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Sample records for marrow allografts prevention

  1. PECULIAR IMMUNOBIOLOGY OF BONE MARROW ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Cudkowicz, Gustavo; Bennett, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Mice are capable of rejecting H-2-incompatible bone marrow grafts after a single lethal exposure to X-rays. The onset of rejection begins 18–24 hr after transplantation and is completed by 96 hr. Maturation of this type of allograft reactivity does not occur until the 22nd day of life. In adult mice, the resistance to marrow allografts can be weakened by administration of cyclophosphamide or dead cultures of Corynebacterium parvum, but not heterologous anti-thymocyte serum. Sublethal exposures to X-rays 7 or 14 days before transplantation also weaken resistance. There is considerable interstrain variation in the ability of mice to resist allografts, even when H-2 differences between hosts and donor are kept identical. Although H-2 incompatibility is a necessary prerequisite for resistance, additional genetic factors influence the outcome of marrow allografts, presumably by controlling recognition. The regulator genes are determinant specific and the alleles for resistance or responder status appear to be dominant. The responder phenotype is expressed by hemopoietic cells and not by the environment. Accordingly, resistance is conferred to otherwise susceptible mice upon transfer of bone marrow cells but not of serum. The production and differentiation of effector cells for marrow graft rejection are thymus independent. In conclusion, bone marrow allografts elicit a particular transplantation reaction, previously unknown, in irradiated mice. Peculiar features of this reaction are the lack of proliferation of host lymphoid cells, tissue specificity, thymus independence, and regulation by genetic factors which apparently do not affect the fate of other grafts. PMID:4397663

  2. The Pentostatin Plus Cyclophosphamide (PC) Non-myeloablative Regimen Induces Durable Host T Cell Functional Deficits and Prevents Murine Marrow Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti, Jacopo; Taylor, Justin; Massey, Paul R.; Ryan, Kaitlyn; Foley, Jason; Buxhoeveden, Nicole; Felizardo, Tania C.; Amarnath, Shoba; Mossoba, Miriam E.; Fowler, Daniel H.

    2010-01-01

    In this manuscript, we characterize for the first time an animal model of non-myeloablative bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using the purine analog pentostatin [P]. Other cohorts of mice received a distinct purine analog, fludarabine [F], which we and others have previously evaluated in non-myeloablative murine models. In this project, we have characterized pentostatin for its ability to: (1) operate synergistically with cyclophosphamide [C] to induce host T cell depletion; (2) induce host T cell suppression, as defined by modulation of cytokine secretion in vitro and abrogation of host-versus-graft reactivity (HVGR) in vivo; (3) constrain host T cell recovery post-chemotherapy; and (4) prevent the rejection of T-cell depleted (TCD), fully MHC mismatched bone marrow allografts. Relative to single-agent regimens, combination PC or FC regimens worked synergistically to deplete host CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; PC and FC regimens were developed that yielded similar levels of host T cell and myeloid cell depletion. In the setting of these generally comparable states of host T and myeloid cell depletion, the PC regimen was found to be highly immune suppressive, as evidenced by reduced host T cell capacity to: (1) secrete IL-2 and IFN-γ in vitro; (2) mediate HVGR in vivo; and (3) recover numerically and functionally during a two-week observation period post-chemotherapy. Finally, using B6 hosts treated with the 14-day chemotherapy regimens, the PC regimen more consistently prevented the rejection of BALB/c TCD-allografts than the FC regimen (rate of alloengraftment, 14/15 [93%] of PC-treated recipients vs. 8/14 [57%] of FC-treated recipients; p<0.05); similar results were observed using an 8-day conditioning regimen. These data suggest that host T cell suppression, distinct from T cell depletion, may therefore represent a critical determinant of engraftment after purine analog-based regimens and may also be preferentially attained by use of pentostatin. PMID:21130889

  3. Bone marrow-derived T lymphocytes responsible for allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Senjanovic, M.; Marusic, M.

    1984-08-01

    Lethally irradiated mice reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow cells were grafted with allogeneic skin grafts 6-7 weeks after irradiation and reconstitution. Mice with intact thymuses rejected the grafts whereas the mice thymectomized before irradiation and reconstitution did not. Thymectomized irradiated mice (TIR mice) reconstituted with bone marrow cells from donors immune to the allografts rejected the grafts. Bone marrow cells from immunized donors, pretreated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C', did not confer immunity to TIR recipients. To determine the number of T lymphocytes necessary for the transfer of immunity by bone marrow cells from immunized donors, thymectomized irradiated mice were reconstituted with nonimmune bone marrow cells treated with Thy 1.2 antibody and C' and with various numbers of splenic T lymphocytes from nonimmune and immune donors. Allogeneic skin graft rejection was obtained with 10(6) nonimmune or 10(4) immune T cells. The effect of immune T cells was specific: i.e., immune T cells accelerated only rejection of the relevant skin grafts whereas against a third-party skin grafts acted as normal T lymphocytes.

  4. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  5. Bone marrow concentrate with allograft equivalent to autograft in lumbar fusions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Robert G

    2014-04-20

    Prospective randomized study. To compare autologous bone marrow concentrate mixed with allograft cancellous bone to iliac crest autograft in lumbar fusions. Bone marrow has been shown to be a rich source of osteoprogenitor cells. Osteoprogenitor cells have been shown in animals, and some human studies, to have potential in use as a bone graft substitute. Twenty-five patients underwent from 1- to 3-level lumbar fusions. One patient was lost to follow-up. On one half of the spine, allograft plus autologous bone marrow concentrate was used, whereas on the other half, autologous iliac crest bone was used. Cellular analysis, consisting of nucleated cell count, mononuclear cell count, CD34+ count, and colony-forming-units-fibroblast count, was done on marrow aspirates and concentrates. At 1 year postoperation, computed tomographic scans of the fusions were evaluated on a blinded basis by 2 neuroradiologists independent of each other. Radiographical fusion was the primary outcome measure. There was no statistical difference in fusion scores between allograft and autograft in the lateral gutters, interbody cages, or facet joints. There was a positive trend between CD34+ counts and radiographical fusion. The study shows equivalence between cancellous allograft mixed with bone marrow concentrate and autologous iliac crest bone for lumbar fusions. 2.

  6. Enhancement by dimethyl myleran of donor type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Singer, T.S.; Salomon, O.; Reisner, Y. )

    1989-05-15

    A major problem in using murine models for studies of bone marrow allograft rejection in leukemia patients is the narrow margin in which graft rejection can be analyzed. In mice irradiated with greater than 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) rejection is minimal, whereas after administration of 8 Gy TBI, which spares a significant number of clonable T cells, a substantial frequency of host stem cells can also be detected. In current murine models, unlike in humans, bone marrow allograft rejection is generally associated with full autologous hematopoietic reconstitution. In the present study, we investigated the effect of the myeloablative drug dimethyl myleran (DMM) on chimerism status following transplantation of T cell-depleted allogenic bone marrow (using C57BL/6 donors and C3H/HeJ recipients, conditioned with 8 Gy TBI). Donor type chimerism 1 to 2 months post-transplant of 1 to 3 x 10(6) bone marrow cells was markedly enhanced by using DMM one day after TBI and prior to transplantation. Conditioning with cyclophosphamide instead of DMM, in combination with 8 Gy TBI, did not enhance engraftment of donor type cells. Artificial reconstitution of T cells, after conditioning with TBI plus DMM, by adding mature thymocytes, or presensitization with irradiated donor type spleen cells 1 week before TBI and DMM, led to strong graft rejection and consequently to severe anemia. The anti-donor responses in these models were proportional to the number of added T cells and to the number of cells used for presensitization, and they could be neutralized by increasing the bone marrow inoculum.

  7. Prevention of allograft tolerance by bacterial infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Luqiu; Ahmed, Emily; Ma, Lianli; Yin, Dengping; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Jikun; Xu, Honglin; Wang$, Chyung-Ru; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to certain viruses and parasites has been shown to prevent the induction of transplantation tolerance in mice, via generation of cross-reactive memory T cell responses or induction of bystander activation. Bacterial infections are common in the peri-operative period of solid organ allograft recipients in the clinic, and correlations between bacterial infections and acute allograft rejection have been reported. However, whether bacterial infections at the time of transplantation have any effect on the generation of transplantation tolerance remains to be established. We used the Gram-positive intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as a model pathogen, as its effects on immune responses are well described. Peri-operative LM infection prevented cardiac and skin allograft acceptance induced by anti-CD154 and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in mice. LM-mediated rejection was not due to the generation of cross-reactive T cells and was largely independent of signaling via MyD88, an adaptor for most toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-1 and IL-18. Instead, transplant rejection following LM infection was dependent on the expression of the phagosome-lysing pore-former listeriolysin O (LLO) and on IFNα/βR signaling. Our results indicate that bacterial exposure at the time of transplantation can antagonize tolerogenic regimens by enhancing alloantigen-specific immune responses, independent from the generation of cross-reactive memory T cells. PMID:18424719

  8. Repopulation of Intrasynovial Flexor Tendon Allograft with Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: An Ex Vivo Model

    PubMed Central

    Amadio, Peter C.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed healing is a common problem whenever tendon allografts are used for tendon or ligament reconstruction. Repopulating the allograft with host cells may accelerate tendon regeneration, but cell penetration into the allograft tendon is limited. Processing the tendon surface with slits that guide cells into the allograft substrate may improve healing. The purpose of this study was to describe a surface modification of allograft tendon that includes slits to aid cell repopulation and lubrication to enhance tendon gliding. Methods: Canine flexor digitorum profundus tendons were used for this study. Cyclic gliding resistance was measured over 1000 cycles. Tensile stiffness was assessed for normal tendon, tendon decellularized with trypsin and Triton X-100 (decellularized group), tendon decellularized and perforated with multiple slits (MS group) and tendon decellularized, perforated with slits and treated with a carbodiimide-derivatized hyaluronic acid and gelatin (cd-HA-gelatin) surface modification (MS-SM group). To assess tendon repopulation, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were used in the decellularized and MS groups. DNA concentration and histology were evaluated and compared to normal tendons and nonseeded decellularized tendons. Results: The gliding resistance of the decellularized and MS groups was significantly higher compared with the normal group. There was no significant difference in gliding resistance between the decellularized and MS group. Gliding resistance of the normal group and MS-SM group was not significantly different. The Young's modulus was not significantly different among the four groups. The DNA concentration in the MS group was significantly lower than in normal tendons, but significantly higher than in decellularized tendons, with or without BMSCs. Viable BMSCs were found in the slits after 2 weeks in tissue culture. Conclusions: Tendon slits can successfully harbor BMSCs without compromising their survival and without

  9. Anti-HLA antibodies and kidney allograft outcomes in recipients with donor bone marrow cell infusion.

    PubMed

    Solgi, Ghasem; Pourmand, Gholamreza; Mehrsai, Abdorasool; Taherimahmoudi, Mohsen; Nicknam, Mohmmad Hossein; Ebrahimi Rad, Mohmmad R; Seraji, Ali; Asadpoor, Amirabbas; Ansaripor, Bita; Nikbin, Behrouz; Amirzargar, Aliakbar

    2010-03-01

    Anti-HLA-antibodies are known to affect the allograft survival in transplant recipient patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between anti-HLA antibodies and kidney allograft outcomes, particularly in recipients with concurrent donor bone marrow cell infusion (DBMI). Between June 2006 and May 2007, forty living unrelated donor kidney transplants consisting of 20 recipients with DBMI and 20 without infusion entered into the study and were monitored prospectively for one year. Pre- and post-transplant (days 14, 30, and 90) sera were screened for the presence of anti-HLA class-I and II antibodies, and subsequently positive sera retested with ELISA specific panel for antibody specification. Of 40 patients, 9 (22.5%) experienced acute rejection episodes (ARE) (6/20 cases in non-infused versus 3/20 in DBMI patients). The prevalence of anti-HLA antibodies before and after transplantation were higher in patients with ARE compared to non-rejecting ones (88.8% vs. 38.7%, p=0.01 and 66.6% vs. 25.8%, p=0.04, respectively). A total of 10% (4/40) of patients developed donor specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) and in this regard 2 patients from the control group experienced ARE. All 3 rejecting patients in DBMI group were negative for DSA and positive for non-DSA. The lower titer of post-transplant anti-HLA antibodies were shown in DBMI patients compared to pre-transplantation titer. Additionally, the average serum creatinine levels during one year follow up and even in those patients with ARE were lower compared to controls. Our findings reveal an association between pre- and post-transplant anti-HLA antibodies, and ARE and also early allograft dysfunction. It suggests that lower incidence of ARE, undetectable DSA, lower titer of antibodies concomitant with a decrease in serum creatinine level, better allograft function and lower percentages of PRA in DBMI patients, could be the probable manifestations of partial hypo-responsiveness against allografts.

  10. Fractionated sublethal total body irradiation and donor bone marrow infusion for induction of specific allograft tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.E.; Kimler, B.F.; Thomas, J.H.; Watts, L.M.; Kinnaman, M.L.

    1981-03-01

    Fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (FT-lymphoid-I) plus donor bone marrow (BM) can induce tolerance to skin allografts. In the present study, fractionated total body irradiation (FT-body-I) was studied as an alternative to FT-lymphoid-I. FT-body-I produces less pulmonary and gastrointestinal injury than does single exposure total body irradiation, but because of the decreased capacity of lymphoid tissues to recover from the effects of irradiation between fractions, the effect of FT-body-I on lymphoid cells, when delivered within 24 h, is approximately the same as an equivalent single exposure of total body irradiation. Therefore, FT-body-I, like FT-lymphoid-I, has some selectivity for lymphoid tissues and has the advantage that it can be delivered within the time constraints of ex vivo organ preservation.

  11. The effect of bone allografts combined with bone marrow stromal cells on the healing of segmental bone defects in a sheep model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The repair of large bone defects is a major orthopedic challenge because autologous bone grafts are not available in large amounts and because harvesting is often associated with donor-site morbidity. Considering that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) are responsible for the maintenance of bone turnover throughout life, we investigated bone repair at a site of a critically sized segmental defect in sheep tibia treated with BMSCs loaded onto allografts. The defect was created in the mid-portion of the tibial diaphysis of eight adult sheep, and the sheep were treated with ex-vivo expanded autologous BMSCs isolated from marrow aspirates and loaded onto cortical allografts (n = 4). The treated sheep were compared with control sheep that had been treated with cell-free allografts (n = 4) obtained from donors of the same breed as the receptor sheep. Results The healing response was monitored by radiographs monthly and by computed tomography and histology at six, ten, fourteen, and eighteen weeks after surgery. For the cell-loaded allografts, union was established more rapidly at the interface between the host bone and the allograft, and the healing process was more conspicuous. Remodeling of the allograft was complete at 18 weeks in the cell-treated animals. Histologically, the marrow cavity was reestablished, with intertrabecular spaces being filled with adipose marrow and with evidence of focal hematopoiesis. Conclusions Allografts cellularized with AOCs (allografts of osteoprogenitor cells) can generate great clinical outcomes to noncellularized allografts to consolidate, reshape, structurally and morphologically reconstruct bone and bone marrow in a relatively short period of time. These features make this strategy very attractive for clinical use in orthopedic bioengineering. PMID:24495743

  12. Tolerance to MHC class II disparate allografts through genetic modification of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jindra, Peter T.; Tripathi, Sudipta; Tian, Chaorui; Iacomini, John; Bagley, Jessamyn

    2012-01-01

    Induction of molecular chimerism through genetic modification of bone marrow is a powerful tool for the induction of tolerance. Here we demonstrate for the first time that expression of an allogeneic MHC class II gene in autologous bone marrow cells, resulting in a state of molecular chimerism, induces tolerance to MHC class II mismatched skin grafts, a stringent test of transplant tolerance. Reconstitution of recipients with syngeneic bone marrow transduced with retrovirus encoding H-2I-Ab (I-Ab) resulted the long-term expression of the retroviral gene product on the surface of MHC class II-expressing bone marrow derived cell types. Mechanistically, tolerance was maintained by the presence of regulatory T cells, which prevented proliferation and cytokine production by alloreactive host T cells. Thus, the introduction of MHC class II genes into bone marrow derived cells through genetic engineering results in tolerance. These results have the potential to extend the clinical applicability of molecular chimerism for tolerance induction. PMID:22833118

  13. Cardiac allograft acceptance after localized bone marrow transplantation by isolated limb perfusion in nonmyeloablated recipients.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Yolcu, Esma S; Shirwan, Haval; Wang, Zhiliang; Farkas, Daniel L; Yoleuk, Esma S

    2003-01-01

    Donor-specific tolerance to cardiac grafts may be induced by hematopoietic chimerism. This study evaluates the potential of localized bone marrow transplantation (BMT) performed by isolated limb (IL) perfusion to induce tolerance to secondary cardiac grafts without myeloablative conditioning. BALB/c recipients (H2d) preconditioned with lethal and sublethal doses of busulfan were injected i.v. and IL with 10(7) whole bone marrow cells (wBMCs) from B10 donors (H2(b)). Two hours after IL infusion of PKH-labeled wBMCs into myeloablated hosts, there were few labeled cells in the host peripheral blood (p < 0.001 versus i.v.) and femurs of the infused limb contained 57% +/- 7% PKH-labeled blasts (p < 0.001 versus 8% +/- 0.6% after i.v.). Femurs of the noninfused limbs contained 60-70 PKH-labeled blasts (p < 0.001 versus i.v.-BMT) after 2 days and 47% +/- 5% of 0.32 x 10(7) donor cells (p < 0.001 versus 78% +/- 4% of 1.2 x 10(7) donor cells in infused femurs) after 4 weeks. The survival rates of myeloablated hosts were 90% and 80% after i.v. and IL infusion, respectively, and the chimeras had 78%-84% donor peripheral blood cells. In recipients conditioned with 35 mg/g busulfan, the levels of donor chimerism in peripheral blood were 33% +/- 4% and 21% +/- 4% at 3 weeks after i.v.- and IL-BMT, respectively. Transplantation of donor-matched (H2(b)) secondary vascularized hearts in these chimeras after 3 weeks resulted in graft survival for periods exceeding 8 weeks, while third-party (H2(k)) allografts were acutely rejected (p < 0.001 versus H2(b)). These data indicate that IL perfusion is a reliable alternative procedure for establishment of hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific tolerance without myeloablative conditioning.

  14. In vitro allograft irradiation prevents graft-versus-host disease in small-bowel transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.K.; Schraut, W.H.

    1985-04-01

    In small-bowel transplantation, the transfer of large numbers of donor lymphocytes with the intestinal allograft may provoke a lethal graft-versus-host reaction. The effectiveness of allograft irradiation in vitro as a method of preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was studied in a rat model of small-bowel transplantation, with the Lewis----Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrid strain combination. Cold harvested small-bowel allografts were irradiated immediately prior to heterotopic or orthotopic transplantation. Animals that had received heterotopic allografts irradiated with 0, 250, or 500 rad all died of GVHD after 14.4 +/- 3.0, 15.0 +/- 1.3, and 14.2 +/- 1.9 days, respectively. None of the animals that had received allografts treated with 1000 rad developed clinical or pathologic evidence of GVHD, however, and all survived for more than 6 months (P less than 0.001). Allograft function was studied in animals that underwent orthotopic transplantation. Recipients of nonirradiated orthotopic allografts all died of GVHD after 14.0 +/- 0.7 days, whereas recipients of allografts irradiated with 1000 rad all survived for more than 5 months (P less than 0.001). After 120 days, weight gain (51.8 +/- 11.7%), serum albumin (3.9 +/- 0.7 g/dl), serum triglycerides (67.0 +/- 24.3 mg/dl), CBC, and differential in these animals were not statistically different from those in either age-matched isograft recipients or normal animals, and when the rats were sacrificed, irradiated allografts showed no changes suggestive of radiation injury. These results indicate that irradiation of small-bowel allografts in vitro prevents development of GVHD, and that this can be achieved at a dose which does not cause injury to or malfunction of the allograft.

  15. Implication of Ia-positive bone marrow interstitial stem cells in the induction of unresponsiveness to canine renal allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Arnold, A.N.; Asari, H.; Sato, K.; Miura, S.; Chanana, A.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1987-02-01

    The removal from stored autologous host bone marrow of a monocytoid cell population by exposure to methylprednisolone is associated with successful introduction of unresponsiveness to renal allografts in irradiated recipients reconstituted with such treated marrow. The eliminated cells are a prominent component of the canine long bone marrow interstitium and share a number of important properties with dendritic cells (DC), including size and shape; poor or nonadherence to plastic or glass surfaces; negative staining for neutral esterase, acid phosphatase, or peroxidase; nonphagocytic; Ia positive, but negative for IgG or IgM; ability to act as accessory cells in augmenting the intensity of allogeneic mixed-lymphocyte reactions. Both cell types are of bone marrow origin and are susceptible to steroids in vitro. The results suggest that the bone marrow interstitial cells identified in the course of this study may be enriched with populations of canine dendritic cell precursors and dendritic cells at various stages of differentiation. The detection of a receptor site for Helix promatia on the surface of such cells may be of usefulness in their further characterization and in the analysis of their precise role in the modulation of allogeneic unresponsiveness.

  16. Bioactive lipid coating of bone allografts directs engraftment and fate determination of bone marrow-derived cells in rat GFP chimeras.

    PubMed

    Das, Anusuya; Segar, Claire E; Chu, Yihsuan; Wang, Tiffany W; Lin, Yong; Yang, Chunxi; Du, Xeujun; Ogle, Roy C; Cui, Quanjun; Botchwey, Edward A

    2015-09-01

    Bone grafting procedures are performed to treat wounds incurred during wartime trauma, accidents, and tumor resections. Endogenous mechanisms of repair are often insufficient to ensure integration between host and donor bone and subsequent restoration of function. We investigated the role that bone marrow-derived cells play in bone regeneration and sought to increase their contributions by functionalizing bone allografts with bioactive lipid coatings. Polymer-coated allografts were used to locally deliver the immunomodulatory small molecule FTY720 in tibial defects created in rat bone marrow chimeras containing genetically-labeled bone marrow for monitoring cell origin and fate. Donor bone marrow contributed significantly to both myeloid and osteogenic cells in remodeling tissue surrounding allografts. FTY720 coatings altered the phenotype of immune cells two weeks post-injury, which was associated with increased vascularization and bone formation surrounding allografts. Consequently, degradable polymer coating strategies that deliver small molecule growth factors such as FTY720 represent a novel therapeutic strategy for harnessing endogenous bone marrow-derived progenitors and enhancing healing in load-bearing bone defects.

  17. Reepithelialization of orthotopic tracheal allografts prevents rejection after withdrawal of immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Govindaraj, Satish; Chaboki, Houtan; Cleven, Heidi; Fedorova, Elena; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Mayer, Lloyd

    2005-04-01

    Prior work has demonstrated that immunosuppressed orthotopic tracheal allografts undergo progressive reepithelialization over a 48-day period with recipient-derived tracheal epithelium. We hypothesized that reepithelialization of tracheal allografts would prevent rejection after withdrawal of immunosuppression. BALB/c murine tracheal grafts were transplanted orthotopically into either syngeneic or allogeneic C57/BL6 recipients. The recipients were either not immunosuppressed, immunosuppressed with cyclosporine A (10 mg/kg per day) continuously, or immunosuppressed for 48 days and then withdrawn from immunosuppression. The grafts were assessed for acute and chronic rejection 10 days and 50 days after immunosuppression withdrawal. The immunosuppressed allograft recipients maintained a ciliated epithelium acutely and chronically after immunosuppression withdrawal. Ten days after immunosuppression withdrawal, there was a mild cellular infiltrate, which resolved 50 days after withdrawal. Electron microscopy, lymphocyte subpopulation assays, and lamina propria analysis demonstrated that immunosuppression withdrawal did not result in tracheal allograft rejection. In vitro and in vivo assessments did not demonstrate evidence of systemic or local immune tolerance. We conclude that reepithelialization of orthotopic tracheal allografts with recipient-derived mucosa prevents rejection of allograft segments. Tracheal transplantation may require only transient immunosuppression, which can be withdrawn after tracheal reepithelialization.

  18. The revitalisation of flexor tendon allografts with bone marrow stromal cells and mechanical stimulation: An ex vivo model revitalising flexor tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Wu, J H; Thoreson, A R; Gingery, A; An, K N; Moran, S L; Amadio, P C; Zhao, C

    2017-03-01

    , mechanical stimulation of a cell-seeded tendon can promote cell proliferation and enhance expression of collagen types I and III in vitro.Cite this article: J. H. Wu, A. R. Thoreson, A. Gingery, K. N. An, S. L. Moran, P. C. Amadio, C. Zhao. The revitalisation of flexor tendon allografts with bone marrow stromal cells and mechanical stimulation: An ex vivo model revitalising flexor tendon allografts. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:179-185. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.63.BJR-2016-0207.R1. © 2017 Zhao et al.

  19. Induction of tolerance to bone marrow allografts by donor-derived host nonreactive ex vivo–induced central memory CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ophir, Eran; Eidelstein, Yaki; Afik, Ran; Bachar-Lustig, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Enabling engraftment of allogeneic T cell–depleted bone marrow (TDBM) under reduced-intensity conditioning represents a major challenge in bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Anti–third-party cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were previously shown to be endowed with marked ability to delete host antidonor T cells in vitro, but were found to be less effective in vivo. This could result from diminished lymph node (LN) homing caused by the prolonged activation, which induces a CD44+CD62L− effector phenotype, and thereby prevents effective colocalization with, and neutralization of, alloreactive host T cells (HTCs). In the present study, LN homing, determined by imaging, was enhanced upon culture conditions that favor the acquisition of CD44+CD62L+ central memory cell (Tcm) phenotype by anti–third-party CD8+ cells. These Tcm-like cells displayed strong proliferation and prolonged persistence in BM transplant recipients. Importantly, adoptively transferred HTCs bearing a transgenic T-cell receptor (TCR) with antidonor specificity were efficiently deleted only by donor-type Tcms. All these attributes were found to be associated with improved efficacy in overcoming T cell–mediated rejection of TDBM, thereby enabling high survival rate and long-term donor chimerism, without causing graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, anti–third-party Tcms, which home to recipient LNs and effectively delete antidonor T cells, could provide an effective and novel tool for overcoming rejection of BM allografts. PMID:20042725

  20. Development of a cyclosporin-A-induced immune tolerant rat model to test marrow allograft cell type effects on bone repair.

    PubMed

    Espitalier, Florent; Durand, Nicolas; Rémy, Séverine; Corre, Pierre; Sourice, Sophie; Pilet, Paul; Weiss, Pierre; Guicheux, Jérôme; Malard, Olivier

    2015-05-01

    Bone repair is an important concept in tissue engineering, and the ability to repair bone in hypotrophic conditions such as that of irradiated bone, represents a challenge for this field. Previous studies have shown that a combination of bone marrow and (BCP) was effective to repair irradiated bone. However, the origin and role played by each cell type in bone healing still remains unclear. In order to track the grafted cells, the development of an animal model that is immunotolerant to an allograft of bone marrow would be useful. Furthermore, because the immune system interacts with bone turnover, it is of critical importance to demonstrate that immunosuppressive drugs do not interfere with bone repair. After a preliminary study of immunotolerance, cyclosporin-A was chosen to be used in immunosuppressive therapy. Ten rats were included to observe qualitative and quantitative bone repair 8 days and 6 weeks after the creation of bone defects. The defects were filled with an allograft of bone marrow alone or in association with BCP under immunosuppressive treatment (cyclosporin-A). The results showed that there was no significant interaction of cyclosporin-A with osseous regeneration. The use of this new immunotolerant rat model of bone marrow allograft in future studies will provide insight on how the cells within the bone marrow graft contribute to bone healing, especially in irradiated conditions.

  1. Multipotential stromal cell abundance in cellular bone allograft: comparison with fresh age-matched iliac crest bone and bone marrow aspirate

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Yasser M; Moseley, Timothy A; Cuthbert, Richard J; Giannoudis, Peter V; McGonagle, Dennis; Jones, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Aim To enumerate and characterize multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) in a cellular bone allograft and compare with fresh age-matched iliac crest bone and bone marrow (BM) aspirate. Materials & methods MSC characterization used functional assays, confocal/scanning electron microscopy and whole-genome microarrays. Resident MSCs were enumerated by flow cytometry following enzymatic extraction. Results Allograft material contained live osteocytes and proliferative bone-lining cells defined as MSCs by phenotypic and functional capacities. Without cultivation/expansion, the allograft displayed an ‘osteoinductive’ molecular signature and the presence of CD45−CD271+CD73+CD90+CD105+ MSCs; with a purity over 100-fold that of iliac crest bone. In comparison with BM, MSC numbers enzymatically released from one gram of cellular allograft were equivalent to approximately 45 ml of BM aspirate. Conclusion Cellular allograft bone represents a unique nonimmune material rich in MSCs and osteocytes. This osteoinductive graft represents an attractive alternative to autograft bone or composite/synthetic grafts in orthopedics and broader regenerative medicine settings. PMID:24617969

  2. Surgical Treatment of a Tibial Osteochondral Defect With Debridement, Marrow Stimulation, and Micronized Allograft Cartilage Matrix: Report of an All-Arthroscopic Technique.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sarang

    2016-01-01

    Although talar dome osteochondral lesions (OCLs) are common injuries, OCLs of the tibial plafond are relatively infrequent. These lesions have historically been managed in a similar manner to talar OCLs, with most treated with debridement and marrow stimulation. This treatment has had mixed results. The present case report describes a patient who underwent an all-arthroscopic surgical technique consisting of debridement and marrow stimulation with application of micronized allograft cartilage matrix (BioCartilage(™), Arthrex, Naples, FL). Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived myeloid suppressor cell (MDSC) adoptive transfer in mouse models of autoimmunity and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Drujont, Lucile; Carretero-Iglesia, Laura; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Beriou, Gaelle; Merieau, Emmanuel; Hill, Marcelo; Delneste, Yves; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Louvet, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic use of immunoregulatory cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of uncontrolled immunity. During the last decade, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have emerged as novel key regulatory players in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, transplantation or autoimmunity. Recently, MDSC have been successfully generated in vitro from naive mouse bone marrow cells or healthy human PBMCs using minimal cytokine combinations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential of adoptive transfer of such cells to control auto- and allo-immunity in the mouse. Culture of bone marrow cells with GM-CSF and IL-6 consistently yielded a majority of CD11b+Gr1hi/lo cells exhibiting strong inhibition of CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro. However, adoptive transfer of these cells failed to alter antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity in vivo. Furthermore, MDSC could not prevent the development of autoimmunity in a stringent model of type 1 diabetes. Rather, loading the cells prior to injection with a pancreatic neo-antigen peptide accelerated the development of the disease. Contrastingly, in a model of skin transplantation, repeated injection of MDSC or single injection of LPS-activated MDSC resulted in a significant prolongation of allograft survival. The beneficial effect of MDSC infusions on skin graft survival was paradoxically not explained by a decrease of donor-specific T cell response but associated with a systemic over-activation of T cells and antigen presenting cells, prominently in the spleen. Taken together, our results indicate that in vitro generated MDSC bear therapeutic potential but will require additional in vitro factors or adjunct immunosuppressive treatments to achieve safe and more robust immunomodulation upon adoptive transfer.

  4. Synergistic effects of ultrashort wave and bone marrow stromal cells on nerve regeneration with acellular nerve allografts.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chao-Jian; Tong, Lei; Ji, Li-Li; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Hai; Jia, Hua; Zhang, Li-Xin; Tong, Xiao-Jie

    2013-10-01

    Acellular nerve allografts (ANA) possess bioactivity and neurite promoting factors in nerve tissue engineering. Previously we reported that low dose ultrashort wave (USW) radiation could enhance the rate and quality of peripheral nerve regeneration with ANA repairing sciatic nerve defects. Meanwhile, ANA implanted with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) exhibited a similar result. Thus, it is interesting to know whether it might yield a synergistic effect when USW radiation is combined with BMSCs-laden ANA. Here we investigated the effectiveness of ANA seeded with BMSCs, combined with USW therapy on repairing peripheral nerve injuries. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) control group, BMSCs-laden group, ultrashort wave (USW) group and BMSC + USW group. The regenerated nerves were assayed morphologically and functionally, and growth-promoting factors in the regenerated tissues following USW administration or BMSCs integration were also detected. The results indicated that the combination therapy caused much better beneficial effects evidenced by increased myelinated nerve fiber number, myelin sheath thickness, axon diameter, sciatic function index, nerve conduction velocity, and restoration rate of tibialis anterior wet weight. Moreover, the mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the spinal cord and muscles were elevated significantly. In conclusion, we found a synergistic effect of USW radiation and BMSCs treatment on peripheral nerve regeneration, which may help establish novel strategies for repairing peripheral nerve defects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Trafficking of donor-derived bone marrow correlates with chimerism and extension of composite allograft survival across MHC barrier.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, S; Ulusal, B G; Ulusal, A E; Izycki, D; Yoder, B; Siemionow, M

    2006-06-01

    We proposed to evaluate differences between recipient's immune response to vascularized skin and combined vascularized skin/bone allografts, under a 7-day alphabeta-TCR plus cyclosporine (CsA) treatment protocol. Thirty-six transplantations were performed in six groups: group I (isograft control-vascularized skin graft; n=6); group II (isograft control-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6); group III (allograft rejection control group-vascularized skin graft; n=6); group IV (allograft rejection control-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6); group V (allograft treatment-vascularized skin graft; n=6); and group VI (allograft treatment-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6). Isograft transplantations were performed between Lewis rats and allografts were transplanted across the MHC barrier from Brown Norway to Lewis rats. In the allograft treatment group, a combined alphabeta-TCR+CsA protocol was applied for 7 days. All groups were compared clinically, immunologically and histologically. Statistical significance was determined with two-tailed Student's t test. Indefinite graft survival was achieved in the isograft control group (>300 days). Allograft rejection controls rejected within 5 to 9 days posttransplant; chimerism levels were undetectable (<.5%). Allografts under the alphabeta-TCR+CsA protocol had significantly extended survival when skin was combined with bone (61-125 days) compared to vascularized skin allografts (43-61 days). Lymphoid macrochimerism was significantly higher in group VI than group V. Histology confirmed skin and bone viability. Combined vascularized skin/bone allografts had higher and sustained levels of donor-specific chimerism and extended allograft survival.

  6. Molecular examination of bone marrow stromal cells and chondroitinase ABC-assisted acellular nerve allograft for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Jia, Hua; Li, Wen-Yuan; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Lingxiao; Liu, Yan-Cui; Liu, Gui-Bo

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying combinatorial bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation and chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC) therapy in a model of acellular nerve allograft (ANA) repair of the sciatic nerve gap in rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=24) were used as nerve donors and Wistar rats (n=48) were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) control group (ANA treated with DMEM only); Group II, Ch-ABC group (ANA treated with Ch-ABC only); Group III, BMSC group (ANA seeded with BMSCs only); Group IV, Ch-ABC + BMSCs group (Ch-ABC treated ANA then seeded with BMSCs). After 8 weeks, the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the regenerated tissues were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Axonal regeneration, motor neuron protection and functional recovery were examined by immunohistochemistry, horseradish peroxidase retrograde neural tracing and electrophysiological and tibialis anterior muscle recovery analyses. It was observed that combination therapy enhances the growth response of the donor nerve locally as well as distally, at the level of the spinal cord motoneuron and the target muscle organ. This phenomenon is likely due to the propagation of retrograde and anterograde transport of growth signals sourced from the graft site. Collectively, growth improvement on the donor nerve, target muscle and motoneuron ultimately contribute to efficacious axonal regeneration and functional recovery. Thorough investigation of molecular peripheral nerve injury combinatorial strategies are required for the optimization of efficacious therapy and full functional recovery following ANA.

  7. Molecular examination of bone marrow stromal cells and chondroitinase ABC-assisted acellular nerve allograft for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Jia, Hua; Li, Wen-Yuan; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Lingxiao; Liu, Yan-Cui; Liu, Gui-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying combinatorial bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation and chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC) therapy in a model of acellular nerve allograft (ANA) repair of the sciatic nerve gap in rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=24) were used as nerve donors and Wistar rats (n=48) were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) control group (ANA treated with DMEM only); Group II, Ch-ABC group (ANA treated with Ch-ABC only); Group III, BMSC group (ANA seeded with BMSCs only); Group IV, Ch-ABC + BMSCs group (Ch-ABC treated ANA then seeded with BMSCs). After 8 weeks, the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the regenerated tissues were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Axonal regeneration, motor neuron protection and functional recovery were examined by immunohistochemistry, horseradish peroxidase retrograde neural tracing and electrophysiological and tibialis anterior muscle recovery analyses. It was observed that combination therapy enhances the growth response of the donor nerve locally as well as distally, at the level of the spinal cord motoneuron and the target muscle organ. This phenomenon is likely due to the propagation of retrograde and anterograde transport of growth signals sourced from the graft site. Collectively, growth improvement on the donor nerve, target muscle and motoneuron ultimately contribute to efficacious axonal regeneration and functional recovery. Thorough investigation of molecular peripheral nerve injury combinatorial strategies are required for the optimization of efficacious therapy and full functional recovery following ANA. PMID:27698684

  8. CXC Chemokine Receptor 4 (CXCR4) Antagonist, a Novel Pathway to Prevent Chronic Allograft Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Wenrui; Zeng, Song; Zhang, Zijian; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hu, Xiaopeng

    2016-11-25

    BACKGROUND Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) remains a major problem for long-term graft survival and different pathways participate in its development. CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is significantly upregulated following renal injury and fibrotic response. We investigated the effect of AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, on the development of CAN in rat models. MATERIAL AND METHODS CAN rat models (n=20) were established using male Fisher 344 to Lewis rats. Rats in the experimental group (n=10) were treated with AMD3100 (1 mg/kg/day subcutaneously, 0-12 weeks), rats in the control group (n=10) were treated with saline. The serum creatinine levels were monitored every week. Kidney grafts were harvested 12 weeks after modeling for histological analysis. We used chronic allograft damage index (CADI) scores to evaluate each group. Q-PCR and Western blotting were used to measure CXCR4, TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling pathway and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression in renal allograft tissue. RESULTS CXCR4 expression was increased significantly in the control group which developed intense chronic changes after 12 weeks. Histological changes of CAN in the experimental group were ameliorated by AMD3100 which also had better graft function compare to the control group. AMD3100 significantly blunted the increase in the mRNA expression level of CXCR4, TGF-β1/Smad3, and α-SMA. A significant reduction in TGF-β1 and α-SMA protein content was observed only in the experimental group as shown in a representative Western blot. CONCLUSIONS Based on these findings, CXCR4 expression may mediate in part the development of CAN. AMD3100 may ameliorate histological changes of CAN and maintain better allograft function. It blunts downstream effects of TGF-β1 signaling and fibroblast activation. Therefore, antagonism of CXCR4 may provide a novel way to prevent the development of CAN.

  9. The impact of donor characteristics on the immune cell composition of mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Tong; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-12-01

    The association of donor characteristics with immune cell composition in allografts remains poorly understood. In this retrospective study, the effects of donor characteristics on immune cell composition in allografts were investigated. The correlations of donor characteristics with the immune cell composition in mixture allografts of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor-mobilized marrow harvests and peripheral blood harvests of 390 healthy donors (male, 240; female, 150; median age, 40 years old) were analyzed. The median doses of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells, and monocytes in mixture allografts were 160.57 × 10(6), 89.29 × 10(6), 56.16 × 10(6), 10.87 × 10(6), and 137.94 × 10(6)/kg, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that younger donor age was associated with a higher dose of CD3+ T cells (p = 0.006), CD3+CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001), CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells (p = 0.004), and monocytes (p = 0.014), as well as a higher ratio of CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells/CD3+ T cells (p < 0.001) in the mixture allografts. A negative association of donor weight with CD3+ T cells (p < 0.001), CD4+ T cells (p = 0.002), CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001), and CD3+CD4-CD8- T cells (p = 0.044) was observed. The count of peripheral blood lymphocyte pre-peripheral blood apheresis was correlated with the yield of CD3+ T cells (p < 0.001) and CD4+ T cells (p = 0.001). The peripheral blood monocyte count before marrow harvest predicted the monocyte dose (p = 0.002). The results suggested that older and overweight donors should not be chosen. The monocyte and lymphocyte counts before harvest could predict the yield of immune cells in allografts. © 2015 AABB.

  10. Cutaneous and bone marrow histoplasmosis after 18 years of renal allograft transplant.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, K Y; Carvalho, N B; Mimicos, E V; Yeh-Li, H; Sotto, M N; França, F O S

    2014-10-01

    The frequency of histoplasmosis among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients appears to be low where there are only a few case series, mostly among renal and liver transplant recipients. Herein we report a case of a 44-year-old woman who underwent a living-related renal transplant 18 years prior to evaluation, developed a nodule after followed by ulceration upon her posterior right leg and a second one upon her left leg 3 months and 2 months before her hospitalisation, respectively. The biopsy of lesion revealed the presence of Histoplasma spp. Bone marrow aspiration was performed and also revealed the same organism. She had initially received itraconazole without improvement of lesions, while a new lesion appeared on her left arm. Healing of all lesions could be observed after 40 days of liposomal amphotericin B when she was submitted to skin grafts on the legs and a surgical treatment on the arms, and the myelosuppression improved simultaneously. Histoplasmosis seems to be very uncommon among patients who underwent to organ solid transplantation. Most cases occur within 12-18 months after transplantation, although unusual cases have been presented many years post-transplant. There are cases reported in the literature, occurring from 84 days to 18 years after organ transplantation, but without cutaneous involvement. Our patient developed lesions on limbs and myelosuppression after 18 years of chronic immunosuppression medication. This case suggests that besides cutaneous histoplasmosis is an uncommon infection following iatrogenic immunosuppression and even rarer over a long period after the transplantation. Clinicians who care SOT recipient patients must bear in mind histoplasmosis infection as differential diagnosis in any case of cutaneous injury with prolonged fever and try to use as many tools as possible to make the diagnosis, once this disease presents a good prognosis if it is diagnosed and treated promptly.

  11. Long-term Tolerance Toward Haploidentical Vascularized Composite Allograft Transplantation in a Canine Model Using Bone Marrow or Mobilized Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeff; Graves, Scott S; Butts-Miwongtum, Tiffany; Sale, George E; Storb, Rainer; Mathes, David Woodbridge

    2016-12-01

    The development of safe and reliable protocols for the transplantation of the face and hands may be accomplished with animal modeling of transplantation of vascularized composite allografts (VCA). Previously, we demonstrated that tolerance to a VCA could be achieved after canine recipients were simultaneously given marrow from a dog leukocyte antigen-identical donor. In the present study, we extend those findings across a dog leukocyte antigen mismatched barrier. Eight recipient dogs received total body irradiation (4.5 cGy), hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), either marrow (n = 4) or granulocyte-colony stimulating factor mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (n = 4), and a VCA transplant from the HCT donor. Post grafting immunosuppression consisted of mycophenolate mofetil (28 days) and cyclosporine (35 days). In 4 dogs receiving bone marrow, 1 accepted both its marrow transplant and demonstrated long-term tolerance to the donor VCA (>52 weeks). Three dogs rejected both their marrow transplants and VCA at 5 to 7 weeks posttransplant. Dogs receiving mobilized stem cells all accepted their stem cell transplant and became tolerant to the VCA. However, 3 dogs developed graft-versus-host disease, whereas 1 dog rejected its stem cell graft by week 15 but exhibited long-term tolerance toward its VCA (>90 weeks). The data suggest that simultaneous transplantation of mobilized stem cells and a VCA is feasible and leads to tolerance toward the VCA in a haploidentical setting. However, there is a higher rate of donor stem cell engraftment compared with marrow HCT and an increase in the incidence of graft-versus-host disease.

  12. Filgrastim-Stimulated Bone Marrow Compared with Filgrastim-Mobilized Peripheral Blood in Myeloablative Sibling Allografting for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: A Randomized Canadian Blood and Marrow Transplant Group Study.

    PubMed

    Couban, Stephen; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Lachance, Sylvie; Walker, Irwin; Toze, Cynthia; Rubinger, Morel; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Lee, Stephanie J; Szer, Richard; Doocey, R; Lewis, Ian D; Huebsch, Lothar; Howson-Jan, Kang; Lalancette, Michel; Almohareb, Fahad; Chaudhri, Nadeem; Ivison, Sabine; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan; Fairclough, Diane; Devins, Gerald; Szwajcer, David; Foley, Ronan; Smith, Clayton; Panzarella, Tony; Kerr, Holly; Kariminia, Amina; Schultz, Kirk R

    2016-08-01

    In adult hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), filgrastim-mobilized peripheral blood (G-PB) has largely replaced unstimulated marrow for allografting. Although the use of G-PB results in faster hematopoietic recovery, it is also associated with more chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). A potential alternative allograft is filgrastim-stimulated marrow (G-BM), which we hypothesized may be associated with prompt hematopoietic recovery but with less cGVHD. We conducted a phase 3, open-label, multicenter randomized trial of 230 adults with hematologic malignancies receiving allografts from siblings after myeloablative conditioning to compare G-PB with G-BM. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure, defined as a composite of extensive cGVHD, relapse/disease progression, and death. With a median follow-up of 36 months (range, 9.6 to 48), comparing G-BM with G-PB, there was no difference between the 2 arms with respect to the primary outcome of this study (hazard ratio [HR], .91; 95% confidence interval [CI], .68 to 1.22; P = .52). However, the cumulative incidence of overall cGVHD was lower with G-BM (HR, .66; 95% CI, .46 to .95; P = .007) and there was no difference in the risk of relapse or progression (P = .35). The median times to neutrophil recovery (P = .0004) and platelet recovery (P = .012) were 3 days shorter for recipients allocated to G-PB compared with those allocated to G-BM, but there were no differences in secondary engraftment-related outcomes, such as time to first hospital discharge (P = .17). In addition, there were no graft failures in either arm. This trial demonstrates that, compared with G-PB, the use of G-BM allografts leads to a significantly lower rate of overall cGVHD without a loss of the graft-versus-tumor effect and comparable overall survival. Our findings suggest that further study of this type of allograft is warranted.

  13. Prevention and treatment of fungal infections in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2003-07-01

    There has not been as much success in the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infections, particularly aspergillosis, compared to the prevention and treatment of cytomegalovirus infection and graft-versus-host disease in bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients. Allogeneic BMT recipients who develop graft-versus-host disease and remain immunosuppressed for long periods are at major risk for development of these infections. Prevention of environmental exposure, antifungal chemoprophylaxis, and attempts at early diagnosis are essential for the reduction of mortality from invasive fungal infections. Chest computerized axial tomography is extremely useful in diagnosing pulmonary aspergillosis. However, microbiologic or histologic identification of infection remains essential. Unfortunately, the response to therapy in BMT recipients remains suboptimal. With the development of the lipid formulations of amphotericin B, the newer azoles, and the echinocandins, safer and more efficacious options have become available. The optimal use of antifungal agents or their combinations remains to be determined.

  14. AS2553627, a novel JAK inhibitor, prevents chronic rejection in rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Inami, Masamichi; Morio, Hiroki; Okuma, Kenji; Ito, Misato; Noto, Takahisa; Shirakami, Shohei; Hirose, Jun; Morokata, Tatsuaki

    2017-02-05

    Janus family kinases (JAKs) are essential molecules for cytokine responses and attractive targets for the treatment of transplant rejection and autoimmune diseases. Several JAK inhibitors have shown demonstrable effects on acute rejection in experimental cardiac transplant models. However, little is known about the potential benefits of JAK inhibitors on chronic rejection outcomes such as vasculopathy and fibrosis. Here, we examined the pharmacological profile of a novel JAK inhibitor, AS2553627, and explored its therapeutic potential in chronic rejection as well as acute rejection in a rat cardiac transplant model. AS2553627 potently inhibited JAK kinases but showed no inhibition of other kinases, including TCR-associated molecules. The compound also suppressed proliferation of IL-2 stimulated human and rat T cells. In a rat cardiac transplant model, oral administration of AS2553627 alone or co-administration with a sub-therapeutic dose of tacrolimus effectively prolonged cardiac allograft survival, suggesting the efficacy in treating acute rejection. To evaluate the effect on chronic rejection, recipient rats were administered a therapeutic dose of tacrolimus for 90 days. In combination with tacrolimus, AS2553627 significantly reduced cardiac allograft vasculopathy and fibrosis that tacrolimus alone did not inhibit. AS2553627 at the effective dose in rat transplantation models did not significantly reduce reticulocyte counts in peripheral whole blood after in vivo erythropoietin administration, indicating a low risk for anemia. These results suggest that AS2553627 may be a therapeutic candidate for the prevention of not only acute but also chronic rejection in cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Abrogation of bone marrow allograft resistance in mice by increased total body irradiation correlates with eradication of host clonable T cells and alloreactive cytotoxic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, E.; Lapidot, T.; Gozes, D.; Singer, T.S.; Reisner, Y.

    1987-01-15

    Host-vs-graft activity presents a major obstacle for transplantation of T cell-depleted bone marrow in HLA-mismatched patients. In a primate model, conditioned exactly like leukemia patients, it was shown that residual host clonable T cells, as well as alloreactive cytotoxic precursors, were present in peripheral blood and spleen after completion of cytoreduction. We have now extended this study in a mouse model for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. C/sub 3/H/HeJ mice were treated by 9 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and 24 hr later their spleen cells were cultured in the presence of T cell growth factor and phytohemagglutinin according to the limit dilution procedure. After 7 days of culture the average frequency of clonable cells was 2.5 X 10(-3) compared with 37 X 10(-3) in the spleens of normal mice. The T cell derivation of the growing cells was ascertained by complement-mediated cytotoxicity with anti-Thy-1 as well as with anti-Lyt-2 and anti-Ly-3T4. In parallel, we found that the initial engraftment rate of bone marrow allograft in mice given 9 Gy TBI was lower than that found in recipients of syngeneic marrow. The initial engraftment rate was measured by the number of colony-forming units in the spleen and by splenic uptake of /sup 125/IUdR. A slight increase in TBI from 9 Gy to 11 Gy markedly reduced the difference in the number of spleen colony-forming units or the IUdR uptake between recipients of allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow. This increase in TBI also coincided with eradication of detectable clonable T cells. Moreover, in mice transplanted with T cell-depleted bone marrow after 9 Gy TBI, we also demonstrate that cytotoxicity against donor-type target cells is present in the spleen 10 to 14 days posttransplantation, whereas in mice treated by 11 Gy TBI such alloreactivity could not be detected.

  16. Prevention of diabetes in rats by bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alinaji; Silvers, W K; Bellgrau, D; Anderson, A O; Plotkin, S; Barker, C F

    1981-09-01

    Hyperglycemia, hypoinsulinemia and ketonemia often develop abruptly in previously normal young "BB" rats. The syndrome mimics human juvenile diabetes closely and is, thus, appropriate for assessing pancreatic transplantation. Transplantation of islet cells from closely histocompatible Wistar Furth (WF) donor resulted in permanent normoglycemia when immunosuppression with ALS was given. However, when islet cells from nondiabetic "BB" donors were transplanted to nonimmunosuppressed diabetic "BB" recipients, only transient normoglycemia followed. Transplantation of WF islets cells also failed in diabetic "BB" rats which were tolerant of WF antigens, again suggesting destruction of transplanted islet cells by the original disease process-possibly autoimmunity. Evidence for autoimmunity was strengthened by the finding that newly diabetic "BB" rats could be rendered normoglycemic by immunosuppression. Since genetic susceptibility to spontaneous autoimmune diabetes is unique to some members of the "BB" stock, an attempt was made to alter their vulnerability by modifying their cellular immune system. Accordingly, 50 million bone marrow cells from WF donors were inoculated into half the newborn members of "BB" litters, leaving the littermates as unmodified controls. Most bone marrow recipients were protected, only four of 37 (10.8%) ever becoming diabetic, while the incidence of diabetes in noninoculated littermates was 22 of 39 (56.4%). The ultimate goal in human diabetes, which also seems very likely to be an autoimmune disease, may not be replacement of destroyed islet cells but identification of potentially susceptible children and prevention of islet destruction by immunologic manipulation.

  17. Corticosteroid-loaded biodegradable nanoparticles for prevention of corneal allograft rejection in rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qing; Xu, Qingguo; Boylan, Nicholas J; Lamb, Nicholas W; Emmert, David G; Yang, Jeh-Chang; Tang, Li; Heflin, Tom; Alwadani, Saeed; Eberhart, Charles G; Stark, Walter J; Hanes, Justin

    2015-03-10

    Immunologic graft rejection is one of the main causes of short and long-term graft failure in corneal transplantation. Steroids are the most commonly used immunosuppressive agents for postoperative management and prevention of corneal graft rejection. However, steroids delivered in eye drops are rapidly cleared from the surface of the eye, so the required frequency of dosing for corneal graft rejection management can be as high as once every 2h. Additionally, these eye drops are often prescribed for daily use for 1 year or longer, which can result in poor patient compliance and steroid-related side effects. Here, we report a biodegradable nanoparticle system composed of Generally Regarded as Safe (GRAS) materials that can provide sustained release of corticosteroids to prevent corneal graft rejection following subconjunctival injection provided initially during transplant surgery. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) exhibited a size of 200 nm, 8 wt.% drug loading, and sustained drug release over 15 days in vitro under sink conditions. DSP-loaded nanoparticles provided sustained ocular drug levels for at least 7 days after subconjunctival administration in rats, and prevented corneal allograft rejection over the entire 9-week study when administered weekly. In contrast, control treatment groups that received weekly injections of either placebo nanoparticles, saline, or DSP in solution demonstrated corneal graft rejection accompanied by severe corneal edema, neovascularization and opacity that occurred in ≤ 4 weeks. Local controlled release of corticosteroids may reduce the rate of corneal graft rejection, perhaps especially in the days immediately following surgery when risk of rejection is highest and when typical steroid eye drop administration requirements are particularly onerous.

  18. Five-year clinical effects of donor bone marrow cells infusions in kidney allograft recipients: improved graft function and higher graft survival.

    PubMed

    Solgi, Ghasem; Gadi, Vijayakrishna; Paul, Biswajit; Mytilineos, Joannis; Pourmand, Gholamreza; Mehrsai, Abdolrasoul; Ranjbar, Moslem; Mohammadnia, Mousa; Nikbin, Behrouz; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Augmentation of microchimerism in solid organ transplant recipients by donor bone marrow cells (DBMC) infusion may promote immune hyporesponsiveness and consequently improve long-term allograft survival. Between March 2005 and July 2007, outcomes for 20 living unrelated donor (LURD) primary kidney recipients with concurrent DBMC infusion (an average of 2.19 ± 1.13 x 10⁹ donor cells consisting of 2.66 ± 1.70 x 10⁷ CD34⁺ cells) were prospectively compared with 20 non-infused control allograft recipients given similar conventional immunosuppressive regimens. With five years of clinical follow up, a total of 11 cases experienced rejection episodes (3 DBMI patients vs. 8 controls, p = 0.15). One DBMC-infused patient experienced chronic rejection vs. two episodes (1 biopsy-confirmed) in the control patients. Actuarial and death-censored 5-y graft survival was significantly higher in infused patients compared with controls (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). Long-term graft survival was significantly associated with pre-transplant anti-HLA antibodies (p = 0.01), slightly with peripheral microchimerism (p = 0.09) and CD4⁺CD25⁺FoxP3⁺ T cells (p = 0.09). Immunosuppressant dosing was lower in infused patients than controls, particularly for mycophenolate mofetil (p = 0.001). The current findings as well as our previous reports on these patients indicates clinical improvement in long-term graft survival of renal transplant patients resulting from low-dose DBMC infusion given without induction therapy.

  19. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-06-12

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide.

  20. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-01-01

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide. PMID:25916827

  1. Negative association of donor age with CD34⁺ cell dose in mixture allografts of G-CSF-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood harvests.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chang, Yingjun; Xu, Lanping; Zhang, Xiaohui; Huang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of donor characteristics on CD34(+) cell dose remain controversial. Recently, we developed a novel haploidentical transplant protocol, in which mixture allografts of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed bone marrow (G-BM) and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood (G-PB) were used. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor characteristics on CD34(+) cell dose in mixture allografts of G-BM and G-PB. A total of 162 healthy adult donors, who underwent bone marrow harvest and peripheral blood collection between January 2009 and November 2010 in Peking University People's Hospital, were prospectively investigated. G-CSF was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 5 µg/kg once a day for 5-6 consecutive days. Bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cells were harvested on the fourth day and fifth day, respectively. A final total CD34(+) cell dose less than 2×10(6) cells/kg recipient body weight was considered a poor mobilization. Of the 162 donors, 31 (19.1%) did not attain this threshold. The obtained median CD34(+) cell doses in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and mixture allografts were 0.83×10(6)/kg, 2.40×10(6)/kg, and 3.47×10(6)/kg, respectively. Multiple regression analysis showed that donor age had a significant negative effect on CD34(+) cell dose in either G-BM, or G-PB, or mixture allografts of G-BM and G-PB. And a 1-year increase in age was associated with a 5.6% decrease in the odds of achieving mobilization cutoff. No significant correlation was found for donor gender, body mass index (BMI), and weight. Donor age is the only factor among the four parameters, including age, gender, weight, and BMI, that influence CD34(+) cell dose in mixture allografts of G-BM and G-PB, and younger donors should be chosen to obtain sufficient CD34(+) cells for transplantation.

  2. The use of potential of bone marrow allograft and whole-body irradiation in the treatment of leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1982-10-15

    A brief history of the clinical application of marrow transplantation based on knowledge gained from ten years work utilizing the dog as an animal model is summarized. The techniques for marrow transplantation, donor selection, and conditioning of the recipient are described. Thirteen of the first 110 endstage leukemic patients who received allogeneic grafts and six of 16 patients who received syngeneic grafts are alive 6-11 years after grafting. Encouraged by the apparent ''cure'' of leukemia in these poor-risk patients, the Seattle transplant group in 1976 decided to give patients transplants earlier in the course of their disease. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second or subsequent relapse were considered to have a poor prognosis. Twenty-two such patients received transplants, with seven surviving in remission 3-5 years later. Nineteen patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia received transplants in first remission and 11 are living in remission 3.5-5.5 years after grafting. The median survival will not be less than 42 months. The problems associated with graft-versus-host disease and recurrence of leukemia and methods aimed at eliminating these problems are discussed.

  3. Low-dose donor bone marrow cells and splenocytes plus adenovirus encoding for CTLA4Ig gene promote stable mixed chimerism and long-term survival of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y-Z; Zhang, Q-Y; Xie, S-S

    2003-12-01

    Co-stimulatory blockade combined with donor bone marrow transfusion engenders stable mixed chimerism and robust tolerance to various organ and cell transplants. However, repeated administration of costly agents to block the co-stimulatory pathway and the high doses of donor bone marrow cells (BMCs) used in most protocols are impeding clinical development of this strategy. To circumvent these shortcomings, we developed a plan in which repeated administration of costly agents was replaced by a single injection of adenovirus containing the gene of interest, and the high dose of donor BMCs replaced by a mixture of low-dose donor BMCs and splenocytes (SPLCs). Cardiac allografts from DA(RT-1(a)) rats were transplanted heterotopically into the abdomens of LEW(RT-1(1)) rats. A cocktail of adenovirus containing CTLA4Ig gene (AdCTLA4Ig), donor BMCs (100 x 10(6)), and SPLCs (50 x 10(6)) was administered to recipients via the portal vein immediately after grafting (n = 6). Treatment with regimens, including AdCTLA4Ig only, AdCTLA4Ig plus donor BMCs, and AdCTLA4Ig plus donor SPLCs, significantly prolonged cardiac allograft survival in recipient rats, while animals that received no treatment or treatment with control adenovirus (AdLacZ) promptly rejected their allografts. Nevertheless, LEW recipients treated with AdCTLA4Ig and the mixture of a low dose of donor BMCs and SPLCs developed stable mixed chimerism, rendering them long-term survivors of cardiac allografts that also accepted skin grafts from the donor but not the third-party strain. We conclude that blockade of CD28-B7 pathway with AdCTLA4Ig plus a mixture of low doses of donor BMCs and SPLCs is a feasible strategy to induce long-term mixed chimerism with a potential application for clinical development.

  4. Early Kidney Allograft Dysfunction (Threatened Allograft): Comparative Effectiveness of Continuing Versus Discontinuation of Tacrolimus and Use of Sirolimus to Prevent Graft Failure: A Retrospective Patient-Centered Outcome Study

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Ravinder K.; Prentice, Heather A.; Reddivari, Venkata; Baffoe-Bonnie, Geroge; Drachenberg, Cinthia I.; Pappadimitriou, John C.; Ramos, Emilio; Cooper, Matthew; Jonsson, Johann; Bartlett, Stephen; Weir, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to lack of treatment options for early acute allograft dysfunction in the presence of tubular-interstitial injury without histological features of rejection, kidney transplant recipients are often treated with sirolimus-based therapy to prevent cumulative calcineurin inhibitor exposure and to prevent premature graft failure. Methods We analyzed transplant recipients treated with sirolimus-based (n = 220) compared with continued tacrolimus-based (n = 276) immunosuppression in recipients of early-onset graft dysfunction (threatened allograft) with the use of propensity score-based inverse probability treatment weighted models to balance for potential confounding by indication between 2 nonrandomized groups. Results Weighted odds for death-censored graft failure (odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.66-2.19, P = 0.555) was similar in the 2 groups, but a trend for increased risk of greater than 50% loss in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline in sirolimus group (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 0.96-3.76; P = 0.067) compared with tacrolimus group. Sirloimus group compared with tacrolimus group had increased risk for death with functioning graft (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.29-3.14; P = 0.002) as well as increased risk of late death (death after graft failure while on dialysis) (OR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.59-3.59; P < 0.001). Analysis of subgroups based on the absence or presence of T cell–mediated rejection or tubulointerstitial inflammation in the index biopsy, or the use of different types of induction agents, and all subgroups had increased risk of death with functioning graft and late death if exposed to sirolimus-based therapy. Conclusions Use of sirolimus compared with tacrolimus in recipients with early allograft dysfunction during the first year of transplant may not prevent worsening of allograft function and could potentially lead to poor survival along with increased risk of late death. PMID:27795990

  5. Does sterilization with fractionated electron beam irradiation prevent ACL tendon allograft from tissue damage?

    PubMed

    Schmidt, T; Grabau, D; Grotewohl, J H; Gohs, U; Pruß, A; Smith, M; Scheffler, S; Hoburg, A

    2017-02-01

    Allografts are frequently used for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, due to the inherent risk of infection, a method that achieves complete sterilization of grafts is warranted without impairing their biomechanical properties. Fractionation of electron beam (FEbeam) irradiation has been shown to maintain similar biomechanical properties compared to fresh-frozen allografts (FFA) in vitro. Therefore, aim of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical properties and early remodelling of grafts that were sterilized with fractionated high-dose electron beam irradiation in an in vivo sheep model. ACL reconstruction was performed in 18 mature merino mix sheep. Sixteen were reconstructed with allografts sterilized with FEbeam irradiation (8 × 3.4 kGy) and two with FFA. Eight FFA from prior studies with identical surgical reconstruction and biomechanical and histological analyzes served as controls. Half of the animals were sacrificed at 6 and 12 weeks, and biomechanical testing was performed. Anterior-posterior laxity (APL) was assessed with an AP drawer test at 60° flexion, and load to failure testing was carried out. Histological evaluation of mid-substance samples was performed for descriptive analysis, cell count, crimp and vessel density. For statistical analysis a Kruskal-Wallis test was used for overall group comparison followed by a Mann-Whitney U test for pairwise comparison of the histological and biomechanical parameters. Biomechanical testing showed significantly decreased stiffness in FEbeam compared to FFA at both time points (p ≤ 0.004). APL was increased in FEbeam compared to FFA, which was significant at 6 weeks (p = 0.004). Median of failure loads was decreased in FEbeam grafts, with 12 reconstructions already failing during cyclic loading. Vessel density was decreased in FEbeam compared to FFA at both time points, with significant differences at 12 weeks (p = 0.015). Crimp length was significantly shorter in

  6. Induction of donor-type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts by different radiation regimens currently used in treatment of leukemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, O.; Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Lubin, I.; Rabi, I.; Reisner, Y. )

    1990-11-01

    Three radiation protocols currently used in treatment of leukemia patients before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated in a murine model (C57BL/6----C3H/HeJ) for BM allograft rejection. These include (a) a single dose of total body irradiation (8.5 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min), (b) fractionated TBI 12 Gy administered in six fractions, 2 Gy twice a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min, and (c) hyperfractionated TBI (14.4 Gy administered in 12 fractions, 1.2 Gy three times a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min). Donor-type chimerism 6 to 8 weeks after BMT and hematologic reconstitution on day 12 after BMT found in these groups were compared with results obtained in mice conditioned with 8 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.67 Gy/min, routinely used in this murine model. The results in both parameters showed a marked advantage for the single dose 8.5 Gy TBI over all the other treatments. This advantage was found to be equivalent to three- to fourfold increment in the BM inoculum when compared with hyperfractionated radiation, which afforded the least favorable conditions for development of donor-type chimerism. The fractionated radiation protocol was equivalent in its efficacy to results obtained in mice irradiated by single-dose 8 Gy TBI, both of which afforded a smaller but not significant advantage over the hyperfractionated protocol. This model was also used to test the effect of radiation dose rate on the development of donor-type chimerism. A significant enhancement was found after an increase in dose rate from 0.1 to 0.7 Gy/min. Further enhancement could be achieved when the dose rate was increased to 1.3 Gy/min, but survival at this high dose rate was reduced.

