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Sample records for marko kaasik tnu

  1. TNU-9 Zeolite: Al Distribution and Extra-Framework Sites of Divalent Cations.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Robert; Dedecek, Jiri; Supronowicz, Barbara; Thomas, Haunani M; Klein, Petr; Tabor, Edyta; Sazama, Petr; Pashkova, Veronika; Sklenak, Stepan

    2017-03-08

    The TNU-9 zeolite (TUN framework) is one of the most complex zeolites known. It represents a highly promising matrix for both acid and redox catalytic reactions. We present a newly developed approach which includes 29Si and 27Al (3Q) MAS NMR spectroscopy, Co(II) cations as probes monitored by UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopies, and extensive periodic DFT calculations including molecular dynamics to investigate the Al distribution in the TUN framework and the location of Al pairs and divalent cations in extra-framework cationic positions. Our study shows that 40 and 60 % of Al atoms in the TNU-9 zeolite are isolated single Al atoms and Al pairs, respectively. The Al pairs are present in two types of six member rings forming the corresponding α and β (15 and 85 %, respectively, of Al pairs) sites for bare divalent cations. The α site is located on the TUN straight channel wall and it connects two channel intersections. The suggested near planar β site is present at the channel intersection.

  2. Study of the effects of solar activities on the ionosphere as observed by VLF signals recorded at TNU station, Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    A SuperSID monitor installed at Tay Nguyen University (TNU), Vietnam is used to detect the temporal variations of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals during 2013 and 2014 to understand the responses of the ionosphere to sunset/sunrise transitions and solar flares. Two VLF station signals are tracked, JJI/22.2 kHz in Japan and NWC/19.8 kHz in Australia. Results show that the effects of sunrise, sunset and solar flares on the NWC signal are more significantly different than those on the JJI signal. Sunset and sunrise spikes only occur on the JJI-TNU path because of longitudinal differences between the receiver and transmitter. Two sunset dips and three sunrise dips appear on the NWC signal during summer season. During intense solar flares, the dips occur after the maximum disturbance of the VLF signals for the North-South path. The appearance of these dips is explained by modal interference patterns. Observing temporal variations of sunrise and sunset dips or spikes of VLF signals during different seasons enhances the understanding of the behavior of the ionosphere.

  3. Knowledge, attitude and practice towards blood donation and associated factors among adults in Debre Markos town, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Jemberu, Yenework Acham; Esmael, Ahmed; Ahmed, Kedir Y

    2016-01-01

    Although the demand for blood supply has progressively increased in developing countries, evidences indicate that there is a major shortage of blood and blood products in these countries, particularly in Ethiopia. Thus, identifying motivational factors affecting blood donation and recruitment of safe and low risk donors is necessary. For this reason, the study aimed at assessing knowledge, attitude, and practice towards blood donation and its associated factors. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Debre Markos town from February to April, 2015. Multi-stage sampling technique was employed to recruit a total of 845 study participants. Interviewer administered questionnaire was employed as a data collection tool. Binary logistic regression was applied to assess the relationship between explanatory variables and outcome variables. In this study, 436 (56.5 %) and 403 (52.2 %) were found to be knowledgeable and having favorable attitude, respectively, while the other 124 (16.1 %) reported to have the practice of blood donation. Younger age group, male sex, those who attended formal education and radio listener were significantly associated with the knowledge of blood donation. Attending secondary and above education, having higher income, listening to radio broadcasts, and knowledge of blood donation were found to be the independent predictors of attitude. The practice of blood donation was higher among respondents who were older, attended certificate and above education, knowledgeable, and favorable attitude groups. The prevalence of knowledge and practice of blood donation is found to be higher compared to similar study conducted in Mekelle, whereas the level of attitude is found to be lower. The finding of this study also justified any possible interventions on the independent predictors. There should be a regularly scheduled awareness creation and voluntary blood donation campaigns organized at the community level to utilize potential blood

  4. Selective proliferation of normal human melanocytes in vitro in the presence of phorbol ester and cholera toxin by Eisinger and Marko.

    PubMed

    Scott, Glynis

    2014-01-01

    Melanocytes are pigment producing cells that arise from the neural crest and migrate to the skin early in fetal development. The pigment that melanocytes synthesize, melanin, plays a critical role in protecting the skin from mutagenic ultraviolet irradiation. Melanocytes are also precursor cells for melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. Because melanocytes make up a minority population of cells in the epidermis they have been difficult to propagate in culture. The landmark paper by Eisinger and Marko, described below, was the first successful report of large scale propagation of pure cultures of melanocytes. This paper set the stage for an explosive growth in knowledge in the biology of human melanocytes and allowed scientists to begin dissecting the different oncogenic events involved in the transition of melanocytes to melanoma.

  5. Development and the initial validation of a new self-administered questionnaire for an early detection of health status changes in smokers at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (MARKO questionnaire).

    PubMed

    Vrbica, Žarko; Labor, Marina; Košćec Đuknić, Adrijana; Radošević-Vidaček, Biserka; Gudelj, Ivan; Labor, Slavica; Jurić, Iva; Calverley, Peter Ma; Plavec, Davor

    2016-10-31

    To develop and do an initial validation of a new simple tool (self-administered questionnaire) that would be sensitive and specific enough to detect early changes in smokers leading to future development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 224 consecutive participants (50.9% women), with mean±standard deviation age of 52.3±6.7 years, 37.5±16.7 pack-years smoking history (85.8% active smokers), and no prior diagnosis of COPD were recruited. The MARKO questionnaire was self-administered twice; at the general practitioner's office and after 2-4 weeks at the tertiary care hospital. Participants were assessed for COPD by a pulmonologist after filling in a quality of life (QoL) questionnaires, history-taking, physical examination, lung function test, 6-minute walk test, and laboratory tests. They were divided into four subgroups: "healthy" smokers, symptomatic smokers, and smokers with mild and moderately severe COPD. Psychometric analyses indicated that the 18-item questionnaire had a very good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.91) and test-retest reliability for a four week period (c=0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-0.92, Lin's concordance). A significant correlations of MARKO scores were found with two QoL questionnaires; r=0.69 (P<0.001) and r=0.81 (P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.753 (95% CI 0.691-0.808, <0.001), with a sensitivity of 71.83% and specificity of 64.24% to discriminate "healthy" smokers from other subgroups. Based on psychometric analyses and high convergent validity correlation with already validated QoL questionnaires, the newly developed MARKO questionnaire was shown to be a reliable self-administered short health status assessment tool.

  6. Maternal Satisfaction on Delivery Service and Its Associated Factors among Mothers Who Gave Birth in Public Health Facilities of Debre Markos Town, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bitew, Kurabachew; Ayichiluhm, Mekonnen; Yimam, Kedir

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The existence of maternal health service does not guarantee its use by women; neither does the use of maternal health service guarantee optimal outcomes for women. The World Health Organization recommends monitoring and evaluation of maternal satisfaction to improve the quality and efficiency of health care during childbirth. Thus, this study aimed at assessing maternal satisfaction on delivery service and factors associated with it. Methods. Community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Debre Markos town from March to April 2014. Systematic random sampling technique were used to select 398 mothers who gave birth within one year. The satisfaction of mothers was measured using 19 questions which were adopted from Donabedian quality assessment framework. Binary logistic regression was fitted to identify independent predictors. Result. Among mothers, the overall satisfaction on delivery service was found to be 318 (81.7%). Having plan to deliver at health institution (AOR = 3.30, 95% CI: 1.38–7.9) and laboring time of less than six hours (AOR = 4.03, 95% CI: 1.66–9.79) were positively associated with maternal satisfaction on delivery service. Those mothers who gave birth using spontaneous vaginal delivery (AOR = 0.11, 95% CI: 0.023–0.51) were inversely related to maternal satisfaction on delivery service. Conclusion. This study revealed that the overall satisfaction of mothers on delivery service was found to be suboptimal. Reasons for delivery visit, duration of labor, and mode of delivery are independent predictors of maternal satisfaction. Thus, there is a need of an intervention on the independent predictors. PMID:26347882

  7. Infant feeding practice and associated factors among HIV positive mothers in Debre Markos Referral Hospital East Gojam zone, North West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Wakwoya, Elias Bekele; Zewudie, Tatek Abate; Gebresilasie, Kahsay Zenebe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dilemma posed between lifesaving benefit and risk of transmission through breast feeding complicates infant feedings among communities grossly affected by HIV/AIDS. According to the world health organization’s guideline which was revised in 2010, exclusive breast feeding and exclusive replacement feeding are the recommended infant feeding practices for HIV positive mothers. The aim of this study was to assess infant feeding practice and associated factors among HIV positive mothers in Debre Markos Referral Hospital, North West Ethiopia. Methods An institutional based cross sectional study was conducted from May to September 2013. A Randomly selected 260 HIV positive mothers were included. The data were collected by using a pretested and structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate analysis were performed to check association and to control confounders. Results From a total of 260 HIV positive mothers, 85.8% of them were feeding their children based on the recommended feeding way of infant feeding practice with the remaining percentage 14.2% were practicing mixed feeding. In multivariate analysis mothers attending high school and above AOR = 5.3 [95% CI = 1.25-22.1], having antenatal care follow up AOR = 5.5 [95% CI = 1.5-20.16], being on anti-retro viral therapy AOR = 6.5 [95% CI = 1.88-22.51] and disclosure of HIV status AOR = 7.1 [95% CI = 1.26-39.76] were found to be independently associated with infant feeding practice. Conclusion This study revealed that large proportion of HIV positive mothers had followed the recommended infant feeding practice and significantly high number of mothers had practiced mixed feeding. Educating mothers, increasing ANC utilization, counseling mothers to start ART, encouraging and supporting mothers to disclose their HIV status were recommended. PMID:28154655

  8. Maternal Satisfaction on Delivery Service and Its Associated Factors among Mothers Who Gave Birth in Public Health Facilities of Debre Markos Town, Northwest Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bitew, Kurabachew; Ayichiluhm, Mekonnen; Yimam, Kedir

    2015-01-01

    The existence of maternal health service does not guarantee its use by women; neither does the use of maternal health service guarantee optimal outcomes for women. The World Health Organization recommends monitoring and evaluation of maternal satisfaction to improve the quality and efficiency of health care during childbirth. Thus, this study aimed at assessing maternal satisfaction on delivery service and factors associated with it. Community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Debre Markos town from March to April 2014. Systematic random sampling technique were used to select 398 mothers who gave birth within one year. The satisfaction of mothers was measured using 19 questions which were adopted from Donabedian quality assessment framework. Binary logistic regression was fitted to identify independent predictors. Among mothers, the overall satisfaction on delivery service was found to be 318 (81.7%). Having plan to deliver at health institution (AOR = 3.30, 95% CI: 1.38-7.9) and laboring time of less than six hours (AOR = 4.03, 95% CI: 1.66-9.79) were positively associated with maternal satisfaction on delivery service. Those mothers who gave birth using spontaneous vaginal delivery (AOR = 0.11, 95% CI: 0.023-0.51) were inversely related to maternal satisfaction on delivery service. This study revealed that the overall satisfaction of mothers on delivery service was found to be suboptimal. Reasons for delivery visit, duration of labor, and mode of delivery are independent predictors of maternal satisfaction. Thus, there is a need of an intervention on the independent predictors.

