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Sample records for marrow cells lacking

  1. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Udomtanakunchai, Chatchanok; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that high-dose radiation is harmful. However, despite extensive research, assessment of potential health-risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still challenging. Recently, we reported that 0.05 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (the existing limit for radiation-exposure in the workplace) was incapable of inducing significant in vivo genomic instability (measured by the presence of late-occurring chromosomal damage at 6 months post-irradiation) in bone marrow (BM) cells of two mouse strains, one with constitutively high and one with intermediate levels of the repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein-kinase catalytic-subunit (DNA-PKcs). In this study, we present evidence for a lack of genomic instability in BM cells of the severely combined-immunodeficiency (SCID/J) mouse (which has an extremely low-level of DNA-PKcs activity) exposed whole-body to low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy). Together with our previous report, the data indicate that low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy) is incapable of inducing genomic instability in vivo (regardless of the levels of DNA-PKcs activity of the exposed mice), yet higher doses of radiation (0.1 and 1 Gy) do induce genomic instability in mice with intermediate and extremely low-levels of DNA-PKcs activity (indicating an important role of DNA-PKcs in DNA repair). PMID:23549227

  2. Transdifferentiation of autologous bone marrow cells on a collagen-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold for tissue engineering in complete lack of native urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J.; Zeiai, S.; Ekblad, Å.; Nordenskjöld, A.; Hilborn, J.; Götherström, C.; Fossum, M.

    2014-01-01

    Urological reconstructive surgery is sometimes hampered by a lack of tissue. In some cases, autologous urothelial cells (UCs) are not available for cell expansion and ordinary tissue engineering. In these cases, we wanted to explore whether autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow could be used to create urological transplants. MSCs from human bone marrow were cultured in vitro with medium conditioned by normal human UCs or by indirect co-culturing in culture well inserts. Changes in gene expression, protein expression and cell morphology were studied after two weeks using western blot, RT-PCR and immune staining. Cells cultured in standard epithelial growth medium served as controls. Bone marrow MSCs changed their phenotype with respect to growth characteristics and cell morphology, as well as gene and protein expression, to a UC lineage in both culture methods, but not in controls. Urothelial differentiation was also accomplished in human bone marrow MSCs seeded on a three-dimensional poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)–collagen construct. Human MSCs could easily be harvested by bone marrow aspiration and expanded and differentiated into urothelium. Differentiation could take place on a three-dimensional hybrid PCL-reinforced collagen-based scaffold for creation of a tissue-engineered autologous transplant for urological reconstructive surgery. PMID:24789561

  3. Systematic analysis of reportedly distinct populations of multipotent bone marrow-derived stem cells reveals a lack of distinction.

    PubMed

    Lodie, Tracey A; Blickarz, Courtney E; Devarakonda, Tara J; He, Chufa; Dash, Ajeeta B; Clarke, Jennifer; Gleneck, Kristen; Shihabuddin, Lamya; Tubo, Ross

    2002-10-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells, having the ability to differentiate into cells of multiple lineages, have been isolated and propagated by varied protocols, including positive (CD105(+))/negative (CD45(-)GlyA(-)) selection with immunomagnetic beads, or direct plating into selective culture media. Each substratum-adherent cell population was subjected to a systematic analysis of their cell surface markers and differentiation potential. In the initial stages of culture, each cell population proliferated slowly, reaching confluence in 10-14 days. Adherent cells proliferated at similar rates whether cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor, medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, or medium containing 10% FBS alone. Cell surface marker analysis revealed that more than 95% of the cells were positive for CD105/endoglin, a putative mesenchymal stem cell marker, and negative for CD34, CD31, and CD133, markers of hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem cells, respectively, regardless of cell isolation and propagation method. CD44 expression was variable, apparently dependent on serum concentration. Functional similarity of the stem cell populations was also observed, with each different cell population expressing the cell type-specific markers beta-tubulin, type II collagen, and desmin, and demonstrating endothelial tube formation when cultured under conditions favoring neural, cartilage, muscle, and endothelial cell differentiation, respectively. On the basis of these data, adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells cultured in adherent monolayer are virtually indistinguishable, both physically and functionally, regardless of the method of isolation or proliferative expansion.

  4. Bone Marrow Derived Kit-positive Cells Colonize the Gut but Fail to Restore Pacemaker Function in Intestines Lacking Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Conor J; Hwang, Sung-Jin; Hennig, Grant W; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Several motility disorders are associated with disruption of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), which provide important functions, such as pacemaker activity, mediation of neural inputs and responses to stretch in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Restoration of ICC networks may be therapeutic for GI motor disorders. Recent reports have suggested that Kit+ cells can be restored to the GI tract via bone marrow (BM) transplantation. We tested whether BM derived cells can lead to generation of functional activity in intestines naturally lacking ICC. Methods BM cells from Kit+/copGFP mice, in which ICC are labeled with a green fluorescent protein, were transplanted into W/WV intestines, lacking ICC. After 12 weeks the presence of ICC was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and functional analysis of electrical behavior and contractile properties. Results After 12 weeks copGFP+ BM derived cells were found within the myenteric region of intestines from W/WV mice, typically populated by ICC. Kit+ cells failed to develop interconnections typical of ICC in the myenteric plexus. The presence of Kit+ cells was verified with Western analysis. BM cells failed to populate the region of the deep muscular plexus where normal ICC density, associated with the deep muscular plexus, is found in W/WV mice. Engraftment of Kit+-BM cells resulted in the development of unitary potentials in transplanted muscles, but slow wave activity failed to develop. Motility analysis showed that intestinal movements in transplanted animals were abnormal and similar to untransplanted W/WV intestines. Conclusions BM derived Kit+ cells colonized the gut after BM transplantation, however these cells failed to develop the morphology and function of mature ICC. PMID:24847840

  5. Lack of estrogen down-regulates CXCR4 expression on Treg cells and reduces Treg cell population in bone marrow in OVX mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, X-L; Duan, X-B; Chen, Z-H; Li, M; Xu, J-S; Ding, G-M

    2015-05-08

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) is the most common metabolic bone disease in women after menopausal. Recent works focused on cross—talk between immune regulation and bone metabolism pathways and suggested Treg cells suppressed bone resorption and osteoclasts (OC) differentiation in bone marrow via cell—cell contact interaction and/or secreting of IL—10 and TGF—beta. In this study, we investigated the impact of estrogen on regulatory T cells (Treg cells) trafficking and staying in bone marrow and we found that a significant reduction of Treg cell population in bone marrow in estrogen deficiency ovariectomied (OVX) mice. We then studied the expressions of chemokines CXCL12/CXCR4 axes, which were critical to Treg cells migration and our data show the expression of CXCR4 on Treg cells was relative with oestrogen in vivo, however, the expression of CXCL12 was not. Furthermore, the loss of trafficking ability of Treg cells in OVX mice was recoverable in our system. These findings may mechanistically explain why Treg cells lose their suppressive functions on the regulation of OC cells and demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for estrogen, which may be critical to the novel therapy in clinical practice of PMO patients.

  6. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Evidence for a donor cell population which increases allogeneic chimerism but which lacks the potential to produce GVHD

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sheard, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of alloengraftment present major obstacles to the application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across complete MHC barriers. The addition of syngeneic T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) to untreated fully allogeneic marrow inocula in lethally irradiated mice has been previously shown to provide protection from GVHD. We have used this model to study the effects of allogeneic T cells on levels of chimerism in recipients of mixed marrow inocula. The results indicate that T cells in allogeneic BM inocula eliminate both coadministered recipient-strain and radioresistant host hematopoietic elements to produce complete allogeneic chimerism without clinical GVHD. To determine the role of GVH reactivity in this phenomenon, we performed similar studies in an F1 into parent combination, in which the genetic potential for GVHD is lacking. The presence of T cells in F1 marrow inocula led to predominant repopulation with F1 lymphocytes in such chimeras, even when coadministered with TCD-recipient-strain BM. These results imply that the ability of allogeneic BM cells removed by T cell depletion to increase levels of allochimerism may be mediated by a population which is distinct from that which produces GVHD. These results may have implications for clinical BM transplantation.

  7. Lack of galectin-3 increases Jagged1/Notch activation in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and promotes dysregulation of T helper cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Fermino, Marise L; Dylon, L Sebastian D; Cecílio, Nerry T; Santos, Sofia N; Toscano, Marta A; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Roque-Barreira, Maria C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Bernardes, Emerson S

    2016-08-01

    Galectin-3, an endogenous glycan-binding protein, is abundantly expressed at sites of inflammation and immune cell activation. Although this lectin has been implicated in the control of T helper (Th) polarization, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous galectin-3 during the course of experimental Leishmania major infection using galectin-3-deficient (Lgals3(-/-)) mice in a BALB/c background and the involvement of Notch signaling pathway in this process. Lgals3(-/-) mice displayed an augmented, although mixed Th1/Th2 responses compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Concomitantly, lymph node and footpad lesion cells from infected Lgals3(-/-) mice showed enhanced levels of Notch signaling components (Notch-1, Jagged1, Jagged2 and Notch target gene Hes-1). Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from uninfected Lgals3(-/-) mice also displayed increased expression of the Notch ligands Delta-like-4 and Jagged1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, activation of Notch signaling in BMDCs upon stimulation with Jagged1 was more pronounced in Lgals3(-/-) BMDCs compared to WT BMDCs; this condition resulted in increased production of IL-6 by Lgals3(-/-) BMDCs. Finally, addition of exogenous galectin-3 to Lgals3(-/-) BMDCs partially reverted the increased sensitivity to Jagged1 stimulation. Our results suggest that endogenous galectin-3 regulates Notch signaling activation in BMDCs and influences polarization of T helper responses, thus increasing susceptibility to L. major infection.

  8. Lack of cardiac nerve sprouting after intramyocardial transplantation of bone marrow-derived stem cells in a swine model of chronic ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Lai, Wing-Hon; Liao, Song-Yan; Siu, Chung-Wah; Yang, Yan-Zong; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2012-06-01

    Previous experimental studies suggested that mesenchymal stem cell transplantation causes cardiac nerve sprouting; however, whether bone marrow (BM)-derived mononuclear cells (MNC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) can also lead to cardiac nerve sprouting and alter gap junction expression remains unclear. We investigated the effect of electroanatomical mapping-guided direct intramyocardial transplantation of BM-MNC (n = 8) and CD31+EPC (n = 8) compared with saline control (n = 8) on cardiac nerve sprouting and gap junction expression in a swine model of chronic ischemic myocardium. At 12 weeks after transplantation, the distribution and density of cardiac nerve sprouting were determined by staining of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and growth associated protein 43(GAP-43) and expression of connexin 43 in the targeted ischemic and remote normal myocardium. After 12 weeks, no animal developed sudden death after the transplantation. There were no significant differences in the number of cells with positive staining of TH and GAP-43 in the ischemic and normal myocardium between three groups. Furthermore, expression of connexin 43 was also similar in the ischemic and normal myocardia in each group of animals (P > 0.05). The results of this study demonstrated that intramyocardial BM-derived MNC or EPC transplantation in a large animal model of chronic myocardial ischemia was not associated with increased cardiac nerve sprouting over the ischemic myocardium.

  9. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  10. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  11. Bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, Diane S

    2008-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived cells can take on the phenotype of epithelial cells and express epithelial-specific genes in multiple organs. Here, we focus on recent data on the appearance of marrow-derived epithelial cells in the adult lung. These findings have garnered significant skepticism because in most cases marrow-derived epithelial cells are very rare, the marrow cell of origin is not known, the techniques for detection have needed improvement, and there seem to be multiple mechanisms by which this occurs. Recent studies have focused on these concerns. Once these important concerns are addressed, further studies on the function(s) of these cells will need to be performed to determine whether this engraftment has any clinical significance-either beneficial or detrimental.

  12. What Is a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as hematopoietic stem cell transplant, hematopoietic cell transplant, autologous transplant, or allogeneic ... or bone marrow transplant replaces abnormal blood-forming stem cells with healthy cells. When the healthy stem cells ...

  13. Bone marrow cells and myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Trester, Cathy

    2004-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) plasticity and its clinical application have been studied profoundly in the past few years. Recent investigations indicate that HSC and other bone marrow stem cells can develop into other tissues. Because of the high morbidity and mortality of myocardial infarction and other heart disorders, myocardial regeneration is a good example of the clinical application of HSC plasticity in regenerative medicine. Preclinical studies in animals suggest that the use of this kind of treatment can reconstruct heart blood vessels, muscle, and function. Some clinical study results have been reported in the past 2 years. In 2003, reports of myocardial regeneration treatment increased significantly. Other studies include observations on the cell surface markers of transplanted cells and treatment efficacy. Some investigations, such as HSC testing, have focused on clinical applications using HSC plasticity and bone marrow transplantation to treat different types of disorders. In this review, we focus on the clinical application of bone marrow cells for myocardial regeneration.

  14. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  15. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  16. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-06-12

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide.

  17. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-01-01

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide. PMID:25916827

  18. Evidence for transdifferentiation of human bone marrow-derived stem cells: recent progress and controversies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Helen; Ma, David D F

    2003-02-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived stem cells have traditionally been known as tissue-specific stem cells capable of producing blood cells. This concept is being challenged by a series of recent discoveries. It has been demonstrated that there are heterogeneous stem cell populations in adult bone marrow compartment. Under appropriate experimental conditions, a certain type of bone marrow stem cells appears to differentiate (or transdifferentiate) into a variety of non-haemopoietic cells of ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal origins (such as myocytes, neural cells and hepatocytes). The plasticity, that is, the ability to regenerate cells belonging to different organs and tissues of adult (postnatal) stem cells, has raised the therapeutic possibility of using these stem cells for tissue repair and regeneration. Presently, definitive evidence for plasticity or transdifferentiation of bone marrow stem cells is lacking. Despite controversies concerning the plasticity of bone marrow-derived stem cells, early clinical trials are being conducted in patients suffering from myocardial infarct, arthritic and neurological diseases using autologous bone marrow stem cells. This review summarises recent progresses and controversies in transdifferentiation of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells to non-haemopoietic tissues.

  19. Mobilised bone marrow-derived cells accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Sun, Yu; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Ji, Shi-Zhao; Han, Shu; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2013-08-01

    Massive skin defects caused by severe burn and trauma are a clinical challenge to surgeons. Timely and effective wound closure is often hindered by the lack of skin donor site. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) have been shown to 'differentiate' into multiple tissue cells. In this study we focused on the direct manipulation of endogenous BMDCs, avoiding the immunocompatibility issues and complicated cell isolation, purification, identification and amplification procedures in vitro on wound repair. We found that mobilisation of the BMDCs into the circulation significantly increased the amount of BMDCs at the injury site which in turn accelerated healing of large open wound. We used a chimeric green fluorescent protein (GFP) mouse model to track BMDCs and to investigate their role in full-thickness skin excisional wounds. We have shown that bone marrow mobilisation by granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) exerted multiple beneficial effects on skin repair, both by increasing the engraftment of BMDCs into the skin to differentiate into multiple skin cell types and by upregulating essential cytokine mRNAs critical to wound repair. The potential trophic effects of G-CSF on bone marrow stem cells to accelerate wound healing could have a significant clinical impact.

  20. Role of T cells in sex differences in syngeneic bone marrow transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Raveche, E.S.; Santoro, T.; Brecher, G.; Tjio, J.H.

    1985-11-01

    Transferred marrow cells will proliferate in normal mice not exposed to irradiation or any other type of stem cell depletion when five consecutive transfers of 40 million cells are given. Approximately 25% of the mitotic cells are of male donor origin observed cytogenetically in all of the female recipient spleens and marrow analyzed from two weeks to one and one-half years after transfusions. Male donor stem cells are accepted and form a stable component of the self-renewing stem cell pool. In contrast, only 5% female cells are found in male recipients. This sex difference in engraftment is not hormonal since castration of recipients does not alter the percentage of donor cells. Rigorous T depletion of female donor bone marrow, however, increases the percentage of donor engraftment to the level observed when male marrow, either whole or T depleted, is transferred to female recipients. The success of T-depleted female stem cells to seed male recipients is observed in both C57BL/6 and CBA/J. In addition, recipient nude BALB/c males, which lack a thymus, fail to accept whole bone marrow from BALB/c females. However, male bone marrow cells seed BALB/c nude females. These studies demonstrate that the poor engraftment of female cells in transfused male recipients is abrogated by the removal of T cells from the donor female marrow.

  1. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cell cultivation in vitro on decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Timothy F; French, Samuel W

    2010-02-01

    The in vitro biocompatibility of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix was evaluated. Following a freeze-thaw cycle, sectioned discs of fresh frozen rat metaphyseal bone were sequentially incubated in solutions of hypertonic, then hypotonic Ringer's solution, followed by deoxycholic acid, then DNAase I. The adequacy of decellularization of marrow stroma was examined by light microscopy. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cells were harvested by dispersion of rat long bone marrow, followed by concentration by discontinuous Ficoll-Paque gradient centrifugation. The fibroblastic cells were expanded by in vitro cultivation, and second passage cells were cryopreserved until needed. Cryopreserved marrow stromal cells were applied dropwise to sections of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix, and cultured in BJGb medium with 20% fetal bovine serum for ten days. Mature cultures were formalin fixed, decalcified, and embedded in paraffin. Light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections showed individual spindle cells invading the upper portion of the decellularized extracellular matrix, and also a monolayer of spindle cells on the upper surfaces of exposed trabecular and cortical bone. This experiment showed that decellularized marrow extracellular matrix is a biocompatible three dimensional in vitro substrate for marrow stromal fibroblastic cells.

  2. Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, B.; Andreeff, M.; Li, D.

    1983-11-01

    Cell survival kinetics in both peripheral blood and in bone marrow have been studied over the time course of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Our unique TBI regimen allows the study of the in vivo radiation effect uncomplicated by prior cyclophosphamide, since this agent is given after TBI in our cytoreduction scheme. Peripheral blood cell concentrations were monitored with conventional laboratory cell counts and differentials. Absolute bone marrow cell concentrations were monitored by measuring cell concentrations in an aspirate sample and correcting for dilution with blood by a cell cycle kinetic method using cytofluorometry. For lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients in remission, the effective D/sub 0/ ranged from 373 rad in 10 children less than or equal to 10 y old, to 536 rad in the four patients between 11 to 17 y old, while n = 1.0 in all groups. There was no trend observed according to age. Granulocytes had a much higher effective D/sub 0/, approximately 1000 rad in vivo. Absolute nucleated cell concentration in marrow dropped slowly initially, due to an increased lymphocyte concentration in marrow during a concurrent drop in lymphocyte concentration in peripheral blood, but eventually fell on the last day of TBI ranging from 7 to 44% of the initial marrow nucleated cell concentration. Marrow myeloid elements, however, dropped continuously throughout the course of TBI.

  3. Bone marrow-derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dongxu; Martinez, Carlo O.; Ochoa, Oscar; Ruiz-Willhite, Lourdes; Bonilla, Jose R.; Centonze, Victoria E.; Waite, Lindsay L.; Michalek, Joel E.; McManus, Linda M.; Shireman, Paula K.

    2009-01-01

    Limb regeneration requires the coordination of multiple stem cell populations to recapitulate the process of tissue formation. Therefore, bone marrow (BM) -derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration was examined in mice lacking the CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Myofiber size, numbers of myogenic progenitor cells (MPCs), and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were assessed after cardiotoxin-induced injury of chimeric mice produced by transplanting BM from wild-type (WT) or CCR2−/− mice into irradiated WT or CCR2−/− host mice. Regardless of the host genotype, muscle regeneration and recruitment of BM-derived cells and macrophages were similar in mice replenished with WT BM, whereas BM-derived cells and macrophage accumulation were decreased and muscle regeneration was impaired in all animals receiving CCR2−/− BM. Furthermore, numbers of MPCs (CD34+/Sca-1−/CD45− cells) were significantly increased in mice receiving CCR2−/− BM despite the decreased size of regenerated myofibers. Thus, the expression of CCR2 on BM-derived cells regulated macrophage recruitment into injured muscle, numbers of MPC, and the extent of regenerated myofiber size, all of which were independent of CCR2 expression on host-derived cells. Future studies in regenerative medicine must include consideration of the role of BM-derived cells, possibly macrophages, in CCR2-dependent events that regulate effective skeletal muscle regeneration.—Sun, D., Martinez, C. O., Ochoa, O., Ruiz-Willhite, L., Bonilla, J. R., Centonze, V. E., Waite, L. L., Michalek, J. E., McManus, L. M., Shireman, P. K. Bone marrow-derived cell regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:18827026

  4. Mice deficient in 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 lack bone marrow adipocytes, but maintain normal bone formation.

    PubMed

    Justesen, Jeannette; Mosekilde, Lis; Holmes, Megan; Stenderup, Karin; Gasser, Jürg; Mullins, John J; Seckl, Jonathan R; Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert potent, but poorly characterized, effects on the skeleton. The cellular activity of GCs is regulated at a prereceptor level by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11betaHSDs). The type 1 isoform, which predominates in bone, functions as a reductase in intact cells and regenerates active cortisol (corticosterone) from circulating inert 11-keto forms. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of this intracrine activation of GCs on normal bone physiology in vivo using mice deficient in 11betaHSD1 (HSD1(-/-)). The HSD1(-/-) mice exhibited no significant changes in cortical or trabecular bone mass compared with wild-type (Wt) mice. Aged HSD1(-/-) mice showed age-related bone loss similar to that observed in Wt mice. Histomorphometric analysis showed similar bone formation and bone resorption parameters in HSD1(-/-) and Wt mice. However, examination of bone marrow composition revealed a total absence of marrow adipocytes in HSD1(-/-) mice. Cells from Wt and HSD1(-/-) mice exhibited similar growth rates as well as similar levels of production of osteoblastic markers. The adipocyte-forming capacity of in vitro cultured bone marrow stromal cells and trabecular osteoblasts was similar in HSD1(-/-) and Wt mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that 11betaHSD1 amplification of intracellular GC actions in mice may be required for bone marrow adipocyte formation, but not for bone formation. The clinical relevance of this observation remains to be determined.