  7. Intra-operative washing of morcellised bone allograft with pulse lavage: how effective is it in reducing blood and marrow content?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, T; Qureshi, A; McQuillan, T A; Thomson, J; Galea, G; Power, R A

    2012-03-01

    The use of unprocessed bone carries a risk of transmission of blood borne diseases. Although models of infectivity are unproven, a theoretical risk of transmission of variant Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease, a human prion disease, exists as probable blood borne transmission has been reported in three cases. The aim of our study was to determine the effectiveness of standard operating theatre pulse lavage in removing protein, fat and double stranded Deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA) from morcellised bone allograft. Twelve donated femoral heads were divided into halves and milled into bone chips. One half of the bone chips were washed with pulse lavage, whereas, the other half acted as control. In order to determine the amount of protein, fat and dsDNA present in the washed and unwashed samples, a validated multistep washing protocol was used. Using the validated technique, simple intra-operative washing of morcellised unprocessed bone allograft removed a significant amount of the protein (70.5%, range: 39.5-85%), fat (95.2%, range: 87.8-98.8%) and DNA (68.4%, range: 31.4-93.1%) content. Intra-operative washing of morcellised bone allograft with pulse lavage may thereby reduce the theoretical risk of prion and other blood borne disease transmission. Combined with the known improved mechanical characteristics of washed allograft, we would recommend pulse lavage as a routine part of bone allograft preparation.

  8. Kupffer cell blockade prevents induction of portal venous tolerance in rat cardiac allograft transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, T.; Callery, M.P.; Flye, M.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Pretransplant portal venous (pv) administration of donor antigen induces allospecific partial tolerance. Although the involved mechanism has not been defined, antigen presentation by Kupffer cells (KC) in the liver is considered to be critical. We evaluated the effect of KC blockade on this pv tolerance induction in Buffalo (RT1b) rats receiving Lewis (RT1(1)) cardiac heterotopic allografts. Control rats received no treatment, while experimental animals received 25 X 10(6) ultraviolet B-irradiated (12,000 J/m2) donor spleen cells via either the iv (systemic intravenous) or the pv routes 7 days before transplantation. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a rare earth metal known to inhibit KC phagocytosis, was given (7 mg/kg) 1 and 2 days before pv preimmunization. Cardiac graft prolongation was obtained by pv (MST = 13.3 +/- 1.9 days, n = 6, vs control = 7.3 +/- 0.5 days, n = 6; P less than 0.001) but not by iv preimmunization (7.7 +/- 0.7 days, n = 6, NS vs control). KC blockade abolished the pv tolerance, as indicated by abrogation of graft prolongation (PV + GdCl3 = 8.0 +/- 0.8 days, n = 6, NS vs control). These findings suggest that effective alloantigen uptake by KC in the liver is essential for the induction of pv tolerance in rat cardiac transplantation.

  9. Deficiency of C4 from donor or recipient mouse fails to prevent renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao; Zhou, Wuding; Farrar, Conrad A; Hargreaves, Roseanna E G; Sheerin, Neil S; Sacks, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    Complement effector products generated in the transplanted kidney are known to mediate transplant rejection, but which of the three main activation pathways of complement trigger this response is unclear. Here we assessed the role of the classical and lectin pathways by studying the common component C4 in mouse kidney transplant rejection. We transplanted wild-type or C4-null H-2(b) donor kidneys into H-2(k) or H-2(d) recipients, or vice-versa, to assess the roles of donor kidney and recipient expression of complement. Intragraft C4 gene expression rose substantially during rejection. However, we found no significant association between graft acceptance and the presence of C4 in either the donor kidney or recipient mouse. At the time of rejection, we found no significant differences in alloantibody response in the different groups. Tubular deposition of C3 to C9 occurred regardless of the absence or presence of C4 in either the donor or recipient mouse, indicating that C4 was dispensable for complement activation at this site. These data suggest that complement activation and renal allograft rejection are independent of the classical and lectin pathways in these models, implying that in the absence of these pathways the alternative pathway is the main trigger for complement-mediated rejection.

  10. Local Tacrolimus (FK506) Delivery for Prevention of Acute Rejection in the Nonhuman Primate Delayed Mixed Chimerism Vascularized Composite Allograft Tolerance Induction Protocol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    optimizing a fabrication method, and developing characterization methods to test the pharmacokinetics after drug loading. To this end, the team...planned for testing the PLDS in a small animal model as well as a non-human primate model. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Drug delivery, immunosuppression...delivery of tacrolimus (a potent immunosuppressive drug ) to prevent acute rejection episodes of vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) in non-human

  11. Enhancement of bone marrow allografts from nude mice into mismatched recipients by T cells void of graft-versus-host activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidot, T.; Lubin, I.; Terenzi, A.; Faktorowich, Y.; Erlich, P.; Reisner, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    Transplantation of 8 x 10(6) C57BL/6-Nu+/Nu+ (nude) bone marrow cells into C3H/HeJ recipients after conditioning with 8 Gy of total body irradiation has resulted in a markedly higher rate of graft rejection or graft failure compared to that found in recipients of normal C57BL/6 or C57BL/6-Bg+/Bg+ (beige) T-cell-depleted bone marrow. Mixing experiments using different numbers of nude bone marrow cells with or without mature thymocytes (unagglutinated by peanut agglutinin) revealed that engraftment of allogeneic T-cell-depleted bone marrow is T-cell dependent. To ensure engraftment, a large inoculum of nude bone marrow must be supplemented with a trace number of donor T cells, whereas a small bone marrow dose from nude donors requires a much larger number of T cells for engraftment. Marked enhancement of donor type chimerism was also found when F1 thymocytes were added to nude bone marrow cells, indicating that the enhancement of bone marrow engraftment by T cells is not only mediated by alloreactivity against residual host cells but may rather be generated by growth factors, the release of which may require specific interactions between T cells and stem cells or between T cells and bone marrow stroma cells.

  12. Complement Inhibition for Prevention and Treatment of Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Renal Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    Therapeutic interventions aimed at the human complement system are recognized as potentially important strategies for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases because there is often evidence of complement-mediated injury according to pathologic assessments. In addition, there are a large number of potential targets, both soluble and cell bound, that might offer potential for new drug development, but progress in this area has met with significant challenges. Currently, 2 drugs are approved aimed at inhibition of complement activation. The first option is eculizumab (anti-C5), which is approved for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab has also been studied in human transplantation for the treatment and prevention of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Initial data from uncontrolled studies suggested a significant benefit of eculizumab for the prevention of ABMR in highly HLA-sensitized patients, but a subsequent randomized, placebo-controlled trial failed to meet its primary endpoint. Anecdotal data, primarily from case studies, showed benefits in treating complement-mediated ABMR. A second approved complement-inhibiting therapy is C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is approved for use in patients with hereditary angioedema, a condition caused by mutations in the gene that codes for C1-INH. A recent placebo-controlled trial of C1-INH for prevention of ABMR in HLA-sensitized patients found that the drug was safe, with evidence for inhibition of systemic complement activation and complement-activating donor-specific antibodies. Other drugs are now under development.

  13. Allograft tolerance in pigs after fractionated lymphoid irradiation. II. Kidney graft after conventional total lymphoid irradiation and bone marrow cell grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Fradelizi, D.; Mahouy, G.; de Riberolles, C.; Lecompte, Y.; Alhomme, P.; Douard, M.C.; Chotin, G.; Martelli, H.; Daburon, F.; Vaiman, M.

    1981-05-01

    Experiments with pigs have been performed in order to establish bone marrow chimerism and kidney graft tolerance between SLA genotyped semi-incompatible animals. Recipients were conditioned by means of conventional fractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) delivered by a vertical cobalt source. The principal lymphoid regions of the pig, including thymus and spleen, were submitted to irradiation. Two protocols were tested: A = 250 cGy four times a week x 13 times (TLI) (two animals) and B = 350 cGy three times a week x 8 times (TLI) (four animals). Bone marrow cells were injected 24 h after the last irradiation. One day later, bilateral nephrectomy and the graft of one kidney from the bone marrow cell donor were performed simultaneously. Results convinced us that application of the TLI protocol to humans is not yet practicable and that further experimental work is needed.

  14. Prevention of osteoporosis in mice after ovariectomy via allograft of microencapsulated ovarian cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Xia; Zhou, Jin-Ling; Xu, Qing; Lu, Xin; Liang, Yuan-Jing; Weng, Jing; Shi, Xiao-Lin

    2010-02-01

    It is believed that estrogen deficiency is one of the major risk factors associated with osteoporosis. To investigate the effects of the transplantation of microencapsulated ovarian cells in estrogen-deficient mice, ovarian cells from female Kunming (KM) mice (6-weeks old) were separated, cultured, and microencapsulated with alginic acid-polylysine-alginic acid. Female KM mice (8-weeks old) were randomly separated into three groups: intact (normal), ovariectomized (OVX), and treatment (OVX+ implantation). Microencapsulated ovarian cells were found to secrete estrogen at normal levels in vitro. Ninety days after transplantation, serum estradiol levels in the OVX group were significantly lower, and the trabecular bone amount and volume were decreased when compared with the normal group. The expression of alkaline phosphatase in chondrocytes appeared lower, while the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in the bone matrix was higher. The ratio of MMP-9-positive chondrocytes and osteoblasts to osteoclasts was significantly lower than that of the normal group. The concentrations of hydroxyproline (Hyp), Ca, and P in the left femurs of the OVX group were lower than those of the normal group. However, the aforementioned changes were not seen in the treatment group. In conclusion, microencapsulated ovarian cells survive well after transplantation and secrete estrogen in vivo, and they can prevent in some degree osteoporosis caused by ovariectomy. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Inhibition of PPARgamma prevents type I diabetic bone marrow adiposity but not bone loss.

    PubMed

    Botolin, Sergiu; McCabe, Laura R

    2006-12-01

    Diabetes type I is associated with bone loss and increased bone adiposity. Osteoblasts and adipocytes are both derived from mesenchymal stem cells located in the bone marrow, therefore we hypothesized that if we could block adipocyte differentiation we might prevent bone loss in diabetic mice. Control and insulin-deficient diabetic BALB/c mice were chronically treated with a peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) antagonist, bisphenol-A-diglycidyl ether (BADGE), to block adipocyte differentiation. Effects on bone density, adiposity, and gene expression were measured. BADGE treatment did not prevent diabetes-associated hyperglycemia or weight loss, but did prevent diabetes-induced hyperlipidemia and effectively blocked diabetes type I-induced bone adiposity. Despite this, BADGE treatment did not prevent diabetes type I suppression of osteoblast markers (runx2 and osteocalcin) and bone loss (as determined by micro-computed tomography). BADGE did not suppress osteoblast gene expression or bone mineral density in control mice, however, chronic (but not acute) BADGE treatment did suppress osteocalcin expression in osteoblasts in vitro. Taken together, our findings suggest that BADGE treatment is an effective approach to reduce serum triglyceride and free fatty acid levels as well as bone adiposity associated with type I diabetes. The inability of BADGE treatment to prevent bone loss in diabetic mice suggests that marrow adiposity is not linked to bone density status in type I diabetes, but we cannot exclude the possibility of additional BADGE effects on osteoblasts or other bone cells, which could contribute to preventing the rescue of the bone phenotype.

  16. Early cyclosporine a withdrawal in kidney-transplant recipients receiving sirolimus prevents progression of chronic pathologic allograft lesions.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Juan C; Campistol, Josep M; Grinyó, Josep M; Mota, Alfredo; Prats, Dolores; Gutiérrez, Jose A; Henriques, Antonio C; Pinto, Jose R; García, Javier; Morales, Jose M; Gómez, Jose M; Arias, Manuel

    2004-11-15

    Nephrotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) is partially responsible for the development of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Sirolimus has demonstrated its potential to substitute for CNIs because it lacks significant nephrotoxicity and shows a short-term immunosuppressive capacity comparable with that of cyclosporine. This results in the maintenance of better renal function when cyclosporine is eliminated, but it has not been demonstrated whether this benefit is associated with an improvement in the pathologic substrate and a reduction in CAN. We analyzed pretransplant and 1-year renal-allograft biopsies from 64 patients enrolled in a multicenter trial. Patients received cyclosporine and sirolimus during the first 3 months after transplant and were then randomly assigned to continue with cyclosporine or have it withdrawn. Histologic chronic allograft lesions were compared between groups. The percentage of patients in whom chronic pathologic lesions progressed was lower in the group of cyclosporine elimination. Significant differences were observed in chronic interstitial and tubular lesions (70% vs. 40.9% [P<0.05] and 70% vs. 47.8% [P<0.05], respectively), whereas no differences were observed in acute lesions (subclinical rejection). Prevalence of CAN at 1 year was lower in this group, as was the severity and incidence of new cases (P<0.05). Early cyclosporine withdrawal associated with sirolimus administration is followed by an improvement in renal function, a reduction in the progression of chronic pathologic allograft lesions, and a lower incidence of new cases and severity of CAN during the first year after transplantation. This benefit may result in better long-term graft outcome.

  17. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. METHODS Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. RESULTS The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. CONCLUSION There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission. PMID:25631893

  18. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving.

    PubMed

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-10-01

    The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission.

  19. Chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, Nidyanandh; Tullius, Stefan G; Chandraker, Anil

    2007-07-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) remains the Achilles heel of renal transplantation. In spite of the significant strides achieved in one-year renal allograft survival with newer immunosuppressant strategies, the fate of long-term renal allograft survival remains unchanged. The number of renal transplant recipients returning to dialysis has doubled in the past decade. This is especially important since these patients pose a significantly increased likelihood of dying while on the waiting list for retransplantation, due to increasing disparity between donor organ availability versus demand and longer waiting time secondary to heightened immunologic sensitization from their prior transplants. In this review we analyze the latest literature in detail and discuss the definition, natural history, pathophysiology, alloantigen dependent and independent factors that play a crucial role in CAN and the potential newer therapeutic targets on the horizon. This article highlights the importance of early identification and careful management of all the potential contributing factors with particular emphasis on prevention rather than cure of CAN as the core management strategy.

  20. [Hepatitis B virus immunoglobulin on demand to prevent infection recurrence among liver allograft recipients: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Poniachik, Jaime; Pizarro, Carolina; Contreras, Jorge; Silva, Javier; Hurtado, Carmen; Venegas, Mauricio; Castillo, Jaime; Cardemil, Gonzalo; Oksenberg, Danny; Ibarra, José; Bórquez, Angélica; Díaz, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Infection recurrence rates among hepatitis B virus infected liver allograft recipients, may be as high as 80%. Immunoprophylaxis with anti HBVgammaglobulin may reduce these rates and improve survival. The dose of anti HBV gammaglobulin that must be used is not clearly defined. The most commonly accepted protocol uses 10,000 units during the anhepatic phase and 10,000 units daily during one week, followed by weekly doses of 10,000 units during one month and maintenance with 10,000 units monthly, without measuring anti hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies (antiHBs). Some reports recommend the use of immunoglobulin on demand, to maintain antiHBs titers between 100 and 250 U/l. The infection recurrence rates among patients treated with immunoglobulin and Lamivudine fluctuates between 0 and 10%, during follow up periods of 13 to 30 months. We report three liver allograft recipients that received immunoglobulin on demand, using a mean of 41,000 units, maintaining adequate antiHBs titers.

  1. Genetic or Pharmaceutical Blockade of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase P110δ Prevents Chronic Rejection of Heart Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Marlene L.; McCormack, Ann M.; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Marelli-Berg, Federica M.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic rejection is the major cause of long-term heart allograft failure, characterized by tissue infiltration by recipient T cells with indirect allospecificity. Phosphoinositol-3-kinase p110δ is a key mediator of T cell receptor signaling, regulating both T cell activation and migration of primed T cells to non-lymphoid antigen-rich tissue. We investigated the effect of genetic or pharmacologic inactivation of PI3K p110δ on the development of chronic allograft rejection in a murine model in which HY-mismatched male hearts were transplanted into female recipients. We show that suppression of p110δ activity significantly attenuates the development of chronic rejection of heart grafts in the absence of any additional immunosuppressive treatment by impairing the localization of antigen-specific T cells to the grafts, while not inducing specific T cell tolerance. p110δ pharmacologic inactivation is effective when initiated after transplantation. Targeting p110δ activity might be a viable strategy for the treatment of heart chronic rejection in humans. PMID:22479345

  2. Neonatal bone marrow transplantation prevents bone pathology in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Pievani, Alice; Azario, Isabella; Antolini, Laura; Shimada, Tsutomu; Patel, Pravin; Remoli, Cristina; Rambaldi, Benedetta; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Riminucci, Mara; Biondi, Andrea; Tomatsu, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could offer a novel therapeutic opportunity for genetic disorders by providing sustainable levels of the missing protein at birth, thus preventing tissue damage. We tested this concept in mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS IH; Hurler syndrome), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of α-l-iduronidase. MPS IH is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, including severe progressive skeletal abnormalities. Although BMT increases the life span of patients with MPS IH, musculoskeletal manifestations are only minimally responsive if the timing of BMT delays, suggesting already irreversible bone damage. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transplanting normal BM into newborn MPS I mice soon after birth can prevent skeletal dysplasia. We observed that neonatal BMT was effective at restoring α-l-iduronidase activity and clearing elevated glycosaminoglycans in blood and multiple organs. At 37 weeks of age, we observed an almost complete normalization of all bone tissue parameters, using radiographic, microcomputed tomography, biochemical, and histological analyses. Overall, the magnitude of improvements correlated with the extent of hematopoietic engraftment. We conclude that BMT at a very early stage in life markedly reduces signs and symptoms of MPS I before they appear. PMID:25298037

  3. Salvianolic acid B prevents bone loss in prednisone-treated rats through stimulation of osteogenesis and bone marrow angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liao; Li, Ting; Liu, Yuyu; Zhou, Le; Li, Pinghua; Xu, Bilian; Huang, Lianfang; Chen, Yan; Liu, Yanzhi; Tian, Xiaoyan; Jee, Webster S S; Wu, Tie

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) induced osteoporosis (GIO) is caused by the long-term use of GC for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The GC related disruption of bone marrow microcirculation and increased adipogenesis contribute to GIO development. However, neither currently available anti-osteoporosis agent is completely addressed to microcirculation and bone marrow adipogenesis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a polyphenolic compound from a Chinese herbal medicine, Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Sal B on osteoblast bone formation, angiogenesis and adipogenesis-associated GIO by performing marrow adipogenesis and microcirculation dilation and bone histomorphometry analyses. (1) In vivo study: Bone loss in GC treated rats was confirmed by significantly decreased BMD, bone strength, cancellous bone mass and architecture, osteoblast distribution, bone formation, marrow microvessel density and diameter along with down-regulation of marrow BMPs expression and increased adipogenesis. Daily treatment with Sal B (40 mg/kg/d) for 12 weeks in GC male rats prevented GC-induced cancellous bone loss and increased adipogenesis while increasing cancellous bone formation rate with improved local microcirculation by capillary dilation. Treatment with Sal B at a higher dose (80 mg/kg/d) not only prevented GC-induced osteopenia, but also increased cancellous bone mass and thickness, associated with increase of marrow BMPs expression, inhibited adipogenesis and further increased microvessel diameters. (2) In vitro study: In concentration from 10(-6) mol/L to 10(-7) mol/L, Sal B stimulated bone marrow stromal cell (MSC) differentiation to osteoblast and increased osteoblast activities, decreased GC associated adipogenic differentiation by down-regulation of PPARγ mRNA expression, increased Runx2 mRNA expression without osteoblast inducement, and, furthermore, Sal B decreased Dickkopf-1 and increased β-catenin mRNA expression with

  4. Salvianolic Acid B Prevents Bone Loss in Prednisone-Treated Rats through Stimulation of Osteogenesis and Bone Marrow Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liao; Li, Ting; Liu, Yuyu; Zhou, Le; Li, Pinghua; Xu, Bilian; Huang, Lianfang; Chen, Yan; Liu, Yanzhi; Tian, Xiaoyan; Jee, Webster S. S.; Wu, Tie

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) induced osteoporosis (GIO) is caused by the long-term use of GC for treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The GC related disruption of bone marrow microcirculation and increased adipogenesis contribute to GIO development. However, neither currently available anti-osteoporosis agent is completely addressed to microcirculation and bone marrow adipogenesis. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a polyphenolic compound from a Chinese herbal medicine, Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Sal B on osteoblast bone formation, angiogenesis and adipogenesis-associated GIO by performing marrow adipogenesis and microcirculation dilation and bone histomorphometry analyses. (1) In vivo study: Bone loss in GC treated rats was confirmed by significantly decreased BMD, bone strength, cancellous bone mass and architecture, osteoblast distribution, bone formation, marrow microvessel density and diameter along with down-regulation of marrow BMPs expression and increased adipogenesis. Daily treatment with Sal B (40 mg/kg/d) for 12 weeks in GC male rats prevented GC-induced cancellous bone loss and increased adipogenesis while increasing cancellous bone formation rate with improved local microcirculation by capillary dilation. Treatment with Sal B at a higher dose (80 mg/kg/d) not only prevented GC-induced osteopenia, but also increased cancellous bone mass and thickness, associated with increase of marrow BMPs expression, inhibited adipogenesis and further increased microvessel diameters. (2) In vitro study: In concentration from 10−6 mol/L to 10−7 mol/L, Sal B stimulated bone marrow stromal cell (MSC) differentiation to osteoblast and increased osteoblast activities, decreased GC associated adipogenic differentiation by down-regulation of PPARγ mRNA expression, increased Runx2 mRNA expression without osteoblast inducement, and, furthermore, Sal B decreased Dickkopf-1 and increased β-catenin mRNA expression with

  5. Prevention of transmission of hepatitis C virus in bone marrow transplantation by treating the donor with alpha-interferon.

    PubMed

    Vance, E A; Soiffer, R J; McDonald, G B; Myerson, D; Fingeroth, J; Ritz, J

    1996-11-15

    Transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the setting of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation can occur through an infected marrow donor. Prevention of transmission may reduce the risks of peritransplant complications. We describe a 43-year-old patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia whose HLA-identical donor was found to be HCV antibody positive and HCV RNA positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The patient was HCV antibody negative and HCV RNA negative by PCR of the serum. For 6 months before bone marrow transplantation, the donor was treated with alpha-interferon at a standard dose. After 3 months, HCV RNA was no longer detectable by PCR. Interferon was discontinued 1 week before harvest. Bone marrow cellularity was normal. Engraftment was prompt. The recipient's serum remained negative for HCV RNA at 1, 3, 5, and 10 months after transplantation. Hepatitis C transmission from a viremic donor to an HCV-seronegative recipient may be preventable by treating the donor with alpha-interferon.

  6. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  7. Defective TGFβ signaling in bone marrow-derived cells prevents Hedgehog-induced skin tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hailan; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yoder, Mervin C.; Kaplan, Mark H.; Xie, Jingwu

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in cancer cells drives changes in the tumor microenvironment that are incompletely understood. Here we report that Hh- driven tumors exhibit an increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and a decrease in T cells, indicative of an immune suppressive tumor microenvironment. This change was associated with activated TGFβ signaling in several cell types in BCCs. We determined that TGFβ signaling in bone marrow (BM)-derived cells, not keratinocytes, regulates MDSC and promotes tumor development. Tgfbr2 deficiency in the BM-derived cells also reduced the size of previously developed tumors in mice. We identified CCL2 as the major chemokine attracting MDSC to tumor, whose expression was Tgfbr2-dependent, whereas its receptor CCR2 was highly expressed in MDSC population. CCL2 alone was sufficient to induce migration of MDSC. Moreover, the CCR2 inhibitors prevented MDSC migration towards skin cells in vitro, reduced MDSC accumulation and Hh signaling-driven tumor development in mice. Our results reveal a signaling network critical for Hh signaling in cancer cells to establish an effective immune suppressive microenvironment during tumor development. PMID:24282281

  8. Nonmyeloablative conditioning generates autoantigen-encoding bone marrow that prevents and cures an experimental autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Nasa, Z; Chung, J-Y; Chan, J; Toh, B-H; Alderuccio, F

    2012-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases result from chronic targeted immune responses that lead to tissue pathology and disease. The potential of autologous hematopoietic stem cells transplantation as a treatment for autoimmunity is currently being trialled but disease relapse is an issue. We have previously shown in a mouse model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) that the transplantation of bone marrow (BM) transduced to encode the autoantigen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) can prevent disease induction. However these studies were performed using lethal irradiation to generate BM chimeras and a critical factor for translation to humans would be the ability to utilize low toxic preconditioning regimes. In this study, treosulfan was used as a nonmyeloablative agent to generate BM chimeras encoding MOG and assessed in models of EAE induction and reversal. We find that treosulfan conditioning can promote a low degree of chimerism that is sufficient to promote antigen specific tolerance and protect mice from EAE. When incorporated into a curative protocol for treating mice with established EAE, nonmyeloablative conditioning and low chimerism was equally efficient in maintaining disease resistance. These studies further underpin the potential and feasibility of utilizing a gene therapy approach to treat autoimmune disease. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Supercharging allografts with mesenchymal stem cells in the operating room during hip revision.

    PubMed

    Homma, Yasuhiro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Hernigou, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been proposed to improve allografts used during hip revision. However, no study has reported the number of MSCs that could be associated with the allograft and the best technique to load MSCs in allografts. The optimal loading technique should combine methods to increase the initial cell density and create an appropriate environment to accelerate the efficiency of the cell-allograft constructs into clinically applicable grafts. We designed a study to evaluate the number of MSCs in an autograft femoral head considered as the gold standard and to determine the best operating room procedure for loading in allograft with MSCs to approach the same number as in an autograft femoral head. Therefore this study explored a potential of charging whole femoral head allografts with autologous MSCs from iliac crest aspirate for hip revision procedures. First, the study evaluated the total number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in 1 cc of an average autograft femoral head; this number then serves as a target for loading allografts, in order to achieve the same density of MSCs. For the loading technique itself, several questions were asked and hence several options were investigated. For example, is it better to load the whole allograft or break it up into several fragments? Which way of injecting works best for the whole femoral head allograft (through cartilage or femoral neck)? How concentrated (in terms of MSCs) should the injected iliac crest marrow be? Bone marrow for injection in allografts was obtained from residual marrow from patients undergoing surgical procedures with concentrated bone marrow. With this bone marrow (with and without concentration) we tested different techniques (injection and soaking) to load stem cells in allografts of different sizes: bulk allografts, pieces or blocks (8 or 1 cm(3) blocks) and morselized fragments (from 125 to 8 mm(3)) or particules (1 mm(3)). We also evaluated the release of

  10. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stegall, Mark D.; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:26284070

  11. [Varicella zoster virus infection after bone marrow transplant. Unusual presentation and importance of prevention].

    PubMed

    Ladrière, M; Bibes, B; Rabaud, C; Delaby, P; May, T; Canton, P

    Leukemeia and lymphoproliferative disease are associated with a high risk of varicela-zoster virus (VZV) infection. Although infrequent, visceral involvement can be fatal. We report two cases of patients presenting severe VZV infection after bone marrow transplantation. The first patient was a 42-year old man who received an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia. A severe graft-versus-host reaction occurred. Three months after discontinuing VZV prophylaxis, VZV transverse myelitis was diagnosed, leading to death despite prompt treatment with acyclovir. The second patient was a 42-year-old woman treated with autologous bone marrow transplantation for lymphoma. She developed acute viral pancreatitis one month after discontinuing VZV prophylaxis. Recovery was achieved with intravenous treatment. These two cases illustrate the potential gravity of VZV infection after bone marrow transplantation. These observations point to the need for revisiting the duration of VZV prophylaxis.

  12. [Combined rapamycin eye drop in nanometer vector and poly (lactic acid) wafers of cyclosporine A effectively prevents high-risk corneal allograft rejection in rabbits].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Sun, Hui-Min; Li, Xiao-Rong; Yuan, Xu-Bo; Wang, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Shu-Xian; Tian, En-Jiang; Yuan, Jia-Qin

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the combined effect of topical rapamycin (RAPA) eye drop in nanometer vector and poly (lactic acid) (PLA) wafers of cyclosporine A (CsA) in the prevention of acute allograft rejection after rabbit corneal transplantation. Methods It was an experimental study. RAPA was incorporated into the nanometer particles and CsA was incorporated into PLA wafers. A was syngeneic control whose both donor and recipient are New Zealand rabbit. Gray donor corneas were implanted into the 102 recipients of New Zealand albino rabbits with corneal neovascularization who were randomly divided into B, C, D, E, F, G 6 groups to receive the different types of therapy: B was no therapy control; C was eye drop of nanometer vector but no RAPA twice a day, 28 days; D was PLA wafers in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes but no drugs; E was 0.5% RAPA eye drop of nanometer vector twice a day, 28 days; F was PLA wafers of CsA in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes; G was PLA wafers of CsA in the anterior chamber of rabbit eyes and 0.5% RAPA eye drop of nanometer vector eye drop twice a day for 28 days together. Postoperative evaluation included slit-lamp biomicroscopy, histopathology and immunohistology, Cytokines related with neovascularization and immunosuppression in the corneal tissue by RT-PCR. The graft survival was assessed by One-Way ANOVA and q test. Corneal allograft survival time: A (100.00 +/- 0.00), B (8.44 +/- 1.24), C (8.89 +/- 2.57), D (8.56 +/- 2.30), E (43.11 +/- 5.58), F (43.67 +/- 9.54), G (72.00 +/- 15.34) d. Group G led to a statistically significant prolongation of transplant survival and was superior than group E and F which was a statistical prolongation compared with group B, C and D (qGE = 11.42, qGF = 11.24, qEB = 13.64, qEC = 13.38, qED = 13.46, qFB = 13.82, qFC = 13.56, qFD = 13.64; P < 0.01). Immunohistopathologically, the grafts were subjected to an immune response contained a dense infiltrate of neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes in the group B

  13. Marrow transplantation from tolerant donors to treat and prevent autoimmune diseases in BXSB mice

    SciTech Connect

    Himeno, K.; Good, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Autoimmune-prone BXSB male mice were supralethally irradiated and transplanted with CBA/H bone marrow cells. A complete and long-term chimerism was established when donor mice had been induced to develop tolerance of BXSB male antigens by combined treatment with BXSB male spleen cells and cyclophosphamide. Such chimeras did not express autoimmune phenomena or develop lethal autoimmune manifestations. Nor did the recipient mice develop the wasting syndrome or evidence of persistent immunodeficiencies that have been seen in other strains of autoimmune-resistant mice that had been transplanted with bone marrow cells across major histocompatibility complex barriers following an initial purging of the bone marrow of Thy-1+ cells using anti-Thy-1+C.

  14. Prevention of the induction of allospecific cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses by ultraviolet irradiation of corneal allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Niederkorn, J.Y.; Callanan, D.; Ross, J.R. )

    1990-08-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) on the immunogenicity of corneal allografts was examined in a mouse model. Corneal allografts differing from the host at the entire MHC and multiple minor H loci were subjected to 200 mJ/cm2 of UVB irradiation immediately prior to heterotropic transplantation. Analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses revealed that UVR treated corneal grafts failed to induce either CTL or DTH responses in C57BL/6 recipients. UVB treatment abolished the immunogenicity of highly immunogenic corneal grafts containing either resident or infiltrating donor-specific Langerhans cells. Sequential grafting experiments demonstrated that UVB-treated grafts rendered the hosts anergic to subsequent immunization with highly immunogenic corneal limbus grafts that contained dense concentrations of Ia+ Langerhans cells of donor origin. The results indicate that UV treatment not only reduces the immunogenicity of the corneal allograft but may also render it tolerogenic.

  15. Non-myeloablative bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2003-01-01

    As a result of the evolution of knowledge in the area of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) transplantation, several dogmata have been broken. We now have the following information: a) successful engraftment if allogeneic HSC bone marrow ablation of the recipient is not required; b) HSC create their own space through graft-vs.-host reactions; c) several malignancies are eradicated by the graft-vs.-tumor effect; d) allografting can be conducted on an out-patient basis; e) allografting can be done in aged or debilitated individuals; f) allografting can be achieved without transfusion of blood products, and g) costs of the allografting procedures can be substantially diminished. Breaking all these dogmata has resulted in availability of HSC allografting to a larger number of individuals, thus offering true curative therapeutic options to patients who otherwise would not qualify to receive these opportunities.

  16. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  17. Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation: joint recommendations of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, and the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, J Douglas; Wingard, John R; Tichelli, Andre; Lee, Stephanie J; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Burns, Linda J; Davies, Stella M; Ferrara, James L M; Socié, Gérard

    2006-02-01

    More than 40000 hematopoietic cell transplants (HCTs) are performed worldwide each year. With improvements in transplant technology, larger numbers of transplant recipients survive free of the disease for which they were transplanted. However, there are late complications that can cause substantial morbidity. Many survivors are no longer under the care of transplant centers, and many community health care providers may be unfamiliar with health matters relevant to HCT. The Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), and American Society for Bone Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT) have developed these recommendations to offer care providers suggested screening and prevention practices for autologous and allogeneic HCT survivors.

  18. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections among renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2015-02-01

    Bacteriuria is common among renal allograft recipients. It can be categorized into asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI). However, in medical literature, the classifications of bacteriuria are often not clear or ASB is also classified as a UTI. This contributes to difficulties in interpretation of the incidence and risk factors of these two entities. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, risk factors, management and the impact on renal allograft function of these two entities separately according to the recent literature. Risk factors for ASB are not completely comparable to the risk factors of UTIs. Persistent ASB has been associated with development of acute rejection and allograft pyelonephritis. The available data suggest that treatment of ASB is not very effective. Prophylaxis with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole does not prevent UTIs such as allograft pyelonephritis. Blood stream infections and emphysematous allograft pyelonephritis are associated with renal allograft loss. ASB is the most common manifestation of bacteriuria after renal transplantation. More effective interventions are needed to prevent bacteriuria. Renal allograft recipients with persistent ASB should be closely monitored since they could be at risk for developing not only UTIs, such as allograft pyelonephritis, but also acute rejection.

  19. Cellular requirements for the rejection of skin allografts in rats.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, D M

    1973-08-01

    The role of bone marrow-derived cells in the rejection of skin allografts in rats was investigated. Lewis rats, rendered tolerant of BN antigens and bearing healthy grafts, were thymectomized, irradiated with 900 rad, and injected with varying doses of either normal isologous bone marrow, normal lymph node cells, and/or lymph node cells presensitized to BN antigens. In some experiments rats were also adoptively sensitized to tuberculin. Results showed that, although necessary for the elicitation of tuberculin skin reactions, bone marrow cells are not needed for the rejection of previously tolerated skin allografts. Rats receiving lymph node cells alone rejected their grafts in about 6-7 days. In addition, rats injected with bone marrow alone also rejected their grafts, although significantly later than did lymph node cell recipients, indicating that rat marrow contains a population of cells capable of reacting to transplantation antigens. These cells were found capable of reacting to major transplantation antigens but not minor as they were ineffective in causing the rejection of Ag-B compatible Fischer skin grafts. From experiments utilizing bone marrow from neonatally thymectomized donors and cells treated with an antiserum to rat T cells, these competent cells in the marrow were shown to be thymus derived.

  20. Host NKT cells can prevent graft-versus-host disease and permit graft antitumor activity after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Asha B; George, Tracy I; Dutt, Suparna; Teo, Pearline; Strober, Samuel

    2007-05-15

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is a curative treatment for leukemia and lymphoma, but graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) remains a major complication. Using a GVHD protective nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen of total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte serum (TLI/ATS) in mice that has been recently adapted to clinical studies, we show that regulatory host NKT cells prevent the expansion and tissue inflammation induced by donor T cells, but allow retention of the killing activity of donor T cells against the BCL1 B cell lymphoma. Whereas wild-type hosts given transplants from wild-type donors were protected against progressive tumor growth and lethal GVHD, NKT cell-deficient CD1d-/- and Jalpha-18-/- host mice given wild-type transplants cleared the tumor cells but died of GVHD. In contrast, wild-type hosts given transplants from CD8-/- or perforin-/- donors had progressive tumor growth without GVHD. Injection of host-type NKT cells into Jalpha-18-/- host mice conditioned with TLI/ATS markedly reduced the early expansion and colon injury induced by donor T cells. In conclusion, after TLI/ATS host conditioning and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, host NKT cells can separate the proinflammatory and tumor cytolytic functions of donor T cells.

  1. Systemic Injection of RPE65-Programmed Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Prevents Progression of Chronic Retinal Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaoping; Pay, S Louise; Yan, Yuanqing; Thomas, James; Lewin, Alfred S; Chang, Lung-Ji; Grant, Maria B; Boulton, Michael E

    2017-04-05

    Bone marrow stem and progenitor cells can differentiate into a range of non-hematopoietic cell types, including retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-like cells. In this study, we programmed bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) ex vivo by inserting a stable RPE65 transgene using a lentiviral vector. We tested the efficacy of systemically administered RPE65-programmed BMDCs to prevent visual loss in the superoxide dismutase 2 knockdown (Sod2 KD) mouse model of age-related macular degeneration. Here, we present evidence that these RPE65-programmed BMDCs are recruited to the subretinal space, where they repopulate the RPE layer, preserve the photoreceptor layer, retain the thickness of the neural retina, reduce lipofuscin granule formation, and suppress microgliosis. Importantly, electroretinography and optokinetic response tests confirmed that visual function was significantly improved. Mice treated with non-modified BMDCs or BMDCs pre-programmed with LacZ did not exhibit significant improvement in visual deficit. RPE65-BMDC administration was most effective in early disease, when visual function and retinal morphology returned to near normal, and less effective in late-stage disease. This experimental paradigm offers a minimally invasive cellular therapy that can be given systemically overcoming the need for invasive ocular surgery and offering the potential to arrest progression in early AMD and other RPE-based diseases.

  2. Bacterial colonization of bone allografts: establishment and effects of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ketonis, Constantinos; Barr, Stephanie; Adams, Christopher S; Hickok, Noreen J; Parvizi, Javad

    2010-08-01

    Bone grafts are frequently used to supplement bone stock and to establish structural stability. However, graft-associated infection represents a challenging complication leading to increased patient morbidity and healthcare costs. We therefore designed this study to (1) determine if increasing initial S. aureus inoculation of bone allograft results in a proportionate increase in colonization; (2) assess if antibiotics decrease colonization and if antibiotic tethering to allograft alters its ability to prevent bacterial colonization; and (3) determine if covalent modification alters the allograft topography or its biological properties. Allograft bone and vancomycin-modified bone (VAN-bone) was challenged with different doses of S. aureus for times out to 24 hours in the presence or absence of solution vancomycin. Bacterial colonization was assessed by fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by direct colony counting. Cell density and distribution of osteoblast-like cells on control and modified allograft were then compared. Bacterial attachment was apparent within 6 hours with colonization and biofilm formation increasing with time and dose. Solution vancomycin failed to prevent bacterial attachment whereas VAN-bone successfully resisted colonization. The allograft modification did not affect the attachment and distribution of osteoblast-like cells. Allograft bone was readily colonized by S. aureus and covered by a biofilm with especially florid growth in natural topographic niches. Using a novel covalent modification, allograft bone was able to resist colonization by organisms while retaining the ability to allow adhesion of osteoblastic cells. Generation of allograft bone that can resist infection in vivo would be important in addressing one of the most challenging problems associated with the use of allograft, namely infection.

  3. Complete Suppression of the Gut Microbiome Prevents Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, Jaak M.; Guiot, Harry F. L.; Lankester, Arjan C.; Vossen, Ann C. T. M.; Bredius, Robbert G. M.; Wolterbeek, Ron; Bakker, Hanny D. J.; Heidt, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that elimination of facultative and strict anaerobic microorganisms from the gastro-intestinal tract by antimicrobial drugs in the period of time around allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) prevents acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), was examined in a cohort of 112 children grafted between 1989 and 2002 for hematological malignancies. All patients received T-cell replete marrow from human leukocyte antigens (HLA) matched sibling donors under identical transplantation conditions. To eliminate microorganisms from the gastro-intestinal tract, total gastro-intestinal decontamination (GID) was applied by high doses of non-absorbable antimicrobial drugs while the graft recipient was maintained in strict protective isolation. About half of the children (51%) proved to be successfully decontaminated, and about half (49%) unsuccessfully. One recipient got acute GVHD in the first group and 8 in the second group (p = 0.013). The degree of success of total GID was decisive for the occurrence of acute GVHD, irrespective of the presence of other risk factors such as higher age of recipient and/or donor, female donor for male recipient and carriership or reactivation of herpesviruses. Our results demonstrate that successful total GID of the graft recipient prevents moderate to severe acute GVHD. We suppose that substantial translocation of gastro-intestinal microorganisms or parts of these, functioning as microbial-associated molecular patterns (MAMP's), triggering macrophages/dendritic cells via pattern recognizing receptors (PRR's) is prohibited. As a consequence the initiation and progression of an inflammatory process leading to acute GVHD is inhibited. PMID:25180821

  4. Transient blockade of Delta-like Notch ligands prevents allograft rejection mediated by cellular and humoral mechanisms in a mouse model of heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Sherri; Feng, Jiane; Chung, Jooho; Radojcic, Vedran; Sandy, Ashley R.; Friedman, Ann; Shelton, Amy; Yan, Minhong; Siebel, Christian W.; Bishop, D. Keith; Maillard, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Rejection remains a major clinical challenge limiting allograft survival after solid organ transplantation. Both cellular and humoral immunity contribute to this complication, with increased recognition of antibody-mediated damage during acute and chronic rejection. Using a mouse model of MHC-mismatched heart transplantation, we report markedly protective effects of Notch inhibition, dampening both T cell and antibody-driven rejection. T cell-specific pan-Notch blockade prolonged heart allograft survival and decreased IFNγ and IL-4 production by alloreactive T cells, especially when combined with depletion of recipient CD8+ T cells. These effects were associated with decreased infiltration by conventional T cells and an increased proportion of regulatory T cells in the graft. Transient administration of neutralizing antibodies specific for Delta-like1/4 (Dll1/4) Notch ligands in the peri-transplant period led to prolonged acceptance of allogeneic hearts, with superior outcome over Notch inhibition only in T cells. Systemic Dll1/4 inhibition decreased T cell cytokines and graft infiltration, but also germinal center B cell and plasmablast numbers as well as production of donor-specific alloantibodies and complement deposition in the transplanted hearts. Dll1 or Dll4 inhibition alone provided partial protection. Thus, pathogenic signals delivered by Dll1/4 Notch ligands early after transplantation promote organ rejection through several complementary mechanisms. Transient interruption of theses signals represents a new attractive therapeutic strategy to enhance long-term allograft survival. PMID:25687759

  5. Preventive measures for cyclophosphamide-related hemorrhagic cystitis in blood and bone marrow transplantation: an Italian multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gonella, Silvia; di Pasquale, Tania; Palese, Alvisa

    2015-02-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a troublesome and potentially life-threatening complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). HC can appear within a few hours after chemotherapy or after weeks or months. Early-onset HC (EOHC) is usually associated with the conditioning regimen. The main aim of this study was to describe the incidence of EOHC in patients undergoing BMT regimens including high-dose cyclophosphamide (CY) and the effects of the main preventive measures adopted in Italian nursing practice. The authors retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 158 Italian patients who underwent BMT from 2006-2008. Thirty-one patients (19.6%) developed EOHC. One hundred and forty-seven patients (93%) given high-dose CY were treated with hyperhydration combined with 2-mercaptoethane sulphonate (mesna) and diuresis alkalinization, and only 51 (32.3%) patients were preventively catheterized and received continuous bladder irrigation (CBI). By univariate analysis, prophylactic urethral catheterization and CBI did not decrease EOHC incidence questioning if these measures were to be routinely recommended. Previous studies showed increased discomfort and urinary tract infection in catheterized patients; therefore, nurses may fulfill an important role in balancing the benefits and harms of preventive catheterization and CBI in patients who received BMT conditioning including high-dose CY.

  6. A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    the Fanconi Anemia Pathway- Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for Preventing Bone Marrow Failure and Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Biochemical Approach to Understanding the Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Regulated Nucleases in Genome Maintenance for...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Fanconi anemia is the most prevalent inherited BMF syndromes, caused by mutations in

  7. Alefacept promotes immunosuppression-free renal allograft survival in nonhuman primates via depletion of recipient memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soyoung; Yamada, Yohei; Tonsho, Makoto; Boskovic, Svjetlan; Nadazdin, Ognjenka; Schoenfeld, David; Cappetta, Kate; Atif, Muhammad; Smith, Rex-Neal; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Benichou, Gilles; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Renal allograft tolerance has been achieved in MHC-mismatched primates via nonmyeloablative conditioning beginning 6 days prior to planned kidney and donor bone marrow (DBM) transplantation. To extend the applicability of this approach to deceased donor transplantation, we recently developed a novel conditioning regimen, the “delayed protocol” in which DBM is transplanted several months after kidney transplantation. However, activation/expansion of donor-reactive CD8+ memory T cells (TMEM) occurring during the interval between kidney and DBM transplantation impaired tolerance induction using this strategy. In the current study, we tested whether, Alefacept, a fusion protein which targets LFA-3/CD2 interactions and selectively depletes CD2highCD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) could similarly induce long-term immunosuppression-free renal allograft survival but avoid the deleterious effects of anti-CD8 mAb treatment. We found that Alefacept significantly delayed the expansion of CD2high cells including CD8+ TEM while sparing naïve CD8+ T and NK cells and achieved mixed chimerism and long-term immunosuppression-free renal allograft survival. In conclusion, elimination of CD2high T cells represents a promising approach to prevent electively the expansion/activation of donor-reactive TEM and promotes tolerance induction via the delayed protocol mixed chimerism approach. PMID:24165326

  8. Suppression of chronic damage in renal allografts by Liver X receptor (LXR) activation relevant contribution of macrophage LXRα.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Eva; Popovic, Zoran; Bedke, Jens; Wang, Shijun; Bonrouhi, Mahnaz; Gretz, Norbert; Stettner, Paula; Teupser, Daniel; Thiery, Joachim; Porubsky, Stefan; Adams, Judith; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2011-07-01

    Liver X receptors (LXR)-α,β regulate intracellular cholesterol homeostasis and inhibit inflammatory gene expression. We studied the effects of the LXRα,β-agonist GW3965 on acute and chronic organ damage in the F344-LEW rat kidney transplantation model. In addition, to gain LXR isoform and cell-specific insights BALB/c kidneys were transplanted into mice with macrophage overexpression of LXRα (mLXRα-tg) and evaluated 7 and 42 days after transplantation. After 56 days GW3965 improved significantly function and morphology of rat kidney allografts by substantial reduction of mononuclear cell infiltrate and fibrosis; in vitro GW3965 reduced inflammatory activity of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and alloreactivity of T cells. Kidneys transplanted into mLXRα-tg mice were also protected from development of chronic allograft dysfunction. Similarly to GW3965-activated BMDMs, mLXRα-tg macrophages secreted significantly less monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β. Interestingly, 7 days after transplantation, when the total number of intragraft macrophages did not differ, evidently more arginase 1- and mannose receptor C type 1-positive cells were found in LXR rat and mice kidney allografts; in vitro both LXR activation by GW3965 and mLXRα overexpression accentuated the induction of alternative activation of BMDMs by IL-4/IL-13, suggesting an additional mechanism by LXRs to prevent graft damage. The results highlight the relevance of macrophage LXRα in allograft rejection and prevention of fibrosis. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inhibition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C prevents bone marrow stromal cell senescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Wang, Nan; Huang, Jie; Xin, Jie; Peng, Fen; Ren, Yinshi; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2009-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate in vitro and can be transplanted for treating many kinds of diseases. However, BMSCs become senescent with long-term culture, which inhibits their application. To understand the mechanism underlying the senescence, we investigated the activity of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS with BMSC senescence. The activity of PC-PLC and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS increased greatly during cell senescence. Selective inhibition of increased PC-PLC activity with D609 significantly decreased the number of senescence-associated beta galactosidase positive cells in BMSCs. Furthermore, D609 restored proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Moreover, D609 suppressed the elevated levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS. The data suggest that PC-PLC is involved in senescence of BMSCs, and its function is associated with integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS.

  10. Inducible nitric oxide synthase suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shears, L L; Kawaharada, N; Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Watkins, S C; Kovesdi, I; Lizonova, A; Pham, S M

    1997-01-01

    In cardiac transplantation, chronic rejection takes the form of an occlusive vasculopathy. The mechanism underlying this disorder remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role nitric oxide (NO) may play in the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Rat aortic allografts from ACI donors to Wistar Furth recipients with a strong genetic disparity in both major and minor histocompatibility antigens were used for transplantation. Allografts collected at 28 d were found to have significant increases in both inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein as well as in intimal thickness when compared with isografts. Inhibiting NO production with an iNOS inhibitor increased the intimal thickening by 57.2%, indicating that NO suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Next, we evaluated the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on iNOS expression and allograft arteriosclerosis. CsA (10 mg/kg/d) suppressed the expression of iNOS in response to balloon-induced aortic injury. Similarly, CsA inhibited iNOS expression in the aortic allografts, associated with a 65% increase in intimal thickening. Finally, we investigated the effect of adenoviral-mediated iNOS gene transfer on allograft arteriosclerosis. Transduction with iNOS using an adenoviral vector suppressed completely the development of allograft arteriosclerosis in both untreated recipients and recipients treated with CsA. These results suggest that the early immune-mediated upregulation in iNOS expression partially protects aortic allografts from the development of allograft arteriosclerosis, and that iNOS gene transfer strategies may prove useful in preventing the development of this otherwise untreatable disease process. PMID:9329968

  11. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells prevents memory impairment in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, Takuya; Kamimura, Naomi; Yokota, Takashi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Iuchi, Katsuya; Lee, Hyunjin; Takami, Shinya; Akashiba, Hiroki; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Ueda, Masayuki; Katsura, Ken-Ichiro; Kimura, Kazumi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2015-04-24

    Stem cell transplantation therapy is currently in clinical trials for the treatment of ischemic stroke, and several beneficial aspects have been reported. Similarly, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), stem cell therapy is expected to provide an efficient therapeutic approach. Indeed, the intracerebral transplantation of stem cells reduced amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and rescued memory deficits in AD model mice. Here, we show that intravenous transplantation of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMMCs) improves cognitive function in two different AD mouse models, DAL and APP mice, and prevents neurodegeneration. GFP-positive BMMCs were isolated from tibiae and femurs of 4-week-old mice and then transplanted intravenously into DAL and APP mice. Transplantation of BMMCs suppressed neuronal loss and restored memory impairment of DAL mice to almost the same level as in wild-type mice. Transplantation of BMMCs to APP mice reduced Aβ deposition in the brain. APP mice treated with BMMCs performed significantly better on behavioral tests than vehicle-injected mice. Moreover, the effects were observed even with transplantation after the onset of cognitive impairment in DAL mice. Together, our results indicate that intravenous transplantation of BMMCs has preventive effects against the cognitive decline in AD model mice and suggest a potential therapeutic effect of BMMC transplantation therapy.

  12. B Lymphocytes Differentially Influence Acute and Chronic Allograft Rejection in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, David J.; Griffiths, Robert; Seshan, Surya V.; Magro, Cynthia M.; Ruiz, Phillip; Coffman, Thomas M.; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The relative contributions of B lymphocytes and plasma cells during allograft rejection remain unclear. Therefore, the effects of B cell depletion on acute cardiac rejection, chronic renal rejection, and skin graft rejection were compared using CD20 or CD19 mAbs. Both CD20 and CD19 mAbs effectively depleted mature B cells, while CD19 mAb treatment depleted plasmablasts and some plasma cells. B cell depletion did not affect acute cardiac allograft rejection, although CD19 mAb treatment prevented allograft-specific IgG production. Strikingly, CD19 mAb treatment significantly reduced renal allograft rejection and abrogated allograft-specific IgG development, while CD20 mAb treatment did not. By contrast, B cell depletion exacerbated skin allograft rejection and augmented the proliferation of adoptively transferred alloantigen-specific CD4+ T cells, demonstrating that B cells can also negatively regulate allograft rejection. Thereby, B cells can either positively or negatively regulate allograft rejection depending on the nature of the allograft and the intensity of the rejection response. Moreover, CD19 mAb may represent a new approach for depleting both B cells and plasma cells to concomitantly impair T cell activation, inhibit the generation of new allograft-specific Abs, or reduce preexisting allograft-specific Ab levels in transplant patients. PMID:21248259

  13. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  14. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration.

  15. Significant prolongation of segmental pancreatic allograft survival in two species

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to assess the suppression of segmental pancreatic allograft rejection by cyclosporine (CSA) alone in baboons and dogs, and subtotal marrow irradiation (TL1) alone and TL 1 in combination with CSA in baboons. Total pancreatectomy in the dog and primate provided a reliable diabetic model, induced an absolute deficiency of insulin and was uniformly lethal if not treated. Continuous administration of CSA in baboons resulted in modest allograft survival. As in baboons, dogs receiving CSA 25 mg/kg/d rendered moderate graft prolongation but a dose of 40 mg/kg/d resulted in significant graft survival (greater than 100 days) in 5 of 8 allograft recipients. Irradiation alone resulted in minimal baboon pancreatic allograft survival of 20 baboons receiving TL1 1,000 rad and CSA, 3 had graft survival greater than of 100 days. Of 15 baboons receiving TL1 800 rad and CSA, 6 had graft survival of greater than 100 days. In conclusion, CSA administration in dogs and TL1 in combination with CSA in baboons resulted in highly significant segmental pancreatic allograft survival.

  16. Does bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell transfusion prevent antisperm antibody production after traumatic testis rupture?

    PubMed

    Aghamir, Seyyed Mohammad Kazem; Salavati, Alborz; Yousefie, Reza; Tootian, Zahra; Ghazaleh, Noushin; Jamali, Mostafa; Azimi, Pourya

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether transfusion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could prevent humoral immune response and autoimmunization against sperms after traumatic testis rupture. Immunomodulatory properties of MSCs have been evaluated by a prospective cohort on 50 adult BALB/c mice. In each interventional arms of study, controlled testis rupture and surgical repair were exerted. In addition to tissue repair, single dose of 5×10(5) MSCs labeled by green fluorescent protein was delivered intravenously to 20 cases (cell therapy group). After euthanizing, seroconversion of antisperm antibody (ASA) was compared between 2 interventional groups as response of humoral immune system. Lung and testis tissues were examined for green fluorescent protein-positive cells to assess whether presence of stem cells is correlated with seroconversion rates. Six cases had been lost during the study. Fourteen of 16 mice in cell therapy control group formed ASA (87.5%) but 6 of 18 mice (33.3%) in cell therapy group were immunized and formed ASA (P=.002). Transplanted cells were traced in lungs of 55% (n=10) of cell therapy group and none were found in trauma site. Small volume of mice blood was our main limitation to trace seroconversion or quantitative measurement of ASA in each case. In this in vivo model of autoimmune infertility, bone marrow-derived MSC transfusion showed immunosuppressive effects on antibody production. Considering immunomodulatory properties of MSCs even in allogeneic settings, novel clinical application should be investigated further. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sterilization of bone allografts by microwave and gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2012-09-01

    Bone allografts are used to enhance healing in osteotomies, arthrodesis, fractures and to replace bone loss resulting from tumour or trauma. However, a major concern associated with the bone allografts is the potential for disease transmission. Various sterilization techniques have been developed to prevent infection through allografts. This study was undertaken with the aim of exploring the use of microwave radiation for sterilization of bone allografts and to compare with gamma radiation sterilization. Bone allografts were processed from femoral heads obtained from living donors. The effect of microwave and gamma radiation on the bacteria isolated from bone allograft was evaluated. The microwave radiation treatment was performed at 2450 MHz (frequency) for varying lengths of time at maximum power 900 Watts (W). Viability of three Gram-positive bacteria - Bacillus subtilis, Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus aureus and three Gram-negative bacteria - Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined after irradiation of bacterial suspensions and contaminated processed bone allografts. The sterility test of microwave and gamma irradiated bone allograft was carried out in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 11737-2. Microwave irradiation (2450 MHz and 900 W) of bacterial isolates resulted in complete inactivation within 60 seconds. The contaminated bone samples showed no growth of organisms after 2 minutes of exposure to microwave irradiation. No viable counts were detected in bone grafts inoculated with Gram-negative bacterial species on gamma irradiation to a dose of 15 kGy. Bones contaminated with Gram-positive bacteria required a higher dose of 20 kGy for complete inactivation. The study shows that sterilization of contaminated femoral head bone allografts can be achieved by short exposure of 2 min to 2450 MHz and 900 W microwave radiation.

  18. Canonical FGFs Prevent Osteogenic Lineage Commitment and Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Via ERK1/2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Simann, Meike; Le Blanc, Solange; Schneider, Verena; Zehe, Viola; Lüdemann, Martin; Schütze, Norbert; Jakob, Franz; Schilling, Tatjana

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the adipo-osteogenic lineage decision of trabecular human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in favor of osteogenesis represents a promising approach for osteoporosis therapy and prevention. Previously, Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 (FGF1) and its subfamily member FGF2 were scored as leading candidates to exercise control over skeletal precursor commitment and lineage decision albeit literature results are highly inconsistent. We show here that FGF1 and 2 strongly prevent the osteogenic commitment and differentiation of hBMSCs. Mineralization of extracellular matrix (ECM) and mRNA expression of osteogenic marker genes Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP), Collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), and Integrin-Binding Sialoprotein (IBSP) were significantly reduced. Furthermore, master regulators of osteogenic commitment like Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (RUNX2) and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4) were downregulated. When administered under adipogenic culture conditions, canonical FGFs did not support osteogenic marker expression. Moreover despite the presence of osteogenic differentiation factors, FGFs even disabled the pro-osteogenic lineage decision of pre-differentiated adipocytic cells. In contrast to FGF Receptor 2 (FGFR2), FGFR1 was stably expressed throughout osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation and FGF addition. Moreover, FGFR1 and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) were found to be responsible for underlying signal transduction using respective inhibitors. Taken together, we present new findings indicating that canonical FGFR-ERK1/2 signaling entrapped hBMSCs in a pre-committed state and arrested further maturation of committed precursors. Our results might aid in unraveling and controlling check points relevant for ageing-associated aberrant adipogenesis with consequences for the treatment of degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis and for skeletal tissue engineering strategies. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 263-275, 2017. © 2016 Wiley

  19. Composite osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, pectoralis muscles, and skin allotransplantation model of bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Klimczak, Aleksandra; Nasir, Serdar; Zor, Fatih; Krokowicz, Lukasz; Siemionow, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cellular and vascularized bone marrow cells have been used to induce donor-specific chimerism in various models of composite tissue allotransplantation. Although thymus transplantation has been reported in the literature, the effect of thymus transplantation on chimerism levels in vascularized bone containing composite tissue allotransplantation has not been reported. In this study, a new method for composite vascularized sternal bone marrow transplant model is descried that can be applied to augment chimerism after transplantation. A total of seven composite osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, pectoralis muscles, and skin transplantations were performed in two groups. The first group (n = 5) was designed as an allotransplantation group and the second group (n = 2) was designed as an isotransplantation group. Composite osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, and pectoralis muscles allografts were harvested on the common carotid artery and external jugular vein and a heterotopic transplantation was performed to the inguinal region of the recipient rat. Cyclosporine A monotherapy was administered in order to prevent acute and chronic allograft rejection. Animals sacrificed when any sign of rejection occurred. The longest survival was 156 day post-transplant. Assessment of bone marrow cells within sternum bone component and flow cytometry analysis of donor-specific chimerism in the peripheral blood of recipients were evaluated. Our results showed that this composite allograft carried 7.5 × 10(6) of viable hematopoietic cells within the sternum component. At day 7 post-transplant chimerism was developed in T-cell population and mean level was assessed at 2.65% for RT1(n) /CD4 and at 1.0% for RT1(n) /CD8. In this study, a new osseomusculocutaneous sternum, ribs, thymus, pectoralis muscle, and skin allotransplantation model is reported which can be used to augment hematopoietic activity for chimerism induction after transplantation.

  20. Mixed bone marrow or mixed stem cell transplantation for prevention or treatment of lupus-like diseases in mice.

    PubMed

    Good, Robert A; Wang, Bing-Yan; El-Badri, Nagwa S; Steele, Ann; Verjee, Tazim

    2002-01-01

    Scientific analyses fortified by interpretations of immunodeficiency diseases as 'experiments of nature' have revealed the specific immune systems to be comprised of T cells subserving cell-mediated immunities plus B cells and plasma cells which produce and secrete antibodies. These two separate cellular systems regularly interact with each other to produce a coordinated defense which permits mammals to live within a sea of microorganisms that threaten the integrity and the survival of individuals. We have shown that bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can be used as a form of cellular engineering to construct or reconstruct the immune systems and cure otherwise fatal severe combined immunodeficiency. When severe aplastic anemia complicated the first BMT which was performed to cure a fatal severe combined immunodeficiency, a second BMT cured for the first time a complicating severe aplastic anemia. Subsequently, BMT has been used effectively to treat some 75 otherwise fatal diseases such as resistant leukemias, lymphomas, inborn errors of metabolism, and genetic anomalies of the hematopoietic development such as sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, congenital neutropenias, and many other diseases. More recently, we have employed BMT in mice both to cure and cause autoimmunities, and, together, these experiments showed that autoimmunities actually reside in the hematopoietic stem cells. We have also found that mixed BMT or mixed hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can be used to prevent and cure the most complex autoimmunities such as those occurring in BXSB mice and in (NZW x BXSB)F1 W/BF1 mice. Untreated, the former develop fulminating lethal glomerulonephritis plus numerous humoral autoimmunities. Mice of the (W/B)F1 strain develop autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary vascular disease with myocardial infarction, glomerulonephritis, and numerous autoantibodies. All of these abnormalities are prevented or cured by mixed syngeneic (autoimmune) plus

  1. Bone marrow aspiration

    MedlinePlus

    Iliac crest tap; Sternal tap; Leukemia - bone marrow aspiration; Aplastic anemia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelodysplastic syndrome - bone marrow aspiration; Thrombocytopenia - bone marrow aspiration; Myelofibrosis - bone marrow aspiration

  2. Facial tissue allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Siemionow, M Z; Demir, Y; Sari, A; Klimczak, A

    2005-01-01

    A hemifacial allograft transplant model was used to investigate the rationale for development of functional tolerance across an MHC barrier. Thirty hemiface transplantations were performed in five groups of six Lewis (RT1(1)) rat recipients each. Isografts were performed in group 1. Transplants were obtained from semiallogenic LBN(RT1(1+n)) in group 2 and from fully allogenic ACI(RT1(a)) in group 3 donors, which served as allograft rejection controls. Group 4 grafts using LBN donors and group 5 using ACI donors in addition received CsA monotherapy (16 mg/kg/d for 1 week) and maintained at 2 mg/kg/d. Signs of graft rejection were sought daily. Isograft controls survived indefinitely. All nontreated allografts were rejected within 5 to 8 days posttransplant. Eighty-three percent of face-transplant recipients from LBN donors and 67% from ACI donors did not show any signs of rejection up to 270 days and 200 days, respectively. Flow cytometry at day 63 in LBN recipients showed the presence of donor-specific chimerism for MHC class I RT1(n) antigens, namely 3.39% CD4/RT1(n); 1.01% CD8/RT1(n) T-lymphocytes; and 3.54% CD45RA/RT1(n) B-lymphocytes. In ACI recipients the chimerism test revealed 10.55% CD4/RT1(a) and 4.59% of CD8/RT1(a) T-lymphocytes. MLR assay at day 160 posttransplant revealed suppressed responses against LBN donor antigens in group 4, but moderate reactivity to ACI donor antigens in group 5. Functional tolerance toward hemifacial allograft transplants induced across MHC barrier using a CsA monotherapy protocol was associated with the presence of donor-specific chimerism in T- and B-cell subpopulations.

