors. • Breast density, marker shape, needle approach etc. affect migration. • Study demonstrates marker migration prevalence; marker design improvements are needed.

  13. Marker Recycling in Candida albicans through CRISPR-Cas9-Induced Marker Excision

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We describe here a new approach to marker recycling, a controlled sequence of steps in which a genetic marker is selected and then lost. Marker recycling is important for genetic manipulation, because it allows a single selection marker to be used repeatedly. Our approach relies upon the ability of the CRISPR-Cas9 system to make a targeted double-strand break in DNA and the expectation that a double-strand break within a selection marker may promote recombination between directly repeated sequences that flank the marker. We call the approach CRISPR-Cas9-induced marker excision (CRIME). We tested the utility of this approach with the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, which is typically diploid. We used two selection markers, modified to include flanking direct repeats. In a proof-of-principle study, we created successive homozygous deletions in three genes through use of the two markers and had one of the markers available in the final strain for further selection and recycling. This strategy will accelerate the creation of multiple-mutant strains in C. albicans. CRISPR-Cas9 systems have been applied to many organisms, so the genetic design principles described here may be broadly applicable. IMPORTANCE It is critical to be able to alter genes in order to elucidate their functions. These alterations often rely upon markers that allow selection for a rare cell in a population that has incorporated a piece of DNA. The number of alterations that can be accomplished is thus limited by the number of selection markers that are available. This limitation is circumvented by marker recycling strategies, in which a marker is eliminated after its initial use. Then, the marker can be used again. In this report, we describe a new marker recycling strategy that is enabled by recently developed CRISPR-Cas9 technology. PMID:28317025

  14. Individual vulnerability to addiction.

    PubMed

    Swendsen, Joel; Le Moal, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The process of addiction is often studied in the neurosciences as a function of the quantity or type of substance consumed, with the ultimate goal of counteracting these effects by other pharmacological means. However, epidemiology and clinical research have extensively demonstrated that most individuals who use drugs do not develop dependence. Numerous factors may explain an individual's propensity to addiction. This review discusses these paradigms and summarizes research on individual differences that encompass cultural and sociodemographic factors, psychiatric or psychological vulnerability, and biological or genetic propensity to addiction. Although these different factors often interact in the expression of vulnerable phenotypes, it is possible to alter or control specific sources of vulnerability. For these reasons, integrating individual vulnerability to addiction across different research disciplines is likely to provide the greatest advances for intervention and prevention efforts. © 2011 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Individualization in Shorthand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foust, Patsy

    1973-01-01

    The method of teaching English rules in intermediate shorthand through the use of self-instructional or learning packages has proved to be successful at Mountain View College. Both instructors and students benefited from the individualized instruction method. (KP)

  16. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lisa Marie [Rocky Point, NY; Smith, Randy J [Wading River, NY; Warren, John B [Port Jefferson, NY; Elliott, Donald [Hampton Bays, NY

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  17. Biochemical genetic markers in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Glaszmann, J C; Fautret, A; Noyer, J L; Feldmann, P; Lanaud, C

    1989-10-01

    Isozyme variation was used to identify biochemical markers of potential utility in sugarcane genetics and breeding. Electrophoretic polymorphism was surveyed for nine enzymes among 39 wild and noble sugarcane clones, belonging to the species most closely related to modern varieties. Up to 114 distinct bands showing presence versus absence type of variation were revealed and used for qualitative characterization of the materials. Multivariate analysis of the data isolated the Erianthus clone sampled and separated the Saccharum spontaneum clones from the S. robustum and S. officinarum clones; the latter two were not differentiated from one another. The analysis of self-progenies of a 2n=112 S. spontaneum and of a commercial variety showed examples of mono- and polyfactorial segregations. Within the progeny of the variety, co-segregation of two isozymes frequent in S. spontaneum led to them being assigned to a single chromosome initially contributed by a S. spontaneum donor. This illustrates how combined survey of ancestral species and segregation analysis in modern breeding materials should permit using the lack of interspecific cross-over to establish linkage groups in a sugarcane genome.

  18. Prognostic markers in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gomatos, Ilias P; Xiaodong, Xu; Ghaneh, Paula; Halloran, Christopher; Raraty, Michael; Lane, Brian; Sutton, Robert; Neoptolemos, John P

    2014-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a mortality rate of 5-10%. Early deaths are mainly due to multiorgan failure and late deaths are due to septic complications from pancreatic necrosis. The recently described 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification and the Determinant Classification both provide a more accurate description of edematous and necrotizing pancreatitis and local complications. The 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification uses the modified Marshall scoring system for assessing organ dysfunction. The Determinant Classification uses the sepsis-related organ failure assessment scoring system for organ dysfunction and, unlike the 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification, includes infected necrosis as a criterion of severity. These scoring systems are used to assess systemic complications requiring intensive therapy unit support and intra-abdominal complications requiring minimally invasive interventions. Numerous prognostic systems and markers have been evaluated but only the Glasgow system and serum CRP levels provide pragmatic prognostic accuracy early on. Novel concepts using genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling and also functional imaging for the identification of specific disease patterns are now required.

  19. Biological Individuality of Man

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    RECIPIENT’S CAT * LOO NUMBER Biological Individuality of Man 5 TlrPE OF REPORT a PERIOD COVERED Technical « PERFORMING ORO REPORT...Variability 13 A. Background , 13 B. Slatistictl Approaches to Biological Variability 13 C. Genetic Aspects of Biological Variability . 14 III...ioiological determinants of individuality. Only recently, have genetic infaienccs been investigated and the potentialities for future control of bio

  20. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A...

  2. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A...

  3. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4660 - Skin marker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Skin marker. 878.4660 Section 878.4660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4660 Skin marker. (a) Identification. A...

  5. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47... markers is subject only to the requirements of § 39.37....

  6. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47... markers is subject only to the requirements of § 39.37....

  7. 10 CFR 39.47 - Radioactive markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Radioactive markers. 39.47 Section 39.47 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.47... markers is subject only to the requirements of § 39.37....

  8. Bilingual Discourse Markers in Indigenous Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    This review of research considers the occurrence and function of Spanish discourse markers and other particles in indigenous speech. I discuss important research that has examined these phenomena and refer to studies of bilingual discourse markers in other non-indigenous language contact situations to address unresolved issues concerning the form…

  9. Bilingual Discourse Markers in Indigenous Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    This review of research considers the occurrence and function of Spanish discourse markers and other particles in indigenous speech. I discuss important research that has examined these phenomena and refer to studies of bilingual discourse markers in other non-indigenous language contact situations to address unresolved issues concerning the form…

  10. 43 CFR 15.6 - Markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Markers. 15.6 Section 15.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.6 Markers. No person shall willfully mark, deface or injure in any way, or displace, remove or tamper with any Preserve...

  11. 43 CFR 15.6 - Markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Markers. 15.6 Section 15.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.6 Markers. No person shall willfully mark, deface or injure in any way, or displace, remove or tamper with any Preserve...

  12. 43 CFR 15.6 - Markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Markers. 15.6 Section 15.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.6 Markers. No person shall willfully mark, deface or injure in any way, or displace, remove or tamper with any Preserve...

  13. 43 CFR 15.6 - Markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Markers. 15.6 Section 15.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.6 Markers. No person shall willfully mark, deface or injure in any way, or displace, remove or tamper with any Preserve...

  14. French Discourse Markers in Shaba Swahili Conversations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Rooij, Vincent A.

    2000-01-01

    Examines data recorded in Shaba, a province in the Congo, and documents the marked preference to employ French discourse markers in Shaba Swahili discourse. Treats discourse markers as a special kind of contextualization cue that ties parts of a discourse to each other, creating cohesion and coherence. (Author/VWL)

  15. 43 CFR 15.6 - Markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Markers. 15.6 Section 15.6 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior KEY LARGO CORAL REEF PRESERVE § 15.6 Markers. No person shall willfully mark, deface or injure in any way, or displace, remove or tamper with any Preserve...

  16. Individualization of tiger by using microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan Chun; Li, Bo; Li, Wan Shui; Bai, Su Ying; Jin, Yu; Li, Xiao Ping; Gu, Ming Bo; Jing, Song Yan; Zhang, Wei

    2005-06-30

    In investigating criminal cases of poaching and smuggling involving tigers (Panthera tigris), the number of tiger individuals involved is critical for determining the penalty. Morphological methodologies do not often work because tiger parts do not possess the distinctive characteristics of the individual. Microsatellite DNAs have been proved a reliable marker for the individualization of animals. Seven microsatellite loci derived from domestic cat (Felis catus) were selected to individualize tigers, namely F41, F42, F146, Fca304, Fca391, Fca441 and Fca453. A reference population containing 37 unrelated tigers were used to investigate alleles, allelic frequencies, genotypes and genotype frequencies of each locus. Consequently, the data was used to assess the validity of the combination of seven loci for tiger individualization. All loci were polymorphic and easy to amplify. Three out of the seven loci were significantly departure from the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (P < 0.05). Cumulative discrimination power (DP) calculated with observed genotype frequencies was 0.99999789. Match probability of an individual in the reference population with a random individual in seven loci ranged from 7.34 x 10(-9) to 2.77 x 10(-5). This suggests that combining the seven microsatellite loci provides desirable power to individualize tigers. The combination of seven loci was applied to a case of tiger bone smuggling. Genotypes of all samples were identical in all seven loci, and the P(M) of the evidence samples in the seven loci hit 5.63 x 10(-7), provided evidence that the bones belong to a single tiger.

  17. Microsatellite markers isolated from the flightless cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi).

    PubMed

    Duffie, Caroline; Glenn, Travis C; Hagen, Cris; Parker, Patricia

    2008-05-01

    Eight polymorphic microsatellite DNA loci were isolated from the flightless cormorant (Phalacrocorax harrisi) for future population genetic studies. Genetic variability was assessed using at least 38 individuals from two populations. Allele numbers ranged from three to nine per locus. Mean observed heterozygosity varied from 0.27 to 0.78. No locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg (HW) or linkage equilibria in either population. The high levels of detected polymorphism indicate the utility of these markers for population genetic studies of this Galápagos species.

  18. Recognition of immunogold markers in electron micrographs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruixuan; Pokhariya, Himanshu; McKenna, Stephen J; Lucocq, John

    2011-11-01

    Immunoelectron microscopy is used in cell biological research to study the spatial distribution of intracellular macromolecules at the ultrastructural level. Colloidal gold particles (immunogold markers) are commonly used to localise molecules of interest on ultrathin sections and can be visualised in transmission electron micrographs as dark spots. Quantitative analysis involves detection of the immunogold markers, and is often performed manually or interactively as part of a stereological estimation technique. The method presented in this paper automatically detects and counts immunogold markers, estimating the location, size and type of each marker. It was evaluated on single-labelled as well as double-labelled images showing markers of two different sizes. This is a first step towards automatic analysis of immunoelectron micrographs, enabling a rapid and more complete quantitative analysis than is currently practicable.

  19. Cancers Screening in an Asymptomatic Population by Using Multiple Tumour Markers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsin-Yao; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Wen, Chiao-Ni; Wen, Ying-Hao; Chen, Chun-Hsien; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2016-01-01

    Analytic measurement of serum tumour markers is one of commonly used methods for cancer risk management in certain areas of the world (e.g. Taiwan). Recently, cancer screening based on multiple serum tumour markers has been frequently discussed. However, the risk-benefit outcomes appear to be unfavourable for patients because of the low sensitivity and specificity. In this study, cancer screening models based on multiple serum tumour markers were designed using machine learning methods, namely support vector machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbour (KNN), and logistic regression, to improve the screening performance for multiple cancers in a large asymptomatic population. AFP, CEA, CA19-9, CYFRA21-1, and SCC were determined for 20 696 eligible individuals. PSA was measured in men and CA15-3 and CA125 in women. A variable selection process was applied to select robust variables from these serum tumour markers to design cancer detection models. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value, area under the curve, and Youden index of the models based on single tumour markers, combined test, and machine learning methods were compared. Moreover, relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction (ARR), and absolute risk increase (ARI) were evaluated. To design cancer detection models using machine learning methods, CYFRA21-1 and SCC were selected for women, and all tumour markers were selected for men. SVM and KNN models significantly outperformed the single tumour markers and the combined test for men. All 3 studied machine learning methods outperformed single tumour markers and the combined test for women. For either men or women, the ARRs were between 0.003-0.008; the ARIs were between 0.119-0.306. Machine learning methods outperformed the combined test in analysing multiple tumour markers for cancer detection. However, cancer screening based solely on the application of multiple tumour markers remains unfavourable because of the

  20. Multiplex pyrosequencing of InDel markers for forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bus, Magdalena M; Karas, Ognjen; Allen, Marie

    2016-12-01

    The capillary electrophoresis (CE) technology is commonly used for fragment length separation of markers in forensic DNA analysis. In this study, pyrosequencing technology was used as an alternative and rapid tool for the analysis of biallelic InDel (insertion/deletion) markers for individual identification. The DNA typing is based on a subset of the InDel markers that are included in the Investigator(®) DIPplex Kit, which are sequenced in a multiplex pyrosequencing analysis. To facilitate the analysis of degraded DNA, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragments were kept short in the primer design. Samples from individuals of Swedish origin were genotyped using the pyrosequencing strategy and analysis of the Investigator(®) DIPplex markers with CE. A comparison between the pyrosequencing and CE data revealed concordant results demonstrating a robust and correct genotyping by pyrosequencing. Using optimal marker combination and a directed dispensation strategy, five markers could be multiplexed and analyzed simultaneously. In this proof-of-principle study, we demonstrate that multiplex InDel pyrosequencing analysis is possible. However, further studies on degraded samples, lower DNA quantities, and mixtures will be required to fully optimize InDel analysis by pyrosequencing for forensic applications. Overall, although CE analysis is implemented in most forensic laboratories, multiplex InDel pyrosequencing offers a cost-effective alternative for some applications.

  1. Development and characterization of 37 novel EST-SSR markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaofeng; McPhee, Kevin E.; Coram, Tristan E.; Peever, Tobin L.; Chilvers, Martin I.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Simple sequence repeat markers were developed based on expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR) and screened for polymorphism among 23 Pisum sativum individuals to assist development and refinement of pea linkage maps. In particular, the SSR markers were developed to assist in mapping of white mold disease resistance quantitative trait loci. • Methods and Results: Primer pairs were designed for 46 SSRs identified in EST contiguous sequences assembled from a 454 pyrosequenced transcriptome of the pea cultivar, ‘LIFTER’. Thirty-seven SSR markers amplified PCR products, of which 11 (30%) SSR markers produced polymorphism in 23 individuals, including parents of recombinant inbred lines, with two to four alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.43 and from 0.31 to 0.83, respectively. • Conclusions: These EST-SSR markers for pea will be useful for refinement of pea linkage maps, and will likely be useful for comparative mapping of pea and as tools for marker-based pea breeding. PMID:25202482

  2. Precision of methods for calculating identity-by-descent matrices using multiple markers

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Anders Christian; Pong-Wong, Ricardo; Windig, Jack J; Woolliams, John A

    2002-01-01

    A rapid, deterministic method (DET) based on a recursive algorithm and a stochastic method based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) for calculating identity-by-descent (IBD) matrices conditional on multiple markers were compared using stochastic simulation. Precision was measured by the mean squared error (MSE) of the relationship coefficients in predicting the true IBD relationships, relative to MSE obtained from using pedigree only. Comparisons were made when varying marker density, allele numbers, allele frequencies, and the size of full-sib families. The precision of DET was 75–99% relative to MCMC, but was not simply related to the informativeness of individual loci. For situations mimicking microsatellite markers or dense SNP, the precision of DET was ≥ 95% relative to MCMC. Relative precision declined for the SNP, but not microsatellites as marker density decreased. Full-sib family size did not affect the precision. The methods were tested in interval mapping and marker assisted selection, and the performance was very largely determined by the MSE. A multi-locus information index considering the type, number, and position of markers was developed to assess precision. It showed a marked empirical relationship with the observed precision for DET and MCMC and explained the complex relationship between relative precision and the informativeness of individual loci. PMID:12427386

  3. Predicting gestational age using neonatal metabolic markers

    PubMed Central

    Ryckman, Kelli K.; Berberich, Stanton L.; Dagle, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Accurate gestational age estimation is extremely important for clinical care decisions of the newborn as well as for perinatal health research. Although prenatal ultrasound dating is one of the most accurate methods for estimating gestational age, it is not feasible in all settings. Identifying novel and accurate methods for gestational age estimation at birth is important, particularly for surveillance of preterm birth rates in areas without routine ultrasound dating. Objective We hypothesized that metabolic and endocrine markers captured by routine newborn screening could improve gestational age estimation in the absence of prenatal ultrasound technology. Study Design This is a retrospective analysis of 230,013 newborn metabolic screening records collected by the Iowa Newborn Screening Program between 2004 and 2009. The data were randomly split into a model-building dataset (n = 153,342) and a model-testing dataset (n = 76,671). We performed multiple linear regression modeling with gestational age, in weeks, as the outcome measure. We examined 44 metabolites, including biomarkers of amino acid and fatty acid metabolism, thyroid-stimulating hormone, and 17-hydroxyprogesterone. The coefficient of determination (R2) and the root-mean-square error were used to evaluate models in the model-building dataset that were then tested in the model-testing dataset. Results The newborn metabolic regression model consisted of 88 parameters, including the intercept, 37 metabolite measures, 29 squared metabolite measures, and 21 cubed metabolite measures. This model explained 52.8% of the variation in gestational age in the model-testing dataset. Gestational age was predicted within 1 week for 78% of the individuals and within 2 weeks of gestation for 95% of the individuals. This model yielded an area under the curve of 0.899 (95% confidence interval 0.895−0.903) in differentiating those born preterm (<37 weeks) from those born term (≥37 weeks). In the subset of