  5. Granule cargo release from bone marrow-derived cells sustains cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Dong, Anping; Ahamed, Jasimuddin; Sunkara, Manjula; Smyth, Susan S

    2014-11-15

    Bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells, including platelets, may contribute to the progression of pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). However, the underlying mechanisms for this are still unclear. One potential mechanism is through release of granule cargo. Unc13-d(Jinx) (Jinx) mice, which lack Munc13-4, a limiting factor in vesicular priming and fusion, have granule secretion defects in a variety of hematopoietic cells, including platelets. In the current study, we investigated the role of granule secretion in the development of LVH and cardiac remodeling using chimeric mice specifically lacking Munc13-4 in marrow-derived cells. Pressure overload was elicited by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Chimeric mice were created by bone marrow transplantation. Echocardiography, histology staining, immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and mass spectrometry were used to study LVH progression and inflammatory responses. Wild-type (WT) mice that were transplanted with WT bone marrow (WT→WT) and WT mice that received Jinx bone marrow (Jinx→WT) developed LVH and a classic fetal reprogramming response early (7 days) after TAC. However, at late times (5 wk), mice lacking Munc13-4 in bone marrow-derived cells (Jinx→WT) failed to sustain the cardiac hypertrophy observed in WT chimeric mice. No difference in cardiac fibrosis was observed at early or late time points. Reinjection of WT platelets or platelet releasate partially restored cardiac hypertrophy in Jinx chimeric mice. These results suggest that sustained LVH in the setting of pressure overload depends on one or more factors secreted from bone marrow-derived cells, possibly from platelets. Inhibiting granule cargo release may represent a novel target for preventing sustained LVH.

  6. Primary marrow-derived stromal cells: isolation and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. "MSC" also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSCs do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded by-product of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs-both primary and immortalized cell lines.

  7. PRIMARY MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS: ISOLATION AND MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. “MSC” also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSC do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we will describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded byproduct of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We will also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs – both primary and immortalized cell lines. PMID:23959984

  8. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-09-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell.

  9. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. III. Characterization of allogeneic bone marrow cell populations that increase allogeneic chimerism independently of graft-vs-host disease in mixed marrow recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Chester, C.H.; Sundt, T.M.; Romick, M.L.; Hoyles, K.A.; Sachs, D.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease vs failure of alloengraftment severely limit the success of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a therapeutic modality. We have recently used a murine bone marrow transplantation model involving reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with mixtures of allogeneic and syngeneic marrow to demonstrate that an allogeneic bone marrow subpopulation, removed by T cell depletion with rabbit anti-mouse brain serum and complement (RAMB/C), is capable of increasing levels of allogeneic chimerism. This effect was observed in an F1 into parent genetic combination lacking the potential for graft-vs-host disease, and radiation protection studies suggested that it was not due to depletion of stem cells by RAMB/C. We have now attempted to characterize the cell population responsible for increasing allogeneic chimerism in this model. The results indicate that neither mature T cells nor NK cells are responsible for this activity. However, an assay involving mixed marrow reconstitution in an Ly-5 congenic strain combination was found to be more sensitive to small degrees of stem cell depletion than radiation protection assays using three-fold titrations of bone marrow cells. Using this assay, we were able to detect some degree of stem cell depletion by treatment with RAMB/C, but not with anti-T cell mAb. Nevertheless, if the effects of alloresistance observed in this model are considered, the degree of stem cell depletion detected by such mixing studies in insufficient to account for the effects of RAMB/C depletion on levels of allogeneic chimerism, suggesting that another cell population with this property remains to be identified.

  10. Post-5-fluorouracil human marrow: stem cell characteristics and renewal properties after autologous marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, F M; Temeles, D; Lowry, P; Thraves, T; Grosh, W W; Quesenberry, P J

    1993-05-01

    The effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) pretreatment on human bone marrow (BM) progenitor/stem cells and recovery of hematopoiesis after autologous marrow transplant was studied. Twenty-one patients were treated with 5-FU (15 mg/kg to 45 mg/kg) intravenously (IV) for 1 to 3 days administered 6 to 22 days before BM harvest. Post-FU marrow was infused into 15 patients after high-dose cyclophosphamide, carmustine (BCNU), and VP-16 (CBV). Seventeen patients (historical controls) were treated with CBV and autologous BM transplantation but did not receive 5-FU before marrow harvest. The groups were comparable for diagnosis and prior therapy. In the 5-FU-treated group and control group, median recovery times for platelet count to 50,000/mm3 were 20 and 30 days, respectively (P = .007), and for platelet count to 100,000/mm3, 23 and 38 days, respectively (P = .007), while neutrophil recovery was not significantly altered. In vitro cultures with 1 to 7 growth factors (interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, colony-stimulating factor-1 [CSF-1], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and G-CSF) were performed. In 8 of 10 patients whose marrow was studied before and after 5-FU treatment, the numbers of CFU-C responsive to the combination of GM-CSF and IL-3 was increased 6.15-fold by 5-FU pretreatment. In 4 of these patients, thymidine suicide of GM-CSF- and IL-3-stimulated CFU-C ranged from 17% to 42%. High proliferative potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) was observed in low frequency in normal marrow and patient's marrow before 5-FU treatment. In 11 of 16 patients pretreated with 5-FU, increased numbers of HPP-CFC were noted. GM-CSF and IL-3 interacted synergistically to stimulate HPP-CFC. Multifactor combinations, especially GM-CSF + G-CSF + IL-3 + IL-6 + IL-1 + CSF-1 did not increase total colony count or classic HPP-CFC but did result in altered morphology, producing huge, loose colonies. The marrow from patients pretreated with 5-FU is enriched with

  11. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer.

  12. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimi, Eijiro

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3), which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment. PMID:27298623

  13. [Bone and Stem Cells. Intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Various kinds of cell types, such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal cells, have been reported to exist in the bone marrow and communicate with each other. Although there have been many previous studies about bone marrow microenvironment, most of them were analyzed by conventional methods such as histological analysis and flow cytometry. These methods could not observe the dynamic cell movement in living bone marrow. Recently rapid development of fluorescent imaging techniques enables us to understand the cellular dynamics in vivo . That's why we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital two-photon microscopy. Here we show the latest data and the detailed methodology of intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment, and also discuss its further application.

  14. Advances in bone marrow stem cell therapy for retinal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna S; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D; Grant, Maria B; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J; Werner, John S; Nolta, Jan A

    2017-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34(+) cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34(+) cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy.

  15. Role of neuropeptide Y in the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Min, Woo-Kie; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) or neurotransmitters in the bone marrow microenvironment has been known to regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions such as self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we demonstrated that NPY deficient mice have significantly reduced HSC numbers and impaired bone marrow regeneration due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Moreover, NPY treatment prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not restore bone marrow dysfunction in spite of NPY injection. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) secreted by NPY-mediated Y1 receptor stimulation in macrophages plays a key role in neuroprotection and HSC survival in the bone marrow. Therefore, this study reveals a new role of NPY in bone marrow HSC microenvironment, and provides an insight into the therapeutic application of this neuropeptide.

  16. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M. Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R.; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A.; Anversa, Piero

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction. PMID:17965233

  17. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A; Anversa, Piero

    2007-11-06

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction.

  18. [Modified method for whole bone marrow adherent culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qing; Zhong, Zhao-Dong; Chen, Zhi-Chao; Zou, Ping

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate a more convenient and efficient method to cultivate the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by means of natural erythrocyte sedimentation principle, based on the whole bone marrow adherent method. The bone marrow was cultured with a six-well plate instead of the flasks.Firstly, the bone marrow specimen was cultivated with the MSC complete medium for 48 h, then the upper RBC-free supernatant layer was drawn and placed into the new wells to isolate MSC. Inverted microscope was used to observe the cell morphology and to record the adherent time of first cell passage, first passaging time. The traditional whole bone marrow adherent method was used as the control. The cell cycle and cell surface markers were detected by flow cytometry,and the differentiative capacity of MSC into osteocyte and adipocyte was identified by alkaline phosphatase kit and oil red O, respectively. Besides, the proliferative curve of P1,P3,P5 of BMSC was depicted by counting method. The results showed that MSC cultured by the modified method highly expressed CD90, CD105, CD13, CD44 and lowly expressed CD14, CD45, CD34. Concerning the cell cycle feature, it was found that most of the cells were in G0/G1 phase (88.76%) , followed by G2/M phase (3.04%) and S phase (8.2%), which was in accordance with stem cell cycle characteristics. The proliferative curve showed a typical "S" type, and both the oil red O and alkaline phosphatase staining of MSC were positive. Compared with the traditional method, the modified method had the advantage of high adherence rate (P = 0.0001) and shorter passaging time for the first passage (P = 0.001), with the statistically significant difference. It is concluded that there is a large number of adherent, active and suspended MSC in the RBC-free supernatant layer after the culture of bone marrow for 48 h. Isolating MSC by the modified method is more convenient and efficient than the traditional whole bone marrow adherent method.

  19. Cells derived from young bone marrow alleviate renal aging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Rossini, Michele; Ma, Li-Jun; Zuo, Yiqin; Ma, Ji; Fogo, Agnes B

    2011-11-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells may modulate renal injury, but the effects may depend on the age of the stem cells. Here we investigated whether bone marrow from young mice attenuates renal aging in old mice. We radiated female 12-mo-old 129SvJ mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from either 8-wk-old (young-to-old) or 12-mo-old (old-to-old) male mice. Transfer of young BMC resulted in markedly decreased deposition of collagen IV in the mesangium and less β-galactosidase staining, an indicator of cell senescence. These changes paralleled reduced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), PDGF-B (PDGF-B), the transdifferentiation marker fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), and senescence-associated p16 and p21. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular cells derived from the transplanted BMC did not show β-galactosidase activity, but after 6 mo, there were more FSP-1-expressing bone marrow-derived cells in old-to-old mice compared with young-to-old mice. Young-to-old mice also exhibited higher expression of the anti-aging gene Klotho and less phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor β. Taken together, these data suggest that young bone marrow-derived cells can alleviate renal aging in old mice. Direct parenchymal reconstitution by stem cells, paracrine effects from adjacent cells, and circulating anti-aging molecules may mediate the aging of the kidney.

  20. Genotoxicity of ibuprofen in mouse bone marrow cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rina; Pancholi, Shyam S; Tripathi, Pankaj

    2012-10-01

    Genotoxicity of ibuprofen was evaluated by employing the mouse in vivo chromosomal aberration (CA) test. Ibuprofen administered orally at doses of 10, 20, 40, and 60 mg/kg body weight to mice resulted in mitotic depression and induction of CAs. A dose-related decrease in mitotic index (MI) and an increase in the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations per cell (CAs/cell) were recorded in bone marrow cells. However, a statistically significant reduction in MI and an increase in CAs/cell were found for both the higher doses. The results obtained indicate that ibuprofen is capable of inducing dose-dependent genotoxicity in bone marrow cells of mice.

  1. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  2. Histochemistry of blood and bone marrow cells in pangolins.

    PubMed

    Caxton-Martins, A E

    1977-04-01

    Blood and bone marrow cells of pangolins have been examined histochemically. Sudanophilia, PAS positivity and acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase reactivity were confined to cells of the granulocytic and monocytic series, while peroxidase reactivity was confined to cells of the erythroid series. In this latter respect the pangolin is unique among mammals so far studied.

  3. Effects of Spaceflight on Cells of Bone Marrow Origin

    PubMed Central

    Özçivici, Engin

    2013-01-01

    Once only a subject for science fiction novels, plans for establishing habitation on space stations, the Moon, and distant planets now appear among the short-term goals of space agencies. This article reviews studies that present biomedical issues that appear to challenge humankind for long-term spaceflights. With particularly focus on cells of bone marrow origin, studies involving changes in bone, immune, and red blood cell populations and their functions due to extended weightlessness were reviewed. Furthermore, effects of mechanical disuse on primitive stem cells that reside in the bone marrow were also included in this review. Novel biomedical solutions using space biotechnology will be required in order to achieve the goal of space exploration without compromising the functions of bone marrow, as spaceflight appears to disrupt homeostasis for all given cell types. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385745

  4. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  5. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasing the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-hr interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplo-type-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  6. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats. PMID:27934903

  7. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-12-09

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats.

  8. Bones of contention: marrow-derived cells in myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Mark A; Murry, Charles E

    2008-06-01

    Almost 7 years have passed since the initial publication reporting that bone marrow cells regenerate infarcted myocardium. The subsequent years produced hundreds of investigations that ran the gamut of findings from validation to disproof. Undeterred by the concurrent debate, clinical trials ensued to test the safety and efficacy of bone marrow-derived cell population for autologous therapy in clinical treatment of myocardial disease. In the following conversational exchange, two scientists with distinct perspectives weigh the pros and cons of pursuing bone marrow stem cell therapy and look toward finding a consensus of where the future lies for regenerative medicine and the heart. The conclusion is that the two camps may not be as far apart as it may seem from the rancor in literature and at meetings, and the potential of one day achieving regenerative therapy is indeed a vision that both parties enthusiastically share.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation on differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into mast cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Sho; Yoshino, Hironori; Ishikawa, Junya; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Kouki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2015-11-01

    Mast cells, immune effector cells produced from bone marrow cells, play a major role in immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic responses. Ionizing radiation affects the functions of mast cells, which are involved in radiation-induced tissue damage. However, whether ionizing radiation affects the differential induction of mast cells is unknown. Here we investigated whether bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells. To induce mast cells, bone marrow cells from X-irradiated and unirradiated mice were cultured in the presence of cytokines required for mast cell induction. Although irradiation at 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy decreased the number of bone marrow cells 1 day post-irradiation, the cultured bone marrow cells of X-irradiated and unirradiated mice both expressed mast cell-related cell-surface antigens. However, the percentage of mast cells in the irradiated group was lower than in the unirradiated group. Similar decreases in the percentage of mast cells induced in the presence of X-irradiation were observed 10 days post irradiation, although the number of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice had recovered by this time. Analysis of mast cell function showed that degranulation of mast cells after immunoglobulin E-mediated allergen recognition was significantly higher in the X-irradiated group compared with in the unirradiated group. In conclusion, bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells, but ionizing radiation affected the differentiation efficiency and function of mast cells.

  10. Chemosensitizing AML cells by targeting bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Raphael C; Wasserstrom, Briana; Meacham, Amy; Wise, Elizabeth; Drusbosky, Leylah; Walter, Glenn A; Chaplin, David J; Siemann, Dietmar W; Purich, Daniel L; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Refractory disease is the greatest challenge in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Blood vessels may serve as sanctuary sites for AML. When AML cells were co-cultured with bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), a greater proportion of leukemia cells were in G0/G1. This led us to a strategy of targeting BMECs with tubulin-binding combretastatins, causing BMECs to lose their flat phenotype, degrade their cytoskeleton, cease growth, and impair migration despite unchanged BMEC viability and metabolism. Combretastatins also caused downregulation of BMEC adhesion molecules known to tether AML cells, including vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. When AML-BMEC co-cultures were treated with combretastatins, a significantly greater proportion of AML cells dislodged from BMECs and entered the G2/M cell cycle, suggesting enhanced susceptibility to cell cycle agents. Indeed, the combination of combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy enhanced additive AML cell death. In vivo mice xenograft studies confirmed this finding by revealing complete AML regression after treatment with combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Beyond highlighting the pathologic role of BMECs in the leukemia microenvironment as a protective reservoir of disease, these results support a new strategy for using vascular-targeting combretastatins in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy to treat AML.

  11. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  12. Characterization of Nestin, a Selective Marker for Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liang; Zeng, Xin; Hu, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and contributing to tissue repair and regeneration. Characterization of the physiological function of MSCs has been largely hampered by lack of unique markers. Nestin, originally found in neuroepithelial stem cells, is an intermediate filament protein expressed in the early stages of development. Increasing studies have shown a particular association between Nestin and MSCs. Nestin could characterize a subset of bone marrow perivascular MSCs which contributed to bone development and closely contacted with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Nestin expressing (Nes+) MSCs also play a role in the progression of various diseases. However, Nes+ cells were reported to participate in angiogenesis as MSCs or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in several tissues and be a heterogeneous population comprising mesenchymal cells and endothelial cells in the developing bone marrow. In this review article, we will summarize the progress of the research on Nestin, particularly the function of Nes+ cells in bone marrow, and discuss the feasibility of using Nestin as a specific marker for MSCs. PMID:26236348

  13. Impaired Function of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Systemic Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, K.; Wilson, T.M.; Ren, J.J.; Sabatino, M.; Stroncek, D.F.; Krepuska, M.; Bai, Y.; Robey, P.G.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Mezey, E.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) have a wide variety of problems, including skeletal abnormalities. The disease results from a mutation of the stem cell receptor (c-kit) in mast cells and we wondered if the function of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs; also known as MSCs or mesenchymal stem cells) might be affected by the invasion of bone marrow by mutant mast cells. As expected, BMSCs from SM patients do not have a mutation in c-kit, but they proliferate poorly. In addition, while osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs seems to be deficient, their adipogenic potential appears to be increased. Since the hematopoietic supportive abilities of BMSCs are also important, we also studied the engraftment in NSG mice of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, after being co-cultured with BMSCs of healthy volunteers vs. BMSCs derived from patients with SM. BMSCs derived from the bone marrow of patients with SM could not support hematopoiesis to the extent that healthy BMSCs do. Finally, we performed an expression analysis and found significant differences between healthy and SM derived BMSCs in the expression of genes with a variety of functions, including the WNT signaling, ossification, and bone remodeling. We suggest that some of the symptoms associated with SM might be driven by epigenetic changes in BMSCs caused by dysfunctional mast cells in the bone marrow of the patients. PMID:26001169

  14. Bone marrow-derived stem cells initiate pancreatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hess, David; Li, Li; Martin, Matthew; Sakano, Seiji; Hill, David; Strutt, Brenda; Thyssen, Sandra; Gray, Douglas A; Bhatia, Mickie

    2003-07-01

    We show that transplantation of adult bone marrow-derived cells expressing c-kit reduces hyperglycemia in mice with streptozotocin-induced pancreatic damage. Although quantitative analysis of the pancreas revealed a low frequency of donor insulin-positive cells, these cells were not present at the onset of blood glucose reduction. Instead, the majority of transplanted cells were localized to ductal and islet structures, and their presence was accompanied by a proliferation of recipient pancreatic cells that resulted in insulin production. The capacity of transplanted bone marrow-derived stem cells to initiate endogenous pancreatic tissue regeneration represents a previously unrecognized means by which these cells can contribute to the restoration of organ function.

  15. Spine fusion using cell matrix composites enriched in bone marrow-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Muschler, George F; Nitto, Hironori; Matsukura, Yoichi; Boehm, Cynthia; Valdevit, Antonio; Kambic, Helen; Davros, William; Powell, Kimerly; Easley, Kirk

    2003-02-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells including osteoblastic progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from bone marrow aspirates using the surface of selected implantable matrices for selective cell attachment. Concentration of cells in this way to produce an enriched cellular composite graft improves graft efficacy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the biologic milieu of a bone marrow clot will significantly improve the efficacy of such a graft. An established posterior spinal fusion model and cancellous bone matrix was used to compare an enriched cellular composite bone graft alone, bone matrix plus bone marrow clot, and an enriched bone matrix composite graft plus bone marrow clot. Union score, quantitative computed tomography, and mechanical testing were used to define outcome. The union score for the enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone and the bone matrix plus bone marrow clot. The enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite also was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone in fusion volume and in fusion area. These data confirm that the addition of a bone marrow clot to an enriched cell-matrix composite graft results in significant improvement in graft performance. Enriched composite grafts prepared using this strategy provide a rapid, simple, safe, and inexpensive method for intraoperative concentration and delivery of bone marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting.

  16. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Contribution to Pulmonary Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Lindsay T; LaRue, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of bone marrow stem cell plasticity and contribution of bone marrow stem cells to pathophysiology is evolving with the advent of innovative technologies. Recent data has led to new mechanistic insights in the field of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) research, and an increased appreciation for the plasticity of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). In this review, we discuss current research examining the origin of pulmonary cell types from endogenous lung stem and progenitor cells as well as bone marrow-derived stem cells (MSCs and HSCs) and their contributions to lung homeostasis and pathology. We specifically highlight recent findings from our laboratory that demonstrate an HSC origin for pulmonary fibroblasts based on transplantation of a clonal population of cells derived from a single HSC. These findings demonstrate the importance of developing an understanding of the sources of effector cells in disease state. Finally, a perspective is given on the potential clinical implications of these studies and others addressing stem cell contributions to lung tissue homeostasis and pathology. PMID:26798846

  17. Bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juan; Chen, Jian; Kim, Jae Chan; Yao, Ke

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer and involved in its destructive and regenerative disease course, tissue specimens were collected from 3 eyes of 3 patients with Mooren's ulcer that underwent lamellar keratectomy. Three normal donor limbal corneoscleras served as controls. Immunohistochemical staining patterns were analyzed by using the following antibodies: CD34 (a marker of hematopoietic progenitor cells and endothelium), c-kit (a marker of hematopoietic and stromal progenitor cells) and STRO-1 (a differentiation antigen present on bone marrow fibroblast cells and on various nonhematopoietic progenitor cells). Strong positive CD34, c-kit and STRO-1 cells were revealed in Mooren's ulcer specimens, especially in the superficial stroma. A few weakly expressed CD34 stromal cells were seen in normal limbal cornea, but no immunoreactivity for c-kit and STRO-1 was found. Bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer and contribute to its destructive and regeneration process by synergizing with other factors. Specific therapeutic strategies that target the role of these cells in Mooren's ulcer are anticipated.

  18. Mature adipocytes in bone marrow protect myeloma cells against chemotherapy through autophagy activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major problem in patients with multiple myeloma is chemotherapy resistance, which develops in myeloma cells upon interaction with bone marrow stromal cells. However, few studies have determined the role of bone marrow adipocytes, a major component of stromal cells in the bone marrow, in myeloma ch...