  3. NASA light-emitting diodes for the prevention of oral mucositis in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Harry T; Connelly, James F; Hodgson, Brian D; Barbeau, Lori; Post, A Charles; Bullard, George; Buchmann, Ellen V; Kane, Mary; Whelan, Noel T; Warwick, Ann; Margolis, David

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prophylactic near-infrared light therapy from light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients. Oral mucositis (OM) is a frequent side effect of chemotherapy that leads to increased morbidity. Near-infrared light has been shown to produce biostimulatory effects in tissues, and previous results using near-infrared lasers have shown improvement in OM indices. However, LEDs may hold greater potential for clinical applications. We recruited 32 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing myeloablative therapy in preparation for BMT. Patients were examined by two of three pediatric dentists trained in assessing the Schubert oral mucositis index (OMI) for left and right buccal and lateral tongue mucosal surfaces, while the patients were asked to rate their current left and right mouth pain, left and right xerostomia, and throat pain. LED therapy consisted of daily treatment at a fluence of 4 J/cm(2) using a 670-nm LED array held to the left extraoral epithelium starting on the day of transplant, with a concurrent sham treatment on the right. Patients were assessed before BMT and every 2-3 days through posttransplant day 14. Outcomes included the percentage of patients with ulcerative oral mucositis (UOM) compared to historical epidemiological controls, the comparison of left and right buccal pain to throat pain, and the comparison between sides of the buccal and lateral tongue OMI and buccal pain. The incidence of UOM was 53%, compared to an expected rate of 70-90%. There was also a 48% and 39% reduction of treated left and right buccal pain, respectively, compared to untreated throat pain at about posttransplant day 7 (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences between sides in OMI or pain. Although more studies are needed, LED therapy appears useful in the prevention of OM in pediatric BMT patients.

  4. Prevention of allograft HCV recurrence with peri-transplant human monoclonal antibody MBL-HCV1 combined with a single oral direct-acting antiviral: A proof-of-concept study.

    PubMed

    Smith, H L; Chung, R T; Mantry, P; Chapman, W; Curry, M P; Schiano, T D; Boucher, E; Cheslock, P; Wang, Y; Molrine, D C

    2017-03-01

    Patients with active hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection at transplantation experience rapid allograft infection, increased risk of graft failure and accelerated fibrosis. MBL-HCV1, a neutralizing human monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting the HCV envelope, was combined with a licensed oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) to prevent HCV recurrence post-transplant in an open-label exploratory efficacy trial. Eight subjects received MBL-HCV1 beginning on the day of transplant with telaprevir initiated between days 3 and 7 post-transplantation. Following FDA approval of sofosbuvir, two subjects received MBL-HCV1 starting on the day of transplant with sofosbuvir initiated on day 3. Combination treatment was administered for 8-12 weeks or until the stopping rule for viral rebound was met. The primary endpoint was undetectable HCV RNA at day 56 with exploratory endpoints of sustained virologic response (SVR) at 12 and 24 weeks post-treatment. Both subjects receiving mAb and sofosbuvir achieved SVR24. Four of eight subjects in the mAb and telaprevir group met the primary endpoint; one subject achieved SVR24 and three subjects relapsed 2-12 weeks post-treatment. The other four subjects experienced viral breakthrough. There were no serious adverse events related to study treatment. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that peri-transplant immunoprophylaxis combined with a single oral direct-acting antiviral in the immediate post-transplant period can prevent HCV recurrence.

  5. Alendronate Can Improve Bone Alterations in Experimental Diabetes by Preventing Antiosteogenic, Antichondrogenic, and Proadipocytic Effects of AGEs on Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates such as alendronate are antiosteoporotic drugs that inhibit the activity of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and secondarily promote osteoblastic function. Diabetes increases bone-matrix-associated advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that impair bone marrow progenitor cell (BMPC) osteogenic potential and decrease bone quality. Here we investigated the in vitro effect of alendronate and/or AGEs on the osteoblastogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic potential of BMPC isolated from nondiabetic untreated rats. We also evaluated the in vivo effect of alendronate (administered orally to rats with insulin-deficient Diabetes) on long-bone microarchitecture and BMPC multilineage potential. In vitro, the osteogenesis (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, type 1 collagen, and mineralization) and chondrogenesis (glycosaminoglycan production) of BMPC were both decreased by AGEs, while coincubation with alendronate prevented these effects. The adipogenesis of BMPC (PPARγ, intracellular triglycerides, and lipase) was increased by AGEs, and this was prevented by coincubation with alendronate. In vivo, experimental Diabetes (a) decreased femoral trabecular bone area, osteocyte density, and osteoclastic TRAP activity; (b) increased bone marrow adiposity; and (c) deregulated BMPC phenotypic potential (increasing adipogenesis and decreasing osteogenesis and chondrogenesis). Orally administered alendronate prevented all these Diabetes-induced effects on bone. Thus, alendronate could improve bone alterations in diabetic rats by preventing the antiosteogenic, antichondrogenic, and proadipocytic effects of AGEs on BMPC. PMID:27840829

  6. Inhibition of the immune response to experimental fresh osteoarticular allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigo, J.J.; Schnaser, A.M.; Reynolds, H.M. Jr.; Biggart, J.M. 3d.; Leathers, M.W.; Chism, S.E.; Thorson, E.; Grotz, T.; Yang, Q.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The immune response to osteoarticular allografts is capable of destroying the cartilage--a tissue that has antigens on its cells identical to those on the bone and marrow cells. Osteoarticular allografts of the distal femur were performed in rats using various methods to attempt to temporarily inhibit the antibody response. The temporary systemic immunosuppressant regimens investigated were cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone, cyclosporine A, and total lymphoid irradiation. The most successful appeared to be cyclosporine A, but significant side effects were observed. To specifically inhibit the immune response in the allograft antigens without systemically inhibiting the entire immune system, passive enhancement and preadministration of donor blood were tried. Neither was as effective as coating the donor bone with biodegradable cements, a method previously found to be successful. Cyclosporine A was investigated in dogs in a preliminary study of medial compartmental knee allografts and was found to be successful in inhibiting the antibody response and in producing a more successful graft; however, some significant side effects were similarly observed.

  7. Phase I and phase II safety and efficacy trial of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ISIS 2302) for the prevention of acute allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Barry D; Stepkowski, Stanislaw; Kilic, Murat; Katz, Steven M; Van Buren, Charles T; Welsh, Maria S; Tami, Joseph A; Shanahan, William R

    2004-09-27

    ISIS 2302, an antisense oligonucleotide that inhibits the expression of human intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, was evaluated in combination with a cyclosporine (CsA)-prednisone (Pred) regimen first in a phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study and then in a phase II assessment of prophylaxis of acute rejection episodes in deceased donor renal allografts. Both phase I and phase II trials were double-blinded and placebo-controlled, including 17 stable and 39 de novo patients, respectively, in time-lagged, ascending-dose regimens. Each study compared the outcomes of 8 alternate-day intravenous infusions of four ISIS 2302 dose levels (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 mg/kg) versus placebo (3:1 ratio). Patients were followed for 34 days (phase I) or 6 months (phase II). All transplant patients were followed for 3 years. ISIS 2302 produced no evident toxicity; a significant, dose-related increase in activated partial thromboplastin time was accompanied by a trend toward a decreased platelet count. ISIS 2302 did not alter the pharmacokinetic behavior of CsA. At 6 months, the rates of acute rejection episodes were 38.1% in the ISIS 2302 group versus 20.0% in the placebo group. Three-year graft survivals were similar. The mean creatinine values at 1, 2, and 3 years for all ISIS dose groups combined versus placebo over 3 years showed no significant differences. ISIS 2302 did not evoke side-effects and produced slightly improved renal function. However, in this pilot study, it did not further reduce the rate of acute rejection episodes or increase graft survival compared to a concentration-controlled CsA-Pred regimen.

  8. Restrictive allograft syndrome post lung transplantation is characterized by pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis.

    PubMed

    Ofek, Efrat; Sato, Masaaki; Saito, Tomohito; Wagnetz, Ute; Roberts, Heidi C; Chaparro, Cecilia; Waddell, Thomas K; Singer, Lianne G; Hutcheon, Michael A; Keshavjee, Shaf; Hwang, David M

    2013-03-01

    We previously described restrictive allograft syndrome as a form of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, demonstrating restrictive pulmonary function decline. However, the histopathological correlates of restrictive allograft syndrome have yet to be satisfactorily described. We hypothesized that pulmonary pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis, as has recently been described in bone marrow transplant recipients, may also be present in the lungs of patients with restrictive allograft syndrome. Retrospective review of 493 patients who underwent lung transplantation between 1 January 1996 and 30 June 2009, was conducted. Out of 47 patients with clinical features of restrictive allograft syndrome, 16 had wedge biopsy, re-transplant lung explant, or autopsy lung specimens available for review. All lungs showed varying degrees of pleural fibrosis. Fifteen of 16 showed parenchymal fibroelastosis, characterized by hypocellular collagen deposition with preservation and thickening of the underlying alveolar septal elastic network. The fibroelastosis was predominantly subpleural in distribution, with some cases also showing centrilobular and paraseptal distribution. A sharp demarcation was often seen between areas of fibroelastosis and unaffected lung parenchyma, with fibroblastic foci often present at this interface. Concurrent features of obliterative bronchiolitis were present in 14 cases. Another common finding was the presence of diffuse alveolar damage (13 cases), usually in specimens obtained <1 year after clinical onset of restrictive allograft syndrome. The single specimen in which fibroelastosis was not identified was obtained before the clinical onset of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, and showed features of diffuse alveolar damage. In conclusion, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a major histopathologic correlate of restrictive allograft syndrome, and was often found concurrently with diffuse alveolar damage. Our findings support a temporal sequence of diffuse

  9. Human leukocyte antigen supertype matching after myeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation with 7/8 matched unrelated donor allografts: a report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research

    PubMed Central

    Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Wang, Tao; Spellman, Stephen R.; Wang, Hai-Lin; Pidala, Joseph; Nishihori, Taiga; Askar, Medhat; Olsson, Richard; Oudshoorn, Machteld; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Yong, Agnes; Gandhi, Manish; Dandoy, Christopher; Savani, Bipin; Hale, Gregory; Page, Kristin; Bitan, Menachem; Reshef, Ran; Drobyski, William; Marsh, Steven GE; Schultz, Kirk; Müller, Carlheinz R.; Fernandez-Viña, Marcelo A.; Verneris, Michael R.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II alleles can be simplified by consolidating them into fewer supertypes based on functional or predicted structural similarities in epitope-binding grooves of HLA molecules. We studied the impact of matched and mismatched HLA-A (265 versus 429), -B (230 versus 92), -C (365 versus 349), and -DRB1 (153 versus 51) supertypes on clinical outcomes of 1934 patients with acute leukemias or myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative disorders. All patients were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research following single-allele mismatched unrelated donor myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation. Single mismatched alleles were categorized into six HLA-A (A01, A01A03, A01A24, A02, A03, A24), six HLA-B (B07, B08, B27, B44, B58, B62), two HLA-C (C1, C2), and five HLA-DRB1 (DR1, DR3, DR4, DR5, DR9) supertypes. Supertype B mismatch was associated with increased risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio =1.78, P=0.0025) compared to supertype B match. Supertype B07-B44 mismatch was associated with a higher incidence of both grade II–IV (hazard ratio=3.11, P=0.002) and III–IV (hazard ratio=3.15, P=0.01) acute graft-versus-host disease. No significant associations were detected between supertype-matched versus -mismatched groups at other HLA loci. These data suggest that avoiding HLA-B supertype mismatches can mitigate the risk of grade II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease in 7/8-mismatched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation when multiple HLA-B supertype-matched donors are available. Future studies are needed to define the mechanisms by which supertype mismatching affects outcomes after alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:27247320

  10. Long-term enzyme replacement therapy in beta-glucuronidase--deficient mice by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Yatziv, S.; Weiss, L.; Morecki, S.; Fuks, Z.; Slavin, S.

    1982-06-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy was successfully accomplished in beta-Glu-deficient C3H/HeJ mice after transplantation of BM cells obtained from normal BALB/c donors. Marrow recipients were prepared for transplantation by fractionated TLI. Enzyme activity increased from 20.5 +/- 7.0 nmol/mg of protein per hour to 180 +/- 30.2 in the liver (p less than 0.001) and from 8.2 +/- 2.0 to 17.5 +/- 5.0 nmol/ml/hr in the plasma (p less than 0.05) at 50 days after marrow infusion. Normal enzyme activity was maintained in treated mice for at least 100 days after marrow transplantation, as documented by repeated liver biopsies and examination of plasma samples. The marrow donors and the recipients were fully histoincompatible. Both immunologic rejection of the marrow allograft and GVHD were prevented by the prior conditioning of the recipients with TLI, resulting in bilateral transplantation tolerance of host vs. graft and graft vs. host. The data suggest that allogeneic BM transplantation may provide a possible therapeutic approach for certain enzyme deficiency syndromes.

  11. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  12. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rajan; Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft.

  13. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Differentiate Into Corneal Tissue and Prevent Ocular Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Hernández-Galilea, Emiliano; Lorenzo, Rebeca; Herrero, Carmen; Velasco, Almudena; Carrancio, Soraya; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Rodríguez-Barbosa, José Ignacio; Parrilla, Marta; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesús; Aijón, José; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials have assessed the use of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) for the treatment of immune-related disorders such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the current study, we show that GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs generated from bone marrow migrate and differentiate into corneal tissue after subconjunctival injection in mice. Interestingly, these hBMSCs display morphological features of epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cells and appear at different layers and with different morphologies depending on their position within the epithelium. Furthermore, these cells display ultrastructural properties, such as bundles of intermediate filaments, interdigitations, and desmosomes with GFP(-) cells, which confirms their differentiation into corneal tissues. GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs were injected at different time points into the right eye of lethally irradiated mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation, which developed ocular GVHD (oGVHD). Remarkably, hBMSCs massively migrate to corneal tissues after subconjunctival injection. Both macroscopic and histopathological examination showed minimal or no evidence of GVHD in the right eye, while the left eye, where no hBMSCs were injected, displayed features of GVHD. Thus, in the current study, we confirm that hBMSCs may induce their therapeutic effect at least in part by differentiation and regeneration of damaged tissues in the host. Our results provide experimental evidence that hBMSCs represent a potential cellular therapy to attenuate oGVHD.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in bone marrow-derived cells prevents acute cardiac inflammation and injury in response to angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Li, T-T; Jia, L-X; Zhang, W-M; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J; Li, Y-L; Li, H-H; Qi, Y-F; Du, J

    2016-06-09

    Inflammation plays an important role in hypertensive cardiac injury. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway is involved in the inflammatory response. However, the role of ER stress in elevated angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced cardiac injury remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of ER stress in Ang II-induced hypertensive cardiac injury. Transcriptome analysis and quantitative real-time PCR showed that Ang II infusion in mice increased ER stress-related genes expression in the heart. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) deficiency, a key mediator of ER stress, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, especially neutrophils, the production of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines in Ang II-infused mouse hearts. CHOP deficiency increased Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic injury: (1) Masson trichrome staining showed increased fibrotic areas, (2) immunohistochemistry staining showed increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor β1 and (3) quantitative real-time PCR showed increased expression of collagen in CHOP-deficient mouse heart. Bone marrow transplantation experiments indicated that CHOP deficiency in bone marrow cells was responsible for Ang II-induced cardiac fibrotic injury. Moreover, TUNEL staining and flow cytometry revealed that CHOP deficiency decreased neutrophil apoptosis in response to Ang II. Taken together, our study demonstrated that hypertension induced ER stress after Ang II infusion. ER stress in bone marrow-derived cells protected acute cardiac inflammation and injury in response to Ang II.

  15. Bacterial contamination of allografts.

    PubMed

    Barrios, R H; Leyes, M; Amillo, S; Oteiza, C

    1994-01-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogenic bone transplantation is one of the major problems facing tissue banks. The purpose of this study is to report the contamination rate in 987 grafts obtained under strictly aseptic conditions, between 1989 and 1992. The grafts were stored at -80 degrees C (cortical bone and tendons) and -40 degrees C (cancellous bone). The overall contamination rate was 6.6%, with Gram-positive bacteria responsible for 80% of the positive cultures. We discuss the sources of contamination, the most frequently isolated bacteria and the steps in the donation and transplantation procedures that help to reduce the risk of contamination. We conclude that the methods of acquisition, processing and storage of tissues are effective in making sterile allografts available.

  16. Bacterial contamination of allografts.

    PubMed

    Barrios, R H; Leyes, M; Amillo, S; Oteiza, C

    1994-01-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogeneic bone transplantation is one of the problems facing tissue banks. The purpose of this study is to report the contamination rate in 987 grafts obtained under strictly aseptic conditions, between 1989 and 1992. The grafts were stored at -80 degrees C (cortical bone and tendons) and -40 degrees C (cancellous bone). The overall contamination rate was 6.6%, with Gram-positive bacteria responsible for 80% of the positive cultures. We discuss the sources of contamination, the most frequently isolated bacteria and the steps in the donation and transplantation procedures that help to reduce the risk of contamination. We conclude that the methods of procurement, processing and storage of tissues are effective in making sterile allografts available.

  17. T-cell alloimmunity and chronic allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Niloufar; Afzali, Behdad; Atalar, Kerem; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I

    2010-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the standard treatment to improve both the quality of life and survival in patients with various end-stage organ diseases. The primary barrier against successful transplantation is recipient alloimmunity and the need to be maintained on immunosuppressive therapies with associated side effects. Despite such treatments in renal transplantation, after death with a functioning graft, chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the most common cause of late allograft loss. Recipient recognition of donor histocompatibility antigens, via direct, indirect, and semidirect pathways, is critically dependent on the antigen-presenting cell (APC) and elicits effector responses dominated by recipient T cells. In allograft rejection, the engagement of recipient and donor cells results in recruitment of T-helper (Th) cells of the Th1 and Th17 lineage to the graft. In cases in which the alloresponse is dominated by regulatory T cells (Tregs), rejection can be prevented and the allograft tolerated with minimum or no immunosuppression. Here, we review the pathways of allorecognition that underlie CAD and the T-cell effector phenotypes elicited as part of the alloresponse. Future therapies including depletion of donor-reactive lymphocytes, costimulation blockade, negative vaccination using dendritic cell subtypes, and Treg therapy are inferred from an understanding of these mechanisms of allograft rejection.

  18. Allograft immune response with sCR1 intervention.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-03-01

    The deposition of complement (C) components on tissues of transplanted organs may induce many proinflammatory responses. The role of such C activation in allograft rejection is uncertain. We addressed this question by inhibiting C at the level of the C3 and C5 convertases, preventing C activation and progression of its cascade, using recombinant human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in an unsensitized rat renal allograft model. Fully MHC disparate Lewis to DA rat renal allograft recipients given 25 mg/kg sCR1 daily, with saline-treated allograft recipients as controls (n = 15 in each group), were sacrificed from day 1 to day 5 post-transplant, and examined histopathologically, and for the deposition of C3 and C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC), and for the presence of leucocyte antigen markers. Treated animals demonstrated a reduction in vascular injury and cellular infiltration, coincident with reduced C deposition. Flow cytometric analysis of leucocyte subpopulations in the spleen showed a reduction in activated (CD25 positive) B and T cells in treated animals, compared to saline treated controls. The results suggest that C inhibition with sCR1, in an unsensitized model of allograft rejection, was able to suppress the vascular and cell mediated components of tissue injury. The data support not only a role for C in antibody and possibly cell mediated cytotoxicity in the graft, but also suggest a role in the primary immune response leading to both T cell and B cell activation.

  19. Requirement of donor-derived stromal cells in the bone marrow for successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Complete prevention of recurrence of autoimmune diseases in MRL/MP-Ipr/Ipr mice by transplantation of bone marrow plus bones (stromal cells) from the same donor.

    PubMed

    Ishida, T; Inaba, M; Hisha, H; Sugiura, K; Adachi, Y; Nagata, N; Ogawa, R; Good, R A; Ikehara, S

    1994-03-15

    MRL/MP-Ipr/Ipr (MRL/Ipr) mice possess radioresistant (9.5 Gy) abnormal stem cells and show a recurrence of autoimmune diseases within 5 mo of conventional allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. We recently have found that the MHC preference exists between hemopoietic stem cells and stromal cells; when bones are engrafted, donor-derived stromal cells present in the engrafted bones can migrate into the recipient bone marrows, which are replaced with both donor-derived stromal cells and hematopoietic cells. Based on these findings, we attempted to prevent the recurrence of autoimmune diseases in MRL/Ipr mice by the transplantation of both bone marrow cells and bone (as a source of stromal cells). MRL/Ipr mice were irradiated (8.5 Gy) and then reconstituted with C57BL/6 bone marrow cells plus bone grafts. The mice survived more than 48 wk after this treatment. Immunohistologic studies revealed that the mice were completely free from both lymphadenopathy and autoimmune diseases such as lupus nephritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Sera from these mice showed normal levels of circulating immune complexes and rheumatoid factors. Normal functions of both T cells and B cells were noted. Abnormal T cells such as Thy-1+B220+ cells present in nontreated MRL/Ipr mice could not be seen in the thus-treated mice. In addition, to our surprise, spleen cells from treated mice showed completely normal in vitro primary anti-SRBC responses. These results indicate that stromal cells in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation play a crucial role not only in the prevention of graft failure but also in the successful cooperation among APCs, T cells, and B cells. Although MRL/Ipr mice are radiosensitive and usually die of interstitial pneumonia or fatty liver due to the side effects of radiation, it should be noted that this strategy allows a reduction in the radiation dose (9.5 Gy-->8.5 Gy), and that these mice can survive more than 48 wk without showing any symptoms of autoimmune diseases.

  20. Ellagic acid peracetate is superior to ellagic acid in the prevention of genotoxicity due to aflatoxin B1 in bone marrow and lung cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Tyagi, Yogesh K; Ponnan, Prija; Rohil, Vishwajeet; Prasad, Ashok K; Dwarkanath, Bilekere S; Parmar, Virinder S; Raj, Hanumantharao G

    2007-01-01

    Earlier observations carried out in our laboratory highlighted the mode of action of acetoxy 4-methylcoumarins and quercetin pentaacetate in preventing the genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). We have extended the observation to an acetoxy biscoumarin i.e. ellagic acid peracetate (EAPA), which unlike ellagic acid (EA) has demonstrated time-dependent inhibition of liver microsomes catalysed AFB1-epoxidation as measured by AFB1 binding to DNA. EAPA was more potent than EA in preventing bone marrow and lung cells from AFB1-induced genotoxicity. EAPA was acted upon by microsomal acetoxy drug:protein transacetylase (TAase) leading to modulation of the catalytic activity of certain functional proteins (cytochrome P450, NADPH cytochrome c reductase and glutathione S-transferase), possibly by way of protein acetylation.

  1. Spleen tyrosine kinase contributes to acute renal allograft rejection in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ramessur Chandran, Sharmila; Tesch, Greg H; Han, Yingjie; Woodman, Naomi; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Blease, Kate; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Kidney allografts induce strong T-cell and antibody responses which mediate acute rejection. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is expressed by most leucocytes, except mature T cells, and is involved in intracellular signalling following activation of the Fcγ-receptor, B-cell receptor and some integrins. A role for Syk signalling has been established in antibody-dependent native kidney disease, but little is known of Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Sprague–Dawley rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and received an orthotopic Wistar renal allograft. Recipient rats were treated with a Syk inhibitor (CC0482417, 30 mg/kg/bid), or vehicle, from 1 h before surgery until being killed 5 days later. Vehicle-treated recipients developed severe allograft failure with marked histologic damage in association with dense leucocyte infiltration (T cells, macrophages, neutrophils and NK cells) and deposition of IgM, IgG and C3. Immunostaining identified Syk expression by many infiltrating leucocytes. CC0482417 treatment significantly improved allograft function and reduced histologic damage, although allograft injury was still clearly evident. CC0482417 failed to prevent T-cell infiltration and activation within the allograft. However, CC0482417 significantly attenuated acute tubular necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and thrombosis of peritubular capillaries. In conclusion, this study identifies a role for Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Syk inhibition may be a useful addition to T-cell-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation. PMID:25529862

  2. Surgical resection of persistent pulmonary fungus nodules and secondary prophylaxis are effective in preventing fungal relapse in patients receiving chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation for leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nosari, A; Ravini, M; Cairoli, R; Cozzi, P; Marbello, L; Marenco, P; Grillo, G; Morra, E

    2007-05-01

    Antifungal therapy may be unable to eradicate invasive mycosis in leukemia patients. The presence of persisting pulmonary nodules owing to mycosis seems to increase the risk of fungal relapse after chemotherapy and transplant procedures. Between 1997 and 2004, 10 acute leukemia patients underwent pulmonary surgery for invasive mycosis. The median time from diagnosis of mycosis to surgery was 135 days (range 21-147). Three patients underwent emergency surgery, owing to hemoptysis. In the other seven patients with nodule/cavitation remaining after antifungal treatment, surgery (three wedge resections, four lobectomies) was scheduled before transplant. Pathologic examination confirmed two aspergillosis and three zygomycosis. The only side effect was pneumothorax in one case. Nine patients were considered cured. Six patients underwent bone marrow transplantation (three allogeneic, three autologous) with antifungal prophylaxis without relapse during the transplant procedure. In selected patients scheduled for bone marrow transplantation, surgical resection of localized pulmonary fungus nodules combined with antifungal prophylaxis seem to be an effective treatment for preventing mycotic relapse.

  3. Histologic evaluation of socket augmentation with mineralized human allograft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Tsao, Yi-Pin

    2008-06-01

    Socket augmentation performed at the time of tooth extraction has been recommended by many authors, since successful socket augmentation may reduce or eliminate the need for future ridge grafts. An augmentation procedure is described here, along with histologic and histomorphometric findings. Five patients (three men, two women; mean age 56 years) were recruited for this pilot study, and seven sites were treated. Solvent-preserved mineralized cancellous allograft was used to fill each socket up to the bone crest (2 mm below soft tissue surface), and sites were covered with a bioabsorbable collagen wound dressing. Core biopsies were taken from the center of extraction sockets 5 to 6 months after augmentation. Histologic evaluation of the prepared biopsies showed formation and remodeling of trabecular bone in areas of mineralized cancellous allografts and no signs of inflammation. Histomorphometric analysis of the samples showed an average of 68.5% vital bone, 3.8% residual graft particles, and 27.7% of connective tissue/bone marrow. In addition, vital bone and connective tissues were seen in close contact with the remaining allograft. These data suggest that this combination of human mineralized bone and absorbable collagen wound dressing is a suitable technique for socket augmentation. Nevertheless, future controlled clinical trials with larger sample sizes are recommended to validate the findings of the current technique.

  4. Adenohypophysitis in rat pituitary allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rotondo, Fabio; Quintanar-Stephano, Andres; Asa, Sylvia L; Lombardero, Matilde; Berczi, Istvan; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2010-01-01

    The histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations in 81 pituitary allografts from Lewis rats transplanted beneath the renal capsule of Wistar rats were investigated. Intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts were also examined. Recipient rats were sacrificed at various time points after transplantation. Two days after transplantation, the central portion of the allografts demonstrated ischaemic necrosis. A week later, massive mononuclear cell infiltrates consisting primarily of lymphocytes and to a lesser extent, macrophages, plasma cells and granulocytes became prominent. At about three to four weeks after transplantation, the mononuclear cell infiltrate diminished; the surviving adenohypophysial cells, mainly prolactin (PRL) cells, increased in number and necrosis was replaced by connective tissue. No histological changes were noted in the intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the surviving adenohypophysial cells were mainly PRL-producing cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenohypophysial cell destruction, a spectrum of inflammatory cells and, in late phase, accumulation of fibroblasts and collagen fibres. PRL cells were the prominent cell types; they increased in number. It appears that pituitary allografts are ‘foreign’ and evoke an immune response, suggesting that they may be used as an experimental animal model for morphological investigation of the development and progression of adenohypophysitis, a rare disease occurring mainly in young women often associated with pregnancy. PMID:20586813

  5. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  6. The effect of mesenchymal stem cell sheets on structural allograft healing of critical-sized femoral defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Teng; Zhu, Zhenan; Awad, Hani A.; Schwarz, Edward M.; Hilton, Matthew J.; Dong, Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    Structural bone allografts are widely used in the clinic to treat critical sized bone defects, despite lacking the osteoinductive characteristics of live autografts. To address this, we generated revitalized structural allografts wrapped with mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell (MSC) sheets, which were produced by expanding primary syngenic bone marrow derived cells on temperature-responsive plates, as a tissue engineered periosteum. In vitro assays demonstrated maintenance of the MSC phenotype in the sheets, suggesting that short-term culturing of MSC sheets is not detrimental. To test their efficacy in vivo, allografts wrapped with MSC sheets were transplanted into 4-mm murine femoral defects and compared to allografts with direct seeding of MSCs and allografts without cells. Evaluations consisted of x-ray plain radiography, 3D microCT, histology, and biomechanical testing at 4- and 6-weeks post-surgery. Our findings demonstrate that MSC sheets induce prolonged cartilage formation at the graft-host junction and enhanced bone callus formation, as well as graft-host osteointegration. Moreover, a large periosteal callus was observed spanning the allografts with MSC sheets, which partially mimics live autograft healing. Finally, biomechanical testing showed a significant increase in the structural and functional properties of MSC sheet grafted femurs. Taken together, MSC sheets exhibit enhanced osteogenicity during critical sized bone defect repair, demonstrating the feasibility of this tissue engineering solution for massive allograft healing. PMID:24393269

  7. The effect of mesenchymal stem cell sheets on structural allograft healing of critical sized femoral defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Long, Teng; Zhu, Zhenan; Awad, Hani A; Schwarz, Edward M; Hilton, Matthew J; Dong, Yufeng

    2014-03-01

    Structural bone allografts are widely used in the clinic to treat critical sized bone defects, despite lacking the osteoinductive characteristics of live autografts. To address this, we generated revitalized structural allografts wrapped with mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell (MSC) sheets, which were produced by expanding primary syngenic bone marrow derived cells on temperature-responsive plates, as a tissue-engineered periosteum. In vitro assays demonstrated maintenance of the MSC phenotype in the sheets, suggesting that short-term culturing of MSC sheets is not detrimental. To test their efficacy in vivo, allografts wrapped with MSC sheets were transplanted into 4-mm murine femoral defects and compared to allografts with direct seeding of MSCs and allografts without cells. Evaluations consisted of X-ray plain radiography, 3D microCT, histology, and biomechanical testing at 4- and 6-weeks post-surgery. Our findings demonstrate that MSC sheets induce prolonged cartilage formation at the graft-host junction and enhanced bone callus formation, as well as graft-host osteointegration. Moreover, a large periosteal callus was observed spanning the allografts with MSC sheets, which partially mimics live autograft healing. Finally, biomechanical testing showed a significant increase in the structural and functional properties of MSC sheet grafted femurs. Taken together, MSC sheets exhibit enhanced osteogenicity during critical sized bone defect repair, demonstrating the feasibility of this tissue engineering solution for massive allograft healing.

  8. Combined procedure of vascularized bone marrow transplantation and mesenchymal stem cells graft - an effective solution for rapid hematopoietic reconstitution and prevention of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Coliţă, Andrei; Coliţă, Anca; Zamfirescu, Dragos; Lupu, Anca Roxana

    2012-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a a standard therapeutic option for several diseases. The success of the procedure depends on quality and quantity of transplanted cells and on stromal capacity to create an optimal microenvironment, that supports survival and development of the hematopoietic elements. Conditions associated with stromal dysfunction lead to slower/insufficient engraftment and/or immune reconstitution. A possible solution to this problem is to realize a combined graft of hematopoietic stem cells along with the medular stroma in the form of vascularized bone marrow transplant (VBMT). Another major drawback of HSCT is the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD). Recently, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have demonstrated the capacity to down-regulate alloreactive T-cell and to enhance the engraftment. Cotransplantation of MSC could be a therapeutic option for a better engraftment and GVHD prevention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Elcatonin prevents bone loss caused by skeletal unloading by inhibiting preosteoclast fusion through the unloading-induced high expression of calcitonin receptors in bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Manabu; Menuki, Kunitaka; Murai, Teppei; Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Takada, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Kayoko; Sakai, Akinori

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether elcatonin (EL) has a preventive action on bone dynamics in skeletal unloading. Seven-week-old male C57BL/6J mice with either ground control (GC) or tail suspension (TS) were administered EL 20U/kg or a vehicle (veh) three times per week and assigned to one of the following four groups: GCEL, GCveh, TSEL, and TSveh. Blood samples and bilateral femurs and tibias of the mice were obtained for analysis. After 7days of unloading, the trabecular bone mineral density in the distal femur obtained via peripheral quantitative computed tomography and the trabecular bone volume were significantly higher in the TSEL group than in the TSveh group. The bone resorption histomorphometric parameters, such as the osteoclast surface and osteoclast number, were significantly suppressed in the TSEL mice, whereas the number of preosteoclasts was significantly increased. The plasma level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b (TRACP-5b) was significantly lower in the TSEL group than in all other groups. In the bone marrow cell culture, the number of TRACP-positive (TRACP(+)) multinucleated cells was significantly lower in the TSEL mice than in the TSveh mice, whereas the number of TRACP(+) mononucleated cells was higher in the TSEL mice. On day 4, the expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1), cathepsin K and d2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase V0 domain (ATP6V0D2) mRNA in the bone marrow cells in the TSEL mice was suppressed, and the expression of calcitonin receptor (Calcr) mRNA on day 1 and Calcr antigen on day 4 were significantly higher in the TSveh mice than in the GCveh mice. EL prevented the unloading-induced bone loss associated with the high expression of Calcr in the bone marrow cells of mouse hindlimbs after tail suspension, and it suppressed osteoclast development from preosteoclasts to mature osteoclasts through bone-resorbing activity. This study of EL-treated unloaded mice provides the

  10. A double-blind randomised controlled investigation into the efficacy of Mirococept (APT070) for preventing ischaemia reperfusion injury in the kidney allograft (EMPIRIKAL): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Kassimatis, Theodoros; Qasem, Anass; Douiri, Abdel; Ryan, Elizabeth G; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Nichols, Laura L; Greenlaw, Roseanna; Olsburgh, Jonathon; Smith, Richard A; Sacks, Steven H; Drage, Martin

    2017-06-06

    Delayed graft function (DGF) is traditionally defined as the requirement for dialysis during the first week after transplantation. DGF is a common complication of renal transplantation, and it negatively affects short- and long-term graft outcomes. Ischaemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a prime contributor to the development of DGF. It is well established that complement system activation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of IRI. Mirococept is a highly effective complement inhibitor that can be administered ex vivo to the donor kidney just before transplantation. Preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that Mirococept inhibits inflammatory responses that follow IRI. The EMPIRIKAL trial (REC 12/LO/1334) aims to evaluate the efficacy of Mirococept in reducing the incidence of DGF in cadaveric renal transplantation. EMPIRIKAL is a multicentre double-blind randomised case-control trial designed to test the superiority of Mirococept in the prevention of DGF in cadaveric renal allografts, as compared to standard cold perfusion fluid (Soltran®). Patients will be randomised to Mirococept or placebo (Pbo) and will be enrolled in cohorts of N = 80 with a maximum number of 7 cohorts. The first cohort will be randomised to 10 mg of Mirococept or Pbo. After the completion of each cohort, an interim analysis will be carried out in order to evaluate the dose allocation for the next cohort (possible doses: 5-25 mg). Immunosuppression therapy, antibiotic and antiviral prophylaxis will be administered as per local centre protocols. The enrolment will take approximately 24 months, and patients will be followed for 12 months. The primary endpoint is DGF, defined as the requirement for dialysis during the first week after transplantation. Secondary endpoints include duration of DGF, functional DGF, renal function at 12 months, acute rejection episodes at 6 and 12 months, primary non-function and time of hospital stay on first admission and in the first year

  11. Histomorphometric analysis following augmentation of the anterior atrophic maxilla with cancellous bone block allograft.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Joseph; Marilena, Vered; Gross, Ora; Mardinger, Ofer; Chaushu, Gavriel

    2012-01-01

    Grafting with bone blocks may be required to restore the alveolar process in extremely atrophic maxillae prior to implant placement to ensure both function and esthetics. The present study was conducted to histologically and histomorphometrically evaluate the application of allograft cancellous bone blocks for the augmentation of the anterior atrophic maxilla. Consecutive patients with severe atrophy in the anterior maxilla underwent augmentation with cancellous bone block allografts. Bony deficiencies of at least 3 mm horizontally and up to 3 mm vertically according to computed tomographic para-axial reconstructions served as inclusion criteria. After 6 months, implants were placed and a cylindric sample core from the graft area was collected. All specimens were prepared for histologic and histomorphometric examination. Forty patients were included in the study. Eighty-three implants were placed in bone that was augmented with 60 cancellous freeze-dried bone block allografts. The implant survival rate was 98.8%. Mean follow-up was 48 ± 22 months (range, 14 to 82 months). The mean percentage of newly formed bone was 33% ± 18%, that of the residual cancellous block allograft was 26% ± 17%, and marrow and connective tissue comprised 41% ± 2%. Statistically significant histomorphometric differences regarding newly formed bone and residual cancellous block allograft were found between younger (< 40 years) and older (≥ 40 years) patients, respectively. Age did not appear to influence the percentage of marrow and connective tissue. Cancellous bone block allograft is biocompatible and osteoconductive, permitting new bone formation following augmentation of extremely atrophic anterior maxillae in a two-stage implant placement procedure. New bone formation was age-dependent.

  12. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  13. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration.

  14. Preliminary efficacy of a brief family intervention to prevent declining quality of life secondary to parental bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fife, B L; Von Ah, D M; Spath, M L; Weaver, M T; Yang, Z; Stump, T; Farag, S

    2017-02-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a brief, cost-effective family-focused intervention to promote adaptive coping and quality of life throughout a parent's bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Targeted outcomes were cohesion, decreased use of avoidance coping, open communication and effective management of emotional distress. Participants included an intervention group of 31 families and 29 families in a control group who received usual care. Each family included the BMT recipient, a partner/caregiver and children 10-18 years old. The intervention included two dyadic sessions for the BMT recipient and the partner/caregiver, one individual session for the caregiver and two digital video discs (DVDs) for children. Statistical analyses indicated that the intervention had a positive impact on at least one aspect of the adaptation of each family member. Caregivers reported the most distress but benefitted least from the intervention, whereas recipients and children reported improvement in distress. Ratings of satisfaction/acceptability were high, with 97% responding that they would recommend the intervention to others. Plans for future research include increased intervention intensity for the caregiver, a larger more diverse sample and implementation over an extended period post BMT.

  15. Preliminary Efficacy of a Brief Family Intervention to Prevent Declining Quality of Life Secondary to Parental Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fife, Betsy L.; Von Ah, Diane M.; Spath, Mary L.; Weaver, Michael T.; Yang, Ziyi; Stump, Timothy; Farag, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of a brief, cost-effective family focused intervention to promote adaptive coping and quality of life throughout a parent's bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Targeted outcomes were cohesion, decreased use of avoidance coping, open communication, and effective management of emotional distress. Participants included an intervention group of 31 families and 29 families in a control group who received usual care. Each Family included the BMT recipient, a partner-caregiver, and children 10-18. The intervention included two dyadic sessions for the BMT recipient and the partner-caregiver, one individual session for the caregiver, and two DVDs for children. Statistical analyses indicated the intervention had a positive impact on at least one aspect of the adaptation of each family member. Caregivers reported the most distress but benefitted least from the intervention, whereas recipients and children reported improvement in distress. Ratings of satisfaction/acceptability were high with 97% responding they would recommend the intervention to others. Plans for future research include increased intervention intensity for the caregiver, a larger more diverse sample, and implementation over an extended period post-BMT. PMID:27869806

  16. Glucocorticoid receptor Antagonist and siRNA Prevent Senescence of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Na; Yu, Yang; Joshi, Vijaya; Schmidt, Thomas; Qian, Fang; Salem, Aliasger K.; Stanford, Clark; Hong, Liu

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects mediated by glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) blockage using RU486, a GR antagonist, and GR siRNA on the proliferative and differentiation capabilities of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs), as well as on their senescence and antioxidant levels during extended in vitro culture. Treatment with either RU486 or GR siRNA for a 7 day period significantly increased the proliferation of MSCs as well as their osteogenic capabilities, as reflected by an increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level after differentiation. After 4 weeks of the treatments MSCs improved or maintained their proliferation rates, while the control MSCs exhibited decreased proliferation. While all MSCs exhibited reduced osteogenic potential after 4 weeks of in vitro culture, the MSCs treated with GR inhibitors showed higher ALP levels than untreated MSCs after they were subjected to osteogenic differentiation. These treatment also significantly down-regulated the adipogenic capabilities of MSCs. Telomere lengths as well as the telomerase and superoxide dismutase activities of MSCs treated with either RU486 or GR siRNA appeared to be higher than those detected in controls. These results demonstrate that blockage of the effects mediated by the GCs normally found in fetal bovine serum may postpone senescence of these cells by up-regulating their antioxidant levels. These data suggested that blocking the effects mediated by GCs could potentially extend the lifespan of endogenous MSCs in patients who have elevated GC levels as a consequence of advancing age or estrogen depletion. PMID:23963647

  17. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  18. Kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Schwarzengrund.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenta; Nishio, Haruomi; Iwatani, Yuji; Yamada, Ryo; Okawa, Takao; Yamamoto, Takumi; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuo, Yoko; Matsuo, Ken; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mori, Noriko

    2017-03-13

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) taking immunosuppressive drugs have a 20-fold greater risk of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection than the healthy adult population. Among KTRs, the urinary tract is the most common site of infection. However, few cases of urinary tract infection caused by NTS have been documented in KTRs, and only one in Japan. Furthermore, it frequently induces acute allograft rejection with high mortality. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Schwarzengrund (S. Schwarzengrund) is now among the more common Salmonella serovars isolated in Japan and is likely to be invasive. We present a case of a 45-year old female with vesicoureteral reflux to her transplanted kidney who developed kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by S. Schwarzengrund. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, urodynia, lower abdominal pain, gross hematuria, and cloudy urine. Urine cultures were positive for S. Schwarzengrund. Exposure to cats, especially stray cats, were identified as the most likely source. We administered antibiotics for 4 weeks (ceftriaxone then amoxicillin, each for 2 weeks) and educated her about pet safety. She experienced no recurrence of infection or clinical kidney allograft rejection for 3 months post-treatment. NTS should be considered as a possible pathogen of urinary tract infection among KTRs, especially in cases with animal exposure or structural urologic abnormalities. When the pathogen is NTS, appropriate antibiotics and treatment periods are essential for preventing recurrence and allograft rejection after the completion of treatment.

  19. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  20. Memory CD4 T Cells Induce Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts.

    PubMed

    Gorbacheva, Victoria; Fan, Ran; Fairchild, Robert L; Baldwin, William M; Valujskikh, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression, antibody-mediated rejection is a serious threat to allograft survival. Alloreactive memory helper T cells can induce potent alloantibody responses and often associate with poor graft outcome. Nevertheless, the ability of memory T cells to elicit well characterized manifestations of antibody-mediated rejection has not been tested. We investigated helper functions of memory CD4 T cells in a mouse model of renal transplantation. Whereas the majority of unsensitized C57Bl/6 recipients spontaneously accepted fully MHC-mismatched A/J renal allografts, recipients containing donor-reactive memory CD4 T cells rapidly lost allograft function. Increased serum creatinine levels, high serum titers of donor-specific alloantibody, minimal T cell infiltration, and intense C4d deposition in the grafts of sensitized recipients fulfilled all diagnostic criteria for acute renal antibody-mediated rejection in humans. IFNγ neutralization did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells, and CD8 T cell depletion at the time of transplantation or depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells also did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells starting at day 4 after transplantation. However, B cell depletion inhibited alloantibody generation and significantly extended allograft survival, indicating that donor-specific alloantibodies (not T cells) were the critical effector mechanism of renal allograft rejection induced by memory CD4 T cells. Our studies provide direct evidence that recipient T cell sensitization may result in antibody-mediated rejection of renal allografts and introduce a physiologically relevant animal model with which to investigate mechanisms of antibody-mediated rejection and novel therapeutic approaches for its prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Inhibition of WNT signaling in the bone marrow niche prevents the development of MDS in the Apc(del/+) MDS mouse model.

    PubMed

    Stoddart, Angela; Wang, Jianghong; Hu, Chunmei; Fernald, Anthony A; Davis, Elizabeth M; Cheng, Jason X; Le Beau, Michelle M

    2017-03-27

    There is accumulating evidence that functional alteration(s) of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment contributes to the development of some myeloid disorders, such as myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In addition to a cell intrinsic role of WNT activation in leukemia stem cells, WNT activation in the BM niche is also thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of MDS and AML. We previously showed that Apc haploinsufficient mice (Apc(del/+) ) model MDS induced by an aberrant BM microenvironment. We sought to determine whether Apc, a multifunctional protein and key negative regulator of the canonical β-catenin (Ctnnb1)/WNT signaling pathway, mediates this disease through modulating WNT signaling, and whether inhibition of WNT signaling prevents the development of MDS in Apc(del/+) mice. Here, we demonstrate that loss of one copy of Ctnnb1 is sufficient to prevent the development of MDS in Apc(del/+) mice and that altered canonical WNT signaling in the microenvironment is responsible for the disease. Furthermore, the FDA-approved drug, pyrvinium, delays and/or inhibits disease in Apc(del/+) mice, even when it is administered after the presentation of anemia. Other groups have observed increased nuclear CTNNB1 in stromal cells from a high frequency of MDS/AML patients, a finding that together with our results highlights a potential new strategy for treating some myeloid disorders.

  2. Bone marrow culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... are very rare. Alternative Names Culture - bone marrow Images Bone marrow aspiration References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Bone marrow aspiration analysis-specimen (biopsy, bone marrow iron stain, iron stain, ...

  3. Bone marrow aspiration (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... amount of bone marrow is removed during a bone marrow aspiration. The procedure is uncomfortable, but can be tolerated by both children and adults. The marrow can be studied to determine ... metabolic products are stored in certain bone marrow cells.

  4. Platelet deposition in rat heart allografts and the effect of a thromboxane receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Foegh, M.L.; Khirabadi, B.S.; Ramwell, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of a thromboxane antagonist, L640,035 on platelet deposition in heart allografts was studied. Twenty Lewis rats received heterotopic allografts from Lewis x Brown-Norway F1 hybrid. All recipients received azathioprine (5 mg/kg/day). The rats were divided into three groups. Groups II and III were also treated daily with either the vehicle for L640,035 or L640,035 respectively. Syngeneic indium-111-labeled platelet deposition was determined in the allograft and the native heart at 6, 9, and 13 days after transplantation; group III was studied on the sixth and ninth day only. A rapidly increasing platelet deposition was seen in allografts from rats given azathioprine; whereas the thromboxane antagonist prevented the increase in platelet deposition on the ninth day.

  5. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Repaired but Did Not Prevent Gentamicin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury through Paracrine Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Luciana A.; Borges, Fernanda T.; Simões, Manuel J.; Borges, Andrea A.; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Schor, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) or their conditioned medium (CM) on the repair and prevention of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) induced by gentamicin (G). Animals received daily injections of G up to 20 days. On the 10th day, injections of BMSCs, CM, CM+trypsin, CM+RNase or exosome-like microvesicles extracted from the CM were administered. In the prevention groups, the animals received the BMSCs 24 h before or on the 5th day of G treatment. Creatinine (Cr), urea (U), FENa and cytokines were quantified. The kidneys were evaluated using hematoxylin/eosin staining and immunohystochemistry. The levels of Cr, U and FENa increased during all the periods of G treatment. The BMSC transplantation, its CM or exosome injections inhibited the increase in Cr, U, FENa, necrosis, apoptosis and also increased cell proliferation. The pro-inflammatory cytokines decreased while the anti-inflammatory cytokines increased compared to G. When the CM or its exosomes were incubated with RNase (but not trypsin), these effects were blunted. The Y chromosome was not observed in the 24-h prevention group, but it persisted in the kidney for all of the periods analyzed, suggesting that the injury is necessary for the docking and maintenance of BMSCs in the kidney. In conclusion, the BMSCs and CM minimized the G-induced renal damage through paracrine effects, most likely through the RNA carried by the exosome-like microvesicles. The use of the CM from BMSCs can be a potential therapeutic tool for this type of nephrotoxicity, allowing for the avoidance of cell transplantations. PMID:22970165

  6. Role of T Cell-Specific NF-κB in Islet Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Porras, Delia Lozano; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Ping; Molinero, Luciana L; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2012-01-01

    Background Pancreatic islet transplantation has the potential to cure Type 1 Diabetes (T1D), a chronic lifelong disease, but its clinical applicability is limited by allograft rejection. Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a transcription factor important for survival and differentiation of T cells. In this study, we tested whether NF-κB in T cells is required for the rejection of islet allografts. Methods Mice expressing a super-repressor form of NF-κB selectively in T cell (IκBαΔN-Tg mice) with or without the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-xL, or mice with impaired TCR-and BCR-driven NF-κB activity (CARMA1-KO mice) were rendered diabetic and transplanted with islet allografts. Secondary skin transplantation in long-term acceptors of islet allografts was used to test for development of donor-specific tolerance. Immune infiltration of the transplanted islets was examined by immunofluorescence. TCR-transgenic CD4+ T cells were used to follow T cell priming and differentiation. Results Islet allograft survival was prolonged in IκBαΔN-Tg mice, although the animals did not develop donor-specific tolerance. Reduced NF-κB activity did not prevent T cell priming or differentiation but rather reduced survival of activated T cells, as transgenic expression of Bcl-xL restored islet allograft rejection in IκBαΔN-Tg mice. Abolishing TCR- and BCR-driven activation of NF-κB selectively via CARMA1 deficiency prevented T cell priming and islet allograft rejection. Conclusions Our data suggest that T cell-NF-κB plays an important role in the rejection of islet allografts. Targeting NF-κB selectively in lymphocytes appears a promising approach to facilitate acceptance of transplanted islets. PMID:22437847

  7. Induction of allogeneic unresponsiveness by supralethal irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Rapaport, F.T.; Bachvaroff, R.J.; Akiyama, N.; Sato, T.

    1980-09-01

    Supralethally irradiated dogs were reconstituted wth their own stored bone marrow and were challenged at various time intervals with a kidney allograft. The data suggest that transplanted bone marrow cells may participate directly in the events leading to allogenic unresponsiveness. The time interval between marrow cell replacement and kidney allotransplantation required for optimal results suggest that at least one cycle of cell turnover by the replaced stem cells is needed in order to produce unresponsiveness. Host irradiation and reconstitution with stored autologous marrow may be useful in the treatment of certain forms of cancer.

  8. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Improve the Mouse Liver after Acute Acetaminophen Intoxication by Preventing Progress of Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Peggy; Brückner, Sandra; Winkler, Sandra; Dollinger, Matthias M.; Christ, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow (hMSC) have the potential to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and continue to maintain important hepatocyte functions in vivo after transplantation into host mouse livers. Here, hMSC were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro (hMSC-HC) and transplanted into livers of immunodeficient Pfp/Rag2−/− mice treated with a sublethal dose of acetaminophen (APAP) to induce acute liver injury. APAP induced a time- and dose-dependent damage of perivenous areas of the liver lobule. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) increased to similar levels irrespective of hMSC-HC transplantation. Yet, hMSC-HC resided in the damaged perivenous areas of the liver lobules short-term preventing apoptosis and thus progress of organ destruction. Disturbance of metabolic protein expression was lower in the livers receiving hMSC-HC. Seven weeks after APAP treatment, hepatic injury had completely recovered in groups both with and without hMSC-HC. Clusters of transplanted cells appeared predominantly in the periportal portion of the liver lobule and secreted human albumin featuring a prominent quality of differentiated hepatocytes. Thus, hMSC-HC attenuated the inflammatory response and supported liver regeneration after acute injury induced by acetaminophen. They hence may serve as a novel source of hepatocyte-like cells suitable for cell therapy of acute liver diseases. PMID:24758938

  9. Zoledronic acid, an aminobisphosphonate, prolongs survival of skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Yuan; Yang, Po-Sheng; Cheng, Shih-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Lee, Jie-Jen; Ko, Chun-Chuan; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2012-08-04

    Zoledronic acid (ZOL), an effective nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate used to prevent excessive bone loss in clinical practice, has been shown to affect the development of dendritic cells by redirecting differentiation toward a state of atypical maturation. The study was aimed to examine whether ZOL can reduce acute rejection of skin allografts. A skin transplantation model using C57BL/6 to BALB/c mice was used. ZOL was injected intraperitoneally into transplant recipients post-surgically. Graft survival, body weight, leukocyte count, hepatic and renal functions were assessed. ZOL treatment significantly prolonged skin allograft survival in mice. In terms of toxicity, there were no significant differences in body weight, leukocyte count, plasma alanine aminotransferase or creatinine levels between the ZOL-treated and control groups. Histopathology showed that the loss of skin integrity seen in control group was prevented by ZOL treatment. In draining lymph nodes and spleen, the number and clustering extent of mononuclear cells were markedly declined by ZOL treatment. The plasma IL-6 levels were reduced by treatment of ZOL. ZOL can prolong skin allograft survival without major toxicity.

  10. Allorecognition by T Lymphocytes and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Jose; Paster, Joshua; Benichou, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of donor antigens by recipient T cells in secondary lymphoid organs initiates the adaptive inflammatory immune response leading to the rejection of allogeneic transplants. Allospecific T cells become activated through interaction of their T cell receptors with intact allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on donor cells (direct pathway) and/or donor peptides presented by self-MHC molecules on recipient antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (indirect pathway). In addition, recent studies show that alloreactive T cells can also be stimulated through recognition of allogeneic MHC molecules displayed on recipient APCs (MHC cross-dressing) after their transfer via cell–cell contact or through extracellular vesicles (semi-direct pathway). The specific allorecognition pathway used by T cells is dictated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the allograft and can influence the nature and magnitude of the alloresponse and rejection process. Consequently, various organs and tissues such as skin, cornea, and solid organ transplants are recognized differently by pro-inflammatory T cells through these distinct pathways, which may explain why these grafts are rejected in a different fashion. On the other hand, the mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs) recognize alloantigen and promote transplantation tolerance are still unclear. It is likely that thymic Tregs are activated through indirect allorecognition, while peripheral Tregs recognize alloantigens in a direct fashion. As we gain insights into the mechanisms underlying allorecognition by pro-inflammatory and Treg cells, novel strategies are being designed to prevent allograft rejection in the absence of ongoing immunosuppressive drug treatment in patients. PMID:28018349

  11. Optimizing the grain size distribution of allografts in bone impaction grafting.

    PubMed

    Putzer, David; Coraça-Huber, Debora; Wurm, Alexander; Schmoelz, Werner; Nogler, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In bone impaction grafting, allografts in the form of bone chips are used for reconstruction of defects and to induce bone remodeling. Optimizing grain size distribution of this allograft material should help prevent implant subsidence by achieving higher primary stability of the graft. We evaluated the influence of grain size distribution on the mechanical stability of allograft material. Bone tissue was rinsed, and the grain size distribution of the allograft material was determined by performing a sieve analysis. Uniaxial compression tests were carried out before and after a standardized compaction procedure for samples with controlled grain size distribution and a control group. Allografts with controlled grain size distribution showed a yield limit almost twice as high as in the control group after a standardized compaction procedure. A better interlocking between bone particles was observed compared to the control group. Thus, grain size distribution has a major impact on the mechanical stability of bone grafts. By controlling the grain size distribution of allograft material, a tighter packing can be achieved and subsequently implant subsidence of implants could be avoided. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: allograft versus autograft.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer K Y; Egami, Darren K; Shaieb, Mark D; Kan, Darryl M; Richardson, Allen B

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the minimal 2-year outcome of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allografts versus autografts, both augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Retrospective review. Forty-six of 52 BPTB ACL reconstructions using allografts and 33 of 37 BPTB ACL reconstructions using autografts were followed up at a mean of 2.75 and 3.36 years, respectively. All patients had an iliotibial band tenodesis. Evaluations included the Lysholm II scale, a questionnaire, physical examination findings, and KT-1000 arthrometry. No statistically significant differences were seen between groups in Lysholm II scores or in any subjective category. Most patients (91% allograft; 97% autograft) had good to excellent Lysholm II scores. Sixty-five percent of allograft patients and 73% of autograft patients returned to their preinjury activity level. More allograft patients complained of retropatellar pain (16% v 9% for autograft patients). Fifty-three percent of allograft patients versus 23% of autograft patients had a flexion deficit of 5 degrees or more when compared with the normal contralateral side. When comparing KT-1000 side-to-side differences, we found no significant differences between groups. Ninety-one percent of both groups had maximum side-to-side differences less than 5 mm. Three allograft patients (6.5%) had traumatic ruptures at 12, 19, and 43 months postoperatively versus none in the autograft group. All three allograft patients who sustained postoperative traumatic ruptures had received fresh frozen, nonirradiated allografts. Results of ACL reconstruction using allografts or autografts augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis were comparable. The BPTB autograft should remain the gold standard, although the BPTB allograft in ACL reconstruction is a reasonable alternative.

  13. Endovenous administration of bone-marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells prevents renal failure in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Fernando; Ezquer, Marcelo; Simon, Valeska; Pardo, Fabian; Yañez, Alejandro; Carpio, Daniel; Conget, Paulette

    2009-11-01

    therapy strategy to prevent chronic renal diseases secondary to diabetes.

  14. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  15. Bone marrow-derived conventional, but not cloned, mesenchymal stem cells suppress lymphocyte proliferation and prevent graft-versus-host disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Yusuke; Li, Xiao-Kang; Xie, Lin; Zhu, Ping; Kimura, Hiromitsu; Takahara, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could exert a potent immunosuppressive effect, and therefore may have a therapeutic potential in T-cell-dependent pathologies. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether MSCs could be used to control graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). MSCs were isolated from Lewis rat bone morrow and then cultured in 10% FBS DMEM at 37°C for 4 weeks. The enriched conventional MSCs and macrophages were purified by auto-MACS. Cloned MSCs were obtained by cloning using the limiting dilution method and expanded up to more than 6 months. The identity of MSCs was confirmed by their typical spindle-shaped morphology and immunophenotypic criteria, based on the absence of expression of CD45 and CD11b/c molecules. Both types of MSCs were also tested for their ability to differentiate into adipocytes. We showed that MSCs, like macrophages, exhibit immunomodulatory properties capable of inhibiting T-cell proliferation stimulated by alloantigens, anti-CD3e/CD28 mAbs, and ConA in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. After performing adoptive transfer, MSCs suppressed systemic Lewis to (Lewis × DA)F1 rat GvHD. In contrast to the immunosuppressive activities of conventional MSCs, the cloned MSCs enhanced T-cell proliferation in vitro and yielded no clinical benefit in regard to the incidence or severity of GvHD. Therefore, these rat models have shown intriguing differences in the suppression effects of lymphocyte proliferation and GvHD prevention between short-term cultured conventional MSCs and cloned MSCs.