  9. Demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and associated factors among married women of reproductive age group in Debre Markos Town, North West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethiopia is the second most populous country in sub Saharan Africa with high total fertility rate, and high maternal and child mortality rates. In sub Saharan African countries, including Ethiopia, even though studies show that demand for contraception is high, the practice is low. Particularly, in Ethiopia, despite the fact that practices on long acting and permanent methods are believed to be low, there are limited evidences on the real magnitude of demand for the methods. Methods To assess demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and associated factors among married women of reproductive age group in Debre Markos town, Amhara Regional State, North West Ethiopia, A community based cross sectional study was conducted, from April 08–19, 2012. Systematic sampling technique was used to select 523 study participants. Pre tested structured Amharic version questionnaire was used to collect the data through interview. Both bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to identify associated factors. Results Among 519 respondents, 323 (62.2%) were using modern family planning (FP) methods in which 101 (19.5%) were using long acting and permanent contraceptive methods (LAPMs). Among all respondents, 171 (32.9%) had unmet need for LAPMs. The total demand for LAPMs was 272 (52.4%) of which 37.1% were satisfied and 62.9% unsatisfied demand. Being in the older age group (40-44 years) [AOR = 2.8; 95% CI:1.12, 9.55], having no desire for more child [AOR = 20.37; 95% CI:9.28, 44.72], desire to have a child after 2 years [AOR = 6.4; 95%CI:3.04,13.47], not ever heard of modern FP [AOR = 5.73; 95% CI:1.26, 25.91], not ever using of modern FP [AOR = 1.89; 95% CI:1.01, 3.55] and having no spousal discussion in the last six month [AOR = 1.642, 95% CI: 1.049, 2.57) were some of the factors significantly associated with demand for LAPMs. Conclusions Demand and unmet need for LAPMs were high in the study area. Therefore

  10. Bacterial agents and antibiotic resistance profiles of infections from different sites that occurred among patients at Debre Markos Referral Hospital, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Abera, Bayeh; Yimer, Mulat; Hailu, Tadesse; Ayele, Haimanot; Abate, Dereje

    2017-07-06

    In developing countries like Ethiopia, infections with antibiotic resistant bacteria become a real threat. Hence, monitoring of local level antimicrobial resistance profile is indispensable to contain the spread of drug resistant bacteria and intervene poor awareness on antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, this study aimed at determining bacterial and antibiotic resistance profiles of infections from different sites that occurred among patients. Retrospective data recorded were analyzed on culture and drug susceptibility test results at Debre Markos Referral Hospital which were performed from 2011 to 2014. Drug susceptibility tests were performed using disk-diffusion technique. Chi square test was computed to compare the proportion of bacterial isolates with patients' age and sex. Out of 575 clinical samples processed, 280 (48.7%) were culture positive for aerobic bacteria pathogens. Wound 238 (41.4%) and urine 108 (18.8%) were the most frequent samples processed. Overall, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was the predominant isolate 100 (31.5%) followed by Escherichia coli (E. coli) 39 (13.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) 30 (10.3%) and Salmonella spp. 25 (8.9%). P. aeruginosa was the most frequent isolate followed by S. aureus from ear infection. E. coli was the leading isolate followed by Klebsiella spp. from urinary tract infection. Salmonella and Shigella spp. were the most frequent isolates in stool in children below 5 years of age. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae) 16 (76.2%) was the most common isolate from urethral discharge. The overall multidrug-resistant Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria isolates were 113 (84.6%) and 96 (72.2%), respectively. Gram positive bacteria revealed resistance to cotrimoxazole (80%), gentamicin (83.1%), amoxicillin (85.1%), ampicillin (85.8%), penicillin (89.7%), clindamycin (93.2%) and erythromycin (90.9%). Gram negative bacteria showed resistance to cotrimoxazole (53.1%), amoxicillin (58.8%), ampicillin

  11. Demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and associated factors among married women of reproductive age group in Debre Markos Town, North West Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bulto, Gizachew Abdissa; Zewdie, Tatek Abate; Beyen, Teresa Kisi

    2014-03-13

    Ethiopia is the second most populous country in sub Saharan Africa with high total fertility rate, and high maternal and child mortality rates. In sub Saharan African countries, including Ethiopia, even though studies show that demand for contraception is high, the practice is low. Particularly, in Ethiopia, despite the fact that practices on long acting and permanent methods are believed to be low, there are limited evidences on the real magnitude of demand for the methods. To assess demand for long acting and permanent contraceptive methods and associated factors among married women of reproductive age group in Debre Markos town, Amhara Regional State, North West Ethiopia, A community based cross sectional study was conducted, from April 08-19, 2012. Systematic sampling technique was used to select 523 study participants. Pre tested structured Amharic version questionnaire was used to collect the data through interview. Both bivariate and multiple logistic regressions were used to identify associated factors. Among 519 respondents, 323 (62.2%) were using modern family planning (FP) methods in which 101 (19.5%) were using long acting and permanent contraceptive methods (LAPMs). Among all respondents, 171 (32.9%) had unmet need for LAPMs. The total demand for LAPMs was 272 (52.4%) of which 37.1% were satisfied and 62.9% unsatisfied demand. Being in the older age group (40-44 years) [AOR = 2.8; 95% CI:1.12, 9.55], having no desire for more child [AOR = 20.37; 95% CI:9.28, 44.72], desire to have a child after 2 years [AOR = 6.4; 95%CI:3.04,13.47], not ever heard of modern FP [AOR = 5.73; 95% CI:1.26, 25.91], not ever using of modern FP [AOR = 1.89; 95% CI:1.01, 3.55] and having no spousal discussion in the last six month [AOR = 1.642, 95% CI: 1.049, 2.57) were some of the factors significantly associated with demand for LAPMs. Demand and unmet need for LAPMs were high in the study area. Therefore raising awareness of the community

  12. Development and the initial validation of a new self-administered questionnaire for an early detection of health status changes in smokers at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (MARKO questionnaire)

    PubMed Central

    Vrbica, Žarko; Labor, Marina; Košćec Đuknić, Adrijana; Radošević-Vidaček, Biserka; Gudelj, Ivan; Labor, Slavica; Jurić, Iva; Calverley, Peter MA; Plavec, Davor

    2016-01-01

    Aim To develop and do an initial validation of a new simple tool (self-administered questionnaire) that would be sensitive and specific enough to detect early changes in smokers leading to future development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods 224 consecutive participants (50.9% women), with mean ± standard deviation age of 52.3 ± 6.7 years, 37.5 ± 16.7 pack-years smoking history (85.8% active smokers), and no prior diagnosis of COPD were recruited. The MARKO questionnaire was self-administered twice; at the general practitioner's office and after 2-4 weeks at the tertiary care hospital. Participants were assessed for COPD by a pulmonologist after filling in a quality of life (QoL) questionnaires, history-taking, physical examination, lung function test, 6-minute walk test, and laboratory tests. They were divided into four subgroups: “healthy” smokers, symptomatic smokers, and smokers with mild and moderately severe COPD. Results Psychometric analyses indicated that the 18-item questionnaire had a very good internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.91) and test-retest reliability for a four week period (ρc = 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-0.92, Lin’s concordance). A significant correlations of MARKO scores were found with two QoL questionnaires; r = 0.69 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.81 (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.753 (95% CI 0.691-0.808, P < 0.001), with a sensitivity of 71.83% and specificity of 64.24% to discriminate “healthy” smokers from other subgroups. Conclusion Based on psychometric analyses and high convergent validity correlation with already validated QoL questionnaires, the newly developed MARKO questionnaire was shown to be a reliable self-administered short health status assessment tool. Trial registration Clinicaltrial.gov NCT01550679 PMID:27815933

  13. A new metal exchanged zeolite for a present environmental problem. An in-situ XAS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Escobar, C.; Franch-Martí, C.; Palomares, A. E.; Rey, F.; Guilera, G.

    2013-04-01

    The medium pore zeolite, TNU-9, is prepared and studied for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO using C3H8 as the reducing agent. The catalytic activity of TNU-9 zeolites for the SCR is comparable to other known highly active zeolites but with the advantage of TNU-9 of having almost the same catalytic performance in the presence of H2O during reaction. The nature and behaviour of Cu and Co active sites contained in the TNU-9 catalysts have been studied under operation conditions using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) to understand the key parameters controlling the performance of this reaction.1 It was found that the well dispersed Cu and Co centres need to be in a mixed valence state to obtain good catalytic results for the SCR and that the catalytic performance is related to the topology of the TNU-9 itself.

  14. Is reproduction limiting growth?. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecquerie, Laure; Lika, Konstadia

    2017-03-01

    Jusup et al. [1] aimed at covering the theoretical foundations of DEB theory and presenting the broadness of its applications for both physicists and biologists and they successfully do so. One of the most striking assumptions of DEB theory for biologists that is, as mentioned by the authors, at odds with an existing body of literature in fisheries sciences [2,3], is the so-called κ-rule. A constant allocation to growth and somatic maintenance throughout ontogeny is indeed at odds with the widely accepted limitation of growth at the onset of sexual maturity by the reproduction process.

  15. Entropy production guides energy budget. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, Leonid M.

    2017-03-01

    The paper [1] is very important and useful for everyone involved in mathematic modeling of biological processes. There is no point in mentioning here all the advantages of the publication because they can be found in the primary source itself. In this comment, I would like to briefly refer to the critical points that authors and readers may find useful for further consideration and development of the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory.

  16. Linking levels of life. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepac, Petra

    2017-03-01

    Energy is a unifying currency of physics and biology. In physics it is one of the fundamental quantities, essential to the laws of thermodynamics. In biology, it is what all organisms need in order to grow, it is a link between different trophic levels in foodwebs, and can serve as a link between different levels of biological organization from individuals, to populations, communities and ecosystems. Dynamic Energy Budget theory provides potentially unifying framework, yet so far there has been a disconnect between theoretical and empirical work. The level of model complexity and the lack of data means that the biggest strength of the theory - its many possible applications - has not been fully appreciated. In their thorough review, Jusup et al. [1] set to unify the theoretical and empirical branches of DEB theory, simplify its derivation and illustrate its potential through diverse set of applications - from conservation of endangered species and bioaccumulation of pollutants, to extensions to population viability and effects of climate change.

  17. Constraints and DEB parameter estimation. Comment on: ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Gonçalo M.

    2017-03-01

    Jusup et al. [1] aim at presenting a fresh and concise way to arrive at the standard model of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory and they manage to do it nicely. A comment by Kooijman [2] focused on several important features of the paper. Since the paper is very rich in terms of topics and is very clear on its formulations, here I will try to focus on another set of features: make some clarifications, leave some open questions and suggest some possible future work.

  18. Challenges for dynamic energy budget theory. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisbet, Roger M.

    2017-03-01

    Jusup et al. [1] provide a comprehensive review of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory - a theory of metabolic organization that has its roots in a model by S.A.L.M Kooijman [2] and has evolved over three decades into a remarkable general theory whose use appears to be growing exponentially. The definitive text on DEB theory [3] is a challenging (though exceptionally rewarding) read, and previous reviews (e.g. [4,5]) have provided focused summaries of some of its main themes, targeted at specific groups of readers. The strong case for a further review is well captured in the abstract: ;Hitherto, the foundations were more accessible to physicists or mathematicians, and the applications to biologists, causing a dichotomy in what always should have been a single body of work.; In response to this need, Jusup et al. provide a review that combines a lucid, rigorous exposition of the core components of DEB theory with a diverse collection of DEB applications. They also highlight some recent advances, notably the rapidly growing on-line database of DEB model parameters (451 species on 15 August 2016 according to [1], now, just a few months later, over 500 species).

  19. Early detection of COPD patients in GOLD 0 population: an observational non-interventional cohort study - MARKO study.