  19. Bone marrow chimera experiments to determine the contribution of hematopoietic stem cells to cerebral angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Machein, Marcia Regina; Plate, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    The generation of bone marrow chimera in mice is a valuable tool to study a variety of cellular processes. Donor bone marrow cells expressing reporter genes have been used to study the process of cell differentiation and the mechanisms involved in bone marrow cell recruitment. Bone marrow cells bearing genetic manipulation have been used in bone marrow chimeras to elucidate the role of molecules in different physiological and pathological settings. Since in the normal adult brain angiogenesis does not occur, models of brain injury like ischemia and tumor growth have been used to study the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the cerebral vasculature. This chapter describes the procedures to perform bone marrow transplantation in order to study the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to vascularization in an orthotopic glioma model.

  20. Phenotypic characteristics of hybrid cells generated by transferring neuronal nuclei into bone marrow stromal cell cytoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhujuan; Xu, Yan; Zhong, Qi; Zheng, Jian

    2012-02-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are promising donor cells for transplantation therapies for a variety of diseases. However, there still lack efficient ways to induce directional differentiation of BMSCs to promote their practical use in transplantation therapy. In this study, we constructed hybrid cells by transferring neuronal nuclei into BMSC cytoplasts and investigated the proliferative capacity and phenotypic characteristics of the hybrid cells. The neuronal nuclei were labeled with Hoechst 33342 before the transfer process, and the cell membrane antigen CD71 was used as a marker of BMSC cytoplasts. The BMSC cytoplasts and neuronal karyoplasts were separated by Ficoll density gradient ultracentrifugation. The hybrid cells were generated by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of BMSC cytoplasts with neuronal karyoplasts. The hybrid cells exhibited Hoechst 33342 staining in their nuclei and CD71 staining on their cytomembranes, which confirmed the success of cell fusion. The hybrid cells were positive for BrdU immunostaining. Viability analysis of the cultured hybrid cells by the MTT assay demonstrated their proliferative ability. Immunocytochemical staining revealed the expression of the neuron-specific markers NeuN and MAP2 in the third passage hybrid cells, which indicated their neuronal phenotypic characteristics. The results demonstrated that the hybrid cells produced by fusing neuronal karyoplasts with BMSC cytoplasts had proliferative capability and expressed the neuron-specific markers. Further study is required to investigate the phenotype of the hybrid cells both structurally and functionally.

  1. Isolation, characterization, and biologic features of bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Porada, G; Ascensão, J L

    1996-10-01

    Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) are an integral part of the bone marrow microenvironment and are likely to play an important role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, either by producing growth factors or inhibitory cytokines or by displaying adhesion molecules that can interact with hematopoietic progenitors. In the present study we demonstrate the isolation, propagation, and characterization of BMECs with regard to morphology, growth characteristics, phenotype, and production of cytokines. Furthermore, we report the creation of a cell line with "BMEC-like" characteristics and compare the characteristics of primary BMEC cultures to those of the immortalized cell line. In addition, we demonstrate that BMECs are susceptible to infection by a laboratory strain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV), suggesting that CMV infection of endothelial cells in vivo could potentially play a role in the hematologic abnormalities observed during CMV infection.

  2. The bone marrow niche for haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Sean J.; Scadden, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Preface Niches are local tissue microenvironments that maintain and regulate stem cells. Haematopoiesis provides a paradigm for understanding mammalian stem cells and their niches, yet the haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche remains incompletely defined and beset by competing models. Here we review progress in elucidating the location and cellular components of the HSC niche in the bone marrow. The niche is perivascular, created partly by mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial cells and often, but not always, located near trabecular bone. Outstanding questions concern the cellular complexity of the niche, the role of the endosteum, and functional heterogeneity among perivascular microenvironments. PMID:24429631

  3. Use of long-term human marrow cultures to demonstrate progenitor cell precursors in marrow treated with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Winton, E.F.; Colenda, K.W.

    1987-07-01

    The continued retrieval of progenitor cells (CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, CFU-E, CFU-GM) from human long-term marrow cultures (LTMC) is not uncommonly used as evidence that proliferation and differentiation are occurring in more primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in these cultures. Alternatively, the continued presence of progenitors in LTMC could be the result of survival and/or limited self-renewal of progenitor cells present when the culture was initiated, and such progenitors would have little relevance to the parent HSC. The following studies were designed to determine the relative contributions of precursors of progenitor cells to the total progenitor cells present in LTMC using a two-stage regeneration model. The adherent layer in LTMC was established over 3 weeks, irradiated (875 rad) to permanently eliminate resident hematopoietic cells, and recharged with autologous cryo-preserved marrow that was either treated or not treated (control) with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC, 100 micrograms/ml for 30 min). The 4-HC-treated marrow contained no progenitor cells, yet based on clinical autologous bone marrow transplant experience, has intact HSC. Within 1-3 weeks, progenitor cells reappeared in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow, and were preferentially located in the adherent layer. By 2-6 weeks, the number of progenitor cells in the adherent layer of LTMC recharged with 4-HC marrow was equivalent to control LTMC. The progenitors regenerating in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow appear to originate from precursors of progenitor cells, perhaps HSC. We propose this model may be useful in elucidating cellular and molecular correlates of progenitor cell regeneration from precursors.

  4. Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Enhances T Cell Recovery following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; King, Christopher G.; Nejat, Rebecca A.; Suh, David Y.; Smith, Odette M.; Bretz, Jamison C.; Samstein, Robert M.; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Chidgey, Ann P.; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Boyd, Richard L.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Posttransplant immunodeficiency, specifically a lack of T cell reconstitution, is a major complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. This immunosuppression results in an increase in morbidity and mortality from infections and very likely contributes to relapse. In this study, we demonstrate that sex steroid ablation using leuprolide acetate, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa), increases the number of lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow and developing thymocytes in the thymus. Although few differences are observed in the peripheral myeloid compartments, the enhanced thymic reconstitution following LHRHa treatment and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation leads to enhanced peripheral T cell recovery, predominantly in the naive T cell compartment. This results in an increase in T cell function in vivo and in vitro. Graft-versus-host-disease is not exacerbated by LHRHa treatment and graft-versus-tumor activity is maintained. Because LHRHa allows for reversible (and temporary) sex steroid ablation, has a strong safety profile, and has been clinically approved for diseases such as prostate and breast cancer, this drug treatment represents a novel therapeutic approach to reversal of thymic atrophy and enhancement of immunity following immunosuppression. PMID:19380833

  5. Cutaneous mast cell maturation does not depend on an intact bone marrow microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Charley, M.R.; Mikhael, A.; Sontheimer, R.D.; Gilliam, J.N.; Bennett, M.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether the maturation of murine cutaneous mast cells from stem cells depends on an intact bone marrow microenvironment. Normal bone marrow cells (+/+) were infused into 2 groups of mast cell-deficient mice: WBB6F1-W/Wv mice and /sup 89/Sr-pretreated W/Wv mice. /sup 89/Sr is a long-lived bone-seeking radioisotope which provides continuous irradiation of the marrow and thereby ablates the marrow microenvironment. Skin biopsies revealed that the /sup 89/Sr-pretreated mice and the controls had repopulated their skin with mast cells equally well. Natural killer cell function was significantly depressed in the /sup 89/Sr-treated mice, confirming that the marrow microenvironment had been functionally altered. It appears that, although the precursors for cutaneous mast cells are marrow derived, they do not need an intact marrow microenvironment for maturation.

  6. Leptin-receptor-expressing mesenchymal stromal cells represent the main source of bone formed by adult bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo O; Yue, Rui; Murphy, Malea M; Peyer, James G; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-08-07

    Studies of the identity and physiological function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been hampered by a lack of markers that permit both prospective identification and fate mapping in vivo. We found that Leptin Receptor (LepR) is a marker that highly enriches bone marrow MSCs. Approximately 0.3% of bone marrow cells were LepR(+), 10% of which were CFU-Fs, accounting for 94% of bone marrow CFU-Fs. LepR(+) cells formed bone, cartilage, and adipocytes in culture and upon transplantation in vivo. LepR(+) cells were Scf-GFP(+), Cxcl12-DsRed(high), and Nestin-GFP(low), markers which also highly enriched CFU-Fs, but negative for Nestin-CreER and NG2-CreER, markers which were unlikely to be found in CFU-Fs. Fate-mapping showed that LepR(+) cells arose postnatally and gave rise to most bone and adipocytes formed in adult bone marrow, including bone regenerated after irradiation or fracture. LepR(+) cells were quiescent, but they proliferated after injury. Therefore, LepR(+) cells are the major source of bone and adipocytes in adult bone marrow.

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles rescue radiation damage to murine marrow hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sicheng; Dooner, Mark; Cheng, Yan; Papa, Elaine; Del Tatto, Michael; Pereira, Mandy; Deng, Yanhui; Goldberg, Laura; Aliotta, Jason; Chatterjee, Devasis; Stewart, Connor; Carpanetto, Andrea; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Camussi, Giovanni; Quesenberry, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to reverse radiation damage to marrow stem cells. We have evaluated the capacity of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) to mitigate radiation injury to marrow stem cells at 4 hours to 7 days after irradiation. Significant restoration of marrow stem cell engraftment at 4, 24 and 168 hours post-irradiation by exposure to MSC-EVs was observed at 3 weeks to 9 months after transplant and further confirmed by secondary engraftment. Intravenous injection of MSC-EVs to 500cGy exposed mice led to partial recovery of peripheral blood counts and restoration of the engraftment of marrow. The murine hematopoietic cell line, FDC-P1 exposed to 500 cGy, showed reversal of growth inhibition, DNA damage and apoptosis on exposure to murine or human MSC-EVs. Both murine and human MSC-EVs reverse radiation damage to murine marrow cells and stimulate normal murine marrow stem cell/progenitors to proliferate. A preparation with both exosomes and microvesicles was found to be superior to either microvesicles or exosomes alone. Biologic activity was seen in freshly isolated vesicles and in vesicles stored for up to 6 months in 10% DMSO at −80°C. These studies indicate that MSC-EVs can reverse radiation damage to bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27150009

  8. Rare aggressive natural killer cell leukemia presented with bone marrow fibrosis - a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Dina S; Sabbagh, Ahmad Al; Omri, Halima El; Ibrahim, Firyal A; Amer, Aliaa M; Otazu, Ivone B

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia is an extraordinary rare aggressive malignant neoplasm of natural killer cells. Although its first recognition as a specific entity was approximately 20 years ago, this leukemia has not yet been satisfactorily characterized as fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the literature and up to our knowledge, this is the first case report in Qatar. Reaching a diagnosis of aggressive natural killer leukemia was a challenging experience, because in addition to being a rare entity, the relative scarcity of circulating neoplastic cells, failure to obtain an adequate aspirate sample sufficient to perform flow cytometric analysis, together with the absence of applicable method to prove NK clonality (as it lack specific clonal marker); our case had atypical confusing presentation of striking increase in bone marrow fibrosis that was misleading and complicated the case further. The bone marrow fibrosis encountered may be related to the neoplastic natural killer cells' chemokine profile and it may raise the awareness for considering aggressive natural killer leukemia within the differential diagnosis of leukemia with heightened marrow fibrosis.

  9. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 10(6) rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells.

  10. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 106 rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells. PMID:25206912

  11. Characterization of a subset of bone marrow-derived natural killer cells that regulates T cell activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Taba; Trivedi, Prachi P; Wolf, Norbert A; Roberts, Paul C; Swanborg, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    We report that bone marrow-derived natural killer (BMNK) cells from DA or F344 rats inhibit PMA/ionomycin-induced T cell proliferation. These NK-regulatory cells are NKR-P1A(dim), whereas a minor subpopulation is NKR-P1A(bright). Only the NKR-P1A(dim) BMNK cells inhibit T cell proliferation. If activated with rat Con A supernatant, the NKR-P1A(dim) cells become NKR-P1A(bright) and lose the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast to BMNK cells, all DA and F344 rat NK cells isolated from the blood, spleen, cervical, or mesenteric lymph nodes or Peyer's patches are NKR-P1A(bright) and lack the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. Inhibition of T cell proliferation correlates with significant down-regulation of CD3, suggesting that this may be the mechanism through which the NKR-P1A(dim) cells mediate suppression. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-arginine acetate-abrogated NKR-P1A(dim) cell inhibition of T cell proliferation. We conclude that rat bone marrow NKR-P1A(dim) cells represent a unique population that may play a role in maintaining immune homeostasis by regulating the clonal expansion of activated T cells.

  12. Lack of evidence for recipient precursor cells replenishing β-cells in transplanted islets.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Inada, Akari; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow and tissue precursor cells have been postulated to replenish grafts of transplanted islets. Several investigators have reported that bone marrow cells can promote the regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we investigated the potential of recipient-derived precursor cells to form new pancreatic endocrine cells in islet grafts transplanted under the kidney capsule. Mouse insulin promoter (MIP)-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice, which express GFP only in β-cells, or β-actin GFP mice, which express GFP ubiquitously, were used to determine if the recipient-derived cells differentiate into β-cells or other types of endocrine cells. We transplanted MIP-GFP islets into wild-type mice, wild-type islets into MIP-GFP mice, β-actin GFP islets into wild-type mice, and wild-type islets into β-actin GFP mice. β-Actin GFP bone marrow cells were then injected into wild-type mice to evaluate the potential role of bone marrow stem cells to provide new islet cells to the graft. No β-cells with green fluorescence were seen in the graft when wild-type islets were transplanted into MIP-GFP mice. When wild-type islets were transplanted into β-actin GFP mice, no β-cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts. Similarly, no endocrine cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts after injection of β-actin GFP bone marrow cells into wild-type islet-transplanted wild-type mice. This study provides further support for the concept that recipient precursor cells do not produce new β-cells in grafts of transplanted islets.

  13. Bone marrow stromal stem cells: nature, biology, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Bianco, P; Riminucci, M; Gronthos, S; Robey, P G

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are progenitors of skeletal tissue components such as bone, cartilage, the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, and adipocytes. In addition, they may be experimentally induced to undergo unorthodox differentiation, possibly forming neural and myogenic cells. As such, they represent an important paradigm of post-natal nonhematopoietic stem cells, and an easy source for potential therapeutic use. Along with an overview of the basics of their biology, we discuss here their potential nature as components of the vascular wall, and the prospects for their use in local and systemic transplantation and gene therapy.

  14. The effects of simulated hypogravity on murine bone marrow cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Desales

    1989-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in complete medium at unit gravity were compared with a similar population cultured in conditions that mimic some aspects of microgravity. After the cells adjusted to the conditions that simulated microgravity, they proliferated as fetal or oncogenic populations; their numbers doubled in twelve hour periods. Differentiated subpopulations were depleted from the heterogeneous mixture with time and the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells increased in numbers. The cells in the control groups in unit gravity and those in the bioreactors in conditions of microgravity were monitored under a number of parameters. Each were phenotyped as to cell surface antigens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Other parameters compared included: pH, glucose uptake, oxygen consumption and carbon-dioxide production. Nuclear DNA was monitored by flow cytometry. Functional responses were studied by mitogenic stimulation by various lectins. The importance of these findings should have relevance to the space program. Cells should behave predictably in zero gravity; specific populations can be eliminated from diverse populations and other populations isolated. The availability of stem cell populations will enhance both bone marrow and gene transplant programs. Stem cells will permit developmental biologists study the paths of hematopoiesis.

  15. Nonhematopoietic cells are the primary source of bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kassmer, Susannah H; Bruscia, Emanuela M; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Krause, Diane S

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow (BM)-derived cells differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells of multiple tissues. To date, it remains unknown which population(s) of BM cells are primarily responsible for this engraftment. To test the hypothesis that nonhematopoietic stem cells in the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells, either wild-type hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic BM cells were transplanted into irradiated surfactant-protein-C (SPC)-null mice. Donor-derived, SPC-positive type 2 pneumocytes were predominantly detected in the lungs of mice receiving purified nonhematopoietic cells and were absent from mice receiving purified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We conclude that cells contained in the nonhematopoietic fraction of the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells. These nonhematopoietic cells may represent a primitive stem cell population residing in adult BM.

  16. [Bone and Stem Cells. Immune cell regulation by the bone marrow niche].

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in the bone marrow and give rise to all blood cell types. The maintenance and the differentiation of blood cells including immune cells are essential for host defense and oxygen delivery. HSCs are maintained in microenvironments called stem cell niches, which consists of various cell types in bone marrow. Recently, new visualization technologies and assay systems brought advances in studies on the stem cell niche. In addition, several reports demonstrated that osteoblasts and osteocytes regulate not only HSC homeostasis but also immune cell differentiation, suggesting a close relationship between bone cells and HSCs.

  17. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of bone marrow dendritic cells from multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rettig, M B; Ma, H J; Vescio, R A; Põld, M; Schiller, G; Belson, D; Savage, A; Nishikubo, C; Wu, C; Fraser, J; Said, J W; Berenson, J R

    1997-06-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was found in the bone marrow dendritic cells of multiple myeloma patients but not in malignant plasma cells or bone marrow dendritic cells from normal individuals or patients with other malignancies. In addition the virus was detected in the bone marrow dendritic cells from two out of eight patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a precursor to myeloma. Viral interleukin-6, the human homolog of which is a growth factor for myeloma, was found to be transcribed in the myeloma bone marrow dendritic cells. KSHV may be required for transformation from MGUS to myeloma and perpetuate the growth of malignant plasma cells.

  18. Comparison of hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Yang, Shao-Guang; Xing, Wen; Lu, Shi-Hong; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Hong-Ying; Chi, Ying; Ma, Feng-Xia; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) shift from fetal liver and spleen to bone marrow at neonatal stages and this movement may be due to inductive signals from different microenvironments. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are the precursors of stromal cells in bone marrow microenvironments such as osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Some researchers speculated that fetal bone marrow before birth might be not perfectly suit HSC growth. However, it is still lack of direct evidence to prove this hypothesis. This study was aimed to compare the hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow MSC in vitro. Adult bone marrow MSC (ABM-MSC) were isolated from three healthy donors and fetal bone marrow MSC (FBM-MSC) were isolated from three fetuses between gestations of 19 to 20 weeks. After irradiation, MSC were co-cultured with CD34(+) cells isolated from umbilical cord blood in long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. The colony number of colony forming cells (CFC) was counted and the phenotypic changes of co-cultured CD34(+) cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine expressions in both kinds of MSC were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that ABM-MSC had a stronger hematopoietic supportive capacity than FBM-MSC. Both of them enhanced the differentiation of CD34(+) cells into myeloid lineages. Cytokines were expressed differently in ABM-MSC and FBM-MSC. It is concluded that ABM-MSC possess more potential application in some treatments than FBM-MSC, especially in hematopoietic reconstitution.

  19. Stem cell niche failure concerns bone marrow failure--a diagnostic and therapeutic consideration.

    PubMed

    Law, Sujata; Chaudhuri, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Diseases of the bone marrow often referred to as "Bone marrow failure" have complicated pathophysiological picture with respect to hematopoietic systemic function. The reason for such bone marrow disorder is not well understood till date, although some sporadic etiological sources have been described earlier. With the advent of current investigations, hematopoietic stem cell involvement together with the failure of signaling interaction within the bone marrow niche has been found to reveal interesting correlations with the disease onset. The present review furnishes justification for bone marrow failure as a concern of stem cell niche failure and hints at providing important clues for disease diagnosis and therapeutic maneuver.

  20. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  1. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K.; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P.; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:28000662

  2. Adipose lineage specification of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Susan M.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy; Erickson, Paul F.; Kong, Raymond; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Nemenoff, Raphael; Moldovan, Radu; Morandi, Shelley A.; Davis, James A.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported the production of white adipocytes in adipose tissue from hematopoietic progenitors arising from bone marrow. However, technical challenges have hindered detection of this adipocyte population by certain other laboratories. These disparate results highlight the need for sensitive and definitive techniques to identify bone marrow progenitor (BMP)-derived adipocytes. In these studies we exploited new models and methods to enhance detection of this adipocyte population. Here we showed that confocal microscopy with spectrum acquisition could effectively identify green fluorescent protein (GFP) positive BMP-derived adipocytes by matching their fluorescence spectrum to that of native GFP. Likewise, imaging flow cytometry made it possible to visualize intact unilocular and multilocular GFP-positive BMP-derived adipocytes and distinguished them from non-fluorescent adipocytes and cell debris in the cytometer flow stream. We also devised a strategy to detect marker genes in flow-enriched adipocytes from which stromal cells were excluded. This technique also proved to be an efficient means for detecting genetically labeled adipocytes and should be applicable to models in which marker gene expression is low or absent. Finally, in vivo imaging of mice transplanted with BM from adipocyte-targeted luciferase donors showed a time-dependent increase in luciferase activity, with the bulk of luciferase activity confined to adipocytes rather than stromal cells. These results confirmed and extended our previous reports and provided proof-of-principle for sensitive techniques and models for detection and study of these unique cells. PMID:23700536

  3. An Enzymatic Method to Rescue Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Clotted Bone Marrow Samples

    PubMed Central

    Malonzo, Cherry; Poetzel, Tobias; Baur, Martin; Steffen, Frank; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) - usually obtained from bone marrow - often require expansion culture. Our protocol uses clinical grade urokinase to degrade clots in the bone marrow and release MSCs for further use. This protocol provides a rapid and inexpensive alternative to bone marrow resampling. Bone marrow is a major source of MSCs, which are interesting for tissue engineering and autologous stem cell therapies. Upon withdrawal bone marrow may clot, as it comprises all of the hematopoietic system. The resulting clots contain also MSCs that are lost for expansion culture or direct stem cell therapy. We experienced that 74% of canine bone marrow samples contained clots and yielded less than half of the stem cell number expected from unclotted samples. Thus, we developed a protocol for enzymatic digestion of those clots to avoid labor-intense and costly bone marrow resampling. Urokinase - a clinically approved and readily available thrombolytic drug – clears away the bone marrow clots almost completely. As a consequence, treated bone marrow aspirates yield similar numbers of MSCs as unclotted samples. Also, after urokinase treatment the cells kept their metabolic activity and the ability to differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Our protocol salvages clotted blood and bone marrow samples without affecting the quality of the cells. This obsoletes resampling, considerably reduces sampling costs and enables the use of clotted samples for research or therapy. PMID:25938767

  4. [Bone and Stem Cells. Bone marrow microenvironment niches for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    In bone marrow, the special microenvironments known as niches control proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) . However, the identity and functions of the niches has been a subject of longstanding debate. Although it has been reported previously that osteoblasts lining the bone surface act as HSC niches, their precise role in HSC maintenance remains unclear. On the other hand, the adipo-osteogenic progenitors with long processes, termed CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, which preferentially express the chemokine CXCL12, stem cell factor (SCF) , leptin receptor and PDGF receptor-β were identified in the bone marrow. Recent studies revealed that endothelial cells of bone marrow vascular sinuses and CAR cells provided niches for HSCs. The identity and functions of various other candidate HSC niche cells, including nestin-expressing cells and Schwann cells would also be discussed in this review.