  16. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  17. Alternative agents to prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Desborough, Michael; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Chaimani, Anna; Trivella, Marialena; Vyas, Paresh; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2016-10-31

    those treated with a TPO mimetic and placebo (RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.04 to 2.26, one trial, 39 participants, low-quality evidence).There was insufficient evidence to detect a difference in the risk of all-cause mortality between those treated with a TPO mimetic and placebo (RR 0.74, 95%CI 0.52 to 1.05, five trials, 456 participants, very low-quality evidence).There was a significant reduction in the number of participants receiving any platelet transfusion between those treated with TPO mimetics and placebo (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.95, four trials, 206 participants, moderate-quality evidence).There was no evidence for a difference in the incidence of transfusion reactions between those treated with TPO mimetics and placebo (pOR 0.06, 95% CI 0.00 to 3.44, one trial, 98 participants, very low-quality evidence).There was no evidence for a difference in thromboembolic events between TPO mimetics and placebo (RR 1.41, 95%CI 0.39 to 5.01, five trials, 456 participants, very-low quality evidence).There was no evidence for a difference in drug reactions between TPO mimetics and placebo (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.51, five trials, 455 participants, low-quality evidence).No trial reported the number of days of bleeding per participant, platelet transfusion episodes, mean red cell transfusions per participant, red cell transfusion episodes, transfusion-transmitted infections, formation of antiplatelet antibodies or platelet refractoriness.In order to demonstrate a reduction in bleeding events from 26 in 100 to 16 in 100 participants, a study would need to recruit 514 participants (80% power, 5% significance). There is insufficient evidence at present for thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics for the prevention of bleeding for people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure. There is no randomised controlled trial evidence for artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen concentrate, rFVIIa, rFXIII or rIL6 or rIL11, antifibrinolytics or DDAVP in this

  18. Alternative agents to prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, Michael; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Chaimani, Anna; Trivella, Marialena; Vyas, Paresh; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2017-01-01

    -quality evidence). There was insufficient evidence to detect a difference in the risk of a life-threatening bleed between those treated with a TPO mimetic and placebo (RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.04 to 2.26, one trial, 39 participants, low-quality evidence). There was insufficient evidence to detect a difference in the risk of all-cause mortality between those treated with a TPO mimetic and placebo (RR 0.74, 95%CI 0.52 to 1.05, five trials, 456 participants, very low-quality evidence). There was a significant reduction in the number of participants receiving any platelet transfusion between those treated with TPO mimetics and placebo (RR 0.76, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.95, four trials, 206 participants, moderate-quality evidence). There was no evidence for a difference in the incidence of transfusion reactions between those treated with TPO mimetics and placebo (pOR 0.06, 95% CI 0.00 to 3.44, one trial, 98 participants, very low-quality evidence). There was no evidence for a difference in thromboembolic events between TPO mimetics and placebo (RR 1.41, 95%CI 0.39 to 5.01, five trials, 456 participants, very-low quality evidence). There was no evidence for a difference in drug reactions between TPO mimetics and placebo (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.51, five trials, 455 participants, low-quality evidence). No trial reported the number of days of bleeding per participant, platelet transfusion episodes, mean red cell transfusions per participant, red cell transfusion episodes, transfusion-transmitted infections, formation of antiplatelet antibodies or platelet refractoriness. In order to demonstrate a reduction in bleeding events from 26 in 100 to 16 in 100 participants, a study would need to recruit 514 participants (80% power, 5% significance). Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence at present for thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetics for the prevention of bleeding for people with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure. There is no randomised controlled trial evidence for artificial

  19. Remodeling of ACL Allografts is Inhibited by Peracetic Acid Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Johannes; Kamp, Julia; Przybilla, Dorothea; Pruss, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Sterilization of allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has become an important prerequisite to prevent disease transmission. However, current sterilization techniques impair the biological or mechanical properties of such treated grafts. Peracetic acid (PAA) has been successfully used to sterilize bone allografts without these disadvantages and does not impair the mechanical properties of soft tissue grafts in vitro. We asked whether PAA sterilization would influence recellularization, restoration of crimp length and pattern, and revascularization of ACL grafts during early healing. We used an in vivo sheep model for open ACL reconstruction. We also correlated the histologic findings with the restoration of anteroposterior stability and structural properties during load-to-failure testing. PAA slowed remodeling activity at 6 and 12 weeks compared to nonsterilized allografts and autografts. The mechanical properties of PAA grafts were also reduced compared to these control groups at both time points. We conclude PAA sterilization currently should not be used to sterilize soft tissue grafts typically used in ACL reconstruction. PMID:18491201

  20. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  1. Efficacy of Acellular Nerve Allografts in Trigeminal Nerve Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yampolsky, Andrew; Ziccardi, Vincent; Chuang, Sung-Kiang

    2017-10-01

    During trigeminal nerve repair, a gap is sometimes encountered that prevents the tension-free apposition of nerve endings. The use of a processed acellular nerve allograft is a novel technique that shows promise in overcoming this problem. The goal of the present study was to support the slowly evolving body of evidence that acellular processed nerve allografts (Avance; Axogen, Alachua, FL) are a viable alternative to autogenous nerve grafting and the use of conduits for reconstructing defects of the trigeminal nerve. The study design consisted of a retrospective review of the medical records of patients referred to Rutgers School of Dental Medicine for management of trigeminal nerve injuries from July 2008 to August 2014. Sixteen patients met the inclusion criteria for the present study. All patients underwent nerve grafting using a processed nerve allograft. All operations were performed by the same surgeon (V.Z.). Serial neurosensory testing was performed by 1 clinician (V.Z.) in a standardized fashion. The primary outcome variable was the interval to functional sensory recovery as defined by the Medical Research Council Scale. The participants ranged in age from 16 to 62 years (mean 32). Of the 16 patients, 12 were female (75%) and 4 were male (25%), and 3 were smokers (18.75%) and 13 were nonsmokers (81.25%). One half of the patients (n = 8; 50%) underwent surgery on the inferior alveolar nerve, and 8 (50%) underwent surgery on the lingual nerve. The most common mechanism of injury was impacted third molar removal (n = 9; 56.25%) Of the 16 patients, 15 (93.75%) achieved functional sensory recovery during the study period. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that processed nerve allografts are effective in reconstructing small (<2-cm) trigeminal nerve defects. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Vancomycin iontophoresis of allograft bone

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, M. C.; Day, R.; Wood, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The most concerning infection of allografts and operative procedures is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and no current iontophoresed antibiotics effectively combat this microbe. It was initially hypothesised that iontophoresis of vancomycin through bone would not be effective due to its large molecular size and lack of charge. The aim of this study was to determine whether this was a viable procedure and to find the optimum conditions for its use. Methods An iontophoresis cell was set up with varying concentrations of Vancomycin within the medulla of a section of sheep tibia, sealed from an external saline solution. The cell was run for varying times, Vancomycin concentrations and voltages, to gain information on optimisation of conditions for impregnating the graft. Each graft was then sectioned and dust ground from the exposed surface. The dust was serially washed to extract the Vancomycin and concentrations measured and plotted for all variables tested. Results Vancomycin was successfully delivered and impregnated to the graft using the iontophoresis technique. The first order fit to the whole data set gave a significant result (p = 0.0233), with a significant concentration (p = 0.02774) component. The time component was the next most significant (p = 0.0597), but did not exceed the 95% confidence level. Conclusions Iontophoresis is an effective method for delivering Vancomycin to allograft bone. The concentrations of the vancomycin solution affected the bone concentration, but results were highly variable. Further study should be done on the effectiveness of delivering different antibiotics using this method. PMID:24729101

  3. Effectiveness of Lavage Techniques in Removing Immunogenic Elements from Osteochondral Allografts.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Maximilian A; McCarthy, Mark A; Gitelis, Matthew E; Poland, Sarah G; Urita, Atsushi; Chubinskaya, Susan; Yanke, Adam B; Cole, Brian J

    2017-10-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare standard saline lavage to combination saline and high-pressure carbon dioxide (CO2) lavage in removing marrow elements from osteochondral allografts. Design Six fresh hemicondyles were obtained. Three osteochondral allograft plugs (15-mm diameter, 6-mm depth) were harvested from each hemicondyle and randomized to 1 of 3 treatment arms: A, no lavage; B, 1 L standard saline lavage; C, simultaneous saline (1 L) and 1-minute high-pressure CO2 lavage. After hematoxylin and eosin staining, a "percentage fill" of remaining marrow elements was calculated for each overall sample and then repeated in 3 distinct compartments for each sample based on depth from surface: 1, deepest third; 2, middle third; and 3, most superficial third. Trial arms B and C were compared with 1-tailed Student t tests. Results Group A had an overall percentage fill of 51.2% ± 8.8%. While both lavage techniques decreased overall remaining marrow elements, group B yielded significantly higher percentages of remaining marrow elements than group C (28.6% ± 16.5%, 14.6% ± 8.7%, P = 0.045). On depth analysis, group A exhibited homogenous filling of trabecular space (63.0% ± 15.5%, 67.6% ± 13.7%, and 55.2% ± 10.1% in zones 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Both lavage arms equally removed marrow elements from superficial zone 3 (B, 17.4% ± 9.2%; C, 15.6% ± 12.4%, P = 0.41) and middle zone 2 (B, 30.2% ± 17.7%; C, 21.4% ± 15.5%, P = 0.18). However, group C lavage removed significantly more marrow elements in deep zone 1 than group B (29.7% ± 10.9%, 58.5% ± 25.2%, P = 0.01). Conclusion Combination saline and high-pressure CO2 lavage more effectively clears marrow elements from osteochondral allografts than saline alone.

  4. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  5. Inability of donor total body irradiation to prolong survival of vascularized bone allografts: Experimental study in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez del Pino, J.; Benito, M.; Randolph, M.A.; Weiland, A.J. )

    1990-07-01

    At the present time, the toxic side effects of recipient immunosuppression cannot be justified for human non-vital organ transplantation. Total body irradiation has proven effective in ablating various bone-marrow-derived and endothelial immunocompetent cellular populations, which are responsible for immune rejection against donor tissues. Irradiation at a dose of 10 Gy was given to donor rats six days prior to heterotopic transplantation of vascularized bone allografts to host animals. Another group of recipient rats also received a short-term (sixth to fourteenth day after grafting), low dose of cyclosporine. Total body irradiation was able merely to delay rejection of grafts across a strong histocompatibility barrier for one to two weeks, when compared to nonirradiated allografts. The combination of donor irradiation plus cyclosporine did not delay the immune response, and the rejection score was similar to that observed for control allografts. Consequently, allograft viability was quickly impaired, leading to irreversible bone damage. This study suggest that 10 Gy of donor total body irradiation delivered six days prior to grafting cannot circumvent the immune rejection in a vascularized allograft of bone across a strong histocompatibility barrier.

  6. [Hand allograft transplantation: what are the implications?].

    PubMed

    Masquelet, Alain Charles

    2013-12-01

    The first hand allograft transplantation was performed in 1998 by a French surgeons team and has opened the era of functional allotransfers. In France, the authorized preliminary study included five patients who sustained traumatic amputation of both hands. All patients had bilateral hand allograft transplantation. Long-term results (follow-up ranging from 3 to 12 years) undoubtedly show a useful daily function, a good psychological acceptance and a physiological integration. Despite several obstacles as the need of immunosuppressive therapy for life, hand allograft transplantation is worthy of interest in some outstanding situations.

  7. Histomorphometric analysis after maxillary sinus floor augmentation using cancellous bone-block allograft.

    PubMed

    Chaushu, Gavriel; Vered, Marilena; Mardinger, Ofer; Nissan, Joseph

    2010-08-01

    Cancellous bone-block allografts may contribute to improved initial implant stability during sinus augmentation in cases with posterior atrophic maxillary ridge height < or =4 mm. The present study histologically and histomorphometrically evaluates the application of cancellous bone-block allografts for maxillary sinus-floor augmentation. Thirty-one consecutive patients, 16 females and 15 males (age range, 25 to 65 years; mean age: 54 +/- 9 years) underwent sinus augmentation with simultaneous implant placement with cancellous bone-block allografts. After 9 months, a second-stage surgery was performed. The previous window location was determined. A cylindrical sample core was collected. All specimens were prepared for histologic and histomorphometric examinations. Seventy-two of 76 implants were clinically osseointegrated (94.7%). All patients received a fixed implant-supported prosthesis. The mean t values of newly formed bone, residual cancellous bone-block allograft, marrow and connective tissue were 26.1% +/- 15% (range: 10% to 58%); 24.7% +/- 19.4% (range: 0.6% to 71%), and 49.2% +/- 20.4% (range: 14.9% to 78.9%), respectively. No statistically significant histomorphometric differences regarding newly formed bone were found between genders (27.02% in males versus 25.68% in females; P = 0.446), ages (29.82% in subjects < or =40 years old versus 24.43% in subjects >40 years old; P = 0.293), presence of membrane perforations (25.5% in non-perforated sinuses versus 27.3% in perforated sinuses; P = 0.427), and residual alveolar bone height (25.85% for residual alveolar bone height <2 mm versus 26.48% for residual alveolar bone height of 2 to 4 mm; P = 0.473). The cancellous bone-block allograft is biocompatible and osteoconductive and permits new bone formation in sinus augmentations with simultaneous implant-placement procedures in extremely atrophic posterior maxillae.

  8. The influence of bone allograft processing on osteoblast attachment and function.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, A; Konrad, L; Hessmann, M H; Küchle, R; Korner, J; Rompe, J D; Rommens, P M

    2005-07-01

    In order to assess the influence of eight different sterilisation and disinfection methods for bone allografts on adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC), cells were grown in culture and then plated onto pieces of human bone allografts. Following processing methods were tested: autoclavation (AUT), low-temperature-plasma sterilisation of demineralised allografts (D-LTP), ethylene oxide sterilisation (EtO), fresh frozen bone (FFB), 80 degrees C-thermodisinfection (80 degrees C), gamma-irradiation (Gamma), chemical solvent disinfection (CSD), and Barrycidal-disinfection (BAR). The seeding efficiency was determined after one hour to detect the number of attached cells before mitosis started. The cell viability was determined after 3, 7, and 21 days. Tests to confirm the osteoblastic differentiation included histochemical alkaline phosphatase staining and RT-PCR for osteocalcin. Human BMSC showed greatest attachment affinities for D-LTP-, 80 degrees C-, and CSD-allografts, whereas less cells were found attached to AUT-, EtO-, FFB-, Gamma-, and BAR-probes. Cell viability assays at day 3 revealed highest proliferation rates within the FFB- and 80 degrees C-groups, whereas after 21 days most viable cells were found in D-LTP-, 80 degrees C-, CSD-, and Gamma-groups. BAR-treatment showed a considerably toxic effect and therefore was excluded from all further experiments. Highest AP-activity and gene expression of osteocalcin were detected in the D-LTP-group in comparison with all other groups. In summary, our results demonstrate that cell adhesion, final population, and function of BMSC are influenced by different disinfection and sterilisation methods. Therefore, processing-related alterations of BMSC-function may be important for the success of bone grafting. The experimental setup used in the present work may be useful for further optimisation of bone allograft processing.

  9. Processing of whole femoral head allografts: a method for improving clinical efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Lomas, R; Drummond, O; Kearney, J N

    2000-01-01

    Femoral heads removed during primary hip replacement surgery are widely utilised as a source of allograft bone. Despite evidence that processing these grafts to remove blood and marrow elements improves both the clinical performance and safety of these allografts, many are transplanted without any processing being applied at all. The goal of this study was to investigate the efficiency of an allograft processing protocol which incorporates pasteurisation, (3 h, 56-60 degrees C) centrifugation, (1850g, 2 x 15 min, 40 degrees C) sonication, and repeated washing in warm (56-60 degrees C, 19 h) distilled, sterile water to remove blood and marrow elements from the graft. The protocol also involves applying heat treatment to the grafts which has been demonstrated to inactivate many pathogenic viruses. Following the processing procedure, the grafts are lyophilised and sterilised with ethylene oxide gas. The amount and rate of removal of 4 different components of blood and marrow from 6 whole femoral head allografts were measured. These were lipid, soluble protein, elastase and chloride ions. Lipid removal was assessed gravimetrically by solvent extraction of dried samples, soluble protein by the Bradford assay, elastase by radioimmunoassay and choride ion content by a modified commercially available colorimetric assay. Removing lipid from grafts has been shown to increase the rate of incorporation when the graft is used clinically. Elastase was studied as a marker of leukocyte removal, as evidence suggests the majority of potentially infective transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) activity resides in a sub-population of leukocytes. Soluble protein was studied as a marker of plasma removal, as a smaller amount of TSE infectivity resides here. Chloride removal was measured as this is a necessary pre-requisite to terminal sterilisation with ethylene oxide. The results showed that the protocol removed 74.5% (range: 68.0-90.8) of the lipid content, 96.4% (range: 94

  10. Predicting the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for patients with end-stage cardiovascular disease. There has been remarkable progress in controlling acute rejection, and the early survival rate after the heart transplantation has significantly improved. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the common causes of death and a major limiting factor for long-term graft survival years after heart transplantation. CAV is a progressive occlusion of arteries and veins of the transplanted heart. CAV is often clinically silent because of the denervation of the transplanted heart. CAV tends to be found at an advanced stage of disease, including myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and/or sudden cardiac death. Because of the serious sequelae of CAV, risk factors, prevention, and prediction of CAV have been investigated. Despite the effort by many researchers, the pathogenesis is not yet completely understood. There are a number of both immune and nonimmune factors in the donor and recipient that are related to the development of CAV. In addition, several biomarkers in blood and tissue are found to correlate with the presence of CAV, and that may be able to predict CAV. Here, we review the pathology, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and the potential for prediction of CAV.

  11. Chronic lung allograft rejection and airway microvasculature: is HIF-1 the missing link?

    PubMed

    Wilkes, David S

    2011-06-01

    Chronic lung allograft rejection, known as obliterative bronchiolitis (OB), is the leading cause of death in lung transplant patients. Although OB pathogenesis is not fully understood, in this issue of the JCI, Jiang and colleagues report that tissue hypoxia resulting in dysfunctional airway microvasculature precedes the airway fibrosis characteristic of OB. In addition, a relative deficiency of allograft endothelial cell-derived HIF-1α contributes to this process. Data showing that overexpressing HIF-1α restores the microvascular airway normoxia and prevents airway fibrosis highlight a novel role for vascular biology in OB pathogenesis.

  12. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  13. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-04-28

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts.

  14. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  15. Fresh vein allograft survival in dogs after cyclosporine treatment.

    PubMed

    Mingoli, A; Edwards, J D; Feldhaus, R J; Hunter, W J; Naspetti, R; Cavallari, N; Sapienza, P; Kretchmar, D H; Cavallaro, A

    1996-04-01

    Synthetic grafts are widely used for peripheral arterial reconstructions when autologous veins are not available, but their results have not been satisfactory. Venous allograft may be used as an alternative to synthetic prostheses. The aim of the study was to explore the immunosuppressive efficacy of Cyclosporine A (CyA) as a means of preventing venous allograft failures and rejection. We utilized 56 mongrel dogs. Immunological incompatibility was checked with the skin graft method. Donor inferior vena cava was transplanted into the infrarenal abdominal aorta of recipient animals. One group (group 1, 10 dogs) served as a control and three groups received CyA treatment regimens. Group 2 (10 dogs) received postoperative oral CyA treatment for 30 days. Group 3 (12 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution without postoperative immunosuppressive therapy. Group 4 (9 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution and postoperative CyA treatment for 30 days. Allografts were examined at 30 days for patency, aneurysmal dilatation, gross structural changes, inflammatory response, and lymphocytic infiltration. Sex chromatine assessment determined the origin (donor or recipient) of the endothelial cells. The allografts from groups 1 and 3 showed significant aneurysmal dilatation and perivenous inflammation when compared to dogs treated with oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0002). Moreover allografts treated with CyA therapy had a better-developed venous neointima (P < 0.009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02) and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02), and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) and adventitial layers (P < 0.02). No significant differences were observed in neointimal thickness among the four groups. Lymphocytic infiltration was greater in the group of animals who did not receive oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0004). Barr bodies status showed significant differences between oral CyA treated groups and nontreated groups (P < 0.0003). Oral CyA therapy

  16. High meniscal slope angle as a risk factor for meniscal allograft extrusion.

    PubMed

    Łuczkiewicz, P; Daszkiewicz, K; Chróścielewski, J; Witkowski, W; Kuik, L

    2017-04-01

    A meniscal graft extrusion is still an unresolved problem that affects most patients after a meniscal transplantation. Despite the advances in surgical techniques, together with the improved methods for a meniscal allograft sizing, success is only observed in up to 75% of patients after they experience a meniscal allograft transplantation. Because a meniscal extrusion is associated with a cartilage deterioration and the progression of osteoarthritis there is a great interest in how to prevent this phenomenon. The crucial factor for the minimisation of a meniscal allograft extrusion is by perfectly matching the implant. Most methods for a meniscal allograft sizing only focus on assessing the length and the width of the meniscus. Even though there is some evidence that there is a relationship between the shape of the meniscus in a cross-sectional plane and the meniscal extrusion, any of the planning methods do not take this factor into consideration. Although there is a large variability of meniscus shapes in cross-section, we hypothesise that by taking the meniscal slope into account during surgical planning, as well as performing the correct adjustments of this particular parameter, we can diminish the risk of a meniscal allograft extrusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prolongation of survival of rat cardiac allografts by T cell vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Reshef, T; Pfeffermann, R A; Cohen, I R

    1993-01-01

    Administration of attenuated, activated autoimmune T lymphocytes to syngeneic mice and rats has been shown to prevent or induce remission of experimental autoimmune diseases specific for the autoimmune T cells. The process has been termed "T cell vaccination." In a recent study, T cell vaccination was done using T cells sensitized to rat alloantigens. The procedure produced a significant reduction of the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) against allogeneic cells. The reduction in MLR was not specific: Vaccination with T cells specific for stimulator cells of one allotype led to a reduced MLR stimulated by cells of another allotype. The present study was undertaken to examine whether T cell vaccination can induce tolerance to transplantation antigens in vivo. We used the model of heterotopic cardiac transplantation in rats. We now report that vaccinating rats with syngeneic, activated, alloantigen-primed T lymphocytes significantly prolonged survival of rat cardiac allografts. The effect of T cell vaccination was most evident when the T cells had been obtained from rats specifically sensitized against the donor rats: Brown-Norway (BN) allografts in control Wistar rats survived 8.5 +/- 0.4 d while BN allografts survived 29.2 +/- 7.1 d in Wistar rats that had been vaccinated with Wistar anti-BN cells. Vaccination of Wistar rats with Wistar anti-hooded T cells prolonged survival of BN heart allografts to a lesser but significant degree (13.0 +/- 1.1 d). Thus, T cell vaccination of recipients can prolong survival of allografts. PMID:8432846

  18. Combination of conjugated linoleic acid with fish oil prevents age-associated bone marrow adiposity in C57Bl/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Halade, Ganesh V; Rahman, Md M; Williams, Paul J; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    The inverse relationship between fat in bone marrow and bone mass in the skeleton of aging subjects is well-known. However, there is no precise therapy for the treatment of bone marrow adiposity. We investigated the ability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and fish oil (FO), alone or in combination, to modulate bone loss using 12 months old C57Bl/6J mice fed 10% corn oil (CO) diet as control or supplemented with 0.5% CLA or 5% FO or 0.5% CLA+5% FO for 6 months. We found, CLA fed mice exhibited reduced body weight, body fat mass (BFM), and enhanced hind leg lean mass (HLLM) and bone mineral density (BMD) in different regions measured by DXA; however, associated with fatty liver and increased insulin resistance; whereas, FO fed mice exhibited enhanced BMD, improved insulin sensitivity, with no changes in BFM and HLLM. Interestingly, CLA+FO fed mice exhibited reduced body weight, BFM, PPARγ and cathepsin K expression in bone marrow with enhanced BMD and HLLM. Moreover, CLA+FO supplementation reduced liver hypertrophy and improved insulin sensitivity with remarkable attenuation of bone marrow adiposity, inflammation and oxidative stress in aging mice. Therefore, CLA with FO combination might be a novel dietary supplement to reduce fat mass and improve BMD. PMID:20656466

  19. Combination of conjugated linoleic acid with fish oil prevents age-associated bone marrow adiposity in C57Bl/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Halade, Ganesh V; Rahman, Md M; Williams, Paul J; Fernandes, Gabriel

    2011-05-01

    The inverse relationship between fat in bone marrow and bone mass in the skeleton of aging subjects is well known. However, there is no precise therapy for the treatment of bone marrow adiposity. We investigated the ability of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and fish oil (FO), alone or in combination, to modulate bone loss using 12 months old C57Bl/6J mice fed 10% corn oil diet as control or supplemented with 0.5% CLA or 5% FO or 0.5% CLA+5% FO for 6 months. We found, CLA-fed mice exhibited reduced body weight, body fat mass (BFM) and enhanced hind leg lean mass (HLLM) and bone mineral density (BMD) in different regions measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA); however, associated with fatty liver and increased insulin resistance; whereas, FO fed mice exhibited enhanced BMD, improved insulin sensitivity, with no changes in BFM and HLLM. Interestingly, CLA+FO fed mice exhibited reduced body weight, BFM, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and cathepsin K expression in bone marrow with enhanced BMD and HLLM. Moreover, CLA+FO supplementation reduced liver hypertrophy and improved insulin sensitivity with remarkable attenuation of bone marrow adiposity, inflammation and oxidative stress in aging mice. Therefore, CLA with FO combination might be a novel dietary supplement to reduce fat mass and improve BMD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Curcumin analog UBS109 prevents bone marrow osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Zhu, Shijun; Weitzmann, M Neale; Snyder, James P; Shoji, Mamoru

    2015-03-01

    UBS109 is a curcumin analog that possesses antitumor properties has been shown to stimulate osteoblastogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. This study was undertaken to determine whether UBS109 might alleviate the inhibitory activity of breast cancer cells on osteoblastic mineralization and stimulatory effects on osteoclastogenesis. Mouse bone marrow cells were cocultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. UBS109 stimulated osteoblastic mineralization and suppressed adipogenesis and osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed osteoblastic mineralization and enhanced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Effects that were reserved by UBS109 (50-200 nM). Mineralization in preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells was suppressed by coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells, while MDA-MB-231 cells did not have effects on osteoclastogenesis of RAW267.4 cells in vitro. UBS109 (500 nM) revealed toxic effects on MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells. This study demonstrates that UBS109, which is an antitumor agent, reveals restorative effects on bone marrow cell differentiation disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. This in vitro model may be a useful tool to evaluate the mechanism of breast cancer cell bone metastasis.

  1. Autograft versus Allograft for Cervical Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), non-ICBG autologous bone, and allograft in cervical spine fusion. To avoid problems at the donor site, various allograft materials have been used as a substitute for autograft. However, there are still questions as to the comparative effectiveness and safety of cadaver allograft compared with autologous ICBG. Methods A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases was conducted to identify studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with cervical degenerative disk disease using ICBG compared with non-ICBG autograft or allograft or non-ICBG autograft compared with allograft in the cervical spine. Radiographic fusion, patient-reported outcomes, and functional outcomes were the primary outcomes of interest. Adverse events were evaluated for safety. Results The search identified 13 comparative studies that met our inclusion criteria: 2 prospective cohort studies and 11 retrospective cohort studies. Twelve cohort studies compared allograft with ICBG autograft during anterior cervical fusion and demonstrated with a low evidence level of support that there are no differences in fusion percentages, pain scores, or functional results. There was insufficient evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with non-ICBG autograft for fusion, pain, revision, and functional and safety outcomes. No publications directly comparing non-ICBG autograft with ICBG were found. Conclusion Although the available literature suggests ICBG and allograft may have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes following anterior cervical fusion, there are too many limitations in the available literature to draw any significant conclusions. No individual study provided greater than class III evidence, and when evaluating the overall body of literature, no conclusion had better than low evidence support. A prospective

  2. CXCL4 Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Chronic Liver Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Shi, Yuan; Xie, Ke-Liang; Yin, Hai-Fang; Yan, Lu-nan; Lau, Wan-yee; Wang, Guo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver allograft dysfunction (CLAD) remains the most common cause of patient morbidity and allograft loss in liver transplant patients. However, the pathogenesis of CLAD has not been completely elucidated. By establishing rat CLAD models, in this study, we identified the informative CLAD-associated genes using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomics analysis and validated these results in recipient rat liver allografts. CXCL4, CXCR3, EGFR, JAK2, STAT3, and Collagen IV were associated with CLAD pathogenesis. We validated that CXCL4 is upstream of these informative genes in the isolated hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Blocking CXCL4 protects against CLAD by reducing liver fibrosis. Therefore, our results indicated that therapeutic approaches that neutralize CXCL4, a newly identified target of fibrosis, may represent a novel strategy for preventing and treating CLAD after liver transplantation. PMID:28053995

  3. Treatment with alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone preserves calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Gualtiero; Sordi, Andrea; Lonati, Caterina; Carlin, Andrea; Turcatti, Flavia; Leonardi, Patrizia; Gatti, Stefano; Catania, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Prevention of graft dysfunction is a major objective in transplantation medicine. Previous research on experimental heart transplantation indicated that treatment with the immunomodulatory peptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) improves histopathology, prolongs allograft survival, and reduces expression of the main tissue injury mediators. Because calcium-handling is critical in heart graft function, we determined the effects of transplantation injury and influences of alpha-MSH treatment on representative calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts. Hearts from Brown Norway rats were transplanted heterotopically into MHC incompatible Lewis rats. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C epsilon (PKC epsilon), sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2 (SERCA2a), arrestin-beta1 (Arrb1), cholinergic receptor M2 (Chrm2), and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (InsP(3)R1) were examined in: (1) non-transplanted donor hearts; (2) allografts from saline-treated rats; and (3) allografts from rats treated with the synthetic alpha-MSH analog Nle4-DPhe7-alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH) (100 microg i.p. every 12h). Transplantation injury was associated with severe reduction in calcium regulatory protein transcription and expression level. NDP-alpha-MSH administration partly reversed inhibition of protein transcription and almost completely prevented protein loss. Finally, because certain effects of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling on calcium handling in cardiac myocytes depend on activation of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), we determined Epac1 mRNA and protein expression in heart allografts. Transplantation injury markedly reduced Epac1. NDP-alpha-MSH treatment significantly preserved both Epac1 protein and mRNA in the allografts. Administration of alpha-MSH or related melanocortins could reduce transplantation-induced dysfunction through protection of heart calcium

  4. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with thrombocytopenia due to chronic bone marrow failure: a network meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Desborough, Michael; Estcourt, Lise J; Chaimani, Anna; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Hadjinicolaou, Andreas V; Vyas, Paresh; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To compare the relative efficacy of different treatments for thrombocytopenia (artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, rFXIII, thrombopoietin mimetics, antifibrinolytic drugs or platelet transfusions) in patients with chronic bone marrow failure and to derive a hierarchy of potential alternate treatments to platelet transfusions. PMID:27069420

  5. The natural history of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Nankivell, Brian J; Borrows, Richard J; Fung, Caroline L-S; O'Connell, Philip J; Allen, Richard D M; Chapman, Jeremy R

    2003-12-11

    With improved immunosuppression and early allograft survival, chronic allograft nephropathy has become the dominant cause of kidney-transplant failure. We evaluated the natural history of chronic allograft nephropathy in a prospective study of 120 recipients with type 1 diabetes, all but 1 of whom had received kidney-pancreas transplants. We obtained 961 kidney-transplant-biopsy specimens taken regularly from the time of transplantation to 10 years thereafter. Two distinctive phases of injury were evident as chronic allograft nephropathy evolved. An initial phase of early tubulointerstitial damage from ischemic injury (P<0.05), prior severe rejection (P<0.01), and subclinical rejection (P<0.01) predicted mild disease by one year, which was present in 94.2 percent of patients. Early subclinical rejection was common (affecting 45.7 percent of biopsy specimens at three months), and the risk was increased by the occurrence of a prior episode of severe rejection and reduced by tacrolimus and mycophenolate therapy (both P<0.05) and gradually abated after one year. Both subclinical rejection and chronic rejection were associated with increased tubulointerstitial damage (P<0.01). Beyond one year, a later phase of chronic allograft nephropathy was characterized by microvascular and glomerular injury. Chronic rejection (defined as persistent subclinical rejection for two years or longer) was uncommon (5.8 percent). Progressive high-grade arteriolar hyalinosis with luminal narrowing, increasing glomerulosclerosis, and additional tubulointerstitial damage was accompanied by the use of calcineurin inhibitors. Nephrotoxicity, implicated in late ongoing injury, was almost universal at 10 years, even in grafts with excellent early histologic findings. By 10 years, severe chronic allograft nephropathy was present in 58.4 percent of patients, with sclerosis in 37.3 percent of glomeruli. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular damage, once established, was irreversible, resulting in

  6. Scintigraphy of lower extremity cadaveric bone allografts in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sever, Z; Connolly, L P; Gebhardt, M C; Treves, S T

    1997-08-01

    To describe scintigraphic characteristics of bone allografts used in limb salvage reconstruction after resection of lower extremity osteosarcoma. The authors reviewed 85 skeletal scintigrams of 20 pediatric patients followed up for 0.5-5.7 years after resection of lower extremity osteosarcoma and allograft reconstruction. Uptake in the allograft and adjacent host tissues was assessed visually. Lack of tracer uptake in the allografts was seen in 99% of the studies and a faint rim of tracer localization outlining the allograft's periphery was seen in 95% of the studies. Increased uptake was noted at the allograft-host bone junction in 78% of the studies. Uptake was increased in the joint surfaces of native bones articulating with allografts (97% of studies), including the patella (93% of studies) when the knee was involved. These findings were stabilized as time passed. Cadaveric bone allografts have a characteristic scintigraphic appearance in this selected patient group that reflects the physiology of their incorporation process.

  7. Detection of hepatitis B virus in bone allografts from donors with occult hepatitis B infection.

    PubMed

    Mirabet, Vicente; Álvarez, Manuel; Luis-Hidalgo, Mar; Galán, Juan; Puig, Nieves; Larrea, Luis; Arbona, Cristina

    2017-07-26

    The implementation of nucleic acid testing in donor screening has improved the safety of tissue allografts. Although infectious disease transmission can be considered a rare event, the detection of occult hepatitis B infection remains challenging. The studies concerning this risk are mainly based on testing blood specimens. This work shows the correlation between results of samples obtained from donor blood and the corresponding tissue washing solution. Hepatitis B virus deoxyribonucleic acid was detected both in bone allografts from donors with serological profiles associated to active hepatitis B infection and occult hepatitis B infection. These results suggest that hepatitis B virus seems to concentrate in bone marrow even when a low viral load is present in peripheral blood. Even detection at molecular level is not enough to avoid the risk of hepatitis B virus transmission and a multiparametrical evaluation is required in tissue donor screening. The role of clinicians in recognition and reporting of allograft-associated infections is a major concern for the acquisition of experience to be applied in risk control of disease transmission.

  8. REJECTION OF ASCITES TUMOR ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Berke, Gideon; Sullivan, Karen A.; Amos, Bernard

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells (PEC), obtained after the rejection of EL4 leukemia by BALB/c mice, are much more effective in the specific in vitro destruction of 51Cr-labeled EL4 cells than are spleen, thymus, lymph node, or peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of a large number of effector cells at the site of graft rejection is reflected in the potent cytolytic activity seen in vitro. Effector cells temporarily lose cytolytic reactivity when treated with trypsin but regain reactivity with time. This recovery occurs in normal as well as in immune serum. The destructive reactivity of PEC is increased when macrophages are removed. The remaining population of nonadherent PEC is composed primarily of small- to medium-sized lymphocytes. Complex tissue culture media are not needed, but there is a definite requirement for serum. The required serum component is heat stable, nondialyzable, and is not consumed during the reaction. The use of an ascites allograft system made these observations possible and permitted the isolation of those host cells intimately associated with rejection. PMID:5025438

  9. Allograft materials in phalloplasty: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Mark P; Komlo, Caroline; Defrain, Molly

    2013-09-01

    Allograft use has increased recently with the rising use of allograft materials in breast surgery. There are few data that compare the performance of the various allograft materials in this application, despite marketing efforts by the manufacturers to present one allograft material as superior to another. Phalloplasty is a procedure that uses allografts for penis girth augmentation. Preparation of these grafts differs with each manufacturer. We report our experience with 3 different types of allografts for this procedure. This allows for the comparison of these materials in their performance with a single model. Forty-seven patients who underwent penis girth enhancement with allograft material were reviewed. All patients underwent circumferential grafting to the shaft of the penis at the level of Buck's fascia. Graft materials included AlloDerm (n = 9), Belladerm (n = 20), and Repriza (n = 21). Charts were reviewed for material type, presence and type of infection, wound exposure, and graft loss with attention to the type of allograft material that was used. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 120 months with an average of 11.25 months. Infection, defined as an open wound with graft exposure, occurred in 20 (42%) of 47 patients. Of these, graft exposure only occurred in 17 (36%) patients, whereas 3 (6%) patients sustained total graft loss. Graft exposure or loss occurred in 3 patients who had AlloDerm, 9 patients with Belladerm, and 8 patients with Repriza. No patients with AlloDerm sustained graft loss, whereas 2 patients with Belladerm and 1 patient with Repriza sustained graft loss. There were no statistical differences among these graft types with regard to infection or graft loss. Three different brands of allograft material were used in 1 surgical procedure and followed up for their performance with regard to exposure and infection. In this model, there is no difference in the rate of infection in these materials despite their different methods of preparation

  10. Genetics and Epigenetics of Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Samadi, Nasser; Mostafidi, Elmira; Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Chronic allograft dysfunction is the most common cause of allograft lost. Chronic allograft dysfunction happens as a result of complex interactions at the molecular and cellular levels. Genetic and environmental factors both influence the evolution and progression of the chronic allograft dysfunction. Epigenetic modification could be considered as a therapeutically modifiable element to pause the fibrosis process through novel strategies. In this review, the PubMed database was searched for English-language articles on these new areas.

  11. Current Safety of Renal Allograft Biopsy With Indication in Adult Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shang-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Cheng, Chi-Hung; Yu, Tung-Min; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ting; Tsai, Jun-Li; Wu, Ming-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Renal biopsy remains the golden standard diagnosis of renal function deterioration. The safety in native kidney biopsy is well defined. However, it is a different story in allograft kidney biopsy. We conduct this retrospective study to clarify the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication. All variables were grouped by the year of biopsy and they were compared by Mann–Whitney U test (for continuous variables) or Chi-square test (for categorical variables). We collected possible factors associated with complications, including age, gender, body weight, renal function, cause of uremia, status of coagulation, hepatitis, size of needle, and immunosuppressants. We recruited all renal transplant recipients undergoing allograft biopsy between January of 2009 and December of 2014. This is the largest database for allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Of all the 269 biopsies, there was no difference in occurrence among the total 14 complications (5.2%) over these 6 years. There were only 3 cases of hematomas (1.11%), 6 gross hematuria (2.23%), 1 hydronephrosis (0.37%), and 2 hemoglobin decline (0.74%). The outcome of this cohort is the best compared to all other studies, and it is even better than the allograft protocol kidney biopsy. Among all possible factors, patients with pathological report containing “medullary tissue only” were susceptible to complications (P < 0.001, 1.8 of relative risk). In modern era, this study demonstrates the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Identifying the renal capsule before biopsy to avoid puncture into medulla is the most important element to prevent complications. PMID:26871853

  12. Current Safety of Renal Allograft Biopsy With Indication in Adult Recipients: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Cheng, Chi-Hung; Yu, Tung-Min; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ting; Tsai, Jun-Li; Wu, Ming-Ju

    2016-02-01

    Renal biopsy remains the golden standard diagnosis of renal function deterioration. The safety in native kidney biopsy is well defined. However, it is a different story in allograft kidney biopsy. We conduct this retrospective study to clarify the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication.All variables were grouped by the year of biopsy and they were compared by Mann-Whitney U test (for continuous variables) or Chi-square test (for categorical variables). We collected possible factors associated with complications, including age, gender, body weight, renal function, cause of uremia, status of coagulation, hepatitis, size of needle, and immunosuppressants.We recruited all renal transplant recipients undergoing allograft biopsy between January of 2009 and December of 2014. This is the largest database for allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Of all the 269 biopsies, there was no difference in occurrence among the total 14 complications (5.2%) over these 6 years. There were only 3 cases of hematomas (1.11%), 6 gross hematuria (2.23%), 1 hydronephrosis (0.37%), and 2 hemoglobin decline (0.74%). The outcome of this cohort is the best compared to all other studies, and it is even better than the allograft protocol kidney biopsy. Among all possible factors, patients with pathological report containing "medullary tissue only" were susceptible to complications (P < 0.001, 1.8 of relative risk).In modern era, this study demonstrates the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Identifying the renal capsule before biopsy to avoid puncture into medulla is the most important element to prevent complications.

  13. Immediate retransplantation for pancreas allograft thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, E F; Powelson, J A; Mangus, R S; Kazimi, M M; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2009-04-01

    Early pancreas allograft failure most commonly results from thrombosis and requires immediate allograft pancreatectomy. Optimal timing for retransplantation remains undefined. Immediate retransplantation facilitates reuse of the same anatomic site before extensive adhesions have formed. Some studies suggest that early retransplantation is associated with a higher incidence of graft loss. This study is a retrospective review of immediate pancreas retransplants performed at a single center. All cases of pancreas allograft loss within 2 weeks were examined. Of 228 pancreas transplants, 12 grafts were lost within 2 weeks of surgery. Eleven of these underwent allograft pancreatectomy for thrombosis. One suffered anoxic brain injury and was not a retransplantation candidate, one was retransplanted at 3.5 months and nine patients underwent retransplantation 1-16 days following the original transplant. Of the nine early retransplants, one pancreas was lost to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, one recipient died with function at 2.9 years and the other grafts continue to function at 76-1137 days (mean 572 days). One-year graft survival for early retransplantation was 89% compared to 91% for all pancreas transplants at our center. Immediate retransplantation following pancreatic graft thrombosis restores durable allograft function with outcomes comparable to first-time pancreas transplantation.

  14. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  15. Suppression of Chronic Damage in Renal Allografts by Liver X Receptor (LXR) Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Eva; Popovic, Zoran; Bedke, Jens; Wang, Shijun; Bonrouhi, Mahnaz; Gretz, Norbert; Stettner, Paula; Teupser, Daniel; Thiery, Joachim; Porubsky, Stefan; Adams, Judith; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2011-01-01

    Liver X receptors (LXR)-α,β regulate intracellular cholesterol homeostasis and inhibit inflammatory gene expression. We studied the effects of the LXRα,β-agonist GW3965 on acute and chronic organ damage in the F344-LEW rat kidney transplantation model. In addition, to gain LXR isoform and cell-specific insights BALB/c kidneys were transplanted into mice with macrophage overexpression of LXRα (mLXRα-tg) and evaluated 7 and 42 days after transplantation. After 56 days GW3965 improved significantly function and morphology of rat kidney allografts by substantial reduction of mononuclear cell infiltrate and fibrosis; in vitro GW3965 reduced inflammatory activity of bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMDMs) and alloreactivity of T cells. Kidneys transplanted into mLXRα-tg mice were also protected from development of chronic allograft dysfunction. Similarly to GW3965-activated BMDMs, mLXRα-tg macrophages secreted significantly less monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β. Interestingly, 7 days after transplantation, when the total number of intragraft macrophages did not differ, evidently more arginase 1– and mannose receptor C type 1–positive cells were found in LXR rat and mice kidney allografts; in vitro both LXR activation by GW3965 and mLXRα overexpression accentuated the induction of alternative activation of BMDMs by IL-4/IL-13, suggesting an additional mechanism by LXRs to prevent graft damage. The results highlight the relevance of macrophage LXRα in allograft rejection and prevention of fibrosis. PMID:21703396

  16. Renal allograft eosinophilia: An unusual presentation of sudden graft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yuvaraj, A.; Ghosh, S.; Abraham, G.; Koshy, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of sudden allograft dysfunction 11 months after renal transplantation which presented as severe peripheral and allograft eosinophilia and was managed as a case of an acute cellular rejection with significant interstitial graft eosinophilic infiltration. Patient had partial response to antirejection therapy and eventually ended up in a chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:28356665

  17. Active haemorrhage of a renal allograft detected on portable ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, James; Pang, Chun Lap; Dissanayake, Prageeth; Hutchinson, Rachel; Gutteridge, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Function of a renal allograft relies on the integrity of its vascular anatomy. Renal biochemistry, ultrasound and percutaneous biopsy are used in combination to determine allograft function. Biopsy is not without risk, and in this case study we demonstrate a rare but a potentially life-threatening complication of renal allograft biopsy. PMID:23682093

  18. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  19. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's ...

  20. Systemic Preconditioning by a Prolyl Hydroxylase Inhibitor Promotes Prevention of Skin Flap Necrosis via HIF-1-Induced Bone Marrow-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takaku, Mitsuru; Tomita, Shuhei; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Kihira, Yoshitaka; Morimoto, Atsushi; Higashida, Mayuko; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Ushiyama, Akira; Hashimoto, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Hideki; Tamaki, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Background Local skin flaps often present with flap necrosis caused by critical disruption of the blood supply. Although animal studies demonstrate enhanced angiogenesis in ischemic tissue, no strategy for clinical application of this phenomenon has yet been defined. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) plays a pivotal role in ischemic vascular responses, and its expression is induced by the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). We assessed whether preoperative stabilization of HIF-1 by systemic introduction of DMOG improves skin flap survival. Methods and Results Mice with ischemic skin flaps on the dorsum were treated intraperitoneally with DMOG 48 hr prior to surgery. The surviving area with neovascularization of the ischemic flaps was significantly greater in the DMOG-treated mice. Significantly fewer apoptotic cells were present in the ischemic flaps of DMOG-treated mice. Interestingly, marked increases in circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and bone marrow proliferative progenitor cells were observed within 48 hr after DMOG treatment. Furthermore, heterozygous HIF-1α-deficient mice exhibited smaller surviving flap areas, fewer circulating EPCs, and larger numbers of apoptotic cells than did wild-type mice, while DMOG pretreatment of the mutant mice completely restored these parameters. Finally, reconstitution of wild-type mice with the heterozygous deficient bone marrow cells significantly decreased skin flap survival. Conclusion We demonstrated that transient activation of the HIF signaling pathway by a single systemic DMOG treatment upregulates not only anti-apoptotic pathways but also enhances neovascularization with concomitant increase in the numbers of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. PMID:22880134

  1. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    mimics the production of the human nerve allograft product used clinically. This includes detergent decellularization , treatment with...is  on  schedule.     The  early  Milestone  to  obtain  ACURO  approval  for   animal  use  was  accomplished...months  1-­‐6):       Task  1a.    Collect,  process  ( decellularize )  and  prepare  7  cm  acellular  allografts

  2. The influence of organ donor factors on early allograft function.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Christoph; Oberbauer, Rainer

    2003-03-01

    Postischaemic acute renal allograft failure is among the main risk factors for reduced transplant survival. Although new immunosuppressive protocols have reduced the number of acute rejections, the incidence of acute renal failure remained unchanged. On the basis of histomorphology it is not possible to predict donor kidneys at risk of subsequent failure. Some factors are associated with failure, but even combinations of these risk factors can not precisely predict the development of acute renal failure. Studies have therefore evaluated the influence of demographic donor and recipient factors on acute renal failure. New biotechnology and data mining tools are currently being used to study and identify the molecular predictors of acute renal failure. Recent studies showed that donor factors contributed to approximately 40% of the variability in early allograft function. Deductive approaches identified some isolated molecular targets, such as adhesion molecules, as risk factors. Explorative analysis of the entire human genome, however, identified several predictive clusters of genes, which can be functionally grouped into categories such as cell death, stress response, cell adhesion, transcription factors, inflammatory response or cell cycle-related genes. Based on this information, preventative strategies using antisense oligonucleotides or antibodies were adopted. Clinical studies identified the use of catecholamines in the organ donor as beneficial. All these efforts aim to reduce renal tubular damage. A detailed analysis of the molecular events and pathways of renal gene expression in the donor and after reperfusion, together with sophisticated data analysis tools, will provide new insights into the pathophysiology of acute renal failure.

  3. Immunohistological observations in rat kidney allografts after local steroid administration

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    In this report we investigated local regulatory mechanisms in graft rejection and their response to local immunosuppressive therapy. For this purpose local immunosuppression was induced in rat kidney allografts by intrarenal infusion of prednisolone. Intrarenal drug delivery resulted in high drug levels within the graft and low systemic drug levels. Systemic drug levels were by themselves not sufficiently immunosuppressive to induce graft survival, and local prednisolone levels within the graft proved to be responsible for prolongation of graft survival. During intrarenal drug delivery, systemic responsiveness to the renal allograft proved normal, since intrarenally treated grafts were infiltrated by MHC class II-positive host cells and, except for a somewhat lower percentage of macrophages, cellular infiltration in intrarenal treated grafts was comparable to untreated grafts. However, T cells and macrophages present in intrarenally treated grafts were not able to destroy the grafted tissue. Local immunosuppressive therapy resulted in inhibition of IL-2-R expression, absence of IFN-gamma, and prevention of MHC class II induction on grafted tissue. These observations strongly indicate the presence of local regulatory mechanisms in graft rejection. The experimental model described can be used for further analysis of these intragraft events. Moreover, the results demonstrate that local immunosuppressive therapy can contribute to effective inhibition of cellular immune response in graft rejection. PMID:3119756

  4. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  5. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasing the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-hr interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplo-type-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  6. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  7. Bioengineering Thymus Organoids to Restore Thymic Function and Induce Donor-Specific Immune Tolerance to Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Tajima, Asako; Goh, Saik Kia; Geng, Xuehui; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; Bertera, Suzanne; Rudert, William A; Banerjee, Ipsita; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    One of the major obstacles in organ transplantation is to establish immune tolerance of allografts. Although immunosuppressive drugs can prevent graft rejection to a certain degree, their efficacies are limited, transient, and associated with severe side effects. Induction of thymic central tolerance to allografts remains challenging, largely because of the difficulty of maintaining donor thymic epithelial cells in vitro to allow successful bioengineering. Here, the authors show that three-dimensional scaffolds generated from decellularized mouse thymus can support thymic epithelial cell survival in culture and maintain their unique molecular properties. When transplanted into athymic nude mice, the bioengineered thymus organoids effectively promoted homing of lymphocyte progenitors and supported thymopoiesis. Nude mice transplanted with thymus organoids promptly rejected skin allografts and were able to mount antigen-specific humoral responses against ovalbumin on immunization. Notably, tolerance to skin allografts was achieved by transplanting thymus organoids constructed with either thymic epithelial cells coexpressing both syngeneic and allogenic major histocompatibility complexes, or mixtures of donor and recipient thymic epithelial cells. Our results demonstrate the technical feasibility of restoring thymic function with bioengineered thymus organoids and highlight the clinical implications of this thymus reconstruction technique in organ transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:25903472

  8. Bone marrow cells are a source of undifferentiated cells to prevent Sjögren’s syndrome and to preserve salivary glands function in the non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Saeed; Liu, Younan; Sumita, Yoshinori; Maria, Ola M.; Blank, David; Key, Sharon; Mezey, Eva; Tran, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice develop Sjögren’s-like syndrome (Ss) and a gradual loss of saliva secretory function. Our previous study showed that injections of matched normal spleen cells with Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) reversed salivary gland dysfunction in 14-week-old NOD mice, which had established Ss. The spleen and bone marrow are closely related organs, and both are among the first sites of hematopoiesis during gestation. Noticing a rapidly increasing number of clinical trials using bone marrow (BM) cells treatments for autoimmune diseases, we tested if BM cells can prevent Ss and restore salivary glands’ function. We injected CFA and MHC class I-matched normal BM cells in 7-week-old NOD mice, which had not yet developed Ss. We found at week 52 post-treatment that all NOD mice receiving BM cells and CFA had a recovery of salivary flow and were protected from Ss and diabetes. BM cells-treated mice had their salivary function restored quantitatively and qualitatively. Saliva flow was higher (p < 0.05) in BM cells-transplanted mice when compared to control mice, which continued to deteriorate over time. Total proteins, epidermal growth factor, amylase, and electrolytes concentrations in saliva of BM cells-treated mice were not significantly changed at week 44 and 52 post-therapy when compared to pre-therapy (when the mice did not have Ss). Restoration of salivary flow could have resulted from a combination of rescue and paracrine effects from BM cells. This study suggests that a combined immuno- and cell-based therapy can permanently prevent Ss and restored salivary function in NOD mice. PMID:20732442

  9. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P < 0.0001). Controlling for chondral lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  10. The Spleen is the Major Source of Anti-Donor Antibody Secreting Cells in Murine Heart Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sicard, Antoine; Phares, Timothy W.; Yu, Hong; Fan, Ran; Baldwin, William M.; Fairchild, Robert L.; Valujskikh, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Antibody mediated allograft rejection is an increasingly recognized problem in clinical transplantation. However, the primary location of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) producing cells after transplantation have not been identified. The purpose of this study was to test the contribution of allospecific antibody secreting cells (ASCs) from different anatomical compartments in a mouse transplantation model. Fully MHC-mismatched heart allografts were transplanted into three groups of recipients: non-sensitized wild type, alloantigen-sensitized wild type and CCR5−/− mice that have exaggerated alloantibody responses. We found that previous sensitization to donor alloantigens resulted in the development of anti-donor alloantibody (alloAb) with accelerated kinetics. Nevertheless, the numbers of alloantibody secreting cells and the serum titers of anti-donor IgG alloantibody were equivalent in sensitized and non-sensitized recipients six weeks after transplantation. Regardless of recipient sensitization status, the spleen contained higher numbers of donor-reactive ASCs than bone marrow at days 7–21 after transplantation. Furthermore, individual spleen ASCs produced more anti-donor IgG alloantibody than bone marrow ASCs. Taken together, our results indicate that the spleen rather than bone marrow is the major source of donor-reactive alloAb early after transplantation in both sensitized and non-sensitized recipients. PMID:22420367

  11. Fetuin, Matrix-Gla Protein and Osteopontin in Calcification of Renal Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, Johan M.; Martino, Filippo; Scheffner, Irina; Bröcker, Verena; Leitolf, Holger; Haller, Hermann; Gwinner, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    Background Calcification of renal allografts is common in the first year after transplantation and is related to hyperparathyroidism. It is associated with an impaired long-term function of the graft (Am J Transplant 5∶1934-41, 2005). Aim of this study is to examine the role of the anti-calcifying/calcifying factors in the pathophysiology of renal allograft calcification. Methods We analyzed protocol allograft biopsies, blood and urine samples of 31 patients with and 27 patients without allograft calcification taken at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months after transplantation. Patient demographical data, cold ischemia time, initial graft function and donor characteristics were comparable between the two groups. Biopsies were stained for osteopontin, fetuin, and matrix-gla-protein. Serum and urine electrolytes, matrix-gla-protein, fetuin, Vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone in serum and osteopontin (OPN) in urine were examined. Results Serum levels of fetuin and matrix-Gla protein as well as urinary levels of OPN showed specific time dependent changes (6 weeks vs. 3 months vs. 6 months; all p<0.0001). In patients with calcifications, urinary levels of OPN were decreased by 55% at 6 weeks and increased thereafter, showing 54% higher levels at 6 months compared to patients without calcification (6 weeks: p<0.01, 6 months: p<0.05). Local protein expression of fetuin-A, matrix-Gla protein and OPN in the graft was specifically increased around calcified plaques, without differences in the mRNA tissue expression. Conclusion Anticalcifying factors show significant changes in the early phase after renal transplantation, which may be important for the prevention of allograft calcification. The differences in OPN indicate an involvement of this factor in the regulation of calcification. PMID:23284864

  12. Fetuin, matrix-Gla protein and osteopontin in calcification of renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Johan M; Martino, Filippo; Scheffner, Irina; Bröcker, Verena; Leitolf, Holger; Haller, Hermann; Gwinner, Wilfried

    2012-01-01

    Calcification of renal allografts is common in the first year after transplantation and is related to hyperparathyroidism. It is associated with an impaired long-term function of the graft (Am J Transplant 5∶1934-41, 2005). Aim of this study is to examine the role of the anti-calcifying/calcifying factors in the pathophysiology of renal allograft calcification. We analyzed protocol allograft biopsies, blood and urine samples of 31 patients with and 27 patients without allograft calcification taken at 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months after transplantation. Patient demographical data, cold ischemia time, initial graft function and donor characteristics were comparable between the two groups. Biopsies were stained for osteopontin, fetuin, and matrix-gla-protein. Serum and urine electrolytes, matrix-gla-protein, fetuin, Vitamin D and intact parathyroid hormone in serum and osteopontin (OPN) in urine were examined. Serum levels of fetuin and matrix-Gla protein as well as urinary levels of OPN showed specific time dependent changes (6 weeks vs. 3 months vs. 6 months; all p<0.0001). In patients with calcifications, urinary levels of OPN were decreased by 55% at 6 weeks and increased thereafter, showing 54% higher levels at 6 months compared to patients without calcification (6 weeks: p<0.01, 6 months: p<0.05). Local protein expression of fetuin-A, matrix-Gla protein and OPN in the graft was specifically increased around calcified plaques, without differences in the mRNA tissue expression. Anticalcifying factors show significant changes in the early phase after renal transplantation, which may be important for the prevention of allograft calcification. The differences in OPN indicate an involvement of this factor in the regulation of calcification.

  13. Results of free vascularized fibula grafting for allograft nonunion after limb salvage surgery for malignant bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M; Gebhardt, Mark C

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the results of free vascularized fibula grafting (FVFG) in the treatment of allograft fracture nonunion after limb salvage surgery for malignant bone tumors.A retrospective study was performed on 8 patients who underwent FVFG for allograft fracture nonunions. All had prior tumor resection and allograft reconstruction for osteosarcoma (n = 6) or Ewing sarcoma (n = 2) of the femur (n = 3), tibia (n = 2), humerus (n = 2), or ulna (n = 1). All patients failed an initial course of immobilization; 4 patients failed prior open reduction and internal fixation with autogenous nonvascularized bone grafting. Average age at the time of FVFG was 14 years. Average follow-up was 44 months. The FVFG resulted in successful bony healing in 7 of 8 patients, providing pain relief, limb preservation, and restoration of function. One patient developed an infection requiring fibula removal and staged prosthetic reconstruction. Additional complications requiring further treatment included limb-length discrepancy, additional allograft fracture, and wound infection. The FVFG is an effective treatment option for allograft nonunion after limb salvage surgery because it provides both the mechanical stability and biological stimulus for bony healing. Attention to internal fixation, limb alignment, and microvascular principles is essential to prevent complications and allow for the best functional outcomes.

  14. Predictors of soft-tissue complications and deep infection in allograft reconstruction of the proximal tibia.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A; Swaim, Sara O; Federico, Amy; Anderson, Megan E; Gebhardt, Mark C

    2016-06-01

    Reconstruction of the proximal tibia after wide resection of malignant tumors in the pediatric population is very challenging. Advocates of allograft reconstruction argue as advantages bone preservation, biological reconstruction that facilitates reattachment of the extensor mechanism and other soft-tissue structures, delay of metallic prosthesis use and preservation of the distal femoral growth plate. However, complications are significant, infection being very common. Under IRB-approved protocol, 32 patients (17 males, 15 females), 13 years old in average (2-20), who underwent 33 allograft reconstructions of the proximal tibia, were evaluated for the occurrence of soft-tissue complications and/or deep infection (infection affecting the allograft). Potential predictors of soft-tissue complications and deep infection, categorized as pre- and perioperative variables, were analyzed in relation to the risk for developing a soft-tissue complication or a deep infection. The prevalence of soft-tissue complications was 48% (16/33). However, we were not able to identify any significant predictors. The prevalence of deep (allograft) infection was 15% (5/33). Multivariate logistic regression determined higher BMI at the index surgical procedure and lower pre-operative WBC to be independent predictors of deep infection. For each unit of increase in BMI, the odds of deep infection increased by 40% (OR = 1.40; CI = 1.07-3.06; P < 0.05). For each one unit (1,000) of increase in the pre-operative white cell-count, the odds of deep infection decreased by 70% (OR = 0.30; 95%CI = 0.01-0.89; P < 0.05). Four of the five deep infections were in patients with soft-tissue complications, mainly wound dehiscence. However, wound dehiscence or soft-tissue complications were not predictive of deep infection. Soft-tissue complications are prevalent in allograft reconstruction of the proximal tibia. Prevention is important as these may progress to deep infection. Careful

  15. Humeral Head Reconstruction With Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Riboh, Jonathan C; Cole, Brian J; Yanke, Adam B

    2015-09-01

    To synthesize, in a systematic review, the available clinical evidence of osteochondral allograft transplants for large osteochondral defects of the humeral head. The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies reporting clinical or radiographic outcomes of osteochondral allograft transplantation for humeral head defects. Descriptive statistics were provided for all outcomes. After checking for data normality, we compared postoperative and preoperative values using the Student t test. We included 12 studies (8 case reports and 4 case series) in this review. The study group consisted of 35 patients. The mean age was 35.4 ± 18.1 years; 77% of patients were male patients. Thirty-three patients had large Hill-Sachs lesions due to instability, 1 had an osteochondritis dissecans lesion, and 1 had an iatrogenic lesion after resection of synovial chondromatosis. The mean lesion size was 3 ± 1.4 cm (anteroposterior) by 2.25 ± 0.3 cm (medial-lateral), representing on average 40.5% ± 4.73% of the native articular surface. Of the 35 patients, 3 received a fresh graft, with all others receiving frozen grafts. Twenty-three femoral heads, 10 humeral heads, and 2 sets of osteochondral plugs were used. The mean length of follow-up was 57 months. Significant improvements were seen in forward flexion at 6 months (68° ± 18.1°, P < .001), forward flexion at 12 months (83.42° ± 18.3°, P < .001), and external rotation at 12 months (38.72° ± 18.8°, P < .001). American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved by 14 points (P = .02). Radiographic studies at final follow-up showed allograft necrosis in 8.7% of cases, resorption in 36.2%, and glenohumeral arthritic changes in 35.7%. Complication rates were between 20% and 30%, and the reoperation rate was 26.67%. Although only 3 patients received fresh allografts, there were no reports of graft resorption, necrosis, or arthritic changes in these patients. Humeral head allograft-most commonly used in the

  16. Factors Predicting Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nicholas; Asplin, Laura; Thompson, Peter; Spalding, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is performed to improve symptoms and function in patients with a meniscal-deficient compartment of the knee. Numerous studies have shown a consistent improvement in patient-reported outcomes, but high failure rates have been reported by some studies. The typical patients undergoing MAT often have multiple other pathologies that require treatment at the time of surgery. The factors that predict failure of a meniscal allograft within this complex patient group are not clearly defined. Purpose: To determine predictors of MAT failure in a large series to refine the indications for surgery and better inform future patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All patients undergoing MAT at a single institution between May 2005 and May 2014 with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were prospectively evaluated and included in this study. Failure was defined as removal of the allograft, revision transplantation, or conversion to a joint replacement. Patients were grouped according to the articular cartilage status at the time of the index surgery: group 1, intact or partial-thickness chondral loss; group 2, full-thickness chondral loss 1 condyle; and group 3, full-thickness chondral loss both condyles. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine significant predictors of failure, independently of other factors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were produced for overall survival and significant predictors of failure in the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: There were 125 consecutive MATs performed, with 1 patient lost to follow-up. The median follow-up was 3 years (range, 1-10 years). The 5-year graft survival for the entire cohort was 82% (group 1, 97%; group 2, 82%; group 3, 62%). The probability of failure in group 1 was 85% lower (95% CI, 13%-97%) than in group 3 at any time. The probability of failure with lateral allografts was 76% lower (95% CI, 16%-89%) than medial allografts at

  17. Amniotic fluid and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells can be converted to smooth muscle cells in the cryo-injured rat bladder and prevent compensatory hypertrophy of surviving smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    De Coppi, Paolo; Callegari, Andrea; Chiavegato, Angela; Gasparotto, Lisa; Piccoli, Martina; Taiani, Jenny; Pozzobon, Michela; Boldrin, Luisa; Okabe, Masaru; Cozzi, Emanuele; Atala, Anthony; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Sartore, Saverio

    2007-01-01

    Wound healing of the cryo-injured bladder can bring about organ remodeling because of incomplete reconstitution of depleted smooth muscle cells. Stem cell transplantation could be beneficial to improve smooth muscle cell regeneration and/or modulate the remodeling process. The repair of bladder injury using adult-type stem cells would be useful for adult urological patients but unsuited for neonatal patients, in whom major benefits are likely to derive from fetal-type stem cells. The smooth muscle cell differentiation potential of fetal-type vs adult-type stem cells was evaluated by injecting green fluorescent protein labeled mesenchymal stem cells from rat amniotic fluid or bone marrow, respectively, in cryo-injured rat bladder walls. At 30 days after transplantation only a few fetal-type or adult-type mesenchymal stem cells gave rise to enteric or vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas most mesenchymal stem cells appeared incapable of specific differentiation. In vitro co-culture experiments of smooth muscle cells with fetal-type or adult-type mesenchymal stem cells selectively labeled with distinct fluorochromes showed the presence of hybrid cells, suggesting that some mesenchymal stem cells can undergo cell fusion. Surprisingly the major effect of rat bone marrow or amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cell transplantation seemed to be preventing cryo-injury induced hypertrophy of surviving smooth muscle cells. In this model stem cell transplantation has a limited effect on smooth muscle cell regeneration. Instead it can regulate post-injury bladder remodeling, possibly via a paracrine mechanism.

  18. Mechanisms of allograft rejection of corneal endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Y.; Silverstein, A.M.; Prendergast, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    The local intraocular graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction, involving the destruction of the corneal endothelial cells of the rabbit host by sensitized donor lymphoid cells, has been used to study the mechanism of corneal allograft rejection. Pretreatment of donor cells with a specific mouse monoclonal hybridoma anti-T cell antibody and complement suppresses the destructive reaction, suggesting that a cellular-immune mechanism is primarily involved. Pretreatment of donor cells with mitomycin-C completely abolishes the local GVH reaction, indicating that the effector lymphocytes must undergo mitosis within the eye before they can engage in target cell destruction. Finally, studies of the local GVH reaction in irradiated leukopenic recipients or in preinflamed rabbit eyes suggest that host leukocytes may contribute nonspecifically to enhance the destructive process. These studies show that the local ocular GVH reaction may provide a useful model for the study of the mechanisms involved in the rejection of corneal allografts.