    PubMed

    Vrbica, Žarko; Labor, Marina; Gudelj, Ivan; Labor, Slavica; Jurić, Iva; Plavec, Davor

    2017-02-10

    Main risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is smoking, although only less than 1/3 of smokers develop clinically manifest COPD. COPD's progressive nature with high disability and mortality makes it plausible to detect it as early as possible thus allowing for an early intervention. The only tool for an early diagnosis that could be used on the global scale is spirometry, even though symptoms and deprivation of health related quality of life (HRQoL) precede relevant spirometric changes. Existing HRQoL questionnaires are too complicated or not developed for an early detection of COPD. The aim of our study was to develop a new simple HRQoL tool that will allow (alone or in combination with other markers) early detection of patients with COPD. A multicenter prospective cohort study recruiting 500 subjects at risk for COPD (smokers/ex-smokers ≥20 pack-years, 40-65 years, both sexes, with no prior diagnosis of COPD) will be carried out in two phases: (1) cross-sectional - development and validation of a new questionnaire; and (2) prospective - follow-up of a cohort of patients at risk for COPD. Subjects were recruited by 25 GPs and assessed for COPD by dedicated pulmonologists in 7 hospital centers using a predefined protocol: HRQoL, history, physical, blood sampling, exhaled breath temperature (EBT), lung function, 6-min walk test (6MWT). Patients without COPD and those in GOLD stage 1 at initial assessment will be reassessed for disease progression by the same pulmonologist after 2 and 5 years. This is one of the first cohort studies attempting to establish the incidence of COPD in the pre-symptomatic stage before significant end organ damage. We intend to assess the validity, predictability and discriminative power ('healthy' smokers vs. pre-symptomatic phase in newly developed COPD) of newly developed HRQoL tool alone or in combination with other markers; EBT, lung function, 6MWT, genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics). We expect that the results of this study can improve our understanding of the development of COPD, identify some new underlying pathophysiological pathways, and offer to sensitive smokers/ex-smokers new preventive and early intervention measures thus improving the management of COPD. Clinicaltrial.gov NCT01550679 retrospectively registered February 28, 2012.

  20. The universality of the von Bertalanffy growth curve. Comment on: ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maino, James L.; Kearney, Michael R.

    2017-03-01

    A key strength of the DEB approach, in contrast to other metabolic theories, is that its foundational principles are general to all of life. Other theories have attempted to explain patterns in metabolism in terms of taxon-specific processes, such as the geometry of vascular network supply constraints [1,2], or heat dissipation requirements of endotherms [3], but DEB theory presents constraints on metabolic processes that apply to a wide range of taxa, including bacteria, invertebrates, birds, or mammals [4]. The price of this generalisability is abstraction, but there is much to gain from a general and unifying metabolic theory. Abstracting individuals into simple energy processors would seem to overlook many other important aspects of their biology, such as their unique phylogeny, physiology, or ethology, but this strategy has facilitated great advances in one of the grand challenges in biology: making sense of interacting phenomena occurring across wide scales in space, time, and organisational complexity. The study of cells, individuals, communities and ecosystems have benefited from such a regime [5,6]. Similarly, the simple abstraction of partitioning individual organisms into compartments of reserve biomass and structural biomass allows one to account for an astounding variety of energetic transformations that occur between species and as an organism develops.

  1. Maturity as quantifier for physiological time. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustine, Starrlight

    2017-03-01

    I appreciated the review of motivational considerations for the set-up of the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory by Jusup et al. [1, section 2]. The authors refer to useful biological literature when illustrating and justifying concepts of homeostasis and maturity.

  2. Homeostasis and the fuelling of metabolism. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2017-03-01

    The nice and lucid introduction by Jusup et al. [2] to the standard model of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory aims, according to the authors, to serve both physicists and biologists. In my opinion, the authors have been very successful in this, and even for me, as founder of DEB theory, I found several new elements (see below).

  3. Autotrophs' challenge to Dynamic Energy Budget theory: Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geček, Sunčana

    2017-03-01

    Jusup and colleagues in the recent review on physics of metabolic organization [1] discuss in detail motivational considerations and common assumptions of Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory, supply readers with a practical guide to DEB-based modeling, demonstrate the construction and dynamics of the standard DEB model, and illustrate several applications. The authors make a step forward from the existing literature by seamlessly bridging over the dichotomy between (i) thermodynamic foundations of the theory (which are often more accessible and understandable to physicists and mathematicians), and (ii) the resulting bioenergetic models (mostly used by biologists in real-world applications).

  4. DEB modeling for nanotoxicology, microbial ecology, and environmental engineering. Comment on: ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Patricia A.

    2017-03-01

    Jusup et al. [1] appeal to mathematical physicists, and to biologists, by providing the theoretical basis for dynamic energy budget (DEB) modeling of individual organisms and populations, while emphasizing model simplicity, universality, and applicability to real world problems. Comments herein regard the disciplinary tensions proposed by the authors and suggest that-in addition to important applications in eco- and specifically nano-toxicology-there are opportunities for DEB frameworks to inform relative complexity in microbial ecological process modeling. This commentary also suggests another audience for bridging DEB theory and application-engineers solving environmental problems.

  5. More practical and gentler guides are required for non-mathematicians in ecotoxicology and beyond. Comment on ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Yuichi

    2017-03-01

    Use of dynamic energy budget (DEB) model [1], and/or other bioenergetic models would be definitely a key in ecotoxicological applications and ecological risk assessments. One of the critical reasons to anticipate so is that we are required to reduce animal use in ecotoxicity testing that usually measures effects of chemicals on survival or reproduction of organisms [2]. Consequently, the prediction of population-level consequences based on ecotoxicological modeling and suborganismal-level effects evaluated by in vitro testing would have more significant value. In this regard, the modeling that can link the sub-organismal responses to organismal- (e.g., survival and reproduction) and then population-levels consequences would be really valuable although challenging [3,4]. Particularly, DEB models have the potential for providing a mechanistic link between sub-organismal and organismal levels once the effects of chemicals on biogenetics (i.e., growth, increased maintenance cost, etc.) are assessed [3]. It should be noted that, even though a considerable amount of work is required to develop such mechanistic models for local populations of a given species [3], a time-consuming model development may not be necessary for ;general; ecological risk assessments as with the case that use of ;standard/surrogate; test species such as Daphnia is accepted in many regulatory contexts. What will be required is probably the agreement on which models/scenarios are used for the assessments.

  6. The role of Dynamic Energy Budget theory in predictive modeling of stressor impacts on ecological systems. Comment on: ;Physics of metabolic organization; by Marko Jusup et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galic, Nika; Forbes, Valery E.

    2017-03-01

    Human activities have been modifying ecosystems for centuries, from pressures on wild populations we harvest to modifying habitats through urbanization and agricultural activities. Changes in global climate patterns are adding another layer of, often unpredictable, perturbations to ecosystems on which we rely for life support [1,2]. To ensure the sustainability of ecosystem services, especially at this point in time when the human population is estimated to grow by another 2 billion by 2050 [3], we need to predict possible consequences of our actions and suggest relevant solutions [4,5]. We face several challenges when estimating adverse impacts of our actions on ecosystems. We describe these in the context of ecological risk assessment of chemicals. Firstly, when attempting to assess risk from exposure to chemicals, we base our decisions on a very limited number of species that are easily cultured and kept in the lab. We assume that preventing risk to these species will also protect all of the untested species present in natural ecosystems [6]. Secondly, although we know that chemicals interact with other stressors in the field, the number of stressors that we can test is limited due to logistical and ethical reasons. Similarly, empirical approaches are limited in both spatial and temporal scale due to logistical, financial and ethical reasons [7,8]. To bypass these challenges, we can develop ecological models that integrate relevant life history and other information and make testable predictions across relevant spatial and temporal scales [8-10].

  7. US EPA, Pesticide Product Label, PROPYLENE OXIDE, 12/21 ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2011-04-21

    ... lit filii. I ,iaun atil t.. tnu .. IfICI il c..,ltl, lint". fl ttt.fIiUIt IiIt .. r uhti. is C..,ll1l. ttci fllilU" riu -.t .. _uni Hi I'" t. cnlaU lea t .. ZI ttl ,lI9fl_ iii" iari ... If 1 .. tbl II ... ...

  8. Current Level and Correlates of Traditional Cooking Energy Sources Utilization in Urban Settings in the Context of Climate Change and Health, Northwest Ethiopia: A Case of Debre Markos Town

    PubMed Central

    Geremew, Kumlachew; Gedefaw, Molla; Dagnew, Zewdu; Jara, Dube

    2014-01-01

    Background. Traditional biomass has been the major source of cooking energy for major segment of Ethiopian population for thousands of years. Cognizant of this energy poverty, the Government of Ethiopia has been spending huge sum of money to increase hydroelectric power generating stations. Objective. To assess current levels and correlates of traditional cooking energy sources utilization. Methods. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted employing both quantitative and qualitative approaches on systematically selected 423 households for quantitative and purposively selected 20 people for qualitative parts. SPSS version 16 for windows was used to analyze the quantitative data. Logistic regression was fitted to assess possible associations and its strength was measured using odds ratio at 95% CI. Qualitative data were analyzed thematically. Result. The study indicated that 95% of households still use traditional biomass for cooking. Those who were less knowledgeable about negative health and environmental effects of traditional cooking energy sources were seven and six times more likely to utilize them compared with those who were knowledgeable (AOR (95% CI) = 7.56 (1.635, 34.926), AOR (95% CI) = 6.68 (1.80, 24.385), resp.). The most outstanding finding of this study was that people use traditional energy for cooking mainly due to lack of the knowledge and their beliefs about food prepared using traditional energy. That means “…people still believe that food cooked with charcoal is believed to taste delicious than cooked with other means.”  Conclusion. The majority of households use traditional biomass for cooking due to lack of knowledge and belief. Therefore, mechanisms should be designed to promote electric energy and to teach the public about health effects of traditional cooking energy source. PMID:24895591

  9. Postnatal Care Service Utilization and Associated Factors among Women Who Gave Birth in the Last 12 Months prior to the Study in Debre Markos Town, Northwestern Ethiopia: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Limenih, Miteku Andualem; Endale, Zerfu Mulaw; Dachew, Berihun Assefa

    2016-01-01

    Improving maternal and newborn health through proper postnatal care services under the care of skilled health personnel is the key strategy to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. However, there were limited evidences on utilization of postnatal care services in Ethiopia. A community based cross-sectional study was conducted in Debremarkos town, Northwest Ethiopia. Cluster sampling technique was used to select 588 study participants. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression model was fitted to identify factors associated with postnatal care utilization. Odds ratio with 95% confidence interval was computed to determine the level of significance. Postnatal care service utilization was found to be 33.5%. Awareness about maternal complication (AOR: 2.72, 95% CI (1.71, 4.34)), place of delivery of last child (AOR: 1.68, 95% CI: (1.01, 2.79)), outcome of birth (AOR: 2.71, 95% CI (1.19, 6.19)), delivery by cesarean section (AOR: 4.82, 95% CI (1.86, 12.54)), and delivery complication that occurred during birth (AOR: 2.58, 95% CI (1.56, 4.28)) were factors associated with postnatal care service utilization. Postnatal care service utilization was found to be low. Increasing awareness about postnatal care, preventing maternal and neonatal complication, and scheduling mothers based on the national postnatal care follow-up protocol would increase postnatal care service utilization. PMID:27433481

  10. Simulator Fidelity: A Concept Paper

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    cnLUMB8iS 1.AUORATORIES TACTICAL TECHNICAL OJýC I USA ARHCTIC TESI CEN ATTN: AMStL-PL-TS 1 UISA cOLD RFGIONS TEST CEN ATTr4: STECR-up I USA t.UNCkP7S ANALYSiS...AISHL)O1-L𔃾U I tSiA 4NFAN’TNY SCHiU) ATTNI ATS-i-tv I USA mP~ C (HEM !ýCtl/TNU CL.N 4 V1. MCCLE6. LAt AITNt ,AT4I’..PT$ SUSK M4P CHEM SCH’- ING CON

  11. Regional study of the Archean to Proterozoic crust at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO+), Ontario: Predicting the geoneutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu; Strati, Virginia; Mantovani, Fabio; Shirey, Steven B.; McDonough, William F.