  5. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  6. Lack of viral control and development of cART escape mutations in macaques after bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    PETERSON, Christopher W.; HAWORTH, Kevin G.; POLACINO, Patricia; HUANG, Meei-Li; SYKES, Craig; OBENZA, Willimark M.; REPETTO, Andrea C.; KASHUBA, Angela; BUMGARNER, Roger; DeROSA, Stephen C.; WOOLFREY, Ann E.; JEROME, Keith R.; MULLINS, James I.; HU, Shiu-Lok; KIEM, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have previously demonstrated robust control of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV1157-ipd3N4) viremia following administration of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in pigtailed macaques. Here, we sought to determine the safety of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in cART-suppressed and unsuppressed animals. Design We compared disease progression in animals challenged with SHIV 100 days post-transplant (PT), to controls that underwent transplant following SHIV challenge and stable, cART-dependent viral suppression. Methods SHIV viral load, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) levels, and anti-SHIV antibodies were measured longitudinally from plasma/serum from each animal. Flow cytometry was used to assess T-cell subset frequencies in peripheral blood and gastrointestinal tract (GI). Deep sequencing was used to identify cART resistance mutations. Results In control animals, virus challenge induced transient peak viremia, viral set point, and durable suppression by cART. Subsequent HSCT was not associated with adverse events in these animals. PT animals were challenged during acute recovery following HSCT, and displayed sustained peak viremia and cART resistance. Although PT animals had comparable plasma levels of antiretroviral drugs and showed no evidence of enhanced infection of myeloid subsets in the periphery, they exhibited a drastic reduction in virus-specific antibody production and decreased T-cell counts. Conclusions These results suggest that virus challenge prior to complete transplant recovery impairs viral control and may promote drug resistance. These findings may also have implications for scheduled treatment interruption (STI) studies in patients on cART during post-HSCT recovery: premature STI could similarly result in lack of viral control and cART resistance. PMID:26372270

  7. A novel view of the adult bone marrow stem cell hierarchy and stem cell trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, M Z

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a novel view and working hypothesis about the hierarchy within the adult bone marrow stem cell compartment and the still-intriguing question of whether adult bone marrow contains primitive stem cells from early embryonic development, such as cells derived from the epiblast, migrating primordial germ cells or yolk sac-derived hemangioblasts. It also presents a novel view of the mechanisms that govern stem cell mobilization and homing, with special emphasis on the role of the complement cascade as a trigger for egress of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow into blood as well as the emerging role of novel homing factors and priming mechanisms that support stromal-derived factor 1-mediated homing of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells after transplantation. PMID:25486871

  8. Skeletal cell fate decisions within periosteum and bone marrow during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Colnot, Céline

    2009-02-01

    Bone repair requires the mobilization of adult skeletal stem cells/progenitors to allow deposition of cartilage and bone at the injury site. These stem cells/progenitors are believed to come from multiple sources including the bone marrow and the periosteum. The goal of this study was to establish the cellular contributions of bone marrow and periosteum to bone healing in vivo and to assess the effect of the tissue environment on cell differentiation within bone marrow and periosteum. Results show that periosteal injuries heal by endochondral ossification, whereas bone marrow injuries heal by intramembranous ossification, indicating that distinct cellular responses occur within these tissues during repair. [corrected] Next, lineage analyses were used to track the fate of cells derived from periosteum, bone marrow, and endosteum, a subcompartment of the bone marrow. Skeletal progenitor cells were found to be recruited locally and concurrently from periosteum and/or bone marrow/endosteum during bone repair. Periosteum and bone marrow/endosteum both gave rise to osteoblasts, whereas the periosteum was the major source of chondrocytes. Finally, results show that intrinsic and environmental signals modulate cell fate decisions within these tissues. In conclusion, this study sheds light into the origins of skeletal stem cells/progenitors during bone regeneration and indicates that periosteum, endosteum, and bone marrow contain pools of stem cells/progenitors with distinct osteogenic and chondrogenic potentials that vary with the tissue environment.

  9. Sertoli cell condition medium can induce germ like cells from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Monfared, Mahdieh Hajian; Minaee, Bagher; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Khrazinejad, Ebrahim; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Although many researchers have confirmed induction of germ cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), there are no reports that confirm spontaneous differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of adult Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) as a mutative factor in the induction of germ cells from BMMSCs. Materials and Methods: BMMSCs were collected from the bone marrow of 6-8-week old NMRI mice and their mesenchymal entities were proven using superficial markers (expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expresion of CD45 and CD11b) by fow cytometry. Their multi-potential entities were proved with differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic cells for 21 days. Also isolated Sertoli cells were enriched using lectin coated plates and Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) was collected. Sertoli cells were identified by immunocytochemistry and Vimentin marker. The cells were then differentiated into germ cells with SCCM for 2 weeks. Finally induced cells were evaluated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results: Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast and adipocyte showed their multi-potential property. Expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expression of CD45 and CD11b confirmed mesenchyme cells. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR results showed expression of germ cells specific marker (Mvh). Conclusion: This study confirmed the effect of SCCM as a motivational factor that can used for differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. PMID:27917274

  10. Multiple Myeloma Impairs Bone Marrow Localization of Effector Natural Killer Cells by Altering the Chemokine Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ponzetta, Andrea; Benigni, Giorgia; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Sanseviero, Emilio; Zingoni, Alessandra; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Santoni, Angela; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2015-11-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key innate immune effectors against multiple myeloma, their activity declining in multiple myeloma patients with disease progression. To identify the mechanisms underlying NK cell functional impairment, we characterized the distribution of functionally distinct NK cell subsets in the bone marrow of multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Herein we report that the number of KLRG1(-) NK cells endowed with potent effector function rapidly and selectively decreases in bone marrow during multiple myeloma growth, this correlating with decreased bone marrow NK cell degranulation in vivo. Altered NK cell subset distribution was dependent on skewed chemokine/chemokine receptor axes in the multiple myeloma microenvironment, with rapid downmodulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on NK cells, increased CXCL9 and CXCL10, and decreased CXCL12 expression in bone marrow. Similar alterations in chemokine receptor/chemokine axes were observed in patients with multiple myeloma. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that KLRG1(-) NK cell migration to the bone marrow was more efficient in healthy than multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Furthermore, bone marrow localization of transferred CXCR3-deficient NK cells with respect to wild type was enhanced in healthy and multiple myeloma-bearing mice, suggesting that CXCR3 restrains bone marrow NK cell trafficking. Our results indicate that multiple myeloma-promoted CXCR3 ligand upregulation together with CXCL12 downmodulation act as exit signals driving effector NK cells outside the bone marrow, thus weakening the antitumor immune response at the primary site of tumor growth.

  11. Use of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells and cultured bone marrow stromal cells in dogs with orthopaedic lesions.

    PubMed

    Crovace, A; Favia, A; Lacitignola, L; Di Comite, M S; Staffieri, F; Francioso, E

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical application in veterinary orthopedics of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) and cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs) for the treatment of some orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The authors carried out a clinical study on 14 dogs of different breed, age and size with the following lesions: 1 bone cyst of the glenoid rime; 2 nonunion of the tibia; 3 nonunion of the femur; 2 lengthening of the radius; 1 large bone defect of the distal radius;1 nonunion with carpus valgus; 4 Legg-Calvé-Perthés disease. In 9 cases the BMMCNs were used in combination with a three dimensional resorbable osteogenic scaffold the chemical composition and size of which facilitates the ingrowth of bone. In these cases the BMMNCs were suspended in an adequate amount of fibrin glue and then distribuited uniformly on a Tricalcium-Phosphate (TCP) scaffold onto which were also added some drops of thrombin. In 1 case of nonunion of the tibia and in 3 cases of Legg-Calvè-Perthés (LCP) disease the cultured BMSCs were used instead because of the small size of the dogs and of the little amount of aspirated bone marrow. X-ray examinations were performed immediately after the surgery. Clinical, ultrasounds and X-ray examinations were performed after 20 days and then every month. Until now the treated dogs have shown very good clinical and X-ray results. One of the objectives of the study was to use the BMMNCs in clinical application in orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The advantages of using the cells immediately after the bone marrow is collected, are that the surgery can be performed the same day, the cells do not need to be expanded in vitro, they preserve their osteogenic potential to form bone and promote the proper integration of the implant with the bone and lastly, the technique is easier and the costs are lower.

  12. Use of spleen organ cultures to monitor hemopoietic progenitor cell regeneration following irradiation and marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    von Melchner, H.; Metcalf, D.; Mandel, T.E.

    1980-11-01

    After lethal irradiation of C57BL mice followed by the injection of 10/sup 7/ marrow cells, total cellularity and progenitor cell levels exceeded pretreatment levels within 12 days in the spleen, but regeneration remained incomplete in the marrow. The exceptional regenerative capacity of progenitor populations in the spleen was observed in organ cultures of spleen slices prepared 24 h after irradiation and transplantation, excluding continuous repopulation from the marrow as a significant factor in splenic regeneration.

  13. PPARγ antagonist attenuates mouse immune-mediated bone marrow failure by inhibition of T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuya; Feng, Xingmin; Chen, Jichun; Li, Jungang; Muranski, Pawel; Desierto, Marie J.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Malide, Daniela; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S.

    2016-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells target hematopoietic cells; at presentation, the bone marrow is replaced by fat. It was reported that bone marrow adipocytes were negative regulators of hematopoietic microenvironment. To examine the role of adipocytes in bone marrow failure, we investigated peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma, a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, utilizing an antagonist of this factor called bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether. While bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether inhibited adipogenesis as expected, it also suppressed T cell infiltration of bone marrow, reduced plasma inflammatory cytokines, decreased expression of multiple inflammasome genes, and ameliorated marrow failure. In vitro, bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether suppressed activation and proliferation, and reduced phospholipase C gamma 1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 expression, as well as inhibiting calcium flux in T cells. The in vivo effect of bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether on T cells was confirmed in a second immune-mediated bone marrow failure model, using different strains and non-major histocompatibility antigen mismatched: bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether ameliorated marrow failure by inhibition of T cell infiltration of bone marrow. Our data indicate that peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists may attenuate murine immune-mediated bone marrow failure, at least in part, by suppression of T cell activation, which might hold implications in the application of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists in immune-mediated pathophysiologies, both in the laboratory and in the clinic. Genetically “fatless” mice developed bone marrow failure with accumulation of marrow adipocytes in our model, even in the absence of body fat, suggesting different mechanisms of systematic and marrow adipogenesis and physiologic versus pathophysiologic fat accumulation. PMID:26589913

  14. PPARγ antagonist attenuates mouse immune-mediated bone marrow failure by inhibition of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuya; Feng, Xingmin; Chen, Jichun; Li, Jungang; Muranski, Pawel; Desierto, Marie J; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Malide, Daniela; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2016-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells target hematopoietic cells; at presentation, the bone marrow is replaced by fat. It was reported that bone marrow adipocytes were negative regulators of hematopoietic microenvironment. To examine the role of adipocytes in bone marrow failure, we investigated peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma, a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, utilizing an antagonist of this factor called bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether. While bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether inhibited adipogenesis as expected, it also suppressed T cell infiltration of bone marrow, reduced plasma inflammatory cytokines, decreased expression of multiple inflammasome genes, and ameliorated marrow failure. In vitro, bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether suppressed activation and proliferation, and reduced phospholipase C gamma 1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 expression, as well as inhibiting calcium flux in T cells. The in vivo effect of bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether on T cells was confirmed in a second immune-mediated bone marrow failure model, using different strains and non-major histocompatibility antigen mismatched: bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether ameliorated marrow failure by inhibition of T cell infiltration of bone marrow. Our data indicate that peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists may attenuate murine immune-mediated bone marrow failure, at least in part, by suppression of T cell activation, which might hold implications in the application of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists in immune-mediated pathophysiologies, both in the laboratory and in the clinic. Genetically "fatless" mice developed bone marrow failure with accumulation of marrow adipocytes in our model, even in the absence of body fat, suggesting different mechanisms of systematic and marrow adipogenesis and physiologic versus pathophysiologic fat accumulation.

  15. Blood and Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells for Transplantation: A Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Janssen; Hiemenz; Fields; Zorsky; Ballester; Goldstein; Elfenbein

    1994-05-01

    Classical bone marrow transplantation collects bone marrow from a normal individual. This is infused into a patient rendered aplastic by high-dose chemoradiotherapy. Shortcomings include a limited donor pool and morbidity and mortality from graft-vs-host and graft rejection phenomena. Autologous marrow transplantation, in which the marrow of the patient to be transplanted is harvested, cryopreserved, and stored until needed, is not so constrained. Although marrow cannot be collected from some individuals due to hypocellularity, fibrosis, or infiltration with malignant disease, the presence of peripheral blood stem cells in the circulation allows these individuals to be treated with autologous transplantation therapy. It has been postulated that these hematopoietic progenitors have advantages over bone marrow collected stem cells, including safer and less expensive collections and accelerated rates of hematopoietic recovery following high-dose therapy and stem cell reinfusion.

  16. Modeling Human Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moonjung; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Winkler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The combination of epigenetic reprogramming with advanced genome editing technologies opened a new avenue to study disease mechanisms, particularly of disorders with depleted target tissue. Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) typically present with a marked reduction of peripheral blood cells due to a destroyed or dysfunctional bone marrow compartment. Somatic and germline mutations have been etiologically linked to many cases of BMFS. However, without the ability to study primary patient material, the exact pathogenesis for many entities remained fragmentary. Capturing the pathological genotype in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows studying potential developmental defects leading to a particular phenotype. The lack of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in these patients can also be overcome by differentiating patient-derived iPSCs into hematopoietic lineages. With fast growing genome editing techniques, such as CRISPR/Cas9, correction of disease-causing mutations in iPSCs or introduction of mutations in cells from healthy individuals enable comparative studies that may identify other genetic or epigenetic events contributing to a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we present recent progresses in disease modeling of inherited and acquired BMFS using reprogramming and genome editing techniques. We also discuss the challenges and potential shortcomings of iPSC-based models for hematological diseases.

  17. Treatment with bone marrow-derived stromal cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, David S; Gao, Xiaohua; Liu, Yong Bo; Dulchavsky, Deborah S; Danyluk, Andrew L; Bansal, Mona; Chopp, Michael; McIntosh, Kevin; Arbab, Ali S; Dulchavsky, Scott A; Gautam, Subhash C

    2008-06-01

    Bone marrow stem cells participate in tissue repair processes and may have a role in wound healing. Diabetes is characterised by delayed and poor wound healing. We investigated the potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) to promote healing of fascial wounds in diabetic rats. After manifestation of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic state for 5 weeks in male adult Sprague-Dawley rats, healing of fascial wounds was severely compromised. Compromised wound healing in diabetic rats was characterised by excessive polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, lack of granulation tissue formation, deficit of collagen and growth factor [transforming growth factor (TGF-beta), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor PDGF-BB and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] expression in the wound tissue and significant decrease in biomechanical strength of wounds. Treatment with BMSC systemically or locally at the wound site improved the wound-breaking strength (WBS) of fascial wounds. The improvement in WBS was associated with an immediate and significant increase in collagen levels (types I-V) in the wound bed. In addition, treatment with BMSCs increased the expression of growth factors critical to proper repair and regeneration of the damaged tissue moderately (TGF-beta, KGF) to markedly (EGF, VEGF, PDGF-BB). These data suggest that cell therapy with BMSCs has the potential to augment healing of the diabetic wounds.

  18. Bone marrow-derived pancreatic stellate cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Sparmann, Gisela; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Hofmeister-Mielke, Nicole; Koczan, Dirk; Jaster, Robert; Liebe, Stefan; Wolff, Daniel; Emmrich, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Origin and fate of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) before, during and after pancreatic injury are a matter of debate. The crucial role of PSCs in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis is generally accepted. However, the turnover of the cells remains obscure. The present study addressed the issue of a potential bone marrow (BM) origin of PSCs. We used a model of stable hematopoietic chimerism by grafting enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-expressing BM cells after irradiation of acceptor rats. Chimerism was detected by FACS analysis of eGFP-positive cells in the peripheral blood. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) was used to induce acute pancreatic inflammation with subsequent recovery over 4 weeks. Investigations have been focused on isolated cells to detect the resting PSC population. The incidence of eGFP-positive PSC obtained from the pancreas of chimeric rats was approximately 7% in healthy pancreatic tissue and increased significantly to a mean of 18% in the restored pancreas 4 weeks after DBTC-induced acute inflammation. Our results suggest that BM-derived progenitor cells represent a source of renewable stellate cells in the pancreas. Increased numbers of resting PSCs after regeneration point toward enhanced recruitment of BM-derived cells to the pancreas and/or re-acquisition of a quiescent state after inflammation-induced activation.

  19. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naozumi; Jin, Hong; Liu, Tianju; Chensue, Stephen W; Phan, Sem H

    2004-01-01

    The origin of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis is assumed to be intrapulmonary, but their extrapulmonary origin and especially derivation from bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells has not been ruled out. To examine this possibility directly, adult mice were durably engrafted with BM isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced GFP. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis in such chimera mice by endotracheal bleomycin (BLM) injection caused large numbers of GFP(+) cells to appear in active fibrotic lesions, while only a few GFP(+) cells could be identified in control lungs. Flow-cytometric analysis of lung cells confirmed the BLM-induced increase in GFP(+) cells in chimera mice and revealed a significant increase in GFP(+) cells that also express type I collagen. GFP(+) lung fibroblasts isolated from chimera mice expressed collagen and telomerase reverse transcriptase but not alpha-smooth muscle actin. Treatment of isolated GFP(+) fibroblasts with TGF-beta failed to induce myofibroblast differentiation. Cultured lung fibroblasts expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 and responded chemotactically to their cognate ligands, stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha and secondary lymphoid chemokine, respectively. Thus the collagen-producing lung fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis can also be derived from BM progenitor cells.

  20. Necroptosis in spontaneously-mutated hematopoietic cells induces autoimmune bone marrow failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Junping; Breslin, Peter; Wei, Wei; Li, Jing; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cannova, Joseph; Ni, Allen; Ng, Grace; Schmidt, Rachel; Chen, Haiyan; Parini, Vamsi; Kuo, Paul C.; Kini, Ameet R.; Stiff, Patrick; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Jiwang

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an autoimmune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. The mechanism by which such an autoimmune reaction is initiated is unknown. Whether and how the genetic lesions detected in patients cause autoimmune bone marrow failure have not yet been determined. We found that mice with spontaneous deletion of the TGFβ-activated kinase-1 gene in a small subset of hematopoietic cells developed bone marrow failure which resembled the clinical manifestations of acquired aplastic anemia patients. Bone marrow failure in such mice could be reversed by depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes or blocked by knockout of interferon-γ, suggesting a Th1-cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism. The onset and progression of bone marrow failure in such mice were significantly accelerated by the inactivation of tumor necrosis factor-α signaling. Tumor necrosis factor-α restricts autoimmune bone marrow failure by inhibiting type-1 T-cell responses and maintaining the function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Furthermore, we determined that necroptosis among a small subset of mutant hematopoietic cells is the cause of autoimmune bone marrow failure because such bone marrow failure can be prevented by deletion of receptor interacting protein kinase-3. Our study suggests a novel mechanism to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmune bone marrow failure. PMID:27634200

  1. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  2. A T Cell View of the Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Adriana; Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Galvani, Rômulo Gonçalves; Balduino, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells present in the bone marrow (BM) represent an activated/memory phenotype and most of these, if not all, are circulating T cells. Their lodging in the BM keeps them activated, turning the BM microenvironment into a “memory reservoir.” This article will focus on how T cell activation in the BM results in both direct and indirect effects on the hematopoiesis. The hematopoietic stem cell niche will be presented, with its main components and organization, along with the role played by T lymphocytes in basal and pathologic conditions and their effect on the bone remodeling process. Also discussed herein will be how “normal” bone mass peak is achieved only in the presence of an intact adaptive immune system, with T and B cells playing critical roles in this process. Our main hypothesis is that the partnership between T cells and cells of the BM microenvironment orchestrates numerous processes regulating immunity, hematopoiesis, and bone remodeling. PMID:27242791

  3. Increased Bone Mass in Female Mice Lacking Mast Cell Chymase

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Thomas; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Calounova, Gabriela; Hu, Lijuan; Rasmusson, Annica; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Wernersson, Sara; Åbrink, Magnus; Andersson, Göran; Larsson, Sune; Melhus, Håkan; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Here we addressed the potential impact of chymase, a mast-cell restricted protease, on mouse bone phenotype. We show that female mice lacking the chymase Mcpt4 acquired a persistent expansion of diaphyseal bone in comparison with wild type controls, reaching a 15% larger diaphyseal cross sectional area at 12 months of age. Mcpt4-/- mice also showed increased levels of a bone anabolic serum marker and higher periosteal bone formation rate. However, they were not protected from experimental osteoporosis, suggesting that chymase regulates normal bone homeostasis rather than the course of osteoporosis. Further, the absence of Mcpt4 resulted in age-dependent upregulation of numerous genes important for bone formation but no effects on osteoclast activity. In spite of the latter, Mcpt4-/- bones had increased cortical porosity and reduced endocortical mineralization. Mast cells were found periosteally and, notably, bone-proximal mast cells in Mcpt4-/- mice were degranulated to a larger extent than in wild type mice. Hence, chymase regulates degranulation of bone mast cells, which could affect the release of mast cell-derived factors influencing bone remodelling. Together, these findings reveal a functional impact of mast cell chymase on bone. Further studies exploring the possibility of using chymase inhibitors as a strategy to increase bone volume may be warranted. PMID:27936149

  4. Effects of OK-432 on murine bone marrow and the production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Rosse, C.