  19. Allograft vasculopathy after allogeneic vascularized knee transplantation.

    PubMed

    Diefenbeck, Michael; Nerlich, Andreas; Schneeberger, Stefan; Wagner, Frithjof; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2011-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation represents a new discipline in reconstructive surgery. Over the past 10 years, we have performed six human vascularized allogeneic knee transplantations. All of these grafts have been lost within the first 56 months. A histomorphologic assessment of the latest case resulted in the detection of diffuse concentric fibrous intimal thickening and occlusion of graft vessels. Findings are comparable with cardiac allograft vasculopathy. The lack of adequate tools for monitoring graft rejection might have allowed multiple untreated episodes of acute rejection, triggering myointimal proliferation and occlusion of graft vessels. Graft vasculopathy represents an obstacle to long-term vascularized bone and joint allograft survival, and adequate tools for monitoring need to be developed.

  20. Combined treatment of amyloid-β₁₋₄₂-stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells plus splenocytes from young mice prevents the development of Alzheimer's disease in APPswe/PSENldE9 mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Hanqiu; Shen, Xueyan; Ao, Hong; Moore, Nick; Gao, Lingling; Chen, Long; Hu, Heng; Ma, Huiying; Yang, Zixiao; Zhai, Chunxiao; Qin, Jie; Zhou, Guomin; Peng, Yuwen; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Li, Ruixi; Liang, Chunmin

    2015-01-01

    Anti-amyloid-β (Aβ) immunotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid plaques and amyloid-associated pathologies in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Immune senescence with aging has also played a crucial role in AD pathogenesis and influences the effect of anti-Aβ immunotherapy. In this study, a combined treatment of Aβ₁₋₄₂-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) with intraperitoneal injection of splenocytes from young mice was designed as a novel immunotherapy for AD in APPswe/PSEN1de9 transgenic mice models. The results showed that the combined treatment not only elevated the level of anti-Aβ antibodies but also reduced amyloid plaques in brain and finally ameliorated deterioration of spatial learning and memory in AD mice. Additionally, the results revealed an increase of CD68 positive microglial cells in the vicinity of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain, which was responsible for the enhanced phagocytosis of Aβ plaques. In conclusion, the Aβ₁₋₄₂-BMDCs plus splenocytes treatment improved the phagocytosis of microglia and prevented AD pathology more effectively. This combined immunotherapy provided a promising treatment in preventing the progression of AD in clinical studies in the near future.

  1. Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Error processing SSI file About Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Heart disease and stroke are an epidemic in ... secondhand smoke. Barriers to Effective Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention Many people with key risk factors for heart ...

  2. Osseous metaplasia in a kidney allograft.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Stanislas; Daniel, Laurent; Legris, Tristan; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Purgus, Raj; Berland, Yvon; Moal, Valerie

    2010-11-01

    Osseous metaplasia is defined by the presence of heterotopic normal bone tissue in a soft tissue. The bone matrix is associated with osteoblasts, osteoclasts, adipocytes and haematopoietic stem cells. Osseous metaplasia pathophysiology is not well known, but many factors have been incriminated including chronic inflammation and chronic ischaemia. We describe the second case of osseous metaplasia in a kidney allograft. Numerous factors might favour its development including factors linked to transplantation failure environment.

  3. [Tubulointerstitial rejection of renal allografts].

    PubMed

    Malušková, Jana; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Tubulo-intersticial rejection represents T-cell mediated rejection of kidney allografts with the morphology of immune-mediated interstitial nephritis. Diagnosis is dependent on the histopathological evaluation of a graft biopsy sample. The key morphological features are interstitial inflammatory infiltrate and damage to tubular epithelial cell which in severe cases can result in the ruptures of the tubular basement membranes. The differential diagnosis of tubulo-interstitial rejection includes acute interstitial nephritis and viral inflammatory kidney diseases, mainly polyomavirus nephropathy.

  4. Procurement of hand and arm allografts.

    PubMed

    Cetrulo, Curtis L; Kovach, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Upper extremity transplantation has been at the forefront of vascularized composite allotransplantation. There have been more hand and upper extremity transplants than any other kinds of vascularized composite allotransplantation. However, it is a new and evolving field. Reconstructive surgeons are relative newcomers to the field of transplantation, and the procurement of upper extremity allografts has many subtleties that will differ depending on the intended recipient. However, there are certain principles that can be adhered to that this review serves to elucidate.

  5. National Marrow Donor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-29

    This task is closed. IID.1 Task 3: Expand Immuno- biology Research Period 1 Activity: • No activity this quarter. National Marrow Donor Program...Development Authority IT Information Technology BBMT Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplant IRB Institutional Review Board BCP Business...Stem Cell Transplantation CREG Cross Reactive Groups OCR /ICR Optical Character Recognition/Intelligent Character Recognition CSS Center Support

  6. Digital Reconstruction with a Nonfrozen Osteotendinous Allograft, Nerve Allografts, and Autogenous Radial Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Martin; Butrón, Patricia; Palafox, Damian; Cruz-Reyes, Angel U

    2015-08-01

    A 21-year-old man underwent amputation of his second to fifth fingers at the proximal phalanx level on the right hand. The third and fourth fingers were reconstructed with 2 toe-to-hand free transfers. The fifth digit was reconstructed with a nonfrozen osteotendinous allograft, nerve allografts, and autogenous radial free flap without immunosuppression. The patient was lost to follow-up for 19 years. He received no rehabilitation. He reported that he had experienced no adverse reactions to the materials or the graft, or infection, or fractures. No additional surgical procedures were performed. Today, the digit is functional and has acceptable aesthetic appearance. This outcome is similar to those obtained in digits reconstructed with frozen osteotendinous allografts and autologous cutaneous covers and opens the possibility for future research.

  7. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, H-M; Li, W; Gelman, A E; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D

    2016-04-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at nonlymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, autoantigens or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3(+) cells are present in long-term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of "tolerogenic" TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity.

  8. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hsao, Hsi-Min; Li, Wenjun; Gelman, Andrew E.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at non-lymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, auto- or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3+ cells are present in long term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of “tolerogenic” TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity. PMID:26614734

  9. Sterilisation of skin allograft with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rooney, P; Eagle, M; Hogg, P; Lomas, R; Kearney, J

    2008-08-01

    The primary surgical requirement of skin allografts within the UK is for cryopreserved viable allografts as these engraft to the wound bed and gain a vascular supply, thus providing true wound closure and a superior clinical performance. Consequently the only disinfection treatment the skin receives is exposure to an antibiotic cocktail. However, antibiotic treatment does not reliably decontaminate skin allografts and 22% of cryopreserved skin fails microbial acceptance criteria and cannot be used clinically. We describe here a study which was carried out to determine a means of saving and using the microbiologically failed skin. Four different treatment regimens were investigated; treatment with 20%, 50% and 85% glycerol followed by 25 kGy irradiation at -80 degrees C, and treatment with 85% glycerol at ambient (30-40 degrees C) temperature and irradiation. Following treatment, the grafts were evaluated for their histological structure, in vitro cytotoxicity and handling properties. The radioprotective effects of the different glycerol concentrations and temperatures on microorganisms were also determined. The data indicate that 25 kGy irradiation of deep-frozen skin in 20% glycerol sterilised the tissue without any histological, cytotoxicological or physical alterations compared to normal cryopreserved skin. In contrast, irradiation of all other glycerol concentrations elicited some cytotoxicity and/or histological effect. These non-viable grafts can be made available for surgical use when cryopreserved viable grafts are not available or required.

  10. Rabbit trochlear model of osteochondral allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    To, Nhat; Curtiss, Shane; Neu, Corey P; Salgado, Christopher J; Jamali, Amir A

    2011-10-01

    Allografting and autografting of osteochondral tissues is a promising strategy to treat articular cartilage lesions in damaged joints. We developed a new model of fresh osteochondral allografting using the entire rabbit trochlea. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate that this model would achieve reproducible graft-host healing and maintain normal articular cartilage histologic, immunolocalization, and biochemical characteristics after transplantation under diverse storage and transplantation conditions. New Zealand white (n = 8) and Dutch belted (n = 8) rabbits underwent a 2-stage transplantation operation using osteochondral grafts that had been stored for 2 or 4 wk. Trochlear grafts harvested from the left knee were transplanted to the right knee as either autografts or allografts. Grafts were fixed with 22-gauge steel wire or 3-0 nylon suture. Rabbits were euthanized for evaluation at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 wk after transplantation. All grafts that remained in vivo for at least 4 wk demonstrated 100% interface healing by microCT. Trabecular bridging was present at the host-graft interface starting at 2 wk after transplantation, with no significant difference in cartilage histology between the various groups. The combined histology scores indicated minimal evidence of osteoarthritis. Immunostaining revealed that superficial zone protein was localized at the surface of all transplants. The rabbit trochlear model met our criteria for a successful model in regard to the ease of the procedure, low rate of surgical complications, relatively large articular cartilage surface area, and amount of host-graft bone interface available for analysis.

  11. Comparative study of the role of professional versus semiprofessional or nonprofessional antigen presenting cells in the rejection of vascularized organ allografts.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J B; Ansari, A A

    1995-12-01

    The immune systems of transplant recipients are progressively challenged with exposure to the multiple lineages of donor cells that comprise the vascularized organ allograft. Each lineage of such donor tissue constitutively expresses or can be induced to express varying densities of MHC antigens ranging from no expression of MHC to MHC class I only to both MHC class I and class II. In addition, the cell surface expression of a diverse assortment of costimulatory and cell adhesion molecules also varies in density in a tissue specific fashion within the allograft. The MHC class I/II molecules displayed on the donor cells contain within their clefts a constellation of processed protein antigens in the form of peptides derived from intracellular and to some extent extracellular sources. Therefore, the potential for each cell lineage to induce alloactivation and serve as a target for allospecific immune responses is dependent on the diversity and density of peptide-bearing MHC molecules, costimulatory molecules, and cell adhesion molecules. In addition, the T cell receptor repertoire of the recipient also contributes to the magnitude of the allogeneic response. Consequently, the variety of clinical outcomes following organ transplantation even with the institution of potent immunosuppressive (drug) therapies is not surprising, as it appears reasonable for such therapies to influence the allogeneic response against distinct lineages differentially. Our failure to prevent chronic human allograft rejection may therefore be due to our limited appreciation of the full spectrum of alloactivating experiences encountered by host T cells as they interact with donor cells of diverse tissue lineages. Investigations by our laboratory of the immunopathogenesis of chronic cardiac allograft rejection have revealed an intrinsic inability of human cardiac myocytes to process and present antigens, not only for primary but also for secondary alloimmune responses. One obvious explanation

  12. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency as a rare cause of renal allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Kati; Hemmilä, Ulla; Salmela, Kaija; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Kouri, Timo; Mäkelä, Satu

    2014-04-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder manifesting as urolithiasis or crystalline nephropathy. It leads to the generation of large amounts of poorly soluble 2,8-dihydroxyadenine excreted in urine, yielding kidney injury and in some patients, kidney failure. Early recognition of the disease, institution of xanthine analog therapy to block the formation of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, high fluid intake, and low purine diet prevent CKD. Because of symptom variability and lack of awareness, however, the diagnosis is sometimes extremely deferred. We describe a patient with adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency who was diagnosed during evaluation of a poorly functioning second kidney allograft. This report highlights the risk of renal allograft loss in patients with undiagnosed adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency and the need for improved early detection of this disease.

  13. PTH promotes allograft integration in a calvarial bone defect.

    PubMed

    Sheyn, Dmitriy; Cohn Yakubovich, Doron; Kallai, Ilan; Su, Susan; Da, Xiaoyu; Pelled, Gadi; Tawackoli, Wafa; Cook-Weins, Galen; Schwarz, Edward M; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2013-12-02

    Allografts may be useful in craniofacial bone repair, although they often fail to integrate with the host bone. We hypothesized that intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) would enhance mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and differentiation, resulting in allograft osseointegration in cranial membranous bones. Calvarial bone defects were created in transgenic mice, in which luciferase is expressed under the control of the osteocalcin promoter. The mice were given implants of allografts with or without daily PTH treatment. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was performed to monitor host osteprogenitor differentiation at the implantation site. Bone formation was evaluated with the aid of fluorescence imaging (FLI) and microcomputed tomography (μCT) as well as histological analyses. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to evaluate the expression of key osteogenic and angiogenic genes. Osteoprogenitor differentiation, as detected by BLI, in mice treated with an allograft implant and PTH was over 2-fold higher than those in mice treated with an allograft implant without PTH. FLI also demonstrated that the bone mineralization process in PTH-treated allografts was significantly higher than that in untreated allografts. The μCT scans revealed a significant increase in bone formation in allograft + PTH treated mice comparing to allograft + PBS treated mice. The osteogenic genes osteocalcin (Oc/Bglap) and integrin binding sialoprotein (Ibsp) were upregulated in the allograft + PTH treated animals. In summary, PTH treatment enhances osteoprogenitor differentiation and augments bone formation around structural allografts. The precise mechanism is not clear, but we show that infiltration pattern of mast cells, associated with the formation of fibrotic tissue, in the defect site is significantly affected by the PTH treatment.

  14. Depletion of CD8 Memory T Cells for Induction of Tolerance of a Previously Transplanted Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, I.; Nadazdin, O.; Boskovic, S.; Ochiai, T.; Smith, R. N.; Sykes, M.; Sogawa, H.; Murakami, T.; Strom, T. B.; Colvin, R. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Benichou, G.; Cosimi, A. B.; Kawai, T.

    2013-01-01

    Heterologous immunologic memory has been considered a potent barrier to tolerance induction in primates. Induction of such tolerance for a previously transplanted organ may be more difficult, because specific memory cells can be induced and activated by a transplanted organ. In the current study, we attempted to induce tolerance to a previously transplanted kidney allograft in nonhuman primates. The conditioning regimen consisted of low dose total body irradiation, thymic irradiation, antithymocyte globulin, and anti- CD154 antibody followed by a brief course of a calcineurin inhibitor. This regimen had been shown to induce mixed chimerism and allograft tolerance when kidney transplantation (KTx) and donor bone marrow transplantation (DBMT) were simultaneously performed. However, the same regimen failed to induce mixed chimerism when delayed DBMT was performed after KTx. We found that significant levels of memory T cells remained after conditioning, despite effective depletion of naïve T cells. By adding humanized anti-CD8 monoclonal antibody (cM-T807), CD8 memory T cells were effectively depleted and these recipients successfully achieved mixed chimerism and tolerance. The current studies provide ‘proof of principle’ that the mixed chimerism approach can induce renal allograft tolerance, even late after organ transplantation if memory T-cell function is adequately controlled. PMID:17286617

  15. [Experimental study of the thermic effect on bone at 60 degrees C, as applied to bone allograft].

    PubMed

    Le Huec, J C

    1992-01-01

    Bone reconstruction methods increasingly often require using bank bone. These massive bone fragments can be taken only from dead subjects or those in irreversible coma. Surgical sterility of the samples does not always guarantee the absence of an HIV infection, for which seroconversion often occurs very late. B. Spire's work has shown the effectiveness of a 30-minute heat treatment at 56 degrees C to inactivate HIV in blood products. Our study has therefore evaluated the effectiveness of a heat treatment method for bone to inactivate HIV on one hand, and the mechanical and histologic consequences of this treatment on rabbit bone. All bone fragments in this study were frozen at -80 degrees C to reproduce the same conditions of use as in current bone banks. Heating deep-frozen fragments of spongious tissue and of bone marrow from seropositive subjects in a 60 degrees C humid heat allowed confirming thermal sterilization of HIV, but a greater number of case is required to support this technique, as well as a verification with cortical bone. Thermal sterilization of bone allografts does not alter the mechanical properties nor the possibilities of bone regrowth in allografts. Application to human bone allografts should be confirmed by a greater number of cases, but it appears as a simple means to suppress the current disadvantage of late seroconversion control.

  16. Resident tissue-specific mesenchymal progenitor cells contribute to fibrogenesis in human lung allografts.

    PubMed

    Walker, Natalie; Badri, Linda; Wettlaufer, Scott; Flint, Andrew; Sajjan, Uma; Krebsbach, Paul H; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G; Peters-Golden, Marc; Lama, Vibha N

    2011-06-01

    Fibrotic obliteration of the small airways leading to progressive airflow obstruction, termed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), is the major cause of poor outcomes after lung transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a donor-derived population of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of human lung transplant recipients. Herein, we study the organ specificity of these cells and investigate the role of local mesenchymal progenitors in fibrogenesis after lung transplantation. We demonstrate that human lung allograft-derived MSCs uniquely express embryonic lung mesenchyme-associated transcription factors with a 35,000-fold higher expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor forkhead box (FOXF1) noted in lung compared with bone marrow MSCs. Fibrotic differentiation of MSCs isolated from normal lung allografts was noted in the presence of profibrotic mediators associated with BOS, including transforming growth factor-β and IL-13. MSCs isolated from patients with BOS demonstrated increased expression of α-SMA and collagen I when compared with non-BOS controls, consistent with a stable in vivo fibrotic phenotype. FOXF1 mRNA expression in the BAL cell pellet correlated with the number of MSCs in the BAL fluid, and myofibroblasts present in the fibrotic lesions expressed FOXF1 by in situ hybridization. These data suggest a key role for local tissue-specific, organ-resident, mesenchymal precursors in the fibrogenic processes in human adult lungs. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Segmental pancreatic allograft survival in baboons treated with combined irradiation and cyclosporine: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; van der Merwe, E.A.

    1985-04-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of cyclosporine (CS) alone, total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone, and CS in combination with total body irradiation (TBI) in suppressing segmental pancreatic allograft rejection in totally pancreatectomized outbred chacma baboons. The administration of CS 25 mg/kg/day and 50 mg/ kg/day resulted in mean graft survival of 21.5 days and 24.5 days, respectively. CS 85 mg/kg/day resulted in median graft survival of 9 days. There was a wide daily fluctuation of CS serum trough levels exhibited between primates receiving the same oral dose. TBI in excess of 300 rads resulted in irreversible bone marrow suppression. Modest results were achieved in recipients of TBI-76 rads (38 x 2 rads), with median graft survival of 21 days, results not different from recipients treated with CS. TLI recipients of 600 rads (150 x 4 rads) resulted in median pancreatic graft survival of 16 days. TBI together with oral CS administration exhibited no synergistic or additive effect and a single peroperative donor-specific blood transfusion did not enhance pancreatic allograft survival in this model. However, of 10 primates receiving TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) and CS 25 mg/kg/day administered orally indefinitely, four remained normoglycemic for more than 60 days. TBI 100 rads (50 x 2 rads) together with oral and parenteral CS resulted in necrotizing enterocolitis in four of six recipients.

  18. Lyophilized allografts without pre-treatment with glutaraldehyde are more suitable than cryopreserved allografts for pulmonary artery reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Olmos-Zúãiga, J.R.; Jasso-Victoria, R.; Díaz-Martínez, N.E.; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, M.O.; Sotres-Vega, A.; Heras-Romero, Y.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.E.; Santillán-Doherty, P.; Hernández-Jiménez, C.

    2015-01-01

    Various methods are available for preservation of vascular grafts for pulmonary artery (PA) replacement. Lyophilization and cryopreservation reduce antigenicity and prevent thrombosis and calcification in vascular grafts, so both methods can be used to obtain vascular bioprostheses. We evaluated the hemodynamic, gasometric, imaging, and macroscopic and microscopic findings produced by PA reconstruction with lyophilized (LyoPA) grafts and cryopreserved (CryoPA) grafts in dogs. Eighteen healthy crossbred adult dogs of both sexes weighing between 18 and 20 kg were used and divided into three groups of six: group I, PA section and reanastomosis; group II, PA resection and reconstruction with LyoPA allograft; group III, PA resection and reconstruction with CryoPA allograft. Dogs were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery, and the status of the graft and vascular anastomosis were examined macroscopically and microscopically. No clinical, radiologic, or blood-gas abnormalities were observed during the study. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) in group III increased significantly at the end of the study compared with baseline (P=0.02) and final [P=0.007, two-way repeat-measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA)] values. Pulmonary vascular resistance of groups II and III increased immediately after reperfusion and also at the end of the study compared to baseline. The increase shown by group III vs group I was significant only if compared with after surgery and study end (P=0.016 and P=0.005, respectively, two-way RM ANOVA). Microscopically, permeability was reduced by ≤75% in group III. In conclusion, substitution of PAs with LyoPA grafts is technically feasible and clinically promising. PMID:26648092

  19. Lyophilized allografts without pre-treatment with glutaraldehyde are more suitable than cryopreserved allografts for pulmonary artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Zúñiga, J R; Jasso-Victoria, R; Díaz-Martínez, N E; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, M O; Sotres-Vega, A; Heras-Romero, Y; Baltazares-Lipp, M; Baltazares-Lipp, M E; Santillán-Doherty, P; Hernández-Jiménez, C

    2016-02-01

    Various methods are available for preservation of vascular grafts for pulmonary artery (PA) replacement. Lyophilization and cryopreservation reduce antigenicity and prevent thrombosis and calcification in vascular grafts, so both methods can be used to obtain vascular bioprostheses. We evaluated the hemodynamic, gasometric, imaging, and macroscopic and microscopic findings produced by PA reconstruction with lyophilized (LyoPA) grafts and cryopreserved (CryoPA) grafts in dogs. Eighteen healthy crossbred adult dogs of both sexes weighing between 18 and 20 kg were used and divided into three groups of six: group I, PA section and reanastomosis; group II, PA resection and reconstruction with LyoPA allograft; group III, PA resection and reconstruction with CryoPA allograft. Dogs were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery, and the status of the graft and vascular anastomosis were examined macroscopically and microscopically. No clinical, radiologic, or blood-gas abnormalities were observed during the study. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) in group III increased significantly at the end of the study compared with baseline (P=0.02) and final [P=0.007, two-way repeat-measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA)] values. Pulmonary vascular resistance of groups II and III increased immediately after reperfusion and also at the end of the study compared to baseline. The increase shown by group III vs group I was significant only if compared with after surgery and study end (P=0.016 and P=0.005, respectively, two-way RM ANOVA). Microscopically, permeability was reduced by ≤75% in group III. In conclusion, substitution of PAs with LyoPA grafts is technically feasible and clinically promising.

  20. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  1. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  2. Focal posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder at the renal allograft hilum.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ben, R; Smith, J K; Kew, C E; Kenney, P J; Julian, B A; Robbin, M L

    2000-11-01

    This report describes the imaging characteristics of focal posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder may be limited to the allograft. A focal complex mass in the renal allograft hilum surrounding the main renal blood vessels is a common finding and can be visualized with sonography. MR imaging can help increase diagnostic confidence.

  3. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Parents > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow A A A What's in this ... ósea What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone marrow, the spongy ...

  4. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Teens > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow A A A What's in this ... Questions What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone marrow, the spongy ...

  5. Prevention

    Treesearch

    Kerry Britton; Barbara Illman; Gary Man

    2010-01-01

    Prevention is considered the most cost-effective element of the Forest Service Invasive Species Strategy (USDA Forest Service 2004). What makes prevention difficult is the desire to maximize free trade and the resulting benefits to society while, at the same time, protecting natural resources. The role of science is to first identify which commodities pose an...

  6. Tracheal regeneration: evidence of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell involvement.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Agathe; Baccari, Sonia; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Bruneval, Patrick; Carpentier, Alain; Taylor, Doris A; Martinod, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in airway transplantation have shown the ability of ex vivo or in vivo tracheal regeneration with bioengineered conduits or biological substitutes, respectively. Previously, we established a process of in vivo-guided tracheal regeneration using vascular allografts as a biological scaffold. We theorized that tracheal healing was the consequence of a mixed phenomenon associating tracheal contraction and regeneration. The aim of the present study was to determine the role that bone marrow stem cells play in that regenerative process. Three groups of 12 rabbits underwent a gender-mismatched aortic graft transplantation after tracheal resection. The first group received no cells (control group), the second group had previously received autologous green fluorescent protein-labeled mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, and the third group received 3 labeled mesenchymal stem cell injections on postoperative days 0, 10, and 21. The clinical results were impaired by stent complications (obstruction or migration), but no anastomotic leakage, dehiscence, or stenosis was observed. The rabbits were killed, and the trachea was excised for analysis at 1 to 18 months after tracheal replacement. In all 3 groups, microscopic examination showed an integrated aortic graft lined by metaplastic epithelium. By 12 months, immature cartilage was detected among disorganized elastic fibers. Positive SRY gene detection served as evidence for engraftment of cells derived from the male recipient. EF-green fluorescent protein detection showed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell involvement. The results of the present study imply a role for bone marrow stem cells in tracheal regeneration after aortic allografting. Studies are necessary to identify the local and systemic factors stimulating that regenerative process. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  7. Incidence, risk factors, and the impact of allograft pyelonephritis on renal allograft function.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Geerlings, S E; Peters-Sengers, H; Idu, M M; Hodiamont, C J; Ten Berge, I J M; Bemelman, F J

    2016-10-01

    The impact of allograft pyelonephritis (AGPN) on renal allograft function is controversial. In this study, we evaluated the incidence, risk factors, and the impact of AGPN on renal allograft function. Retrospective cohort study in adult renal allograft recipients with 1-year follow-up after transplantation (Tx). Renal allograft function was evaluated by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula) and 24-h urine protein excretion. A total of 431 renal allograft recipients were analyzed; 57 (13.2%) developed AGPN within 1 year after Tx. Median time between Tx and AGPN was 50 days. Risk factors for AGPN were the presence of a urological catheter (odds ratio [OR] = 18.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.00-44.81, P < 0.001) and preceding asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.20-3.90, P = 0.009). In 72.7%, the causative microorganism of ASB was identical to that of the succeeding AGPN episode. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that experiencing AGPN did not decrease the eGFR (P = 0.61) nor did increased proteinuria (P = 0.29) 1 year after Tx. For the eGFR, an interaction was found between AGPN/bacteriuria (BU) and acute rejection (AR): the group experiencing BU preceding AR had significantly (P < 0.001) lower eGFR compared with the group that experienced only AR (21 mL/min/1.73 m(2) vs. 48 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ), as a result of increased prevalence of combined rejections within the BU group. Indwelling urological catheters and preceding ASB are associated with developing AGPN. An incident of AGPN itself does not impair renal allograft function 1 year after Tx. However, a relevant interaction occurs between BU and AR, in which the sequence of occurrence of these 2 events synergistically impairs the eGFR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail.

  9. Proximal humeral osteoarticular allografts: technique, pearls and pitfalls, outcomes.

    PubMed

    Farfalli, German L; Ayerza, Miguel A; Muscolo, D Luis; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    Allograft transplantation is a biologic reconstruction option for massive bone defects after resection of bone sarcomas. This type of reconstruction not only restores bone stock but it also allows us to reconstruct the joint anatomically. These factors are a major concern, especially in a young and active population.We are describing indications, surgical techniques, pearls and pitfalls, and outcomes of proximal humeral osteoarticular allografts, done at present time in our institution.We found that allograft fractures and articular complications, as epiphyseal resorption and subchondral fracture, are the main complications observed in proximal humerus osteoarticular allograft reconstructions. Nevertheless, only fractures need a reconstruction revision. Joint complications may adversely affect the limb function, but for this reason, an allograft revision is rarely performed.

  10. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... myelodysplastic syndrome; MDS) A nerve tissue tumor called neuroblastoma Bone marrow disease that leads to an abnormal ... Hairy cell leukemia Hodgkin lymphoma Multiple myeloma Myelofibrosis Neuroblastoma Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Platelet count Polycythemia vera Primary ...

  11. Capturing echocardiographic allograft valve function over time after allograft aortic valve or root replacement.

    PubMed

    Mokhles, M Mostafa; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Bekkers, Jos A; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2014-11-01

    This study describes echocardiographic allograft valve function over time in a cohort of patients who were prospectively followed after allograft aortic valve or root replacement, illustrating the use of longitudinal data analysis for assessing valve function over time. Serial, standardized echocardiographic measurements of aortic regurgitation, aortic gradient, annulus diameter, left ventricular outflow tract diameter, and aortic diameter in 301 hospital survivors (mean age, 46 years; range, 16-83 years) after allograft aortic valve (N=77) or root (N=224) replacement were analyzed using nonlinear longitudinal models. Aortic regurgitation increased over time. At 15 years, 41% of patients had at least moderate aortic regurgitation. Younger patient age and subcoronary implantation technique were associated with increased aortic regurgitation. Aortic gradient increased over time (from 9.4 mm Hg at 6 months to 21.3 mm Hg at 15 years); both initial and increase in aortic gradient were greater in younger patients and after subcoronary implantation technique. Annulus diameter slightly increased (from 21.9 mm at 6 months to 22.4 mm at 15 years), whereas aortic diameter slightly decreased over time (from 34.3 mm at 6 months to 32.7 mm at 15 years). Left ventricular outflow tract diameter remained constant at 22 mm. Younger patients in the subcoronary implantation group had a larger annulus diameter. Both aortic regurgitation and stenosis increase over time after allograft aortic valve or root replacement. Younger patient age and use of the subcoronary implantation technique are associated with increased regurgitation and stenosis. The use of nonlinear longitudinal models allows for an insightful analysis of allograft valve function over time. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Platonin improves survival of skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Ping; Lee, Jie-Jen; Chi, Chin-Wen; Chang, Kuo-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Platonin is an immunomodulator with NF-κB inhibitory activity. It not only inhibits interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in sepsis, but also attenuates heatstroke reactions. In addition, platonin redirects differentiation of dendritic cells toward an intermediate stage of maturation. The study was designed to examine whether platonin can reduce acute graft rejection. A C57BL/6 to BALB/c mice skin transplantation model was used. Platonin was given intraperitoneally to transplant recipients at various doses. Skin grafts were submitted to histologic analysis. NF-κB DNA binding activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were determined in harvested draining lymph nodes. Leukocyte count, hepatic and renal functions were serially assessed. An array of serum cytokines was evaluated on d 1, 3, 5, and 7 after skin transplantation. Platonin resulted in significantly prolonged skin allograft survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histologic changes in the skin allografts paralleled the gross appearance of rejection. Serum cytokine analysis shows that platonin significantly suppressed the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. However, no significant changes occurred in the serum levels of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines. NF-κB activity and iNOS expression were remarkably suppressed in draining lymph nodes. In terms of toxicity, there were no significant differences in body weight, leukocyte count, plasma alanine aminotransferase, or creatinine between the platonin-treated and control groups. Platonin effectively prolongs skin allograft survival without major toxicity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. LYMPHATIC INJURY AND REGENERATION IN CARDIAC ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Thing Rinda; Pathak, Arvind; Asano, Hiroshi; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Baldwin, William M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Severed donor heart lymphatics are not anastomosed to recipient lymphatics in cardiac transplantation. We evaluated the effects of cellular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages on the morphology of lymphatics in heart grafts. Methods: Dark Agouti (DA) hearts were transplanted to Lewis or control DA rats on sub-therapeutic doses of cyclosporin. Transplants were examined by immunohistology and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy using LYVE-1 as a lymphatic marker and CD8 and CD68 as markers for cellular infiltration at selected intervals from 1 to 8 weeks post-transplantation. Results: Allograft inner myocardial lymphatic density decreased by more than 30-fold at 1 week, and recovered to only 15% of the native level at 8 weeks post-transplantation. In contrast, allograft lymphatics in and near the epicardium showed no significant density decline, but increased in size by more than 5-fold at 2 weeks, and sustained about a 3-fold increase at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Lymphatic changes correlated temporally with the extent of T cell and macrophage infiltration in allografts, which peaked at 2-3 weeks post-transplantation. When grafts were retransplanted from allogeneic to isogeneic recipients at 3 weeks post-transplantation, inner lymphatic density returned close to native level within 2 weeks after retransplantation. Conclusions: This is the first characterization of regional and morphological effects of immunological responses on heart lymphatics after transplantation. Elimination of alloimmune responses produces rapid restoration of inner lymphatic vessels, suggesting that lymphatics injured during rejection can recover when rejection is reversed during the post-transplantation course. PMID:20118845

  14. Chemical sterilization of allograft dermal tissues.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Abigail; Vaynshteyn, Edward; Kowalski, John B; Ngo, Manh-Dan; Merritt, Karen; Osborne, Joel; Chnari, Evangelia

    2017-08-10

    Common terminal sterilization methods are known to alter the natural structure and properties of soft tissues. One approach to providing safe grafts with preserved biological properties is the combination of a validated chemical sterilization process followed by an aseptic packaging process. This combination of processes is an accepted method for production of sterile healthcare products as described in ANSI/AAMI ST67:2011. This article describes the validation of the peracetic acid and ethanol-based (PAAE) chemical sterilization process for allograft dermal tissues at the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF, Edison, NJ). The sterilization capability of the PAAE solution used during routine production of aseptically processed dermal tissue forms was determined based on requirements of relevant ISO standards, ISO 14161:2009 and ISO 14937:2009. The resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium sporogenes, Mycobacterium terrae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium, and Staphylococcus aureus to the chemical sterilization process employed by MTF was determined. Using a worst-case scenario testing strategy, the D value was calculated for the most resistant microorganism, Bacillus. The 12D time parameter determined the minimum time required to achieve a SAL of 10(-6). Microbiological performance qualification demonstrated a complete kill of 10(6) spores at just a quarter of the full cycle time. The validation demonstrated that the PAAE sterilization process is robust, achieves sterilization of allograft dermal tissue to a SAL 10(-6), and that in combination with aseptic processing secures the microbiological safety of allograft dermal tissue while avoiding structural and biochemical tissue damage previously observed with other sterilization methods such as ionizing irradiation.

  15. A Systematic Review of Failed Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autograft Compared With Allograft in Young Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, David; Sheth, Ujash; Cabrera, Alison; Spindler, Kurt P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The advantages of allograft anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), which include shorter surgical time, less postoperative pain, and no donor site morbidity, may be offset by a higher risk of failure. Previous systematic reviews have inconsistently shown a difference in failure prevalence by graft type; however, such reviews have never been stratified for younger or more active patients. Objective: To determine whether there is a different ACLR failure prevalence of autograft compared with allograft in young, active patients. Data Sources: EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane trials registry. Study Selection: Comparative studies of allograft versus autograft primary ACL reconstruction in patients <25 years of age or of high-activity level (military, Marx activity score >12 points, collegiate or semiprofessional athletes). Study Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: Manual extraction of available data from eligible studies. Quantitative synthesis of failure prevalence and Lysholm score (outcomes in ≥3 studies) and I2 test for heterogeneity. Assessment of study quality using CLEAR NPT and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results: Seven studies met inclusion criteria (1 level 1; 2 level 2, 4 level 3), including 788 patients treated with autograft tissue and 228 with various allografts. The mean age across studies was 21.7 years (64% male), and follow-up ranged between 24 and 51 months. The pooled failure prevalence was 9.6% (76/788) for autografts and 25.0% (57/228) for allografts (relative risk, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.24-0.53; P < 0.00001; I2 = 16%). The number needed to benefit to prevent 1 failure by using autograft was 7 patients (95% CI, 5-10). No difference between hamstrings autograft and patella tendon autograft was noted. Lysholm score was reported in 3 studies and did not differ between autograft and allograft. Conclusion: While systematic reviews comparing allograft and autograft ACLR have been equivocal

  16. Marrow transplantation for leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1981-07-01

    Marrow transplantation for selected patients with leukemia, as for patients with severe combined immunologic deficiency or severe aplastic anemia, has now become an accepted clinical procedure. For patients with acute leukemia who have relapsed after achieving a remission of chemotherapy, marrow grafting from an identical twin or an HLA-identical sibling has now been demonstrated to produce median remissions as long as or longer than any reported for combination chemotherapy. In contrast to chemotherapy, marrow transplantation offers the possibility of cure for a small but significant fraction of these patients. Marrow transplantation for patients with ANL in first remission has now resulted in median survivals much longer than any reported with chemotherapy. Although it now appears that more than 50% of these patients can be cured with marrow transplantation, a much longer follow-up is indicated since some patients who achieve a complete remission with combination chemotherapy are now living for a long time, and some of these patients (less than 20%) may also be cured. Current intensive research with new modalities such as interferon, Acyclovir, Cyclosporin A, and monoclonal antibodies can reasonably be expected to improve the overall results of marrow transplantation.

  17. Hip Capsular Reconstruction Using Dermal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Soares, Eduardo; Mook, William R; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Because hip arthroscopic procedures are increasing in number, complications related to the operation itself are starting to emerge. Whereas the capsule has been recognized as an important static stabilizer for the hip, it has not been until recently that surgeons have realized the importance of its preservation and restoration. Disruption of the capsule during arthroscopic procedures is a potential contributor to postoperative iatrogenic hip instability. In cases of a symptomatic deficient capsule, a capsular reconstruction is mandatory because instability may lead to detrimental chondral and labral changes. The purpose of this report was to describe our technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using dermal allograft.

  18. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    decellularized allografts tested did not perform well in this repair model. Additional evaluations and...2c  was  completed.    All   animals  were  assessed  weekly  until  termination  26  weeks  after   receiving  the...the  engrafted  nerves  were  examined  for  nerve-­‐graft  continuity.     Animals  with  a  loss  of   continuity

  19. Polyethylene Glycol-Fused Allografts Produce Rapid Behavioral Recovery After Ablation of Sciatic Nerve Segments

    PubMed Central

    Riley, D.C.; Bittner, G.D.; Mikesh, M.A.; Cardwell, N.L.; Pollins, A.C.; Ghergherehchi, C.L.; Sunkesula, S.R. Bhupanapadu; Ha, T.N.; Hall, B.T.D.; Poon, A.D.; Pyarali, M.; Boyer, R.B.; Mazal, A.T.; Munoz, N.; Trevino, R.C.; Schallert, T.; Thayer, W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of neuronal functions by outgrowths regenerating at ~1mm/d from the proximal stumps of severed peripheral nerves takes many weeks or months, if it occurs at all, especially after ablation of nerve segments. Distal segments of severed axons typically degenerate in 1–3 days. The purpose of this study was to show that Wallerian degeneration could be prevented or retarded and lost behavioral function restored following ablation of 0.5 – 1 cm segments of rat sciatic nerves in host animals. This is achieved using 0.8 – 1.1cm microsutured donor allografts treated with bioengineered solutions varying in ionic and polyethylene glycol (PEG) concentrations (modified PEG-fusion procedure), being careful not to stretch any portion of donor or host sciatic nerves. Our data show that PEG-fusion permanently restores axonal continuity within minutes as initially assessed by action potential conduction and intracellular diffusion of dye. Behavioral functions mediated by the sciatic nerve are largely restored within 2 – 4 wk as measured by the Sciatic Functional Index (SFI). Increased restoration of sciatic behavioral functions after ablating 0.5 – 1 cm segments is associated with greater numbers of viable myelinated axons within, and distal to, PEG-fused allografts. Many such viable myelinated axons are almost-certainly spared from Wallerian degeneration by PEG-fusion. PEG-fusion of donor allografts may produce a paradigm-shift in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:25425242

  20. Early treatment with xenon protects against the cold ischemia associated with chronic allograft nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hailin; Luo, Xianghong; Zhou, Zhaowei; Liu, Juying; Tralau-Stewart, Catherine; George, Andrew J T; Ma, Daqing

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a common finding in kidney grafts with functional impairment. Prolonged hypothermic storage-induced ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with the early onset of CAN. As the noble gas xenon is clinically used as an anesthetic and has renoprotective properties in a rodent model of ischemia-reperfusion injury, we studied whether early treatment with xenon could attenuate CAN associated with prolonged hypothermic storage. Exposure to xenon enhanced the expression of insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and its receptor in human proximal tubular (HK-2) cells, which, in turn, increased cell proliferation. Xenon treatment before or after hypothermia-hypoxia decreased cell apoptosis and cell inflammation after reoxygenation. The xenon-induced HK-2 cell proliferation was abolished by blocking the IGF-1 receptor, mTOR, and HIF-1α individually. In the Fischer-to-Lewis rat allogeneic renal transplantation model, xenon exposure of donors before graft retrieval or recipients after engraftment enhanced tubular cell proliferation and decreased tubular cell death and cell inflammation associated with ischemia-reperfusion injury. Compared with control allografts, xenon treatment significantly suppressed T-cell infiltration and fibrosis, prevented the development of CAN, and improved renal function. Thus, xenon treatment promoted recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury and reduced susceptibility to the subsequent development of CAN in allografts.

  1. Increased Release Time of Antibiotics from Bone Allografts through a Novel Biodegradable Coating

    PubMed Central

    Madácsi, Edit; Kalugyer, Pálma; Vácz, Gabriella; Horváthy, Dénes B.; Szendrői, Miklós; Han, Weiping; Lacza, Zsombor

    2014-01-01

    The use of bone allografts is contraindicated in septic revision surgery due to the high risk of graft reinfection. Antibiotic release from the graft may solve the problem and these combinations can theoretically be used for prevention or even therapy of infection. The present study investigated whether amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, and vancomycin alone or in combination with chitosan or alginate are suitable for short-term or long-term bone coating. Human bone allografts were prepared from femoral head and lyophilized. Antibiotic coating was achieved by incubating the grafts in antibiotic solution and freeze-drying again. Two biopolymers chitosan and alginate were used for creating sustained-release implantable coatings and the drug release profile was characterized in vitro by spectrophotometry. Using lyophilization with or without chitosan only resulted in short-term release that lasted up to 48 hours. Alginate coating enabled a sustained release that lasted for 8 days with amoxicillin, 28 days with ciprofloxacin coating, and 50 days with vancomycin coating. Using only implantable biodegradable allograft and polymers, a sustained release of antibiotics was achieved with ciprofloxacin and vancomycin for several weeks. Since the calculated daily release of the antibiotic was lower than the recommended IV dose, the calcium alginate coated bone graft can support endoprosthesis revision surgery. PMID:25045678

  2. Key role for CD4 T cells during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, A.; Wang, J.; Pelletier, R.P.; Nadasdy, T.; Brodsky, S.; Roy, S.; Lodder, M.; Bobek, D.; Mofatt-Bruce, S.; Fairchild, R.L.; Henry, M.L.; Hadley, G.A.

    2014-01-01

    We utilized mouse models to elucidate the immunologic mechanisms of functional graft loss during mixed antibody mediated rejection of renal allografts (mixed AMR), in which humoral and cellular responses to the graft occur concomitantly. Although the majority of T cells in the graft at the time of rejection were CD8 T cells with only a minor population of CD4 T cells, depletion of CD4 but not CD8 cells prevented acute graft loss during mixed AMR. CD4 depletion eliminated anti-donor alloantibodies and conferred protection from destruction of renal allografts. ELISPOT revealed that CD4 T effectors responded to donor alloantigens by both the direct and indirect pathways of allorecognition. In transfer studies, CD4 T effectors primed to donor alloantigens were highly effective at promoting acute graft dysfunction, and exhibited the attributes of effector T cells. Laser capture microdissection and confirmatory immunostaining studies revealed that CD4 T cells infiltrating the graft produced effector molecules with graft destructive potential. Bioluminescent imaging confirmed that CD4 T effectors traffic to the graft site in immune replete hosts. These data document that host CD4 T cells can promote acute dysfunction of renal allografts by directly mediating graft injury in addition to facilitating anti-donor alloantibody responses. PMID:24410909

  3. FTY720 in combination with cyclosporine--an analysis of skin allograft survival and renal function.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francieli Ruiz; Silva, Lea Bueno Lucas; Cury, Patricia Maluf; Burdmann, Emmanuel Almeida; Bueno, Valquiria

    2006-12-20

    Acute and chronic nephrotoxicity caused by CsA continuous administration impair kidney allograft survival. Several clinical and experimental protocols have shown benefits to the kidney after decreasing CsA dose, withdrawing the drug or delaying its introduction after transplantation. FTY720 is a new compound that has immunosuppressive characteristics and increase allograft survival in animal models without causing the side effects of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). FTY720 described mechanism of action that consists to alter the lymphocyte migration pattern without impairment of the immune system response against pathogens. In our mice model, FTY720 administered alone or in combination with CsA during 21 days increased skin allograft survival in a fully mismatched strain combination and did not cause significant changes in renal function. Moreover, renal structure was normal in all groups suggesting that at low doses (10 mg/kg/day) CsA can be associated during short-term period to other immunosuppressive drugs, i.e. FTY720 without affecting the kidney. Combination of immunosuppressive compounds with FTY720 and/or delayed introduction of low cyclosporine dose could prevent graft rejection and avoid nephrotoxicity.

  4. Long-Term Tolerance to Kidney Allografts after Induced Rejection of Donor Hematopoietic Chimerism in a Preclinical Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Scott S.; Mathes, David W.; Georges, George E.; Kuhr, Christian S.; Chang, Jeff; Butts, Tiffany M.; Storb, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation provides a reliable method for inducing tolerance towards solid organ grafts. However, this procedure can result in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) thereby limiting its application. Here we test the hypothesis that mixed chimerism can be intentionally reverted to host hematopoiesis without rejection of a kidney graft. Methods Recipient dogs were given 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) before and a short course of immunosuppression after marrow infusion from dog leukocyte antigen-identical littermates. All dogs achieved stable mixed chimerism. After a mean of 20 weeks, one cohort of dogs received kidney transplants from their respective marrow donors. Subsequently, recipients were reconditioned with 2 Gy TBI and given autologous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor-mobilized leukocytes (recipient leukocyte infusion) that had been collected before marrow transplant. Results Dogs receiving a second TBI and recipient leukocyte infusion without a kidney transplant rejected their donor hematopoietic graft within 3 weeks. Dogs that received kidney grafts, followed by a second TBI and recipient leukocyte infusion, rejected their marrow graft without rejecting their transplanted kidneys for periods greater than one year. Conclusion Mixed chimerism may be clinically reverted to 100% recipient without rejection of a kidney allograft. This finding may have application towards minimizing the risk of GVHD in solid organ transplant patients given hematopoietic cell transplantation from HLA-identical donors. PMID:22929594

  5. ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and irradiated fresh frozen allograft*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shao-qi; Zhang, Ji-hua; Xia, Chang-suo; Zhang, Cai-long; Yu, Teng-bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. Methods: All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 68 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into one of the two groups (autograft and irradiated allograft groups). The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months of follow-up (ranging from 24 to 47 months), patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Results: Of these patients, 65 (autograft 33, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When the irradiated allograft group was compared to the autograft group at the 31-month follow-up by the Lachman test, the anterior drawer test (ADT), the pivot shift test, and KT-2000 arthrometer test, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the autograft group and just only 31.3% in the irradiated allograft group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%). The anterior and rotational stabilities decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), functional and subjective evaluations, and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. Besides, patients in the irradiated allograft group had a shorter operation time and a longer duration of postoperative fever. When the patients had a fever, the

  6. Long-lasting skin allograft tolerance in adult mice induced across fully allogeneic (multimajor H-2 plus multiminor histocompatibility) antigen barriers by a tolerance-inducing method using cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    A new method of cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced skin allograft tolerance in mice that can regularly overcome fully allogeneic (major H-2 plus non-H-2) antigen barriers in mice has been established. The components of the method are intravenous or intraperitoneal administration of 50- 100 micrograms of anti-Thy-1.2 mAb on day -1, intravenous injection of 90 x 10(6) allogeneic spleen cells mixed with 30 x 10(6) allogeneic bone marrow cells from the same donor on day 0, and intraperitoneal injection of 200 mg/kg CP on day 2. In each of four fully allogeneic donor----recipient combinations, including C3H/HeJ (C3H; H-2k)---- C57BL/6J(B6; H-2b), B6----C3H, BALB/cByJ (BALB; H-2d)----B6, and BALB--- -C3H, long-lasting survival of skin allografts was induced in most of the recipient mice. The specific tolerant state induced was dependent on the doses of the antibody and bone marrow cells used. The optimal timing of CP treatment to induce tolerance was found to be 1-3 d after the stimulating cell injection. Treatment with the anti-Thy-1.2 antibody together with CP on day 2 after the cell injection on day 0 also induced profound tolerance. In the B6 mice made tolerant of C3H with antibody, C3H spleen cells plus C3H bone marrow cells, and then CP, a minimal degree of stable mixed chimerism was established and the antitolerogen (C3H) immune responses examined here, including delayed footpad reaction (DFR), CTL activity, and capacity for antibody production against donor-strain antigens were abrogated in a tolerogen- specific manner. From cell transfer experiments, the mechanism of tolerance could be largely attributed to reduction of effector T cells reactive against the tolerogen, and strong suppressive influences that might prolong skin allograft survival directly were not detected in the tolerant mice. Moreover, pretreatment with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody or anti-L3T4 (CD4) antibody was more effective than pretreatment with anti- Lyt-1 (CD5) antibody or anti-Lyt-2 (CD8) antibody as

  7. Murine islet allograft tolerance upon blockade of the B-lymphocyte stimulator, BLyS/BAFF.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Ronald F; Yu, Ming; Vivek, Kumar; Zekavat, Ghazal; Rostami, Susan Y; Ziaie, Amin S; Luo, Yanping; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Redfield, Robert R; Ward, Christopher D; Migone, Thi-Sau; Cancro, Michael P; Naji, Ali; Noorchashm, Hooman

    2012-04-15

    Immunologic rejection is a major barrier to successful long-term outcomes in clinical transplantation. The importance of B lymphocytes-and their secretory products, alloantibodies-in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection is accepted. Furthermore, it is now clear that the dominant regulator of peripheral B-cell homeostasis and tolerance is the B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), also referred to as the B-cell activating factor (BAFF). Recently, a novel class of clinical immunotherapeutic agents specific for BLyS, and its family of cytokines, has emerged for the treatment of B-cell-mediated diseases. In this study, we demonstrate the potential utility of BLyS-directed immunotherapy in preventing allograft rejection using a murine islet transplantation model. A transient period of mature peripheral B-cell depletion was induced by means of in vivo BLyS neutralization using a murine analog of the monoclonal antibody, Benlysta. Subsequently, fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched islets were transplanted into naïve diabetic mice followed by a short course of rapamycin. After BLyS neutralization, indefinite islet allograft survival was achieved. Induction therapy with rapamycin was necessary, but not sufficient, for the achievement of this long-term graft survival. The tolerant state was associated with (1) abrogation of the donor-specific antibody response, (2) transient preponderance of immature/transitional B cells in all lymphoid organs, (3) impaired CD4 T-cell activation during the period of B-cell depletion, and (4) presence of a "regulatory" cytokine milieu. In vivo BLyS neutralization effectively induces humoral tolerance and promotes long-term islet allograft survival in mice. Therefore, B-lymphocyte-directed immunotherapy targeting the homeostatic regulator, BLyS, may be effective in promoting transplantation tolerance.

  8. Renoprotective effects of the AGE-inhibitor pyridoxamine in experimental chronic allograft nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Waanders, Femke; van den Berg, Else; Nagai, Ryoji; van Veen, Ingrid; Navis, Gerjan; van Goor, Harry

    2008-02-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are involved in diabetic nephropathy (DN). The AGE formation inhibitor pyridoxamine (PM) is renoprotective in DN and in normoglycaemic obese Zucker rats. In chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), renal AGE accumulation occurs as well. To investigate whether inhibition of AGE formation is renoprotective in CAN, we studied the Fisher 344 to Lewis (F-L) allograft rat model of experimental CAN. Fisher to Fisher (F-F) isografts served as controls. Proteinuria, renal function and renal histology of untreated transplanted rats (F-L n = 8, F-F n = 8) were compared to rats receiving PM 2 g/l in drinking water for 20 weeks starting at transplantation (F-L n = 5, F-F n = 10). All rats received cyclosporin A (1.5 mg/kg/day) for 10 days after transplantation to prevent early acute rejection. Compared to untreated allografts, PM significantly decreased proteinuria (76 +/- 18 vs 29 +/- 3 mg/day), serum creatinine (130 +/- 12 vs 98 +/- 5 micromol/l), focal glomerulosclerosis (116 +/- 27 vs 16 +/- 5 AU), glomerular macrophage influx (5.6 +/- 0.6 vs 3.3 +/- 1.0), interstitial fibrosis (132 +/- 24 vs 76 +/- 2 AU) and interstitial macrophage influx (47.0 +/- 8.7 vs 15.4 +/- 5.0. Moreover, PM significantly ameliorated tubular accumulation of pentosidine, compared to untreated allografts (2.5 +/- 0.6 vs 0.3 +/- 0.3, all p < 0.05). In the isograft controls, these values did not differ between untreated and PM treated rats. PM exerts renoprotective effects and decreases renal pentosidine accumulation in experimental CAN, suggesting a detrimental role for renal AGE accumulation in the pathogenesis of renal damage in this non-diabetic model. These results indicate that inhibition of AGE formation might be a useful adjunct therapy to attenuate CAN.

  9. Intra-Bone Marrow Transplantation of Endosteal Bone Marrow Cells Facilitates Allogeneic Hematopoietic and Stromal Cells Engraftment Dependent on Early Expression of CXCL-12.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Su, Yingjun; Chen, Jianwu; Zhang, Dongliang; Song, Yajuan; Guo, Shuzhong

    2015-09-16

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been considered as an effective approach at inducing allogeneic hematopoietic reconstitution and immune tolerance. However, it remains critical to find the optimal HSCT delivery method and robust sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We introduced a new method by infusing allogeneic endosteal bone marrow cells (BMCs) harvested from long bones endosteum through intra-bone marrow transplantation (IBBMT) into irradiated mice. Recipient mice that were transplanted with central BMCs or through intravenous bone marrow transplantation (IVBMT) were used as controls (n=6 per group). We compared the new method with each control group for allogeneic HSCs homing pattern, peripheral blood chimerism level, skin allograft survival time, and donor stromal cell percentage in recipient BM. AMD3100 was injected to determine whether chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL-12) was critical for the new method. More allogeneic HSCs homed into spleen and bone marrow for the new method as compared to each control group. IBBMT of endosteal BMCs led to a higher peripheral blood chimerism and skin allograft survival. At 18 weeks, donor stromal cell percentage in recipient BMCs was higher for the new method than in each control group. By AMD3100 blockade at day 1, peripheral blood chimerism level and donor stromal cell percentage were significantly reduced as compared to the control group without AMD3100 blockade. Our study suggests that IBBMT of endosteal BMCs is an effective approach for HSCT in inducing allogeneic hematopoietic reconstitution. The advantage is dependent upon the early expression of CXCL-12 after bone marrow transplantation.

  10. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  11. Sterilization of skin allografts by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Bourroul, Selma Cecília; Herson, Marisa Roma; Pino, Eddy; Matho, Monica Beatriz

    2002-11-01

    The skin has a fundamental role in the viability of human body. In the case of extensive wounds, skin allografts provide an alternative to cover temporarily the damaged areas. After donor screening and preservation in glycerol 85%, the skin can be stored in a Skin Bank. Glycerol at this concentration has a bacteriostatic effect after certain time of preservation. On the other hand, skin sterilization by ionizing radiation may reduce the quarentine period for transplantation in patients. The objective of this work was to evaluate allograft sterilization using two sources of ionizing radiation. Through the analysis of stress-strain, it was intended to verify possible effects of the radiation on the structure of preserved grafts. Three groups of skin samples were selected. The first group was maintained in the initial conditions, not irradiated. The second was exposed to cobalt-60, while the third one was irradiated using an Dynamitron Accelerator JOB188 electron beam. The irradiation dose was 25 kGy for both tests. Both irradiation sources, and the Instron Universal Machine used for biomechanical experiments, are installed at the Centro de Tecnologia das Radiações/Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (São Paulo, Brazil). According to the preliminary results, biomechanical characteristics of the samples irradiated seem to be maintained with regard to the non irradiated group.

  12. Allograft selection for distal femur through cutting contour registration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Lihui; Niu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Allograft reconstruction is an acceptable procedure for the recovery of normal anatomy after the bone tumor resection. During the past few years, several automated methods have been proposed to select the best anatomically matching allograft from the virtual donor bone bank. The surface-based automated method uses the contralateral healthy bone to obtain the normal surface shape of the diseased bone, which could achieve good matching of the defect and the selected allograft. However, the surface-based method focuses on the matching of the whole bone so that the matching of the contact surface between the allograft and the recipient bone may not be optimal. To deal with the above problem, we propose a cutting contour based method for the allograft selection. Cutting contour from the recipient bone could reflect the structural information of the defect and is seldom influenced by tumor. Thus the cutting contour can be used as the matching template to find the optimal alignment of the recipient bone and the allograft. The proposed method is validated using the data of distal femurs where bone transplantation is commonly performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method generally outperforms the surface-based method within modest extra time. Overall, our contour-based method is an effective complementary technique for allograft selection in the virtual bone bank.

  13. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. A retrospective study on annual evaluation of radiation processing for frozen bone allografts complying to quality system requirements.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Saravana; Mohd, Suhaili; Samsuddin, Sharifah Mazni; Min, N G Wuey; Yusof, Norimah; Mansor, Azura

    2015-12-01

    Bone allografts have been used widely to fill up essential void in orthopaedic surgeries. The benefit of using allografts to replace and reconstruct musculoskeletal injuries, fractures or disease has obtained overwhelming acceptance from orthopaedic surgeons worldwide. However, bacterial infection and disease transmission through bone allograft transplantation have always been a significant issue. Sterilization by radiation is an effective method to eliminate unwanted microorganisms thus assist in preventing life threatening allograft associated infections. Femoral heads procured from living donors and long bones (femur and tibia) procured from cadaveric donors were sterilized at 25 kGy in compliance with international standard ISO 11137. According to quality requirements, all records of bone banking were evaluated annually. This retrospective study was carried out on annual evaluation of radiation records from 1998 until 2012. The minimum doses absorbed by the bones were ranging from 25.3 to 38.2 kGy while the absorbed maximum doses were from 25.4 to 42.3 kGy. All the bones supplied by our UMMC Bone Bank were sterile at the required minimum dose of 25 kGy. Our analysis on dose variation showed that the dose uniformity ratios in 37 irradiated boxes of 31 radiation batches were in the range of 1.003-1.251, which indicated the doses were well distributed.

  15. High-pressure saline washing of allografts reduces bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M Y; Salmela, P M; Vuento, R E

    2001-02-01

    60 fresh-frozen bone allografts were contaminated on the operating room floor. No bacterial growth was detected in 5 of them after contamination. The remaining 55 grafts had positive bacterial cultures and were processed with three methods: soaking in saline, soaking in antibiotic solution or washing by high-pressure saline. After high-pressure lavage, the cultures were negative in three fourths of the contaminated allografts. The corresponding figures after soaking grafts in saline and antibiotic solution were one tenth and two tenths, respectively. High-pressure saline cleansing of allografts can be recommended because it improves safety by reducing the superficial bacterial bioburden.

  16. Adenovirus Interstitial Nephritis and Rejection in an Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Storsley, Leroy

    2011-01-01

    Viral infections are an important complication of solid organ transplantation. Although polyoma is the virus that most commonly infects the renal allograft, adenoviral infections are also reported. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings in a patient with adenoviral infection associated with acute rejection of the renal allograft. The pathologic findings of adenovirus infection usually include a granulomatous interstitial nephritis, which is helpful in distinguishing from acute rejection. We discuss the differential diagnosis and pathophysiology of allograft viral infections and concomitant rejection. PMID:21436288

  17. Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells prolong survival of corneal allograft in corneal allograft transplantation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Guoling; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Han

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells could inhibit allograft rejection in corneal allograft transplantation mouse model. Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells were constructed by transfection of retroviral expression plasmid expressing Foxp3 into the sensi-Teff cells from a Balb/c mouse immunized by C57BL/6(H2b) mouse splenocytes. Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: Four groups received tail vein injection of Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells, or Foxp3-expressing Teff cells, or Treg cells or no intervention 1 day prior to corneal allograft transplantation. C57BL/6(H2b) was the donor mouse. The last group received corneal autograft transplantation. Corneal allograft survival time and percentage of CD4(+) T cells were detected. ELISPOT and Footpad swelling test were used to measure IL-2 and IFN-γ, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, respectively. Mice that had received an injection of Foxp3-expressing sensitized T cells prior to an allograft corneal transplantation, showed significantly longer survival time of corneal allograft, decreased percentage of CD4(+) T cells, IL-2 and IFN-γ, and alleviated footpad swelling than the mice that had received either Foxp3-Teff or Treg cells. Foxp3-sensi-Teff cell treatment that prolongs corneal allograft survival in the mouse model, might partly through suppressing CD4(+) T cells, IL-2 and IFN-γ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Donor-derived hematopoietic cells in organ transplantation: a major step toward allograft tolerance?

    PubMed

    Rifle, Gérard; Mousson, Christiane

    2003-05-15

    Infusion of donor-derived cells can improve organ allograft survival in animal models. Under certain conditions, it can even induce tolerance (i.e., unlimited organ survival without any maintenance immunosuppressive therapy). Use of nonmyeloablative regimens allows engraftment of donor-derived bone marrow cells, induction of mixed chimerism, and tolerance in rodents. High doses of bone marrow cells together with anti-T-cell antibodies can even result in mixed chimerism without cytoablative host conditioning. Cultured donor-derived CD34+ cells or donor-derived immature (or even mature) dendritic cells associated with monoclonal antibodies directed against co-stimulatory molecules might also induce tolerance. Among the numerous experimental protocols leading to tolerance of solid organs in animal models, how can we find our bearings in human transplantation? Numerous problems have yet to be solved: the type and amount of donor-derived cells (including stromal cells) to be used, the timing for infusion of donor cells in keeping with organ transplantation, the route of infusion (should it be intravenous, into the portal vein?), and the conditioning regimen. The first clinical trials would appear to indicate that tolerance induction in humans using donor-derived cells is a relatively safe solution that is both promising and realistic.

  19. Efficient use of a limited resource femoral head allograft: A comparison of allograft preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Timothy; Chow, Jason; Sivakumar, Brahman; Ahmed, Nushin; Smith, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the yield and compressed volume of femoral head allograft prepared by either hand morselization or a bone mill. Twenty human femoral head allografts were donated from a bone bank and morselized by two different methods. The heads were divided in half and split into two sample groups. One group underwent hand morselization with large bone nibblers, while the other was prepared using a bone mill. The volume of graft produced was measured. Ten-gram aliquots of each sample then underwent 30 impactions in a contained cavity, with the volume of graft compression measured. Bone milling yielded approximately 31% more usable graft than hand morselization (81% to 50%; p = 0.0001). There was no difference between the compressed volume of graft prepared by either method ( p = 0.14). This study demonstrates the efficacy of preparation of allograft with a bone mill and assists the clinician in determining the yield of graft by the weight of femoral head, thereby potentially minimizing excessive ordering and wastage.

  20. Allelic and Epitopic Characterization of Intra-Kidney Allograft Anti-HLA Antibodies at Allograft Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Milongo, D; Kamar, N; Del Bello, A; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Sallusto, F; Esposito, L; Dörr, G; Blancher, A; Congy-Jolivet, N

    2017-02-01

    The reasons for the increased incidence of de novo anti-human leukocyte antibody (HLA) donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) observed after kidney allograft nephrectomy are not fully understood. One advocated mechanism suggests that at graft loss, DSAs are not detected in the serum because they are fixed on the nonfunctional transplant; removal of the kidney allows DSAs to then appear in the blood circulation. The aim of our study was to compare anti-HLA antibodies present in the serum and in the graft at the time of an allograft nephrectomy. Using solid-phase assays, anti-HLA antibodies were searched for in the sera of 17 kidney transplant patients undergoing allograft nephrectomy. No anti-HLA antibodies were detected in the graft if they were not also detected in the serum. Eleven of the 12 patients who had DSAs detected in their sera also had DSAs detected in the grafts. Epitopic analysis revealed that most anti-HLA antibodies detected in removed grafts were directed against the donor. In summary, our data show that all anti-HLA antibodies that were detected in grafts were also detected in the sera. These intragraft anti-HLA antibodies are mostly directed against the donor at an epitopic level but not always at an antigenic level.