  4. Human-Associated Bacteroides spp. and Human Polyomaviruses as Microbial Source Tracking Markers in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Caffaro-Filho, Roberto A.; Wong, Mayee; Harwood, Valerie J.; Moravcik, Philip; Fujioka, Roger S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Identification of sources of fecal contaminants is needed to (i) determine the health risk associated with recreational water use and (ii) implement appropriate management practices to mitigate this risk and protect the environment. This study evaluated human-associated Bacteroides spp. (HF183TaqMan) and human polyomavirus (HPyV) markers for host sensitivity and specificity using human and animal fecal samples collected in Hawaii. The decay rates of those markers and indicator bacteria were identified in marine and freshwater microcosms exposed and not exposed to sunlight, followed by field testing of the usability of the molecular markers. Both markers were strongly associated with sewage, although the cross-reactivity of the HF183TaqMan (also present in 82% of canine [n = 11], 30% of mongoose [n = 10], and 10% of feline [n = 10] samples) needs to be considered. Concentrations of HF183TaqMan in human fecal samples exceeded those in cross-reactive animals at least 1,000-fold. In the absence of sunlight, the decay rates of both markers were comparable to the die-off rates of enterococci in experimental freshwater and marine water microcosms. However, in sunlight, the decay rates of both markers were significantly lower than the decay rate of enterococci. While both markers have their individual limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity, these limitations can be mitigated by using both markers simultaneously; ergo, this study supports the concurrent use of HF183TaqMan and HPyV markers for the detection of sewage contamination in coastal and inland waters in Hawaii. IMPORTANCE This study represents an in-depth characterization of microbial source tracking (MST) markers in Hawaii. The distribution and concentrations of HF183TaqMan and HPyV markers in human and animal fecal samples and in wastewater, coupled with decay data obtained from sunlight-exposed and unexposed microcosms, support the concurrent application of HF183TaqMan and HPyV markers for

  5. Genetic markers for schizophrenic subgroups.

    PubMed

    Lange, V

    1982-01-01

    By the study of hereditary serum protein markers in psychotic patients and normal controls, a surplus of Gc 1-1 (p less than 0.01) and transferrin B variants (p less than 0.0027) has been established in schizophrenias. Affective psychoses are characterized by an excess of the haptoglobin (Hp) serum type 2-2 (p less than 0.001). These general statements have to be modified in regard to the clinical and psychopathological subdivision beyond the traditional classification into two major groups of endogenous mental disease. Using Leonhard's criteria, the prevalence of Gc 1-1 is restricted to the systematic schizophrenias reaching its highest value in hebephrenias, which are followed by paraphrenic and catatonic forms in this trait. In contrast to this, periodical catatonia and affective paraphrenia, classified as subgroups of the unsystematic schizophrenias, have Gc 1-1 frequencies like healthy controls. On the other hand, the Hp 2-2 value is not increased in the systematic schizophrenias, but it displays a relative overplus in the unsystematic forms. Concerning the Hp 2-2 and Gc 1-1 frequencies a certain similarity can be observed between affective paraphrenia and the paranoid psychoses with late onset, it they are characterized by a cyclic axis syndrome as described by the Vienna school. The cycloid psychoses are marked by an extreme surplus of Hp 2-2 (p less than 0.001) and an overweight of Gc 1-1 (p less than 0.05). Probably the Gc and Hp alleles play a role as risk factors or accidental effectors in the multifactorial genetic systems responsible for the biological background of psychoses. For both serum systems a selective interaction is discussed considering the vitamin D transport by the Gc proteins with the relation to neuronal consolidation and the possible influence of Hp 2-2 on transport and receptor functions.

  6. Ancestry informative markers and admixture proportions in northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L; Beuten, Joke; Leach, Robin J; Parra, Esteban J; Cruz-Lopez, Miguel; Rangel-Villalobos, Hector; Riego-Ruiz, Lina R; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Martinez-Rodriguez, Herminia G; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the ancestral admixture in the Mestizo population in northeastern Mexico, we genotyped 74 ancestral informative markers (AIMs) and 15 Y-single-nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) in 100 individuals. The Native American contribution is 56% (range: 27.4-81.2%), the European contribution is 38% (range: 16.7-70.5%) and the West African contribution is 6%. The results show a higher European contribution than was reported in other similar studies in the country, albeit with a predominant Native American ancestry. No remarkable differences in the ancestry proportions were observed using subgroups of 74, 54, 34 and 24 AIMs. The paternal lineage calculated by genotyping of 15 Y-SNPs, shows a major component of European and Eurasian ancestry markers ( approximately 78%), compared with Amerindian ( approximately 12%) and African markers (10%). This information will set a reference for future determinations of admixture proportions in the Mestizo population from Mexico and for population-based association studies of complex diseases.

  7. Demonstrating coprophagy with passage markers? The example of the plains viscacha (Lagostomus maximus).

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Besselmann, Dorothea; Schwarm, Angela; Ortmann, Sylvia; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2007-06-01

    Coprophagy, or the ingestion of a certain fraction of the faeces, is a well-known strategy of small herbivores. However, the question of whether a particular species actually uses this cryptic strategy or not is not easily answered experimentally. In this study we introduce the use of ingesta passage markers as a tool to verify coprophagy in species where individual observation might be difficult. In two captive adult plains viscachas (Lagostomus maximus), we demonstrate recurrent excretion peaks for both a fluid (cobald-EDTA) and a particle (chromium-mordanted fibre) marker, the most parsimonious explanation for which is faeces re-ingestion. In addition, a literature review of graphical presentations of passage marker excretion revealed such recurrent marker peaks in a large number of studies; however, these observations were rarely explicitly contributed to a coprophagic digestion strategy. The widespread use of semi-logarithmic plots or cumulative marker excretion curves in displaying passage studies makes recurrent marker excretion peaks less evident. We conclude that passage markers offer a comparatively easy way of assessing the incidence of coprophagy. Due to the reported absence of coprophagy in rabbits, a species well-known for using this strategy, on high-protein, low-fibre diets, it is recommended that investigations of the occurrence of coprophagy should be made with animals fed challenging, high-fibre diets.

  8. Determining finger segmental centers of rotation in flexion-extension based on surface marker measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Lee, Sang-Wook; Braido, Peter

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel algorithm for deriving finger segmental center of rotation (COR) locations during flexion-extension from measured surface marker motions in vivo. The algorithm employs an optimization routine minimizing the time-variance of the internal link lengths, and incorporates an empirically quantifiable relationship between the local movement of a surface marker around a joint (termed "surface marker excursion") and the joint flexion-extension. The latter relationship constrains and simplifies the optimization routine to make it computationally tractable. To empirically investigate this relationship and test the proposed algorithm, an experiment was conducted, in which hand cylinder-grasping movements were performed by 24 subjects (12 males and 12 females). Spherical retro-reflective markers were placed at various surface landmarks on the dorsal aspect of each subject's right (grasping) hand, and were measured during the movements by an opto-electronic system. Analysis of experimental data revealed a highly linear relationship between the "surface marker excursion" and the marker-defined flexion-extension angle: the average R(2) in linear regression ranged from 0.89 to 0.97. The algorithm successfully determined the CORs of the distal interphalangeal, proximal interphalangeal, and metacarpophalangeal joints of digits 2-5 during measured motions. The derived CORs appeared plausible as examined in terms of the physical locations relative to surface marker trajectories and the congruency across different joints and individuals.

  9. The linkage maps of Dendrobium species based on RAPD and SRAP markers.

    PubMed

    Xue, Dawei; Feng, Shangguo; Zhao, Hongyan; Jiang, Hua; Shen, Bo; Shi, Nongnong; Lu, Jiangjie; Liu, Junjun; Wang, Huizhong

    2010-03-01

    Dendrobium plants are used commonly as tonic herbs and health food in many Asian countries, especially in China. Here we report the genetic map construction of two Dendrobium species with a double pseudo-testcross strategy using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. A F(1) mapping population of 90 individuals was developed from a cross between D. officinale and D. hercoglossum. A total of 307 markers, including 209 RAPD and 98 SRAP, were identified and used for genetic linkage group (LG) analysis. The D. officinale linkage map consisted of 11 major linkage groups and 3 doublets, which covered 629.4 cM by a total of 62 markers with an average locus distance of 11.2 cM between two adjacent markers. The D. hercoglossum linkage map contained 112 markers mapped on 15 major and 4 minor linkage groups, spanning a total length of 1,304.6 cM with an average distance of 11.6 cM between two adjacent markers. The maps constructed in this study covered 92.7% and 82.7% of the D. hercoglossum and D. officinale genomes respectively, providing an important basis for the mapping of horticultural and medicinal traits and for the application of marker-assisted selection in Dendrobium breeding program.

  10. Usefulness of molecular markers in the diagnosis of occupational and recreational histoplasmosis outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Frías-De-León, María Guadalupe; Ramírez-Bárcenas, José Antonio; Rodríguez-Arellanes, Gabriela; Velasco-Castrejón, Oscar; Taylor, Maria Lucia; Reyes-Montes, María Del Rocío

    2017-03-01

    Histoplasmosis is considered the most important systemic mycosis in Mexico, and its diagnosis requires fast and reliable methodologies. The present study evaluated the usefulness of PCR using Hcp100 and 1281-1283(220) molecular markers in detecting Histoplasma capsulatum in occupational and recreational outbreaks. Seven clinical serum samples of infected individuals from three different histoplasmosis outbreaks were processed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to titre anti-H. capsulatum antibodies and to extract DNA. Fourteen environmental samples were also processed for H. capsulatum isolation and DNA extraction. Both clinical and environmental DNA samples were analysed by PCR with Hcp100 and 1281-1283(220) markers. Antibodies to H. capsulatum were detected by ELISA in all serum samples using specific antigens, and in six of these samples, the PCR products of both molecular markers were amplified. Four environmental samples amplified one of the two markers, but only one sample amplified both markers and an isolate of H. capsulatum was cultured from this sample. All PCR products were sequenced, and the sequences for each marker were analysed using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLASTn), which revealed 95-98 and 98-100 % similarities with the reference sequences deposited in the GenBank for Hcp100 and 1281-1283(220), respectively. Both molecular markers proved to be useful in studying histoplasmosis outbreaks because they are matched for pathogen detection in either clinical or environmental samples.

  11. Optimal marker-strategy clinical trial design to detect predictive markers for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yong; Liu, Suyu; Yuan, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In developing targeted therapy, the marker-strategy design (MSD) provides an important approach to evaluate the predictive marker effect. This design first randomizes patients into non-marker-based or marker-based strategies. Patients allocated to the non-marker-based strategy are then further randomized to receive either the standard or targeted treatments, while patients allocated to the marker-based strategy receive treatments based on their marker statuses. Little research has been done on the statistical properties of the MSD, which has led to some widespread misconceptions and placed clinical researchers at high risk of using inefficient designs. In this article, we show that the commonly used between-strategy comparison has low power to detect the predictive effect and is valid only under a restrictive condition that the randomization ratio within the non-marker-based strategy matches the marker prevalence. We propose a Wald test that is generally valid and also uniformly more powerful than the between-strategy comparison. Based on that, we derive an optimal MSD that maximizes the power to detect the predictive marker effect by choosing the optimal randomization ratios between the two strategies and treatments. Our numerical study shows that using the proposed optimal designs can substantially improve the power of the MSD to detect the predictive marker effect. We use a lung cancer trial to illustrate the proposed optimal designs.

  12. The elusive quantal individual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groenewold, H. J.

    1985-10-01

    In the formal hedgehog representation of quantum mechanics [5] (ambiguous) weights are derived for hedgehogs with a finite number of questions and answers, in particular applied to spin {1}/{2} and to correlated spin {1}/{2} pairs. Unavoidable negative weights are a clear signal for conceptual difficulties in quantum mechanical interpretation. If these weights had been presupposed to be non-negative, they could have led to Bell-like inequalities inconsistent with quantum mechanics. This is what has happened already in various special models. Owing to the indefinite weights, the hedgehog hypothesis of one-to-one mapping between individual physical samples and individual fictitious hedgehogs cannot be maintained. If no physical interpretation is conceived for the negative weights, the only way to avoid unsolved conceptual difficulties appears to resign (even in the hedgehog representation) to the skeptical ensemble interpretation [1], without theorizing about individual physical samples at all.

  13. Individual Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Andersen, Ture; Poulsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR), held in Nyborg, Denmark, in August 2015. The following collection of papers results from some of the work that was presented and discussed at the symposium. PMID:27566802

  14. cpDNA microsatellite markers for Lemna minor (Araceae): Phylogeographic implications1

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Gowher A.; Shah, Manzoor A.; Reshi, Zafar A.; Atangana, Alain R.; Khasa, Damase P.

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: A lack of genetic markers impedes our understanding of the population biology of Lemna minor. Thus, the development of appropriate genetic markers for L. minor promises to be highly useful for population genetic studies and for addressing other life history questions regarding the species. • Methods and Results: For the first time, we characterized nine polymorphic and 24 monomorphic chloroplast microsatellite markers in L. minor using DNA samples of 26 individuals sampled from five populations in Kashmir and of 17 individuals from three populations in Quebec. Initially, we designed 33 primer pairs, which were tested on genomic DNA from natural populations. Nine loci provided markers with two alleles. Based on genotyping of the chloroplast DNA fragments from 43 sampled individuals, we identified one haplotype in Quebec and 11 haplotypes in Kashmir, of which one occurs in 56% of the genotypes, one in 8%, and nine in 4%, respectively. There was a maximum of two alleles per locus. • Conclusions: These new chloroplast microsatellite markers for L. minor and haplotype distribution patterns indicate a complex phylogeographic history that merits further investigation. PMID:25202636

  15. Development and evaluation of microsatellite markers for the critically endangered birch Betula chichibuensis (Betulaceae).

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Yuji; Aihara, Hiroki; Handa, Yoshihiro; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Fujii, Masanori; Nakano, Koichiro; Hirao, Toshihide

    2017-05-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized for the critically endangered birch Betula chichibuensis (Betulaceae) to investigate the genetic structure of this species for conservation purposes. Sixteen microsatellite markers with di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeat motifs were developed and optimized using MiSeq paired-end sequencing. Of these, 14 were polymorphic, with two to five alleles per locus, in 47 individuals from two newly discovered populations of B. chichibuensis in Japan. Observed and unbiased expected heterozygosities per locus ranged from 0.000 to 0.617 and from 0.000 to 0.629, respectively. These markers were tested for cross-species amplification in B. maximowicziana, B. platyphylla var. japonica, and B. schmidtii. This set of microsatellite markers, the first developed for B. chichibuensis, will help elucidate spatial patterns of gene flow and levels of inbreeding in this species to aid its conservation.

  16. Development and characterisation of nine polymorphic microsatellite markers for Tephrosia calophylla Bedd. (Fabaceae).

    PubMed

    Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Lakshmi, P; Kumar, Devinder; Shaik, Jilani P; Alanazi, Mohammed; Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan

    2015-03-01

    Tephrosia calophylla Bedd. (Fabaceae) is an endangered tropical plant endemic to southwestern Ghats, India. The objective of this study was to contribute to the characterisation of the diversity of this rare species, which is necessary for its future conservation. Accordingly, microsatellite markers were designed, and their ability to detect polymorphisms was determined. Nine microsatellite markers were developed using genomic libraries, and all of the markers were successfully amplified in 42 individuals. Three to nine alleles per locus were observed, and the heterozygosity of the loci ranged from 0.381 to 0.905. The nine newly developed polymorphic markers recognise a sufficient number of varying loci to perform further studies on the conservation and breeding of this medicinal cultivar.

  17. Development and characterisation of nine polymorphic microsatellite markers for Tephrosia calophylla Bedd. (Fabaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Lakshmi, P.; Kumar, Devinder; Shaik, Jilani P.; Alanazi, Mohammed; Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan

    2014-01-01

    Tephrosia calophylla Bedd. (Fabaceae) is an endangered tropical plant endemic to southwestern Ghats, India. The objective of this study was to contribute to the characterisation of the diversity of this rare species, which is necessary for its future conservation. Accordingly, microsatellite markers were designed, and their ability to detect polymorphisms was determined. Nine microsatellite markers were developed using genomic libraries, and all of the markers were successfully amplified in 42 individuals. Three to nine alleles per locus were observed, and the heterozygosity of the loci ranged from 0.381 to 0.905. The nine newly developed polymorphic markers recognise a sufficient number of varying loci to perform further studies on the conservation and breeding of this medicinal cultivar. PMID:25737647

  18. Development of 10 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for the Indo-Pacific horned starfish, Protoreaster nodosus.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuichi; Yasuda, Nina; Matsuki, Yu; Arriesgado, Dan M; Lian, Chunlan; Fortes, Miguel D; Uy, Wilfredo H; Campos, Wilfredo L; Nakaoka, Masahiro; Taquet, Coralie; Suharsono; Nagai, Satoshi; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2013-09-01

    Ten novel polymorphic nuclear microsatellite simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were isolated from an Indo-Pacific horned starfish, Protoreaster nodosus. The isolated SSR markers provided polymorphisms of 2-9 alleles per locus in three populations obtained from Indonesia and the Philippines. The expected and observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.049 to 0.691 and from 0.050 to 0.800, respectively. Pairwise FST values among three populations ranged from 0.018 to 0.050 (global FST=0.031). All P. nodosus individuals collected from three populations exhibited different genotypes for the ten identified SSR markers, indicating that P. nodosus reproduces sexually. Then the developed SSR markers will be useful for studying the population and conservation genetics of P. nodosus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and characterization of twelve microsatellite markers for Porphyra linearis Greville.