    1985-01-01

    The streptococcal preparation, OK-432, which augments anti-tumor responses in humans and mice, has been shown to be a potent immunomodulator. Among its effects is a pronounced augmentation of natural killer (NK) activity. The hypothesis that OK-432 alters the rates of production and maturation of NK cells in the bone marrow was tested. Studies to determine the kinetic parameters of NK cell production in normal C57BL/6J mice using tritiated thymidine, /sup 3/H-TdR, as a DNA marker are described. We are now extending those studies to determine the effect of OK-432 on the bone marrow and on the production of NK cells in the marrow. Initial observations are reported which indicate that OK-432 has profound effects on the cellularity and mitotic activity of the bone marrow, and in particular, on cells with the characteristics of natural killer cells within the marrow. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. The Challenge and the Promise of Bone Marrow Cells for Human Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Chu, Constance R

    2015-04-01

    The cartilage repair potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells has been well described. Harnessing this potential for human articular cartilage repair remains challenging. Accessing bone marrow repair cells through marrow stimulation techniques such as microfracture is readily achieved with generally good but inconsistent results. Animal and human studies show feasibility for ex vivo processing of bone marrow to isolate, concentrate, and culture mesenchymal stem cells. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to show consistent and clinically meaningful improvement using bone marrow cell preparations above what has been achieved with microfracture. Consequently, microfracture continues to be the simplest and most commonly used method to enhance repair of focal articular cartilage defects. Emerging preclinical work in the equine model suggests a role for enhancing marrow-stimulation techniques through the use of natural scaffolds such as autologous platelet enriched fibrin as well as optimization of joint biology through localized gene therapy to support cartilage repair. In contrast to joint replacement where inert materials of known mechanical properties are used, host biology determines the relative success, failure, and durability of cartilage repair. As such, development of personalized strategies to improve the quality and durability of bone marrow cell-based articular cartilage repair represent exciting new areas of inquiry. Continued advances in stem cell biology, scaffold technologies, and methods to delineate and enhance host biology, both systemically and within the joint, hold promise for harnessing the full power of bone marrow cells to facilitate cartilage repair and regeneration.

  6. Heme-Oxygenases during Erythropoiesis in K562 and Human Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Liliane R.; Costa, Elaine S.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara L.; Teodosio, Cristina; Bárcena, Paloma; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Orfao, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, heme can be degraded by heme-oxygenases (HO). Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is known to be the heme inducible isoform, whereas heme-oxygenase 2 (HO-2) is the constitutive enzyme. Here we investigated the presence of HO during erythroid differentiation in human bone marrow erythroid precursors and K562 cells. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were below limits of detection in K562 cells. Moreover, heme was unable to induce HO-1, at the protein and mRNA profiles. Surprisingly, HO-2 expression was inhibited upon incubation with heme. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these findings, we analyzed HO expression during normal erythropoiesis in human bone marrow. Erythroid precursors were characterized by lack of significant expression of HO-1 and by progressive reduction of HO-2 during differentiation. FLVCR expression, a recently described heme exporter found in erythroid precursors, was also analyzed. Interestingly, the disruption in the HO detoxification system was accompanied by a transient induction of FLVCR. It will be interesting to verify if the inhibition of HO expression, that we found, is preventing a futile cycle of concomitant heme synthesis and catabolism. We believe that a significant feature of erythropoiesis could be the replacement of heme breakdown by heme exportation, as a mechanism to prevent heme toxicity. PMID:21765894

  7. NKT cells, Treg, and their interactions in bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Pillai, Asha B.; Lowsky, Robert; Strober, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Tumor eradication is promoted by the anti-tumor activity of donor T cells contained in the transplant; however, donor T cells also mediate the serious side effect of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Separation of GVHD from graft anti-tumor activity is an important goal of research in improving transplant outcome. One approach is to take advantage of the immunomodulatory activity of regulatory NKT cells and CD4+ CD25+ Treg of host and/or donor origin. Both host and donor NKT cells and donor Treg are able to prevent GVHD in murine models. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of NKT cell- and Treg-mediated protection against GVHD in mice while maintaining graft anti-tumor activity. In addition, we also examine the interactions between NKT cells and Treg in the context of BMT, and integrate the data from murine experimental models with the observations made in humans. PMID:20583031

  8. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Display Intact Functionality.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Elizabeth O; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Yuan, Shala; Garcia, Marco; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Galipeau, Jacques

    2017-01-26

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only cure for sickle cell disease (SCD), but engraftment remains challenging in patients lacking matched donors. Infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) at the time of HCT may promote hematopoiesis and ameliorate graft-versus-host disease. Experimental murine models suggest MSC major histocompatibility complex compatibility with recipient impacts their in vivo function, suggesting autologous MSCs could be superior to third-party MSCs for promoting HCT engraftment. Here we tested whether bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs from SCD subjects have comparable functionality compared with MSCs from healthy volunteers. SCD MSC doubling time and surface marker phenotype did not differ significantly from non-SCD. Third-party and autologous (SCD) T cell proliferation was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by all MSCs. SCD MSCs comparably expressed indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, which based on transwell and blocking experiments appeared to be the dominant immunomodulatory pathway. The expression of key genes involved in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-MSC interactions was minimally altered between SCD and non-SCD MSCs. Expression was, however, altered by IFN-γ stimulation, particularly CXCL14, CXCL26, CX3CL1, CKITL, and JAG1, indicating the potential to augment MSC expression by cytokine stimulation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of expanding BM-derived MSCs from SCD patients that phenotypically and functionally do not differ per International Society of Cell Therapy essential criteria from non-SCD MSCs, supporting initial evaluation (primarily for safety) of autologous MSCs to enhance haploidentical HSC engraftment in SCD.

  9. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  10. Cytokeratin-positive cells in bone marrow of breast cancer patients and noncancer donors

    PubMed Central

    Krag, David N.; Kusminsky, Roberto; Manna, Edward; Weaver, Donald; Harlow, Seth P.; Covelli, Michael; Stanley, Mary A.; McCahill, Laurence; Ittleman, Frank; Leavitt, Bruce; Krag, Martin; Amarante, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Detection of disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow may provide important prognostic information in breast cancer patients. With few exceptions the number of stained cells scored as cancer is very low; there may be only one cell per slide. This makes definitive interpretation of cancer in marrow challenging. False-positive staining of marrow cells with cytokeratin (CK) antibody is relatively common and makes interpretation more difficult. In this report we focus on false-positive staining of marrow specimens from breast cancer patients and noncancer controls and demonstrate that the frequency of false positive events is common. Bone marrow was collected from 23 cancer-free donors and 60 breast cancer patients. Samples were processed by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation and slides were prepared for immunocytochemical staining with CK and irrelevant (IR) antibody. Slides were evaluated manually and positive cells were categorized as tumor cells (TCs), hematopoetic cells (HCs), or questionable cells (QCs). False-positive staining events were commonly observed in noncancer cases stained with CK or IR antibodies and in breast cancer cases stained with IR antibody. There was little difference in the number of breast cancer marrow specimens scored as tumor cells regardless of whether the antibody used was CK or IR. It is important to devise improved criteria and methods for accurate detection and interpretation of disseminated tumor cells in the marrow of breast cancer patients. PMID:19417625

  11. The role of bone marrow-derived cells during the bone healing process in the GFP mouse bone marrow transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Katase, Naoki; Buery, Rosario Rivera; Tamamura, Ryo; Ito, Satoshi; Takagi, Shin; Iida, Seiji; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Bone healing is a complex and multistep process in which the origin of the cells participating in bone repair is still unknown. The involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in tissue repair has been the subject of recent studies. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells in bone healing were traced using the GFP bone marrow transplantation model. Bone marrow cells from C57BL/6-Tg (CAG-EGFP) were transplanted into C57BL/6 J wild mice. After transplantation, bone injury was created using a 1.0-mm drill. Bone healing was histologically assessed at 3, 7, 14, and 28 postoperative days. Immunohistochemistry for GFP; double-fluorescent immunohistochemistry for GFP-F4/80, GFP-CD34, and GFP-osteocalcin; and double-staining for GFP and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were performed. Bone marrow transplantation successfully replaced the hematopoietic cells into GFP-positive donor cells. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that osteoblasts or osteocytes in the repair stage were GFP-negative, whereas osteoclasts in the repair and remodeling stages and hematopoietic cells were GFP-positive. The results indicated that bone marrow-derived cells might not differentiate into osteoblasts. The role of bone marrow-derived cells might be limited to adjustment of the microenvironment by differentiating into inflammatory cells, osteoclasts, or endothelial cells in immature blood vessels.

  12. Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells from Bone Marrow Differentiate into Chondrocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lele; Weng, Yimin; Shui, Xiaolong; Fang, Wenlai; Zhang, Erge; Pan, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has great potential for treating chondral and osteochondral injuries. Efficient seed cells are the key to cartilage tissue engineering. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have greater differentiation ability than other bone-marrow stem cells, and thus may be candidate seed cells. We attempted to differentiate MAPCs into chondrocyte-like cells to evaluate their suitability as seed cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Toluidine blue and Alcian blue staining suggested that glycosaminoglycan was expressed in differentiated cells. Immunofluorostaining indicated that differentiated human MAPCs (hMAPCs) expressed collagen II. Based on these results, we concluded that bone-marrow-derived hMAPCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells in vitro.

  13. Characterization of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamzic, Edita; Whiting, Karen; Gordon Smith, Edward; Pettengell, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In aplastic anaemia (AA), haemopoietic activity is significantly reduced and generally attributed to failure of haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the bone marrow (BM). The regulation of haemopoiesis depends on the interaction between HSC and various cells of the BM microenvironment, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). MSC involvement in the functional restriction of HSC in AA is largely unknown and therefore, the physical and functional properties of AA MSC were studied in vitro. MSC were characterized by their phenotype and ability to form adherent stromal layers. The functional properties of AA MSC were assessed through proliferative, clonogenic and cross-over culture assays. Results indicate that although AA MSC presented typical morphology and distinctive mesenchymal markers, stromal formation was reduced, with 50% of BM samples failing to produce adherent layers. Furthermore, their proliferative and clonogenic capacity was markedly decreased (P = 0·03 and P = 0·04 respectively) and the ability to sustain haemopoiesis was significantly reduced, as assessed by total cell proliferation (P = 0·032 and P = 0·019 at Week 5 and 6, respectively) and clonogenic potential of HSC (P = 0·02 at Week 6). It was concluded that the biological characteristics of AA MSC are different from those of control MSC and their in vitro haemopoiesis-supporting ability is significantly reduced.

  14. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Drive Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Ludovic; Erpicum, Charlotte; Detry, Benoit; Blacher, Silvia; Lenoir, Bénédicte; Carnet, Oriane; Péqueux, Christel; Cataldo, Didier; Lecomte, Julie; Paupert, Jenny; Noel, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    It is now well accepted that multipotent Bone-Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM-MSC) contribute to cancer progression through several mechanisms including angiogenesis. However, their involvement during the lymphangiogenic process is poorly described. Using BM-MSC isolated from mice of two different backgrounds, we demonstrate a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC both in vivo and in vitro. Co-injection of BM-MSC and tumor cells in mice increased the in vivo tumor growth and intratumoral lymphatic vessel density. In addition, BM-MSC or their conditioned medium stimulated the recruitment of lymphatic vessels in vivo in an ear sponge assay, and ex vivo in the lymphatic ring assay (LRA). In vitro, MSC conditioned medium also increased the proliferation rate and the migration of both primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and an immortalized lymphatic endothelial cell line. Mechanistically, these pro-lymphangiogenic effects relied on the secretion of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-A by BM-MSC that activates VEGF Receptor (VEGFR)-2 pathway on LEC. Indeed, the trapping of VEGF-A in MSC conditioned medium by soluble VEGF Receptors (sVEGFR)-1, -2 or the inhibition of VEGFR-2 activity by a specific inhibitor (ZM 323881) both decreased LEC proliferation, migration and the phosphorylation of their main downstream target ERK1/2. This study provides direct unprecedented evidence for a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC via the production of VEGF-A which acts on LEC VEGFR-2. PMID:25222747

  15. [Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into Neuron-Like Cells In Vitro

    PubMed

    Guo, Zi-Kuan; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Hou, Chun-Mei; Li, Xiu-Sen; Mao, Ning

    2001-03-01

    Recent reports have clearly demonstrated that bone marrow cells can be differentiated into neurons, suggesting the existence of cells with the differentiation capacity in the bone marrow cell population. It is well known that hematopoietic stem cells as well as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be transplanted and therefore, alternative of them might contribute to the process. In the present study it was addressed whether marrow MSCs could be coaxed into neuron-specific antigen bearing cells and if so, whether the differentiated cells possess the cytochemical features seen in neurons. The report here showed that high concentration of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) could induce some of the MSCs into neuron-like cells expressing neurofilament (NF) and neuron specific enolase (NSE). The neuron-like cells were alkaline phosphotase positive while the others MSCs were kept negative. Cells treated with 2-ME were positive for alpha-naphthylacetate esterase and glycogen and negative for acetylchonlinesterase, which were similar with the results seen in untreated cells. Furthermore, Nissel body was not observed in treated cells shown by toluidine blue staining. Therefore, it is likely that the cells described here seem not belong to the neuronal lineage. These findings, however, reveal that human MSCs could alter their committed fates under some circumstances.

  16. Roles of bone marrow cells in skeletal metastases: no longer bystanders.

    PubMed

    Park, Serk In; Soki, Fabiana N; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-12-01

    Bone serves one of the most congenial metastatic microenvironments for multiple types of solid tumors, but its role in this process remains under-explored. Among many cell populations constituting the bone and bone marrow microenvironment, osteoblasts (originated from mesenchymal stem cells) and osteoclasts (originated from hematopoietic stem cells) have been the main research focus for pro-tumorigenic roles. Recently, increasing evidence further elucidates that hematopoietic lineage cells as well as stromal cells in the bone marrow mediate distinct but critical functions in tumor growth, metastasis, angiogenesis and apoptosis in the bone microenvironment. This review article summarizes the key evidence describing differential roles of bone marrow cells, including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), megakaryocytes, macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the development of metastatic bone lesions. HSCs promote tumor growth by switching on angiogenesis, but at the same time compete with metastatic tumor cells for occupancy of osteoblastic niche. Megakaryocytes negatively regulate the extravasating tumor cells by inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation. Macrophages and myeloid cells have pro-tumorigenic roles in general, suggesting a similar effect in the bone marrow. Hematopoietic and stromal cell populations in the bone marrow, previously considered as simple by-standers in the context of tumor metastasis, have distinct and active roles in promoting or suppressing tumor growth and metastasis in bone. Further investigation on the extended roles of bone marrow cells will help formulate better approaches to treatment through improved understanding of the metastatic bone microenvironment.

  17. Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma-Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 .TITLE: Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert...the compound (Figure 1 ). The inhibitor was slightly more effective in T-47D cells than in MCF-7 cells, but did not eradicate dormant clones much past

  18. Antitumor immunomodulatory activity of allogenic bone marrow cells on TiNi scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokorev, O. V.; Hodorenko, V. N.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Gunther, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of modulation of anti-tumor response by allogenic bone marrow cell transplantation into porous TiNi-based scaffold. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into porous TiNi-based scaffold leads to antitumor (35%) and antimetastatic (55%) effects. The lifetime of tumor-bearing animals and implanted allogenic bone marrow cells in incubator of TiNi increases up to 60%. The possible mechanisms of the effect of allogenic cells on tumor process are the stimulation of endogenous effectors of antitumor immunity.

  19. Primary bone marrow B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma successfully treated with R-CHOP.

    PubMed

    Qian, Liren; Zhang, Zhi; Shen, Jianliang; Liu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Primary isolated bone marrow disease as a presenting feature of lymphoma is very rare. We describe the case of a Chinese with isolated bone marrow small B-cell lymphoma as a first manifestation. A 55-year old woman was admitted to our hospital with fever. Her peripheral blood smear and laboratory findings were suggestive of bicytopenia. Bone marrow specimen showed diffusely distributed small-sized lymphocytes. Combined with immunophenotypic and chromosomal analysis, a diagnosis of primary bone marrow B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was made. The patient was treated with R-CHOP (rituximab and cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, vindesine, and prednisone) regimen for six cycles. She had complete remission and is still alive without relapse. We concluded that primary bone marrow mature small B-cell lymphoma is a rare but distinctive subtype of lymphoma. The prognosis for this entity is poor but rituximab-based treatment is promising for improving its outcomes.

  20. The Role of Bone Marrow Cells in the Phenotypic Changes Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Cheng, Qingli; Liu, Sheng; Zhao, Jiahui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the role of bone marrow cells in the phenotypic changes that occur in diabetic nephropathy. Bone marrow cells were obtained from either streptozotocin-induced diabetic or untreated control C3H/He mice and transplanted into control C3H/He mice. Eight weeks after bone marrow cell transplantation, renal morphologic changes and clinical parameters of diabetic nephropathy, including the urine albumin/creatinine ratio and glucose tolerance, were measured in vivo. Expression levels of the genes encoding α1 type IV collagen and transforming growth factor-β1 in the kidney were assayed. Our results demonstrated that glucose tolerance was normal in the recipients of bone marrow transplants from both diabetic and control donors. However, compared with recipients of the control bone marrow transplant, the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, glomerular size, and the mesangial/glomerular area ratio increased 3.3-fold (p < 0.01), 1.23-fold (p < 0.01), and 2.13-fold (p < 0.001), respectively, in the recipients of the diabetic bone marrow transplant. Expression levels of the genes encoding glomerular α1 type IV collagen and transforming growth factor-β1 were also significantly increased (p < 0.01) in the recipients of the diabetic bone marrow transplant. Our data suggest that bone marrow cells from the STZ-induced diabetic mice can confer a diabetic phenotype to recipient control mice without the presence of hyperglycemia. PMID:26340671

  1. Neuronal-like cell differentiation of non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxin; Zhang, Jinghan; Ben, Xiaoming

    2013-08-05

    Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells from C57BL/6J mice were separated and cultured using the "pour-off" method. Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells developed colony-forming unit-fibroblasts, and could be expanded by supplementation with epidermal growth factor. Immunocytochemistry showed that the non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells exposed to basic fibroblast growth factor/epidermal growth factor/nerve growth factor expressed the neuron specific markers, neurofilament-200 and NeuN, in vitro. Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells from β-galactosidase transgenic mice were also transplanted into focal ischemic brain (right corpus striatum) of C57BL/6J mice. At 8 weeks, cells positive for LacZ and β-galactosidase staining were observed in the ischemic tissues, and cells co-labeled with both β-galactosidase and NeuN were seen by double immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that the non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells could differentiate into neuronal-like cells in vitro and in vivo.

  2. T cell regeneration after allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Favrot, Marie; Janossy, G.; Tidman, N.; Blacklock, Hilary; Lopez, Elisa; Bofill, Margarita; Lampert, I.; Morgenstein, G.; Powles, R.; Prentice, H. G.; Hoffbrand, A. V.

    1983-01-01

    Various T cell subsets were characterized by double immunofluorescent staining using monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) in blood, bone marrow (BM) and tissues of 29 patients after allogeneic BM transplantation (BMT). In an attempt to prevent graft versus host disease (GvHD), 15 patients received cyclosporin A (Cy A). In the remaining 14 patients the BM was pre-incubated with a MoAb, OKT3. The regeneration of T4+ subset was delayed and the level of T8+ cells was abnormally high even 1 year after engraftment. This did not have any predictive value for the appearance of complications such as GvHD or severe viral infections. The number of T8+ cells was lower in the group of patients who received Cy A than in the OKT3 group (0·7±0·2 vs 1·5±0·3×109/1 at day 90). In contrast to normal individuals, the T4/T8 ratio in both blood and regenerating BM of BMT patients was <1. A sizeable subset of circulating T cells expressed the phenotype T8+,T10+,HNK-1+,DR+. Circulating cells of this phenotype were transiently very high (up to 50%) in patients with active GvHD or suffering from severe viral infection. This subpopulation of lymphocytes was not found in the epidermal infiltrate that accompanied GvHD where the predominant phenotype was T8+,T1-,T10-,HNK-1-,DR-. We conclude therefore that after BMT the number and phenotype of circulating T cells reflects the T cell distribution seen in the regenerating BM. PMID:6352107

  3. Anticonvulsant activity of bone marrow cells in electroconvulsive seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow is an accessible source of progenitor cells, which have been investigated as treatment for neurological diseases in a number of clinical trials. Here we evaluated the potential benefit of bone marrow cells in protecting against convulsive seizures induced by maximum electroconvulsive shock (MES), a widely used model for screening of anti-epileptic drugs. Behavioral and inflammatory responses were measured after MES induction in order to verify the effects promoted by transplantation of bone marrow cells. To assess the anticonvulsant effects of bone marrow cell transplantation, we measured the frequency and duration of tonic seizure, the mortality rate, the microglial expression and the blood levels of cytokine IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α after MES induction. We hypothesized that these behavioral and inflammatory responses to a strong stimulus such as a convulsive seizure could be modified by the transplantation of bone marrow cells. Results Bone marrow transplanted cells altered the convulsive threshold and showed anticonvulsant effect by protecting from tonic seizures. Bone marrow cells modified the microglial expression in the analyzed brain areas, increased the IL-10 and attenuate IL-6 levels. Conclusions Bone marrow cells exert protective effects by blocking the course of electroconvulsive seizures. Additionally, electroconvulsive seizures induced acute inflammatory responses by altering the pattern of microglia expression, as well as in IL-6 and IL-10 levels. Our findings also indicated that the anticonvulsant effects of these cells can be tested with the MES model following the same paradigm used for drug testing in pharmacological screening. Studies on the inflammatory reaction in response to acute seizures in the presence of transplanted bone marrow cells might open a wide range of discussions on the mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology of epilepsies. PMID:24011127

  4. Allospecific rejection of MHC class I-deficient bone marrow by CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Haspot, Fabienne; Li, Hao Wei; Lucas, Carrie L.; Fehr, Thomas; Beyaz, Semir; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance of long-term immunosuppression is a desired goal in organ transplantation. Mixed chimerism offers a promising approach to tolerance induction, and we have aimed to develop low-toxicity, non-immunodepleting approaches to achieve this outcome. In a mouse model achieving fully MHC-mismatched allogeneic bone marrow engraftment with minimal conditioning (3 Gy total body irradiation followed by anti-CD154 and T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow cells), CD4 T cells in the recipient are required to promote tolerance of pre-existing alloreactive recipient CD8 T cells and thereby permit chimerism induction. We now demonstrate that mice devoid of CD4 T cells and NK cells reject MHC class-I deficient and class I/class II-deficient marrow in a CD8 T cell-dependent manner. This rejection is specific for donor alloantigens, since recipient hematopoiesis is not affected by donor marrow rejection and MHC class-I deficient bone marrow that is syngeneic to the recipient is not rejected. Recipient CD8 T cells are activated and develop cytotoxicity against MHC class I-deficient donor cells in association with rejection. These data implicate a novel CD8 T cell-dependent bone marrow rejection pathway, wherein recipient CD8 T cells indirectly activated by donor alloantigens promote direct killing, in a TCR-independent manner, of class I-deficient donor cells. PMID:24304495

  5. Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangzhi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Chaoyong; Sun, Yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Yuebei; Bao, Rongni; Zhao, Ningjian

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-µm Transwell inserts. The differentiation and biological activity of chondrocytes in the culture system were measured, and the inflammatory factors and OA-associated markers were also measured. The results indicated that coculture with human bone marrow stem cells increases cell proliferation of chondrocytes and inhibits inflammatory activity in osteoarthritis.