  1. [Hand allografts: experience from Lyon team].

    PubMed

    Gazarian, A; Abrahamyan, D-O; Petruzzo, P; Kanitakis, J; Guigal, V; Garret, J; Rizzo, C; Durand, P-Y; Fredenucci, J-F; Streichenberger, T; Parmentier, H; Galewicz, T; Guillot, M; Sirigu, A; Burloux, G; Morelon, E; Braye, F; Badet, L; Martin, X; Dubernard, J-M; Eljaafari, A

    2007-10-01

    Hand allograft is a method in the stage of clinical experimentation, which is reserved in France for the treatment of bilateral traumatic amputees. This study reports the Lyon team experience, which is pioneer in this domain. Four patients (3 males and 1 female) underwent seven (one unilateral and three bilateral) hand transplantations from September 1998 to February 2007. The level of amputation was at the wrist or at the mid-forearm. Delay since hand loss ranged from 2.5 to 9 years. The surgical protocol was elaborated and planned case by case. All recipients received the same immunosuppressive treatment. Episodes of acute rejection were observed in the first 3 months after transplantation, which were easily managed after a few days increasing oral prednisone doses and applying topical immunosuppressants. Currently the patients receive the doses of immunosuppressants comparable to those in kidney-grafted patients. We have not registered any severe complication of immunosuppressive treatment up till now (7 years follow-up for the earliest graft). We performed analytical and functional clinical, as well as questionnaire evaluation of patients. The first case (unilateral graft) resulted in graft failure at 2 years due to non-compliance of the patient. The three bilateral graftees demonstrate a favorable evolution despite some immunological (hyperglycemia, serum sickness) and surgical (thrombosis, osteomyelitis, skin loss) complications, which could be managed. The middle and long-term follow-up evaluation revealed good to excellent sensorimotor recovery of 4 hands in both male recipients (4 and 7 years) with satisfactory social adaptation, higher or equal to those expected after post-traumatic replantations at the equivalent level and higher to those obtained with currently available myoelectric prosthesis. The last patient, a young female who has been grafted in February 2007, receives ongoing reeducation course and shows normal progress of functional restoration

  2. Bone-marrow transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100112.htm Bone-marrow transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Bone-marrow is a soft, fatty tissue found inside of ...

  3. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Parashis, Andreas O.; Kalaitzakis, Charalampos J.; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients) indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP. PMID:25328523

  4. Mycobacteria and allograft heart valve banking: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R M; Magee, J G; Leeming, J P; Graham, J C; Hannan, M M; Chadwick, M; Crook, D W; Yearsley, C P; Rayner, A; Parker, R

    2008-03-01

    Since the 1970s many tissue banks have been testing allograft heart valves (HVs) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Donor selection for low risk of tuberculosis (TB) was introduced in the 1980s and appears to have reduced the risk of TB transmission. Regulatory guidance does not specify testing for TB, but does exclude donors with a recent history of TB. This survey of HV international bank practices revealed variations in donor selection, testing and processing of valves. Participant banks (from Europe and the USA) reported that over a period of 15 years, HV tissues from 38,413 donors were banked and 32,289 donors were tested for TB, none being positive. HV-associated tissue from 27,840 donors was stained and underwent microscopy; none of these were positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTBM) were detected by culture on 24 HVs. It is recommended that HV banks employ donor selection to exclude donors at risk of TB, to culture material for mycobacteria, and to investigate potential sources when clusters of NTBM are found to facilitate corrective and preventative actions.

  5. [A preliminary report of two cases of human hand allograft].

    PubMed

    Pei, G; Gu, L; Yu, L

    2000-06-01

    confirmed no rejection. Ideal histocompatability and combined usage of currently available immunosupressants can prevent hyperacute and accelerating rejection of human hand allograft. The tissues heal and the early function recover similarly to those in autologous replantation.

  6. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  7. Ultraviolet irradiated corneal allografts include antigen scientific unresponsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Niederkorn, J.Y. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the immunogenicity of corneal allografts was examined in a mouse model. BALB/c corneal allografts were exposed to 200 mJ/cm{sup 2} of UVB irradiation immediately prior to heterotopic transplantation of C57BL/6 recipients. Analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses revealed profound impairment of both forms of cell-mediated immunity. Mice grafted with UVB irradiated corneal grafts 7 days prior to immunization with nonirradiated, immunogenic corneal grafts failed to mount either allospecific CTL or DTH responses. Suppression of DTH responses was cyclophosphamide sensitive; C57BL/6 hosts treated with cyclophosphamide one day prior to receiving UVB irradiated corneal grafts developed normal DTH responses. Allospecific suppression could be transferred to naive recipients using spleen cells from host grafted with UV irradiated corneal allografts. The results indicated that UVB irradiation not only rendered corneal allografts nonimmunogenic but also tolerogenic.

  8. Multifocal bacterial osteomyelitis in a renal allograft recipient following urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Valson, A T; David, V G; Balaji, V; John, G T

    2014-05-01

    Non-tubercular bacterial osteomyelitis is a rare infection. We report on a renal allograft recipient with osteomyelitis complicating urosepsis, manifesting as a multifocal infection poorly responsive to appropriate antibiotics and surgical intervention and culminating in graft loss.

  9. The imbalance between Treg and Th17 cells caused by FTY720 treatment in skin allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Commodaro, Alessandra Gonçalves; Pedregosa, Juliana Figueredo; Peron, Jean Pierre; Brandão, Wesley; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bueno, Valquiria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: FTY720 modulates CD4+T cells by the augmentation of regulatory T cell activity, secretion of suppressive cytokines and suppression of IL-17 secretion by Th17 cells. To further understand the process of graft rejection/acceptance, we evaluated skin allograft survival and associated events after FTY720 treatment. METHODS: F1 mice (C57BL/6xBALB/c) and C57BL/6 mice were used as donors for and recipients of skin transplantation, respectively. The recipients were transplanted and either not treated or treated with FTY720 by gavage for 21 days to evaluate the allograft survival. In another set of experiments, the immunological evaluation was performed five days post-transplantation. The spleens, axillary lymph nodes and skin allografts of the recipient mice were harvested for phenotyping (flow cytometry), gene expression (real-time PCR) and cytokine (Bio-Plex) analysis. RESULTS: The FTY720 treatment significantly increased skin allograft survival, reduced the number of cells in the lymph nodes and decreased the percentage of Tregs at this site in the C57BL/6 recipients. Moreover, the treatment reduced the number of graft-infiltrating cells and the percentage of CD4+ graft-infiltrating cells. The cytokine analysis (splenocytes) showed decreased levels of IL-10, IL-6 and IL-17 in the FTY720-treated mice. We also observed a decrease in the IL-10, IL-6 and IL-23 mRNA levels, as well as an increase in the IL-27 mRNA levels, in the splenocytes of the treated group. The FTY720-treated mice exhibited increased mRNA levels of IL-10, IL-27 and IL-23 in the skin graft. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated prolonged but not indefinite skin allograft survival by FTY720 treatment. This finding indicates that the drug did not prevent the imbalance between Tr1 and Th17 cells in the graft that led to rejection. PMID:22892927

  10. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  11. Bipolar fresh osteochondral allograft of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Grigolo, Brunella; Bevoni, Roberto; Di Caprio, Francesco; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Desando, Giovanna; Vannini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Severe post-traumatic ankle arthritis poses a reconstructive challenge in the young and active patient. Bipolar fresh osteochondral allograft (BFOA) may represent an intriguing alternative to arthrodesis and prosthetic replacement. The aim of this study was to describe a lateral trans-malleolar technique for BFOA, and to evaluate the results in a case series. From 2004 to 2006, 32 patients, mean age of 36.8 +/- 8.4 years, affected by ankle arthritis underwent BFOA with a mean followup of 31.2 months. The graft was prepared by specifically designed jigs, including the talus and the tibia with the medial malleolus. The host surfaces were prepared by the same jigs through a lateral approach. The graft was placed and fixed with twist-off screws. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically at 2, 4, and 6 month after operation, and at a minimum 24 months followup. A biopsy of the grafted areas was obtained from 7 patients at 1-year followup for histological and immunohistochemical examination. Preoperative AOFAS score was 33.1 +/- 10.9 and postoperatively 69.5 +/- 19.4 (p < 0.0005). Six failures occurred. Cartilage harvests showed hyaline-like histology with a normal collagen component but low proteoglycan presence and a disorganized structure. Samples were positive for MMP-1, MMP-13 and Capsase-3. The use of BFOA represents an intriguing alternative to arthrodesis or arthroplasty. We believe precise allograft sizing, stable fitting and fixation and delayed weightbearing were key factors for a successful outcome. Further research regarding the immunological behavior of transplanted cartilage is needed.

  12. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > For Parents > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A What's in this article? ... Aspiraciones y biopsias: médula ósea What It Is Bone marrow aspirations and biopsies are performed to examine bone ...

  13. [Effects of reconstruction with unicondylar osteoarticular allografts with or without prosthesis for bone tumors around knee joint].

    PubMed

    Xue, Y S; Fu, J; Guo, Z; Wang, Z; Pei, Y J; Dang, L L; Fan, H B

    2017-04-01

    or prosthesis composite was feasible reconstruction for tumors in distal femoral uni-condyle. It could provide good functional outcomes and also prevent joint degeneration. Similarly, allograft reconstruction was also a reliable technique for proximal tibial defect.

  14. Autograft versus Allograft for Cervical Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-02-01

    Systematic review. To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), non-ICBG autologous bone, and allograft in cervical spine fusion. To avoid problems at the donor site, various allograft materials have been used as a substitute for autograft. However, there are still questions as to the comparative effectiveness and safety of cadaver allograft compared with autologous ICBG. A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases was conducted to identify studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with cervical degenerative disk disease using ICBG compared with non-ICBG autograft or allograft or non-ICBG autograft compared with allograft in the cervical spine. Radiographic fusion, patient-reported outcomes, and functional outcomes were the primary outcomes of interest. Adverse events were evaluated for safety. The search identified 13 comparative studies that met our inclusion criteria: 2 prospective cohort studies and 11 retrospective cohort studies. Twelve cohort studies compared allograft with ICBG autograft during anterior cervical fusion and demonstrated with a low evidence level of support that there are no differences in fusion percentages, pain scores, or functional results. There was insufficient evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with non-ICBG autograft for fusion, pain, revision, and functional and safety outcomes. No publications directly comparing non-ICBG autograft with ICBG were found. Although the available literature suggests ICBG and allograft may have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes following anterior cervical fusion, there are too many limitations in the available literature to draw any significant conclusions. No individual study provided greater than class III evidence, and when evaluating the overall body of literature, no conclusion had better than low evidence support. A prospective randomized trial with adequate sample size to

  15. Tuberculosis in a renal allograft: a successful outcome.

    PubMed

    George, Pratish; Pawar, Basant; Calton, Nalini

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in most South-East Asian countries including India. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients and often, it is not diagnosed early, due to its innocuous clinical presentations. A high index of suspicion and proactive management in the early phase of presentation can reduce allograft nephropathy, graft nephrectomy and mortality. A patient with an unusual presentation of tuberculosis localized to the allograft and successful management with anti-tuberculosis medications is described.

  16. Deceased donor skin allograft banking: Response and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Madhuri A.; De, Anuradha S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In the absence of xenograft and biosynthetic skin substitutes, deceased donor skin allografts is a feasible option for saving life of patient with extensive burn injury in our country. Aims: The first deceased donor skin allograft bank in India became functional at Lokmanya Tilak Municipal (LTM) medical college and hospital on 24th April 2000. The response of Indian society to this new concept of skin donation after death and the pattern of utilization of banked allografts from 2000 to 2010 has been presented in this study. Settings and Design: This allograft skin bank was established by the department of surgery. The departments of surgery and microbiology share the responsibility of smooth functioning of the bank. Materials and Methods: The response in terms of number of donations and the profile of donors was analyzed from records. Pattern and outcome of allograft utilization was studied from specially designed forms. Results: During these ten years, 262 deceased donor skin allograft donations were received. The response showed significant improvement after counselling was extended to the community. Majority of the donors were above 70 years of age and procurement was done at home for most. Skin allografts from 249 donors were used for 165 patients in ten years. The outcome was encouraging with seven deaths in 151 recipients with burn injuries. Conclusions: Our experience shows that the Indian society is ready to accept the concept of skin donation after death. Use of skin allografts is life saving for large burns. We need to prepare guidelines for the establishment of more skin banks in the country. PMID:21321645

  17. National Marrow Donor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-29

    associated with improved outcomes following unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia . Oral presentation 2011 BMT Tandem...appropriate emergency preparedness or response organization to inform about RITN. Educate: educate staff about radiation, acute radiation syndrome ...Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic Agents January 01, 2011 through March 31, 2011 18 of 21 acute GVHD after

  18. Overview of marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is now an accepted form of therapy for many hematologic disorders including aplastic anemia, genetically determined diseases and malignant diseases, particularly leukemia, and for rescue of patients given intensive chemoradiotherapy for malignant disease. The donor may be a healthy identical twin, a family member or even an unrelated person. Selection is made on the basis of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing. Intensive chemoradiotherapy is used to suppress patients' immune systems to facilitate engraftment and destroy diseased marrow. Transfusion of platelets, erythrocytes and granulocytes (or all of these), antibiotic coverage and protection from infection are necessary during the pancytopenic period. Survival rates vary considerably depending on a patient's disease, clinical state and age. Patients with aplastic anemia transplanted early in the course of their disease have a survival rate of approximately 80%. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are usually transplanted in a second or subsequent remission and have a survival rate of 25% to 40%. Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia in remission have survivals ranging from 45% to 70%. More than 200 patients in the chronic phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia have been transplanted with survival ranging from 50% to 70%. Complications of marrow transplantation include marrow graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, immunologic insufficiency and the possibility of recurrence of the leukemia. 14 references.

  19. Increasing incidence of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: cryptic etiology and uncertain therapy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, I D; DeFor, T; Weisdorf, D J

    2000-09-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a non-infectious pulmonary complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with resultant high mortality. It reportedly occurs primarily in autologous recipients. We examined the incidence of DAH in our center in order to assess potential risk factors and develop preventive strategies. Between 1991 and 1997, 23 cases of DAH occurred in 922 adult patients (2.5%) receiving BMT for hematological malignancy. Strikingly, 12 cases occurred in 1997 with the majority in recipients of allogeneic matched sibling donor stem cells. Treatment with high-dose steroids, 250 mg to 2 g/day, in 15 patients led to transient improvement in 10 patients, but 21 of the 23 patients required mechanical ventilation. Mortality was high with 17 patients (74%) dying a median of 39 days (range 22-47) post transplant; a median of 17 days post onset of DAH (range 5-34). Six patients are alive with a median follow-up of 18 months (range 12-60). No recognizable alteration in supportive care, conditioning regimen, GVHD prophylaxis or cytokine usage was associated with this striking increase in the frequency of DAH after allografting. Further follow-up is required to establish whether this increase in the incidence of DAH in allogeneic transplantation is an isolated occurrence or an ongoing problem. If indeed there is a real increase in the incidence of this complication, then efforts need to be directed towards elucidating a possible cause or risk factors. We offer the possibility that a new unidentified infection, undetected by current microbiological tests might contribute to this striking increase in DAH. These data, while not establishing a cause, suggest a markedly augmented risk of DAH in allogeneic BMT. In addition, high-dose corticosteroids have only limited efficacy as therapy for DAH after allotransplantation. Further investigation into the pathogenesis of this syndrome is essential as is prompt and immediate consideration of DAH in all patients with

  20. Bone marrow transplantation reverses new-onset immunoinflammatory diabetes in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cheng-Lan; Wang, Jing; Xie, Ting; Ouyang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation might be an effective method to cure type 1 diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to investigate whether bone marrow transplantation could reverse hyperglycemia in diabetic mice and whether high-dose total body irradiation followed by high-dose bone marrow mononuclear cell infusion could improve the efficiency of bone marrow transplantation in treating diabetic mice. Diabetic mice after multiple low doses of streptozotocin injection were irradiated followed by infusion with approximately 1×10(7) bone marrow mononuclear cells intravenously. Before and after bone marrow transplantation, fasting blood glucose, intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, serum insulin, pancreatic histology, and the examination of insulin and glucagon in islets were processed. All recipients returned to near euglycemic within 1 week after undergoing bone marrow transplantation. No mice became hyperglycemia again during investigation period. The change of serum insulin, glucose tolerance test, pancreatic histology and the expression of insulin and glucagon in recipient islets after bone marrow transplantation all revealed islets regeneration and significant amelioration when compared respectively with those of diabetic mice without bone marrow transplantation. Bone marrow transplantation contributed to reduce blood glucose, prevent further blood glucose hike in diabetic recipients, and promote islets regeneration. High-dose total body irradiation in combination with high-dose bone marrow monoclear cell infusion could improve the efficiency of bone marrow transplantation in treating streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

  1. Utility of sentinel flaps in assessing facial allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Fischer, Sebastian; Lian, Christine G; Bueno, Ericka M; Marty, Francisco M; Tullius, Stefan G; Pribaz, Julian J; Murphy, George J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsies are critical for histologic evaluation of rejection and proper treatment after facial allotransplantation. Many facial allografts provide only limited skin area, and frequent biopsies may also compromise aesthetic outcome. Sentinel flaps, recovered as free fasciocutaneous radial forearm flaps, have been used for remote-site rejection monitoring. They maintain their axial blood supply, similar to facial allografts. The correlation between facial allografts and sentinel flaps in cases of rejection is presented. The authors analyzed the experience of the Boston team's use of four sentinel flaps. Rejection was evaluated and results were compared for each time point. Sentinel flaps were used as functional flaps whenever possible. Results showed a reliable correlation between biopsy specimens taken from the facial allograft and sentinel flaps. During severe rejection episodes in 100 percent of biopsy pairs, both sites displayed a similar grade of rejection. In one case, clinical findings suggested rejection in the facial allograft but were unraveled as rosacea, because clinically there was no rejection displayed in the sentinel flap. The sentinel flap shows a reliable correlation to the facial allograft in cases of severe rejection, therefore providing a valuable tool for rejection monitoring in facial allotransplantation. Advantages of using these flaps include the avoidance of further surgical procedures to the primary vascularized composite allotransplant, additional use of the sentinel flap to repair damaged nonfacial sites, and its utility as both a clinical and histopathologic barometer of rejection and predictor of the potential existence of facial dermatitis unrelated to rejection. Therapeutic, IV.

  2. Complications of irradiated allografts in orthopaedic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Lietman, S A; Tomford, W W; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Mankin, H J

    2000-06-01

    Massive structural allografts used for replacement of bone defects after removal of bone tumors have several complications, including fracture, infection, and nonunion. To decrease the rate of infection, irradiation of selected allografts before their implantation was performed. This study evaluated the complications in patients with these irradiated grafts. Twenty-four patients were identified who had received allografts from 1987 through 1991 that were irradiated before implantation. The dosage of radiation was between 10 kGy and 30 kGy. The mean length of followup of the patients was 5 years (range, 2-9 years). These grafts were compared with a control group of grafts that were not irradiated but were implanted during the same time and used for similar diagnostic problems with defects of similar size. The outcomes of the groups differed significantly only in the incidence of allograft fracture. These findings indicate that high-dose irradiation to bone allografts is associated with a higher rate of fracture than are similar reconstructions using nonirradiated allografts.

  3. Primary integumentary allograft reactivity in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    George, J F; Howcroft, T K; Karp, R D

    1987-04-01

    Previous reports have failed to demonstrate integumentary allograft rejection in insects. We realized however, that these studies may not have fully appreciated the structure of the insect exoskeleton. Since the subcuticlar epidermal layer constitutes the only living tissue associated with insect integument, its destruction would indicate that the animal recognized and responded to the foreign tissue. Thus, we investigated allograft reactivity in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, by observing the fate of the epidermal portion of the integument. Each animal in a pair received a 3 X 4-mm integumentary allograft from its partner, as well as a 3 X 4-mm control autograft. The transplants were then examined histologically for signs of epidermal destruction at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10-70 days (in 10-day increments) posttransplantation. The results indicated that significant rejection of the allografts began by day 3, with peak reactivity occurring by day 7 when 92% of the grafts were scored as rejected. At later periods (greater than 20 days), the graft sites showed signs of repopulation by host epidermal cells. The allograft reaction was found to lag behind the xenograft reaction, which showed peak activity after only 1 day posttransplantation. Even so, allograft rejection in this insect occurred quite rapidly (as compared with some other invertebrates), and would appear to be due to a cytotoxic reaction against the epidermal layer.

  4. Ex Situ Perfusion of Human Limb Allografts for 24 Hours.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nicole L; Alghanem, Fares; Rakestraw, Stephanie L; Sarver, Dylan C; Nicely, Bruce; Pietroski, Richard E; Lange, Paul; Rudich, Steven M; Mendias, Christopher L; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Magee, John C; Bartlett, Robert H; Ozer, Kagan

    2017-03-01

    Vascularized composite allografts, particularly hand and forearm, have limited ischemic tolerance after procurement. In bilateral hand transplantations, this demands a 2 team approach and expedited transfer of the allograft, limiting the recovery to a small geographic area. Ex situ perfusion may be an alternative allograft preservation method to extend allograft survival time. This is a short report of 5 human limbs maintained for 24 hours with ex situ perfusion. Upper limbs were procured from brain-dead organ donors. Following recovery, the brachial artery was cannulated and flushed with 10 000 U of heparin. The limb was then attached to a custom-made, near-normothermic (30-33°C) ex situ perfusion system composed of a pump, reservoir, and oxygenator. Perfusate was plasma-based with a hemoglobin concentration of 4 to 6 g/dL. Average warm ischemia time was 76 minutes. Perfusion was maintained at an average systolic pressure of 93 ± 2 mm Hg, flow 310 ± 20 mL/min, and vascular resistance 153 ± 16 mm Hg/L per minute. Average oxygen consumption was 1.1 ± 0.2 mL/kg per minute. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation continually displayed contraction until the end of perfusion, and histology showed no myocyte injury. Human limb allografts appeared viable after 24 hours of near-normothermic ex situ perfusion. Although these results are early and need validation with transplantation, this technology has promise for extending allograft storage times.

  5. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  6. Chronic cardiac allograft rejection: critical role of ED-A(+) fibronectin and implications for targeted therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Neri, Dario; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Chronic cardiac allograft rejection is characterized by cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) causing severe long-term complications after heart transplantation and determining allograft function and patients' prognosis. Until now, there have been no sufficient preventive or therapeutic strategies. CAV and CIF are accompanied by changes in the extracellular matrix, including re-expression of the fetal fibronectin splice variant known as ED-A(+) fibronectin. This molecule has been shown to be crucial for the development of myofibroblasts (MyoFbs) as the main cell type in CIF and for the activation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) as the main cell type in CAV. Relevant re-expression and protein deposition of ED-A(+) fibronectin has been demonstrated in animal models of chronic rejection, with spatial association to CAV and CIF, and a quantitative correlation to the rejection grade. The paper by Booth et al published in this issue of The Journal of Pathology could prove for the first time the functional importance of ED-A(+) fibronectin for the development of CIF as a main component of chronic cardiac rejection. Thus, promising conclusions for the development of new diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for chronic cardiac rejection focusing on ED-A(+) fibronectin can be suggested.

  7. Long-Term Study of Vascularized Free-Draining Intraperitoneal Pancreatic Segmental Allografts in Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakides, George K.; Rabinovitch, Alexander; Mintz, Daniel; Olson, Les; Rapaport, Felix T.; Miller, Joshua

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the significance of immunogenetic factors on the survival of pancreatic allografts in beagle dogs. Donors and recipients were leukocyte antigen (DLA)-typed and mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-tested. Recipients were made diabetic by total pancreatectomy and immediately implanted intraperitoneally with a vascularized, free-draining (duct unligated) pancreatic segmental (FDPS) allograft. Two groups of dogs were studied. In group I consisting of donor-recipient littermates, recipients were immunosuppressed with prednisone and azathioprine (n = 16 dogs), or not immunosuppressed (n = 4). In group II, recipients were made specifically unresponsive by total body radiation, autologous marrow implantation, and kidney transplantation from DLA-MLC identical donors, 1 yr before FDPS transplantation from the corresponding original kidney donors. Survival of the FDPS grafts in group I was inversely related to pretransplant MLC reactivity, irrespective of DLA genotyped match between donor and recipient. Thus, immunosuppressed high MLC reactors (n = 8) rejected FDPS grafts between 7 and 14 d, whereas immunosuppressed low MLC reactors (n = 8) accepted grafts for 25 to 260+ days, and nonimmunosuppressed low MLC reactors (n = 4) accepted grafts for 9-55 d. Rejection (hyperglycemia) of FDPS grafts was sudden, permanent, and unpredictable despite weekly intravenous glucose tolerance tests with measurements of glucose disappearance rates and serum insulin responses. Nevertheless, serial in vitro cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity (CML) assays revealed increases in CML before graft rejection in low MLC reactors, and decreases in both CML and MLC responses before graft rejection in high MLC reactors. FDPS graft survival was indefinite (>6 mo) in group II dogs, despite low-grade MLC reactivity (2:4 dogs) and CML responses (4:4 dogs). Biopsies of FDPS grafts at 6 mo in normoglycemic dogs showed disappearance of exocrine tissue and coalescence of

  8. Development of a Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Program Outside North America

    PubMed Central

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; de Rezende, Márcia Uchoa; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Bugbee, William Dick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To standardize and to develop a fresh osteochondral allograft protocol of procurement, processing and surgical utilization in Brazil. This study describes the steps recommended to make fresh osteochondral allografts a viable treatment option in a country without previous fresh allograft availability. Design The process involves regulatory process modification, developing and establishing procurement, and processing and surgical protocols. Results Legislation: Fresh osteochondral allografts were not feasible in Brazil until 2009 because the law prohibited preservation of fresh grafts at tissue banks. We approved an amendment that made it legal to preserve fresh grafts for 30 days from 2°C to 6°C in tissue banks. Procurement: We changed the protocol of procurement to decrease tissue contamination. All tissues were procured in an operating room. Processing: Processing of the grafts took place within 12 hours of tissue recovery. A serum-free culture media with antibiotics was developed to store the grafts. Surgeries: We have performed 8 fresh osteochondral allografts on 8 knees obtaining grafts from 5 donors. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was 31.99 ± 13.4, improving to 81.26 ± 14.7 at an average of 24 months’ follow-up. Preoperative Knee Injury and Oseoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) score was 46.8 ± 20.9 and rose to 85.24 ± 13.9 after 24 months. Mean preoperative Merle D’Aubigne-Postel score was 8.75 ± 2.25 rising to 16.1 ± 2.59 at 24 months’ follow-up. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation in South America. We believe that this experience may be of value for physicians in countries that are trying to establish an osteochondral allograft transplant program. PMID:27375837

  9. Development of a Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Program Outside North America.

    PubMed

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; de Rezende, Márcia Uchoa; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Bugbee, William Dick

    2016-07-01

    To standardize and to develop a fresh osteochondral allograft protocol of procurement, processing and surgical utilization in Brazil. This study describes the steps recommended to make fresh osteochondral allografts a viable treatment option in a country without previous fresh allograft availability. The process involves regulatory process modification, developing and establishing procurement, and processing and surgical protocols. Legislation: Fresh osteochondral allografts were not feasible in Brazil until 2009 because the law prohibited preservation of fresh grafts at tissue banks. We approved an amendment that made it legal to preserve fresh grafts for 30 days from 2°C to 6°C in tissue banks. Procurement: We changed the protocol of procurement to decrease tissue contamination. All tissues were procured in an operating room. Processing: Processing of the grafts took place within 12 hours of tissue recovery. A serum-free culture media with antibiotics was developed to store the grafts. Surgeries: We have performed 8 fresh osteochondral allografts on 8 knees obtaining grafts from 5 donors. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was 31.99 ± 13.4, improving to 81.26 ± 14.7 at an average of 24 months' follow-up. Preoperative Knee Injury and Oseoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) score was 46.8 ± 20.9 and rose to 85.24 ± 13.9 after 24 months. Mean preoperative Merle D'Aubigne-Postel score was 8.75 ± 2.25 rising to 16.1 ± 2.59 at 24 months' follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation in South America. We believe that this experience may be of value for physicians in countries that are trying to establish an osteochondral allograft transplant program.

  10. Methenamine silver staining quantitative digital histochemistry in chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Sakar, M; Sonmez, D; Tekis, D

    2004-12-01

    Renal function and final outcome of renal allografts have been correlated with irreversible damage. This study describes a quantitative histochemical method relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining of all renal compartments. Among 60 renal allograft biopsies from 43 patients, 15 biopsies showing pure chronic allograft nephropathy were selected to determine PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP), using image analysis with quantitative histochemistry. Of the 15 cases, 9 (60%) were grade I and 6 (40%) were grade II chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The mean serum creatinine (sCr) value was 1.86 +/- 0.47 for allograft biopsies. The mean (+/-SD) SAP for the implantation biopsies was 10.58 +/- 1.87%, and for allograft biopsies 25.26 +/- 9.67 (P <.000). The serum creatinine (sCr) values for grade I versus II CAN were 1.63 +/- 0.24 versus 2.20 +/- 0.54 mg/dL, respectively (P=.019), and SAP values were 18.97 +/- 0.24 versus 34.7 +/- 5.89 (P=.003). There was a strong positive correlation between sCr values and SAP (P=.005; r=0.64). These findings show the PAMS approach to be a useful alternative method for reflecting damage in more than one compartment of the renal tissue. Also, the method can discriminated implantation and allograft biopsies as well as grade I and II CAN cases. The series is small for a multivariate analysis of the value of SAP measurements in PAMS-stained sections as a prognosticator, but the data support its use.

  11. Novel Therapeutics Identification for Fibrosis in Renal Allograft Using Integrative Informatics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Greene, Ilana; Readhead, Benjamin; Menon, Madhav C.; Kidd, Brian A.; Uzilov, Andrew V.; Wei, Chengguo; Philippe, Nimrod; Schroppel, Bernd; He, John Cijiang; Chen, Rong; Dudley, Joel T.; Murphy, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Chronic allograft damage, defined by interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA), is a leading cause of allograft failure. Few effective therapeutic options are available to prevent the progression of IF/TA. We applied a meta-analysis approach on IF/TA molecular datasets in Gene Expression Omnibus to identify a robust 85-gene signature, which was used for computational drug repurposing analysis. Among the top ranked compounds predicted to be therapeutic for IF/TA were azathioprine, a drug to prevent acute rejection in renal transplantation, and kaempferol and esculetin, two drugs not previously described to have efficacy for IF/TA. We experimentally validated the anti-fibrosis effects of kaempferol and esculetin using renal tubular cells in vitro and in vivo in a mouse Unilateral Ureteric Obstruction (UUO) model. Kaempferol significantly attenuated TGF-β1-mediated profibrotic pathways in vitro and in vivo, while esculetin significantly inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway in vitro and in vivo. Histology confirmed significantly abrogated fibrosis by kaempferol and esculetin in vivo. We developed an integrative computational framework to identify kaempferol and esculetin as putatively novel therapies for IF/TA and provided experimental evidence for their therapeutic activities in vitro and in vivo using preclinical models. The findings suggest that both drugs might serve as therapeutic options for IF/TA. PMID:28051114

  12. National Marrow Donor Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-05

    Information Report • Added additional tests: Chagas (screening) and Chagas (confirmatory), along with their results and test dates performed • Revisions...Disease Marker screen and Cord Information (Detailed and Summary) and Cord Lab Summary Reports o The Chagas EIA test text was changed to Chagas (screening...o The RIPA (confirmatory) test was changed to Chagas (confirmatory) National Marrow Donor Program® N000014-08-1-0058 QUARTER PROGRESS REPORT

  13. Iliac crest fresh-frozen allografts and autografts in maxillary and mandibular reconstruction: a histologic and histomorphometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chiapasco, M; Giammattei, M; Carmagnola, D; Autelitano, L; Rabbiosi, D; Dellavia, C

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare histologically and histomorphometrically the osseointegration of iliac crest fresh-frozen allografts and autografts in human pre-prosthetic maxillary and mandibular onlay bone blocks reconstruction. Twelve patients with edentulous atrophic ridges, scheduled for implant-supported prosthetic restorations, underwent reconstruction using iliac crest fresh-frozen allografts (group A, six patients) or autografts (group B, six patients). Four-to-nine months later implants were placed in the augmented areas and bone specimens were simultaneously obtained using trephine burs. The specimens were processed for ground sections and evaluated histologically and histomorphometrically. The postoperative course was uneventful in all patients in group B and in all except one in group A. Late complications occurred in 5 patients of group A. Dental implants could be inserted in all cases. Specimens from group A showed a vascularized bone with osteoprogenitor stem cells and medium-high grade of bone remodeling. Small areas of necrotic bone were observed sporadically. Sections obtained from group B revealed an advanced stage of bone remodeling. The histomorphometric analysis showed in group A a mean proportion of 24.7±14.7% for lamellar bone, 28.4±13.3% for newly formed bone and 46.9±16.9% for bone marrow; in group B the corresponding values were 25.3±15.3%, 22.9±11.0%, 51.7±15.7%. No statistically significant difference was found (Wilcoxon Test; P>0.05). There were no significant histological differences between group A and B. Larger studies with long term follow-up are needed to confirm that fresh-frozen allografts are a reliable alternative to autografts.

  14. Transmission of infection with human allografts: essential considerations in donor screening.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jay A; Greenwald, Melissa A; Grossi, Paolo A

    2012-09-01

    Transmission of infection via transplantation of allografts including solid organs, eyes, and tissues are uncommon but potentially life-threatening events. Donor-derived infections have been documented following organ, tissue, and ocular transplants. Each year, more than 70 000 organs, 100 000 corneas, and 2 million human tissue allografts are implanted worldwide. Single donors may provide allografts for >100 organ and tissue recipients; each allograft carries some, largely unquantifiable, risk of disease transmission. Protocols for screening of organ or tissue donors for infectious risk are nonuniform, varying with the type of allograft, national standards, and availability of screening assays. In the absence of routine, active surveillance, coupled with the common failure to recognize or report transmission events, few data are available on the incidence of allograft-associated disease transmission. Research is needed to define the optimal screening assays and the transmissibility of infection with allografts. Approaches are reviewed that may contribute to safety in allograft transplantation.

  15. Allogeneic hematolymphoid microchimerism and prevention of autoimmune disease in the rat. A relationship between allo- and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, C P; Murase, N; Chen-Woan, M; Fung, J J; Starzl, T E; Demetris, A J

    1996-01-01

    Conventional allogeneic bone marrow transplantation after myeloablation can prevent experimental autoimmunity and has been proposed as treatment for humans. However, trace populations of donor hematolymphoid cells persisting in solid organ allograft recipients have been associated in some circumstances with therapeutic effects similar to replacement of the entire bone marrow. We therefore examined whether inducing hematolymphoid microchimerism without myeloablation could confer the ability to resist mercuric chloride (HgCl2)-induced autoimmunity. Brown-Norway (BN) rats were pretreated with a syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow infusion under transient FK506 immunosuppression before receiving HgCl2. They were compared with BN rats receiving either no pretreatment (naive) or FK506 alone. Administration of HgCl2 to naive BN rats induced marked autoantibody production, systemic vasculitis and lymphocytic infiltration of the kidneys, liver and skin in all of the animals and a 47% mortality. In contrast, BN rats pretreated with HgCl2-resistant allogeneic Lewis bone marrow and transient FK506 showed less clinical disease and were completely protected from mortality. More specifically, IgG anti-laminin autoantibody production was decreased by 40% (P < 0.05), and there was less histopathological tissue injury (P < 0.005), less in vitro autoreactivity (P < 0.05), less of an increase in class II MHC expression on B cells (P < 0.01), and 22% less weight loss (P < 0.01), compared with controls. Protection from the experimental autoimmunity was associated with signs of low grade activation of the BN immune system, which included: increased numbers of circulating B and activated T cells before administration of HgCl2, and less autoreactivity and spontaneous proliferation in vitro after HgCl2. PMID:8550837

  16. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in presensitized rats after a high activity Yunnan-cobra venom factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Chen, G; Guo, H; Wang, D W; Xie, L; Wang, S S; Wang, W Y; Xiong, Y L; Chen, S

    2006-12-01

    Complement-dependent antibody-mediated acute humoral rejection is the major obstacle of clinical transplantation across ABO incompatibility and human leukocyte antigen presensitization. We previously demonstrated that Yunnan-cobra venom factor (Y-CVF) could almost completely abrogate complement activity and successfully prevent hyperacute rejection in some xenotransplant models without any obvious toxicity. In this study we investigated whether depletion of complement by Y-CVF prevented acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats thereby prolonging graft survival. Presensitization was achieved in Lewis rats by sequential grafting of three full-thickness skin pieces from Brown Norway rats. Serum cytotoxic alloantibody titers were determined by a modified in vitro complement-dependent microcytotoxicity assay. After presensitization, each Lewis rat received a heterotopic Brown Norway cardiac allograft. Fifteen recipients were divided into two groups: (1) no treatment control (n = 7); (2) Y-CVF therapy group (86 u/kg, IV, day -1) (n = 8). After cessation of the heart beat, allograft rejection was confirmed by pathologic as well as IgG and C3 immunohistochemical examinations. The mean graft survival time was significantly prolonged to 99.50 +/- 38.72 hours among rats that received Y-CVF vs 12.71 +/- 13.94 hours in nontreated controls (P < .001). Upon pathological and immunohistochemical examination, acute humoral rejection was mainly exhibited in the control group, whereas acute cellular rejection was mainly displayed in the Y-CVF therapy group. Our study demonstrated that complement depletion by Y-CVF significantly inhibited acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats. As a therapeutic immunointervention tool for complement, Y-CVF has shown potential efficacy across ABO incompatible and positive cross-match barriers.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Elastography to Assess Fibrosis in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Kirpalani, Anish; Hashim, Eyesha; Leung, General; Kim, Jin K; Krizova, Adriana; Jothy, Serge; Deeb, Maya; Jiang, Nan N; Glick, Lauren; Mnatzakanian, Gevork; Yuen, Darren A

    2017-10-06

    Fibrosis is a major cause of kidney allograft injury. Currently, the only means of assessing allograft fibrosis is by biopsy, an invasive procedure that samples <1% of the kidney. We examined whether magnetic resonance elastography, an imaging-based measure of organ stiffness, could noninvasively estimate allograft fibrosis and predict progression of allograft dysfunction. Kidney allograft recipients >1 year post-transplant undergoing an allograft biopsy first underwent free-breathing, flow-compensated magnetic resonance elastography on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Each patient had serial eGFR measurements after the elastography scan for a follow-up period of up to 1 year. The mean stiffness value of the kidney allograft was compared with both the histopathologic Banff fibrosis score and the rate of eGFR change during the follow-up period. Sixteen patients who underwent magnetic resonance elastography and biopsy were studied (mean age: 54±9 years old). Whole-kidney mean stiffness ranged between 3.5 and 7.3 kPa. Whole-kidney stiffness correlated with biopsy-derived Banff fibrosis score (Spearman rho =0.67; P<0.01). Stiffness was heterogeneously distributed within each kidney, providing a possible explanation for the lack of a stronger stiffness-fibrosis correlation. We also found negative correlations between whole-kidney stiffness and both baseline eGFR (Spearman rho =-0.65; P<0.01) and eGFR change over time (Spearman rho =-0.70; P<0.01). Irrespective of the baseline eGFR, increased kidney stiffness was associated with a greater eGFR decline (regression r(2)=0.48; P=0.03). Given the limitations of allograft biopsy, our pilot study suggests the potential for magnetic resonance elastography as a novel noninvasive measure of whole-allograft fibrosis burden that may predict future changes in kidney function. Future studies exploring the utility and accuracy of magnetic resonance elastography are needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  18. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  19. Recurrent renal allograft dysfunction due to ureteric stenosis in a patient with the BK virus infection.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Trabert, Johannes; Wunderer, Florian; Abraham, Georgi; Reddy, Yuvaram N V

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of the genitourinary tract in association with the BK virus (BKV) infection are increasing among renal allograft recipients. We herewith report a young, female renal transplant recipient who presented with allograft dysfunction secondary to proximal ureteric stenosis. The allograft function improved dramatically after correction and stenting of the stenosis. Our case suggests that screening for BKV infection should be an integral part of evaluation of allograft dysfunction.

  20. Perioperative release of pro-regenerative biochemical signals from human renal allografts subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Błogowski, Wojciech; Dolegowska, Barbara; Budkowska, Marta; Sałata, Daria; Domański, Leszek; Starzynska, Teresa

    2014-02-01

    Complement-derived molecules modulate the intensity of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and may lead to the generation of biochemical signals [such as stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) or sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)], which stimulate tissue/organ regeneration after injury. We tested the association between perioperative C5b-9/membrane attack complex (MAC) levels and intensified erythrocyte lysis, and asked whether significant changes in the levels of pro-regenerative substances occur during the early phase of renal allograft reperfusion. Seventy-five recipients were enrolled and divided into the early, slow, and delayed graft function (DGF) groups. Perioperative blood samples were collected from the renal vein during consecutive minutes of reperfusion. Extracellular hemoglobin (eHb), albumin (plasma S1P transporter), 8-iPF2α-III isoprostane, SDF-1 and S1P concentrations were measured. Throughout the reperfusion period, erythrocyte lysis intensified and was most pronounced in the DGF group. However, perioperative eHb levels did not correlate significantly with C5b-9/MAC values, but rather with the intensity of oxidative stress. No significant changes were observed in S1P, its plasma transporter (albumin) or SDF-1 levels, which were relatively low in all groups throughout the reperfusion period. Our study therefore demonstrates that no known biochemical signal for bone marrow-derived stem cell mobilization is released from human renal allografts to the periphery during the early phase of reperfusion.

  1. Immature CD4⁺ dendritic cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen prolong renal allograft survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xu, Lin; Li, Heng; Huang, Zheng-Yu; Zhang, Sheng-Ping; Miao, Bin; Na, Ning

    2012-07-01

    Allogeneic transplant rejection is currently a major problem encountered during organ transplantation. The dendritic cell (DC) is the most effective powerful known professional antigen-presenting cell, and recent studies have found that DCs can also induce immune tolerance, and avoid or reduce the degree of transplant rejection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of transfused immature CD4(+) DCs on renal allografts in the rat model. In this study, we induced CD4(+) immature DCs from rat bone marrow cells by a cytokine cocktail. The immature CD4(+) DCs were identified by morphological analysis and then the suppressive activity of these cells conditioned with donor kidney antigen was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Immature CD4(+) DCs conditioned with donor kidney antigen possessed immunosuppressive activity in vitro and they were able to prolong renal transplant survival in an allograft rat model in vivo. Our study provides new information on efficacious renal transplantation, which might be useful for understanding the function of immature CD4(+) DCs in modulating renal transplant rejection and improving clinical outcome in future studies.

  2. Imaging mouse lung allograft rejection with 1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinbang; Huang, Howard J.; Wang, Xingan; Wang, Wei; Ellison, Henry; Thomen, Robert P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Woods, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that longitudinal, non-invasive monitoring via MRI can characterize acute cellular rejection (ACR) in mouse orthotopic lung allografts. Methods Nineteen Balb/c donor to C57BL/6 recipient orthotopic left lung transplants were performed, further divided into control-Ig vs anti-CD4/anti-CD8 treated groups. A two-dimensional multi-slice gradient-echo pulse sequence synchronized with ventilation was used on a small-animal MR scanner to acquire proton images of lung at post-operative days 3, 7 and 14, just before sacrifice. Lung volume and parenchymal signal were measured, and lung compliance was calculated as volume change per pressure difference between high and low pressures. Results Normalized parenchymal signal in the control-Ig allograft increased over time, with statistical significance between day 14 and day 3 post transplantation (0.046→0.789, P < 0.05), despite large inter-mouse variations; this was consistent with histopathologic evidence of rejection. Compliance of the control-Ig allograft decreased significantly over time (0.013→0.003, P < 0.05), but remained constant in mice treated with anti-CD4/anti-CD8 antibodies. Conclusion Lung allograft rejection in individual mice can be monitored by lung parenchymal signal changes and by lung compliance through MRI. Longitudinal imaging can help us better understand the time course of individual lung allograft rejection and response to treatment. PMID:24954886

  3. Factors affecting nonunion of the allograft-host junction.

    PubMed

    Hornicek, F J; Gebhardt, M C; Tomford, W W; Sorger, J I; Zavatta, M; Menzner, J P; Mankin, H J

    2001-01-01

    Nonunion of allograft-host junction after bone transplantation is not uncommon, and its treatment frequently is problematic. To improve the understanding of these nonunions, a retrospective review was performed of 163 nonunions in 945 patients who underwent allograft transplantation (17.3%) for various benign and malignant tumors at the authors' institution between 1974 and 1997. Of these 945 patients, 558 did not receive adjuvant therapy. Chemotherapy was administered to 354 patients and only 33 patients received radiation therapy alone. Seventy-one patients had radiation treatment and chemotherapy. Of the 163 patients who had nonunion develop at the allograft-host junction, there were 269 reoperations performed on the involved extremity. In 108 patients, treatment was successful resulting in union of the allograft-host junction. Forty-nine patients did not respond to multiple surgical treatment attempts. The greater the number of surgical procedures, the worse the outcome. The rate of nonunions increased to 27% for the patients who received chemotherapy as compared with 11% for the patients who did not receive chemotherapy. The order of allografts from highest rate of nonunion to lowest was as follows: alloarthrodesis, intercalary, osteoarticular, and alloprosthesis. Infection and fracture rates were higher in the patients with nonunions as compared with the patients without nonunions.

  4. Morphological and functional alterations in glycerol preserved rat aortic allografts.

    PubMed

    Fahner, P J; Idu, M M; Legemate, D A; Vanbavel, E; Borstlap, J; Pfaffendorf, M; van Marle, J; van Gulik, T M

    2004-11-01

    Glycerol preservation is an effective method for long-term preservation of skin allografts and has a potential use in preserving arterial allografts. We evaluated the effect of glycerol concentration and incubation period on vessel-wall integrity of rat aortic allografts. No significant differences were measured in breaking strength (2.3 +/- 0.3 N) and bursting pressure (223 +/- 32 kPa) between standard glycerolized and control segments (1.7 +/- 0.3 N, 226 +/- 17 kPa). Isometric tension measurements showed complete lack of functional contraction and relaxation capacity in allograft segments prepared according to all preservation protocols. Morphologically, thickness of the vessel-wall media diminished after preservation using low (30/50/75%) or high (70/85/98%) concentrations of glycerol, as compared to control segments (i.e. 81 +/- 2.4 microm, 95 +/- 5.6 microm and 125 +/- 3.5 microm, respectively). Confocal microscopy and Fourier analysis demonstrated that vascular collagen and elastin bundle orientation had remained unaltered. Electron microscopy showed defragmentation of luminal endothelial cells. In conclusion, glycerol preservation of rat aorta resulted in an acellular tissue matrix, which maintained biomechanical integrity and extracellular matrix characteristics. The next step in the investigation will be to test the concept of glycerol preservation of arterial allografts in a vascular transplantation model.

  5. Differential gene expression pattern in biopsies with renal allograft pyelonephritis and allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Oghumu, Steve; Nori, Uday; Bracewell, Anna; Zhang, Jianying; Bott, Cherri; Nadasdy, Gyongyi M.; Brodsky, Sergey V.; Pelletier, Ronald; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from acute rejection (AR) in renal allograft biopsies can sometimes be difficult because of overlapping clinical and histologic features, lack of positive urine cultures, and variable response to antibiotics. We wanted to study differential gene expression between AR and APN using biopsy tissue. Thirty-three biopsies were analyzed using NanoString multiplex platform and PCR (6 transplant baseline biopsies, 8 AR, 15 APN [8 culture positive, 7 culture negative], and 4 native pyelonephritis [NP]). Additional 22 biopsies were tested by PCR to validate the results. CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and IDO1 were the top differentially expressed genes, upregulated in AR. Lactoferrin (LTF) and CXCL1 were higher in APN and NP. No statistically significant difference in transcript levels was seen between culture-positive and culture-negative APN biopsies. Comparing the overall mRNA signature using Ingenuity pathway analysis, interferon-gamma emerged as the dominant upstream regulator in AR and allograft APN, but not in NP (which clustered separately). Our study suggests that chemokine pathways in graft APN may differ from NP and in fact resemble AR, due to a component of alloreactivity, resulting in variable response to antibiotic treatment. Therefore, cautious addition of steroids might help in resistant cases of graft APN. PMID:27352120

  6. The effects of low-dose radiotherapy on fresh osteochondral allografts: An experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gönç, Uğur; Çetinkaya, Mehmet; Atabek, Mesut

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-dose fractionated radiotherapy on cartilage degeneration after distal femoral fresh massive osteochondral allograft transplantation. Twenty-four New Zealand White rabbits were divided into three groups of 8 rabbits each. All rabbits underwent distal femoral medial condyle fresh massive osteochondral allograft transplantation from California rabbits. The group 1 underwent transplantation without any preliminary process. The group 2 underwent fractionated local radiotherapy of 100 cGy for five days starting on the transplantation day. The group 3 included the rabbits to which the grafts transplanted after radiating in vitro by a single dose radiation of 1500 cGy. The hosts were sacrificed twelve weeks later. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were taken. Synovial tissue, cartilaginous tissue, and subchondral bone were assessed histopathologically. Nonunion was present in three cases of group 2 and one of group 3 in which cartilage degeneration was more severe. Synovial hypertrophy and pannus formation were more obvious in non-radiated rabbits. Hypocellularity and necrosis of the subchondral bone were rare in group 2. More cartilage tissue impairment was present in group 3 compared to group 1. In osteochondral massive allograft transplantations, the immune reaction of the host could be precluded with radiotherapy, and the side-effects can be prevented by low-dose fractionated regimen. The total dose of fractionated radiotherapy for an immune suppression should be adjusted not to damage the cartilage tissue, but to avoid articular degeneration in the long term. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Allograft Reconstruction for the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Tumors of the Upper Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-Tinao, Luis A.; Ayerza, Miguel A.; Muscolo, D. Luis; Farfalli, German L.

    2013-01-01

    In comparison with the lower extremity, there is relatively paucity literature reporting survival and clinical results of allograft reconstructions after excision of a bone tumor of the upper extremity. We analyze the survival of allograft reconstructions in the upper extremity and analyze the final functional score according to anatomical site and type of reconstruction. A consecutive series of 70 allograft reconstruction in the upper limb with a mean followup of 5 years was analyzed, 38 osteoarticular allografts, 24 allograft-prosthetic composites, and 8 intercalary allografts. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of the allografts was performed, with implant revision for any cause and amputation used as the end points. The function evaluation was performed using MSTS functional score. Sixteen patients (23%) had revision surgery for 5 factures, 2 infections, 5 allograft resorptions, and 2 local recurrences. Allograft survival at five years was 79% and 69% at ten years. In the group of patients treated with an osteoarticular allograft the articular surface survival was 90% at five years and 54% at ten years. The limb salvage rate was 98% at five and 10 years. We conclude that articular deterioration and fracture were the most frequent mode of failure in proximal humeral osteoarticular reconstructions and allograft resorption in elbow reconstructions. The best functional score was observed in the intercalary humeral allograft. PMID:23476115

  8. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  9. Nasal dorsal augmentation with freeze-dried allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Clark, Richard P; Wong, Granger; Johnson, Loche M; Hagge, Rosalie J; Ciminello, Frank; Lee, John; Stone, Kiki I; Clark, Isabel A

    2009-10-01

    Properly prepared freeze-dried bone has been used with impunity by orthopedic surgeons since 1992 without a single report of disease transmission. The aim of this study was to evaluate freeze-dried cortical allograft bone for nasal dorsal augmentation. Freeze-dried human cortical bone was obtained from DCI Donor Services, Nashville, Tennessee. Standards recommended by the American Association of Tissue Banks, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were followed. Objective evaluation of the persistence of graft volume was obtained by cephalometric radiography. Vascularization and incorporation of new bone elements within the grafts were demonstrated by using fluorine-18 sodium fluoride positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic scanning. The average persistence of projection in 18 patients was 87 percent at 6 months. Thereafter, 10 patients showed 100 percent maintenance of projection at 12 to 36 months. Vascularization and incorporation of new bone elements within the grafts were demonstrated by using fluorine-18 sodium fluoride positron emission tomographic/computed tomographic scanning in four patients. The initial loss of 13 percent of projection is most likely attributable to resolution of early surgical edema. The authors postulate that there are two pathways based on whether the recipient bed allows vascular access to the graft. The revascularization or inductive pathway involves stem cell conversion to eventual osteoblasts. The scar bed barrier or noninductive pathway involves the preservation of the graft as an unchanged alloimplant. This report is the first of a series that will include a 5-year and a 10-year follow-up.

  10. Cholera toxin-induced tolerance to allografts in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, S; Taniguchi, M; Shinomiya, N; Fujisawa, H; Zinnaka, Y; Nomoto, K

    1987-01-01

    When C3H/HeN (C3H) mice were primed with viable C57BL/6 (B6) spleen cells and treated with cholera toxin (CT) on the same day, a profound tolerance to tumour allografts of B6 origin was induced. The tolerant state was sustained for as long as 6 weeks or more. Skin allografts of B6 were rejected by such tolerant C3H mice, although the survival times were prolonged very slightly. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes was reduced markedly in the tolerant mice, whereas delayed footpad reaction to B6 cells was maintained at the normal immune level or higher. There is a possibility that a T-cell subset responsible for delayed footpad reaction is resistant to CT-induced tolerance and participates in the rejection of skin allografts in tolerant mice. PMID:2438209

  11. Cefuroxime, rifampicin and pulse lavage in decontamination of allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M; Laitinen, M; Pirkkalainen, S; Vuento, R

    2004-03-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogenic bone transplantation is one of the major problems facing tissue banks. Different screening methods and decontamination procedures are being used to achieve a safe surgical result. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contamination rate in fresh frozen bone allografts after treating them with different decontamination methods. The allografts were contaminated by rubbing on the operating theatre floor for 60 min, after which they were rinsed either with sterile physiological saline, cefuroxime or rifampicin solution or they were washed with low-pressure pulse lavage of sterile physiological saline. Our findings show that low-pressure pulse lavage with sterile saline solution is very effective in removing bacteria from bone allograft, when compared with the antibiotic solutions tested.

  12. Lung transplantation: chronic allograft dysfunction and establishing immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gracon, Adam S A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-08-01

    Despite significant medical advances since the advent of lung transplantation, improvements in long-term survival have been largely unrealized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction, in particular obliterative bronchiolitis, is the primary limiting factor. The predominant etiology of obliterative bronchiolitis involves the recipient's innate and adaptive immune response to the transplanted allograft. Current therapeutic strategies have failed to provide a definitive treatment paradigm to improve long-term outcomes. Inducing immune tolerance is an emerging therapeutic strategy that abrogates allograft rejection, avoids immunosuppression, and improves long-term graft function. The aim of this review is to discuss the key immunologic components of obliterative bronchiolitis, describe the state of establishing immune tolerance in transplantation, and highlight those strategies being evaluated in lung transplantation.

  13. Mechanisms of stem subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyne; Frei, Hanspeter; Duncan, Clive; Fernlund, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Failure of the femoral component of total hip arthroplasty is often accompanied by bone loss that can pose a significant challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. Femoral impaction allografting has attractive potential for restoring bone stock in deficient femurs. However, there have been reports of problematic postoperative stem subsidence with this procedure. Subsidence is highly variable among patients, and there is disagreement over the mechanisms that cause it. This article reviews the various mechanisms that can contribute to subsidence in femoral impaction allografting. Variables such as graft density, cement penetration profile, use of synthetic graft substitutes, or other graft additives are discussed, as well as their potential impact on subsidence. Finally, recommendations are made for future studies aiming to reduce the risk of excessive subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

  14. Vertical ridge augmentation of the atrophic posterior mandible with sandwich technique: bone block from the chin area versus corticocancellous bone block allograft--clinical and histological prospective randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Laino, Luigi; Iezzi, Giovanna; Piattelli, Adriano; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Cicciù, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare the histological aspects of bone formation in atrophic posterior mandibles augmented by autologous bone block from chin area with corticocancellous bone block allograft used as inlays with the sandwich technique. Sixteen patients with bilateral partial edentulism in the posterior mandible were selected. The residual bone height, preliminarily measured by computed tomography scans, ranged between 5 and 7 mm from the inferior alveolar nerve. All patients required regeneration procedure with autologous bone block from chin area (control group) versus bone block allograft Puros (Zimmer Dental, 1900 Aston Avenue, Carlsbad, CA, USA) (test group). Histological and histomorphometric samples were collected at the time of implant positioning in order to analyze the percentage of newly formed bone, the residual graft material, and marrow spaces/soft tissue. No statistically significant differences between the two groups were found regarding the percentage of newly formed bone. The percentage of residual grafted material was significantly higher in the test group, whilst the percentage of marrow spaces was higher in control group. In conclusion, both procedures supported good results, although the use of bone blocks allograft was less invasive and preferable than harvesting bone from the mental symphysis.

  15. Immunomodulatory Strategies Directed Towards Tolerance of Vascularized Composite Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Sebastian G.; Villani, Vincenzo; Muraglia, Glenn M. La; Torabi, Radbeh; Leonard, David A.; Randolph, Mark A.; Colvin, Robert B.; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Madsen, Joren C.; Cetrulo, Curtis L.; Sachs, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achieving tolerance of vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) would improve the risk-to-benefit ratio in patients who undergo this life-enhancing, though not life-saving, transplant. Kidney co-transplantation along with a short course of high-dose immunosuppression enables tolerance of heart allografts across a full MHC mismatch. In this study, we investigated whether tolerance of VCA across full MHC disparities could be achieved in animals already tolerant of heart and kidney allografts. Methods Miniature swine that were tolerant of heart and/or kidney allografts long-term underwent transplantation of myocutaneous VCA across the same MHC barrier. Prior to VCA transplant, Group 1 (n=3) underwent Class I-mismatched kidney transplantation; Group 2 (n=3) underwent two sequential Class I-mismatched kidney transplantations; Group 3 (n=2) underwent haploidentical MHC-mismatched heart/kidney transplantation; and Group 4 (n=2) underwent full MHC-mismatched heart/kidney transplantation. Results All three animals in Group 1 and two of three animals in Group 2 showed skin rejection ≤85 days; one animal in Group 2 showed prolonged skin survival >200 days. Animals in Groups 3 and 4 showed skin rejection ≤30 days and regained in vitro evidence of donor responsiveness. Conclusion This is the first pre-clinical study in which hearts, kidneys, and VCAs have been transplanted into the same recipient. Despite VCA rejection, tolerance of heart and kidney allografts was maintained. These results suggest that regulatory tolerance of skin is possible but not generally achieved by the same level of immunomodulation that is capable of inducing tolerance of heart and kidney allografts. Achieving tolerance of skin may require additional immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:25757218

  16. Postransplant lymphoproliferative disorder localized near the allograft in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kew, C E; Lopez-Ben, R; Smith, J K; Robbin, M L; Cook, W J; Gaston, R S; Deierhoi, M H; Julian, B A

    2000-03-15

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a complication of immunosuppression, develops in approximately 1% of renal allograft recipients. Typically, PTLD is a proliferation of B-cells associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection; it is said to be most often a systemic disease. Involvement occasionally is localized near the allograft. This is a retrospective analysis of all cases of PTLD in recipients of 1474 renal transplants performed at University of Alabama at Birmingham between 1993 and 1997. Of 14 patients developing PTLD, 10 had disease localized near the allograft. The mean interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 221 +/- 70 days. All patients presented with renal dysfunction; an ultrasound examination revealed a hilar mass, with hydronephrosis in five and stenosis of renal vessels in eight. No patient had lymphadenopathy, according to computerized tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging findings. After reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, seven required a nephrectomy because of rejection, progressive dysfunction, or mass enlargement. Tissue recovered in four patients was consistent with PTLD; the tumors in the remaining three patients were unresectable and regressed. One patient died 1 month after a nephrectomy, and another died 4 years after surgery; neither had evidence of PTLD when they died. Three patients retain functional grafts without clinical or radiographical evidence of progression. All patients with disseminated disease died. In a large cohort of renal allograft recipients, PTLD affected 1%. Disease localized near the allograft was the most common variant. For most patients with localized disease, the outcome was graft loss, and the mortality was low. Localized PTLD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction in the 1st posttransplant year.

  17. Autograft versus sterilized allograft for lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian A.; Barg, Alexej; Vavken, Patrick; Valderrabano, Victor; Müller, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sterilized allografts may be less resistant to collapse and prone to nonunion leading to loss of correction in open wedge osteotomies. These adverse events usually occur at early time points (i.e., < 9 months postoperatively). The goal of this study was to compare sterilized allografts to autologous grafts in respect to secondary loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation after lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies. Fifty patients (22 F/ 28 M, age: 16–69 years) who had undergone 50 lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies for adult flatfoot deformity were included in this retrospective study. Cortical sterilized allografts were used in 25 patients, autologous grafts in the remaining 25. Patients’ preoperative, 6 and 12 weeks, and 6 to 9 months follow-up weight-bearing radiographs of the affected foot were analyzed by 2 blinded radiologists: on each radiograph, graft incorporation, the talo-first metatarsal angle (TFMA), the talo-navicular coverage angle (TNCA), and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) were assessed. Loss of hindfoot alignment was defined as an increase of the TFMA or the TNCA or a decrease of the CPA, each by 5°. Inter- and intraclass correlation coefficients for TFMA, TNCA, and CPA measurements ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. At all follow-up visits, the ratio of patients with loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation was not significantly different between the allograft and autograft group. However, loss of correction was associated with failure of graft incorporation. Compared with autografts, sterilized allografts do not increase the risk for loss of hindfoot alignment in lateral column lengthening of the calcaneus. With respect to mechanical resistance, allografts thus mean an equal and valid alternative without risk of donor site morbidities. PMID:27472719

  18. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes.

  19. Porous Allograft Bone Scaffolds: Doping with Strontium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28±0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60±0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  20. Rare Presentations of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common viral infection after kidney transplantation. Clinical presentations of cytomegalovirus infection range from asymptomatic infection to organ-specific involvement. Most symptomatic infections manifest as fever and cytopenia. The gastrointestinal tract is the most common site of tissue-invasive infection, often presenting as diarrhea or gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal obstruction, perforation, thrombosis of large gastrointestinal veins, splenic artery thrombosis, and pancreatitis are rare gastrointestinal presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. Renal-allograft ureteral stricture and skin involvement are other rare presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. hemophagocytic syndrome, thrombotic microangiopathy, adrenal insufficiency, and renal allograft artery stenosis are other rare symptoms of cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:23573461

  1. Surgical management of extensive burns treatment using allografts

    PubMed Central

    Calota, DR; Nitescu, C; Florescu, IP; Lascar, I

    2012-01-01

    Patients with extensive burns (TBSA over 45%) can benefit from treatment with split thickness skin allotransplants (skin bank or honorific donors). In this study, we present our protocols for the surgical treatment by using allografts. We emphasize the criteria for the staging of the procedures, the prioritisation of the areas that need to be grafted and the postoperative management. The treatment includes a serial excision grafting with simple grafts or the sandwich method, which implies the covering of the wound with a widely meshed autograft (6:1). This layer is covered by a 1,5:1 or 3:1 expanded mesh allograft. PMID:23346256

  2. Successful liver allograft inflow reconstruction with the right gastroepiploic vein.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Rafael S; Cruz, Ruy J; Nacif, Lucas S; Vane, Matheus F; D'Albuquerque, Luiz A C

    2016-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a common complication in cirrhotic patients. When portal vein thrombectomy is not a suitable option, a large collateral vessel can be used for allograft venous inflow reconstruction. We describe an unusual case of successful portal revascularization using the right gastroepiploic vein. The patient underwent a cadaveric orthotopic liver transplantation with end-to-end anastomosis of the portal vein to the right gastroepiploic vein. Six months after liver transplantation the patient is well with good liver function. The use of the right gastroepiploic vein for allograft venous reconstruction is feasible and safe, with a great advantage of avoiding the need of venous jump graft.