    2014-10-01

    SNO+ detector that is currently under construction in Ontario, Canada, will be a new kiloton-scale liquid scintillation detector with the capability of recording geoneutrino events that can be used to constrain the strength of the Earth's radiogenic power, and in turn, to test compositional models of the bulk silicate Earth (BSE). We constructed a detailed 3-D model of the regional crust centered at SNO+ from compiled geological, geophysical, and geochemical information. Crustal cross sections obtained from refraction and reflection seismic surveys were used to characterize the crust and assign uncertainties to its structure. The average Moho depth in the study area is 42.3 ± 2.6 km. The upper crust was divided into seven dominant lithologic units on the basis of regional geology. The abundances of U and Th and their uncertainties in each upper crustal lithologic unit were determined from analyses of representative outcrop samples. The average chemical compositions of the middle and lower crust beneath the SNO+ region were determined by coupling local seismic velocity profiles with a global compilation of the chemical compositions of amphibolite and granulite facies rocks. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the geoneutrino signal originating from the regional crust at SNO+ and to track asymmetrical uncertainties of U and Th abundances. The total regional crust contribution of the geoneutrino signal at SNO+ is predicted to be 15.6-3.4+5.3 TNU (a Terrestrial Neutrino Unit is one geoneutrino event per 1032 target protons per year), with the Huronian Supergroup near SNO+ dominantly contributing 7.3-3.0+5.0 TNU to this total. Future systematically sampling of this regional unit and denser seismic surveys will better model its composition and structure, and thus reduce the uncertainty on geoneutrino signal at SNO+. The bulk crustal geoneutrino signal at SNO+ is estimated to be 30.7-4.2+6.0 TNU, which is lower than that predicted in a global-scale reference

  12. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to preterm infants through breast milk.

    PubMed

    Behari, Priya; Englund, Janet; Alcasid, Grace; Garcia-Houchins, Sylvia; Weber, Stephen G

    2004-09-01

    To determine a potential source of MRSA colonization and infection among preterm infants in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using molecular analysis of breast milk samples. Case report, outbreak investigation. Preterm triplets were delivered at 26 weeks' gestation via cesarean section when routine active surveillance for MRSA was performed for all infants in a NICU. Surveillance consisted of swabbing the throat, nose, and umbilicus (TNU) weekly. Although infants A and B initially had negative TNU swabs, repeat cultures were positive for MRSA on day of life (DOL) 10 and DOL 18, respectively. Surveillance and clinical cultures for infant C were negative. Infant A developed sepsis, and multiple blood cultures were positive for MRSA beginning on DOL 14. Infant B developed conjunctivitis and a conjunctival exudate culture was positive for MRSA on DOL 70. Both infants were fed breast milk via nasogastric tube. Cultures of breast milk samples for infants A and B dated prior to either infant's first positive surveillance culture were positive for MRSA. All MRSA isolates had identical results on antibiotic susceptibility testing. PFGE demonstrated identical banding patterns for the MRSA isolates from the blood culture of infant A, breast milk for infants A and B, and a surveillance swab from infant B. At no time did the mother develop evidence of mastitis or other local breast infection. MRSA can be passed from mother to preterm infant through contaminated breast milk, even in the absence of maternal infection. Colonization and clinical disease can result.

  13. Achieving Lower Nitrogen Balance and Higher Nitrogen Recovery Efficiency Reduces Nitrous Oxide Emissions in North America's Maize Cropping Systems

    PubMed Central

    Omonode, Rex A.; Halvorson, Ardell D.; Gagnon, Bernard; Vyn, Tony J.

    2017-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the common, yet unproven, hypothesis that an increase of plant nitrogen (N) uptake and/or recovery efficiency (NRE) will reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during crop production. Understanding the relationships between N2O emissions and crop N uptake and use efficiency parameters can help inform crop N management recommendations for both efficiency and environmental goals. Analyses were conducted to determine which of several commonly used crop N uptake-derived parameters related most strongly to growing season N2O emissions under varying N management practices in North American maize systems. Nitrogen uptake-derived variables included total aboveground N uptake (TNU), grain N uptake (GNU), N recovery efficiency (NRE), net N balance (NNB) in relation to GNU [NNB(GNU)] and TNU [NNB(TNU)], and surplus N (SN). The relationship between N2O and N application rate was sigmoidal with relatively small emissions for N rates <130 kg ha−1, and a sharp increase for N rates from 130 to 220 kg ha−1; on average, N2O increased linearly by about 5 g N per kg of N applied for rates up to 220 kg ha−1. Fairly strong and significant negative relationships existed between N2O and NRE when management focused on N application rate (r2 = 0.52) or rate and timing combinations (r2 = 0.65). For every percentage point increase, N2O decreased by 13 g N ha−1 in response to N rates, and by 20 g N ha−1 for NRE changes in response to rate-by-timing treatments. However, more consistent positive relationships (R2 = 0.73–0.77) existed between N2O and NNB(TNU), NNB(GNU), and SN, regardless of rate and timing of N application; on average N2O emission increased by about 5, 7, and 8 g N, respectively, per kg increase of NNB(GNU), NNB(TNU), and SN. Neither N source nor placement influenced the relationship between N2O and NRE. Overall, our analysis indicated that a careful selection of appropriate N rate applied at the right time can both increase NRE and reduce N2O

  14. Physical Rehabilitation Improves Muscle Function Following Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-19

    Seene T, Kaasik P: Role of exercise therapy in prevention of decline in aging muscle function : glucocorticoid myopathy and unloading. J Aging Res...Combination of exercise training and diet restriction normalizes limited exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function in diet-induced diabetic mice... exercise . Int J Sports Med 2014, 35(1):19–27. 25. Hourdé C, Joanne P, Medja F, Mougenot N, Jacquet A, Mouisel E, Pannerec A, Hatem S, Butler-Browne G

  15. Female Teachers' Professional Development through Action Research Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassen, Rukya

    2016-01-01

    This is a study on teachers' professional development through action research practice. The participants of the study were 23 English Language Teachers (ELT) who teach in high schools, preparatory schools and colleges in Debre Markos, in Dessie and around in 2014. The methods of data collection were teacher reflection, and in-depth interview. The…

  16. Close Combat Missile Methodology Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-14

    Modeling: Industrial Applications of DEX.” Informatica 23 (1999): 487-491. Bohanec, Marko, Blaz Zupan, and Vladislav Rajkovic. “Applications of...Lisec. “Multi-attribute Decision Analysis in GIS: Weighted Linear Combination and Ordered Weighted Averaging.” Informatica 33, (1999): 459- 474

  17. User's Guide and Metadata to Coastal Biodiversity Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT): Framework for the Systemization of Life History and Biogeographic Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACTUser’s Guide & Metadata to Coastal Biodiversity Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT): Framework for the Systemization of Life History and Biogeographic Information(EPA/601/B-15/001, 2015, 123 pages)Henry Lee II, U.S. EPA, Western Ecology DivisionKatharine Marko, U.S. EPA,...

  18. A Study of Cumulative Trauma Disorders of the Upper Extremities and Occupation in Wright-Patterson Adir Force Base Civilian Personnel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    Workers: Individual, Ergonomie and Work Organizational Factors," Ergonomics, 38: 763- 776 (April 1995). Brogmus, G.E. and R. Marko. "The...Naval Health Research Center, San Diego CA, June 1988 (AD-A199920). Keyserling, W. M. and others. "A Checklist For Evaluating Ergonomie Risk Factors

  19. User's Guide and Metadata to Coastal Biodiversity Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT): Framework for the Systemization of Life History and Biogeographic Information

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACTUser’s Guide & Metadata to Coastal Biodiversity Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT): Framework for the Systemization of Life History and Biogeographic Information(EPA/601/B-15/001, 2015, 123 pages)Henry Lee II, U.S. EPA, Western Ecology DivisionKatharine Marko, U.S. EPA,...

  20. Occupational Analysis Bibliography.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Institute for the Behavioural and Social Sciences. 188. Llssltz, R. W., Mendoza , J. L., Huberty, C. J.. & Markos, H.V. (1979). Some further ideas on a... Pina , M. P. (1979). Policy specifying with application to personnel classification and assignment. Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference of the

  1. Spring Research Festival Features Visit from FCPS Superintendent | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of the highlights of the 19th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 4–7, was a visit from Terry Alban, Ph.D., superintendent of Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS), and Mike Markoe, deputy superintendent, FCPS. They toured the event on May 7, talking to researchers and students about their posters. “Dr. Alban was very interested in hearing what the Werner H. Kirsten students were presenting at their posters,” said Andrea Frydl, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick. “Many WHK students are also FCPS students, some of whom Dr. Alban and Dr. Markoe knew personally.” Alban tweeted (@FCPSMDSuper) photos and information about four of the students whose posters she visited during the tour.

  2. Spring Research Festival Features Visit from FCPS Superintendent | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    One of the highlights of the 19th annual Spring Research Festival (SRF), held May 4–7, was a visit from Terry Alban, Ph.D., superintendent of Frederick County Public Schools (FCPS), and Mike Markoe, deputy superintendent, FCPS. They toured the event on May 7, talking to researchers and students about their posters. “Dr. Alban was very interested in hearing what the Werner H. Kirsten students were presenting at their posters,” said Andrea Frydl, public affairs specialist, Office of Scientific Operations, NCI at Frederick. “Many WHK students are also FCPS students, some of whom Dr. Alban and Dr. Markoe knew personally.” Alban tweeted (@FCPSMDSuper) photos and information about four of the students whose posters she visited during the tour.