  6. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  7. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  8. Bone marrow origin of Ia-positive cells in the medulla rat thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, A.N.; Mayrhofer, G.

    1981-06-01

    Irradiated rats were reconstituted with bone marrow from F1 hybrids. Ia antigen of donor-bone marrow origin was detected by an immunoperoxidase technique on cryostat sections and found predominantly in the medulla of rat thymus 2 wk after reconstitution. These Ia-bearing cells increased in number with time after reconstitution, but the Ia on the cortical epithelial cells remained of host origin. The nature of the bone marrow-derived cells and their implication for major histocompatibility complex restriction are discussed.

  9. [Therapeutic potential of bone marrow stem cells in cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cruz, Gilberto; Milián-Rodríguez, Lismary

    2015-05-16

    Introduccion. Las celulas madre constituyen una alternativa terapeutica que se encuentra en fase de experimentacion para el infarto cerebral. Objetivo. Mostrar la evidencia cientifica existente sobre el potencial terapeutico de las celulas madre de la medula osea en esta enfermedad. Desarrollo. El infarto cerebral representa el 80% de las enfermedades cerebrovasculares. La trombolisis constituye la unica terapia aprobada, pero, por su estrecha ventana terapeutica, solo se aplica a un bajo porcentaje de los pacientes. De manera alternativa, los tratamientos neurorrestauradores, como el de celulas madre, pueden aplicarse en periodos mas prolongados. Por esta razon se efectuo una busqueda bibliografica en PubMed con el empleo de las palabras clave 'stem cells', 'bone marrow derived mononuclear cells' y 'stroke'. Se encontraron evidencias de seguridad y eficacia de dichas celulas en diferentes momentos evolutivos del infarto cerebral. Se identificaron estudios que en clinica y preclinica las recolectaron por puncion medular y en sangre periferica, y las trasplantaron directamente en el area infartada o por via intravascular. El efecto terapeutico se relaciona con sus propiedades de plasticidad celular y liberacion de factores troficos. Conclusiones. El concentrado de celulas mononucleares autologas, obtenido en sangre periferica o por puncion de la medula osea, y trasplantado por via intravenosa, es una factible opcion metodologica que permitira rapidamente incrementar el numero de ensayos clinicos en diferentes etapas evolutivas del infarto cerebral. Esta terapia muestra seguridad y eficacia; sin embargo, deben ampliarse las evidencias que avalen su generalizacion en humanos.

  10. Characterization of bone marrow mononuclear cells on biomaterials for bone tissue engineering in vitro.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Dirk; Verboket, René; Schaible, Alexander; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma), demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and bovine cancellous bone (BS) were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo.

  11. Bone marrow metastases in small cell lung cancer: detection with magnetic resonance imaging and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Trillet, V.; Revel, D.; Combaret, V.; Favrot, M.; Loire, R.; Tabib, A.; Pages, J.; Jacquemet, P.; Bonmartin, A.; Mornex, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of bone marrow involvement might be of prognostic value and may influence therapeutic decisions in small cell lung cancer. By unilateral bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, evidence of bone marrow metastases is seen in 15-30% of patients with this disease. Since magnetic resonance imaging of the lower body and immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies have recently been shown to be very sensitive detection methods, we investigated the value of these two techniques in detecting bone marrow involvement in 35 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer. The results were compared to those obtained with conventional cytohistological analysis. In all cases when cytology and/or bone marrow biopsy were positive, monoclonal antibodies immunostaining and magnetic resonance imaging also detected malignant cells. Furthermore, evidence of bone marrow involvement was shown with magnetic resonance imaging and/or immunostaining in 10 of 26 cases (38%) where routine procedures were unable to detect malignant cells. In one of these 26 patients, magnetic resonance imaging and immunostaining provided the only evidence of metastatic disease. These data suggest that the rate of bone marrow metastases is underestimated by routine procedures. Further investigation is needed to determine whether or not these new non-invasive methods have prognostic value or affect therapeutic choices in small cell lung carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2553088

  12. Application of Autologous Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to an Ovine Model of Growth Plate Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Rosa C; Xian, Cory J; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C.W; Foster, Bruce K

    2010-01-01

    Injury to growth plate cartilage in children can lead to bone bridge formation and result in bone growth deformities, a significant clinical problem currently lacking biological treatment. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) offer a promising therapeutic option for regeneration of damaged cartilage, due to their self renewing and multi-lineage differentiation attributes. Although some small animal model studies highlight the therapeutic potential of MSC for growth plate repair, translational research in large animal models, which more closely resemble the human condition, are lacking. Our laboratory has recently characterised MSCs derived from ovine bone marrow, and demonstrated these cells form cartilage-like tissue when transplanted within the gelatin sponge, Gelfoam, in vivo. In the current study, autologous bone marrow MSC were seeded into Gelfoam scaffold containing TGF-β1, and transplanted into a surgically created defect of the proximal ovine tibial growth plate. Examination of implants at 5 week post-operatively revealed transplanted autologous MSC failed to form new cartilage structure at the defect site, but contributed to an increase in formation of a dense fibrous tissue. Importantly, the extent of osteogenesis was diminished, and bone bridge formation was not accelerated due to transplantation of MSCs or the gelatin scaffold. The current study represents the first work that has utilised this ovine large animal model to investigate whether autologous bone marrow derived MSC can be used to initiate regeneration at the injured growth plate. PMID:20721323

  13. Lack of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Attenuates Foreign Body Inflammation because of Decreased Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Solowiej, Anna; Biswas, Purba; Graesser, Donnasue; Madri, Joseph A.

    2003-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kd member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of proteins, expressed on endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets. Antibody-blocking studies have implicated it in modulating leukocyte transmigration and angiogenesis. However, the generation of the PECAM-1 knockout mouse has shown that its function can be compensated for by similarly acting proteins because most acute inflammatory models proceed in a comparable manner in wild-type and knockout animals. We decided to examine the function of PECAM-1 in the chronic process of foreign body inflammation. We show that PECAM-1-deficient mice exhibit attenuated neutrophil infiltration in and around a subcutaneous polyvinyl acetyl implant. Bone marrow engraftment studies indicate that the lack of CD31 expression on the endothelium determines the diminished leukocyte accumulation in the knockout implants. Specifically, we find that decreased angiogenesis (as manifested by lower vessel density, decreased hemoglobin content, and less laminin deposition) correlates with lower neutrophil accumulation in the knockout animals. This study indicates that the absence of endothelial PECAM-1 results in decreased angiogenesis and therefore in diminished delivery of leukocytes to the foreign body implants. PMID:12598328

  14. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose.

  15. Derivation of hepatocytes from bone marrow cells in mice after radiation-induced myeloablation.

    PubMed

    Theise, N D; Badve, S; Saxena, R; Henegariu, O; Sell, S; Crawford, J M; Krause, D S

    2000-01-01

    Following a report of skeletal muscle regeneration from bone marrow cells, we investigated whether hepatocytes could also derive in vivo from bone marrow cells. A cohort of lethally irradiated B6D2F1 female mice received whole bone marrow transplants from age-matched male donors and were sacrificed at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 and months 2, 4, and 6 posttransplantation (n = 3 for each time point). Additionally, 2 archival female mice of the same strain who had previously been recipients of 200 male fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS)-sorted CD34(+)lin(-) cells were sacrificed 8 months posttransplantation under the same protocol. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the Y-chromosome was performed on liver tissue. Y-positive hepatocytes, up to 2.2% of total hepatocytes, were identified in 1 animal at 7 days posttransplantation and in all animals sacrificed 2 months or longer posttransplantation. Simultaneous FISH for the Y-chromosome and albumin messenger RNA (mRNA) confirmed male-derived cells were mature hepatocytes. These animals had received lethal doses of irradiation at the time of bone marrow transplantation, but this induced no overt, histologically demonstrable, acute hepatic injury, including inflammation, necrosis, oval cell proliferation, or scarring. We conclude that hepatocytes can derive from bone marrow cells after irradiation in the absence of severe acute injury. Also, the small subpopulation of CD34(+)lin(-) bone marrow cells is capable of such hepatic engraftment.

  16. Stromal cells from human long-term marrow cultures, but not cultured marrow fibroblasts, phagocytose horse serum constituents: studies with a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a species-specific epitope common to multiple horse serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Charbord, P; Tippens, D; Wight, T S; Gown, A M; Singer, J W

    1987-01-01

    This report describes an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody derived after immunization of mice with washed stromal cells from human, long-term bone marrow cultures. The antigen recognized by the antibody (BMS-1) is a carbohydrate-containing prosthetic group that is common to and specific for multiple horse serum proteins. These proteins are avidly ingested by stromal cells and concentrated in endocytic vesicles. Cultured smooth muscle cells took up the horse proteins in a similar manner to marrow stromal cells while cultured marrow fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and hepatoma cells did not. These data indicate that marrow stromal cells specifically accumulate horse serum proteins which might partially explain the horse serum requirement for long-term marrow culture maintenance. The data also suggest further similarities between marrow stromal and smooth muscle cells and additional differences between marrow fibroblasts and marrow stromal cells.

  17. Contribution of transplanted bone marrow cells to Purkinje neurons in human adult brains

    PubMed Central

    Weimann, James M.; Charlton, Carol A.; Brazelton, Timothy R.; Hackman, Robert C.; Blau, Helen M.

    2003-01-01

    We show here that cells within human adult bone marrow can contribute to cells in the adult human brain. Cerebellar tissues from female patients with hematologic malignancies, who had received chemotherapy, radiation, and a bone marrow transplant, were analyzed. Brain samples were obtained at autopsy from female patients who received male (sex-mismatched) or female (sex-matched, control) bone marrow transplants. Cerebella were evaluated in 10-μm-thick, formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections that encompassed up to ≈50% of a human Purkinje nucleus. A total of 5,860 Purkinje cells from sex-mismatched females and 3,202 Purkinje cells from sex-matched females were screened for Y chromosomes by epifluorescence. Confocal laser scanning microscopy allowed definitive identification of the sex chromosomes within the morphologically distinct Purkinje cells. In the brains of females who received male bone marrow, four Purkinje neurons were found that contained an X and a Y chromosome and two other Purkinje neurons contained more than a diploid number of sex chromosomes. No Y chromosomes were detected in the brains of sex-matched controls. The total frequency of male bone marrow contribution to female Purkinje cells approximated 0.1%. This study demonstrates that although during human development Purkinje neurons are no longer generated after birth, cells within the bone marrow can contribute to these CNS neurons even in adulthood. The underlying mechanism may be caused either by generation de novo of Purkinje neurons from bone marrow-derived cells or by fusion of marrow-derived cells with existing recipient Purkinje neurons. PMID:12576546

  18. Bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in five painted storks.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martha A; Terrell, Scott P; Neiffer, Donald L; Miller, Michele A; Mangold, Barbara J

    2002-08-01

    Five painted storks were treated with fenbendazole for 5 days for internal parasitism. Four birds died following treatment. Profound heteropenia was a consistent finding in all samples evaluated; additionally, the 1 surviving bird had progressive anemia. Consistent necropsy findings in the 4 birds that died were small intestinal crypt cell necrosis and severe bone marrow depletion and necrosis. Fenbendazole has been associated with bone marrow hypoplasia and enteric damage in mammals and other species of birds. The dosages of fenbendazole used in birds are often substantially higher than those recommended for mammals, which may contribute to bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in birds.

  19. Identification of Bone Marrow-Derived Soluble Factors Regulating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Li, Wan-Ju

    2017-02-14

    Maintaining properties of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in culture for regenerative applications remains a great challenge. An emerging approach of constructing a culture environment mimicking the bone marrow niche to regulate BMSC activities has been developed. In this study, we have demonstrated a systematic approach to identify soluble factors of interest extracted from human bone marrow and used them in BMSC culture for tissue regeneration. We have found that lipocalin-2 and prolactin are key factors in bone marrow, involved in regulating BMSC activities. Treating the cell with lipocalin-2 and prolactin delays cellular senescence of BMSCs and primes the cell for osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. We have also demonstrated that BMSCs pretreated with lipocalin-2 and prolactin can enhance the repair of calvarial defects in mice. Together, our study provides research evidence of using a viable approach to prime BMSC properties in vitro for improving cell-based tissue regeneration in vivo.

  20. Asiatic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Piao, Cheng-dong; Sun, Hong-hui; Ren, Xian-Sheng; Bai, Yun-Shen

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes. With aging, BMSC osteoblast differentiation decreases whereas BMSC differentiation into adipocytes increases, resulting in increased adipogenesis and bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs. AA inhibited the adipogenic induction of lipid accumulation, activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and expression of marker genes in adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (ap) 2, and adipsin. Further, we found that AA did not alter clonal expansion rate and expression of C/EBPβ, upstream key regulator of PPARγ, and binding activity of C/EBPβ to PPARγ promoter was not affected by AA as well. These findings suggest that AA may modulate differentiation of BMSCs to cause a lineage shift away from the adipocytes, and inhibition of PPARγ by AA is through C/EBPβ-independent mechanisms. Thus, AA could be a potential candidate for a novel drug against osteoporosis.

  1. [Method for concentrating marrow stem cells using the IBM 2991 washer. Necessary preparation before in vitro treatment of bone marrow by pharmacologic or immunologic means].

    PubMed

    Hervé, P; Coffe, C; Peters, A

    1983-04-01

    The technique using the IBM 2991 blood cell processor is an effective technique for the concentration of mononuclear cells from large volumes of bone marrow. The marrow cells are layered on to Ficoll Metrizoate using the IBM processing set. The mononuclear cells and CFU-GM recoveries are in close relationship with the hematocrit of the cell suspension processed. Twenty two bone marrows have been collected and purified according to this protocol. The mononuclear cell recovery is an average of 78,3% (range: 44-92%) and the CFU-GM recovery is in average of 67,5% (range: 40-89%). At the end of the procedure the cell viability is satisfying (97,1% +/- 1,7 are trypan blue negatives). When it is necessary to remove from the bone marrow collected either malignant cells prior autologous bone marrow graft or T lymphocytes in an attempt to prevent GVHD in allogeneic BMT, the purity of marrow cell suspension become a fundamental parameter.

  2. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  3. Neuropeptide y and neuropeptide y y5 receptor interaction restores impaired growth potential of aging bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Igura, Koichi; Haider, Husnain Kh; Ahmed, Rafeeq P H; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    Abstract improved growth characteristics of the aging bone marrow cells subsequent to neuropeptide Y (NPY)/neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor (NPY Y5R) ligand-receptor interaction. Bone marrow cells were isolated from neonatal (2-3 weeks), young (8-12 weeks), and old (24-28 months) rats on the basis of their preferential adherence to plastic surface. After culturing the cells at initial seeding density of 1×10(4) cells/cm(2), we found that the proliferation potential of bone marrow cells declined with age. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting showed that bone marrow cells in different age groups constitutively expressed NPY and NPY receptor subtypes (Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R). However, NPY and Y5R expression increased by more than 130-fold and decreased by 28-fold, respectively, in old bone marrow cells as compared to young bone marrow cells. NPY (10 nM) stimulated the proliferation of all bone marrow cells age groups, and their proliferation was blocked by Y5R antagonist. However, the pro-proliferative effect of NPY on old bone marrow cells was weaker than other cell groups due to lower Y5R expression. Y5R gene transfection of old bone marrow cells with subsequent NPY(3-36) (10 nM) treatment significantly increased proliferation of old bone marrow cells (>56%) as compared to green fluorescence protein-transfected control old bone marrow cells. Stimulation of old bone marrow cells by NPY treatment rejuvenated the growth characteristics of aging bone marrow cells as a result of Y5R overexpression.

  4. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  5. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  6. Signaling Interplay between Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Multiple Myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Falank, Carolyne; Fairfield, Heather; Reagan, Michaela R.

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000, Hanahan and Weinberg (1) defined the six Hallmarks of Cancer as: self-sufficiency in growth signals, evasion of apoptosis, insensitivity to antigrowth mechanisms, tissue invasion and metastasis, limitless replicative potential, and sustained angiogenesis. Eleven years later, two new Hallmarks were added to the list (avoiding immune destruction and reprograming energy metabolism) and two new tumor characteristics (tumor-promoting inflammation and genome instability and mutation) (2). In multiple myeloma (MM), a destructive cancer of the plasma cell that grows predominantly in the bone marrow (BM), it is clear that all these hallmarks and characteristics are in play, contributing to tumor initiation, drug resistance, disease progression, and relapse. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is a newly recognized contributor to MM oncogenesis and disease progression, potentially affecting MM cell metabolism, immune action, inflammation, and influences on angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the confirmed and hypothetical contributions of BMAT to MM development and disease progression. BMAT has been understudied due to technical challenges and a previous lack of appreciation for the endocrine function of this tissue. In this review, we define the dynamic, responsive, metabolically active BM adipocyte. We then describe how BMAT influences MM in terms of: lipids/metabolism, hypoxia/angiogenesis, paracrine or endocrine signaling, and bone disease. We then discuss the connection between BMAT and systemic inflammation and potential treatments to inhibit the feedback loops between BM adipocytes and MM cells that support MM progression. We aim for researchers to use this review to guide and help prioritize their experiments to develop better treatments or a cure for cancers, such as MM, that associate with and may depend on BMAT. PMID:27379019

  7. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  8. Imaging Sensitivity of Quiescent Cancer Cells to Metabolic Perturbations in Bone Marrow Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Neely, Taylor; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant cells from breast cancer and other common cancers such as prostate and melanoma may persist in bone marrow as quiescent, non-dividing cells that remain viable for years or even decades before resuming proliferation to cause recurrent disease. This phenomenon, referred to clinically as tumor dormancy, poses tremendous challenges to curing patients with breast cancer. Quiescent tumor cells resist chemotherapy drugs that predominantly target proliferating cells, limiting success of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies. We recently developed a 3D spheroid model of quiescent breast cancer cells in bone marrow for mechanistic and drug testing studies. We combined this model with optical imaging methods for label-free detection of cells preferentially utilizing glycolysis versus oxidative metabolism to investigate the metabolic state of co-culture spheroids with different bone marrow stromal and breast cancer cells. Through imaging and biochemical assays, we identified different metabolic states of bone marrow stromal cells that control metabolic status and flexibilities of co-cultured breast cancer cells. We tested metabolic stresses and targeted inhibition of specific metabolic pathways to identify approaches to preferentially eliminate quiescent breast cancer cells from bone marrow environments. These studies establish an integrated imaging approach to analyze metabolism in complex tissue environments to identify new metabolically-targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27478871

  9. Selective retention of bone marrow-derived cells to enhance spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Muschler, George F; Matsukura, Yoichi; Nitto, Hironori; Boehm, Cynthia A; Valdevit, Antonio D; Kambic, Helen E; Davros, William J; Easley, Kirk A; Powell, Kimerly A

    2005-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from fresh bone marrow aspirates using some porous matrices as a surface for cell attachment and selective retention, and for creating a cellular graft that is enriched with respect to the number of progenitor cells. We evaluated the potential value of this method using demineralized cortical bone powder as the matrix. Matrix alone, matrix plus marrow, and matrix enriched with marrow cells were compared in an established canine spinal fusion model. Fusions were compared based on union score, fusion mass, fusion volume, and by mechanical testing. Enriched matrix grafts delivered a mean of 2.3 times more cells and approximately 5.6 times more progenitors than matrix mixed with bone marrow. The union score with enriched matrix was superior to matrix alone and matrix plus marrow. Fusion volume and fusion area also were greater with the enriched matrix. These data suggest that the strategy of selective retention provides a rapid, simple, and effective method for concentration and delivery of marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting procedures in various clinical settings.

  10. Injury mechanism dictates contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to murine hepatic vascular regeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem and progenitor cells derived from adult marrow have been shown to regenerate vascular cells in response to injury. However, it is unclear whether the type of injury dictates the contribution of such cells to neovascularization and which subpopulations of cells contribute to vascular regeneratio...