    PubMed

    Varela-Álvarez, Elena; Paulino, Cristina; Serrão, Ester A

    2017-02-01

    The genus Porphyra (and its sister genus Pyropia) contains important red algal species that are cultivated and/or harvested for human consumption, sustaining a billion-dollar aquaculture industry. A vast amount of research has been focused on species of this genus, including studies on genetics and genomics among other areas. Twelve novel microsatellite markers were developed here for Porphyra linearis. Markers were characterized using 32 individuals collected from four natural populations of P. linearis with total heterozygosity varying from 0.098 to 0.916. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 18. All markers showed cross amplification with Porphyra umbilicalis and/or Porphyra dioica. These polymorphic microsatellite markers are useful for investigating population genetic diversity and differentiation in P. linearis and may become useful for other genetic research on the reproductive biology of this important species.

  20. Microsatellite DNA markers for delineating population structure and kinship among the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, T.L.; Eackles, M.S.; Henderson, A.P.; Bocetti, Carol I.; Currie, D.; Wunderle, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    We document the isolation and characterization of 23 microsatellite DNA markers for the endangered Kirtland's warbler (Dendroica kirtlandii), a Nearctic/Neotropical migrant passerine. This suite of markers revealed moderate to high levels of allelic diversity (averaging 7.7 alleles per locus) and heterozygosity (averaging 72%). Genotypic frequencies at 22 of 23 (95%) markers conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium expectations, and no linkage disequilibrium was observed in blood samples taken from 14 warblers found on the wintering grounds in the Bahamas archipelago. Multilocus genotypes resulting from this suite of markers should reduce the amount of resources required for initiating new genetic studies assessing breeding structure, parentage, demographics, and individual-level ecological interactions for D. kirtlandii. ?? 2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. The use of marker-assisted selection in animal breeding and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Williams, J L

    2005-04-01

    Improvement of livestock has focused on the selective breeding of individuals with superior phenotypes. With the development of increasingly advanced statistical methods that maximise selection for genetic gain, this simple approach has been extremely successful in increasing the quantity of agricultural output. However, information now available on the organisation and functioning of the genome could be used in breeding programmes to improve a range of traits. Many traits are under the control of several genetic loci, each of which contribute to the variation in the trait and hence are called quantitative trait loci (QTL). While genetic markers for QTL that are linked to the trait gene could be used to choose animals for selective breeding programmes, the most effective markers are the functional mutations within the trait genes. Strategies to identify markers for traits and the application of these markers are described by reference to examples of loci that control a range of different traits.

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers from the Chinese Medicinal Herb Atractylodes macrocephala (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Li; Shao, Zhong-Da; Wang, Zong-Chao; Fu, Cheng-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. (Asteraceae) is an economically important Chinese medicinal herb. In this study, 15 polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed from A. macrocephala using the compound microsatellite marker technique. Levels of polymorphism within the 15 markers were assessed using 83 individuals from two wild and two cultivated populations in China. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 20, with an average of 9.9 alleles. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.083 to 1.000 and from 0.097 to 0.938, respectively. These markers will be valuable for germplasm classification and identification, as well as for assessing the genetic diversity and spatial genetic structure among wild and cultivated populations of A. macrocephala. PMID:23443109

  3. Mexican American ancestry-informative markers: examination of population structure and marker characteristics in European Americans, Mexican Americans, Amerindians and Asians.

    PubMed

    Collins-Schramm, Heather E; Chima, Bill; Morii, Takanobu; Wah, Kimberly; Figueroa, Yolanda; Criswell, Lindsey A; Hanson, Robert L; Knowler, William C; Silva, Gabriel; Belmont, John W; Seldin, Michael F

    2004-02-01

    Markers with large differences in allele frequencies between ethnicities provide ancestry information that can be applied to genetic studies. We identified over 100 biallelic ancestry informative markers (AIMs) with large allele frequency differences between European Americans (EA) and Pima Amerindians from laboratory and database screens. For 35 of these markers, Mayan, Yavapai and Quechuan Amerindians were genotyped and compared with EA and Pima allele frequencies. Markers with large allele frequency differences between EA and one Amerindian tribe showed only small differences between the Amerindian tribes. Examination of structure in individuals demonstrated a clear separation of subjects of European from those of Amerindian ancestry, and similarity between individuals from disparate Amerindian populations. The AIMs demonstrated the variation in ancestral composition of individual Mexican Americans, providing evidence of applicability in admixture mapping and in controlling for structure in association tests. In addition, a high percentage of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected on the basis of large frequency differences between EA and Asian populations had large allele frequency differences between EA and Amerindians, suggesting an efficient method for greatly expanding AIMs for use in admixture mapping/structure analysis in Mexican Americans. Together, these data provide additional support for the practical application of admixture mapping in the Mexican American population.

  4. Augmented Reality Marker Hiding with Texture Deformation.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Norihiko; Sato, Tomokazu; Nakashima, Yuta; Yokoya, Naokazu

    2016-10-19

    Augmented reality (AR) marker hiding is a technique to visually remove AR markers in a real-time video stream. A conventional approach transforms a background image with a homography matrix calculated on the basis of a camera pose and overlays the transformed image on an AR marker region in a real-time frame, assuming that the AR marker is on a planar surface. However, this approach may cause discontinuities in textures around the boundary between the marker and its surrounding area when the planar surface assumption is not satisfied. This paper proposes a method for AR marker hiding without discontinuities around texture boundaries even under nonplanar background geometry without measuring it. For doing this, our method estimates the dense motion in the marker's background by analyzing the motion of sparse feature points around it, together with a smooth motion assumption, and deforms the background image according to it. Our experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in various environments with different background geometries and textures.

  5. Inflammatory markers in relation to long-term air pollution.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Nahid; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Beelen, Rob; Modig, Lars; Palli, Domenico; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Vineis, Paolo; Hoek, Gerard; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios Α; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-08-01

    Long-term exposure to ambient air pollution can lead to chronic health effects such as cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Systemic inflammation has been hypothesized as a putative biological mechanism contributing to these adverse health effects. We evaluated the effect of long-term exposure to air pollution on blood markers of systemic inflammation. We measured a panel of 28 inflammatory markers in peripheral blood samples from 587 individuals that were biobanked as part of a prospective study. Participants were from Varese and Turin (Italy) and Umea (Sweden). Long-term air pollution estimates of nitrogen oxides (NOx) were available from the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Linear mixed models adjusted for potential confounders were applied to assess the association between NOx and the markers of inflammation. Long-term exposure to NOx was associated with decreased levels of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-α in Italy, but not in Sweden. NOx exposure levels were considerably lower in Sweden than in Italy (Sweden: median (5th, 95th percentiles) 6.65 μg/m(3) (4.8, 19.7); Italy: median (5th, 95th percentiles) 94.2 μg/m(3) (7.8, 124.5)). Combining data from Italy and Sweden we only observed a significant association between long-term exposure to NOx and decreased levels of circulating IL-8. We observed some indication for perturbations in the inflammatory markers due to long-term exposure to NOx. Effects were stronger in Italy than in Sweden, potentially reflecting the difference in air pollution levels between the two cohorts.

  6. Immunocytochemical markers of neuronal maturation in human diagnostic neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Sarnat, Harvey B

    2015-01-01

    Histological descriptions of morphogenesis in human fetal brain and in malformations and tumours can now be supplemented by the timing and sequence of the maturation of individual neurons. In human neuropathology, this is principally achieved by immunocytochemical reactivities used as maturational markers of neuronal properties denoted by molecules and cell products. Cytological markers can appear early and then regress, often being replaced by more mature molecules, or might not exhibit the onset of immunoreactivity until a certain stage of neuronal differentiation is achieved, some early, others intermediate and some late during the maturational process. Inter-specific differences occur in some structures of the brain. The classification of markers of neuronal maturation can be based, in addition to those mentioned above, on several criteria: cytological localisation, water solubility, biochemical nature of the antigen, specificity and various technical factors. The most useful immunocytochemical markers of neuronal maturation in human neuropathology are NeuN, synaptophysin, calretinin and other calcium-binding molecules, various microtubule-associated proteins and chromogranins. Non-antibody histochemical stains that denote maturational processes include luxol fast blue for myelination, acridine orange fluorochrome for nucleic acids, mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and argentophilic impregnations. Neural crest derivatives of the peripheral nervous system, including chromaffin and neuroendocrine cells, have special features that are shared and others that differ greatly between lineages. Other techniques used in human diagnostic neuropathology, particularly as applied to tumours, include chromosomal and genetic analyses, the mTOR signalling pathway, BRAF V600E and other tumour-suppressor gene products, transcription products of developmental genes and the proliferation index of the tumour cells and of mitotic neuroepithelial cells.

  7. Appropriateness of tumor marker request: a case of study

    PubMed Central

    Trevisiol, Chiara; Fabricio, Aline S. C.

    2017-01-01

    Appropriateness is crucial to provide efficient and high-quality health services at affordable costs. Laboratory medicine is a sector of special interest for the investigation of inappropriateness, due to the high rate of technological innovation and its pivotal role in many diseases and clinical settings. Some subjective aspects related to either the patient or physician seem to have a major role on inappropriateness rates. Given the psychological impact of cancer on both patients and physicians, tumor markers represent a case of study for appropriateness. The assessment of inappropriateness of laboratory tests has been focused mainly on ordering patterns. Appropriateness can barely be appraised by matching the requested test with the clinical problem because clinical information on the test requisition form is usually inadequate. Monitoring inappropriateness through individual clinical information may be feasible in inpatient (clinical data are available), while an indirect approach should be used for outpatients. To estimate inappropriateness in outpatients our group developed innovative models based on comparison between the actually ordered and expected requests of tumor marker, calculated according to recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) applied to figures of cancer prevalence. The implementation of the model at national scale in Italy led to recognize a very high rate of overordering of tumor markers. The model was further focused by a dedicated algorithm to be adapted to different clinical conditions or organizational settings by applying performance indicators to cohort-wide structured information in electronic health records (EHRs). With this novel approach, we showed that inappropriateness is multifaceted even within the specific category of tumour markers. The model was effective in identifying both over- and underordering. Implementation of evidence based information and monitoring their impact on the clinical practice are parts of

  8. Functional characterization of the bladder cancer marker, BLCA-4.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Thu-Suong; Myers, Julie; Konety, Badrinath R; Barder, Timothy; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2004-02-15

    Bladder cancer is a common disease of the genitourinary tract for which the development of a noninvasive detection technique would have a significant impact on disease management. One of our previously identified bladder cancer-specific proteins, BLCA-4, appears to be associated with a "field effect" of the disease, and in clinical trials is able to separate individuals with bladder cancer from those without the disease with high sensitivity and specificity. The potential clinical utility of this marker has led to the analysis of its function in bladder cancer pathobiology. To additionally analyze the specificity of this marker, the expression in the urine of a variety of benign urologic conditions was analyzed. After cloning the gene encoding BLCA-4, functional aspects of the protein were analyzed by overexpressing it in cell systems, as well as its interaction with other transcription factors and in gel mobility shift assays. Finally, to determine the timing of expression in relation to the observance of bladder cancer, an animal model of the disease was examined. Expression of BLCA-4, the cDNA of which reveals that it is a novel member of the ETS transcription factor family, is not found in benign urologic conditions. Overexpression leads to increased growth rates of cells, and the protein interacts with other transcription factors. In vivo studies reveal that BLCA-4 expression occurs significantly before the observance of grossly visible tumors in an animal model of the disease. BLCA-4 is a bladder cancer marker that is highly specific and occurs early in the development of the disease. It appears to be a transcription factor that may play a role in the regulation of the gene expression in bladder cancer. BLCA-4 is a marker with significant clinical utility that may have an active role in the disease.

  9. Appropriateness of tumor marker request: a case of study.

    PubMed

    Gion, Massimo; Trevisiol, Chiara; Fabricio, Aline S C

    2017-07-01

    Appropriateness is crucial to provide efficient and high-quality health services at affordable costs. Laboratory medicine is a sector of special interest for the investigation of inappropriateness, due to the high rate of technological innovation and its pivotal role in many diseases and clinical settings. Some subjective aspects related to either the patient or physician seem to have a major role on inappropriateness rates. Given the psychological impact of cancer on both patients and physicians, tumor markers represent a case of study for appropriateness. The assessment of inappropriateness of laboratory tests has been focused mainly on ordering patterns. Appropriateness can barely be appraised by matching the requested test with the clinical problem because clinical information on the test requisition form is usually inadequate. Monitoring inappropriateness through individual clinical information may be feasible in inpatient (clinical data are available), while an indirect approach should be used for outpatients. To estimate inappropriateness in outpatients our group developed innovative models based on comparison between the actually ordered and expected requests of tumor marker, calculated according to recommendations of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) applied to figures of cancer prevalence. The implementation of the model at national scale in Italy led to recognize a very high rate of overordering of tumor markers. The model was further focused by a dedicated algorithm to be adapted to different clinical conditions or organizational settings by applying performance indicators to cohort-wide structured information in electronic health records (EHRs). With this novel approach, we showed that inappropriateness is multifaceted even within the specific category of tumour markers. The model was effective in identifying both over- and underordering. Implementation of evidence based information and monitoring their impact on the clinical practice are parts of

  10. A set of microsatellite markers with long core repeat optimized for grape (Vitis spp.) genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Guido; Marrazzo, Maria Teresa; Di Gaspero, Gabriele; Pfeiffer, Antonella; Morgante, Michele; Testolin, Raffaele

    2008-01-01

    Background Individual fingerprinting based on molecular markers has become a popular tool for studies of population genetics and analysis of genetic diversity in germplasm collections, including the solution of synonymy/homonymy and analysis of paternity and kinship. Genetic profiling of individuals is nowadays based on SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) markers, which have a number of positive features that make them superior to any other molecular marker developed so far. In humans, SSRs with core repeats three to five nucleotides long are preferred because neighbour alleles are more easily separated and distinguished from each other; while in plants, SSRs with shorter repeats, namely two-nucleotides long, are still in use although they suffer lower separation of neighbour alleles and uncomfortable stuttering. Results New microsatellite markers, containing tri-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide repeats, were selected from a total of 26,962 perfect microsatellites in the genome sequence of nearly homozogous grapevine PN40024, assembled from reads covering 8.4 X genome equivalents. Long nucleotide repeats were selected for fingerprinting, as previously done in many species including humans. The new grape SSR markers were tested for their reproducibility and information content in a panel of 48 grape cultivars. Allelic segregation was tested in progenies derived from two controlled crosses. Conclusion A list of 38 markers with excellent quality of peaks, high power of discrimination, and uniform genome distribution (1–3 markers/chromosome), is proposed for grape genotyping. The reasons for exclusion are given for those that were discarded. The construction of marker-specific allelic ladders is also described, and their use is recommended to harmonise allelic calls and make the data obtained with different equipment and by different laboratories fully comparable. PMID:19087321

  11. New microsatellite markers for bananas (Musa spp).

    PubMed

    Amorim, E P; Silva, P H; Ferreira, C F; Amorim, V B O; Santos, V J; Vilarinhos, A D; Santos, C M R; Souza Júnior, M T; Miller, R N G

    2012-04-27

    Thirty-four microsatellite markers (SSRs) were identified in EST and BAC clones from Musa acuminata burmannicoides var. Calcutta 4 and validated in 22 Musa genotypes from the Banana Germplasm Bank of Embrapa-CNPMF, which includes wild and improved diploids. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14. The markers were considered highly informative based on their polymorphism information content values; more than 50% were above 0.5. These SSRs will be useful for banana breeding programs, for studies of genetic diversity, germplasm characterization and selection, development of saturated genetic linkage maps, and marker assisted selection.

  12. DNA markers for identifying individual snowshoe hares using field-collected pellets

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Schwartz; Kristine L. Pilgrim; Kevin S. McKelvey; Pilar T. Rivera; Leonard F. Ruggiero

    2007-01-01

    Snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) abundance has been of interest to wildlife biologists, as hares are essential prey items for many rare and endangered predators. Snowshoe hare abundance has most commonly been estimated through indices such as pellet counts. While pellet counts may be useful in the areas they are developed and when hares are dense,...

  13. Neurophysiologically-informed markers of individual variability and pharmacological manipulation of human cortical gamma.