  3. Bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells infiltrate allogeneic and syngeneic transplants.

    PubMed

    Fan, Z; Enjoji, K; Tigges, J C; Toxavidis, V; Tchipashivili, V; Gong, W; Strom, T B; Koulmanda, M

    2014-12-01

    Lineage (CD3e, CD11b, GR1, B220 and Ly-76) negative hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infiltrate islet allografts within 24 h posttransplantation. In fact, lineage(negative) Sca-1(+) cKit(+) ("LSK") cells, a classic signature for HSCs, were also detected among these graft infiltrating cells. Lineage negative graft infiltrating cells are functionally multi-potential as determined by a standard competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT) assay. By 3 months post-BMT, both CD45.1 congenic, lineage negative HSCs/HPCs and classic "LSK" HSCs purified from islet allograft infiltrating cells, differentiate and repopulate multiple mature blood cell phenotypes in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus of CD45.2 hosts. Interestingly, "LSK" HSCs also rapidly infiltrate syngeneic islet transplants as well as allogeneic cardiac transplants and sham surgery sites. It seems likely that an inflammatory response, not an adaptive immune response to allo-antigen, is responsible for the rapid infiltration of islet and cardiac transplants by biologically active HSCs/HPCs. The pattern of hematopoietic differentiation obtained from graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs, cells that are recovered from inflammatory sites, as noted in the competitive BMT assay, is not precisely the same as that of intramedullary HSCs. This does not refute the obvious multi-lineage potential of graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. Bone Marrow Derived Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Infiltrate Allogeneic and Syngeneic Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Z.; Enjoji, K.; Tigges, J. C.; Toxavidis, V.; Tchipashivili, V.; Gong, W.; Strom, T. B.; Koulmanda, M.

    2015-01-01

    Lineage (CD3e, CD11b, GR1, B220 and Ly-76) negative hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infiltrate islet allografts within 24 h posttransplantation. In fact, lineagenegative Sca-1+cKit+ (“LSK”) cells, a classic signature for HSCs, were also detected among these graft infiltrating cells. Lineage negative graft infiltrating cells are functionally multi-potential as determined by a standard competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT) assay. By 3 months post-BMT, both CD45.1 congenic, lineage negative HSCs/HPCs and classic “LSK” HSCs purified from islet allograft infiltrating cells, differentiate and repopulate multiple mature blood cell phenotypes in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus of CD45.2 hosts. Interestingly, “LSK” HSCs also rapidly infiltrate syngeneic islet transplants as well as allogeneic cardiac transplants and sham surgery sites. It seems likely that an inflammatory response, not an adaptive immune response to allo-antigen, is responsible for the rapid infiltration of islet and cardiac transplants by biologically active HSCs/HPCs. The pattern of hematopoietic differentiation obtained from graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs, cells that are recovered from inflammatory sites, as noted in the competitive BMT assay, is not precisely the same as that of intra-medullary HSCs. This does not refute the obvious multi-lineage potential of graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs. PMID:25387427

  5. Essential role of PDL1 expression on nonhematopoietic donor cells in acquired tolerance to vascularized cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Riella, L V; Watanabe, T; Sage, P T; Yang, J; Yeung, M; Azzi, J; Vanguri, V; Chandraker, A; Sharpe, A H; Sayegh, M H; Najafian, N

    2011-04-01

    The PD1:PDL1 pathway is an essential negative costimulatory pathway that plays a key role in regulating the alloimune response. PDL1 is expressed not only on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) but also cardiac endothelium. In this study, we investigated the importance of PDL1 expression on donor cardiac allograft in acquired transplantation tolerance in a fully MHC-mismatched model. We generated PDL1 chimeric mice on B6 background that expressed PDL1 on either hematopoietic cells or nonhematopoietic cells of the heart. Sham animals were used as controls. These hearts were then transplanted into BALB/c recipients and treated with CTLA4-Ig to induce tolerance. Cardiac endothelium showed significant expression of PDL1, which was upregulated upon transplantation. While the absence of PDL1 on hematopoietic cells of the heart resulted in delayed rejection and prevented long-term tolerance in most but not all recipients, we observed an accelerated and early graft rejection of all donor allografts that lacked PDL1 on the endothelium. Moreover, PDL1-deficient endothelium hearts had significant higher frequency of IFN-γ-producing alloreactive cells as well as higher frequency of CD8(+) effector T cells. These findings demonstrate that PDL1 expression mainly on donor endothelium is functionally important in a fully allogeneic mismatched model for the induction of cardiac allograft tolerance.

  6. Allergic Conjunctivitis Renders CD4+ T Cells Resistant to T Regulatory Cells and Exacerbates Corneal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Nancy J.; Chen, Peter W.; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic diseases rob corneal allografts of immune privilege and increase immune rejection. Corneal allograft rejection in BALB/c allergic hosts was analyzed using a short ragweed (SWR) pollen model of allergic conjunctivitis. Allergic conjunctivitis did not induce exaggerated T cell responses to donor C57BL/6 (B6) alloantigens or stimulate cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. Allergic conjunctivitis did affect T regulatory cells (Tregs) that support graft survival. Exogenous IL-4, but not IL-5 or IL-13, prevented Treg suppression of CD4+ effector T cells isolated from naïve mice. However, mice with allergic conjunctivitis developed Tregs that suppressed CD4+ effector T cell proliferation. In addition, IL-4 did not inhibit Treg suppression of IL-4Rα−/− CD4+ T cell responses, suggesting that IL-4 rendered effector T cells resistant to Tregs. SRW-sensitized IL-4Rα−/− mice displayed the same 50% graft survival as non-allergic WT mice, that was significantly less than the 100% rejection that occurred in allergic WT hosts, supporting the role of IL-4 in the abrogation of immune privilege. Moreover, exacerbation of corneal allograft rejection in allergic mice was reversed by administering anti-IL-4 antibody. Thus, allergy-induced exacerbation of corneal graft rejection is due to the production of IL-4, which renders effector T cells resistant to Treg suppression of alloimmune responses. PMID:23489547

  7. PDL1 is required for peripheral transplantation tolerance and protection from chronic allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Albin, Monica J; Yuan, Xueli; Yamaura, Kazuhiro; Habicht, Antje; Murayama, Takaya; Grimm, Martin; Waaga, Ana Maria; Ueno, Takuya; Padera, Robert F; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Shin, Tahiro; Blazar, Bruce R; Rothstein, David M; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Najafian, Nader

    2007-10-15

    The PD-1:PDL pathway plays an important role in regulating alloimmune responses but its role in transplantation tolerance is unknown. We investigated the role of PD-1:PDL costimulatory pathway in peripheral and a well established model of central transplantation tolerance. Early as well as delayed blockade of PDL1 but not PDL2 abrogated tolerance induced by CTLA4Ig in a fully MHC-mismatched cardiac allograft model. Accelerated rejection was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma-producing alloreactive T cells and expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells in the periphery, and a decline in the percentage of Foxp3(+) graft infiltrating cells. Similarly, studies using PDL1/L2-deficient recipients confirmed the results with Ab blockade. Interestingly, while PDL1-deficient donor allografts were accepted by wild-type recipients treated with CTLA4Ig, the grafts developed severe chronic rejection and vasculopathy when compared with wild-type grafts. Finally, in a model of central tolerance induced by mixed allogeneic chimerism, engraftment was not abrogated by PDL1/L2 blockade. These novel data demonstrate the critical role of PDL1 for induction and maintenance of peripheral transplantation tolerance by its ability to alter the balance between pathogenic and regulatory T cells. Expression of PDL1 in donor tissue is critical for prevention of in situ graft pathology and chronic rejection.

  8. in Vitro and in Vivo Inhibitory Effects of α-Mangostin on Cholangiocarcinoma Cells and Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Sriraj, Pranee; Sripan, Panupan; Songsri, Jiraporn; Ratanasuwan, Panaratana; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Boueroy, Parichart; Khueangchaingkhwang, Sukhonthip; Pumhirunroj, Benjamabhorn; Artchayasawat, Atchara; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Wu, Zhiliang; Hahnvajanawong, Chariya; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Wongkham, Sopit

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the anti-cholangiocarcinoma effect of α-mangostin from Garcinia mangostana pericarp extract (GM) in a human cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cell line and a hamster CCA allograft model. In vitro, human CCA cells were treated with GM at various concentrations and for different time periods; then cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were evaluated using flow cytometry, and metastatic potential with wound healing assays. In vivo, hamster allografts were treated with GM, gemcitabine (positive control) and a placebo (negative control) for 1 month; tumor weight and volume were then determined. Histopathological features and immunostaining (CK19 and PCNA) characteristics were examined by microscopy. The present study found that α-mangostin could: inhibit CCA cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway; induce G1 cell-cycle arrest; and inhibit metastasis. Moreover, α-mangostin could inhibit CCA growth, i.e. reduce tumor mass (weight and size) and alter CCA pathology, as evidenced by reduced positive staining for CK19 and PCNA. The present study thus suggested that α-mangostin is a promising anti-CCA compound whose ready availability in tropical countries might indicate use for prevention and treatment of CCA. PMID:28441703

  9. Premalignant and Malignant Skin Lesions in Two Recipients of Vascularized Composite Tissue Allografts (Face, Hands)

    PubMed Central

    Kanitakis, Jean; Petruzzo, Palmina; Gazarian, Aram; Testelin, Sylvie; Devauchelle, Bernard; Badet, Lionel; Dubernard, Jean-Michel; Morelon, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ transplants (RSOT) have a highly increased risk for developing cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions, favored by the lifelong immunosuppression. Vascularized composite tissue allografts (VCA) have been introduced recently, and relevant data are sparse. Two patients with skin cancers (one with basal cell carcinoma and one with squamous cell carcinomas) have been so far reported in this patient group. Since 2000 we have been following 9 recipients of VCA (3 face, 6 bilateral hands) for the development of rejection and complications of the immunosuppressive treatment. Among the 9 patients, one face-grafted recipient was diagnosed with nodular-pigmented basal cell carcinoma of her own facial skin 6 years after graft, and one patient with double hand allografts developed disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, a potentially premalignant dermatosis, on her skin of the arm and legs. Similar to RSOT, recipients of VCA are prone to develop cutaneous premalignant and malignant lesions. Prevention should be applied through sun-protective measures, regular skin examination, and early treatment of premalignant lesions. PMID:26550517

  10. Proximal humeral fracture fixation: locking plate construct ± intramedullary fibular allograft.

    PubMed

    Chow, Roxanne M; Begum, Farhana; Beaupre, Lauren A; Carey, Jason P; Adeeb, Samer; Bouliane, Martin J

    2012-07-01

    Locking plate constructs for proximal humeral fractures can fail due to varus collapse, especially in osteoporotic bone with medial cortex comminution. Augmentation, using a fibular allograft as an intramedullary bone peg, may strengthen fixation preventing varus collapse. This study investigated the ability of the augmented locking plate construct to withstand repetitive varus stresses relative to the nonaugmented construct. Proximal humeral fractures with medial comminution were simulated by performing wedge-shaped osteotomies at the surgical neck in cadaveric specimens. For each cadaver (n = 8), 1 humeral fracture was fixated with the locking plate construct alone and the other with the locking plate construct plus ipsilateral fibular autograft augmentation. The humeral head was immobilized and a repetitive, medially directed load was applied to the humeral shaft until construct collapse or until 25000 cycles were completed. No augmented construct collapsed. In comparison, 6 of 8 nonaugmented constructs collapsed (P < .05). Collapse in the 6 nonaugmented constructs occurred after an average ±SD of 6604 ± 1984 cycles. Screw penetration of the articular surface was found in only 1 of the nonaugmented constructs. Fibular allograft augmentation increased the ability of the locking plate to withstand repetitive varus loading. Clinically, this may assist proximal humeral fracture fixation in osteoporotic bone with medial cortex comminution. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CXCR3 Antagonism Impairs the Development of Donor-reactive, IFN-γ-producing Effectors and Prolongs Allograft Survival 1

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, J.M.; Zhang, Q-W.; Siu, G.; Collins, T. L.; Sullivan, T.; Dairaghi, D.J.; Medina, J.C.; Fairchild, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Current immunosuppression regimens are highly toxic to transplant recipients and, in many cases, acute rejection episodes occur due to escape of donor-reactive lymphocytes from the immunosuppression. T cells are the mediators of acute, cell-mediated graft damage and are hypothesized to use the CXCR3 chemokine axis for migration into the allograft. In the current study, we investigated the effect of CXCR3 blockade using a non-peptide, small molecule inhibitor, AMG1237845, in murine cardiac allograft survival. Methods C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice received vascularized cardiac allografts from A/J (H-2a) donors and were treated with the CXCR3 antagonist. Histological and flow cytometric analyses were used to measure infiltration of leukocytes, and qRT-PCR and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays were used to measure donor-specific reactivity. Results CXCR3 antagonism modestly prolonged allograft survival compared to vehicle treatment, but at time-matched intervals post-transplant, neutrophil, CD8+, and CD4+ T cell infiltration was indistinguishable. While proliferation of donor-reactive naïve T cells was unaffected by CXCR3 antagonism, the frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells in the recipient spleen was significantly reduced by AMG1237845 treatment. CXCR3 blockade for 30 days synergized with short-term, low-dose anti-CD154 mAb to prolong survival past 50 days in 75% of grafts and past 80 days in 25% of the cases. Conclusions These results indicate that in synergy with co-stimulation blockade, CXCR3 is a viable therapeutic target to prevent acute graft rejection. PMID:19202440

  12. Antibody formation by bone marrow cells in irradiated mice

    PubMed Central

    Playfair, J. H. L.; Purves, Elizabeth C.

    1971-01-01

    Bone marrow-thymus cooperation experiments were carried out in lethally irradiated mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as the antigen and direct plaque-forming cells (PFC) as the end point. Various parameters were altered, with the following results: (1) Above 800 rad, the response by marrow cells alone, as well as the increase due to added thymus cells, was independent of irradiation dose. (2) The response of marrow cells was greatest at high SRBC concentrations, but the co-operative effect of thymus cells was most evident at lower SRBC levels, and completely absent at high levels. (3) Increasing the number of marrow cells, without thymus, gave increasing numbers of PFC, but the dose-response curve did not suggest cell synergism. (4) Thymectomy and antithymocyte serum treatment of host or donor did not prevent the response by marrow cells alone. It was concluded that this was a true IgM response by antibody-forming precursors from the marrow, unaided by thymus-derived cells. PMID:4934135

  13. Parathyroid Hormone Directs Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Hanai, Jun-Ichi; Le, Phuong T; Bi, Ruiye; Maridas, David; DeMambro, Victoria; Figueroa, Carolina A; Kir, Serkan; Zhou, Xuedong; Mannstadt, Michael; Baron, Roland; Bronson, Roderick T; Horowitz, Mark C; Wu, Joy Y; Bilezikian, John P; Dempster, David W; Rosen, Clifford J; Lanske, Beate

    2017-03-07

    Intermittent PTH administration builds bone mass and prevents fractures, but its mechanism of action is unclear. We genetically deleted the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R) in mesenchymal stem cells using Prx1Cre and found low bone formation, increased bone resorption, and high bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT). Bone marrow adipocytes traced to Prx1 and expressed classic adipogenic markers and high receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (Rankl) expression. RANKL levels were also elevated in bone marrow supernatant and serum, but undetectable in other adipose depots. By cell sorting, Pref1(+)RANKL(+) marrow progenitors were twice as great in mutant versus control marrow. Intermittent PTH administration to control mice reduced BMAT significantly. A similar finding was noted in male osteoporotic patients. Thus, marrow adipocytes exhibit osteogenic and adipogenic characteristics, are uniquely responsive to PTH, and secrete RANKL. These studies reveal an important mechanism for PTH's therapeutic action through its ability to direct mesenchymal cell fate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Can Skin Allograft Occasionally Act as a Permanent Coverage in Deep Burns? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Ezzatollah; Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Ahmadabadi, Ali; Tavousi, Seyed Hassan; Alipour Tabrizi, Arash; Fotuhi, Kazem; Jabbari Nooghabi, Mehdi; Manafi, Amir; Ahmadi Moghadam, Shokoofeh

    2017-01-01

    Skin allograft is the gold standard of wound coverage in patients with extensive burns; however, it is considered as a temporary wound coverage and rejection of the skin allograft is considered inevitable. In our study, skin allograft as a permanent coverage in deep burns is evaluated. Skin allograft survival was assessed in 38 patients from March 2009 to March 2014, retrospectively. Because of the lack of tissue specimen from the skin donors, patients with long skin allograft survival in whom the gender of donor and recipient of allograft was the same were excluded. Seven cases with skin allograft longevity and opposite gender in donor and recipient were finally enrolled. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on the biopsy specimen from recipients and donors were undertaken. PCR on the biopsy specimen from recipients confirmed those specimens belong to the donors. All patients received allograft from the opposite sex. Two (28.57%) patients received allograft from their first-degree blood relatives, and in one (14.29%) case, the allograft was harvested from an alive individual with no blood relation. The rest were harvested from multiorgan donors. In eight months of follow up, no clinical evidence of graft rejection was noted. Long term persistence of skin allograft in patients is worthy of more attention. Further studies An increase in knowledge of factors influencing this longevity could realize the dream of burn surgeons to achieve a permanent coverage other than autograft for major burn patients.

  15. Intraoperative culture positive allograft bone and subsequent postoperative infections: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Laura; Kulyk, Paul; Woo, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Background Obtaining intraoperative cultures of allograft bone just before use in orthopedic procedures is standard practice in many centres; however, the association between positive cultures and subsequent surgical infections is unknown. Our study had 3 goals: to determine the prevalence of positive intraoperative allograft culture and subsequent infection; to determine if, in cases of subsequent infection, organisms isolated at reoperation were the same as those cultured from the allograft at the time of the index procedure; and to assess the costs associated with performing intraoperative allograft cultures. Methods In this retrospective case series, we obtained data on patients receiving allograft bone between 2009 and 2012. Patients receiving allograft with positive cultures were reviewed to identify cases of significant infection. Organisms isolated at reoperation were compared with the allograft culture taken at the time of implantation, and we performed a cost assessment. Results Of the 996 allograft bone grafts used, 43 (4.3%) had positive intraoperative cultures and significant postoperative infections developed in 2, requiring reoperation. Antibiotics based on culture results were prescribed in 24% of cases. Organisms cultured at the time of reoperation differed from those isolated initially. The cost of performing 996 allograft cultures was $169 320. Conclusion This series suggests that rates of positive intraoperative bone allograft culture are low, and subsequent infection is rare. In cases of postoperative infection, primary allograft culture and secondary tissue cultures isolated different organisms. Costs associated with performing cultures are high. Eliminating initial culture testing could save $42 500 per year in our health region. PMID:28234217

  16. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b+ Ly6Chigh monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers. PMID:26833095

  17. Resident Tissue-Specific Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Contribute to Fibrogenesis in Human Lung Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Natalie; Badri, Linda; Wettlaufer, Scott; Flint, Andrew; Sajjan, Uma; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Lama, Vibha N.

    2011-01-01

    Fibrotic obliteration of the small airways leading to progressive airflow obstruction, termed bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), is the major cause of poor outcomes after lung transplantation. We recently demonstrated that a donor-derived population of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be isolated from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of human lung transplant recipients. Herein, we study the organ specificity of these cells and investigate the role of local mesenchymal progenitors in fibrogenesis after lung transplantation. We demonstrate that human lung allograft–derived MSCs uniquely express embryonic lung mesenchyme–associated transcription factors with a 35,000-fold higher expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor forkhead box (FOXF1) noted in lung compared with bone marrow MSCs. Fibrotic differentiation of MSCs isolated from normal lung allografts was noted in the presence of profibrotic mediators associated with BOS, including transforming growth factor-β and IL-13. MSCs isolated from patients with BOS demonstrated increased expression of α-SMA and collagen I when compared with non-BOS controls, consistent with a stable in vivo fibrotic phenotype. FOXF1 mRNA expression in the BAL cell pellet correlated with the number of MSCs in the BAL fluid, and myofibroblasts present in the fibrotic lesions expressed FOXF1 by in situ hybridization. These data suggest a key role for local tissue-specific, organ-resident, mesenchymal precursors in the fibrogenic processes in human adult lungs. PMID:21641374

  18. The Difficulty of Eliminating Donor Leukocyte Microchimerism in Rat Recipients Bearing Established Organ Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Kiyomoto, Tetsuma; Toyokawa, Hideyoshi; Nakao, Atsunori; Kaizu, Takashi; Demetris, Anthony J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Murase, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    Background Unequivocal eradication of donor leukocyte microchimerism from recipients of long-surviving organ transplants has never been reported. Here we describe a drastic attempt to accomplish this objective. Methods In control experiments, a rank order of microchimerism and of associated donor specific nonreactivity was produced in Brown-Norway (BN) rats by transplantation of Lewis (LEW) liver, bone marrow cell (BMC) and heart allografts under a brief course of tacrolimus. The degree of microchimerism at 60 and 110 days was estimated with semiquanitative immunocytochemical and PCR techniques. Tolerance at 110 days was assessed in the different control groups by challenge transplantation of naive LEW hearts. In parallel experimental groups, an attempt was made to eliminate microchimerism from the BN recipients. The animals were submitted at 60 days to 9.5-Gy total body irradiation (TBI), reconstituted immediately with naïve BN BMC, and tested for donor specific nonreactivity by LEW heart transplantation at 110 days. Results After the TBI-reconstitution at 60 days, microchimerism was undetectable in BMC recipients at 110 days, significantly reduced in heart recipients, and least affected in liver recipients. Except in liver recipients, abrogation of LEW-specific nonreactivity was demonstrated by rejection of the priming grafts, or by rejection of the challenge heart grafts, and by in vitro immune assay. Conclusions It is difficult to eliminate microchimerism in organ recipients once the donor cells have settled into tissue niches. PMID:16477232

  19. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, Yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-02-01

    CD11b(+) Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers.

  20. Composite vascularized skin/bone transplantation models for bone marrow-based tolerance studies.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Selahattin; Ulusal, Betul G; Ulusal, Ali E; Izycki, Dariusz; Siemionow, Maria

    2006-03-01

    There is an ongoing need to understand the mechanisms of bone marrow-based allograft tolerance. This is important in clarifying the diverse variables influencing the ultimate outcome of the solid organ and composite tissue transplants. To establish bone marrow transplantation as a routine clinical application, further experimental studies should be conducted to overcome the obstacles related to the bone marrow transplantation. These obstacles include graft versus host disease, immunocompetence, and toxicity of the conditioning regimens. For these purposes, novel experimental models are needed. In an attempt to provide a reliable research tool for bone marrow-based tolerance induction studies, we introduced different experimental models of modified vascularized skin/bone marrow (VSBM) transplantation technique for tolerance induction, monitoring, and maintenance studies. In this skin/bone transplantation model, the technical feasibility of concurrent or consecutive transplantation of the combination of bilateral vascularized skin, vascularized bone marrow, or vascularized skin/bone marrow transplants was investigated. Isograft transplantations were performed between genetically identical Lewis (LEW, RT1) rats. Five different experimental designs in 5 groups of 5 animals each were studied. Group I: Bilateral vascularized skin (VS) transplantation; group II: bilateral vascularized skin/bone transplantation; group III: vascularized skin transplantation on one side and vascularized skin/bone transplantation on the contralateral side; group IV: vascularized bone transplantation on one side and vascularized skin/bone transplantation on the contralateral side; group V: vascularized bone transplantation on one side and vascularized skin transplantation on the contralateral side. Successful transplantations were performed in all groups. The survival of the isograft transplants was evaluated clinically and histologically. All skin flaps remained pink and pliable and grew new

  1. Allograft biopsy findings in patients with small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jamie; Dawson, David W; Dry, Sarah; French, Samuel W; Naini, Bita V; Wang, Hanlin L

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of post-transplant complications including acute cellular rejection (ACR), infection, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in mucosal allograft biopsies in patients with small bowel transplant at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed pathology reports from 5675 small bowel allograft biopsies from 99 patients and analyzed the following: indications for biopsy, frequency and grade of ACR, the presence of infectious agents, results of workup for potential PTLD, results of C4d immunohistochemistry (IHC), features of chronic mucosal injury, and findings in concurrent native bowel biopsies. Findings from 42 allograft resection specimens were also correlated with prior biopsy findings. Indeterminate, mild, moderate, and severe ACR were seen in 276 (4.9%), 409 (7.2%), 100 (1.8%), and 207 (3.6%) of biopsies, respectively. Although ACR may show histologic overlap with mycophenolate mofetil toxicity, we found the analysis of concurrent native bowel biopsies to be helpful in this distinction. Adenovirus was the most common infectious agent seen (11%), and we routinely performed adenovirus IHC on biopsies. Eighteen patients (18%) developed PTLD, 83% of which were EBV associated, but only 28% of PTLD cases were diagnosed on mucosal allograft biopsies. C4d IHC did not correlate with the presence of donor-specific antibodies in limited cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Biceps tenodesis versus allograft reconstruction for varus instability.

    PubMed

    Beiro, Cristobal; Parks, Brent G; Tsai, Michael; Hinton, Richard Y

    2014-04-01

    Although effective to restore stability in varus laxity, a fibula-based procedure such as figure-of-8 reconstruction can be technically demanding and requires use of allograft or autograft. Biceps rerouting offers an alternative without the potential complications of allograft or autograft procedures. It is not known whether biceps tenodesis is effective in addressing isolated varus laxity with lateral collateral ligament (LCL) rupture. We compared biceps tenodesis and figure-of-8 allograft reconstruction for restoration of varus stability. Nine knees were loaded at 10 N-m at 0- and 30-degree knee flexion in intact, LCL sectioned, and reconstructed state. Both biceps tenodesis and figure-of-8 reconstruction restored varus stability to at least baseline stability. Normalized displacement with biceps tenodesis measured at time zero was significantly lower than with allograft reconstruction at 0 degrees (0.75 ± 0.26 vs. 1.09 ± 0.31 degrees; p = 0.04) and 30 degrees (0.66 ± 0.14 vs. 0.91 ± 0.27 degrees; p =  0.04). Biceps tenodesis was effective at restoring baseline varus stability in isolated varus laxity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. [Functionality and osteointegration of bone allografts in long bone osteosarcomas].

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, J J; García-Sandoval, P P; Fernández-Hernández, J A; Valcárcel-Díaz, A

    2012-01-01

    In patients undergoing long bone resection for osteosarcoma the use of bone allografts is a treatment option. How do they behave functionally and what is their long term osteointegration? A retrospective, observational, longitudinal study was conducted to obtain clinical and radiologic data of the sample composed of a group of 15 patients with a diagnosis of limb osteosarcoma treated at our hospital with structural bone allografts. The Mankin and ISOLS (International Symposium on Limb Salvage) scales were applied to assess allograft functionality and osteointegration, respectively, from 1993 to 2006. Functional results were as follows: excellent, 10 patients (66.6%); good, one patient (6.6%), and poor, 4 patients (26%). The osteointegration assessment reported excellent results in 77% of cases at 18 months and in 87% at 2 years. Surgical wound infection was reported as a complication in only 2 patients (13.3%). Functionality and osteointegration in patients undergoing conservative surgery with bone allografts are excellent in most cases, and this is the technique of choice for the treatment of long bone osteosarcomas.

  4. Pulse lavage washing in decontamination of allografts improves safety.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M; Laitinen, M; Vuento, R

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the bacterial contamination rate of 140 femoral head allografts after rinsing the allografts in different decontamination solutions. Bacterial screening methods and cleansing effect of antibiotics (cefuroxime and rifampicin) and pulse lavage were compared. Swabbing and taking small pieces of bone for culture were the screening methods used. Both methods proved to be quite unreliable. Approximately one-fourth of the results were false negative. Culturing small pieces of bone gave the most accurate and reliable results and, therefore, can be recommended as a bacterial screening method. The use of antibiotics in allograft decontamination is controversial. In prophylactic use antibiotics include risks of allergic reactions and resistant development and our results in the present study show that antibiotics do not improve the decontamination any better than low-pressure pulse lavage with sterile saline solution. Therefore, pulse lavage with sterile saline solution can be recommended for allograft decontamination. Our results demonstrate that it decreases bacterial bioburden as effectively as the antibiotics without persisting the disadvantages.

  5. Multifocal Primary Neoplasms in Kidney Allografts: Evaluation of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Keng Lim; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Del Vecchio, Sharon J.; Wood, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the fifth most common malignancy in kidney transplant recipients, with increased risk arising due to immunosuppression. De novo RCC occurrence in kidney allografts is much less common when compared with the native kidneys. Multifocal RCC in allograft kidneys is rarely described. In this report, we discuss two cases of de novo multifocal renal neoplasms in allograft kidneys. Case 1 had three distinct neoplastic lesions of >5 mm, and case 2 had four. Using the World Health Organization 2016 classification of adult renal tumours, case 1 had one clear-cell (cc) RCC (grade 3) and two papillary adenomas; all confined to the kidney. Case 2 had a nodular lesion classified as ccRCC (grade 4) with focal rhabdoid differentiation and some infiltration of renal sinus fat; a cc tubulopapillary RCC; a multilocular cystic renal neoplasm of low malignant potential; and a mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma; the last three all confined to the kidney. This is the first report of mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma in a kidney allograft. When considering multifocal RCC with discordant histology, it is likely that these represent independent tumourigenic events. PMID:28326280

  6. Viable cells survive in fresh frozen human bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David; Kakarala, Gopikrishna; Hampson, Karen; Steele, Niall; Ashton, Brian

    2007-02-01

    Fresh frozen bone allograft is available for human recipients after at least 6 months of quarantine at -80 degrees C. It is assumed that cryopreservation without cryoprotectant removes all viable donor cells. We studied the in vitro cell growth from samples of fresh frozen human femoral head allografts after they had been released for patient use, and compared it with cell growth from a control group of fresh cancellous bone specimens from excised femoral heads (8 samples in each group). Cell outgrowths were seen in all of the fresh cancellous bone specimens (100% of replicates, 48 replicates per specimen) but only in a small minority of replicates from 4 of the allograft samples (mean 3.1%). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) investigations revealed that cell outgrowths from both groups contained mRNA for transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix, and also for matrix proteins collagen type I, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein. This is consistent with the cells being osteoblast-related. This study confirms that fresh frozen human bone allograft cells have the potential to grow in vitro, but the significance of this in recipients is currently unknown.

  7. A Lifetime of Allograft Function with Kidneys from Older Donors.

    PubMed

    Rose, Caren; Schaeffner, Elke; Frei, Ulrich; Gill, Jagbir; Gill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Strategies to increase expanded criteria donor (ECD) transplantation are needed. We quantified the extent to which ECD kidneys provide recipients with a lifetime of allograft function by determining the difference between patient survival and death-censored allograft survival (graft survival). Initial analyses compared 5-year outcomes in the Eurotransplant Senior Program (European) and the United States Renal Data System. Among European recipients ≥65 years, patient survival exceeded graft survival, and ECD recipients returned to dialysis for an average of 5.2 months after transplant failure. Among United States recipients ≥60 years, graft survival exceeded patient survival. Although patient survival in elderly recipients in the United States was low (49% at 5 years), the average difference in patient survival at 10 years in elderly recipients in the United States with an ECD versus non-ECD transplant was only 7 months. The probability of patient survival with a functioning allograft at 5 years was higher with ECD transplantation within 1 year after activation to the waiting list than with delayed non-ECD transplantation ≥3 years after activation to the waiting list. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that ECD transplants do not provide a lifetime of allograft function in recipients <50 years in the United States. These findings should encourage ECD transplantation in patients ≥60 years, demonstrate that rapid ECD transplantation is superior to delayed non-ECD transplantation, and challenge the policy in the United States of allowing patients <50 years to receive an ECD transplant.

  8. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  9. Urine Proteomics to Detect Biomarkers for Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luís F.; Solé-Gonzalez, Amanda; Kalko, Susana G.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Solé, Manel; Diekmann, Fritz; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Abian, Joaquin; Campistol, Josep M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite optimal immunosuppressive therapy, more than 50% of kidney transplants fail because of chronic allograft dysfunction. A noninvasive means to diagnose chronic allograft dysfunction may allow earlier interventions that could improve graft half-life. In this proof-of-concept study, we used mass spectrometry to analyze differences in the urinary polypeptide patterns of 32 patients with chronic allograft dysfunction (14 with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 18 with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection) and 18 control subjects (eight stable recipients and 10 healthy control subjects). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed good segregation of samples in groups corresponding mainly to the four biomedical conditions. Moreover, the composition of the proteome of the pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy group differed from that of the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group, and an independent validation set confirmed these results. The 14 protein ions that best discriminated between these two groups correctly identified 100% of the patients with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 100% of the patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection. In summary, this study establishes a pattern for two histologic lesions associated with distinct graft outcomes and constitutes a first step to designing a specific, noninvasive diagnostic tool for chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:19056874

  10. Assessment of Kidney Function After Allograft Transplantation by Texture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbasian Ardakani, Ali; Mohammadi, Afshin; Khalili Najafabad, Bahareh; Abolghasemi, Jamileh

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonography is the preferable imaging technique for monitoring and assessing complications in kidney allograft transplants. Computer-aided diagnostic system based on texture analysis in ultrasonographic imaging is recommended to identify changes in kidney function after allograft transplantation. A total of 61 biopsy-proven kidney allograft recipients (11 rejected and 50 unrejected) were assessed by a computer-aided diagnostic system. Up to 270 statistical texture features were extracted as descriptors for each region of interest in each recipient. Correlations of texture features with serum creatinine level and differences between rejected and unrejected allografts were analyzed. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated for each significant texture feature. Linear discriminant analysis was employed to analyze significant features and increase discriminative power. Recipients were classified by the first nearest neighbor classifier. Fourteen texture features had a significant correlation with serum creatinine level and 16 were significantly different between the rejected and unrejected allografts, for which an area under the curve values were in the range of 0.575 for difference entropy S(4,0) to 0.676 for kurtosis. Using all 16 features, linear discriminant analysis indicated higher performance for classification of the two groups with an area under the curve of 0.975, which corresponded to a sensitivity of 90.9%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 98.0%. Texture analysis was a reliable method, with the potential for characterization, and can help physicians to diagnose kidney failure after transplantation on ultrasonographic imaging.

  11. Metabolomic Profiling in Individuals with a Failing Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Luigi; Bussolino, Stefania; Merugumala, Sai; Tezza, Sara; D’Addio, Francesca; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Valderrama-Vasquez, Alessandro; Usuelli, Vera; De Zan, Valentina; El Essawy, Basset; Venturini, Massimo; Secchi, Antonio; De Cobelli, Francesco; Lin, Alexander; Chandraker, Anil; Fiorina, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Background Alteration of certain metabolites may play a role in the pathophysiology of renal allograft disease. Methods To explore metabolomic abnormalities in individuals with a failing kidney allograft, we analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS; for ex vivo profiling of serum and urine) and two dimensional correlated spectroscopy (2D COSY; for in vivo study of the kidney graft) 40 subjects with varying degrees of chronic allograft dysfunction stratified by tertiles of glomerular filtration rate (GFR; T1, T2, T3). Ten healthy non-allograft individuals were chosen as controls. Results LC-MS/MS analysis revealed a dose-response association between GFR and serum concentration of tryptophan, glutamine, dimethylarginine isomers (asymmetric [A]DMA and symmetric [S]DMA) and short-chain acylcarnitines (C4 and C12), (test for trend: T1-T3 = p<0.05; p = 0.01; p<0.001; p = 0.01; p = 0.01; p<0.05, respectively). The same association was found between GFR and urinary levels of histidine, DOPA, dopamine, carnosine, SDMA and ADMA (test for trend: T1-T3 = p<0.05; p<0.01; p = 0.001; p<0.05; p = 0.001; p<0.001; p<0.01, respectively). In vivo 2D COSY of the kidney allograft revealed significant reduction in the parenchymal content of choline, creatine, taurine and threonine (all: p<0.05) in individuals with lower GFR levels. Conclusions We report an association between renal function and altered metabolomic profile in renal transplant individuals with different degrees of kidney graft function. PMID:28052095

  12. Cell-Free DNA and Active Rejection in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Roy D; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Poggio, Emilio D; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Langone, Anthony J; Sood, Puneet; Matas, Arthur J; Mehta, Shikha; Mannon, Roslyn B; Sharfuddin, Asif; Fischbach, Bernard; Narayanan, Mohanram; Jordan, Stanley C; Cohen, David; Weir, Matthew R; Hiller, David; Prasad, Preethi; Woodward, Robert N; Grskovic, Marica; Sninsky, John J; Yee, James P; Brennan, Daniel C

    2017-07-01

    Histologic analysis of the allograft biopsy specimen is the standard method used to differentiate rejection from other injury in kidney transplants. Donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) is a noninvasive test of allograft injury that may enable more frequent, quantitative, and safer assessment of allograft rejection and injury status. To investigate this possibility, we prospectively collected blood specimens at scheduled intervals and at the time of clinically indicated biopsies. In 102 kidney recipients, we measured plasma levels of dd-cfDNA and correlated the levels with allograft rejection status ascertained by histology in 107 biopsy specimens. The dd-cfDNA level discriminated between biopsy specimens showing any rejection (T cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection [ABMR]) and controls (no rejection histologically), P<0.001 (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve [AUC], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.61 to 0.86). Positive and negative predictive values for active rejection at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 61% and 84%, respectively. The AUC for discriminating ABMR from samples without ABMR was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.97). Positive and negative predictive values for ABMR at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 44% and 96%, respectively. Median dd-cfDNA was 2.9% (ABMR), 1.2% (T cell-mediated types ≥IB), 0.2% (T cell-mediated type IA), and 0.3% in controls (P=0.05 for T cell-mediated rejection types ≥IB versus controls). Thus, dd-cfDNA may be used to assess allograft rejection and injury; dd-cfDNA levels <1% reflect the absence of active rejection (T cell-mediated type ≥IB or ABMR) and levels >1% indicate a probability of active rejection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. [The influence of HX- I on rabbit thyroid allografts].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Shen, W; Tan, J; Du, C; Li, K; Huang, X

    1996-03-01

    We studied the anti-rejection effect of HX- I, a preparation of traditional Chinese herbs, on rabbit thyroid allografts. The transplantations were performed on 28 rabbits after total thyroidectomies. The grafting sites were in their pretrachial muscles. These animals were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: homografts: Group I: allografts without medication; Group II: allografts with dexamethason (0.25 mg/(kg.d) intramuscularly), and Group IV: allografts with HX-I water solution, (5g/(kg.d), peros). The medication lasted 28 days. Blood samples were drawn every week postoperatively. Serum T3 and T4 were tested by RIA. The grafts were removed for histopathological evaluation on the 28th day postoperatively. The histopathology of rejection and survival were scored and classified. On the 7th and 14th days, serum T3 and T4 levels were almost the same between groups. On the 21st and 28th days, the T3 and T4 levels were higher in Groups I and IV than those in Group II (P < 0.05). The histopathological findings were; in Group I, damaged follicles with much lymphocytes infiltration and fibrosis, and 6 cases being rejected; in Group II, two deaths and three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and much lymphocytes infiltration; in Group IV, three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and four intact grafts. Our results indicate that HX-I and dexamethason both can inhibit rejection in thyroid allografts in rabbits, but dexamethason has more side effects HX-I has many components and the machanism of its early anti-rejection effect is worthy of further study.

  14. Stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism permits tolerance of vascularized composite allografts across a full major histocompatibility mismatch in swine.

    PubMed

    Mathes, David W; Solari, Mario G; Gazelle, Guy Scott; Butler, Peter E M; Wu, Anette; Nazzal, Adam; Nielsen, Gunnlauger P; Huang, Christene A; Sachs, David H; Lee, Wei Ping Andrew; Randolph, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that vascularized composite allografts (VCA) could be accepted in a robust model of hematopoietic chimerism by injecting allogeneic bone marrow cells (BMC) into swine fetuses. Outbred Yorkshire sows and boars were screened to ensure the absence of the major histocompatibility (MHC) allele SLA(cc) of inbred MGH miniature swine and then mated. Bone marrow harvested from an SLA(cc) swine donor was T-cell depleted and injected intravenously into the fetuses between days 50-55 of gestation. After birth, the piglets were studied with flow cytometry to detect donor cells and mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assays to assess their response to donor. Donor-matched VCAs from SLA(cc) donors were performed on four chimeric and two nonchimeric swine. The results showed donor cell engraftment and multilineage macrochimerism after the in utero transplantation of adult BMC, and chimeric animals were unresponsive to donor antigens in vitro. Both control VCAs were rejected by 21 days and were alloreactive. Chimeric animals accepted the VCAs and never developed antidonor antibodies or alloreactivity to donor. These results confirm that the intravascular, in utero transplantation of adult BMC leads to donor cell chimerism and donor-specific tolerance of VCAs across a full MHC barrier in this animal model.

  15. Induction of specific unresponsiveness to heart allografts in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte globulin

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.; Modry, D.L.; Hoppe, R.T.; Pennock, J.L.; Bieber, C.P.; Holm, B.I.; Jamieson, S.W.; Stinson, E.B.; Schroder, J.; Suomalainen, H.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1984-02-01

    The survival of heterotopic heart allografts was determined in mongrel dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents. TLI alone (total dose, 1800 rad) minimally prolonged graft survival as compared with untreated controls. However, marked synergy was observed when TLI was combined with a 10-day post-transplant course of rabbit anti-dog thymocyte globulin (ATG). Approximately 40% of recipients given TLI and ATG showed specific unresponsiveness, as judged by the lack of rejection on serial biopsies for more than 1 year and the prompt rejection of third party hearts. The addition of post-transplant azathioprine (90 to 180 days) to the TLI and ATG regimen increased the mortality of recipients and reduced the fraction of dogs showing specific unresponsiveness. Infusion of donor bone marrow cells at the time of heart transplantation failed to induced specific unresponsiveness in recipients given TLI alone or TLI in combination with post-transplant methotrexate, cyclosporine A, or ATG. The results indicate that the combination of TLI and a brief course of ATG without marrow transplantation was the most effective regimen for the induction of specific unresponsiveness in mongrel dogs.

  16. The use of cement in osteoarticular allografts for proximal humeral bone tumors.

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Henry; Donati, Davide; Di Liddo, Michele; Gozzi, Enrico; Mercuri, Mario

    2004-10-01

    In a proximal humerus resection for a bone tumor, the use of an osteoarticular allograft is considered the best restoration of shoulder function. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 31 patients who had an intraarticular resection of the proximal humerus for a bone tumor. Twenty-three of the allografts were filled with cement. The average followup was 5.3 years. Of the 31 patients with more than 24 months followup, seven had revision surgery or removal of the allograft. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the probability of survival of the reconstruction was 78% at 5 years. Fracture was the main complication in 11 patients (37%) of whom seven were in the noncemented group. Four of these patients had successful surgery for conversion to an allograft-prosthetic composite, whereas one patient had a new allograft. Allografts that were filled with cement had four fractures (18%); three were subchondral fractures discovered by routine CT scans. None of these patients had pain or needed revision surgery. Osteochondral allograft in proximal humerus replacement is a reliable reconstructive technique if the allograft is augmented by filling the intramedullary space with cement. Moreover, cement augmented allografts are less expensive and technically easier than allograft-prosthetic composites.

  17. Anti-thymocyte globulin as graft-versus-host disease prevention in the setting of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Baron, Frédéric; Mohty, Mohamad; Blaise, Didier; Socié, Gérard; Labopin, Myriam; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Savani, Bipin N; Schmid, Christoph; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is increasingly used as treatment for patients with life-threatening blood diseases. Its curative potential is largely based on immune-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effects caused by donor T cells contained in the graft. Unfortunately, donor T cells are also the cause of graft-versus-host disease. The vast majority of human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants are nowadays carried out with peripheral blood stem cells as the stem cell source. In comparison with bone marrows, peripheral blood stem cells contain more hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells but also one log more T cells. Consequently, the use of peripheral blood stem cells instead of bone marrow has been associated with faster hematologic recovery and a lower risk of relapse in patients with advanced disease, but also with a higher incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. These observations have been the basis for several studies aimed at assessing the impact of immunoregulation with anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given human leukocyte antigen-matched peripheral blood stem cells from related or unrelated donors. After a brief introduction on anti-thymocyte globulin, this article reviews recent studies assessing the impact of anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given peripheral blood stem cells from human leukocyte antigen-matched related or unrelated donors as well as in recipients of grafts from human leukocyte antigen haploidentical donors. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. Anti-thymocyte globulin as graft-versus-host disease prevention in the setting of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Frédéric; Mohty, Mohamad; Blaise, Didier; Socié, Gérard; Labopin, Myriam; Esteve, Jordi; Ciceri, Fabio; Giebel, Sebastian; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Savani, Bipin N; Schmid, Christoph; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is increasingly used as treatment for patients with life-threatening blood diseases. Its curative potential is largely based on immune-mediated graft-versus-leukemia effects caused by donor T cells contained in the graft. Unfortunately, donor T cells are also the cause of graft-versus-host disease. The vast majority of human leukocyte antigen-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants are nowadays carried out with peripheral blood stem cells as the stem cell source. In comparison with bone marrows, peripheral blood stem cells contain more hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells but also one log more T cells. Consequently, the use of peripheral blood stem cells instead of bone marrow has been associated with faster hematologic recovery and a lower risk of relapse in patients with advanced disease, but also with a higher incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. These observations have been the basis for several studies aimed at assessing the impact of immunoregulation with anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given human leukocyte antigen-matched peripheral blood stem cells from related or unrelated donors. After a brief introduction on anti-thymocyte globulin, this article reviews recent studies assessing the impact of anti-thymocyte globulin on transplantation outcomes in patients given peripheral blood stem cells from human leukocyte antigen-matched related or unrelated donors as well as in recipients of grafts from human leukocyte antigen haploidentical donors. PMID:27927772

  19. Follicular Helper T (Tfh) Cells in Autoimmune Diseases and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yun-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Production of high affinity antibodies for antigens is a critical component for the immune system to fight off infectious pathogens. However, it could be detrimental to our body when the antigens that B cells recognize are of self-origin. Follicular helper T, or Tfh, cells are required for the generation of germinal center reactions, where high affinity antibody-producing B cells and memory B cells predominantly develop. As such, Tfh cells are considered as targets to prevent B cells from producing high affinity antibodies against self-antigens, when high affinity autoantibodies are responsible for immunopathologies in autoimmune disorders. This review article provides an overview of current understanding of Tfh cells and discusses it in the context of animal models of autoimmune diseases and allograft rejections for generation of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27574501

  20. Quantitative digital histochemistry with methenamine silver staining in renal allograft biopsies excluding pure chronic allograft nephropathy cases.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Sis, B; Celik, A; Tekis, D; Kavukcu, S; Bora, S; Camsari, T

    2006-03-01

    Deterioration of renal function is correlated with irreversible damage in chronic diseases. Recently we described a digital quantitative histochemistry method, relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining to determine the chronic renal lesions. This index was strongly correlated with progressive deterioration of renal function in grafts with chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Herein the method has been applied to a cohort of renal allografts which were biopsied for various reasons, we sought to highlight its value to quantify chronic graft damage. Forty-four renal allograft biopsies from 37 patients with elevated serum creatinine values (SCr) underwent light microscopic image analysis (Mediscope, Dokuz Eylül University, Clinical Engineering Department, Izmir, Turkey) of the PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP). SCr was recorded at four intervals to overcome acute effects: the under SCr value before (SCr1) and after a biopsy within 3 months (SCr3), SCr at the time of the biopsy (SCr2), and the latest value (SCr4). The PAMS-SAP scores were strongly associated with increased interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy Banff scores (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = .006 and P = .003, respectively). There was a moderate positive correlation between PAMS and SCr3 (Pearson correlation test, P = .04, r = .312), and a strong positive correlation between time from transplantation to biopsy (Pearson correlation test, P < .000, r = .532). The present results show that PAMS-SAP seems to be of value to quantify renal scarring in allograft biopsies, reflecting four compartments. The strong correlation with time is noteworthy especially as a probable reflection of aging of the renal allograft.

  1. Bone allograft and implant fixation tested under influence of bio-burden reduction, periosteal augmentation and topical antibiotics. Animal experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Barckman, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    femur (Study II and III) in dogs. The observation period was four weeks and the bone-implant specimens were evaluated by mechanical tests and histomorphometry. Study I compared the fixation of grafted implants where the morselized allograft bone was either rinsed in saline or not. Since the majority of immunogenic factors in allograft bone are present in the blood, the marrow and fat, the objective of this study was to investigate whether rinsing of the allograft bone would lower the immunogenic load and thereby improve osseointegration and bone graft incorporation. We found no statistically significant difference in the histomorphometric or the mechanical evaluations between the two groups. Study II investigated the addition of minced periosteal tissue to the allograft bone. The objective of this study was to investigate whether adding autologous tissue containing bone-forming cells could augment the bioactivity of allograft bone and thereby improve bone graft incorporation. Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no benefit of adding autologous periosteum to the allograft bone. No differences in mechanical fixation were observed, and the periosteum-treated implants had reduced new-bone ongrowth and increased amounts of fibrous tissue. Study III evaluated the impact of antibiotic impregnation of the allograft bone prior to impaction. Antibiotic-impregnated bone graft has been used in one-stage septic revisions and in cases where potential infection is suspected, but its potentially harmful effect on bone graft incorporation has not been studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Tobramycin impregnation of bone-grafted implants by mechanical testing and histomorphometric assessment. We hypothesized that Tobramycin impregnation would impair implant fixation. Under the conditions of the present study, Tobramycin impregnation of allograft bone did not appear to impair implant fixation or tissue in-growth. In conclusion, under the premises of the present

  2. The use of mycophenolate mofetil suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bunchman, T; Navarro, M; Broyer, M; Sherbotie, J; Chavers, B; Tönshoff, B; Birk, P; Lerner, G; Lirenman, D; Greenbaum, L; Walker, R; Zimmerhackl, L B; Blowey, D; Clark, G; Ettenger, R; Arterburn, S; Klamerus, K; Fong, A; Tang, H; Thomas, S; Ramos, E

    2001-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is widely used to prevent acute rejection in adults after renal, cardiac, and liver transplantation. This study investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of MMF suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients. One hundred renal allograft recipients were enrolled into three age groups (33 patients, 3 months to <6 years; 34 patients, 6 to <12 years; 33 patients, 12 to 18 years). Patients received MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. concomitantly with cyclosporine and corticosteroids with or without antilymphocyte antibody induction. One year after transplantation, patient and graft survival (including death) were 98% and 93%, respectively. Twenty-five patients (25%) experienced a biopsy-proven (Banff grade borderline or higher) or presumptive acute rejection within the first 6 months post-transplantation. Analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters for mycophenolic acid (MPA) and mycophenolic acid glucuronide showed no clinically significant differences among the age groups. The dosing regimen of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. achieved the targeted early post-transplantation MPA 12-h area under concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of 27.2 microg h per ml. Adverse events had similar frequencies among the age groups (with the exception of diarrhea, leukopenia, sepsis, and anemia, which were more frequent in the <6 years age group) and led to withdrawal of MMF in about 10% of patients. Administration of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. is effective in prevention of acute rejection, provides predictable pharmacokinetics, and is associated with an acceptable safety profile in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

  3. [Atrophy of the bone marrow].

    PubMed

    Dziecioł, J; Kemona, A; Sulik, M; Sulkowski, S; Brykalska, A; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Ostapiuk, H

    1990-01-01

    The authors made a quantitative analysis of the active hematopoietic tissue of the bone marrow with particular consideration of its atrophy in the course of various diseases. The material consisted of 407 non-selected autopsy cases. For a morphometric analysis the bone marrow was sampled from the sternum, ala ossis illi and spine. In the quantitative analysis of the active hematopoietic tissue we took into account age groups as quantitative changes appear with age. Atrophy of the bone marrow was in 19.4% of the studied cases. The presence of bone marrow atrophy was found in the course of various diseases, most frequently neoplastic, particularly in patients aged from 50 to 59 years.

  4. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePlus

    ... in determining treatment and prognosis) viral, bacterial, or fungal infections in the bone marrow that might be causing a lasting fever or other symptoms certain genetic diseases (such as lipid storage diseases) They also ...

  5. What Are Bone Marrow Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people with certain bleeding disorders such as hemophilia. Bone marrow tests can be done in a ... reading Anemia Aplastic Anemia Blood Tests Clinical Trials Hemophilia Thrombocythemia and Thrombocytosis Thrombocytopenia Rate This Content: Updated: ...

  6. Bone Marrow Diseases - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Marrow Diseases URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bonemarrowdiseases.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  7. Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil causes trabecular bone loss, bone marrow cell depletion and marrow adiposity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chiaming; Georgiou, Kristen R; McKinnon, Ross A; Keefe, Dorothy M K; Howe, Peter R C; Xian, Cory J

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of anthracyclines to adjuvant chemotherapy has increased survival rates among breast cancer patients. Cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) combination therapy is now one of the preferred regimens for treating node-positive breast cancer due to better survival with less toxicity involved. Despite the increasing use of CEF, its potential in causing adverse skeletal effects remains unclear. Using a mature female rat model mimicking the clinical setting, this study examined the effects of CEF treatment on bone and bone marrow in long bones. Following six cycles of CEF treatment (weekly intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide at 10 mg/kg, epirubicin at 2.5 mg/kg and 5-flurouracil at 10 mg/kg), a significant reduction in trabecular bone volume was observed at the metaphysis, which was associated with a reduced serum level of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), increased trends of osteoclast density and osteoclast area at the metaphysis, as well as an increased size of osteoclasts being formed from the bone marrow cells ex vivo. Moreover, a severe reduction of bone marrow cellularity was observed following CEF treatment, which was accompanied by an increase in marrow adipose tissue volume. This increase in marrow adiposity was associated with an expansion in adipocyte size but not in marrow adipocyte density. Overall, this study indicates that six cycles of CEF chemotherapy may induce some bone loss and severe bone marrow damage. Mechanisms for CEF-induced bone/bone marrow pathologies and potential preventive strategies warrant further investigation.

  8. L-leucyl-l-leucine methyl ester treatment of canine marrow and peripheral blood cells: Inhibition of proliferative responses with maintenance of the capacity for autologous marrow engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Raff, R.F.; Severns, E.; Storb, R.; Martin, P.; Graham, T.

    1988-11-01

    The success of allogeneic marrow transplantation as treatment for malignant and nonmalignant hematopoietic diseases has been restricted by the serious complications of graft-versus-host disease. Experiments in a variety of mammalian marrow transplant models have shown that removal of mature T cells from donor marrow permits engraftment without the development of GVHD. Incubation of canine marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells with L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester resulted in the inhibition of mitogen-and alloantigen induced blastogenesis, the elimination of allosensitized Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte and Natural Killer activity, and prevented the development of CTL from pCTL. The effects of these incubations were similar to those described in mice and humans. Additionally, in vitro CFU-GM growth from treated canine marrow was reduced, but could be regained when the Leu-Leu-OMe-treated marrow was cocultured with either untreated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells or monocyte-enriched PBMC but not with untreated monocyte-depleted PBMC. Six of seven dogs conditioned with 920 cGy total-body irradiation engrafted successfully after receiving autologous marrow that was incubated with Leu-Leu-OMe prior to infusion. These cumulative results indicate that incubation with Leu-Leu-OMe is a feasible method to deplete canine marrows of alloreactive and cytotoxic T cells prior to transplantation.

  9. Necroptosis in spontaneously-mutated hematopoietic cells induces autoimmune bone marrow failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Junping; Breslin, Peter; Wei, Wei; Li, Jing; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cannova, Joseph; Ni, Allen; Ng, Grace; Schmidt, Rachel; Chen, Haiyan; Parini, Vamsi; Kuo, Paul C.; Kini, Ameet R.; Stiff, Patrick; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Jiwang

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an autoimmune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. The mechanism by which such an autoimmune reaction is initiated is unknown. Whether and how the genetic lesions detected in patients cause autoimmune bone marrow failure have not yet been determined. We found that mice with spontaneous deletion of the TGFβ-activated kinase-1 gene in a small subset of hematopoietic cells developed bone marrow failure which resembled the clinical manifestations of acquired aplastic anemia patients. Bone marrow failure in such mice could be reversed by depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes or blocked by knockout of interferon-γ, suggesting a Th1-cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism. The onset and progression of bone marrow failure in such mice were significantly accelerated by the inactivation of tumor necrosis factor-α signaling. Tumor necrosis factor-α restricts autoimmune bone marrow failure by inhibiting type-1 T-cell responses and maintaining the function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Furthermore, we determined that necroptosis among a small subset of mutant hematopoietic cells is the cause of autoimmune bone marrow failure because such bone marrow failure can be prevented by deletion of receptor interacting protein kinase-3. Our study suggests a novel mechanism to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmune bone marrow failure. PMID:27634200

  10. Differential expression of collagenase by human fibroblasts and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, G W; Moran, D; Andrews, D F; Singer, J W

    1994-02-01

    The bone marrow stroma, represented in long-term marrow culture by cells of the adherent layer, is composed of a heterogenous mixture of macrophages and mesenchymal cells, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells and adipocytes, in association with a proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which is synthesized by the stroma, is capable of binding hematopoietic growth factors, and likely plays a major role in hematopoietic regulation. Clonally-derived non-transformed bone marrow stromal cells, propagated in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor, were studied for expression of collagenase, an enzyme whose substrate, collagen, is a major component of the extracellular matrix. Expression of steady-state collagenase mRNA was undetectable in both unstimulated dermal fibroblasts and non-transformed marrow stromal cells. However, stimulation with interleukin 1 alpha (10 U/ml) for 24 h resulted in marked accumulation of collagenase mRNA in dermal fibroblast cells, yet failed to elicit a similar response in bone marrow stromal cells. Both marrow stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts constitutively expressed transcripts of collagen I, and rhIL-1 alpha upregulated transcripts of interleukin 6 in both these cells as well. Although similar in morphology, these data indicate that bone marrow stromal cells differ from fibroblasts in their response to IL-1. In the marrow microenvironment, where IL-1 may be secreted by a variety of cell types, such suppression of collagenase expression may serve to prevent unwanted mobilization of collagen from the glycoprotein matrix by marrow stromal cells.

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapy for Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction: Results of a First-in-Man Study.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Daniel C; Enever, Debra; Lawrence, Sharon; Sturm, Marian J; Herrmann, Richard; Yerkovich, Stephanie; Musk, Michael; Hopkins, Peter M A

    2017-04-01

    Chronic lung transplant rejection (termed chronic lung allograft dysfunction [CLAD]) is the main impediment to long-term survival after lung transplantation. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent an attractive cell therapy in inflammatory diseases, including organ rejection, given their relative immune privilege and immunosuppressive and tolerogenic properties. Preclinical studies in models of obliterative bronchiolitis and human trials in graft versus host disease and renal transplantation suggest potential efficacy in CLAD. The purpose of this phase 1, single-arm study was to explore the feasibility and safety of intravenous delivery of allogeneic MSCs to patients with advanced CLAD. MSCs from unrelated donors were isolated from bone marrow, expanded and cryopreserved in a GMP-compliant facility. Patients had deteriorating CLAD and were bronchiolitis obliterans (BOS) grade ≥ 2 or grade 1 with risk factors for rapid progression. MSCs (2 x 10(6) cells per kilogram patient weight) were infused via a peripheral vein twice weekly for 2 weeks, with 52 weeks follow-up. Ten Patients (5 male, 8 bilateral, median [interquartile range] age 40 [30-59] years, 3 BOS2, 7 BOS3) participated. MSC treatment was well tolerated with all patients receiving the full dosing schedule without any procedure-related serious adverse events. The rate of decline in forced expiratory volume in one second slowed after the MSC infusions (120 ml/month preinfusion vs. 30 ml/month postinfusion, p = .08). Two patients died at 152 and 270 days post-MSC treatment, both from progressive CLAD. In conclusion, infusion of allogeneic bone marrow-derived MSCs is feasible and safe even in patients with advanced CLAD. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1152-1157.

  12. Lipidomics comparing DCD and DBD liver allografts uncovers lysophospholipids elevated in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Casas-Ferreira, Ana M; Ma, Yun; Sen, Arundhuti; Kim, Min; Proitsi, Petroula; Shkodra, Maltina; Tena, Maria; Srinivasan, Parthi; Heaton, Nigel; Jassem, Wayel; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2015-12-04

    Finding specific biomarkers of liver damage in clinical evaluations could increase the pool of available organs for transplantation. Lipids are key regulators in cell necrosis and hence this study hypothesised that lipid levels could be altered in organs suffering severe ischemia. Matched pre- and post-transplant biopsies from donation after circulatory death (DCD, n = 36, mean warm ischemia time = 2 min) and donation after brain death (DBD, n = 76, warm ischemia time = none) were collected. Lipidomic discovery and multivariate analysis (MVA) were applied. Afterwards, univariate analysis and clinical associations were conducted for selected lipids differentiating between these two groups. MVA grouped DCD vs. DBD (p = 6.20 × 10(-12)) and 12 phospholipids were selected for intact lipid measurements. Two lysophosphatidylcholines, LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0), showed higher levels in DCD at pre-transplantation (q < 0.01). Lysophosphatidylcholines were associated with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 14-day post-transplantation (q < 0.05) and were more abundant in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction (EAD) (p < 0.05). A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve combining both lipid levels predicted EAD with 82% accuracy. These findings suggest that LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0) might have a role in signalling liver tissue damage due to warm ischemia before transplantation.

  13. Micro-organisms isolated from cadaveric samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Allograft musculoskeletal tissue is commonly used in orthopaedic surgical procedures. Cadaveric donors of musculoskeletal tissue supply multiple allografts such as tendons, ligaments and bone. The microbiology laboratory of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (SEALS, Australia) has cultured cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples for bacterial and fungal isolates since 2006. This study will retrospectively review the micro-organisms isolated over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swab and tissue samples were received for bioburden testing and were inoculated onto agar and/or broth culture media. Growth was obtained from 25.1 % of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received. The predominant organisms isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci and coliforms, with the heaviest bioburden recovered from the hemipelvis. The rate of bacterial and fungal isolates from cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples is higher than that from living donors. The type of organism isolated may influence the suitability of the allograft for transplant.

  14. The use of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the reconstruction of tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Fu, Li; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Dongsong; Qi, Xin

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the clinical behavior of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the treatment of depressed tibial plateau fractures. Twenty-two patients with a tibial plateau fracture were treated with cancellous bone allografts. The bone allograft preparation process included fresh-freezing at -70 °C for 4 weeks and gamma-irradiation at 25 kGy. All of the patients were followed for 1-2 years. The clinical effects were assessed using the Rasmussen score for tibial head fractures and X-rays. Postoperatively, the average excellent and fair Rasmussen scores were 88.9%. Only one patient developed an infection, with no integration between allograft and recipient bone observed. All of the other bone allografts were incorporated successfully, and no osteoporosis or sclerosis was observed. The frozen and gamma-irradiated bone allograft is a good alternative in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures, which we have shown can integrate with the surrounding host bone.