  11. Bone Marrow Homing Enriches Stem Cells Responsible for Neogenesis of Insulin-Producing Cells, While Radiation Decreases Homing Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Iskovich, Svetlana; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-10-01

    Small-sized adult bone marrow cells isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate into insulin-producing cells and stabilize glycemic control. This study assessed competitive migration of syngeneic stem cells to the bone marrow and islets in a murine model of chemical diabetes. VLA-4 is expressed in ∼ 25% of these cells, whereas CXCR4 is not detected, however, it is transcriptionally upregulated (6-fold). The possibility to enrich stem cells by a bone marrow homing (BM-H) functional assay was assessed in sequential transplants. Fr25lin(-) cells labeled with PKH26 were grafted into primary myeloablated recipients, and mitotically quiescent Fr25lin(-)PKH(bright) cells were sorted from the bone marrow after 2 days. The contribution of bone marrow-homed stem cells was remarkably higher in secondary recipients compared to freshly elutriated cells. The therapeutic efficacy was further increased by omission of irradiation in the secondary recipients, showing a 25-fold enrichment of islet-reconstituting cells by the bone marrow homing assay. Donor cells identified by the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a genomic marker in sex-mismatched transplants upregulated PDX-1 and produced proinsulin, affirming the capacity of BM-H cells to convert in the injured islets. There was no evidence of transcriptional priming of freshly elutriated subsets to express PDX-1, insulin, and other markers of endocrine progenitors, indicating that the bone marrow harbors stem cells with versatile differentiation capacity. Affinity to the bone marrow can be used to enrich stem cells for pancreatic regeneration, and reciprocally, conditioning reduces the competitive incorporation in the injured islets.

  12. Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil causes trabecular bone loss, bone marrow cell depletion and marrow adiposity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chiaming; Georgiou, Kristen R; McKinnon, Ross A; Keefe, Dorothy M K; Howe, Peter R C; Xian, Cory J

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of anthracyclines to adjuvant chemotherapy has increased survival rates among breast cancer patients. Cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) combination therapy is now one of the preferred regimens for treating node-positive breast cancer due to better survival with less toxicity involved. Despite the increasing use of CEF, its potential in causing adverse skeletal effects remains unclear. Using a mature female rat model mimicking the clinical setting, this study examined the effects of CEF treatment on bone and bone marrow in long bones. Following six cycles of CEF treatment (weekly intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide at 10 mg/kg, epirubicin at 2.5 mg/kg and 5-flurouracil at 10 mg/kg), a significant reduction in trabecular bone volume was observed at the metaphysis, which was associated with a reduced serum level of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), increased trends of osteoclast density and osteoclast area at the metaphysis, as well as an increased size of osteoclasts being formed from the bone marrow cells ex vivo. Moreover, a severe reduction of bone marrow cellularity was observed following CEF treatment, which was accompanied by an increase in marrow adipose tissue volume. This increase in marrow adiposity was associated with an expansion in adipocyte size but not in marrow adipocyte density. Overall, this study indicates that six cycles of CEF chemotherapy may induce some bone loss and severe bone marrow damage. Mechanisms for CEF-induced bone/bone marrow pathologies and potential preventive strategies warrant further investigation.

  13. Stromal cell migration precedes hemopoietic repopulation of the bone marrow after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Werts, E.D.; Gibson, D.P.; Knapp, S.A.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Circulation of hemopoietic stem cells into an irradiated site has been thoroughly documented, but migration of stromal cells to repair radiation damage has not. We determined the radiosensitivity of mouse bone marrow stroma and evaluated stromal and hemopoietic repopulation in x-irradiated marrow. The D/sub 0/ for growth of colonies of marrow stromal cells (MSC) was 215 to 230 rad. Total-body irradiation (TB) obliterated marrow stromal and hemopoietic cells within 3 days. In contrast, 1 day after 1000 rad leg irradiation (LI), MSC rose to 80% of normal, but fell to 34% by 3 days and recovered to 72% by 30 days. However, femoral nucleated cells diminished to 20% by 3 days and recovered to 74% of normal by 30 days. Likewise, differentiated marrow cells and hemopoietic stem cells were initially depleted. With 1000 rad LI followed 3 h later by 1000 rad to the body while shielding the leg, MSC and femoral nucleated cells recovered to values intermediate between 1000 rad TB and 1000 rad LI. We concluded that: (1) the D/sub 0/ for MSC was 215 to 230 rad, (2) stromal repopulation preceded hemopoietic recovery, and (3) immigration of stromal cells from an unirradiated sanctuary facilitated hemopoietic repopulation of a heavily irradiated site.

  14. Adeno associated viral-mediated intraosseous labeling of bone marrow derived cells for CNS tracking.

    PubMed

    Selenica, Maj-Linda B; Reid, Patrick; Pena, Gabriela; Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Jerry B; Nash, Kevin R; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N; Lee, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation, including microglial activation in the CNS, is an important hallmark in many neurodegenerative diseases. Microglial stimuli not only impact the brain microenvironment by production and release of cytokines and chemokines, but also influence the activity of bone marrow derived cells and blood born macrophage populations. In many diseases including brain disorders and spinal cord injury, researchers have tried to harbor the neuroprotective and repair properties of these subpopulations. Hematopoietic bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) are of great interest, especially during gene therapy because certain hematopoietic cell subpopulations traffic to the sites of injury and inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a method of labeling endogenous bone marrow derived cells through intraosseous impregnation of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) or lentivirus. We utilized rAAV serotype 9 (rAAV-9) or lentivirus for gene delivery of green florescence protein (GFP) to the mouse bone marrow cells. Flow cytometry showed that both viruses were able to efficiently transduce mouse bone marrow cells in vivo. However, the rAAV9-GFP viral construct transduced BMDCs more efficiently than the lentivirus (11.2% vs. 6.8%), as indicated by cellular GFP expression. We also demonstrate that GFP labeled cells correspond to bone marrow cells of myeloid origin using CD11b as a marker. Additionally, we characterized the ability of bone marrow derived, GFP labeled cells to extravasate into the brain parenchyma upon acute and subchronic neuroinflammatory stimuli in the mouse CNS. Viral mediated over expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or intracranial injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recruited GFP labeled BMDCs from the periphery into the brain parenchyma compared to vehicle treated mice. Altogether our findings demonstrate a useful method of labeling endogenous BMDCs via viral transduction and the ability to track subpopulations throughout the body

  15. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-15

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubule-associated protein 1B in the cells was greater after exposure to okadaic acid and lower after N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine. We then injected the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the ear vein into rabbit models of spinal cord contusion. The migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards the injured spinal cord was poorer in cells exposed to okadaic acid- and N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine than in non-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we blocked phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using the inhibitors LY294002 and U0126, respectively. LY294002 resulted in an elevated expression of phosphorylated type I microtubule-associated protein 1B, whereas U0126 caused a reduction in expression. The present data indicate that PI3K and ERK1/2 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells modulate the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 1B via a cross-signaling network, and affect the migratory efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards injured spinal cord.

  16. Different Procoagulant Activity of Therapeutic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Placental Decidua.

    PubMed

    Moll, Guido; Ignatowicz, Lech; Catar, Rusan; Luecht, Christian; Sadeghi, Behnam; Hamad, Osama; Jungebluth, Philipp; Dragun, Duska; Schmidtchen, Artur; Ringdén, Olle

    2015-10-01

    While therapeutic mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have usually been obtained from bone marrow, perinatal tissues have emerged as promising new sources of cells for stromal cell therapy. In this study, we present a first safety follow-up on our clinical experience with placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs), used as supportive immunomodulatory and regenerative therapy for patients with severe complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that DSCs are smaller, almost half the volume of MSCs, which may favor microvascular passage. DSCs also show different hemocompatibility, with increased triggering of the clotting cascade after exposure to human blood and plasma in vitro. After infusion of DSCs in HSCT patients, we observed a weak activation of the fibrinolytic system, but the other blood activation markers remained stable, excluding major adverse events. Expression profiling identified differential levels of key factors implicated in regulation of hemostasis, such as a lack of prostacyclin synthase and increased tissue factor expression in DSCs, suggesting that these cells have intrinsic blood-activating properties. The stronger triggering of the clotting cascade by DSCs could be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft reconstitution before infusion, for example, by use of low-dose heparin anticoagulant in the cell infusion buffer. We conclude that DSCs are smaller and have stronger hemostatic properties than MSCs, thus triggering stronger activation of the clotting system, which can be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft preparation before infusion. Our results highlight the importance of hemocompatibility safety testing for every novel cell therapy product before clinical use, when applied using systemic delivery.

  17. Cigarette smoke inhibits recruitment of bone-marrow-derived stem cells to the uterus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuping; Gan, Ye; Taylor, Hugh S

    2011-02-01

    Cigarette smoking leads to female infertility and a decreased incidence of endometriosis. Bone marrow derived stem cells are recruited to uterine endometrium and endometriosis. The effect of cigarette smoking on stem cell recruitment to any organ is uncharacterized. We hypothesized that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell recruitment to the uterus and differentiation would be diminished by cigarette smoke. We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in vitro and a mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure. After myeloablation female C57BL/6J received bone marrow cells from males. Mice were exposed to room air or smoke from unfiltered cigarettes. Immunofluorescence and Y-FISH was performed on uterine sections. In vitro hMSCs were treated with 8-Br-cAMP to induce endometrial cell differentiation with or without cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and decidualization assessed morphologically and by prolactin expression. After 4 weeks the total number of Y-chromosome cells in the uterus was reduced by 68% in the smoke exposed mice. Both leukocytes and bone marrow derived endometrial cells were reduced by 60% and 73%, respectively. Differentiation of bone marrow derived cell to endometrial epithelial cells was reduced by 84%. hMSC treated with CSE failed to show cytological characteristics of decidualization. mRNA levels of the decidualization marker prolactin were decreased by 90% in CSE treated cells. Smoking inhibits both recruitment of bone marrow derived stem cells to uterus and stem cell differentiation. Inhibition of stem cells recruitment may be a general mechanism by which smoking leads to long term organ damage through inability to repair or regenerate multiple tissues.

  18. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Jong-Seok; Shin, Sung Jae; Ko, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs), IONPs, and iron citrate) and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26389886

  19. Bone Marrow Stromal Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Polymeri, A; Giannobile, W V; Kaigler, D

    2016-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are adult multipotent cells, which have the potential to differentiate into cell types of mesodermal origin, namely osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Due to their accessibility and expansion potential, BMSCs have historically held therapeutic promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. More recently, it has been demonstrated that not only can bone marrow stromal stem cells directly participate in tissue regeneration, but they also have the capacity to migrate to distant sites of tissue injury, where they can participate in tissue repair either directly through their differentiation or indirectly through paracrine mechanisms. Additionally, they can elicit various immunomodulatory signals, which can attenuate the inflammatory and immune responses. As such, bone marrow stromal stem cells have been explored clinically for treatment of a wide variety of different conditions including bone defects, graft-vs.-host disease, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and liver and kidney diseases. This review provides an overview of current clinical applications of bone marrow stromal stem cells and discusses their therapeutic properties, while also addressing limitations of their use. PubMed, Ovid, and Google Scholar online databases were searched using several keywords, including "stem cells", "tissue engineering", tissue regeneration" and "clinical trials". Additionally, Clinical trials.gov was used to locate completed clinical trials using bone marrow derived stem cells.

  20. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-ping; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yin; Li, Jian-ding; Xie, Jun

    2015-01-01

    An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T7-8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:25878588

  1. Effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. /sup 51/Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras.

  2. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells.

  3. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Glatman Zaretsky, Arielle; Konradt, Christoph; Dépis, Fabien; Wing, James B; Goenka, Radhika; Atria, Daniela Gomez; Silver, Jonathan S; Cho, Sunglim; Wolf, Amaya I; Quinn, William J; Engiles, Julie B; Brown, Dorothy C; Beiting, Daniel; Erikson, Jan; Allman, David; Cancro, Michael P; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Lu, Li-Fan; Benoist, Christophe O; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-02-21

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM) are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg) cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP(+) cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  4. Functional signature of human islet-derived precursor cells compared to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Catarina; Ebert, Regina; Schilling, Tatjana; Path, Gunter; Benisch, Peggy; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Seufert, Jochen; Jakob, Franz

    2010-05-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cell replenishment can be driven by epithelial cells from exocrine pancreas via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the reverse process MET, while specified pancreatic mesenchymal cells control islet cell development and maintenance. The role of human islet-derived precursor cells (hIPCs) in regeneration and support of endocrine islets is under investigation. Here, we analyzed hIPCs as to their immunophenotype, multilineage differentiation capacity, and gene profiling, in comparison to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). hIPCs and hBM-MSCs display a common mesenchymal character and express lineage-specific marker genes upon induction toward pancreatic endocrine and mesenchymal pathways of differentiation. hIPCs can go further along endocrine pathways while lacking some core mesenchymal differentiation attributes. Significance analysis of microarray (SAM) from 5 hBM-MSC and 3 hIPC donors mirrored such differences. Candidate gene cluster analysis disclosed differential expression of key lineage regulators, indicated a HoxA gene-associated positional memory in hIPCs and hBM-MSCs, and showed as well a clear transition state from mesenchyme to epithelium or vice versa in hIPCs. Our findings raise new research platforms to further clarify the potential of hIPCs to undergo complete MET thus contributing to islet cell replenishment, maintenance, and function.

  5. [The effect of cells presenting the erythroblast antigen on the natural suppressor activity of nonadhesive bone marrow cells].

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, S A; Agranovich, I M; Bel'skiĭ, Iu P; Goncharskaia, M A

    1993-06-01

    Concanavalin A-induced proliferation of spleen cells of C57B1/6 mice was inhibited by syngeneic normal bone marrow cells. Elimination of Ag-Eb-positive cells by panning was shown to result in markedly reduced inhibitory activity of bone marrow cells. To evaluate the role of Ag-Eb in natural suppressor activity, bone marrow cells were preincubated with different dilutions of MAE-15 monoclonal antibody and then added to spleen cells. The inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells decreased with the increasing concentration of the monoclonal antibody in a dose-dependent manner and nearly disappeared at a concentration of MAE-15 of 150 m micrograms/ml and 300 m micrograms/ml. In control experiments, bone marrow cells were preincubated with antibodies non-reactive with Ag-Eb under the same conditions. It is concluded that the decrease of natural suppressor activity after incubation of bone marrow cells with MAE-15 monoclonal antibody is specific for anti-Ag-Eb antibodies.

  6. Tributyltin alters the bone marrow microenvironment and suppresses B cell development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Amelia H; Wu, Ting Hua; Bolt, Alicia M; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Mann, Koren K; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2017-04-07

    Organotins are industrial chemicals and agricultural pesticides, and they contaminate both outdoor and indoor environments. Organotins are detectable in human sera at biologically active concentrations and are immuno-and neuro-toxicants. Triphenyltin, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) and promote adipogenesis. TBT also has been shown to suppress osteogenesis; osteoblasts not only support bone homeostasis but also support B lymphopoiesis. In addition, developing B cells are highly sensitive to exogenous insults. Thus, we hypothesized that bone marrow B cells may be negatively affected by TBT exposure both directly, through activation of apoptosis, and indirectly, through alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment. TBT activated apoptosis in developing B cells at environmentally relevant concentrations (as low as 80 nM) in vitro, via a mechanism that is distinct from that induced by high dose (μM) TBT and that requires p53. TBT suppressed the proliferation of hematopoietic cells in an ex vivo bone marrow model. Concurrent treatment of stromal cells and B cells or pretreatment of stromal cells with TBT induced adipogenesis in the stromal cells and reduced the progression of B cells from the early pro B (Hardy fraction B) to the pre B stage (Hardy fraction D). In vivo, TBT induced adipogenesis in bone marrow, reduced "aging-sensitive" AA4+CD19+ B cells in bone marrow, and reduced splenic B cell numbers. Immunosenescence and osteoporosis are adverse health effects of aging, we postulate that TBT exposure may mimic, and possibly intensify, these pathologies.

  7. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Results Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Conclusion Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent. PMID:25281406

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in the detection of bone marrow metastases in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Skov, B G; Hirsch, F R; Bobrow, L

    1992-04-01

    Using conventional examination (CE) of H&E stained slides from bone marrow aspirates, metastases can be detected in approximately 25% of patients with small cell lung cancer. We investigated a panel of monoclonal antibodies using immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of bone marrow infiltration from SCLC and compared the results with CE. Seven monoclonal antibodies raised against epithelial antigens (CAM 5.2, MOV 15, NCCST 433, PE 35, LCA1/L38, HMFG 1 AND HMFG 2) were applied on bone marrow sections from three groups of patients (pts): (1) 19 pts in whom SCLC-metastases were detected by CE, (2) 44 pts with SCLC in whom metastases could not be detected by CE, and (3) 20 pts with non-malignant bone marrow diseases. All the antibodies except LCA1/L38 were positive in 60-90% of the slides with infiltrating tumour cells in group 1. No positive tumour cells were detected in group 2. A few plasma cells and megakaryocytes were slightly positive for MOV 15 and NCCST 433, but no other positive cells were detected in group 3. In conclusion, the monoclonal antibodies used in this study may be useful for diagnostic purposes when a suspicious looking infiltration is detected by CE. However, these antibodies could not detect metastatic tumour cells in the bone marrow sections from patients in whom CE did not reveal any tumour cells.

  9. Encapsulated Whole Bone Marrow Cells Improve Survival in Wistar Rats after 90% Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Cruz, Carolina; Kieling, Carlos Oscar; López, Mónica Luján; Osvaldt, Alessandro; Ochs de Muñoz, Gustavo; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel; Giugliani, Roberto; Matte, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. The use of bone marrow cells has been suggested as an alternative treatment for acute liver failure. In this study, we investigate the effect of encapsulated whole bone marrow cells in a liver failure model. Methods. Encapsulated cells or empty capsules were implanted in rats submitted to 90% partial hepatectomy. The survival rate was assessed. Another group was euthanized at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after hepatectomy to study expression of cytokines and growth factors. Results. Whole bone marrow group showed a higher than 10 days survival rate compared to empty capsules group. Gene expression related to early phase of liver regeneration at 6 hours after hepatectomy was decreased in encapsulated cells group, whereas genes related to regeneration were increased at 12, 24, and 48 hours. Whole bone marrow group showed lower regeneration rate at 72 hours and higher expression and activity of caspase 3. In contrast, lysosomal-β-glucuronidase activity was elevated in empty capsules group. Conclusions. The results show that encapsulated whole bone marrow cells reduce the expression of genes involved in liver regeneration and increase those responsible for ending hepatocyte division. In addition, these cells favor apoptotic cell death and decrease necrosis, thus increasing survival. PMID:26649048

  10. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent. PMID:28357227

  11. Activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Bone Marrow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    antigen in situ and in vitro. Atherosclerosis 135(1): 19–27. 21. Chow A, et al. (2011) Bone marrow CD169+ macrophages promote the retention of hematopoietic...renal injury-acceleration of atherosclerosis . Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 31(12):2856–2864. 30. Lin SL, et al. (2010) Macrophage Wnt7b is critical for

  12. CD87-positive tumor cells in bone marrow aspirates identified by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Noack, F; Helmecke, D; Rosenberg, R; Thorban, S; Nekarda, H; Fink, U; Lewald, J; Stich, M; Schutze, K; Harbeck, N; Magdolen, V; Graeff, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-10-01

    Dissemination of single tumor cells to the bone marrow is a common event in cancer. The clinical significance of cytokeratin-positive cells detected in the bone marrow of cancer patients is still a matter of debate. In gastric cancer, overexpression of the receptor (uPAR or CD87) for the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in disseminated cancer cells indicates shorter survival of cancer patients. A new immunofluorescence approach, applying confocal laser scanning microscopy, is introduced to locate CD87 antigen in cytokeratin-positive tumor cells and to quantify the CD87 antigen by consecutive scanning. At first, cytokeratin 8/18/19-positive carcinoma cells are identified at excitation wavelength 488 nm using monoclonal antibody A45B/B3 to the cytokeratins and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with the fluorochrome Alexa488. Next, CD87 in tumor cells is identified by chicken antibody HU277 to the uPA-receptor and goat anti-chicken IgY labeled with fluorochrome Alexa568 (excitation wavelength 568 nm) and the fluorescence signal quantified on a single cell basis using fluorescently labeled latex beads as the fluorescence reference. From 16 patients with gastric or esophageal carcinoma, bone marrow aspirates were obtained, stained for cytokeratins and CD87 and then subjected to laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. Three of six gastric cancer patients had tumor cells present in the bone marrow of which 2 stained for CD87. Three of ten esophageal carcinoma patients had tumor cells in the bone marrow, all three samples stained for CD87. CD87-positive tumor cells were also dissected from stained bone marrow aspirates by laser microdissection microscope to allow analysis of single cells at the gene level.

  13. Busulfan and total body irradiation as antihematopoietic stem cell agents in the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Parkman, R.; Rappeport, J.M.; Hellman, S.; Lipton, J.; Smith, B.; Geha, R.; Nathan, D.G.

    1984-10-01

    The capacity of busulfan and total body irradiation to ablate hematopoietic stem cells as preparation for the allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders was studied. Fourteen patients received 18 transplants; busulfan was used in the preparatory regimen of eight transplants and total body irradiation in the regimens of six transplants. Sustained hematopoietic ablation was achieved in six of eight patients prepared with busulfan and in all six patients prepared with total body irradiation. Three patients prepared with total body irradiation died with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, whereas no patients receiving busulfan developed interstitial pneumonitis. The optimal antihematopoietic stem cell agent to be used for the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorder for bone marrow transplantation is not certain.

  14. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, He; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  15. Effects of GSM-modulated 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on the hematopoietic potential of mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Maria Manuela; Nasta, Francesca; Prisco, Maria Grazia; Lovisolo, Giorgio Alfonso; Marino, Carmela; Pioli, Claudio

    2014-12-01

    Studies describing the influence of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on bone marrow cells (BMC) often lack functional data. We examined the effects of in vivo exposure to a Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) modulated 900 MHz RF fields on BMC using two transplantation models. X-irradiated syngeneic mice were injected with BMC from either RF-field-exposed, sham-exposed or cage control mice. Twelve weeks after transplantation, no differences in thymocyte number, frequency of subpopulations and cell proliferation were found in mice receiving BMC from either group. Also, in the spleen cell number, percentages of B/T cells, B/T-cell proliferation, and interferon γ (IFN-γ) production were similar in all groups. In parallel, a mixture of BMC from congenic sham- and RF-exposed mice were co-transplanted into lymphopenic Rag2 deficient mice. BMC from RF-exposed and sham-exposed mice displayed no advantage or disadvantage when competing for the replenishment of lymphatic organs with mature lymphocytes in Rag2 deficient mice. This model revealed that BMC from sham-exposed and RF-exposed mice were less efficient than BMC from cage control mice in repopulating the thymus, an effect likely due to restraint stress. In conclusion, our results showed no effects of in vivo exposure to GSM-modulated RF-fields on the ability of bone marrow (BM) precursors to long-term reconstitute peripheral T and B cell compartments.