  3. Who Do You Know? Developing and Analyzing Entrepreneur Networks: Data Collection in the Tech Entrepreneurial Environment of Six African Cities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    with this visit. Markos is also the Community Manager of iceaddis, Ethiopia’s first high tech innovation hub. iceaddis is located on the beautiful...www.netscience.usma.edu 845.938.0804 iceaddis, Ethiopia’s First High Tech Innovation Hub iceaddis, Ethiopia’s First High Tech Innovation Hub On our...BongoHive, Lusaka’s first Technology and Innovation Hub. The local tech community in Lusaka was similar to Addis Ababa; BongoHive is the only major

  4. A Note on Zipf’s Law, Natural Languages, and Noncoding DNA Regions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    the lower 1 Indeed, as N. Chomsky points out (p.c.), if we take a col- lection of English sentences and define "words" by taking the strings...words in written English . American Journal of Psychology, 71, 209-218. [6] Mandelbrot, B. 1961. Word frequencies and Marko- vian models of discourse...similarity between DNA’s " gramar " and natural language grammars, just as the observation of exact Zipf-like behavior cannot distinguish between the

  5. Engineering Applications of Bird Flight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-27

    are available in the Zoology Department and Southwell Laboratories of Oxford University. These will be used to test models of the automatic flow...Fellow in the Department of Zoology , Oxford University, with expertise in animal flight dynamics and control. Dr Adrian Thomas (MA, PhD) is a University...Lecturer in the Department of Zoology , Oxford University, with expertise in the aerodynamics of animal flight. Dr Marko Bacic (MEng, D.Phil.) is a

  6. This Car Seems to Be Alive--Perspectives on the Documentary, "Plan F"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Margaret M.; Smith, J. Webster; Hayward, Casey

    2009-01-01

    Ed Marko redefines what it means to be not only an auto mechanic but also a person who is blind. At the age of 20 years, he lost his sight from a degenerative disease called infantile glaucoma. However, he has surpassed what we traditionally think of as the capabilities of blind people. Now in his late 60s, he was once a rehabilitation counsellor,…

  7. This Car Seems to Be Alive--Perspectives on the Documentary, "Plan F"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Margaret M.; Smith, J. Webster; Hayward, Casey

    2009-01-01

    Ed Marko redefines what it means to be not only an auto mechanic but also a person who is blind. At the age of 20 years, he lost his sight from a degenerative disease called infantile glaucoma. However, he has surpassed what we traditionally think of as the capabilities of blind people. Now in his late 60s, he was once a rehabilitation counsellor,…

  8. Addressing the Neglected Tropical Disease Podoconiosis in Northern Ethiopia: Lessons Learned from a New Community Podoconiosis Program

    PubMed Central

    Tomczyk, Sara; Tamiru, Abreham; Davey, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite its great public health importance, few control initiatives addressing podoconiosis (non-filarial elephantiasis, a geochemical neglected tropical disease) exist. In June 2010, the first podoconiosis program in Northern Ethiopia, consisting of prevention, awareness, and care and support activities, began in Debre Markos, Northern Ethiopia. This study aims to document and disseminate the lessons learned from a new community podoconiosis program in Debre Markos. Methods/Principal Findings We used a content analysis approach to examine and evaluate data from a series of sources. These sources include conducted interview transcripts, a focus group discussion transcript and secondary sources including monitoring and evaluation field reports, observation notes, and research obtained from a literature review. Themes were identified and grouped into matrix tables. Overall, sixteen program steps were identified and grouped into 6 domains: Initial preparation, training and sensitization, foundation building, treatment activity implementation, awareness, and follow-up. Emphasis is placed on the need for baseline data, effective training, local leadership, experience-sharing, mass-awareness, cross-cutting sector issues (i.e., water and waste management), and integration with government health systems. Related successes and challenges are also described, as are stakeholder roles and misconceptions and socio-cultural challenges affecting the program start-up. Many of the identified successes and challenges are relevant to the aim of the podoconiosis program to be sustainable and community-led. Conclusions/Significance Much of this information has already been used to improve the Debre Markos program. We also anticipate that the domains and steps identified will be useful in guiding new programs in other settings where podoconiosis is highly prevalent. We hope to encourage partnerships and collaboration among podoconiosis stakeholders in future growth and

  9. Extension, torque, and supercoiling in single, stretched, and twisted DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lam, Pui-Man; Zhen, Yi

    2015-11-07

    We reinvestigate the model originally studied by Neukirch and Marko that describes the extension, torque, and supercoiling in single, stretched, and twisted DNA molecules, which consists of a mixture of extended state and supercoiled state, using now a more accurate form of the free energy for the untwisted but stretched DNA. The original model uses an approximate form of this free energy and the agreement with experiment is only qualitative. We find that this more accurate free energy significantly improves the results, which bring them into quantitative agreement with experiment, throughout the entire force regime. This is rather surprising, considering that the theory is completely parameter-free.

  10. Perturbation expansion for a one-dimensional Anderson model with off-diagonal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovier, Anton

    1989-09-01

    The weak disorder expansion for a random Schrödinger equation with off-diagonal disorder in one dimension is studied. The invariant measure, the density of states, and the Lyapunov exponent are computed. The most interesting feature in this model appears at the band center, where the differentiated density of states diverges, while the Lyapunov exponent vanishes. The invariant measure approaches an atomic measure concentrated on zero and infinity. The results extend previous work of Markos to all orders of perturbation theory.

  11. Size of knots in ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Marcone, B; Orlandini, E; Stella, A L; Zonta, F

    2007-04-01

    We give two different, statistically consistent definitions of the length l of a prime knot tied into a polymer ring. In the good solvent regime the polymer is modeled by a self avoiding polygon of N steps on cubic lattice and l is the number of steps over which the knot "spreads" in a given configuration. An analysis of extensive Monte Carlo data in equilibrium shows that the probability distribution of l as a function of N obeys a scaling of the form p(l,N) approximately l(-c)f(l/N(D)) , with c approximately equal to 1.25 and D approximately equal to 1. Both D and c could be independent of knot type. As a consequence, the knot is weakly localized, i.e., approximately N(t) , with t=2-c approximately equal to 0.75 . For a ring with fixed knot type, weak localization implies the existence of a peculiar characteristic length l(nu) approximately N(tnu) . In the scaling approximately N(nu) (nu approximately equal to 0.58) of the radius of gyration of the whole ring, this length determines a leading power law correction which is much stronger than that found in the case of unrestricted topology. The existence of this correction is confirmed by an analysis of extensive Monte Carlo data for the radius of gyration. The collapsed regime is studied by introducing in the model sufficiently strong attractive interactions for nearest neighbor sites visited by the self-avoiding polygon. In this regime knot length determinations can be based on the entropic competition between two knotted loops separated by a slip link. These measurements enable us to conclude that each knot is delocalized (t approximately equal to 1) .

  12. Expected geoneutrino signal at JUNO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strati, Virginia; Baldoncini, Marica; Callegari, Ivan; Mantovani, Fabio; McDonough, William F.; Ricci, Barbara; Xhixha, Gerti

    2015-12-01

    Constraints on the Earth's composition and on its radiogenic energy budget come from the detection of geoneutrinos. The Kamioka Liquid scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND) and Borexino experiments recently reported the geoneutrino flux, which reflects the amount and distribution of U and Th inside the Earth. The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) neutrino experiment, designed as a 20 kton liquid scintillator detector, will be built in an underground laboratory in South China about 53 km from the Yangjiang and Taishan nuclear power plants, each one having a planned thermal power of approximately 18 GW. Given the large detector mass and the intense reactor antineutrino flux, JUNO aims not only to collect high statistics antineutrino signals from reactors but also to address the challenge of discriminating the geoneutrino signal from the reactor background. The predicted geoneutrino signal at JUNO is terrestrial neutrino unit (TNU), based on the existing reference Earth model, with the dominant source of uncertainty coming from the modeling of the compositional variability in the local upper crust that surrounds (out to approximately 500 km) the detector. A special focus is dedicated to the 6° × 4° local crust surrounding the detector which is estimated to contribute for the 44% of the signal. On the basis of a worldwide reference model for reactor antineutrinos, the ratio between reactor antineutrino and geoneutrino signals in the geoneutrino energy window is estimated to be 0.7 considering reactors operating in year 2013 and reaches a value of 8.9 by adding the contribution of the future nuclear power plants. In order to extract useful information about the mantle's composition, a refinement of the abundance and distribution of U and Th in the local crust is required, with particular attention to the geochemical characterization of the accessible upper crust where 47% of the expected geoneutrino signal originates and this region contributes

  13. Role of phenolic compounds during antioxidative responses of winter triticale to aphid and beetle attack.

    PubMed

    Czerniewicz, Paweł; Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Durak, Roma; Borowiak-Sobkowiak, Beata; Chrzanowski, Grzegorz

    2017-09-01

    One of the earliest responses of plants to insects' attack is generation of reactive oxygen species. However, the elevated level of ROS can elicit oxidative burst within plant tissues, and plants employ antioxidant systems against these radicals. Due to their chemical structures, polyphenols are able to diminish the level of ROS. Thus, we investigated the role of phenolic compounds in oxidative stress within winter triticale caused by Sitobion avenae and Oulema melanopus. It was found, that infestation by insects induced a high increase in the content of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion radical within resistant Lamberto cv. 24 hpi, whereas in sensitive Marko cv., an increase in H2O2 content was found within two days of aphid feeding. Moreover, resistant plants showed earlier and much greater induction of l-phenylalanine and l-tyrosine ammonia lyases and chalcone synthase activities, as well as accumulation of phenolic compounds in response to insect feeding than susceptible Marko. On the other hand, strong positive influence of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical contents on chalcone synthase activity and furthermore flavonoid biosynthesis was detected in the susceptible cultivar. Negative relationships between level of o-coumaric acid or flavonoid compounds and content of hydrogen peroxide or superoxide radical suggest their antioxidant capacity. Luteolin and o-coumaric acid may attend in scavenging of hydrogen peroxide, whereas quercetin, apigenin and (+)-catechin probably participate in reduction of superoxide anion radical content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of brain dynamics from EEG with a Markov prior.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sofie Therese; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2016-12-13

    Electroencephalography (EEG) can capture brain dynamics in high temporal resolution. By projecting the scalp EEG signal back to its origin in the brain also high spatial resolution can be achieved. Source localized EEG therefore has potential to be a very powerful tool for understanding the functional dynamics of the brain. Solving the inverse problem of EEG is however highly ill-posed as there are many more potential locations of the EEG generators than EEG measurement points. Several well-known properties of brain dynamics can be exploited to alleviate this problem. More short ranging connections exist in the brain than long ranging, arguing for spatially focal sources. Additionally, recent work (Delorme et al., 2012) argues that EEG can be decomposed into components having sparse source distributions. On the temporal side both short and long term stationarity of brain activation are seen. We summarize these insights in an inverse solver, the so-called "Variational Garrote" (Kappen and Gómez, 2013). Using a Markov prior we can incorporate flexible degrees of temporal stationarity. Through spatial basis functions spatially smooth distributions are obtained. Sparsity of these are inherent to the Variational Garrote solver. We name our method the MarkoVG and demonstrate its ability to adapt to the temporal smoothness and spatial sparsity in simulated EEG data. Finally a benchmark EEG dataset is used to demonstrate MarkoVG's ability to recover non-stationary brain dynamics.

  15. Bosnian Franciscans and the Monasteries in Kresevo and Fojnica as Source of Scientific Bibliography

    PubMed Central

    Skrbo, Armin; Masic, Izet; Skrbo, Selma; Ramakic, Elma; Zunic, Lejla

    2017-01-01

    All of these centuries-old records contain enormous treasures, and the modern medicine is increasingly searching for the sources of natural remedies. The Franciscans should be credited for carefully collecting the methods folk treatment and passed them on to future generations. In the words of Br. Marko Karamatić: „The fact that the Friars were engaged in healthcare, that they became the first graduate doctors in Bosnia and Herzegovina, that they wrote” herbal manuals „ and other medical records, is the result of historical opportunities in these areas, and this activity became one of the most important tasks for the Franciscans. They performed their duties regardless of the circumstances. PMID:28883781

  16. Twist-Bend Coupling and the Torsional Response of Double-Stranded DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomidis, Stefanos K.; Kriegel, Franziska; Vanderlinden, Willem; Lipfert, Jan; Carlon, Enrico

    2017-05-01

    Recent magnetic tweezers experiments have reported systematic deviations of the twist response of double-stranded DNA from the predictions of the twistable wormlike chain model. Here we show, by means of analytical results and computer simulations, that these discrepancies can be resolved if a coupling between twist and bend is introduced. We obtain an estimate of 40 ±10 nm for the twist-bend coupling constant. Our simulations are in good agreement with high-resolution, magnetic-tweezers torque data. Although the existence of twist-bend coupling was predicted long ago [J. Marko and E. Siggia, Macromolecules 27, 981 (1994), 10.1021/ma00082a015], its effects on the mechanical properties of DNA have been so far largely unexplored. We expect that this coupling plays an important role in several aspects of DNA statics and dynamics.