    PubMed

    Shaw, A D; Moran, R J; Muthukumaraswamy, S D; Brealy, J; Linden, D E; Friston, K J; Singh, K D

    2017-08-12

    The ability to quantify synaptic function at the level of cortical microcircuits from non-invasive data would be enormously useful in the study of neuronal processing in humans and the pathophysiology that attends many neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we provide proof of principle that one can estimate inter-and intra-laminar interactions among specific neuronal populations using induced gamma responses in the visual cortex of human subjects - using dynamic causal modelling based upon the canonical microcircuit (CMC; a simplistic model of a cortical column). Using variability in induced (spectral) responses over a large cohort of normal subjects, we find that the predominant determinants of gamma responses rest on recurrent and intrinsic connections between superficial pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. Furthermore, variations in beta responses were mediated by inter-subject differences in the intrinsic connections between deep pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. Interestingly, we also show that increasing the self-inhibition of superficial pyramidal cells suppresses the amplitude of gamma activity, while increasing its peak frequency. This systematic and nonlinear relationship was only disclosed by modelling the causes of induced responses. Crucially, we were able to validate this form of neurophysiological phenotyping by showing a selective effect of the GABA re-uptake inhibitor tiagabine on the rate constants of inhibitory interneurons. Remarkably, we were able to recover the pharmacodynamics of this effect over the course of several hours on a per subject basis. These findings speak to the possibility of measuring population specific synaptic function - and its response to pharmacological intervention - to provide subject-specific biomarkers of mesoscopic neuronal processes using non-invasive data. Finally, our results demonstrate that, using the CMC as a proxy, the synaptic mechanisms that underlie the gain control of neuronal message passing within and between different levels of cortical hierarchies may now be amenable to quantitative study using non-invasive (MEG) procedures. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Blood DNA Radiosensitivity May Be Predictive Marker for Efficacy of Radiation Therapy in Glioma Tumorbearing Individuals].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S D; Korytova, L I; Yamshanov, V A; Zhabina, R M; Semenov, A L; Krasnikova, V G

    2015-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies were conducted to evaluate the association between the blood DNA radiosensitivity, assessed by determining the original S-index ex vivo, and the response of gliomas to irradiation in vivo. Possible modifications of the latter after administration of iron-containing water (ICW) in rats were also explored. The study was performed on the rats with subcutaneously implanted experimental glioma-35. The tumors were locally X-irradiated with a single 15 Gy dose as a radiation therapy (RT). ICW (60-63 mg · Fe 2+/l) was administered as a drinking water for 3 days before treatment. The animals underwent blood sampling for analysis of the DNA concentration and leukocyte count. The DNA index was estimated 24 h after RT. The S-index was evaluated within 4 h before RT. The mean initial S-index in the blood samples of glioma-bearing rats was 0.73 ± 0.05. Addition of ICW ex vivo resulted in a significantly increased S-index in a half of the samples. In general, the irradiated rats, which had been given pretreatment with ICW and demonstrated an ex vivo increase of the S-index to > 1.0, showed the most marked inhibition of tumor progression and the smallest tumor volume 25 days after irradiation. They also exhibited the lowest rate of growth and the longest survival. Determination of the biochemical S-index and evaluation of its changes ex vivo caused by ICW may be predictive of the response of experimental glioma to irradiation with radiomodification. The S-index may serve as a predictive indicator in clinic of the efficient evaluation of RT in patients with glioma.

  15. Increased network centrality as markers of relapse risk in nicotine-dependent individuals treated with varenicline.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhujing; Huang, Peiyu; Wang, Chao; Qian, Wei; Yang, Yihong; Zhang, Minming

    2017-04-03

    Identifying smokers at high risk of relapse could improve the effectiveness of cessation therapies. Although altered regional brain function in smokers has been reported, whether the whole-brain functional organization differs smokers with relapse vulnerability from others remains unclear. Thus, the goal of this study is to investigate the baseline functional connectivity differences between relapsers and quitters. Using resting-state fMRI, we acquired images from 57 smokers prior to quitting attempts. After 12-week treatment with varenicline, smokers were divided into relapsers (n=36) and quitters (n=21) (quitter: continuously abstinent for weeks 9-12). The smoking cessation outcomes were cross-validated by self-reports and expired carbon monoxide. We then used eigenvector centrality (EC) mapping to identify the functional connectivity differences between relapsers and quitters. When compared to quitters, increased EC in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), left middle temporal gyrus (MTG) and cerebellum anterior lobe was observed in relapsers. In addition, a logistic regression analysis of EC data (with DLPFC, MTG and cerebellum included) predicted relapse with 80.7% accuracy. These findings suggest that the DLPFC, MTG and cerebellum may be important substrates of smoking relapse vulnerability. The data also suggest that relapse-vulnerable smokers can be identified before quit attempts, which could enable personalized treatment and improve smoking cessation outcomes.

  16. Genetic diversity of Saccharum complex using ISSR markers.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L A R; Machado, C A; Cardoso, M N; Oliveira, A C A; Amaral, A L; Rabbani, A R C; Silva, A V C; Ledo, A S

    2017-09-21

    Sugarcane (Saccharum sp, Poaceae) is native to Southeast Asia, and due to growing demand as raw material, its cultivation recently expanded to new frontiers. The genetic diversity analysis is essential for targeting strategies in the formation and maintenance of a germplasm. This study aimed to assess the genetic diversity of 26 accessions of sugarcane from the Active Germplasm Bank of Embrapa Coastal Tablelands, using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. Sixteen primers were used, resulting in 87 fragments with 91.13% of polymorphism. The similarity of the individuals ranged between 0.22 and 0.87. Individuals RB867515 and RB92579 were closer genetically, and the most distant ones were PI240785 and NSL 291970. Four distinct clusters were formed, using UPGMA. This information can be used to prioritize the selection of accessions for the conduction of hybridization in breeding and germplasm exchange actions.

  17. Individualized Instruction and Unipacs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Sylvester, Jr.

    Individualized instruction is an educational program in which grade levels and time units are designed to permit the student to work at his own pace and level with the use of unipacs. The unipac, a "unique package," is a specially designed group of learning activities based on specific behavioral objectives chosen by the student. Unipacs consist…

  18. Applied Music (Individual Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Background information and resources to help students in grades 9-12 in Texas pursue an individual study contract in applied music is presented. To fulfill a contract students must publicly perform from memory, with accompaniment as specified, three selections from a list of approved music for their chosen field (instrument or voice). Material…

  19. Individual-System Dialectic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Gerald R.

    1986-01-01

    Describes how dialectic metatherapy may be used to integrate various dimensions of human development as they pertain to symptom formation and therapy. A dialectical conceptualization of therapy allows one to systematically organize individually and systematically oriented ideas. Points out the paradoxical nature of therapy and how to use this…

  20. Individual Differences in Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on individual differences in learning. "Novice and Expert Learning: Impact on Training" (Barbara J. Daley) reports on a study in which 20 novice and expert nurses were interviewed to identify their different learning processes and the factors that facilitated or hindered their learning.…

  1. Perspectives in Individualized Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisgerber, Robert A.

    The readings presented here are an analysis of selected factors underlying the process of individualized learning. The book is organized topically and moves from theoretical considerations toward an analysis of important educational components. The readings come from a cross section of experts representing the areas of learning theory, individual…

  2. Individualized Systems of Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J. D.

    The techniques and effectiveness of systems for adjusting the pace, content, sequence, and style of instruction to fit the needs of individual learners are briefly reviewed. These systems are all designed to function in group instructional settings. They may be separated into print-oriented approaches (programmed instruction, personalized system…

  3. Applied Music (Individual Study).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Background information and resources to help students in grades 9-12 in Texas pursue an individual study contract in applied music is presented. To fulfill a contract students must publicly perform from memory, with accompaniment as specified, three selections from a list of approved music for their chosen field (instrument or voice). Material…

  4. The Individual Evaluation Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Dept. of Rehabilitation and Manpower Services. Materials Development Center.

    For people directly involved with vocational evaluation, rationale and guidelines are presented for developing individual evaluation plans (IEPs) to meet the needs of handicapped clients. Functions served by the IEP are discussed: (1) master plan of the purposes and objectives of an evaluation; (2) written record of the assessment techniques used,…

  5. Individual Differences in Affect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haviland, Jeannette

    This paper argues that infants' affect patterns are innate and are meaningful indicators of individual differences in internal state. Videotapes of seven infants' faces were coded using an ethogram; the movement of the eyebrow, eye direction, eye openness, mouth shape, mouth position, lip position, and tongue protrusion were assessed…

  6. Mapping Individual Logical Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smetana, Frederick O.

    1975-01-01

    A technique to measure and describe concisely a certain class of individual mental reasoning processes has been developed. The measurement is achieved by recording the complete dialog between a large, varied computerized information system with a broad range of logical operations and options and a human information seeker. (Author/RC)

  7. Accepting Individual Differences: Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Shirley; And Others

    The overview, the first in a series of five manuals, describes the goals of the AID (Accepting Individual Differences) curriculum of fostering acceptance and respect for differences, as exemplified by disabilities. Briefly discussed in the guide's section on the curriculum's rationale are need, assumptions (such as that handicapped individuals…

  8. Individualized Early Learning Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Margaret C.; And Others

    A description and discussion of the design, development, implementation, evaluation and effects of the Individualized Early Learning Program (IELP) are presented in this paper. Implemented in Project Follow Through and other school settings, the IELP gives priority to teaching basic skills and concepts needed for school performance to children in…

  9. EVOLUTION OF INDIVIDUAL CUMULUS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In this paper, the evolution of individual cumulus is studied with basic equations involving the drag effect of water droplets and the phase...the thermal conditions and other properties in the evolution process. It is shown that the drag and phase transformation effects on cloud

  10. AN INDIVIDUALIZED SCIENCE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LIPSON, JOSEPH I.

    THE LEARNING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH IS WORKING ON AN EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT TO EXAMINE METHODS OF INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION IN SCIENCE AT THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEVEL. AT THIS TIME, THE EXPERIMENT IS FOCUSED UPON NON-READERS IN GRADES K-3. EACH STUDENT RECEIVES A TAPE CARTRIDGE AND A PLASTIC BOX CONTAINING…

  11. AN INDIVIDUALIZED SCIENCE LABORATORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LIPSON, JOSEPH I.

    THE LEARNING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH IS WORKING ON AN EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT TO EXAMINE METHODS OF INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION IN SCIENCE AT THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL LEVEL. AT THIS TIME, THE EXPERIMENT IS FOCUSED UPON NON-READERS IN GRADES K-3. EACH STUDENT RECEIVES A TAPE CARTRIDGE AND A PLASTIC BOX CONTAINING…

  12. Individual Instruction: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dirr, Peter J.

    The bibliography lists 58 references (1969-74) on individualized instruction. Topics covered include computer assisted instruction, diagnostic teaching, and instructional materials, for handicapped as well as nonhandicapped children. Entries are listed in alphabetical order by author (or source) and usually include name of publisher, date, and…

  13. Individual Voices, Common Values.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausslein, Evelyn, Comp.

    1993-01-01

    This issue of the "Early Childhood Bulletin" describes some of the ways in which parents are learning to speak out on behalf of young children and their families being served through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part H early intervention programs. The document consists of four sections in which parents share…

  14. Individual Events Judging Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronn-Mills, Daniel

    Understanding communication (of which individual events is a part) requires a triangle among theory-practice-criticism, and any missing component dramatically hinders understanding and ability. Students compete in, and judges judge, forensics to better enhance communication understanding and abilities. The process of oral interpretation requires a…

  15. An Individualized Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Nancy B.

    The operating procedures of a university reading and study skills center for completely individualized reading instruction are described. The program is offered as a student service (no fee) on a voluntary, noncredit basis. A prepared set of instructional tapes is used whereby students can largely serve themselves, proceeding at their own rates,…

  16. Individual Folk Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Jean L.

    An individual folk anthology unit covering eight topics is described in this paper. The eight topics include (1) I have an identity, (2) my interesting name, (3) mandalas and sentences, (4) rhythms and rhymes of old times, (5) myths of my childhood, (6) folk legends/old and new, (7) aspects of folklore, and (8) slang. The activities accompanying…

  17. Identification of DNA-microsatellite markers for the characterization of somatic embryos in Quercus suber.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Garay, Arancha; Bueno, Angeles; Pintos, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear DNA-microsatellite markers led the possibility to characterize individually both Quercus suber trees and somatic embryos. The genotype inferred by SSR markers opens the possibility to obtain a fingerprint for clonal lines identification. Furthermore, allow to infer the origin of somatic embryos from haploid cells (microspores) or from diploid tissues. Using few SSR markers from other Quercus species and an automatic system based in fluorescence, it is possible to obtain a high discrimination power between genotypes. This method is sufficient to assign tissues to an individual tree with high statistical certainty. Nevertheless, it is necessary to take care to select the adequate DNA extraction method to avoid PCR inhibitors present in diverse Q. suber tissues.

  18. Breakpoint analysis: Precise localization of genetic markers by means of nonstatistical computation using relatively few genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Elsner, T.I.; Albertsen, H.; Gerken, S.C.; Cartwright, P.; White, R.

    1995-02-01

    Placing new markers on a previously existing genetic map by using conventional methods of multilocus linkage analysis requires that a large number of reference families be genotyped. This paper presents a methodology for placing new markers on existing genetic maps by genotyping only a few individuals in a selected subset of the reference panel. We show that by identifying meiotic breakpoint events within existing genetic maps and genotyping individuals who exhibit these events, along with one nonrecombinant sibling and their parents, we can determine precise locations for new markers even within subcentimorgan chromosomal regions. This method also improves detection of errors in genotyping and assists in the observation of chromosome behavior in specific regions. 31 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Microsatellite markers for genetic studies of the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda.

    PubMed

    Pavinato, V A C; Martinelli, S; de Lima, P F; Zucchi, M I; Omoto, C

    2013-02-08

    We developed six microsatellite markers for the fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The SSR loci were isolated with enriched genomic library protocol by using native individuals as a genome source for markers. These loci were characterized in 48 individuals and they were tested for the ability to identify candidate migrants exchanged among the samples. The number of alleles per locus ranged from 5 to 18 (10.8 on average). The observed polymorphism information content ranged from 0.172 to 0.891. Beside the lower efficiency to obtain SSR loci, the six microsatellites were polymorphic and sufficiently discriminant for the genetic studies of S. frugiperda; it allowed us to identify migrants with both NJ clustering and the Bayesian methods. These markers will be useful for molecular ecology studies of this highly polyphagous species in order to understand the processes that determine genetic differentiation in the complex agro-ecosystems that it infests and improve local integrated pest management practices.

  20. Increased expression of astrocyte markers in schizophrenia: Association with neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Catts, Vibeke Sørensen; Wong, Jenny; Fillman, Stu Gregory; Fung, Samantha Jane; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2014-08-01

    While schizophrenia may have a progressive component, the evidence for neurodegenerative processes as indicated by reactive astrocytes is inconclusive. We recently identified a subgroup of individuals with schizophrenia with increased expression of inflammatory markers in prefrontal cortex, and hypothesized that this subgroup would also have reactive astrocytes. We measured glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and protein levels by immunoblotting in grey matter homogenate from 37 individuals with schizophrenia and 37 unaffected controls. We examined the morphology of GFAP-positive astrocytes in immunostained sections of middle frontal gyrus. We tested if GFAP expression or astrocyte morphology were altered in people with schizophrenia with increased expression of inflammatory markers. We used RNA-Seq data on a subset of patients and controls (n=20/group) to ascertain whether mRNA transcripts associated with astrogliosis were elevated in the individuals with active neuroinflammation. GFAP (mRNA and protein) levels and astrocyte morphology were not significantly different between people with schizophrenia and controls overall. However, individuals with schizophrenia with neuroinflammation had increased expression of GFAP mRNA (t(33)=2.978, p=0.005), hypertrophic astrocyte morphology (χ(2)(2)=6.281, p=0.043), and statistically significant elevated expression of three mRNA transcripts previously associated with astrogliosis. We found clear evidence of astrogliosis in a subset of people with schizophrenia. We suggest that the lack of astrogliosis reported in previous studies may be due to cohort differences in aetiopathology, illness stage, treatment exposure, or a failure to examine subsets of people with schizophrenia. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  1. Expression of lymphatic markers during avian and mouse cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Yang, Ke; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Wikenheiser, Jamie; Bader, David; Barnett, Joey; Austin, Anita; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Watanabe, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    The adult heart has been reported to have an extensive lymphatic system, yet the development of this important system during cardiogenesis is still largely unexplored. The nuclear-localized transcription factor Prox-1 identified a sheet of Prox-1-positive cells on the developing aorta and pulmonary trunk in avian and murine embryos just prior to septation of the four heart chambers. The cells coalesced into a branching lymphatic network that spread within the epicardium to cover the heart. These vessels eventually expressed the lymphatic markers LYVE-1, VEGFR-3, and podoplanin. Before the Prox-1-positive cells were detected in the mouse epicardium, LYVE-1, a homologue of the CD44 glycoprotein, was primarily expressed in individual epicardial cells. Similar staining patterns were observed for CD44 in avian embryos. The proximity of these LYVE-1/CD44-positive mesenchymal cells to Prox-1-positive vessels suggests that they may become incorporated into the lymphatics. Unexpectedly, we detected LYVE-1/PECAM/VEGFR-3-positive vessels within the embryonic and adult myocardium which remained Prox-1/podoplanin-negative. Lymphatic markers were surprisingly found in adult rat and embryonic mouse epicardial cell lines, with Prox-1 also exhibiting nuclear-localized expression in primary cultures of embryonic avian epicardial cells. Our data identified three types of cells in the embryonic heart expressing lymphatic markers: (1) Prox-1-positive cells from an extracardiac source that migrate within the serosa of the outflow tract into the epicardium of the developing heart, (2) individual LYVE-1-positive cells in the epicardium that may be incorporated into the Prox-1-positive lymphatic vasculature, and (3) LYVE-1-positive cells/vessels in the myocardium that do not become Prox-1-positive even in the adult heart. PMID:19938109

  2. Sarcoidosis: Immunopathogenesis and Immunological Markers

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Wei Sheng Joshua; Herbert, Cristan; Thomas, Paul S.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disorder invariably affecting the lungs. It is a disease with noteworthy variations in clinical manifestation and disease outcome and has been described as an “immune paradox” with peripheral anergy despite exaggerated inflammation at disease sites. Despite extensive research, sarcoidosis remains a disease with undetermined aetiology. Current evidence supports the notion that the immune response in sarcoidosis is driven by a putative antigen in a genetically susceptible individual. Unfortunately, there currently exists no reliable biomarker to delineate the disease severity and prognosis. As such, the diagnosis of sarcoidosis remains a vexing clinical challenge. In this review, we outline the immunological features of sarcoidosis, discuss the evidence for and against various candidate etiological agents (infective and noninfective), describe the exhaled breath condensate, a novel method of identifying immunological biomarkers, and suggest other possible immunological biomarkers to better characterise the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. PMID:26464848

  3. Risk factors for atherosclerosis in young individuals.

    PubMed

    Misra, A

    2000-06-01

    Atherosclerosis starts in childhood, and is accelerated in some individuals. A cluster of clinical and biochemical factors constitute the risk profile for many of them, perhaps most important being metabolic insulin resistance syndrome. Insulin resistance and its components for children and adolescents, especially obesity and dyslipidemia, are generators of hypertension, glucose intolerance and complications of atherosclerosis in adulthood. Some individuals are genetically predisposed, particularly those with the family history of such disorders. For many subjects, there is 'tracking' of metabolic and lifestyle factors from early age to adulthood. Several new risk factors of atherosclerosis (e.g. level of lipoprotein (a), procoagulant state, hyperhomocysteinemia, low birth weight and adverse in-utero environment, and possibly inflammatory markers) are current and potentially future areas of research concerning children and young individuals. Definition of and research on new and hitherto not investigated factors and formulation of strategies to neutralize the known factors are of paramount importance for primary prevention of atherosclerosis. Simple and effective measures for prevention include increasing awareness of the diseases, maintenance of ideal body weight, regular physical exercise, avoidance of smoking and chewing of tobacco, eating a balanced diet, and early periodic monitoring of blood pressure and metabolic status. These measures, starting from childhood, should be applied to all and in particular to the susceptible offspring, predisposed individuals, and populations.