  15. Remodeling of cortical bone allografts mediated by adherent rAAV-RANKL and VEGF gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Koefoed, Mette; Tiyapatanaputi, Prarop; Gromov, Kirill; Goater, J Jeffrey; Carmouche, Jonathan; Zhang, Xinping; Rubery, Paul T; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Samulski, R Jude; Nakamura, Takashi; Soballe, Kjeld; O'Keefe, Regis J; Boyce, Brendan F; Schwarz, Edward M

    2006-01-01

    Structural allograft healing is limited because of a lack of vascularization and remodeling. To study this we developed a mouse model that recapitulates the clinical aspects of live autograft and processed allograft healing. Gene expression analyses showed that there is a substantial decrease in the genes encoding RANKL and VEGF during allograft healing. Loss-of-function studies showed that both factors are required for autograft healing. To determine whether addition of these signals could stimulate allograft vascularization and remodeling, we developed a new approach in which rAAV can be freeze-dried onto the cortical surface without losing infectivity. We show that combination rAAV-RANKL- and rAAV-VEGF-coated allografts show marked remodeling and vascularization, which leads to a new bone collar around the graft. In conclusion, we find that RANKL and VEGF are necessary and sufficient for efficient autograft remodeling and can be transferred using rAAV to revitalize structural allografts. PMID:15711561

  16. Kidney retransplantation for BK virus nephropathy with active viremia without allograft nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Danovitch, Gabriel; Pham, Phuong-Thu; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Huang, Edmund

    2015-12-01

    BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney allograft failure. Retransplantation has been successfully performed for patients with previous allograft loss due to BK virus nephropathy; however, whether allograft nephrectomy and viral clearance are required prior to retransplantation is controversial. Some recent studies have suggested that retransplantion can be successfully achieved without allograft nephrectomy if viremia is cleared prior to retransplant. The only published experience of successful retransplantation in the presence of active viremia occurred in the presence of concomitant allograft nephrectomy of the failing kidney. In this report, we describe a case of successful repeat kidney transplant in a patient with high-grade BK viremia and fulminant hepatic failure without concomitant allograft nephrectomy performed under the setting of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant.

  17. Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...2009 The Author(s) Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs Daniel K. Park,* MD...4-stranded allografts are used for soft tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; however, the fixation properties of fixation devices are

  18. Creeping attachment: autogenous graft vs dermal matrix allograft.

    PubMed

    Haeri, A; Parsell, D

    2000-09-01

    For many years, free autogenous grafts have been used as a method of gaining keratinized tissue around teeth with mucogingival problems. Creeping attachment using autogenous graft material has been actively studied. In addition, biocompatible, acellular connective-tissue material has recently been used as an alternative to free gingival grafts to increase the zone of keratinization. This report presents a patient with bilateral mucogingival defects in the canine and premolar areas. The patient received an autogenous graft on one side and a dermal matrix allograft on the contralateral side. Creeping attachments were measured and compared at 3 months and 12 months after surgery. After 12 months of healing, an average of 1.23 mm of creeping attachment was measured on the free gingival graft side and 0.96 mm of creeping attachment was measured with the dermal matrix allograft.

  19. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue.

  20. The Tips and Pitfalls of Meniscus Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Rak; Nam, Sang Wook

    2012-01-01

    When faced with an irrepairable meniscus or a patient who has had a total or subtotal meniscectomy, meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) is the preferred modality to restore biomechanical function of the meniscus. The indications for meniscus allograft transplantation are yet to be established. However, currently, MAT has previously been indicated for symptomatic patients who have mild or early osteoarthritis, are younger than 50 years of age, and present with an Outerbridge grade II or lower. The short- to intermediate-term results confirmed noteworthy clinical improvements and consistent objective findings. On the other hand, the successful outcome would be reduced by various complications. Therefore, long-term observation required to evaluate the longevity of these results. The purpose of this article is to review the current research of concerns on the results of MAT, and to describe the technical tips and pitfalls so as to successful clinical results. PMID:22977790

  1. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  2. Total lymphoid irradiation for treatment of intractable cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.A.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Stinson, E.B. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability of postoperative total lymphoid irradiation to reverse otherwise intractable cardiac allograft rejection was examined in a group of 10 patients in whom conventional rejection therapy (including pulsed steroids and monoclonal or polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody therapy) had failed to provide sustained freedom from rejection. Follow-up periods range from 73 to 1119 days since the start of total lymphoid irradiation. No patient died or sustained serious morbidity because of the irradiation. Three patients have had no further rejection (follow-up periods, 105 to 365 days). Two patients died--one in cardiogenic shock during the course of total lymphoid irradiation, the other with recurrent rejection caused by noncompliance with his medical regimen. Total lymphoid irradiation appears to be a safe and a moderately effective immunosuppressive modality for 'salvage' therapy of cardiac allograft rejection unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  3. [The immunologic function and role of allograft inflammatory factor-1].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Aihiro; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 is the protein that expressed in the macrophages around the coronary arteries in rat ectopic cardiac allograft model. AIF-1 is produced mainly by macrophages and regulated by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). There are various splicing valiants in AIF-1, and the functions are different. AIF-1 has Ca-binding EF-hand motif that induces cell proliferation and migration by structural features. Besides cell proliferation and migration, AIF-1 contributes to secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), insulin resistance by downregulation of GLUT4 or IRS-1, and fibrosis process by upregulation of collagen production. It has been elucidated that AIF-1 is responsible for the onset of various diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic sclerosis, atherosclerotic disease, diabetes mellitus. AIF-1 may have the therapeutic potential for chronic inflammatory diseases by elucidation of the mechanism.

  4. Human renal allograft blood flow and early renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C B; Etheredge, E E

    1977-01-01

    Renal allograft blood flow (RBF) was measured at operation by electromagnetic flow meter and probes in 45 patients (34 cadaver donors and 11 living related donors). Mean RBF in 26 patients without acute tubular necrosis (ATN), was 412 +/- 80 ml/min and in 19 patients with ATN, 270 +/- 100 ml/min (p less than .001). Only two of 24 transplants (8%) with RBF greater than 350 ml/min had ATN; whereas, 17 of 21 transplants (81 per cent) with RBF less than 350 ml/min had ATN (p less than .001). In cadaver donor transplants, RBF did not correlate with duration of ATN, warm ischemia time, total ischemia time, pulsatile perfusion time or renal vascular resistance during perfusion. Measurement of renal allograft blood flow can predict presence or absence of postoperative ATN in 87% of patients. PMID:335986

  5. Persistence of antigen is required to maintain transplantation tolerance induced by genetic modification of bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, C; Bagley, J; Iacomini, J

    2006-09-01

    Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) resulting in a state of molecular chimerism can be used to induce donor-specific tolerance to allografts. However, the requirements for maintaining tolerance in molecular chimeras remain unknown. Here, we examined whether long-term expression of a retrovirally encoded alloantigen in hematopoietic cells is required to maintain donor-specific tolerance in molecular chimeras. To this end, mice were reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow transduced with retroviruses carrying the gene encoding the allogeneic MHC class I molecule Kb. Following induction of molecular chimerism, mice were depleted of cells expressing Kb by administration of the anti-Kb monoclonal antibody Y-3. Mice that were effectively depleted of cells expressing the retrovirally encoded MHC class I antigen rejected Kb disparate skin allografts. In contrast, control molecular chimeras accepted Kb disparate skin allografts indefinitely. These data suggest maintenance of tolerance in molecular chimeras requires long-term expression of retrovirally transduced alloantigen on the progeny of retrovirally transduced HSCs.

  6. Allograft Reconstruction of Chronic Tibialis Anterior Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeannie; Boyette, Deanna M; Parekh, Selene G; Nunley, James A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are often associated with tendon retraction and poor-quality tissue, resulting in large segmental defects that make end-to-end repair impossible. Interpositional allograft reconstruction has previously been described as an operative option in these cases; however, there are no reports of the clinical outcomes of this technique in the literature. Eleven patients with chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures underwent intercalary allograft recon-struction between 2006 and 2013. Patient demographics, injury presentation, and details of surgery were reviewed. Postoperative outcomes at a mean follow-up of 43.8 (range, 6-105) months included the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot score, Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical health score, Lower Extremity Functional Score (LEFS), visual analog scale (VAS) pain rating, dorsiflexion strength, gait analysis, and complications. The average postoperative dorsiflexion strength, as categorized by the Medical Council grading scale, was 4.8 ± 0.45. The average postoperative VAS score was 0.8 ± 1.1. The average LEFS was 66.9 ± 17.2, SF-12 physical health score was 40.1 ± 14.4, and AOFAS score was 84.3 ± 7.7. One complication occurred, consisting of transient neuritic pain in the superficial peroneal nerve distribution. There were no postoperative infections, tendon reruptures, reoperations, or allograft-associated complications. Allograft reconstruction of chronic irreparable tibialis anterior tendon ruptures yielded satisfactory strength, pain, and patient-reported functional outcomes. This technique offers a safe and reliable alternative, without the donor site morbidity associated with tendon transfer or autograft harvest. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Retrieval of the pancreas allograft for whole-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Powelson, John A; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Burke, George W; Sageshima, Junichiro; Rogers, Jeffrey; Stratta, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Proper pancreas retrieval during multi-organ recovery is one of the cornerstones of technically successful whole-organ pancreas transplantation. With evolving surgical approaches for organ retrieval and implantation, it has become standard to procure the pancreas in conjunction with other abdominal organs without compromising either vasculature, graft quality, or transplant outcomes. This review summarizes the major steps required for proper whole-organ retrieval of the pancreas allograft with suggestions and tips whenever alternative approaches are available.

  8. Fresh-frozen Complete Extensor Mechanism Allograft versus Autograft Reconstruction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyin; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Qiong; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Ma, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Different clinical results have been reported in the repair of extensor mechanism disruption using fresh-frozen complete extensor mechanism (CEM) allograft, creating a need for a better understanding of fresh-frozen CME allograft reconstruction. Here, we perform histological and biomechanical analyses of fresh-frozen CEM allograft or autograft reconstruction in an in vivo rabbit model. Our histological results show complete incorporation of the quadriceps tendon into the host tissues, patellar survival and total integration of the allograft tibia, with relatively fewer osteocytes, into the host tibia. Vascularity and cellularity are reduced and delayed in the allograft but exhibit similar distributions to those in the autograft. The infrapatellar fat pad provides the main blood supply, and the lowest cellularity is observed in the patellar tendon close to the tibia in both the allograft and autograft. The biomechanical properties of the junction of quadriceps tendon and host tissues and those of the allograft patellar tendon are completely and considerably restored, respectively. Therefore, fresh-frozen CEM allograft reconstruction is viable, but the distal patellar tendon and the tibial block may be the weak links of the reconstruction. These findings provide new insight into the use of allograft in repairing disruption of the extensor mechanism. PMID:26911538

  9. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  13. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit S.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS. Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS. With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION. Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  14. Inability to determine tissue health is main indication of allograft use in intermediate extent burns.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John L; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Sinha, Indranil; Leung, Kai P; Renz, Evan M; Chan, Rodney K

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous allograft is commonly used in the early coverage of excised burns when autograft is unavailable. However, allograft is also applied in intermediate-extent burns (25-50%), during cases in which it is possible to autograft. In this population, there is a paucity of data on the indications for allograft use. This study explores the indications for allograft usage in moderate size burns. Under an IRB-approved protocol, patients admitted to our burn unit between March 2003 and December 2010 were identified through a review of the burn registry. Data on allograft use, total burn surface area, operation performed, operative intent, number of operations, intensive care unit length of stay, and overall length of stay were collected and analyzed. Data are presented as means±standard deviations, except where noted. In the study period, 146 patients received allograft during their acute hospitalization. Twenty-five percent of allograft recipients sustained intermediate-extent burns. Patients with intermediate-extent burns received allograft later in their hospitalization than those with large-extent (50-75% TBSA) burns (6.8 days vs. 3.4 days, p=0.01). Allografted patients with intermediate-extent burns underwent more operations (10.8 vs. 6.1, p=0.002) and had longer hospitalizations (78.3 days vs. 40.9 days, p<0.001) than non-allografted patients, when controlled for TBSA. Clinical rationale for placement of allograft in this population included autograft failure, uncertain depth of excision, lack of autograft donor site, and wound complexity. When uncertain depth of excision was the indication, allograft was universally applied onto the face. In half of allografted intermediate-extent burn patients the inability to identify a viable recipient bed was the ultimate reason for allograft use. Unlike large body surface area burns, allograft skin use in intermediate-extent injury occurs later in the hospitalization and is driven by the inability to determine wound bed

  15. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  16. [Normal bone marrow and common reactive alterations].

    PubMed

    Tzankov, A; Dirnhofer, S; Beham-Schmid, C

    2012-11-01

    Histological examination of bone marrow biopsies is an important and powerful diagnostic tool to assess various hematological and non-hematological disorders. Morphological examination of such biopsies requires knowledge of the composition of normal bone marrow and its variations, such as age-related changes. Diagnostic problems may arise due to poor specimen quality, insufficient sections or stainings and insufficient experience with reactive bone marrow changes which occasionally resemble neoplastic disorders. Reactive bone marrow processes can affect one or more hematopoietic cell lines, lead to disruption of the normal architecture and specifically affect the bone marrow stroma. Optimal bone marrow diagnosis requires adequately stained slides and, when needed, immunophenotyping and molecular examinations. Furthermore, rather than biopsy interpretation of other organs, pathologists routinely need clinical history information for correct interpretation and diagnosis of bone marrow changes. In this article, the normal features of bone marrow as well as the most frequent reactive bone marrow alterations are described.

  17. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on human tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Gardner, E M H; VonderHeide, N; Fisher, R; Brooker, G; Yates, P J

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial contamination of tendon allografts at the completion of processing has historically been about 2 %, with tendons that are found to be culture positive being discarded. Treatment of tendon allograft with hydrogen peroxide at the beginning of tissue processing may reduce bacterial contamination, however, the potential side effects of hydrogen peroxide treatment include hydrolysis of the collagen and this may alter the mechanical properties of the graft. Pairs of human tendons were used. One was washed in 3 % hydrogen peroxide for 5 min and the untreated tendon was used as a control. The ultimate tensile strength of the tendons was determined using a material testing machine. A freeze clamp technique was used to hold the tendons securely at the high loads required to cause tendon failure. There was no statistical difference in the ultimate tensile strength between the treated and untreated tendons. Mean strength ranged from Extensor Hallucis Longus at 588 Newtons to Tibialis Posterior at 2,366 Newtons. Hydrogen peroxide washing may reduce bacterial contamination of tendon allograft and does not affect the strength of the tendon.

  18. STAT4 gene polymorphism in patients after renal allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowska-Żamojcin, Ewa; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Domański, Leszek; Słuczanowska-Głabowska, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction STAT4 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 4) is involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Some studies have suggested that STAT4 may be involved in the immune response after graft transplantation. Several polymorphisms in the STAT4 gene have been identified. The most commonly studied polymorphism in the STAT4 gene is rs7574865. In our study, we examined whether this polymorphism is associated with the early and late functions of renal allografts. Material and methods A total of 270 recipients of first renal transplants were included in the study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the STAT4 gene were genotyped using TaqMan genotyping assays. Results There were no statistically significant associations between the STAT4 gene rs7574865 polymorphism and delayed graft function, acute rejection, chronic allograft dysfunction, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, or creatinine serum concentrations after transplantation. Conclusions Our results suggest a lack of association between the STAT4 rs7574865 SNP and kidney allograft function in the Polish population. PMID:27833442

  19. Impact of freezing on immunology and incorporation of bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Reikerås, Olav; Sigurdsen, Ulf W; Shegarfi, Hamid

    2010-09-01

    With an increasing clinical use of deep frozen allograft for bone reconstruction, it is important to understand the immunological and biological events of allograft incorporation. In this study, we have investigated the impact of deep freezing on immunology and biopotency for incorporation of bone allografts. Deep frozen bone grafts matched or mismatched for major histoscompatibilty complex (MHC) were implanted in an 8-mm segmental defect in the tibia in rats. The construct was stabilized with intramedullary nailing. The immune response was evaluated by determination of serum antibody against the grafts MHC molecules at day 1 and after 2 and 4 months. Incorporation of the graft was compared with fresh syngeneic grafts and assessed with the use of conventional radiography, biomechanical testing and measurement of bone mineral content and density after 4 months. The analyses revealed no antibody responses in the rats that received grafts from donors differing at histocompatibility loci, and at 4 months the frozen grafts showed an overall reconstruction that was not significantly different from the fresh grafts. This study indicates that in the long run there are no significant consequences; either immunological or biomechanical, of the use of deep frozen allogenous bone as compared to fresh autogenous bone grafts in this animal model.

  20. Immunohistochemical Investigation of the Heart Allograft Myocardium (1991-1998).

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, Ludmila V.; Baranova, Flora S.; Khalimova, Zarema A.; Zaidenov, Vladimir A.; Kurenkova, Lubov G.; Kormer, Arkadiy Ya.; Khubutia, Anzor Sh.; Kupriyanova, Anna G.; Shumakov, Valeriy I.

    2000-04-01

    What is a contribution of the humoral (vascular) and mixed type of the rejection episodes to all the episodes of heart allograft rejection is not quite clear, though this factor is of considerable importance for the choice of the treatment methods. The hearts from recipients, as well as endomyocardial biopsies of the heart allografts and postmortem material were investigated with the aim to determine the immunopathological process. Overall, 420 samples from 80 patients were analyzed. Immunofluorescence examination of endomyocardial biopsy showed that in 8 from 44 patients with heart allograft in postoperative period for the first six weeks there were revealed the immunomorphological signs of the acute humoral rejection, manifested as fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in capillaries. Six of them exhibited rejection of mixed type. Most patients in the later postoperative period exhibited a discrete local fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in myocardium, that can be assessed as one of the compartments of the chronic rejection process. In cases of the secondary administration of serum preparations, the fixation of immune complexes was shown in sarcolemma and capillaries, and can be proposed as a sign of serum disease. Repeated acute rejection episodes of humoral or mixed types raised at the first six weeks after transplantation. In the period from 1-5 years after operation, patients displayed discrete deposits of the immunoglobulins and complement as part of the chronic rejection process.

  1. Renal allograft tuberculosis with infected lymphocele transmitted from the donor.

    PubMed

    Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Al-Ani, Omar Isam; Al-Ani, Ahmed Abdul-Rahman; Rashed, Awad Hamed

    2014-03-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from a donor through renal transplantation is a rare incident. We are reporting a 53-year-old Qatari woman diagnosed with renal allograft TB infection. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fluid from the lymphocele and demonstration of caseating granuloma in graft biopsy with acid-fast bacilli seen on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The diagnosis was made quite early post-transplantation. The presence of the granuloma, which is unusual with patients on intensive immunosuppressant medications, suggests that transmission of the infection occurred from the donor rather than from the activation of latent infection. In reviewing the literature, we found ten case reports of TB in transplanted kidney with transmission of TB infection from the donor. The presence of TB in lymphocele in association with the infected transplant by TB, to the best of our knowledge, was reported only once in the literature. Our case had unfavorable outcome and ended by renal allograft nephrectomy and hemodialysis. We are presenting this case of TB infection of renal allograft and lymphocele diagnosed early post-transplantation transmitted from the donor and pertinent review from the literature.

  2. [Oral mucosa analog allografts in non-consanguineous rats].

    PubMed

    González, Luis; Padrón, Karla; Salmen, Siham; Jerez, Elsy; Dávila, Lorena; Solórzano, Eduvigis

    2017-01-24

    Although there are therapeutic options for the treatment of oral mucosa defects, the need for functional, anatomical and aesthetically similar substitutes persists, as well as for solutions to reduce autologous grafts morbidity. To determine clinical and histological compatibility of equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated through tissue engineering in non-consanguineous rats. We used a sample of oral mucosa from Sprague Dawley rats to obtain a fibroblast culture and a keratinocytes and fibroblasts co-culture. In both cases, we used a commercial collagen membrane as "scaffold". After ten weeks of culture, we grafted the resulting membranes into four Wistar rats. The first phase of the study was the development of the oral mucosa equivalents generated by tissue engineering. Then, we implanted them in immunocompetent Wistar rats, and finallywe evaluated the clinical and histological features of the allografts. In vivo evaluation of mucosal substitutes showed a correct integration of artificial oral mucosa in immunocompetent hosts, with an increase in periodontal biotype and the creation of a zone with increased keratinization. Histologically, the tissue was similar to the control oral mucosa sample with no inflammatory reaction nor clinical or histological rejection signs. The equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated by tissue engineering showed clinical and histological compatibility.

  3. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using peroneus brevis tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ruben; Damacen, Harvey; Nyland, John; Caborn, David

    2007-07-01

    We describe the use of a double-strand peroneus brevis allograft to reconstruct the coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular (AC) joint ligaments. Through sharp dissection, the distal clavicle, the AC joint, and the torn superior AC and coracoacromial ligaments are identified. The coracoid process and injured coracoclavicular ligaments are identified with blunt dissection. A 1-cm segment of the lateral clavicle is resected. Vertical and connecting horizontal tunnels are created (4.5 mm) in the lateral clavicle and in the medial acromion process. The 5.5- to 6.0-mm-diameter allograft is looped around the coracoid process, and both strands are passed through the vertical clavicle tunnel with a nitinol wire loop. One strand passes through the vertical clavicle tunnel, and the other strand passes through the horizontal tunnel, exiting through the lateral end. The allograft strand passed through the vertical clavicle tunnel is then passed inferiorly through the superior vertical acromion tunnel, and the strand passed completely through the horizontal clavicle tunnel is passed laterally through the medial horizontal acromion tunnel. After both strands exit inferiorly through the vertical acromion tunnel, they are tensioned and sutured with AC joint reduction. Soft tissue closure uses No. 0 and No. 2-0 absorbable sutures with No. 3-0 nylon sutures at the skin.

  4. Allograft Heart Valves: Current Aspects and Future Applications.

    PubMed

    Lisy, Milan; Kalender, Guenay; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Biermann, Anna; Stock, Ulrich Alfred

    2017-02-02

    Human heart valve allografts continue to represent almost perfect substitutes for heart valves. They have optimal hemodynamic characteristics and are highly resistant to infections. The first clinical use of allograft heart valves was as homovitals being transplanted after antibiotic incubation without any preservation. Since 1968, relatively standardized frozen cryopreservation (SFC) has been employed, including storage in vapor-phase liquid nitrogen. Disadvantages, particularly in pediatric patients, are limited availability due to organ scarcity, inability to grow, degeneration, immune response, and long-term failure. However, in contrast to alternative prosthetic or bioprosthetic heart valve replacements, they represent the best pediatric and juvenile replacement options for the pulmonary valve. Application of multiphoton imaging analysis for three-dimensional visualization of elastin and collagen by induction of autofluorescence without chemical fixation, embedding, and staining has revealed partial destruction of elastic and collagenous matrix in SFC valves. As the overall amount of collagen and elastin remains unchanged, the observed destruction is attributed to freezing-induced extracellular matrix damages due to ice crystal formation during SFC. The objective of this review is an assessment of current allograft preservation methods and the potential of novel preservation techniques to avoid ice formation with accompanied better long-term function.

  5. Gr-1intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells accumulate in corneal allograft and improve corneal allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wungrak; Ji, Yong Woo; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Yeo, Areum; Noh, Hyemi; Jin, Su-Eon; Song, Jong Suk; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Hyung Keun

    2016-12-01

    We identified the characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and investigated their mechanism of induction and their functional role in allograft rejection using a murine corneal allograft model. In mice, MDSCs coexpress CD11b and myeloid differentiation antigen Gr-1. Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells infiltrated allografted corneas between 4 d and 4 wk after surgery; however, the frequencies of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells were not different between accepted and rejected allografts or in peripheral blood or BM. Of interest, Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells, but not Gr-1(hi)CD11b(+) cells, infiltrated the accepted graft early after surgery and expressed high levels of immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10, TGF-β, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. This population remained until 4 wk after surgery. In vitro, only high dose (>100 ng/ml) of IFN-γ plus GM-CSF could induce immunosuppressive cytokine expression in Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells reduced T cell infiltration, which improved graft survival. In conclusion, high-dose IFN-γ in allograft areas is essential for development of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) MDSCs in corneal allografts, and subtle environmental changes in the early period of the allograft can result in a large difference in graft survival.

  6. A Biomechanical Comparison of Allograft Tendons for Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremiah E; Russell, Joseph P; Grieshober, Jason; Iacangelo, Abigail; Ellison, Benjamin A; Lease, T Dylan; Kim, Hyunchul; Henn, R Frank; Hsieh, Adam H

    2017-03-01

    Allograft tendons are frequently used for ligament reconstruction about the knee, but they entail availability and cost challenges. The identification of other tissues that demonstrate equivalent performance to preferred tendons would improve limitations. Hypothesis/Purpose: We compared the biomechanical properties of 4 soft tissue allograft tendons: tibialis anterior (TA), tibialis posterior (TP), peroneus longus (PL), and semitendinosus (ST). We hypothesized that allograft properties would be similar when standardized by the looped diameter. Controlled laboratory study. This study consisted of 2 arms evaluating large and small looped-diameter grafts: experiment A consisted of TA, TP, and PL tendons (n = 47 each) with larger looped diameters of 9.0 to 9.5 mm, and experiment B consisted of TA, TP, PL, and ST tendons (n = 53 each) with smaller looped diameters of 7.0 to 7.5 mm. Each specimen underwent mechanical testing to measure the modulus of elasticity (E), ultimate tensile force (UTF), maximal elongation at failure, ultimate tensile stress (UTS), and ultimate tensile strain (UTε). Experiment A: No significant differences were noted among tendons for UTF, maximal elongation at failure, and UTϵ. UTS was significantly higher for the PL (54 MPa) compared with the TA (44 MPa) and TP (43 MPa) tendons. E was significantly higher for the PL (501 MPa) compared with the TP (416 MPa) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TP and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the TA tendons for all outcomes. Experiment B: All groups exhibited a similar E. UTF was again highest in the PL tendons (2294 N) but was significantly different from only the ST tendons (1915 N). UTϵ was significantly higher for the ST (0.22) compared with the TA (0.19) and TP (0.19) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TA, TP, and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the ST tendons. Compared with TA tendons, TP and PL tendons of a given looped

  7. Allograft survival enhancement using doxycycline in alkali-burned mouse corneas.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shiqi; Li, Weihua; Liu, Lin; Zhou, Hongmei; Wang, Tao; Ye, Hui; Liang, Lingyi; Yuan, Jin

    2013-08-01

    To explore the inhibitory effects of doxycycline on allograft rejection in alkali-burned cornea beds. The corneas of BALB/c mice were injured using a 1 mol/l NaOH solution. Following the injury, the corneas from C57BL/6 mice were transplanted into the eyes of BALB/c mice after being randomized into three groups: allogeneic corneal transplantation (group A), topical use of doxycycline after allogeneic corneal transplantation (group B) and syngeneic corneal transplantation (group C). Corneal angiogenesis was examined using whole-mount immunofluorescence, and corneal inflammation was evaluated using inflammation index scoring. The immune rejection of the grafts was examined using a slit lamp. In addition, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A and interleukin-1β in the transplanted corneas was examined using a real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The outgrowth of the corneal blood vessels in the group A mice was faster than that in the group B and group C mice. The inflammation index levels were highest in the group A mice, intermediate in the group B mice and lowest in the group C mice. Vascular endothelial growth factor and the interleukin-1β protein and mRNA levels decreased dramatically in the group B mice compared with the group A mice (all p-values < 0.01). In addition, the mean survival time in the group B mice (27.00 ± 2.00 days) was significantly longer than that in the group A mice (11.67 ± 1.51 days; p < 0.05). Doxycycline may have had a significant role in preventing corneal angiogenesis and inflammation in alkali-burned corneal beds, which resulted in higher allograft survival rates. © 2013 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Tendon allograft sterilized by peracetic acid/ethanol combined with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Zhang, Naili; Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Youchen; Zhang, Yumin; Wang, Xusheng; Li, Baoming; Li, Baoxing

    2014-07-01

    Research and clinical applications have demonstrated that the effects of tendon allografts are comparable to those of autografts when reconstructing injured tendons or ligaments, but allograft safety remains problematic. Sterilisation could eliminate or decrease the possibility of disease transmission, but current methods seldom achieve satisfactory sterilisation without affecting the mechanical properties of the tendon. Peracetic acid-ethanol in combination with low-dose gamma irradiation (PE-R) would inactivate potential deleterious microorganisms without affecting mechanical and biocompatible properties of tendon allograft. Controlled laboratory design. HIV, PPV, PRV and BVDV inactivation was evaluated. After verifying viral inactivation, the treated tendon allografts were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing, and the cytocompatibility was assessed with an MTT assay and by subcutaneous implantation. Effective and efficient inactivation of HIV, PPV, PRV and BVDV was observed. Histological structure and ultrastructure were unchanged in the treated tendon allograft, which also exhibited comparable biomechanical properties and good biocompatibility. The preliminary results confirmed our hypothesis and demonstrated that the PE-R tendon allograft has significant potential as an alternative to ligament/tendon reconstruction. Tendon allografts have been extensively used in ligament reconstruction and tendon repair. However, current sterilisation methods have various shortcomings, so PE-R has been proposed. This study suggests that PE-R tendon allograft has great potential as an alternative for ligament/tendon reconstruction. Sterilisation has been a great concern for tendon allografts. However, most sterilisation methods cannot inactivate viruses and bacteria without impairing the mechanical properties of the tendon allograft. Peracetic acid/ethanol with gamma irradiation can effectively inactivate viruses and bacteria

  9. Engineering of bone marrow cells with fas-ligand protein-enhances donor-specific tolerance to solid organs.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, E M; Shushlav, Y; Sun, Z; Shirwan, H; Yolcu, E S; Askenasy, N

    2011-11-01

    Effective immunomodulation to induce tolerance to tissue/organ allografts is attained by infusion of donor lymphocytes endowed with killing capacity through ectopic expression of a short-lived Fas-ligand (FasL) protein. The same approach has proven effective in improving hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell engraftment. This study evaluates the possibility of substitution of immune cells for bone marrow cells (BMC) to induce FasL-mediated tolerance to solid organ grafts. Expression of FasL protein on BMC increased the survival of simultaneously grafted vascularized heterotopic cardiac grafts to 90%, as compared to 30% in recipients of naïve BMC. Similar results were obtained for skin allografts implanted into radiation chimeras at 1 week after bone marrow transplantation. Further reduction of preparative conditioning to busulfan resulted in acceptance of donor skin implanted at 2 weeks after transplantation of naïve and FasL-coated BMC, whereas third-party grafts were acutely rejected. The levels of donor chimerism were in the range of 0.7% to 12% at the time of skin grafting, with higher levels in recipients of FasL-coated BMC. It is concluded that FasL-mediated abrogation of alloimmune responses can be effectively attained with BMC. There is no threshold of donor chimerism, but tolerance to solid organs evolves during the process of donor-host mutual acceptance.

  10. Simultaneous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and a Vascularized Composite Allograft Leads to Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mathes, David W.; Chang, Jeff; Hwang, Billanna; Graves, Scott S.; Storer, Barry E.; Butts-Miwongtum, Tiffany; Sale, George E.; Storb, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that tolerance to a vascularized composite allograft (VCA) can be achieved after the establishment of mixed chimerism. Here, we test the hypothesis that tolerance to a VCA in our dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-matched canine model is not dependent on the previous establishment of mixed chimerism and can be induced coincident with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Methods Eight DLA-matched, minor antigen mismatched dogs received 200 cGy of radiation and a VCA transplant. Four dogs received donor bone marrow at the time of VCA transplantation (group 1) while a second group of 4 dogs did not (group 2). All recipients received a limited course of post-grafting immunosuppression. All dogs that received HCT and VCA were given donor, third party and autologous skin grafts. Results All group 1 recipients were tolerant to their VCA (> 62 weeks). Three of the four dogs in group 2 rejected their VCA transplants after the cessation of immunosuppression. Biopsies obtained from muscle and skin of VCA from group 1 showed few infiltrating cells compared to extensive infiltrates in biopsies of VCA from group 2. Compared to autologous skin and muscle, elevated levels of CD3+ FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells were found in skin and muscle obtained from VCA of HCT recipients. All group 1 animals were tolerant to their donor skin graft and promptly rejected the third-part skin grafts. Conclusion These data demonstrated donor specific tolerance to all components of the VCA can be established through simultaneous nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT and VCA transplant protocol. PMID:24918616

  11. Methotrexate and bone marrow metaphases.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, J J; Potter, A M; Watmore, A E; Winfield, D A

    1988-07-15

    The efficacy of a methotrexate (MTX) block/thymidine release synchronization technique has been assessed in bone marrow cultures from patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia and myelodysplasia. In contrast to cultures of stimulated lymphocytes from normal individuals, no improvement in mitotic index (MI) or metaphase quality could be detected using this technique. Demonstration of an unchanged level of division in bone marrow cultures in the presence of MTX suggests that the technique is unsuitable for synchronization purposes in this tissue. The influence of preincubation prior to MTX exposure and duration of exposure to colcemid on MI and metaphase quality have also been examined.

  12. Adenosine triphosphate-competitive mTOR inhibitors: a new class of immunosuppressive agents that inhibit allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Rosborough, B R; Raïch-Regué, D; Liu, Q; Venkataramanan, R; Turnquist, H R; Thomson, A W

    2014-09-01

    The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is inhibited clinically to suppress T cell function and prevent allograft rejection. mTOR is the kinase subunit of two mTOR-containing complexes, mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and 2. Although mTORC1 is inhibited by the macrolide immunosuppressant rapamycin (RAPA), its efficacy may be limited by its inability to block mTORC1 completely and its limited effect on mTORC2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive mTOR inhibitors are an emerging class of mTOR inhibitors that compete with ATP at the mTOR active site and inhibit any mTOR-containing complex. Since this class of compounds has not been investigated for their immunosuppressive potential, our goal was to determine the influence of a prototypic ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor on allograft survival. AZD8055 proved to be a potent suppressor of T cell proliferation. Moreover, a short, 10-day course of the agent successfully prolonged murine MHC-mismatched, vascularized heart transplant survival. This therapeutic effect was associated with increased graft-infiltrating regulatory T cells and reduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell interferon-γ production. These studies establish for the first time, that ATP-competitive mTOR inhibition can prolong organ allograft survival and warrant further investigation of this next generation mTOR inhibitors. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Ex vivo expanded human regulatory T cells can prolong survival of a human islet allograft in a humanized mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Douglas C; Hester, Joanna; Nadig, Satish N; Zhang, Wei; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Gray, Derek; Hughes, Stephen; Johnson, Paul; Wood, Kathryn J

    2013-10-27

    Human regulatory T cells (Treg) offer an attractive adjunctive therapy to reduce current reliance on lifelong, nonspecific immunosuppression after transplantation. Here, we evaluated the ability of ex vivo expanded human Treg to prevent the rejection of islets of Langerhans in a humanized mouse model and examined the mechanisms involved. We engrafted human pancreatic islets of Langerhans into the renal subcapsular space of immunodeficient BALB/c.rag2(-/-).cγ(-/-) mice, previously rendered diabetic via injection of the β-cell toxin streptozocin. After the establishment of stable euglycemia, mice were reconstituted with allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant alloreactive response studied. Ex vivo expanded CD25high CD4+ human Treg, which expressed FoxP3, CTLA-4, and CD62L and remained CD127low, were then cotransferred together with human PBMC and islet allografts and monitored for evidence of rejection. Human islets transplanted into diabetic immunodeficient mice reversed diabetes but were rejected rapidly after the mice were reconstituted with allogeneic human PBMC. Cotransfer of purified, ex vivo expanded human Treg prolonged islet allograft survival resulting in the accumulation of Treg in the peripheral lymphoid tissue and suppression of proliferation and interferon-γ production by T cells. In vitro, Treg suppressed activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription and inhibited the effector differentiation of responder T cells. Ex vivo expanded Treg retain regulatory activity in vivo, can protect a human islet allograft from rejection by suppressing signal transducers and activators of transcription activation and inhibiting T-cell differentiation, and have clinical potential as an adjunctive cellular therapy.

  14. The effect of decellularization of tracheal allografts on leukocyte infiltration and of recellularization on regulatory T cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Haykal, Siba; Zhou, Yingzhe; Marcus, Paula; Salna, Michael; Machuca, Tiago; Hofer, Stefan O P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2013-07-01

    Tracheal transplantation without immunosuppressive therapy has been accomplished with a tissue-engineering approach using decellularized biological scaffolds in combination with recipient progenitor cells. The mechanisms of immune response directed towards these tracheal allografts have not been fully determined. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity of these grafts at the protein level, and functionally, in vitro and in vivo in a large animal model. Long-segment circumferential tracheal allografts were decellularized using two different protocols and recellularized using recipient mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and tracheal epithelial progenitor cells (TEC). Residual MHCI and MHCII immunostaining was found surrounding the submucosal glands despite cyclical decellularization. In an in vitro lymphocyte proliferation assay, CD4+ T cells continued to proliferate on decellularized pieces and this proliferation was inhibited by co-culture with autologous MSC. Allografts were heterotopically transplanted under a muscle flap in the neck of the recipients and decellularization was found to delay leukocyte infiltration but resulted in eventual cartilage degradation. Recellularization prevented this infiltration up to 3 weeks post-transplantation and allowed for preservation of the cartilage. The immune cells found within these grafts included a significant number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Furthermore, gene expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β1, involved in proliferation, differentiation and function of regulatory T cells was found in these grafts. These results indicate that the immunological modification induced by recellularized tracheal scaffolds is an active process involving the recruitment of immunosuppressive cells, rather than simply the removal of donor-derived antigenic components.

  15. Bone Marrow Adipocytes Facilitate Fatty Acid Oxidation Activating AMPK and a Transcriptional Network Supporting Survival of Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Saitoh, Kaori; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Mogushi, Kaoru; Shikami, Masato; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ishizawa, Jo; Hail, Numsen; Kazuno, Saiko; Igarashi, Mamoru; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Yasunari; Arai, Hajime; Nagaoka, Isao; Miida, Takashi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2017-03-15

    Leukemia cells in the bone marrow must meet the biochemical demands of increased cell proliferation and also survive by continually adapting to fluctuations in nutrient and oxygen availability. Thus, targeting metabolic abnormalities in leukemia cells located in the bone marrow is a novel therapeutic approach. In this study, we investigated the metabolic role of bone marrow adipocytes in supporting the growth of leukemic blasts. Prevention of nutrient starvation-induced apoptosis of leukemic cells by bone marrow adipocytes, as well as the metabolic and molecular mechanisms involved in this process, was investigated using various analytic techniques. In acute monocytic leukemia (AMoL) cells, the prevention of spontaneous apoptosis by bone marrow adipocytes was associated with an increase in fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) along with the upregulation of PPARγ, FABP4, CD36, and BCL2 genes. In AMoL cells, bone marrow adipocyte coculture increased adiponectin receptor gene expression and its downstream target stress response kinase AMPK, p38 MAPK with autophagy activation, and upregulated antiapoptotic chaperone HSPs. Inhibition of FAO disrupted metabolic homeostasis, increased reactive oxygen species production, and induced the integrated stress response mediator ATF4 and apoptosis in AMoL cells cocultured with bone marrow adipocytes. Our results suggest that bone marrow adipocytes support AMoL cell survival by regulating their metabolic energy balance and that the disruption of FAO in bone marrow adipocytes may be an alternative, novel therapeutic strategy for AMoL therapy. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1453-64. ©2017 AACR.

  16. Blood and Bone MarrowTransplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as hematopoietic stem cell ... autologous transplant, or allogeneic transplant. A blood or bone marrow transplant replaces abnormal blood-forming stem cells ...

  17. Mechanisms of Donor-Specific Tolerance in Recipients of Haploidentical Combined Bone Marrow/Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Andreola, G.; Chittenden, M.; Shaffer, J.; Cosimi, A.B.; Kawai, T.; Cotter, P.; LoCascio, S.A.; Morokata, T.; Dey, B.R.; Tolkoff-Rubin, N.T.; Preffer, F.; Bonnefoix, T.; Kattleman, K.; Spitzer, T.R.; Sachs, D.H.; Sykes, M.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported long-term organ allograft survival without ongoing immunosuppression in 4 of 5 patients receiving combined kidney and bone marrow transplantation from haploidentical donors following non-myeloablative conditioning. In vitro assays up to 18 months revealed donor-specific unresponsiveness. We now demonstrate that T cell recovery is gradual and is characterized by memory-type cell predominance and an increased proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127−FOXP3+ Treg during the lymphopenic period. Complete donor-specific unresponsiveness in proliferative and cytotoxic assays, and in limiting dilution analyses of IL-2-producing and cytotoxic cells, developed and persisted for the 3-year follow-up in all patients, and extended to donor renal tubular epithelial cells. Assays in 2 of 4 patients were consistent with a role for a suppressive tolerance mechanism at 6 months to 1 year, but later (≥18 months) studies on all 4 patients provided no evidence for a suppressive mechanism. Our studies demonstrate, for the first time, long-term, systemic donor-specific unresponsiveness in patients with HLA-mismatched allograft tolerance. While regulatory cells may play an early role, long-term tolerance appears to be maintained by a deletion or anergy mechanism. PMID:21645255

  18. Primary cutaneous aspergillosis and idiopathic bone marrow aplasia*

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Karina Colossi; Pires, Mario Cezar; Kakizaki, Priscila; Chartuni, Juliana Cabral Nunes; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 9-year-old boy with idiopathic bone marrow aplasia and severe neutropenia, who developed skin ulcers under cardiac monitoring electrodes. The diagnosis of primary cutaneous aspergillosis was made after the second biopsy and culture. Imaging investigation did not reveal internal fungal infection. The child was treated, but did not improve and died 3 months after admission. The report highlights and discusses the preventable risk of aspergillus skin infection in immunocompromised patients. PMID:27438213

  19. Three-Dimensional Virtual Bone Bank System Workflow for Structural Bone Allograft Selection: A Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, German Luis; Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ayerza, Miguel Angel; Muscolo, Domingo Luis

    2013-01-01

    Structural bone allograft has been used in bone defect reconstruction during the last fifty years with acceptable results. However, allograft selection methods were based on 2-dimensional templates using X-rays. Thanks to preoperative planning platforms, three-dimensional (3D) CT-derived bone models were used to define size and shape comparison between host and donor. The purpose of this study was to describe the workflow of this virtual technique in order to explain how to choose the best allograft using a virtual bone bank system. We measured all bones in a 3D virtual environment determining the best match. The use of a virtual bone bank system has allowed optimizing the allograft selection in a bone bank, providing more information to the surgeons before surgery. In conclusion, 3D preoperative planning in a virtual environment for allograft selection is an important and helpful tool in order to achieve a good match between host and donor. PMID:23690733

  20. Endocrine function after immunosuppression of pancreatic allograft by ionizing irradiation in the primate

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; Du Toit, L.B.

    1986-05-01

    The object of this preliminary study was to evaluate the endocrine function after heterotopic intraperitoneal segmental pancreatic allotransplantation with unligated duct in irradiated, totally pancreatectomized primates. All allograft recipients received, pre- and peroperative donor-specific blood transfusions and peroperative external irradiation from a linear accelerator; 200 rads was administered weekly and increased to a total dose of 1,500 rads. Pancreatic transplantation was performed between 2 and 6 weeks after completion of irradiation and preoperative blood transfusions. As previously reported, only minimal pancreatic allograft survival was achieved following preoperative irradiation. One recipient remained normoglycaemic for greater than 100 days after transplantation, the longest surviving pancreatic allograft recipient reported from this laboratory. Intravenous glucose tolerance test results in this recipient revealed normoglycaemia, reduced K-value, hypoinsulinaemia, normal glucagon response, reduced C-peptide values, and moderate glucose intolerance. Aortography and electron-microscopic examination of allograft biopsy tissue confirmed the presence of a functioning allograft.

  1. Results of 32 Allograft-prosthesis Composite Reconstructions of the Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Larousserie, Frédérique; Thévenin, Fabrice; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Anract, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The use of allograft-prosthesis composites for reconstruction after bone tumor resection at the proximal femur has generated considerable interest since the mid1980s on the basis that their use would improve function and survival, and restore bone stock. Although functional improvement has been documented, it is unknown whether these composites survive long periods and whether they restore bone stock. We therefore determined long-term allograft-prosthesis composite survival, identified major complications that led to revision, and determined whether allograft bone stock could be spared at the time of revision. We also compared the radiographic appearance of allografts sterilized by gamma radiation and fresh-frozen allografts. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with bone malignancy in the proximal femur who underwent reconstruction with a cemented allograft-prosthesis composite. The allograft-prosthesis composite was a primary reconstruction for 23 patients and a revision procedure for nine. The minimum followup was 2 months (median, 68 months; range, 2–232 months). The cumulative incidence of revision for any reason was 14% at 5 years (95% confidence interval, 1%–28%) and 19% at 10 years (95% confidence interval, 3%–34%). Nine patients (28%) had revision of the reconstruction during followup; four of these patients had revision surgery for infection. Allografts sterilized by gamma radiation showed worse resorption than fresh-frozen allografts. Based on reported results, allograft-composite prostheses do not appear to improve survival compared with megaprostheses. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19851817

  2. First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis Technique With Interposition Allograft Bone Block.

    PubMed

    Luk, Pamela C; Johnson, Jeffrey E; McCormick, Jeremy J; Klein, Sandra E

    2015-08-01

    We present a technique of first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis utilizing an interposition allograft bone block with a bipolar reaming technique that creates congruent fusion surfaces on both ends of the graft-host bone interface. In addition, we examined the union rates, fusion position, patient satisfaction, and functional outcome of this technique. Fifteen patients underwent first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis with an interposition allograft bone block between September 2004 and October 2013. Charts and radiographs were reviewed. Six measures were compared on preoperative and postoperative radiographs. Clinical outcomes were measured using a telephone questionnaire, pre- and postoperative visual analog scale pain scale, and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. Average follow-up was 46 weeks (range, 19 to 97). Thirteen of 15 (87%) patients achieved bony union at an average of 21 weeks. One patient underwent revision arthrodesis for their nonunion. Symptomatic hardware was removed in 3 cases. Improvement was noted in visual analog scale pain scores (6 to 2) and functional scores as measured by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. There were no postoperative wound complications or infections. Average length of the first ray on anteroposterior radiograph increased from 10.7 to 11.3 cm and from 10.0 to 10.7 cm on the lateral radiograph. Thirteen of 14 patients were very satisfied or satisfied. One patient expressed dissatisfaction with the procedure. One patient was not available for clinical follow-up. First metatarsophalangeal joint allograft bone block arthrodesis using the bipolar reaming technique achieved high bony union rates and satisfactory radiographic and clinical outcomes. This procedure was an effective salvage option for managing bone loss on 1 or both sides of the joint. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Autoantibodies to Vimentin Cause Accelerated Rejection of Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Leong, Hon-Sing; McCormack, Ann; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Holder, Angela; Rose, Marlene L.

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune responses to vimentin occur after solid organ transplantation, but their pathogenic effects are unclear. The aim of these studies was to investigate the effects of vimentin preimmunization on allogeneic and isografted hearts in a murine transplant model. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with murine vimentin in complete Freund’s adjuvant resulted in anti-vimentin antibodies and vimentin-reactive Th-1 cells. Transplantation of 129/sv hearts into vimentin-immunized C57BL/6 recipients resulted in accelerated rejection (8.4 ± 1.5 days; n = 18), compared with hen egg lysozyme-immunized C57BL/6 (13.3 ± 2.2 days; n = 10; P < 0.0001, log-rank test). In contrast, isografts continued to beat beyond 90 days. Immunohistochemical analysis of allografts from vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant mice demonstrated increased numbers of T cells and enhanced microvascular deposition of C3d, CD41, and P-selectin compared with controls. Antibodies were necessary for accelerated rejection, shown by the fact that vimentin-immunized B-cell-deficient IgH6 mice did not show accelerated rejection of 129/sv allografts, but rejection was restored by adoptive transfer of serum containing anti-vimentin antibodies. Eluates from donor hearts placed in vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant recipients contained anti-vimentin antibodies, shown by Western blotting. Confocal imaging of rejected hearts demonstrated presence of vimentin and C3d on apoptosed leukocytes, endothelial cells, and platelet/leukocyte conjugates. These results demonstrate that autoantibodies to vimentin, in conjunction with the alloimmune response, have a pathogenic role in allograft rejection. PMID:17392180

  4. Injury-induced allograft rejection: A rendezvous with evolution.

    PubMed

    Land, Walter G

    2013-01-01

    Modern immunology, in many ways, is based on three major paradigms: the clonal selection theory, the pattern recognition theory, and the danger/injury theory. The last theory holds that any cell stress and tissue injury, including allograft injury, via induction of damage-associated molecular patterns, induces immunity, including alloimmunity, leading to allograft rejection. On the other hand, the concept precludes that non-self per se induces immunity as proposed by the two former theories. Recently, the danger/injury model has gained considerable acceptance by immunologists, in particular as promoted by new insights into the function of the mammalian gut microbiota, representing a huge assemblage of non-self. Harboring microbiota by hosts is characterized by the fact that harmless noninjurious commensal microbes are protected by innate immunity-based tolerance, whereas intestinal injury-causing pathogenic microbes are immunologically attacked. Plausibility and validity of the danger/injury concept is stringently supported by observations of similar phenomena across the tree of life: the ability of the immune system to discriminate between harmful life-threatening non-self to induce immunity and harmless beneficial non-self to induce tolerance has apparently emerged during evolution. Immune defense responses to injuring/injured non-self (e.g., as reflected by plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses on one hand, and allograft rejection on the other hand) as well as immunity-controlled protection of beneficial non-self (e.g., as reflected by microbiota and the fetus of placental mammals) are processes in the interest of evolution and, thus, evolved under pressure across the phylogenetic tree.

  5. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy.

  6. Heart transplantation using allografts from older donors: Multicenter study results.

    PubMed

    Roig, Eulàlia; Almenar, Luís; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa; Segovia, Javier; Mirabet, Sònia; Delgado, Juan; Pérez-Villa, Felix; Luís Lambert, Jose; Teresa Blasco, M; Muñiz, Javier

    2015-06-01

    The lengthy waiting time for heart transplantation is associated with high mortality. To increase the number of donors, new strategies have emerged, including the use of hearts from donors ≥50 years old. However, this practice remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of patients receiving heart transplants from older donors. We retrospectively analyzed 2,102 consecutive heart transplants in 8 Spanish hospitals from 1998 to 2010. Acute and overall mortality were compared in patients with grafts from donors ≥50 years old versus grafts from younger donors. There were 1,758 (84%) transplanted grafts from donors < 50 years old (Group I) and 344 (16%) from donors ≥50 years old (Group II). Group I had more male donors than Group II (71% vs. 57%, p = 0.0001). The incidence of cardiovascular risk factors was higher in older donors. There were no differences in acute mortality or acute rejection episodes between the 2 groups. Global mortality was higher in Group II (rate ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.67; p = 0.001) than in Group I. After adjusting for donor cause of death, donor smoking history, recipient age, induction therapy, and cyclosporine therapy, the differences lost significance. Group II had a higher incidence of coronary allograft vasculopathy at 5 years (rate ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.27; p = 0.001). There were no differences in acute and overall mortality after adjusting for confounding factors. However, there was a midterm increased risk of coronary allograft vasculopathy with the use of older donors. Careful selection of recipients and close monitoring of coronary allograft vasculopathy are warranted in these patients. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Meniscal Allograft Interposition Combined with Proximal Row Carpectomy.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Murphy M; Willsey, Matthew R; Werner, Frederick W; Harley, Brian J; Klein, Shay; Setter, Kevin J

    2017-02-01

    Background Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is contraindicated in wrists with preexisting arthritis of the proximal capitate or radiolunate fossa. Patients with these conditions frequently pursue wrist arthrodesis with its associated functional limitations. Questions/Purposes The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of using lateral meniscal allograft interposition (LMAI), in combination with PRC, in patients with symptomatic wrist arthritis. The primary question is whether this allograft will allow wrist function comparable to that in patients having only a PRC. A secondary question was to determine the short-term longevity of the allograft. Patients/Method Between 2006 and 2012, nine wrists underwent PRC with LMAI. Patient demographics and rates of complication or graft failure were determined. During independent clinical exams, functional outcomes were reviewed, patients completed a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores, and radiographs were taken. Results Four patients met the inclusion criteria, having clinical follow-up at an average of 4.2 years. DASH scores at the time of follow-up ranged from 9 to 33, with an average of 24. Average radiocapitate joint space in the first postoperative radiograph was 2.8 mm compared with 1.8 mm at the time of final follow-up. No wrists went on to arthrodesis. Conclusion Early outcomes of PRC with LMAI are comparable to those results found in the literature of PRC alone. LMAI with PRC may be a valid short-term option as a motion-preserving procedure in those patients contraindicated to having a PRC alone. Level of Evidence Level IV.

  8. Structural features of bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Anatolii; Lyndina, Yuliia; Sikora, Vladyslav; Lyndin, Mykola; Karpenko, Ludmyla; Gladchenko, Oksana; Masalitin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article is devoted to the investigation of the structural features of the bone marrow of mature rats. Materials and methods The investigation of the structural features of the bone marrow was performed on the femurs of the mature male rats. General structure of the organ was studied with hematoxylin–eosin and Van Gieson staining of samples. Certain features of the bone marrow structure were studied using immunohistochemical method (CD3, CD79α, S100, myeloperoxidase, and cyclin D1). Results We can state that stromal–parenchymal structure is typical for the bone marrow of rats as for any other organ. The stromal component is presented with bone tissue (48.8 ± 3.3% at epiphyses), the net of blood vessels (18.7 ± 2.1%), fat tissue (11 ± 2%), fibrous tissue (0.7 ± 0.2%), and the network of reticular fibers. Hematopoietic tissue covers 20.9 ± 3.7% at the femoral epiphyses and 69.6 ± 2.2% at diaphysis. Among these tissues, myelopoiesis occupies 74.2 ± 4.7%, erythropoiesis – 24.3 ± 4.7%, and lymphopoiesis – less than 5%. Megalokaryocytes take 0.1–0.3%. Conclusion Considering the lack of significant anatomical, morphological, and histological differences of red bone marrow of rats and humans, we can state that hematopoiesis in rats takes place on the basis of the same principles as in humans, although it has certain mechanisms. PMID:28203394

  9. Stem cell autograft and allograft in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    De Cata, Angelo; Matarangolo, Angela; Inglese, Michele; Rubino, Rosa; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an insufficiency of immune tolerance and, although treated with a number of useful drugs, may need more unconventional therapeutic strategies for their more severe presentations. Among such unconventional therapeutic approaches, stem cell autograft and allograft have been used, with the aim of stimulating disease remission by modifying the pathogenic mechanisms that induce anomalous responses against self-antigens. Autologous transplantation is performed with the purpose of retuning autoimmune cells, whereas allogeneic transplantation is performed with the purpose of replacing anomalous immune effectors and mediators. In this article, we comprehensively review up-to-date information on the autoimmune diseases for which the transplantation of stem cells is indicated.

  10. Vascularized composite allograft-specific characteristics of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation, or reconstructive transplantation, has revolutionized the treatment of complex tissue and functional defects. Despite arriving during an age in which the immunology of solid organ transplant rejection has been investigated in much detail, these transplants have offered new perspectives from which to explore the immunobiology of transplantation. VCAs have a number of unique molecular, cellular, and architectural features which alter the character and intensity of the rejection response. While much is yet to be clarified, an understanding of these distinct mechanisms affords new possibilities for the control of immune responses in an effort to improve outcomes after VCA transplantation.

  11. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  12. Until they have faces: the ethics of facial allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Agich, G; Siemionow, M

    2005-01-01

    The ethical discussion of facial allograft transplantation (FAT) for severe facial deformity, popularly known as facial transplantation, has been one sided and sensationalistic. It is based on film and fiction rather than science and clinical experience. Based on our experience in developing the first IRB approved protocol for FAT, we critically discuss the problems with this discussion, which overlooks the plight of individuals with severe facial deformities. We discuss why FAT for facial deformity is ethically and surgically justified despite its negative portrayal in the media. PMID:16319234

  13. Until they have faces: the ethics of facial allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Agich, G J; Siemionow, M

    2005-12-01

    The ethical discussion of facial allograft transplantation (FAT) for severe facial deformity, popularly known as facial transplantation, has been one sided and sensationalistic. It is based on film and fiction rather than science and clinical experience. Based on our experience in developing the first IRB approved protocol for FAT, we critically discuss the problems with this discussion, which overlooks the plight of individuals with severe facial deformities. We discuss why FAT for facial deformity is ethically and surgically justified despite its negative portrayal in the media.

  14. Acellular flexor tendon allografts: a new horizon for tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Drake, David B; Tilt, Alexandra C; DeGeorge, Brent R

    2013-12-01

    Flexor tendon injuries continue to pose a significant challenge to the hand surgeon. In particular, chronic tendon ruptures with adhesions of the tendons and sheath, damage or loss of the intrasynovial flexor tendons in zone II, and combined soft tissue and bone injuries present especially difficult problems for restoring satisfactory digital function. This challenge in flexor tendon reconstruction has motivated hand surgeons to explore and develop novel solutions for nearly a century. Recent advances and techniques in processing and decellularizing allograft human flexor tendon constructs may prove to be a new horizon for tendon reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Microvascular transplantation of epiphyseal plates: studies utilizing allograft donor material.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Martin I; Bowen, C Vaughan A

    2007-01-01

    Compromised function of an epiphyseal plate caused by trauma, tumor, infection, or congenital malformation can result in significant musculoskeletal deformity. Techniques used to correct or minimize the extent of these deformities include autogenous or allogeneic cancellous bone grafts, nonvascularized cortical allografts, vascularized bone and composite tissue transfers, and distraction osteogenesis. These solutions are not ideal for children because they do not adequately address the actively growing nature of the extremity. Microvascular techniques have enabled the experimental transplantation of vascularized epiphyseal plates with high levels of postoperative viability and subsequent growth and offer a potential advantage over conventional treatments.

  16. [Gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow].

    PubMed

    Kemona, A; Dziecioł, J; Sulik, M; Brykalska, A; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M; Baltaziak, M

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and histopathologic picture of gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow were analysed in non-selected autopsy material. It was found that gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow occurred in terminal stages of various diseases (malignant neoplasms, chronic inflammation). Histological studies showed that gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow led to atrophy of the hematopoietic and adipose tissues of the bone marrow and accumulation of acid mucopolysaccharides. The patients with gelatinous transformation of the bone marrow exhibit hematologic disorders, most frequently anemia and thrombocytopenia.

  17. Bone marrow and the control of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ende; Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Lin; Kryczek, Ilona; Wu, Ke; Hu, Yu; Wang, Guobin; Zou, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow is thought to be a primary hematopoietic organ. However, accumulated evidences demonstrate that active function and trafficking of immune cells, including regulatory T cells, conventional T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, natural killer T (NKT) cells, neutrophils, myeloid-derived suppressor cells and mesenchymal stem cells, are observed in the bone marrow. Furthermore, bone marrow is a predetermined metastatic location for multiple human tumors. In this review, we discuss the immune network in the bone marrow. We suggest that bone marrow is an immune regulatory organ capable of fine tuning immunity and may be a potential therapeutic target for immunotherapy and immune vaccination. PMID:22020068

  18. Hepatitis B transmission by cell and tissue allografts: How safe is safe enough?

    PubMed Central

    Solves, Pilar; Mirabet, Vicente; Alvarez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    More than 2 million human tissue transplants (bone, tendon, cartilage, skin, cornea, amniotic membrane, stem cells, heart valve, blood vessel, etc.), are performed worldwide every year. Cells and tissues are shared between countries which have different regulations and laboratory equipment and represent a risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission that has become a global safety concern. While the risk of transfusion-transmitted HBV infection from blood donations has been estimated, the rate of HBV transmission from donors to recipients of allografts is unknown and varies between different tissues. There are various important ways of reducing the transmission risk, but donor screening and donor testing are still the main factors for preventing HBV transmission. HBV detection is included in the routine screening tests for cell and tissue donors. The standard test for preventing transplant-transmitted hepatitis B is the hepatitis B surface antigen. The implementation of methods involving nucleic acid amplification and the new generation of reactives to detect viral antibodies or antigens with an immunoassay, has increased the sensitivity and the specificity of the screening tests. The objective of our research was to review the literature and critically analyse the different steps for avoiding HBV transmission in cell and tissue donors, focusing on the screening tests performed. PMID:24966613

  19. Toxoplasma gondii infection in marrow transplant recipients: a 20 year experience.

    PubMed

    Slavin, M A; Meyers, J D; Remington, J S; Hackman, R C

    1994-05-01

    Twelve of 3803 consecutive marrow allograft patients treated at this center over the past 20 years have had a post-transplant tissue diagnosis of toxoplasmosis: 10 at autopsy and 2 by brain biopsy. This infection was identified in none of 509 autologous marrow recipients. Occurrence of toxoplasmosis was 0.31 cases per 100 allogeneic transplants and 1.0 per 100 autopsies. An estimated 15% of allogeneic transplant recipients were seropositive for Toxoplasma gondii and 2% of seropositive patients developed toxoplasmosis. Pre-transplant serology was positive by both dye and agglutination tests in 11 infected patients tested. Sequential IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE antibody titers to T. gondii and the differential agglutination ratio were not helpful in diagnosing toxoplasmosis. Median day of clinical presentation was day 59 post-transplant (35-97 days) and of diagnosis, day 62 after transplant (37-143 days). Eleven patients had graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) of grades II-IV. All 12 patients died. Infection was diagnosed prior to death in only 16% of patients and contributed to death in at least 40%. Histopathology revealed tachyzoites of T. gondii most prevalent in brain (100%), heart (67%) and lungs (33%), and toxoplasma cysts alone in heart (33%) and lungs (22%). Toxoplasma infection was diagnosed in two patients receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis suggesting this was insufficient prophylaxis for toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasmosis appeared to occur by reactivation within the first 6 months after marrow transplant. Infection developed in patients who were seropositive for T. gondii pre-transplant, had received allogeneic marrow and had severe GVHD.

  20. NK026680 inhibits T-cell function in an IL-2-dependent manner and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Susumu; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Goto, Ryoichi; Oura, Tetsu; Wakayama, Kenji; Hirokata, Gentaro; Shibata, Tomohiro; Igarashi, Rumi; Haga, Sanae; Ozaki, Michitaka; Todo, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    NK026680 is a triazolopyrimidine derivative that has been shown to inhibit dendritic cell maturation and activation. Here, we examined the immunosuppressive properties of NK026680 on T-cell function and assessed its immunosuppressive efficacy in an ACI (RT1(av1) haplotype) to Lewis (RT1(l)) rat heart transplantation model. The effects of NK026680 on T-cell proliferation, activation, and cytokine production were investigated in vitro. Heart transplant recipient rats were administered NK026680 daily for 14 days post-transplantation. In addition to graft survival time, alloimmune responses and graft histology at 4-10 days post-transplantation were assessed. NK026680 was found to inhibit proliferation, CD25 upregulation, IL-2 production, and cell cycle progression in αCD3/αCD28-stimulated murine T cells. These effects were likely due to suppression of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and the subsequent inhibition of p65, c-Fos, and to a lesser extent, c-Jun. Daily NK026680 treatment suppressed alloimmune responses, prevented cellular infiltration into allografts, and prolonged graft survival. The anti-rejection effects of NK026680 were enhanced by tacrolimus. In conclusion, NK026680 inhibits the activation of T cells and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats. These features make it a potential candidate immunosuppressant for the treatment of organ transplant patients in the future.