  17. Nuclear physics (of the cell, not the atom).

    PubMed

    Pederson, Thoru; Marko, John F

    2014-11-05

    The nucleus is physically distinct from the cytoplasm in ways that suggest new ideas and approaches for interrogating the operation of this organelle. Chemical bond formation and breakage underlie the lives of cells, but as this special issue of Molecular Biology of the Cell attests, the nonchemical aspects of cell nuclei present a new frontier to biologists and biophysicists. © 2014 Pederson and Marko. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. Water quality and pollution status of Chambal river in National Chambal Sanctuary, Madhya Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Saksena, D N; Garg, R K; Rao, R J

    2008-09-01

    The physico-chemical characteristics of Chambal river water in National Chambal sanctuary (Madhya Pradesh) have been studied. The stretch of Chambal river contained in the National Chambal sanctuary (located at 25 degrees 23'-26 degrees 52'N, 76 degrees 28'-79 degrees 15'E) is extending up to 600 km downstream from Kota (Rajasthan) to the confluence of the Chambal with Yamuna river (Etawah). The river flow in Madhya Pradesh spans up to approximately 400 km. Three sampling stations viz., Station A--near Palighat, district Sheopurkalan, Station B--near Rajghat, district Morena and Station C--near Baraighat, district Bhind were established for the collection of water samples during April, 2003 to March, 2004. The water quality parameters namely transparency (12.12-110 cm), colour (transparent-very turbid), turbidity (1-178 TNU), electrical conductivity (145.60-884 microS cm(-1)), total dissolved solids (260-500 mgl(-1)), pH (7.60-9.33), dissolved oxygen (4.86-14.59 mgl(-1)), free carbon dioxide (0-16.5 mgl(-1)), total alkalinity (70-290 mgl(-1)), total hardness (42-140 mgl(-1)), chloride (15.62-80.94 mgl(-1)), nitrate (0.008-0.025 mgl(-1)), nitrite (0.002-0.022 mgl(-1)), sulphate (3.50-45 mgl(-1)), phosphate (0.004-0.050 mgl(-1)), silicate (2.80-13.80 mgl(-1)), biochemical oxygen demand (0.60-5.67 mgl(-1)), chemical oxygen demand (2.40-26.80 mgl(-1)), ammonia (nil-0.56 mgl(-1)), sodium (14.30-54.40 mgl(-1)) and potassium (2.10 mgl(-1)-6.30 mgl(-1)) reflects on the pristine nature of the river in National Chambal sanctuary. On the basis of various parameters studied, Chambal river in this stretch can be placed under the category of oligosaprobic. The water quality analysis, indicated that the riverwater in the sanctuary area is pollution free and can serve as a good habitat for many aquatic animals including endangered species.

  19. Microelasticity of Single Mitotic Chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poirier, Michael; Eroglu, Sertac; Chatenay, Didier; Marko, John F.; Hirano, Tatsuya

    2000-03-01

    The force-extension behavior of mitotic chromosomes from the newt TVI tumor cell line was studied using micropipette manipulation and force measuring techniques. Reversible, linear elastic response was observed for extensions up to 5 times the native length; the force required to double chromosome length was 1 nanonewton (nN). For further elongations, the linear response teminates at a force plateau of 15 nN and at an extension of 20x. Beyond this extension, the chromosome breaks at elongations between 20x and 70x. These results will be compared to the similar behavior of mitotic chromosomes from explanted newt cells (Poirier, Eroglu, Chatenay and Marko, Mol. Biol. Cell, in press). Also, the effect of biochemical modifications on the elasticity was studied. Ethidium Bromide, which binds to DNA, induces up to a 10 times increase in the Young's modulus. Anti-XCAP-E, which binds to a putative chromosome folding protein, induces up to a 2 times increase in the Young's modulus. Preliminary results on the dynamical relaxation of chromosomes will also be presented. Support of this research through a Biomedical Engineering Research Grant from The Whitaker Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  20. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  1. Physics of the Bacterial Chromosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavans, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Genomic DNA in bacteria is concentrated in a distinct structure, the bacterial chromosome or nucleoid [Pettijohn, D.E. (1996) The Nucleoid. In Neidhardt, F.C., Curtis III, R., Ingraham, J.L., Lin, E.C.C., Low, K.B., Magasanik, B., Reznikoff, W.S., Riley, M., Schaechter, M. and Umbarger, H.E. (eds.), Escherichia coli and Salmonella. ASM Press, Washington D.C., pp. 158-166; Trun, N.J. and Marko, J.F. (1998) Architecture of a bacterial chromosome. Am. Soc. Microbiol. Rev., 64, 276-283]. Stripped of all bound proteins and RNA being produced during transcription and then stretched, the length of the DNA is circa 1.5 mm, a factor of about a thousandfold larger than typical bacterial dimensions. Thus, bacteria, like all living organisms, face the daunting challenge of compacting their genome to fit inside the cell in such a way that the information encoded in the DNA will be accessible for gene expression and replication of the genome. In the case of bacteria, members of the prokaryote world (cells without a nucleus), natural selection resulted in three mechanisms that act together to compact the genome and produce a functional, dynamic architecture: supercoiling, macromolecular crowding, and the association of the DNA with a class of nucleoid-associated or histone-like proteins. I will now describe briefly these mechanisms.

  2. Density functional theory of liquid crystals and surface anchoring: hard Gaussian overlap-sphere and hard Gaussian overlap-surface potentials.

    PubMed

    Avazpour, A; Avazpour, L

    2010-12-28

    This article applies the density functional theory to confined liquid crystals, comprised of ellipsoidal shaped particles interacting through the hard Gaussian overlap (HGO) potential. The extended restricted orientation model proposed by Moradi and co-workers [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17, 5625 (2005)] is used to study the surface anchoring. The excess free energy is calculated as a functional expansion of density around a reference homogeneous fluid. The pair direct correlation function (DCF) of a homogeneous HGO fluid is approximated, based on the optimized sum of Percus-Yevick and Roth DCF for hard spheres; the anisotropy introduced by means of the closest approach parameter, the expression proposed by Marko [Physica B 392, 242 (2007)] for DCF of HGO, and hard ellipsoids were used. In this study we extend an our previous work [Phys. Rev. E 72, 061706 (2005)] on the anchoring behavior of hard particle liquid crystal model, by studying the effect of changing the particle-substrate contact function instead of hard needle-wall potentials. We use the two particle-surface potentials: the HGO-sphere and the HGO-surface potentials. The average number density and order parameter profiles of a confined HGO fluid are obtained using the two particle-wall potentials. For bulk isotropic liquid, the results are in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation of Barmes and Cleaver [Phys. Rev. E 71, 021705 (2005)]. Also, for the bulk nematic phase, the theory gives the correct density profile and order parameter between the walls.

  3. Conformational statistics of bent semiflexible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2003-09-01

    This paper extends previous methods for obtaining the probability distribution function of end-to-end distance for semiflexible polymers, and presents a general formalism that can generate conformational statistics of any continuum filament model of semiflexible chains with internal bends and twists. In particular, our focus is distribution functions for chains composed of straight or helical segments connected with discrete bends or twists. Prior polymer theories are not able to fully account for the effects of these internal shape discontinuities. We use the operational properties of the noncommutative Fourier transform for the group of rigid-body motions in three-dimensional space. This general method applies to various stiffness models of semiflexible chainlike macromolecules. Examples are given which apply the stiffness parameters defined in the Kratky-Porod model, Yamakawa helical wormlike chain model, and revised Marko-Siggia double-helix model to chains with intrinsic bends or twists in their undeformed (minimal energy) state. We demonstrate how the location and magnitude of internal bends in the chain affect the distribution of end-to-end distances for each of these models. This capability allows one to study the entropic effects of intrinsic shape changes (e.g., bend angle) in various models, and may lead to coarse-grained continuum mechanical models of processes that occur during transcription regulation.

  4. Twist-Stretch Coupling and Phase Transition During DNA Supercoiling

    PubMed Central

    Sheinin, Maxim Y.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    As a single DNA molecule is positively supercoiled under constant tension, its extension initially increases due to a negative twist-stretch coupling1, 2. The subsequent attainment of an extension maximum has previously been assumed to be indicative of the onset of a phase transition from B- to scP-DNA2. Here we show that an extension maximum in fact does not coincide with the onset of a phase transition. This transition is evidenced by a direct observation of a torque plateau using an angular optical trap. Instead we find that the shape of the extension curve can be well explained with a theory by John Marko3 that incorporates both DNA twist-stretch coupling and bending fluctuations. This theory also provides a more accurate method of determining the value of the twist-stretch coupling modulus, which has possibly been underestimated in previous studies that did not take into consideration the bending fluctuations2. Our study demonstrates the importance of torque detection in the correct identification of phase transitions as well as the contribution of the twist-stretch coupling and bending fluctuations to DNA extension. PMID:19506753

  5. Polymer extension under flow: A path integral evaluation of the free energy change using the Jarzynski relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Aishani; Cherayil, Binny J.

    2016-06-01

    The Jarzynski relation (and its variants) has provided a route to the experimental evaluation of equilibrium free energy changes based on measurements conducted under arbitrary non-equilibrium conditions. Schroeder and co-workers [Soft Matter 10, 2178 (2014) and J. Chem. Phys. 141, 174903 (2014)] have recently exploited this fact to determine the elastic properties of model DNA from simulations and experiments of chain extension under elongational flow, bypassing the need to make these measurements mechanically using sophisticated optical trapping techniques. In this paper, motivated by these observations, we investigate chain elasticity analytically, using the Jarzynski relation and a finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-type Rouse model within a path integral formalism to calculate (essentially exactly) both the flow-induced free energy change between chain conformations of definite average end-to-end distance, as well as the force-extension curve that follows from it. This curve, based on a new analytic expression, matches the trends in the corresponding curve obtained from a model of chain stretching developed by Marko and Siggia [Macromolecules 28, 8759 (1995)], which itself is in very satisfactory agreement with the numerical and experimental data from the work of Schroeder et al.

  6. DNA elasticity from coarse-grained simulations: The effect of groove asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoruppa, Enrico; Laleman, Michiel; Nomidis, Stefanos K.; Carlon, Enrico

    2017-06-01

    It is well established that many physical properties of DNA at sufficiently long length scales can be understood by means of simple polymer models. One of the most widely used elasticity models for DNA is the twistable worm-like chain (TWLC), which describes the double helix as a continuous elastic rod with bending and torsional stiffness. An extension of the TWLC, which has recently received some attention, is the model by Marko and Siggia, who introduced an additional twist-bend coupling, expected to arise from the groove asymmetry. By performing computer simulations of two available versions of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of nucleic acids, we investigate the microscopic origin of twist-bend coupling. We show that this interaction is negligible in the oxDNA version with symmetric grooves, while it appears in the oxDNA version with asymmetric grooves. Our analysis is based on the calculation of the covariance matrix of equilibrium deformations, from which the stiffness parameters are obtained. The estimated twist-bend coupling coefficient from oxDNA simulations is G =30 ±1 nm. The groove asymmetry induces a novel twist length scale and an associated renormalized twist stiffness κt≈80 nm, which is different from the intrinsic torsional stiffness C ≈110 nm. This naturally explains the large variations on experimental estimates of the intrinsic stiffness performed in the past.