  4. Inflammatory Markers in Recent Onset Psychosis and Chronic Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Faith; Stallings, Cassie; Origoni, Andrea; Schroeder, Jennifer; Katsafanas, Emily; Schweinfurth, Lucy; Savage, Christina; Khushalani, Sunil; Yolken, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Immune markers have been associated with schizophrenia, but few studies have examined multiple markers in both recent onset and chronic schizophrenia patients. Methods. The sample of 588 individuals included 79 with recent onset psychosis, 249 with chronic schizophrenia, and 260 controls. A combined inflammation score was calculated by principal components factor analysis of the levels of C-reactive protein, Pentraxin 3, and IgG antibodies to gliadin, casein, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae measured in blood samples. Inflammation scores among groups were compared by multivariate analyses. Results. The chronic schizophrenia group showed significant elevations in the combined inflammation score compared with controls. The recent onset group surprisingly showed a reduction in the combined inflammation score. Consistent with these findings, the chronic schizophrenia group had significantly increased odds of a combined inflammation score greater than the 75th and the 90th percentile of that of the controls. The recent onset group had significantly increased odds of a combined inflammation score less than the 10th and the 25th percentile level of the controls. Conclusions. The recent onset of psychosis may be associated with inherent deficits in innate immunity. Individuals later in the course of disease may have increased levels of innate immunity. The reasons for these changes are not known with certainty but may be related to compensatory increases as the disease progresses. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine the course of immune abnormalities in schizophrenia and their role in the clinical manifestations of the disorder. PMID:26294704

  5. Genetic linkage maps of Eucalyptus grandis and Eucalyptus urophylla using a pseudo-testcross: mapping strategy and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Grattapaglia, D; Sederoff, R

    1994-08-01

    We have used a "two-way pseudo-testcross" mapping strategy in combination with the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay to construct two moderate density genetic linkage maps for species of Eucalyptus. In the cross between two heterozygous individuals many single-dose RAPD markers will be heterozygous in one parent, null in the other and therefore segregate 1:1 in their F1 progeny following a testcross configuration. Meiosis and gametic segregation in each individual can be directly and efficiently analyzed using RAPD markers. We screened 305 primers of arbitrary sequence, and selected 151 to amplify a total of 558 markers. These markers were grouped at LOD 5.0, theta = 0.25, resulting in the maternal Eucalyptus grandis map having a total of 240 markers into 14 linkage groups (1552 cM) and the paternal Eucalyptus urophylla map with 251 markers in 11 linkage groups (1101 cM) (n = 11 in Eucalyptus). Framework maps ordered with a likelihood support > or = 1000:1 were assembled covering 95% of the estimated genome size in both individuals. Characterization of genome complexity of a sample of 48 mapped random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers indicate that 53% amplify from low copy regions. These are the first reported high coverage linkage maps for any species of Eucalyptus and among the first for any hardwood tree species. We propose the combined use of RAPD markers and the pseudo-testcross configuration as a general strategy for the construction of single individual genetic linkage maps in outbred forest trees as well as in any highly heterozygous sexually reproducing living organisms. A survey of the occurrence of RAPD markers in different individuals suggests that the pseudo-testcross/RAPD mapping strategy should also be efficient at the intraspecific level and increasingly so with crosses of genetically divergent individuals. The ability to quickly construct single-tree genetic linkage maps in any forest species opens the way for a shift from the

  6. Genetic variability and structure of Quercus brantii assessed by ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers.

    PubMed

    Alikhani, Leila; Rahmani, Mohammad-Shafie; Shabanian, Naghi; Badakhshan, Hedieh; Khadivi-Khub, Abdollah

    2014-11-15

    Persian oak (Quercus brantii Lindl.) is one of the most important woody species of the Zagros forests in Iran. Three molecular marker techniques: start codon targeted (SCoT), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and inter-retrotransposon amplified polymorphism (IRAP) markers were compared for fingerprinting of 125 individuals of this species collected from different geographical locations of north-west of Iran. A total of 233 bands were amplified by 18 ISSR primers, of which 224 (96.10%) were polymorphic, and 126 polymorphic bands (97.65%) were observed in 129 bands amplified by 10 IRAP primers. Besides, 118 bands were observed for all 10 SCoT primers, of which 113 were polymorphic (95.71%). Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for ISSR, IRAP and SCoT markers was 0.30, 0.32 and 0.38, respectively, and this revealed that SCoT markers were more informative than IRAP and ISSR for the assessment of diversity among individuals. Based on the three different molecular types, cluster analysis revealed that 125 individuals taken for the analysis can be divided into three distinct clusters. The Jaccard's genetic similarity based on the combined data ranged from 0.23 to 0.76. These results suggest that efficiency of SCoT, IRAP and ISSR markers was relatively the same in fingerprinting of individuals. All molecular marker types revealed a low genetic differentiation among populations, indicating the possibility of gene flow between the studied populations. These results have an important implication for Persian oak (Q. brantii) germplasm characterization, improvement, and conservation.

  7. DNA marker technology for wildlife conservation.

    PubMed

    Arif, Ibrahim A; Khan, Haseeb A; Bahkali, Ali H; Al Homaidan, Ali A; Al Farhan, Ahmad H; Al Sadoon, Mohammad; Shobrak, Mohammad

    2011-07-01

    Use of molecular markers for identification of protected species offers a greater promise in the field of conservation biology. The information on genetic diversity of wildlife is necessary to ascertain the genetically deteriorated populations so that better management plans can be established for their conservation. Accurate classification of these threatened species allows understanding of the species biology and identification of distinct populations that should be managed with utmost care. Molecular markers are versatile tools for identification of populations with genetic crisis by comparing genetic diversities that in turn helps to resolve taxonomic uncertainties and to establish management units within species. The genetic marker analysis also provides sensitive and useful tools for prevention of illegal hunting and poaching and for more effective implementation of the laws for protection of the endangered species. This review summarizes various tools of DNA markers technology for application in molecular diversity analysis with special emphasis on wildlife conservation.

  8. Potential markers of preeclampsia – a review

    PubMed Central

    Grill, Simon; Rusterholz, Corinne; Zanetti-Dällenbach, Rosanna; Tercanli, Sevgi; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Hahn, Sinuhe; Lapaire, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and fetal/neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The early identification of patients with an increased risk for preeclampsia is therefore one of the most important goals in obstetrics. The availability of highly sensitive and specific physiologic and biochemical markers would allow not only the detection of patients at risk but also permit a close surveillance, an exact diagnosis, timely intervention (e.g. lung maturation), as well as simplified recruitment for future studies looking at therapeutic medications and additional prospective markers. Today, several markers may offer the potential to be used, most likely in a combinatory analysis, as predictors or diagnostic tools. We present here the current knowledge on the biology of preeclampsia and review several biochemical markers which may be used to monitor preeclampsia in a future, that, we hope, is not to distant from today. PMID:19602262

  9. (ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  10. MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  11. [Application of tumour markers in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Keuren, Jeffrey F W; Thomas, Chris M G; Bonfrèr, J M G Hans; Sweep, C G J Fred; Boonstra, Joke G

    2009-01-01

    Usefully requesting and applying serum tumour markers in diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. It should be noted that tumour markers are used for varying purposes: screening, diagnosis, staging and prognostic evaluation, detection of recurrence and treatment monitoring. Due to the poor sensitivity and specificity of current tumour markers, most are not suitable for screening an asymptomatic population. Further, the benefits of an improved prognosis by early detection should be weighed against a poorer quality of life and the cost of substantial over-diagnosis and over-treatment. Serum tumour markers are particularly applicable in treatment monitoring and detection of recurrence. Sometimes they can be used to support the diagnostic process and give useful prognostic information.

  12. MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  13. (ISEA) MOLECULAR MARKER ANALYSIS OF DEARS SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source apportionment based on organic molecular markers provides a promising approach for meeting the Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) objective of comparing source contributions between community air monitoring stations and various neighborhoods. Source appor...

  14. DNA marker technology for wildlife conservation

    PubMed Central

    Arif, Ibrahim A.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Bahkali, Ali H.; Al Homaidan, Ali A.; Al Farhan, Ahmad H.; Al Sadoon, Mohammad; Shobrak, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Use of molecular markers for identification of protected species offers a greater promise in the field of conservation biology. The information on genetic diversity of wildlife is necessary to ascertain the genetically deteriorated populations so that better management plans can be established for their conservation. Accurate classification of these threatened species allows understanding of the species biology and identification of distinct populations that should be managed with utmost care. Molecular markers are versatile tools for identification of populations with genetic crisis by comparing genetic diversities that in turn helps to resolve taxonomic uncertainties and to establish management units within species. The genetic marker analysis also provides sensitive and useful tools for prevention of illegal hunting and poaching and for more effective implementation of the laws for protection of the endangered species. This review summarizes various tools of DNA markers technology for application in molecular diversity analysis with special emphasis on wildlife conservation. PMID:23961128

  15. A Study of the Acquisition of Discourse Markers by Chinese Learners of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bu, Jiemin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the acquisition of discourse markers by Chinese learners of English in terms of gender, style and individual identity. The subjects of the study are 15 female university students and 15 male university students. The data is collected by means of audio recording in the classroom discussion and in the interviews. The examined…

  16. Molecular characterization of the marker chromosome associated with cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Mears, A. J.; Duncan, A. M.; Budarf, M. L.; Emanuel, B. S.; Sellinger, B.; Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Greenberg, C. R.; McDermid, H. E.

    1994-01-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome which is derived from duplicated regions of 22pter-22q11.2. In this study we have used dosage and RFLP analyses on 10 CES patients with marker chromosomes, by using probes to five loci mapped to 22q11.2. The sequences recognized by the probes D22S9, D22S43, and D22S57 are in four copies in all patients, but the sequences at the more distal loci, D22S36 and D22S75, are duplicated only in some individuals. D22S36 is present in three copies in some individuals, and D22S75 is present in two copies in the majority of cases. Only three individuals have a duplication of the most distal locus examined (D22S75), and these individuals have the largest marker chromosomes identified in this study. From the dosage analysis it was found that the marker chromosomes are variable in size and can be asymmetric in nature. There is no obvious correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the size of the duplication. The distal boundary of the CES critical region (D22S36) is proximal to that of DiGeorge syndrome, a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome of 22q11.2. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7912885

  17. An improved consensus linkage map of barley based on flow-sorted chromosomes and SNP markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping have made it easier to combine information from different mapping populations into consensus genetic maps, which provide increased marker density and genome coverage compared to individual maps. Previously, a SNP-based genotyping platform was developed a...

  18. Characterization of twelve microsatellite markers for the native redbud tree (Cercis canadensis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eight microsatellite DNA markers were developed for studies of gene flow in the redbud tree (Cercis canadensis), which is native to North America. The loci were unlinked and polymorphic in a sample of 22 individuals collected from a single population in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Allele number ranged fr...

  19. Molecular characterization of the marker chromosome associated with cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mears, A J; Duncan, A M; Budarf, M L; Emanuel, B S; Sellinger, B; Siegel-Bartelt, J; Greenberg, C R; McDermid, H E

    1994-07-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome which is derived from duplicated regions of 22pter-22q11.2. In this study we have used dosage and RFLP analyses on 10 CES patients with marker chromosomes, by using probes to five loci mapped to 22q11.2. The sequences recognized by the probes D22S9, D22S43, and D22S57 are in four copies in all patients, but the sequences at the more distal loci, D22S36 and D22S75, are duplicated only in some individuals. D22S36 is present in three copies in some individuals, and D22S75 is present in two copies in the majority of cases. Only three individuals have a duplication of the most distal locus examined (D22S75), and these individuals have the largest marker chromosomes identified in this study. From the dosage analysis it was found that the marker chromosomes are variable in size and can be asymmetric in nature. There is no obvious correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the size of the duplication. The distal boundary of the CES critical region (D22S36) is proximal to that of DiGeorge syndrome, a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome of 22q11.2.

  20. Verification of genetic identity of introduced cacao germplasm in Ghana using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Accurate identification of individual genotypes is important for cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) breeding, germplasm conservation and seed propagation. The development of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers in cacao offers an effective way to use a high-throughput genotyping system for cacao gen...

  1. Molecular characterization of the marker chromosome associated with cat eye syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, A.J.; McDermid, H.E. ); Duncan, A.M.V. ); Budarf, M.L.; Emanuel, B.S.; Sellinger, B. ); Siegel-Bartelt, J. ); Greenberg, C.R. )

    1994-07-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a supernumerary bisatellited marker chromosome which is derived from duplicated regions of 22pter-22q11.2. In this study the authors have used dosage and RFLP analyses on 10 CES patients with marker chromosomes, by using probes to five loci mapped to 22q11.2. The sequences recognized by the probes D22S9, D22S43, and D22S57 are in four copies in all patients, but the sequences at the more distal loci, D22S36 and D22S75, are duplicated only in some individuals. D22S36 is present in three copies in some individuals, and D22S75 is present in two copies in the majority of cases. Only three individuals have a duplication of the most distal locus examined (D22S75), and these individuals have the largest marker chromosomes identified in this study. From the dosage analysis it was found that the marker chromosomes are variable in size and can be asymmetric in nature. There is no obvious correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the size of the duplication. The distal boundary of the CES critical region (D22S36) is proximal to that of DiGeorge syndrome, a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome of 22q11.2. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Genetics and biological markers in urachal cancer

    PubMed Central

    van Rhijn, Bas W. G.

    2016-01-01

    Urachal cancer (UraC) is a rare tumor entity that usually develops at the basis of the remnant embryologic urachus. Consisting of mostly adenocarcinomas, most patients present with secondary symptoms due to an advanced stage with urinary bladder infiltration. One third of patients are already metastasized at presentation rendering them unsuitable for curative surgical treatment. In order to improve staging, treatment and follow-up, adequate knowledge about the genetic origin and potential markers is necessary. This paper reviews the English literature until December 2015. Pathologists argue for and against metaplasia or remnant enteric cells as origin for the adenomatous tissue found in UraC. Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, GNAS and Her2 have been associated with UraC. Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers like CEA, 34βE12, Claudin-18 and RegIV are indicative for mucous producing UraC. So far, IHC markers fail as prognosticators when matched to clinical data. Little is known about serum markers for UraC. CEA, CA19-9, CA125 and CA724 are mentioned as being elevated in UraC by some reports. Regarding the literature for biological markers in UraC, knowledge is mostly derived from case reports or cohort studies mentioning markers or predictors. More genetic research is needed to show whether UraC stems from progenitor cells of the cloaca or is due to metaplasia of transitional cells. Few IHC markers have shown indicative potential for UraC. A useful panel for differential diagnostics and clinicopathologic prognostication needs to be developed. Serum markers show very little potential for neither diagnosis nor follow-up in UraC. Further research on larger cohorts is necessary. PMID:27785422

  3. Smart magnetic markers use in hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Bogacki, Jan

    2016-11-01

    One of the main challenges and unknowns during shale gas exploration is to assess the range and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing. It is also essential to assess the distribution of proppant, which keeps the fracture pathways open. Solving these problems may considerably increase the efficiency of the shale gas extraction. Because of that, the idea of smart magnetic marker, which can be detected when added to fracturing fluid, has been considered for a long time. This study provides overview of the possibilities of magnetic marker application for shale gas extraction. The imaging methods using electromagnetic markers, are considered or developed in two directions. The first possibility is the markers' electromagnetic activity throughout the whole volume of the fracturing fluid. Thus, it can be assumed that the whole fracturing fluid is the marker. Among these type of hydraulic fracturing solutions, ferrofluid could be considered. The second possibility is marker, which is just one of many components of the fracturing fluid. In this case feedstock magnetic materials, ferrites and nanomaterials could be considered. Magnetic properties of magnetite could be too low and ferrofluids' or nanomaterials' price is unacceptably high. Because of that, ferrites, especially ZnMn ferrites seems to be the best material for magnetic marker. Because of the numerous applications in electronics, it is cheap and easily available, although the price is higher, then that of magnetite. The disadvantage of using ferrite, could be too small mechanical strength. It creates an essential need for combining magnetic marker with proppant into magnetic-ceramic composite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of multi-InDels as novel markers to analyze 13 X-chromosome haplotype loci for forensic purposes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangyao; Ye, Yi; Luo, Haibo; Hou, Yiping

    2015-12-01

    Many studies have been proposed to identify insertion/deletion (InDel) polymorphisms in humans for forensic genetic studies. However, the discriminatory power of InDels is limited by the poor polymorphisms of diallelic markers. To improve their discriminatory power, we developed multi-InDel, a novel autosomal marker comprising more than two InDel loci that are tightly linked by their physical position and combined into a specific marker by a pair of PCR primers. This strategy gives at least three haplotypes for each multi-InDel marker. Such markers can be potentially very useful in forensic applications. In this study, we focused on multi-InDel markers located on X chromosome (ChrX). A multiplex system with 13 multi-InDel markers, including 28 InDel loci in ChrX, was developed. To validate the multi-InDel panel, the haplotype distribution in a population sample and in a set of pedigrees was investigated. This study demonstrates usefulness of these markers for individual identification and relationship studies. We highlight the fact that the multi-InDel markers located on ChrX can provide new supporting information for complex kinship testing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Genetic linkage mapping in peach using morphological, RFLP and RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, S; Belthoff, L E; He, G; Estager, A E; Scorza, R; Verde, I; Ballard, R E; Baird, W V; Callahan, A; Monet, R; Abbott, A G

    1995-03-01

    We have constructed a genetic linkage map of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] consisting of RFLP, RAPD and morphological markers, based on 71 F2 individuals derived from the self-fertilization of four F1 individuals of a cross between 'New Jersey Pillar' and KV 77119. This progeny, designated as the West Virginia (WV) family, segregates for genes controlling canopy shape, fruit flesh color, and flower petal color, size and number. The segregation of 65 markers, comprising 46 RFLP loci, 12 RAPD loci and seven morphological loci, was analyzed. Low-copy genomic and cDNA probes were used in the RFLP analysis. The current genetic map for the WV family contains 47 markers assigned to eight linkage groups covering 332 centi Morgans (cM) of the peach nuclear genome. The average distance between two adjacent markers is 8 cM. Linkage was detected between Pillar (Pi) and double flowers (Dl) RFLP markers linked to Pi and flesh color (γ) loci were also found. Eighteen markers remain unassigned. The individuals analyzed for linkage were not a random sample of all F2 trees, as an excess of pillar trees were chosen for analysis. Because of this, Pi and eight other markers that deviated significantly from the expected Mendelian ratios (e.g., 1∶2∶1 or 3∶1) were not eliminated from the linkage analysis. Genomic clones that detect RFLPs in the WV family also detect significant levels of polymorphism among the 34 peach cultivars examined. Unique fingerprint patterns were created for all the cultivars using only six clones detecting nine RFLP fragments. This suggests that RFLP markers from the WV family have a high probability of being polymorphic in crosses generated with other peach cultivars, making them ideal for anchor loci. This possibility was examined by testing RFLP markers developed with the WV family in three other unrelated peach families. In each of these three peach families respectively 43%, 54% and 36% of RFLP loci detected in the WV family were also polymorphic

  6. Thinking individuation forward.

    PubMed

    Tresan, David

    2007-02-01

    This paper extends Jung's theory of individuation as faithfully elaborated by Joseph L. Henderson in his authoritative book Thresholds of Initiation. It addresses analyses that continue over very many years with analysands said to be individuated and proposes psychodynamics that explain and support such work that is otherwise beyond formal theoretical justification. In so doing, the paper addresses both Jung's and Henderson's refusal to explore the relevance of metaphysics for psychology and offers both a theoretical corrective for this shortcoming and a clinical illustration in support of an expanded point of view. In the course of the paper, personal material from interviews with Dr. Henderson, aged 101, serve as a substrate, both to support the above considerations and to shed new light on the development of his thought that led to Thresholds of Initiation.

  7. Predicting Individual Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    To make informed decisions about travel and vehicle purchase, consumers need unbiased and accurate information of the fuel economy they will actually obtain. In the past, the EPA fuel economy estimates based on its 1984 rules have been widely criticized for overestimating on-road fuel economy. In 2008, EPA adopted a new estimation rule. This study compares the usefulness of the EPA's 1984 and 2008 estimates based on their prediction bias and accuracy and attempts to improve the prediction of on-road fuel economies based on consumer and vehicle attributes. We examine the usefulness of the EPA fuel economy estimates using a large sample of self-reported on-road fuel economy data and develop an Individualized Model for more accurately predicting an individual driver's on-road fuel economy based on easily determined vehicle and driver attributes. Accuracy rather than bias appears to have limited the usefulness of the EPA 1984 estimates in predicting on-road MPG. The EPA 2008 estimates appear to be equally inaccurate and substantially more biased relative to the self-reported data. Furthermore, the 2008 estimates exhibit an underestimation bias that increases with increasing fuel economy, suggesting that the new numbers will tend to underestimate the real-world benefits of fuel economy and emissions standards. By including several simple driver and vehicle attributes, the Individualized Model reduces the unexplained variance by over 55% and the standard error by 33% based on an independent test sample. The additional explanatory variables can be easily provided by the individuals.

  8. Understanding individual routing behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lima, Antonio; Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C

    2016-03-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779-782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65-100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325-362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin-destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. Modeling individual tree survial

    Treesearch

    Quang V. Cao

    2016-01-01

    Information provided by growth and yield models is the basis for forest managers to make decisions on how to manage their forests. Among different types of growth models, whole-stand models offer predictions at stand level, whereas individual-tree models give detailed information at tree level. The well-known logistic regression is commonly used to predict tree...

  10. Understanding individual routing behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Stanojevic, Rade; Papagiannaki, Dina; Rodriguez, Pablo; González, Marta C.

    2016-01-01

    Knowing how individuals move between places is fundamental to advance our understanding of human mobility (González et al. 2008 Nature 453, 779–782. (doi:10.1038/nature06958)), improve our urban infrastructure (Prato 2009 J. Choice Model. 2, 65–100. (doi:10.1016/S1755-5345(13)70005-8)) and drive the development of transportation systems. Current route-choice models that are used in transportation planning are based on the widely accepted assumption that people follow the minimum cost path (Wardrop 1952 Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng. 1, 325–362. (doi:10.1680/ipeds.1952.11362)), despite little empirical support. Fine-grained location traces collected by smart devices give us today an unprecedented opportunity to learn how citizens organize their travel plans into a set of routes, and how similar behaviour patterns emerge among distinct individual choices. Here we study 92 419 anonymized GPS trajectories describing the movement of personal cars over an 18-month period. We group user trips by origin–destination and we find that most drivers use a small number of routes for their routine journeys, and tend to have a preferred route for frequent trips. In contrast to the cost minimization assumption, we also find that a significant fraction of drivers' routes are not optimal. We present a spatial probability distribution that bounds the route selection space within an ellipse, having the origin and the destination as focal points, characterized by high eccentricity independent of the scale. While individual routing choices are not captured by path optimization, their spatial bounds are similar, even for trips performed by distinct individuals and at various scales. These basic discoveries can inform realistic route-choice models that are not based on optimization, having an impact on several applications, such as infrastructure planning, routing recommendation systems and new mobility solutions. PMID:26962031

  11. Fractional Stochastic Individuals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-16

    approach no coarse graining is envoked. In the DMM neither the single individual nor the dynamics of the social net- work are specified by Hamiltonians...values of the inverse power-law index. The dynamic behavior of the net- work results in a stretched exponential autocorrelation for the dynamics of the...34, to appear in Chaos, Solitons & Fractals (2013). [5] C.A. Ellwood, “The Theory of Imitation in Social Psychology”, Am. J. Sociol . 6, 721-741 (1901

  12. Detection of immunocytological markers in photomicroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, David; zur Jacobsmühlen, Joschka; Braunschweig, Till; Bell, André; Chaisaowong, Kraisorn; Knüchel-Clarke, Ruth; Aach, Til

    2012-03-01

    Early detection of cervical cancer can be achieved through visual analysis of cell anomalies. The established PAP smear achieves a sensitivity of 50-90%, most false negative results are caused by mistakes in the preparation of the specimen or reader variability in the subjective, visual investigation. Since cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), the detection of HPV-infected cells opens new perspectives for screening of precancerous abnormalities. Immunocytochemical preparation marks HPV-positive cells in brush smears of the cervix with high sensitivity and specificity. The goal of this work is the automated detection of all marker-positive cells in microscopic images of a sample slide stained with an immunocytochemical marker. A color separation technique is used to estimate the concentrations of the immunocytochemical marker stain as well as of the counterstain used to color the nuclei. Segmentation methods based on Otsu's threshold selection method and Mean Shift are adapted to the task of segmenting marker-positive cells and their nuclei. The best detection performance of single marker-positive cells was achieved with the adapted thresholding method with a sensitivity of 95.9%. The contours differed by a modified Hausdorff Distance (MHD) of 2.8 μm. Nuclei of single marker positive cells were detected with a sensitivity of 95.9% and MHD = 1.02 μm.

  13. Intelligent DNA-based molecular diagnostics using linked genetic markers

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, D.K.; Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a knowledge-based system for molecular diagnostics, and its application to fully automated diagnosis of X-linked genetic disorders. Molecular diagnostic information is used in clinical practice for determining genetic risks, such as carrier determination and prenatal diagnosis. Initially, blood samples are obtained from related individuals, and PCR amplification is performed. Linkage-based molecular diagnosis then entails three data analysis steps. First, for every individual, the alleles (i.e., DNA composition) are determined at specified chromosomal locations. Second, the flow of genetic material among the individuals is established. Third, the probability that a given individual is either a carrier of the disease or affected by the disease is determined. The current practice is to perform each of these three steps manually, which is costly, time consuming, labor-intensive, and error-prone. As such, the knowledge-intensive data analysis and interpretation supersede the actual experimentation effort as the major bottleneck in molecular diagnostics. By examining the human problem solving for the task, we have designed and implemented a prototype knowledge-based system capable of fully automating linkage-based molecular diagnostics in X-linked genetic disorders, including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Our system uses knowledge-based interpretation of gel electrophoresis images to determine individual DNA marker labels, a constraint satisfaction search for consistent genetic flow among individuals, and a blackboard-style problem solver for risk assessment. We describe the system`s successful diagnosis of DMD carrier and affected individuals from raw clinical data.

  14. Individuality of handwriting.

    PubMed

    Srihari, Sargur N; Cha, Sung-Hyuk; Arora, Hina; Lee, Sangjik

    2002-07-01

    Motivated by several rulings in United States courts concerning expert testimony in general, and handwriting testimony in particular, we undertook a study to objectively validate the hypothesis that handwriting is individual. Handwriting samples of 1,500 individuals, representative of the U.S. population with respect to gender, age, ethnic groups, etc., were obtained. Analyzing differences in handwriting was done by using computer algorithms for extracting features from scanned images of handwriting. Attributes characteristic of the handwriting were obtained, e.g., line separation, slant, character shapes, etc. These attributes, which are a subset of attributes used by forensic document examiners (FDEs), were used to quantitatively establish individuality by using machine learning approaches. Using global attributes of handwriting and very few characters in the writing, the ability to determine the writer with a high degree of confidence was established. The work is a step towards providing scientific support for admitting handwriting evidence in court. The mathematical approach and the resulting software also have the promise of aiding the FDE.

  15. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  16. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  17. 14 CFR 171.269 - Marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Interim Standard Microwave Landing System (ISMLS) § 171.269 Marker beacon performance requirements. ISMLS marker beacon equipment...

  18. Development of diagnostic microsatellite markers from whole-genome sequences of Ammodramus sparrows for assessing admixture in a hybrid zone

    PubMed Central

    Kovach, Adrienne I; Walsh, Jennifer; Ramsdell, Jordan; Kelley Thomas, W

    2015-01-01

    Studies of hybridization and introgression and, in particular, the identification of admixed individuals in natural populations benefit from the use of diagnostic genetic markers that reliably differentiate pure species from each other and their hybrid forms. Such diagnostic markers are often infrequent in the genomes of closely related species, and genomewide data facilitate their discovery. We used whole-genome data from Illumina HiSeqS2000 sequencing of two recently diverged (600,000 years) and hybridizing, avian, sister species, the Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's (A. nelsoni) Sparrow, to develop a suite of diagnostic markers for high-resolution identification of pure and admixed individuals. We compared the microsatellite repeat regions identified in the genomes of the two species and selected a subset of 37 loci that differed between the species in repeat number. We screened these loci on 12 pure individuals of each species and report on the 34 that successfully amplified. From these, we developed a panel of the 12 most diagnostic loci, which we evaluated on 96 individuals, including individuals from both allopatric populations and sympatric individuals from the hybrid zone. Using simulations, we evaluated the power of the marker panel for accurate assignments of individuals to their appropriate pure species and hybrid genotypic classes (F1, F2, and backcrosses). The markers proved highly informative for species discrimination and had high accuracy for classifying admixed individuals into their genotypic classes. These markers will aid future investigations of introgressive hybridization in this system and aid conservation efforts aimed at monitoring and preserving pure species. Our approach is transferable to other study systems consisting of closely related and incipient species. PMID:26078861

  19. Development of diagnostic microsatellite markers from whole-genome sequences of Ammodramus sparrows for assessing admixture in a hybrid zone.

    PubMed

    Kovach, Adrienne I; Walsh, Jennifer; Ramsdell, Jordan; Kelley Thomas, W

    2015-06-01

    Studies of hybridization and introgression and, in particular, the identification of admixed individuals in natural populations benefit from the use of diagnostic genetic markers that reliably differentiate pure species from each other and their hybrid forms. Such diagnostic markers are often infrequent in the genomes of closely related species, and genomewide data facilitate their discovery. We used whole-genome data from Illumina HiSeqS2000 sequencing of two recently diverged (600,000 years) and hybridizing, avian, sister species, the Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's (A. nelsoni) Sparrow, to develop a suite of diagnostic markers for high-resolution identification of pure and admixed individuals. We compared the microsatellite repeat regions identified in the genomes of the two species and selected a subset of 37 loci that differed between the species in repeat number. We screened these loci on 12 pure individuals of each species and report on the 34 that successfully amplified. From these, we developed a panel of the 12 most diagnostic loci, which we evaluated on 96 individuals, including individuals from both allopatric populations and sympatric individuals from the hybrid zone. Using simulations, we evaluated the power of the marker panel for accurate assignments of individuals to their appropriate pure species and hybrid genotypic classes (F1, F2, and backcrosses). The markers proved highly informative for species discrimination and had high accuracy for classifying admixed individuals into their genotypic classes. These markers will aid future investigations of introgressive hybridization in this system and aid conservation efforts aimed at monitoring and preserving pure species. Our approach is transferable to other study systems consisting of closely related and incipient species.

  20. Tumour markers in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Warnes, T W; Smith, A

    1987-01-01

    The 20-year period since the discovery of AFP by Abelev has seen the introduction of a wide range of new tumour markers and it is now clear that PLC is biologically heterogeneous. Hepatoblastomas, fibrolamellar carcinomas, hepatocellular carcinomas and cholangiocarcinomas may secrete a variety of distinctive markers which are predominantly glycoproteins, and may resemble those found in placenta or fetal liver. Diagnostically, AFP remains the best marker for HCC, both in sensitivity and specificity; it is known to consist of isoforms. In patients with elevated serum AFP and filling defects on liver scan, Con A reactive AFP may differentiate PLC from hepatic metastases, whilst fucosylated AFP may distinguish PLC from benign disorders when AFP is non-diagnostically elevated. With this recognition of tumour heterogeneity the value of a multiple-marker approach has become apparent. The measurement of vitamin B12 binding protein and neurotensin should lead to the detection of most patients with the fibrolamellar variant of HCC and many of these should be resectable. In patients with normal serum AFP levels, HCC-associated GGTP is of major value whilst in low-incidence areas for HCC, patients should also be screened for H-ALP; using a multiple marker approach in high-risk groups, 90% of clinically diagnosed hepatocellular carcinomas are serologically positive. The Chinese and Alaskan studies, in which small, potentially resectable tumours were detected, suggest that it is now possible to achieve 5-year survival figures of up to 60% in HCC patients detected by screening. The value of such a strategy in low-incidence countries is currently under study. In patient monitoring, as in diagnosis, AFP remains the outstanding marker. In AFP-negative patients, other markers including vitamin B12-binding protein, neurotensin, HCC-specific isoenzymes, des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin and alpha-fucosidase, are of undoubted diagnostic value, but their value as indicants of disease

  1. Markers of gluten sensitivity in acute mania: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Faith; Stallings, Cassie; Origoni, Andrea; Vaughan, Crystal; Khushalani, Sunil; Yolken, Robert

    2012-03-30

    Increased levels of antibodies to gliadin, which is derived from the wheat protein gluten, have been reported in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in cross-sectional studies. We examined longitudinally the levels of antibody reactivity to gliadin in acute mania. The sample included 60 individuals assessed during a hospital stay for acute mania, 39 at a 6-month follow-up, and a sample of 143 non-psychiatric controls. Antibodies to gliadin were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The relationship of the antibodies to the clinical course of mania was analyzed by the use of regression models. Individuals with mania had significantly increased levels of IgG antibodies to gliadin, but not other markers of celiac disease, at baseline compared with controls in multivariate analyses. However, these levels were not significantly different from those of controls at the six month follow-up. Among the individuals with mania, elevated levels at follow-up were significantly associated with re-hospitalization in the 6-month follow-up period. The monitoring and control of gluten sensitivity may have significant effects on the management of individuals hospitalized with acute mania.