  7. Lost in the Dark: A proto-history of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia L.; History 1

    2016-01-01

    Einasto, Kaasik, and Saar (published in Nature, in case you are thinking of more Meddelande). I feel enormous respect and affection for Vera Rubin and Fritz Zwicky, but the published papers as are they are.

  8. The flinders sensitive line rat model of depression--25 years and still producing.

    PubMed

    Overstreet, David H; Wegener, Gregers

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 25 years have passed since the first publication suggesting the Flinders sensitive line (FSL) rat as an animal model of depression. At least 6 years of research on these rats was completed before that seminal paper, and there has been a steady stream of publications (130+) over the years. The present review will focus on several issues not previously covered in earlier reviews, summarize the several lines of ongoing investigations, and propose a novel mechanism that accounts for a number of previously unexplained observations. A key observation in the FSL rat relates to the antidepressant (AD)-like effects of known and putative antidepressants. The FSL rat typically exhibits an AD-like effect in behavioral tests for AD-like activity following chronic (14 days) treatment, although some studies have found AD-like effects after fewer days of treatment. In other observations, exaggerated swim test immobility in the FSL rat has been found to have a maternal influence, as shown by cross-fostering studies and observations of maternal behavior; the implications of this finding are still to be determined. Ongoing or recently completed studies have been performed in the laboratories of Marko Diksic of Canada, Aleksander Mathé of Sweden, Gregers Wegener of Denmark, Brian Harvey of South Africa, Paul Pilowsky and Rod Irvine of Australia, and Gal Yadid of Israel. Jennifer Loftis of Portland, Oregon, and Lynette Daws of San Antonio, Texas, have been working with the FSL rats in the United States. A puzzling feature of the FSL rat is its sensitivity to multiple chemicals, and its greater sensitivity to a variety of drugs with different mechanisms of action. It has been recently shown that each of these drugs feeds through G protein-coupled receptors to potassium-gated channels. Thus, an abnormality in the potassium channel could underlie the depressed-like behavior of the FSL rats.

  9. Prediction of sea ice thickness cluster in the Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuckar, Neven-Stjepan; Guemas, Virginie; Johnson, Nathaniel; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice thickness (SIT) has a potential to contain substantial climate memory and predictability in the northern hemisphere (NH) sea ice system. We use 5-member NH SIT, reconstructed with an ocean-sea-ice general circulation model (NEMOv3.3 with LIM2) with a simple data assimilation routine, to determine NH SIT modes of variability disentangled from the long-term climate change. Specifically, we apply the K-means cluster analysis - one of nonhierarchical clustering methods that partition data into modes or clusters based on their distances in the physical - to determine optimal number of NH SIT clusters (K=3) and their historical variability. To examine prediction skill of NH SIT clusters in EC-Earth2.3, a state-of-the-art coupled climate forecast system, we use 5-member ocean and sea ice initial conditions (IC) from the same ocean-sea-ice historical reconstruction and atmospheric IC from ERA-Interim reanalysis. We focus on May 1st and Nov 1st start dates from 1979 to 2010. Common skill metrics of probability forecast, such as rank probability skill core and ROC (relative operating characteristics - hit rate versus false alarm rate) and reliability diagrams show that our dynamical model predominately perform better than the 1st order Marko chain forecast (that beats climatological forecast) over the first forecast year. On average May 1st start dates initially have lower skill than Nov 1st start dates, but their skill is degraded at slower rate than skill of forecast started on Nov 1st.

  10. Study of TrES-3 Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodniza, A. Q.; Rojas, M.; Reyes, K.

    2011-10-01

    The first amateur observation of an exoplanet was made from the Nyrola Observatory in September 16, 2000. (Marko Moilanen, Jalo Ojanperä, Jouni Sorvari, Aki Id and Arto Oksanen). The jovian-type planet orbits a star that is 153 light years far away, and was called HD209458b in Pegasus [1]. The equipment used by this Observatory was a 16 inches MEADE LX200, a ST7E CCD SBIG camera with a V photometric filter and an f/6.3 focal distance reducer. At the University of Nariño Observatory we have a similar equipment. The equipment we employed is: 14"LX200 GPS MEADE telescope and STL-1001 SBIG. The camera we used in our search is much more sensible than the one used by the Nyrola Observatory [2]. From the Astronomical Observatory at the University of Nariño-COLOMBIA, we begun a systematic search for exoplanets. We have already confirmed the transit of the exoplanet TrES-3. This exoplanet was discovered by O'Donovan and other investigators, and turns around the GSC 03089- 00929, with an orbital period of 1.30619 days (31.34856 hours) and inclination of 82.15 deg [3]. The TrES-3 is quite interesting because it has one of the smallest periods found on exoplanets. Jessie L. Christiansen, et.al. observed seven transits and they found that the duration of transit is 81.9+/-1.1 minutes and inclination of 81.99+/-0.30 deg [4], [5]. We have captured a lot of data to elaborate the lightcurves so we can estimate the physical parameters of the exoplanet.

  11. Rate of Recovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Frozen Acid-Fast-Bacillus Smear-Positive Sputum Samples Subjected to Long-Term Storage in Northwest Ethiopia ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Belay; Beer, Joerg; Emmrich, Frank; Sack, Ulrich; Rodloff, Arne C.

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in Ethiopia. The diagnosis and treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis remain a challenge in the country. This study aimed to assess whether single morning sputum samples could be stored at −20°C for extended periods of time at remote settings and then transported and successfully cultured for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Single morning sputum samples were collected from all smear-positive tuberculosis patients diagnosed at Gondar Hospital, Gondar Health Center, Metemma Hospital, Bahir Dar Hospital, and Debre Markos Hospital in Northwest Ethiopia between March and July 2009. Specimens were stored at the study sites and sent to the mycobacteriology laboratory at the University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany, where specimens were processed and inoculated into the BacT/Alert 3D system and Lowenstein-Jensen and Gottsacker media. Ice packs were added in the package of the specimens during transport. A total of 319 patients were enrolled in this study. The median specimen storage time was 132 days (range, 16 to 180 days). Of all specimens, 283 (88.7%) were culture positive by any of the three culturing systems. M. tuberculosis isolates from four contaminated specimens in all culturing systems were successfully isolated on Middlebrook 7H10 agar; thereby, the recovery rate increased to 287 (90.0%). The length of time of sputum storage had no significant effect on the rate of recovery of M. tuberculosis in all culturing systems. In conclusion, single morning sputum specimens collected at remote settings stored at −20°C for long periods of time without the addition of preservatives can yield a high recovery rate. These findings suggest a simple and cost-effective alternative method of sputum storage for epidemiological and drug resistance studies in low-resource countries. PMID:21562105

  12. Fifty-five years (1955-2010) of the Coagulation Section at Laboratory of Hematology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, and its founder, hematologist Ljubomir Popović.

    PubMed

    Stancić, Vladimir; Stancić, Nevenka; Vucelić, Vesna; Lang, Nada; Grbac, Ljiljana

    2011-09-01

    The Coagulation Section at Laboratory of Hematology, Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital, Zagreb, was founded in 1955 by Ljubomir Popović, hematologist and assistant at School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, in cooperation with hard-working laboratory technicians. Apart from papers on hematologic neoplasms, plasmacytoma and lymphoma, Ljubomir Popović published a number of papers in the field of anticoagulant therapy with heparin and oral anticoagulants, some of which are also in use today. After Ljubomir Popović left the Hospital in 1964, the Laboratory was run by Professor Nedjeljko Milić, head of the newly founded Division of Hematology. In 1968, the management of the Laboratory of Hematology was taken over by Biserka Raić, MS, medical biochemist, until her retirement in 2007. Great development in morphological and cytometric studies of blood and blood cells has been paralleled by continuous progress and almost dominating activities in the diagnosis of hemostasis disorders. In the 1970s, Marko Koprcina, hematologist, and Biserka Raić introduced the then latest tests in practice at all Hospital departments. In that golden age of the Coagulation Section, M. Koprcina, B. Raić and their associates transferred their knowledge to all colleagues in the Hospital. Through that collaboration, high standards in the diagnosis of hemostasis disorders were achieved, from which the currently high level of clinical knowledge about coagulation disorders and their treatment has derived, making Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital one of the leading hospitals in this field in the country. By describing development of the Coagulation Section and the life of its founder Ljubomir Popović, the authors tried to provide an answer to the following question: can today's clinicians still have a deciding role in laboratory development, considering that assessments of different phenomena are always initiated by an interested clinician who is trying to interpret and understand

  13. A possible influence on standard model of quasars and active galactic nuclei in strong magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Qiu-He; Liu, Jing-Jing; Chou, Chi-Kang

    2016-12-01

    Recent observational evidence indicates that the center of our Milky Way galaxy harbors a super-massive object with ultra-strong radial magnetic field (Eatough et al. in Nature 591:391, 2013). Here we demonstrate that the radiations observed in the vicinity of the Galactic Center (GC) (Falcke and Marko in arXiv:1311.1841v1, 2013) cannot be emitted by the gas of the accretion disk since the accreting plasma is prevented from approaching to the GC by the abnormally strong radial magnetic field. These fields obstruct the infalling accretion flow from the inner region of the disk and the central massive black hole in the standard model. It is expected that the observed radiations near the GC can not be generated by the central black hole. We also demonstrate that the observed ultra-strong radial magnetic field near the GC (Eatough et al. in Nature 591:391, 2013) can not be generated by the generalized α-turbulence type dynamo mechanism since preliminary qualitative estimate in terms of this mechanism gives a magnetic field strength six orders of magnitude smaller than the observed field strength at r=0.12 pc. However, both these difficulties or the dilemma of the standard model can be overcome if the central black hole in the standard model is replaced by a model of a super-massive star with magnetic monopoles (SMSMM) (Peng and Chou in Astrophys. J. Lett. 551:23, 2001). Five predictions about the GC have been proposed in the SMSMM model. Especially, three of them are quantitatively consistent with the observations. They are: (1) Plenty of positrons are produced, the production rate is 6×10^{42} e+ s^{-1} or so, this prediction is confirmed by the observation (Kn ödlseder et al. 2003); (2) The lower limit of the observed ultra-strong radial magnetic field near the GC (Eatough et al. in Nature 591:391, 2013), is just good agreement with the predicted estimated radial magnetic field from the SMSMM model, which really is an exclusive and a key prediction; (3) The

  14. Strain-compensated Ga(AsP)/Ga(AsBi)/Ga(AsP) quantum-well active-region lasers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Honghyuk; Guan, Yingxin; Forghani, Kamran; Kuech, Thomas F.; Mawst, Luke J.

    2017-02-01

    Ga(AsBi) quantum well (QW) active regions are an alternate to dilute-nitride QWs for achieving lasers in the telecom wavelength regions (λ 1.3-1.55μm) on GaAs substrates. Ludewig et al first reported the successful operation of Ga(AsBi) single quantum well laser in 2013 [1] with low threshold current densities, Jth=1.56kA/cm2 where (AlGa)As was used as a barrier material for low Bi-content QWs to improve the electron confinement in the conduction band and reduce thermally activated carrier leakage from the QW. We implement here the use of tensile-strained Ga(AsP) as a QW barrier material, providing carrier confinement as well as potential for strain-balancing. Laser structures employing a single GaAs0.976Bi0.024 quantum well (SQW) with either GaAs0.8P0.2, Al0.15Ga0.85As, or GaAs barrier materials were grown by MOVPE on a nominally singular (001) GaAs substrate Ridge waveguide lasers, 25μm-wide and 1mm-long ridge, were fabricated and characterized under pulsed current conditions. The threshold current densities for devices are 5.9kA/cm2 and 5.8kA/cm2 for GaAsP barriers and Al0.15Ga0.85As barriers respectively, with a lasing wavelength of 960nm. Devices with GaAs barriers only lased at higher currents for a short wavelength transition 900nm. While threshold currents are relatively high, no post growth thermal annealing was performed on these laser materials. Thermal annealing studies will be presented indicating significant improvement in QW luminescence and reduction in Jth can be achieved after the post-growth in-situ annealing. [1] Ludewig, P., Knaub, N., Hossain, N., Reinhard, S., Nattermann, L., Marko, I. P., and Volz, K. 2013. Appl. Phys. Lett., 102(24), 242115.