  2. SCAR, RAPD and RFLP markers linked to a dominant gene (Are) conferring resistance to anthracnose in common bean.

    PubMed

    Adam-Blondon, A F; Sévignac, M; Bannerot, H; Dron, M

    1994-08-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungusColletotrichum lindemuthianum, is a severe disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) controlled, in Europe, by a single dominant gene,Are. Four pairs of near-isogenic lines (NILs) were constructed, in which theAre gene was introgressed into different genetic backgrounds. These pairs of NILs were used to search for DNA markers linked to the resistance gene. Nine molecular markers, five RAPDs and four RFLPs, were found to discriminate between the resistant and the susceptible members of these NILs. A backcross progeny of 120 individuals was analysed to map these markers in relation to theAre locus. Five out of the nine markers were shown to be linked to theAre gene within a distance of 12.0 cM. The most tightly linked, a RAPD marker, was used to generate a pair of primers that specifically amplify this RAPD (sequence characterized amplified region, SCAR).

  3. Paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in association with a maternal supernumerary marker chromosome (6)

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.S.; Crolla, J.A.; Sitch, F.L.

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy may arise by a number of different mechanisms of aneuploidy correction. A population that has been identified as being at increased risk of aneuploidy are those individuals bearing supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs). There have been a number of cases reported of trisomy 21 in association with bi-satellited marker chromosomes have described two individuals with small inv dup (15) markers. One had paternal isodisomy of chromosome 15 and Angelman syndrome. The other had maternal heterodisomy (15) and Prader-Willi syndrome. At the Wessex Regional Genetics Laboratory we have conducted a search for uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosomes from which SMCs originated. Our study population consists of 39 probands with SMCs originating from a number of different autosomes, including 17 with SMCs of chromosome 15 origin. Using PCR amplification of microsatellite repeat sequences located distal to the regions included in the SMCs we have determined the parental origin of the two normal homologues in each case. We have identified paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in a female child with a supernumerary marker ring chromosome 6 in approximately 70% of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The marker was found to be of maternal origin. This is the second case of paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 to be reported, and the first in association with a SMC resulting in a partial trisomy for a portion of the short arm of chromosome 6. In spite of this, the patient appears to be functioning appropriately for her age.

  4. Association of RAPD marker with linolenic acid concentration in the seed oil of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Tanhuanpää, P K; Vilkki, J P; Vilkki, H J

    1995-04-01

    The F2 progeny (64 individuals) from the cross between oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivar Topas and R4 (a low linolenic mutation line) was analyzed with 8 RFLPs and 34 RAPDs to discover a genetic tag for gene(s) affecting linolenic acid concentration. According to variance analysis (ANOVA), one RAPD marker (25a) was significantly associated with linolenic acid content; the linolenic acid concentration in the seeds of F2 individuals showing the marker (includes both homo- and hetero-zygotes) was 7.43 +/- 1.35% and in those lacking the marker was 5.70 +/- 1.52%. Marker 25a may be used to facilitate selection for fatty acid composition in future breeding programs of oilseed rape.

  5. Development of microsatellite markers for Fargesia denudata (Poaceae), the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yan; Yu, Tao; Lu, Sihai; Tian, Cheng; Li, Junqing; Du, Fang K

    2016-06-01

    There is a need for microsatellite primers to analyze genetic parameters of Fargesia denudata (Poaceae), the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Using next-generation sequencing technology, we obtained a 75-Mb assembled sequence of F. denudata and identified 182 microsatellites. Primer pairs for 70 candidate microsatellite markers were selected and validated in four individuals, and 42 primer pairs generated reliable amplicons. Fourteen of 16 tested markers were found to be polymorphic in 72 individuals from four F. denudata populations. The number of alleles ranged from two to 19 per locus; the observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 1 and from 0 to 0.87, respectively. The transferability of these 16 novel microsatellite markers was validated in five related species. These markers will be useful for examining the genetic diversity, genetic structure, and cloning of F. denudata, the staple-food bamboo of the giant panda, and related bamboo species.

  6. Clinical application of tumour markers: a review.

    PubMed

    Amayo, A A; Kuria, J G

    2009-12-01

    Tumour markers have made a difference to oncology practice. They can be used in screening, diagnosis, prognostication and assessment of treatment efficacy. Reports on tumour marker usage suggest that many clinicians assume that a biomarker for a particular cancer can be effectively used for all these indications. This assumption is incorrect. Several guidelines have been published to inform clinicians on effective utilisation of these tests. To outline the recommended uses of the most commonly requested tumours markers in clinical practice. A hand search of literature on the recommended use of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alphafetoprotein (AFP), prostate specific antigen (PSA), CA-125 and CA-19.9. Systematic reviews and prospective randomised clinical trials of tumour marker applications were also looked at. Five key journals and reference lists of relevant studies were considered. Two authors abstracted relevant data independently. Emphasis was given to guidelines from expert panels. The quality of the guidelines was assessed by availability of level of evidence supporting the recommendations. Several national and international expert groups have developed guidelines for use of markers for most cancers. CEA, AFP, PSA, CA-125 and CA-19.9 are validated for use in treatment monitoring of colorectal, hepatocellular, prostatic, ovarian and pancreatic carcinomas respectively. AFP and PSA are also useful for cancer screening in high risk groups. CA-125 has limited role in screening while CEA and CA 19.9 are not recommended for cancer screening. Not all currently available tumour markers can be used for screening and diagnosis of malignancies. Adherence to recommendations on tumour marker utilisation will improve the cost-effectiveness of these tests.

  7. Individual Differences in Attention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-18

    equally often (viz., 34 times ). In the one-familiar condition, the same familiar word appeared in every attention display along with three novel...Classification) Individual Differences in Attention 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) William A. Johnston, K vin J. Hawley, and M. 4ann Farah 13a. TYPE OF REPORT...13b TIME COVERED 114. DATE OF REPORT (Year, Month, Day) 15. PAGE COUNT Final IFROMLI2aT5LI/388 88/7/18 10 16. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17. COSATI CODES

  8. Self-Injurious Behaviour in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, C.; Oliver, C.; Nelson, L.; Moss, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been identified as a risk marker for self-injurious behaviour. In this study we aimed to describe the prevalence, topography and correlates of self-injury in individuals with ASD in contrast to individuals with Fragile X and Down syndromes and examine person characteristics associated with self-injury…

  9. Self-Injurious Behaviour in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, C.; Oliver, C.; Nelson, L.; Moss, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been identified as a risk marker for self-injurious behaviour. In this study we aimed to describe the prevalence, topography and correlates of self-injury in individuals with ASD in contrast to individuals with Fragile X and Down syndromes and examine person characteristics associated with self-injury…

  10. Identification of Sex-Specific Markers Reveals Male Heterogametic Sex Determination in Pseudobagrus ussuriensis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zheng-Jun; Li, Xi-Yin; Zhou, Feng-Jian; Qiang, Xiao-Gang; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2015-08-01

    Comprehending sex determination mechanism is a first step for developing sex control breeding biotechnologies in fish. Pseudobagrus ussuriensis, one of bagrid catfishes in Bagridae, had been observed to have about threefold size dimorphism between males and females, but its sex determination mechanism had been unknown. In this study, we firstly used the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based screening approach to isolate a male-specific DNA fragment and thereby identified a 10,569 bp of male-specific sequence and a 10,365 bp of female-related sequence by genome walking in the bagrid catfish, in which a substantial genetic differentiation with 96.35 % nucleotide identity was revealed between them. Subsequently, a high differentiating region of 650 bp with only 70.26 % nucleotide identity was found from the corresponding two sequences, and three primer pairs of male-specific marker, male and female-shared marker with different length products in male and female genomes, and female-related marker were designed. Significantly, when these markers were used to identify genetic sex of the bagrid catfish, only male individuals was detected to amplify the male-specific marker fragment, and female-related marker was discovered to produce dosage association in females and in males. Our current data provide significant genetic evidence that P. ussuriensis has heterogametic XY sex chromosomes in males and homogametic XX sex chromosomes in females. Therefore, sex determination mechanism of P. ussuriensis is male heterogametic XX/XY system.

  11. Clinical neuropathology practice guide 5-2013: markers of neuronal maturation

    PubMed Central

    Sarnat, Harvey B.

    2013-01-01

    This review surveys immunocytochemical and histochemical markers of neuronal lineage for application to tissue sections of fetal and neonatal brain. They determine maturation of individual nerve cells as the tissue progresses to mature architecture. From a developmental perspective, neuronal markers are all about timing. These diverse cellular labels may be classified in two ways: 1) time of onset of expression (early; intermediate; late); 2) labeling of subcellular structures or metabolic functions (nucleoproteins; synaptic vesicle proteins; enolases; cytoskeletal elements; calcium-binding; nucleic acids; mitochondria). Apart from these positive markers of maturation, other negative markers are expressed in primitive neuroepithelial cells and early stages of neuroblast maturation, but no longer are demonstrated after initial stages of maturation. These examinations are relevant for studies of normal neuroembryology at the cellular level. In fetal and perinatal neuropathology they provide control criteria for application to malformations of the brain, inborn metabolic disorders and acquired fetal insults in which neuroblastic maturation may be altered. Disorders, in which cells differentiate abnormally, as in tuberous sclerosis and hemimegalencephaly, pose another yet aspect of mixed cellular lineage. The measurement in living patients, especially neonates, of serum and CSF levels of enolases, chromogranins and S-100 proteins as biomarkers of brain damage may potentially be correlated with their corresponding tissue markers at autopsy in infants who do not survive. The neuropathological markers here described can be performed in ordinary hospital laboratories, not just research facilities, and offer another dimension of diagnostic precision in interpreting abnormally developed fetal and postnatal brains. PMID:23883617

  12. A genetic linkage map of quinoa ( Chenopodium quinoa) based on AFLP, RAPD, and SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Maughan, P J; Bonifacio, A; Jellen, E N; Stevens, M R; Coleman, C E; Ricks, M; Mason, S L; Jarvis, D E; Gardunia, B W; Fairbanks, D J

    2004-10-01

    Quinoa ( Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) is an important seed crop for human consumption in the Andean region of South America. It is the primary staple in areas too arid or saline for the major cereal crops. The objective of this project was to build the first genetic linkage map of quinoa. Selection of the mapping population was based on a preliminary genetic similarity analysis of four potential mapping parents. Breeding lines 'Ku-2' and '0654', a Chilean lowland type and a Peruvian Altiplano type, respectively, showed a low similarity coefficient of 0.31 and were selected to form an F(2) mapping population. The genetic map is based on 80 F(2) individuals from this population and consists of 230 amplified length polymorphism (AFLP), 19 simple-sequence repeat (SSR), and six randomly amplified polymorphic DNA markers. The map spans 1,020 cM and contains 35 linkage groups with an average marker density of 4.0 cM per marker. Clustering of AFLP markers was not observed. Additionally, we report the primer sequences and map locations for 19 SSR markers that will be valuable tools for future quinoa genome analysis. This map provides a key starting point for genetic dissection of agronomically important characteristics of quinoa, including seed saponin content, grain yield, maturity, and resistance to disease, frost, and drought. Current efforts are geared towards the generation of more than 200 mapped SSR markers and the development of several recombinant-inbred mapping populations.

  13. The behavioral- and neuro-economic process of temporal discounting: A candidate behavioral marker of addiction.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Warren K; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Moody, Lara; Wilson, A George

    2014-01-01

    Addiction science would benefit from the identification of a behavioral marker. A behavioral marker could reflect the projected clinical course of the disorder, function as a surrogate measure of clinical outcome, and/or may be related to biological components that underlie the disorder. In this paper we review relevant literature, made possible with the early and sustained support by NIDA, to determine whether temporal discounting, a neurobehavioral process derived from behavioral economics and further explored through neuroeconomics, may function as a behavioral marker. Our review suggests that temporal discounting 1) identifies individuals who are drug-dependent, 2) identifies those at risk of developing drug dependence, 3) acts as a gauge of addiction severity, 4) correlates with all stages of addiction development, 5) changes with effective treatment, and 6) may be related to the biological and genetic processes that underlie addiction. Thus, initial evidence supports temporal discounting as a candidate behavioral marker. Additional studies will be required in several areas for a more conclusive determination. Confirmation that temporal discounting functions as a behavioral marker for addiction could lead to 1) a screen for new treatments, 2) personalization of prevention and treatment interventions, and 3) the extension of temporal discounting as a behavioral marker for other etiologically similar disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  14. Application of microsatellite markers as potential tools for traceability of Girgentana goat breed dairy products.

    PubMed

    Sardina, Maria Teresa; Tortorici, Lina; Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Tolone, Marco; Portolano, Baldassare

    2015-08-01

    In livestock, breed assignment may play a key role in the certification of products linked to specific breeds. Traceability of farm animals and authentication of their products can contribute to improve breed profitability and sustainability of animal productions with significant impact on the rural economy of particular geographic areas and on breed and biodiversity conservation. With the goal of developing a breed genetic traceability system for Girgentana dairy products, the aim of this study was to identify specific microsatellite markers able to discriminate among the most important Sicilian dairy goat breeds, in order to detect possible adulteration in Girgentana dairy products. A total of 20 microsatellite markers were analyzed on 338 individual samples from Girgentana, Maltese, and Derivata di Siria goat breeds. Specific microsatellite markers useful for traceability of dairy products were identified. Eight microsatellite markers showed alleles present at the same time in Maltese and Derivata di Siria and absent in Girgentana and, therefore, they were tested on DNA pools of the three breeds. Considering the electropherograms' results, only FCB20, SRCRSP5, and TGLA122 markers were tested on DNA samples extracted from cheeses of Girgentana goat breed. These three microsatellite markers could be applied in a breed genetic traceability system of Girgentana dairy products in order to detect adulteration due to Maltese and Derivata di Siria goat breeds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of novel genic microsatellite markers from transcriptome sequencing in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.).

    PubMed

    Harmon, Monica; Lane, Thomas; Staton, Margaret; Coggeshall, Mark V; Best, Teodora; Chen, Chien-Chih; Liang, Haiying; Zembower, Nicole; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Hwee, Yap Zhei; Schuster, Stephan C; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Carlson, John E; Gailing, Oliver

    2017-08-08

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) is a hardwood tree species native to northeastern North America and economically valued for its wood and sap. Yet, few molecular genetic resources have been developed for this species to date. Microsatellite markers have been a useful tool in population genetics, e.g., to monitor genetic variation and to analyze gene flow patterns. The objective of this study is to develop a reference transcriptome and microsatellite markers in sugar maple. A set of 117,861 putative unique transcripts were assembled using 29.2 Gb of RNA sequencing data derived from different tissues and stress treatments. From this set of sequences a total of 1068 microsatellite motifs were identified. Out of 58 genic microsatellite markers tested on a population of 47 sugar maple trees in upper Michigan, 22 amplified well, of which 16 were polymorphic and 6 were monomorphic. Values for expected heterozygosity varied from 0.224 to 0.726 for individual loci. Of the 16 polymorphic markers, 15 exhibited transferability to other Acer L. species. Genic microsatellite markers can be applied to analyze genetic variation in potentially adaptive genes relative to genomic reference markers as a basis for the management of sugar maple genetic resources in the face of climate change.

  16. Development of 10 microsatellite markers from Pantala flavescens and their applicability in studying genetics diversity.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lingzhen; Fu, Xiaowei; Wu, Kongming

    2015-08-01

    Pantala flavescens (Fabricius 1798) is one of the most common species among migration dragonflies. It is often encountered in large swarms during migration or directed dispersal flights. For a better understanding of its gene flow, genetic structure and migration patterns throughout the world, 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated in this study. We respectively collected 32 P. flavescens from three places (Hunan, Liaoning and Heilongjiang) and 20 P. flavescens from Beijing. Partial genomic libraries containing microsatellite sequences were constructed with magnetic-bead enrichment method. By screening, sequence analysis, PCR amplification and so on, ten 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated. In order to assess their applicability, genetic diversity of these novel markers was tested in 96 individuals from three populations in China (Hunan, Liaoning and Heilongjiang). These markers were highly polymorphic, with 3-12 alleles per markers. The observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosities ranged 0.321-0.667 and from 0.531 to 0.948 respectively. The genetic difference between Hunan and Liaoning is 0.429, while the genetic difference between Liaoning and Heilongjiang is 0.0508. These microsatellite markers for P. flavescens were developed for the first time, and will be a powerful tool for studying population genetic diversity and dispersal behavior of P. flavescens in China and worldwide.

  17. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers.

    PubMed

    Lewers, Kim S; Saski, Chris A; Cuthbertson, Brandon J; Henry, David C; Staton, Meg E; Main, Dorrie S; Dhanaraj, Anik L; Rowland, Lisa J; Tomkins, Jeff P

    2008-06-20

    The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L.) cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackberry breeding. Yet no genetic maps, molecular markers, or even sequences exist specifically for cultivated blackberry. The purpose of this study is to begin development of these tools by generating and annotating the first blackberry expressed sequence tag (EST) library, designing primers from the ESTs to amplify regions containing simple sequence repeats (SSR), and testing the usefulness of a subset of the EST-SSRs with two blackberry cultivars. A cDNA library of 18,432 clones was generated from expanding leaf tissue of the cultivar Merton Thornless, a progenitor of many thornless commercial cultivars. Among the most abundantly expressed of the 3,000 genes annotated were those involved with energy, cell structure, and defense. From individual sequences containing SSRs, 673 primer pairs were designed. Of a randomly chosen set of 33 primer pairs tested with two blackberry cultivars, 10 detected an average of 1.9 polymorphic PCR products. This rate predicts that this library may yield as many as 940 SSR primer pairs detecting 1,786 polymorphisms. This may be sufficient to generate a genetic map that can be used to associate molecular markers with phenotypic traits, making possible molecular marker-assisted breeding to compliment existing morphological marker-assisted breeding in blackberry.