  15. Factors associated with late Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) diagnosis among peoples living with it, Northwest Ethiopia: hospital based unmatched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Aniley, Abebayehu Bitew; Ayele, Tadesse Awoke; Zeleke, Ejigu Gebeye; Kassa, Assefa Andargie

    2016-10-12

    Early HIV diagnosis and access to treatment is one of the most effective ways to prevent its further spread and to protect the health of those living with the virus. However, delay in diagnosis is the major risk factor for uptake of and response to antiretroviral therapy. Institution-based unmatched case-control study design was used in the study. The study was conducted in Debre-Markos and Finote-Selam Hospitals, Northwest Ethiopia. Cases were people living with HIV who had CD4 count <350cells/mm(3) or WHO clinical stage III and IV regardless of the CD4 count at first presentation and controls were those who had CD4 count ≥350cells/mm(3) or WHO clinical stage I and II. If both criteria were available, the CD4 count was used in the study as World Health Organization recommended. A total of 392 respondents (196 cases and 196 controls) were recruited and selected systematically. The data were collected by trained nurses using chart review and interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Binary Logistic Regression Model was used to identify the factors associated with late HIV diagnosis. About 95.9 % of study participants provided complete response. Having no understanding, compared to having understanding, about HIV/AIDS (AOR = 1.7, 95 %CI = 1.08-2.79) and ART (AOR = 2.1, 95 %CI: 1.25-3.72), being tested as a result of symptoms/ illness, compared to being tested for risk exposure (inverted AOR =2.5, 95 %CI: 1.64-4.76), and acquiring HIV through sexual contact, compared to acquiring it through other modes (AOR = 2.5, 95 %CI = 1.52-4.76) were positively and independently associated with late HIV diagnosis. Unlike perceived HIV stigma, having no understanding about HIV and ART, being tested for presence of symptoms/illness, and acquiring HIV through sexual contact were independent and significant factors for late HIV diagnosis.

  16. Midwives' and patients' perspectives on disrespect and abuse during labor and delivery care in Ethiopia: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Burrowes, Sahai; Holcombe, Sarah Jane; Jara, Dube; Carter, Danielle; Smith, Katheryn

    2017-08-22

    It is increasingly recognized that disrespect and abuse of women during labor and delivery is a violation of a woman's rights and a deterrent to the use of life-saving, facility-based labor and delivery services. In Ethiopia, rates of skilled birth attendance are still only 28% despite a recent dramatic national scale up in the numbers of trained providers and facilities. Concerns have been raised that womens' perceptions of poor quality of care and fear of mistreatment might contribute to this low utilization. This study examines the experiences of disrespect and abuse in maternal care from the perspectives of both providers and patients. We conducted 45 in-depth interviews at four health facilities in Debre Markos, Ethiopia with midwives, midwifery students, and women who had given birth within the past year. Students and providers also took a brief quantitative survey on patients' rights during labor and delivery and responded to clinical scenarios regarding the provision of stigmatized reproductive health services. We find that both health care providers and patients report frequent physical and verbal abuse as well as non-consented care during labor and delivery. Providers report that most abuse is unintended and results from weaknesses in the health system or from medical necessity. We uncovered no evidence of more systematic types of abuse involving detention of patients, bribery, abandonment or ongoing discrimination against particular ethnic groups. Although health care providers showed good basic knowledge of confidentiality, privacy, and consent, training on the principles of responsive and respectful care, and on counseling, is largely absent. Providers indicated that they would welcome related practical instruction. Patient responses suggest that women are aware that their rights are being violated and avoid facilities with reputations for poor care. Our results suggest that training on respectful care, offered in the professional ethics modules of the

  17. Temporal and spatial variability of water isotopes in Ethiopian rainfall and its implication for moisture sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedaso, Z. K.; Levin, N.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Shanko, D.

    2013-12-01

    moisture in the Northwestern Plateau vs. the predominance of precipitation with an ocean source in the Southeastern Plateau. Within the Northwestern Plateau, daily d excess values at Debre Markos station (19.5×4.2‰) are higher than those observed at the Gonder station (15.0×4.5‰). The difference in d-excess within the Northwestern Plateau might hint at the significance of local water recycling in addition to continental-scale recycling over the Congo basin and the Sudd swamps.

  18. Toward efficient fiber-based quantum interface (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soshenko, Vladimir; Vorobyov, Vadim V.; Bolshedvorsky, Stepan; Lebedev, Nikolay; Akimov, Alexey V.; Sorokin, Vadim; Smolyaninov, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    , vol. 528, no. 1, p. 1-45, 2013. [2] A.V. Akimov, A. Mukherjee, C.L. Yu, D.E. Chang, A.S. Zibrov, P.R. Hemmer, H. Park and M.D. Lukin, "Generation of single optical plasmons in metallic nanowires coupled to quantum dots," Nature, vol. 450, p. 402-406, 2007. [3] Michael J. Burek , Yiwen Chu, Madelaine S.Z. Liddy, Parth Patel, Jake Rochman , Srujan Meesala, Wooyoung Hong, Qimin Quan, Mikhail D. Lukin and Marko Loncar High quality-factor optical nanocavities in bulk single-crystal diamond, Nature communications 6718 (2014) [4] Tim Schroder, Andreas W. Schell, Gunter Kewes, Thomas Aichele, and Oliver Benson Fiber-Integrated Diamond-Based Single Photon Source, Nano Lett. 2011, 11, 198-202 [5]Lars Liebermeister, et. al. "Tapered fiber coupling of single photons emitted by a deterministically positioned single nitrogen vacancy center", Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 031101 (2014)

  19. PREFACE: The Universe under the Microscope: Astrophysics at High Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schödel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Köln, Köln, Germany Eduardo Ros Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Bonn, Germany Scientific organizing committee Dennis Downes Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimétrique, France Wolfgang Duschl University of Kiel, Germany Andrea Ghez University of California, Los Angeles, USA Vladimir Karas Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic Andreas Eckart University of Cologne, Germany Sera Marko University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands Susanne Pfalzner University of Cologne, Germany Sebastian Rabien Max-Planck-Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Germany Daniel Rouan Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, France Eduardo Ros Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Germany Rainer Schödel Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía -CSIC, Spain Zhiqiang Shen Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China Anton Zensus Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy, Germany Local organizing committee Sebastian Fischer University of Cologne, Germany Devaky Kunneriath University of Cologne, Germany Leo Meyer University of Cologne, Germany Koraljka Muzic University of Cologne, Germany Rainer Schödel University of Cologne, Germany/IAA -CSIC, Spain Christian Straubmeier University of Cologne, Germany Mohammad Zamaninasab University of Cologne, Germany

  20. Catalytic Deprotection of Acetals In Strongly Basic Solution Usinga Self-Assembled Supramolecular 'Nanozyme'

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-07-26

    Acetals are among the most commonly used protecting groups for aldehydes and ketones in organic synthesis due to their ease of installation and resistance to cleavage in neutral or basic solution.[1] The common methods for hydrolyzing acetals almost always involve the use of either Broensted acid or Lewis acid catalysts.[2] Usually aqueous acids or organic solutions acidified with organic or inorganic acids have been used for reconversion of the acetal functionality to the corresponding carbonyl group; however, recently a number of reports have documented a variety of strategies for acetal cleavage under mild conditions. These include the use of Lewis acids such as bismuth(III)[3] or cerium(IV),[4, 5] functionalized silica gel, such as silica sulfuric acid[6] or silica-supported pyridinium p-toluene sulfonate,[7] or the use of silicon-based reagents such as TESOTf-2,6-Lutidine.[8] Despite these mild reagents, all of the above conditions require either added acid or overall acidic media. Marko and co-workers recently reported the first example of acetal deprotection under mildly basic conditions using catalytic cerium ammonium nitrate at pH 8 in a water-acetonitrile solution.[5] Also recently, Rao and co-workers described a purely aqueous system at neutral pH for the deprotection of acetals using {beta}-cyclodextrin as the catalyst.[9] Herein, we report the hydrolysis of acetals in strongly basic aqueous solution using a self-assembled supramolecular host as the catalyst. During the last decade, we have used metal-ligand interactions for the formation of well-defined supramolecular assemblies with the stoichiometry M{sub 4}L{sub 6}6 (M = Ga{sup III} (1 refers to K{sub 12}[Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]), Al{sup III}, In{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}, or Ge{sup IV}, L = N,N{prime}-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-1,5-diaminonaphthalene) (Figure 1).[10] The metal ions occupy the vertices of the tetrahedron and the bisbidentate catecholamide ligands span the edges. The strong

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cold and Ultracold Molecules FOCUS ON COLD AND ULTRACOLD MOLECULES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Ye, Jun

    2009-05-01

    öhlich, A Griesmaier, T Pfau, H Saito, Y Kawaguchi and M Ueda High-energy-resolution molecular beams for cold collision studies L P Parazzoli, N Fitch, D S Lobser and H J Lewandowski Collisional effects in the formation of cold guided beams of polar molecules M Motsch, C Sommer, M Zeppenfeld, L D van Buuren, P W H Pinkse and G Rempe Towards sympathetic cooling of large molecules: cold collisions between benzene and rare gas atoms P Barletta, J Tennyson and P F Barker Efficient formation of ground-state ultracold molecules via STIRAP from the continuum at a Feshbach resonance Elena Kuznetsova, Marko Gacesa, Philippe Pellegrini, Susanne F Yelin and Robin Côté Emergent timescales in entangled quantum dynamics of ultracold molecules in optical lattices M L Wall and L D Carr Rotational state resolved photodissociation spectroscopy of translationally and vibrationally cold MgH+ ions: toward rotational cooling of molecular ions K Højbjerre, A K Hansen, P S Skyt, P F Staanum and M Drewsen Collective transverse cavity cooling of a dense molecular beam Thomas Salzburger and Helmut Ritsch A Stark decelerator on a chip Samuel A Meek, Horst Conrad and Gerard Meijer Deceleration of molecules by dipole force potential: a numerical simulation Susumu Kuma and Takamasa Momose Ultracold molecules: vehicles to scalable quantum information processing Kathy-Anne Brickman Soderberg, Nathan Gemelke and Cheng Chin Magnetic field modification of ultracold molecule-molecule collisions T V Tscherbul, Yu V Suleimanov, V Aquilanti and R V Krems Spectroscopy of 39K85Rb triplet excited states using ultracold a 3Σ+ state molecules formed by photoassociation J T Kim, D Wang, E E Eyler, P L Gould and W C Stwalley Pumping vortex into a Bose-Einstein condensate of heteronuclear molecules Z F Xu, R Q Wang and L You Intense atomic and molecular beams via neon buffer-gas cooling David Patterson, Julia Rasmussen and John M Doyle Dynamical properties of dipolar Fermi gases T Sogo, L He, T Miyakawa, S Yi, H Lu