  18. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection.

  19. Development and characterization of microsatellite markers in the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis).

    PubMed

    Gugala, Natalie A; Ishida, Yasuko; Georgiadis, Nicholas J; Roca, Alfred L

    2016-07-26

    African elephants comprise two species, the savanna elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the forest elephant (L. cyclotis), which are distinct morphologically and genetically. Forest elephants are seriously threatened by poaching for meat and ivory, and by habitat destruction. However, microsatellite markers have thus far been developed only in African savanna elephants and Asian elephants, Elephas maximus. The application of microsatellite markers across deeply divergent lineages may produce irregular patterns such as large indels or null alleles. Thus we developed novel microsatellite markers using DNA from two African forest elephants. One hundred microsatellite loci were identified in next generation shotgun sequences from two African forest elephants, of which 53 were considered suitable for testing. Twenty-three microsatellite markers successfully amplified elephant DNA without amplifying human DNA; these were further characterized in 15 individuals from Lope National Park, Gabon. Three of the markers were monomorphic and four of them carried only two alleles. The remaining sixteen polymorphic loci carried from 3 to 8 alleles, with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.27 to 0.87, expected heterozygosity from 0.40 to 0.86, and the Shannon diversity index from 0.73 to 1.86. Linkage disequilibrium was not detected between loci, and no locus deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The markers developed in this study will be useful for genetic analyses of the African forest elephant and contribute to their conservation and management.

  20. Development of microsatellite markers based on expressed sequence tags in Asparagus cochinchinensis (Asparagaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bo-Yun; Park, Han-Sol; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Kwak, Myounghai; Kim, Young-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Premise of the study: Transcriptome-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed in Asparagus cochinchinensis (Asparagaceae). Due to its application in traditional medicine, its wild populations are threatened by over-collection even in protected areas, requiring immediate conservation efforts. Methods and Results: Based on transcriptome data of A. cochinchinensis, 96 primer pairs with two to seven alleles per locus were selected for initial validation; of those, 27 primer pairs amplified across all samples, resulting in 15 polymorphic and 12 monomorphic microsatellite markers. The usefulness of these markers was assessed in 60 individuals representing three populations of A. cochinchinensis. Observed and expected heterozygosity values ranged from 0.050 to 0.950 and 0.049 to 0.626, respectively. Cross-species amplification of the 27 markers was tested in the related species A. rigidulus and A. schoberioides. Conclusions: These polymorphic, transcriptome-derived SSR markers can be used as molecular markers to study population genetics and ecological conservation in A. cochinchinensis and related taxa. PMID:28439480

  1. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass

    PubMed Central

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C.; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection. PMID:28187136

  2. A multicopy dinucleotide marker that maps close to the spinal muscular atrophy gene

    SciTech Connect

    Burghes, A.H.M.; Ingraham, S.E.; Kote-Jarai, Z.; Carpten, J.D.; DiDonato, C.J. ); McLean, M.; Surh, L. ); Thompson, T.G.; McPherson, J.D. ); Ikeda, J.E. ); Wirth, B. )

    1994-05-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder resulting in loss of motor neurons. The interval containing the SMA gene has been defined by linkage analysis as 5qcen-D5S435-SMA-D5S557-5qter. The authors have isolated a new dinucleotide repeat marker, CATT1, that lies between these two closest markers. The marker CATT1 has 16 alleles and is highly polymorphic. The marker can have 1 to 4 (or more) copies per chromosome, giving rise to individuals with up to 8 (or more) alleles. All of the subloci map between the markers D5S557 and D5S435 and lie in close proximity to one another. The marker CATT1 is linked to the SMA gene with a lod score of Z[sub max] = 34.42 at [theta] = 0 and crosses all available recombinants. Certain alleles occurred more frequently in either the SMA or normal populations, indicating significant allelic association between CATT1 and the SMA locus. Haplotype analysis combining US and Canadian SMA families reveals that one haplotype group (VII) occurs significantly more frequently in the SMA population than in the normal. This confirms the allelic association of CATT1 with the SMA locus. 37 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Comparison of markers of coagulation activation and thrombin generation test in uncomplicated pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Joly, Berangere; Barbay, Virginie; Borg, Jeanne-Yvonne; Le Cam-Duchez, Veronique

    2013-09-01

    Pregnancy is a well-established risk factor for venous thromboembolism, and is associated with a state of hypercoagulability or parameters of thrombin generation. Currently, there is a lack of consensual data on thrombin generation during pregnancy. This study aimed to find a sensitive and specific biological marker of coagulation activation and to identify parameters of thrombin generation. The population included 101 women with uncomplicated pregnancies. The objective of this study was to correlate thrombin generation test (measured at 5pM tissue factor, 4μM lipids and without thrombomodulin), with fibrinogen and markers of blood coagulation activation: D-dimer, prothrombin fragments 1+2 (F1+2), thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT) and fibrin monomer complexes (FMC) in these women. Internal quality control was performed in each set of experiments. Fibrinogen, D-dimer, F1+2, and TAT concentrations increased significantly throughout pregnancy, and were correlated with term of pregnancy. In our study, thrombin generation seemed to increase early on, and then remained stable throughout normal pregnancy, in contrast with other markers of blood coagulation activation, excepting FMC. The latter are subject to large inter-individual variations, especially during second trimester. No correlation was demonstrated between thrombin generation parameters and other activation markers. While markers of coagulation activation significantly increased during pregnancy, thrombin generation increased only early on and remains stable during pregnancy. Finding a sensitive and specific biological marker for vascular pregnancy complications, such as FMC and thrombin generation levels, requires further investigation. © 2013.

  4. Distribution of Genetic Marker Concentrations for Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Sewage and Animal Feces

    PubMed Central

    Kelty, Catherine A.; Varma, Manju; Sivaganesan, Mano; Haugland, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Very little is known about the density and distribution of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) genetic markers measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) in fecal pollution sources. Before qPCR-based FIB technologies can be applied to waste management and public health risk applications, it is vital to characterize the concentrations of these genetic markers in pollution sources (i.e., untreated wastewater and animal feces). We report the distribution of rRNA genetic markers for several general FIB groups, including Clostridium spp., Escherichia coli, enterococci, and Bacteroidales, as determined by qPCR on reference collections consisting of 54 primary influent sewage samples collected from treatment facilities across the United States and fecal samples representing 20 different animal species. Based on raw sewage sample collection data, individual FIB genetic markers exhibited a remarkable similarity in concentration estimates from locations across the United States ranging from Hawaii to Florida. However, there was no significant correlation between genetic markers for most FIB combinations (P > 0.05). In addition, large differences (up to 5 log10 copies) in the abundance of FIB genetic markers were observed between animal species, emphasizing the importance of indicator microorganism selection and animal source contribution for future FIB applications. PMID:22504809

  5. On the Additive and Dominant Variance and Covariance of Individuals Within the Genomic Selection Scope

    PubMed Central

    Vitezica, Zulma G.; Varona, Luis; Legarra, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Genomic evaluation models can fit additive and dominant SNP effects. Under quantitative genetics theory, additive or “breeding” values of individuals are generated by substitution effects, which involve both “biological” additive and dominant effects of the markers. Dominance deviations include only a portion of the biological dominant effects of the markers. Additive variance includes variation due to the additive and dominant effects of the markers. We describe a matrix of dominant genomic relationships across individuals, D, which is similar to the G matrix used in genomic best linear unbiased prediction. This matrix can be used in a mixed-model context for genomic evaluations or to estimate dominant and additive variances in the population. From the “genotypic” value of individuals, an alternative parameterization defines additive and dominance as the parts attributable to the additive and dominant effect of the markers. This approach underestimates the additive genetic variance and overestimates the dominance variance. Transforming the variances from one model into the other is trivial if the distribution of allelic frequencies is known. We illustrate these results with mouse data (four traits, 1884 mice, and 10,946 markers) and simulated data (2100 individuals and 10,000 markers). Variance components were estimated correctly in the model, considering breeding values and dominance deviations. For the model considering genotypic values, the inclusion of dominant effects biased the estimate of additive variance. Genomic models were more accurate for the estimation of variance components than their pedigree-based counterparts. PMID:24121775

  6. On the additive and dominant variance and covariance of individuals within the genomic selection scope.

    PubMed

    Vitezica, Zulma G; Varona, Luis; Legarra, Andres

    2013-12-01

    Genomic evaluation models can fit additive and dominant SNP effects. Under quantitative genetics theory, additive or "breeding" values of individuals are generated by substitution effects, which involve both "biological" additive and dominant effects of the markers. Dominance deviations include only a portion of the biological dominant effects of the markers. Additive variance includes variation due to the additive and dominant effects of the markers. We describe a matrix of dominant genomic relationships across individuals, D, which is similar to the G matrix used in genomic best linear unbiased prediction. This matrix can be used in a mixed-model context for genomic evaluations or to estimate dominant and additive variances in the population. From the "genotypic" value of individuals, an alternative parameterization defines additive and dominance as the parts attributable to the additive and dominant effect of the markers. This approach underestimates the additive genetic variance and overestimates the dominance variance. Transforming the variances from one model into the other is trivial if the distribution of allelic frequencies is known. We illustrate these results with mouse data (four traits, 1884 mice, and 10,946 markers) and simulated data (2100 individuals and 10,000 markers). Variance components were estimated correctly in the model, considering breeding values and dominance deviations. For the model considering genotypic values, the inclusion of dominant effects biased the estimate of additive variance. Genomic models were more accurate for the estimation of variance components than their pedigree-based counterparts.

  7. Individual Genetic Susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Hall

    2008-12-08

    Risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies of exposed populations, as well as the maximum permissible doses allowed for occupational exposure and exposure of the public to ionizing radiation are all based on the assumption that the human population is uniform in its radiosensitivity, except for a small number of individuals, such as ATM homozygotes who are easily identified by their clinical symptoms. The hypothesis upon which this proposal is based is that the human population is not homogeneous in radiosensitiviry, but that radiosensitive sub-groups exist which are not easy to identify. These individuals would suffer an increased incidence of detrimental radiation effects, and distort the shape of the dose response relationship. The radiosensitivity of these groups depend on the expression levels of specific proteins. The plan was to investigate the effect of 3 relatively rare, high penetrate genes available in mice, namely Atm, mRad9 & Brca1. The purpose of radiation protection is to prevent! deterministic effects of clinical significance and limit stochastic effects to acceptable levels. We plan, therefore to compare with wild type animals the radiosensitivity of mice heterozygous for each of the genes mentioned above, as well as double heterozygotes for pairs of genes, using two biological endpoints: a) Ocular cataracts as an important and relevant deterministic effect, and b) Oncogenic transformation in cultured embryo fibroblasts, as a surrogate for carcinogenesis, the most relevant stochastic effect.

  8. Individual susceptibility to toxicity.

    PubMed

    Grandjean, P

    1992-12-01

    Individual variation in susceptibility to chemical toxicity may be due to differences in toxicokinetic patterns or effect modification. Well-documented interspecies genetic differences in susceptibility to chemicals had lead to studies of such variation also within species. Epidemiological evidence now suggests that common variations, particularly in the P-450 enzymes, may play a major role in determining individual susceptibility to chemically-induced disease. Physiologic factors are involved in the particular susceptibility of the fetus, the newborn, and the old. Constitutional susceptibility is also affected by acquired conditions, including chronic disease, such as diabetes mellitus. Perhaps the most complex area relates to the increase in vulnerability caused by previous or contemporary exposure to other factors, thus eliciting, e.g., synergistic effects. Although amply demonstrated by experimental studies, epidemiological or clinical confirmation is generally lacking. One hypothesis suggests that a chemical exposure may affect the reserve capacity of the body, though not resulting in any immediate adverse effect. Subsequently, the body becomes unable to compensate for an additional stress, and toxicity then develops. Epidemiological approaches are available and need to be expanded. Research in this area has potential ethical implications which should be dealt with in an open, informed forum.

  9. Individual Colorimetric Observer Model

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Yuta; Fairchild, Mark D.; Blondé, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a vision model for individual colorimetric observers. The proposed model can be beneficial in many color-critical applications such as color grading and soft proofing to assess ranges of color matches instead of a single average match. We extended the CIE 2006 physiological observer by adding eight additional physiological parameters to model individual color-normal observers. These eight parameters control lens pigment density, macular pigment density, optical densities of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments, and λmax shifts of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments. By identifying the variability of each physiological parameter, the model can simulate color matching functions among color-normal populations using Monte Carlo simulation. The variabilities of the eight parameters were identified through two steps. In the first step, extensive reviews of past studies were performed for each of the eight physiological parameters. In the second step, the obtained variabilities were scaled to fit a color matching dataset. The model was validated using three different datasets: traditional color matching, applied color matching, and Rayleigh matches. PMID:26862905

  10. Pharmacogenetics of osteoporosis and the prospect of individualized prognosis and individualized therapy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan V; Center, Jacqueline R; Eisman, John A

    2008-12-01

    Description of recent progress in genetics and pharmacogenetics of osteoporosis. Osteoporosis and its consequence of fragility fracture are characterized by highly complex phenotypes, which include bone mineral density, bone strength, bone turnover markers, and nonskeletal traits. Recent developments in the genome-wide studies using high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphisms have yielded reliable findings. Four genome-wide studies have identified 40 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in various chromosomes that were modestly associated with either bone mineral density or fracture risk. Clinical response, including adverse reactions, to antiosteoporosis therapy (such as bisphosphonates and selective estrogen receptor modulators) is highly variable among treated individuals. Candidate gene studies have found that common polymorphic variations within the collagen I alpha 1 and vitamin D receptor genes were associated with variability in response to antiosteoporosis treatment. Moreover, a recent genome-wide study identified four single-nucleotide polymorphisms that were associated with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw with relative risk being between 10 and 13. The evaluation of osteoporosis and fracture risk is moving from a risk stratification approach to a more individualized approach, in which an individual's absolute risk of fracture is evaluable as a constellation of the individual's environmental exposure and genetic makeup. Therefore, the identification of gene variants that are associated with osteoporosis phenotypes or response to therapy can eventually help individualize the prognosis, treatment and prevention of fracture and its adverse outcomes.

  11. Evaluation of colon cancer-specific antigen 2 as a potential serum marker for colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Leman, Eddy S; Schoen, Robert E; Magheli, Ahmed; Sokoll, Lori J; Chan, Daniel W; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2008-03-01

    A blood test to detect colon cancer at a preventable stage would represent a major advancement. We have previously identified colon cancer-specific markers using focused proteomics analysis of nuclear structural proteins. Two of these markers, colon cancer-specific antigen (CCSA)-3 and CCSA-4, have been developed into blood-based markers that are able to distinguish individuals with colorectal cancer from those without. CCSA-2 is a distinct novel colon cancer marker identified using focused proteomics. Using an indirect ELISA on serum samples obtained from two institutions, we evaluated CCSA-2 as a serum-based colon cancer marker. A total of 111 serum samples from individuals who underwent colonoscopy and were subsequently diagnosed as either being normal or having hyperplastic polyps, nonadvanced adenomas, advanced adenomas, and colorectal cancer were evaluated. A diverse control population that consisted of 125 serum samples was also included in this study. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were used to measure the sensitivity and specificity of CCSA-2. CCSA-2 at a cutoff of 10.8 mug/mL has overall specificity of 78.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 67.3-87.1%] and sensitivity of 97.3% (95% CI, 85.8-99.5%) in separating individuals with advanced adenomas and colorectal cancer from normal, hyperplastic, and nonadvanced adenoma populations. The receiver operating characteristic curve for CCSA-2 has an area under the curve of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.83-0.95). Our initial study shows that CCSA-2 is a potential serum-based marker for colon cancer detection with high sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Neural activity, memory, and dementias: serotonergic markers.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2017-04-01

    Dysfunctional memory seems to be a key component of diverse dementias and other neuropsychiatric disorders; unfortunately, no effective treatment exists for this, probably because of the absence of neural biomarkers accompanying it. Diverse neurotransmission systems have been implicated in memory, including serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). There are multiple serotonergic pharmacological tools, well-characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species and neural markers providing new insights into memory functions and dysfunctions. Serotonin in mammal species has multiple neural markers, including receptors (5-HT1-7), serotonin transporter, and volume transmission, which are present in brain areas involved in memory. Memory, amnesia, and forgetting modify serotonergic markers; this influence is bidirectional. Evidence shows insights and therapeutic targets and diverse approaches support the translatability of using neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions, including memory formation and amnesia. For instance, 5-HT2A/2B/2C, 5-HT4, and 5-HT6 receptors are involved in tau protein hyperphosphorylation in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, at least, 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as serotonin transporter seem to be useful neural markers and therapeutic targets. Hence, available evidence supports the notion that several mechanisms cooperate to achieve synaptic plasticity or memory, including changes in the number of neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Considering that memory is a key component of dementias, hence reversing or reducing memory deficits might positively affect them?

  13. Perils of gene mapping with microsatellite markers

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, J.A.; Gilliam, T.C. );