  16. Bone marrow plasmacytoid dendritic cells can differentiate into myeloid dendritic cells upon virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga, Elina I; McGavern, Dorian B; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Teng, Chao; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2017-01-01

    Two subsets of dendritic cell (DCs), plasmacytoid (p) and myeloid (m) DCs, have been described in humans and mice. These subsets are known to have divergent roles during an immune response, but their developmental course is unclear. Here we report that virus infection induces bone marrow pDCs to differentiate into mDCs, thereby undergoing profound phenotypic and functional changes including the acquisition of enhanced antigen-presenting capacity and the ability to recognize different microbial structures through Toll-like receptor 4. The conversion of pDCs into mDCs is also induced by the injection of double-stranded RNA and requires type I interferons. Our results establish a precursor-product developmental relationship between these two DC subsets and highlight unexpected plasticity of bone marrow pDCs. PMID:15531885

  17. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation promotes beta-cell regeneration after acute injury through BM cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogihara, Takehide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Gao, Junhong; Kaneko, Keizo; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Sasano, Hironobu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2007-05-01

    There is controversy regarding the roles of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in pancreatic beta-cell regeneration. To examine these roles in vivo, mice were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), followed by bone marrow transplantation (BMT; lethal irradiation and subsequent BM cell infusion) from green fluorescence protein transgenic mice. BMT improved STZ-induced hyperglycemia, nearly normalizing glucose levels, with partially restored pancreatic islet number and size, whereas simple BM cell infusion without preirradiation had no effects. In post-BMT mice, most islets were located near pancreatic ducts and substantial numbers of bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells were detected in islets and ducts. Importantly, green fluorescence protein-positive, i.e. BM-derived, cells were detected around islets and were CD45 positive but not insulin positive. Then to examine whether BM-derived cell mobilization contributes to this process, we used Nos3(-/-) mice as a model of impaired BM-derived cell mobilization. In streptozotocin-treated Nos3(-/-) mice, the effects of BMT on blood glucose, islet number, bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells in islets, and CD45-positive cells around islets were much smaller than those in streptozotocin-treated Nos3(+/+) controls. A series of BMT experiments using Nos3(+/+) and Nos3(-/-) mice showed hyperglycemia-improving effects of BMT to correlate inversely with the severity of myelosuppression and delay of peripheral white blood cell recovery. Thus, mobilization of BM-derived cells is critical for BMT-induced beta-cell regeneration after injury. The present results suggest that homing of donor BM-derived cells in BM and subsequent mobilization into the injured periphery are required for BMT-induced regeneration of recipient pancreatic beta-cells.

  18. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  19. Tracking Intracavernously Injected Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Qiu, Xuefeng; Fandel, Thomas; Banie, Lia; Wang, Guifang; Lue, Tom F.; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2012-01-01

    Intracavernous (IC) injection of stem cells (SCs) has been shown to improve erectile function in various erectile dysfunction (ED) animal models. However, the tissue distribution of the injected cells remains unknown. In this study we tracked IC injected adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in various tissues. Rat paratesticular fat was processed for ADSC isolation and culture. The animals were then subject to cavernous nerve (CN) crush injury or sham operation, followed by IC injection of one million autologous or allogeneic ADSCs that were labeled with 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU). Another group of rats received IC injection of EdU-labeled allogeneic penile smooth muscle cells (PSMCs). At 2 and 7 days post-injection, penises and femoral bone marrow were processed for histological analyses. Whole femoral bone marrows were also analyzed for EdU-positive cells by flow cytometry. The results show that ADSCs exited the penis within days of IC injection and migrated preferentially to bone marrow. Allogenicity did not affect ADSC's bone marrow appearance either at 2 or 7 days, while CN injury reduced the number of ADSCs in bone marrow significantly at 7 but not 2 days. The significance of these results in relation to SC therapy for ED is discussed. PMID:21796145

  20. Resveratrol Increases the Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Lofek-Czubek, Sébastien; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that has shown protective effects against many disorders including, several types of cancers and other age-associated diseases as well as blood disorders in cultured cells and/or animal models. However, whether resveratrol has any impact specifically on normal blood stem cells remains unknown. Here we show that a three-week treatment of resveratrol increases the frequency and total numbers of normal bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) without any impact on their competitive repopulation capacity. In addition, we show that resveratrol enhances the bone marrow multipotent progenitor capacity in vivo. These results have therapeutic value for disorders of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) as well as for bone marrow transplantation settings. PMID:25163926

  1. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fatma, N.; Khan, S.G.; Aslam, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, cytogenetic effects of Indian chrysotile asbestos in rat bone marrow cells after 290 days of intratracheal inoculation, when it develops massive pulmonary fibrosis, were investigated. The pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed by both histopathological studies and increased collagen content in the lung of the treated animals. In the asbestotic rats a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations was recorded and a decrease in mitotic index of bone marrow cells. The types of chromosomal aberrations in these cells were chromatid gaps and breaks. The results indicate the significant cytogenetic changes in the bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats and also suggest that these changes directly or indirectly may be one of the biological events involved in eliciting the asbestos-mediated toxic responses.

  2. Bone marrow long label-retaining cells reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio

    2008-02-08

    In response to changing signals, quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be induced to an activated cycling state and provide multi-lineage hematopoietic cells to the whole body via blood vessels. However, the precise localization of quiescent HSCs in bone marrow microenvironment is not fully characterized. Here, we performed whole-mount immunostaining of bone marrow and found that BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) definitively reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic zone distant from the 'vascular niche'. Although LRCs expressed very low level of a well-known HSC marker, c-kit in normal circumstances, myeloablation by 5-FU treatment caused LRCs to abundantly express c-kit and proliferate actively. These results demonstrate that bone marrow LRCs reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche, and function as a regenerative cell pool of HSCs.

  3. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka; Inoue-Yokoo, Tomoko; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+) cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+) c-Kit(+) cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  4. HGF Expressing Stem Cells in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Originate from the Bone Marrow and Are Antifibrotic

    PubMed Central

    Gazdhar, Amiq; Susuri, Njomeza; Hostettler, Katrin; Gugger, Mathias; Knudsen, Lars; Roth, Michael; Ochs, Matthias; Geiser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary fibrosis may result from abnormal alveolar wound repair after injury. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) improves alveolar epithelial wound repair in the lung. Stem cells were shown to play a major role in lung injury, repair and fibrosis. We studied the presence, origin and antifibrotic properties of HGF-expressing stem cells in usual interstitial pneumonia. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed in lung tissue sections and primary alveolar epithelial cells obtained from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, n = 7). Bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSC) from adult male rats were transfected with HGF, instilled intratracheally into bleomycin injured rat lungs and analyzed 7 and 14 days later. Results In UIP, HGF was expressed in specific cells mainly located in fibrotic areas close to the hyperplastic alveolar epithelium. HGF-positive cells showed strong co-staining for the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD44, CD29, CD105 and CD90, indicating stem cell origin. HGF-positive cells also co-stained for CXCR4 (HGF+/CXCR4+) indicating that they originate from the bone marrow. The stem cell characteristics were confirmed in HGF secreting cells isolated from UIP lung biopsies. In vivo experiments showed that HGF-expressing BMSC attenuated bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat, indicating a beneficial role of bone marrow derived, HGF secreting stem cells in lung fibrosis. Conclusions HGF-positive stem cells are present in human fibrotic lung tissue (UIP) and originate from the bone marrow. Since HGF-transfected BMSC reduce bleomycin induced lung fibrosis in the bleomycin lung injury and fibrosis model, we assume that HGF-expressing, bone-marrow derived stem cells in UIP have antifibrotic properties. PMID:23840329

  5. Bone Marrow Adipocytes Facilitate Fatty Acid Oxidation Activating AMPK and a Transcriptional Network Supporting Survival of Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Saitoh, Kaori; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Mogushi, Kaoru; Shikami, Masato; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ishizawa, Jo; Hail, Numsen; Kazuno, Saiko; Igarashi, Mamoru; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Yasunari; Arai, Hajime; Nagaoka, Isao; Miida, Takashi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2017-03-15

    Leukemia cells in the bone marrow must meet the biochemical demands of increased cell proliferation and also survive by continually adapting to fluctuations in nutrient and oxygen availability. Thus, targeting metabolic abnormalities in leukemia cells located in the bone marrow is a novel therapeutic approach. In this study, we investigated the metabolic role of bone marrow adipocytes in supporting the growth of leukemic blasts. Prevention of nutrient starvation-induced apoptosis of leukemic cells by bone marrow adipocytes, as well as the metabolic and molecular mechanisms involved in this process, was investigated using various analytic techniques. In acute monocytic leukemia (AMoL) cells, the prevention of spontaneous apoptosis by bone marrow adipocytes was associated with an increase in fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) along with the upregulation of PPARγ, FABP4, CD36, and BCL2 genes. In AMoL cells, bone marrow adipocyte coculture increased adiponectin receptor gene expression and its downstream target stress response kinase AMPK, p38 MAPK with autophagy activation, and upregulated antiapoptotic chaperone HSPs. Inhibition of FAO disrupted metabolic homeostasis, increased reactive oxygen species production, and induced the integrated stress response mediator ATF4 and apoptosis in AMoL cells cocultured with bone marrow adipocytes. Our results suggest that bone marrow adipocytes support AMoL cell survival by regulating their metabolic energy balance and that the disruption of FAO in bone marrow adipocytes may be an alternative, novel therapeutic strategy for AMoL therapy. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1453-64. ©2017 AACR.

  6. [Origin of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Bone Marrow--Endothelial to Hematopoietic Transition (EHT)?].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Yuan, Yan; Chen, Tong

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to primitive hematopoiesis, during embryonic definitive hematopoiesis, it has been demonstrated that multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) arise from hemogenic endothelium, and the endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT) exists within the yolk sac, placenta, AGM, mouse head vascular and extraembryonic vessels. However, whether hemogenic endothelial cells contribute to blood cell development at other sites of definitive hematopoiesis, including fetal liver and bone marrow, remains largely unknown. Recently, more and more researches showed that hematopoiesis within bone marrow had a close relationship with vascular endothelium development, too. This review summarizes the mechanism of EHT during embryo development, and discuss whether EHT exists in adult hematopoiesis.

  7. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 mediates changes of bone marrow stem cells during the bone repair process.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kiyotaka; Kawao, Naoyuki; Yano, Masato; Tamura, Yukinori; Kurashimo, Shinzi; Okumoto, Katsumi; Kojima, Kotarou; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, and macrophages that participate in the bone repair process are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, the roles of these stem cells during the repair of injured bone tissue are still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of bone defect on HSCs and MSCs in bone marrow and spleen in 75 mice and its mechanism. We analyzed the HSC and MSC populations in these tissues of a mouse with femoral bone damage by using flow cytometry. The number of HSCs in the bone marrow of mice with damaged femurs was significantly lower than the number of these cells in the bone marrow of the contralateral intact femurs on day 2 after injury. Meanwhile, the number of MSCs in the bone marrow of mice with damaged femurs was significantly higher than that of the contralateral femurs. Both intraperitoneal administration of AMD3100, a C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonist, and local treatment with an anti-stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) antibody blunted the observed decrease in HSC and increase in MSC populations within the bone marrow of injured femurs. In conclusion, the present study revealed that there is a concurrent decrease and increase in the numbers of HSCs and MSCs, respectively, in the bone marrow during repair of mouse femoral bone damage. Furthermore, the SDF-1/CXCR4 system was implicated as contributing to the changes in these stem cell populations upon bone injury.

  8. Fibrillin-1 Regulates Skeletal Stem Cell Differentiation by Modulating TGFβ Activity Within the Marrow Niche.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Silvia; Clayton, Nicholas P; del Solar, Maria; Pascual, Gemma; Cheng, Seng H; Wentworth, Bruce M; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A full understanding of the microenvironmental factors that control the activities of skeletal stem cells (also known as mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]) in the adult bone marrow holds great promise for developing new therapeutic strategies to mitigate age-related diseases of bone and cartilage degeneration. Bone loss is an understudied manifestation of Marfan syndrome, a multisystem disease associated with mutations in the extracellular matrix protein and TGFβ modulator fibrillin-1. Here we demonstrate that progressive loss of cancellous bone in mice with limbs deficient for fibrillin-1 (Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice) is accounted for by premature depletion of MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells combined with constitutively enhanced bone resorption. Longitudinal analyses of Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice showed incremental bone loss and trabecular microarchitecture degeneration accompanied by a progressive decrease in the number and clonogenic potential of MSCs. Significant paucity of marrow fat cells in the long bones of Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice, together with reduced adipogenic potential of marrow stromal cell cultures, indicated an additional defect in MSC differentiation. This postulate was corroborated by showing that an Fbn1-silenced osteoprogenitor cell line cultured in the presence of insulin yielded fewer than normal adipocytes and exhibited relatively lower PPARγ levels. Consonant with fibrillin-1 modulation of TGFβ bioavailability, cultures of marrow stromal cells from Fbn1(Prx1-/-) limb bones showed improper overactivation of latent TGFβ. In line with this finding, systemic TGFβ neutralization improved bone mass and trabecular microarchitecture along with normalizing the number of MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, and marrow adipocytes. Collectively, our findings show that fibrillin-1 regulates MSC activity by modulating TGFβ bioavailability within the microenvironment of marrow niches.

  9. [Protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Zhen; Yin, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jia-Yu; Wei, Bo-Xiong; Zhan, Yu; Yu, Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Qu, Jia; Guo, Zi-Kuan

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice. Human bone marrow MSC were isolated, ex vivo expanded, and identified by cell biological tests. Female BALB/c mice were irradiated with (60)Co γ-ray at a single dose of 6 Gy, and received different doses of human MSC and MSC lysates or saline via tail veins. The survival of mice was record daily, and the femurs and spleens were harvested on day 9 and 16 for pathologic examination. The histological changes were observed and the cellularity was scored. The results showed that the estimated survival time of MSC- and MSC lysate-treated mice was comparable to that of controls. The hematopoiesis in the bone marrow of mice that received high-dose (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates was partially restored on day 9 and the capacity of hemopoietic tissue and cellularity scorings were significantly elevated as compared with that of controls (P < 0.05). Proliferative nudes were also obviously observed in the spleens of mice that received high-dose of MSC or MSC lysates on d 9 after irradiation. The histological structures of the spleen and bone marrow of the mice that received high-doses (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates were restored to normal, the cell proliferation displayed extraordinarily active. Further, the cellularity scores of the bone marrow were not significantly different between the high-dose MSC and MSC lysate-treated mice. It is concluded that the bone marrow MSC can promote the hematopoietic recovery of the irradiated mice, which probably is associated with the bioactive materials inherently existed in bone marrow cells.

  10. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells altered the immunoregulatory activities of hepatic natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Qingqing, Ma; Xin, Zu; Meizhong, Sun

    2014-12-01

    We explored the biological characteristics of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and their immunological effects in vivo. To establish the characteristics of BMSCs, we first examined their morphology, differentiation ability, phenotype, and growth patterns. We further explored the effects of intravenous infusion of BMSCs on the immunological activities in vivo and the possible mechanism involved in it. The results showed that BMSCs displayed a fibroblast-like morphology and could differentiate into bone, fat and cartilage cells. Phenotypic analysis indicated the cells were negative for CD34 and CD31 but positive for Flk1, CD29, CD44 and CD105. In addition, BMSC culture supernatants could not improve the resistance against H2O2-induced apoptosis in L02 cells. We also found that infusion of BMSCs suppressed the activity of intrahepatic natural killer T cells. In summary, BMSCs are an ideal candidate for therapeutic application because they are relatively easy to harvest, easily expandable in vitro, and can be isolated from adult bone marrow while retaining their differentiation potential. BMSCs have stem cell properties, and BMSC therapy is an alternative treatment for acute liver disease.

  11. Differentiation of lymphatic endothelial cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with VEGFs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Luwan; Liu, Yanli; Chen, Guoling; Fang, Yunhai; Song, Xianrang; Dong, Ping; Gao, Jie; Liu, Rong; Ding, Zhaoxi; Bi, Yushun; Liu, Zhiyu

    2012-12-01

    Although there have been many experimental studies demonstrating that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues such as osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes in vivo and in vitro, little information is available regarding their potential to differentiate into lymphatic endothelial cells. Therefore, we chose to investigate differentiation of MSCs into lymphatic endothelial cells using stimulation with members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFs) family. Rat MSCs were isolated from bone marrow aspirate of Sprague-Dawley rats as previously described and characterized with flow cytometry for surface markers CD14, CD34, CD29, and CD90. Purified MSCs were plated and cultured in the presence of VEGF-A, VEGF-C, or the combination of both for 10 days. We examined the cells for Prox-1 and LYVE-1 by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis. Results demonstrated that compared to controls, cell differentiated with VEGF-A, VEGF-C and VEGF-A+VEGF-C expressed Prox-1 and LYVE-1. Our results indicate that MSCs induced by VEGFs are capable of differentiating into lymphatic endothelial-like cells in vitro, and this response has the potential to make them attractive candidates for the development of autologous tissue grafts for future therapy.

  12. Cure of murine thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation without eradication of endogenous stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemaker, G.; Visser, T.P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1986-09-01

    alpha-Thalassemic heterozygous (Hbath/+) mice were used to investigate the possible selective advantage of transplanted normal (+/+) hemopoietic cells. Without conditioning by total-body irradiation (TBI), infusion of large numbers of normal bone marrow cells failed to correct the thalassemic peripheral blood phenotype. Since the recipients' stem cells are normal with respect to number and differentiation capacity, it was thought that the transplanted stem cells were not able to lodge, or that they were not stimulated to proliferate. Therefore, a nonlethal dose of TBI was given to temporarily reduce endogenous stem cell numbers and hemopoiesis. TBI doses of 2 or 3 Gy followed by infusion of normal bone marrow cells proved to be effective in replacing the thalassemic red cells by normal red cells, whereas a dose of 1 Gy was ineffective. It is concluded that cure of thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation does not necessarily require eradication of thalassemic stem cells. Consequently, the objectives of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation of thalassemic patients (and possibly other nonmalignant hemopoietic disorders) should be reconsidered.

  13. Bone Marrow Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells: New Generation of Autologous Cell Therapy Soon Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M

    2017-01-18

    Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are major pluripotent stem cells described in human and mouse. In this issue of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports, Shaikh and colleagues show in a valuable work that mouse bone marrow collected after 5FU treatment contains VSELs able to undergo in vitro multi-lineage differentiation into cells from all three germ layers and also in germ and hematopoietic cells. These findings are robust since no confounding factor such as feeder cell fusion with VSELs can occur here. This paper allows one to better appreciate bone marrow-VSELs differentiation potential and opens new perspectives for autologous cell therapy. Furthermore, it might help explaining lots of contradictive data from the past 20 years, in particular related to ability of bone marrow cells to differentiate into cardiomyocytes.

  14. Cell-autonomous sex differences in gene expression in chicken bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M; Clinton, Mike; Hume, David A

    2015-03-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome-specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes.

  15. Human blood and marrow side population stem cell and Stro-1 positive bone marrow stromal cell numbers decline with age, with an increase in quality of surviving stem cells: correlation with cytokines.

    PubMed

    Brusnahan, S K; McGuire, T R; Jackson, J D; Lane, J T; Garvin, K L; O'Kane, B J; Berger, A M; Tuljapurkar, S R; Kessinger, M A; Sharp, J G

    2010-01-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging leading to anemias, reduced hematopoietic stress responses and myelodysplasias. This study tested the hypothesis that side population hematopoietic stem cells (SP-HSC) would decrease with aging, correlating with IGF-1 and IL-6 levels and increases in bone marrow fat. Marrow was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur at surgery for total hip replacement (N=100). Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle and cellularity and fat content determined. Marrow and blood mononuclear cells were stained with Hoechst dye and the SP-HSC profiles acquired. Marrow stromal cells (MSC) were enumerated flow cytometrically employing the Stro-1 antibody, and clonally in the colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. Plasma levels of IGF-1 (ng/ml) and IL-6 (pg/ml) were measured by ELISA. SP-HSC in blood and bone marrow decreased with age but the quality of the surviving stem cells increased. MSC decreased non-significantly. IGF-1 levels (mean=30.7, SEM=2) decreased and IL-6 levels (mean=4.4, SEM=1) increased with age as did marrow fat (mean=1.2mmfat/g, SEM=0.04). There were no significant correlations between cytokine levels or fat and SP-HSC numbers. Stem cells appear to be progressively lost with aging and only the highest quality stem cells survive.

  16. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues.

  17. Paranuclear blue inclusions in metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Wittchow, R; Laszewski, M; Walker, W; Dick, F

    1992-09-01

    Paranuclear blue inclusions (PBIs) are frequently identified within metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma (SCC) cells on air-dried bone marrow aspirates stained with Wright's stain. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of this finding, 116 bone marrow aspirates containing metastatic neoplasms were evaluated for the presence and frequency of PBIs. Bone marrow specimens included 47 cases of metastatic SCC of the lung, 13 cases of large cell lymphoma, 19 cases of neuroblastoma, five cases of small, noncleaved cell lymphoma, seven cases of rhabdomyosarcoma, three cases of Ewing's sarcoma, three cases of other sarcomas, and 19 cases of non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). PBIs were identified in 40 of 47 (85%) cases of SCC and their frequency varied from 0 to 24% of tumor cells among different cases. In approximately half the cases of SCC, PBIs were identified in 1 to 4% tumor cells; and in eight cases, PBIs were present in 5% or more of tumor cells. PBIs were also identified in two of seven (29%) cases of rhabdomyosarcoma and one case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, but they were not seen in Ewing's sarcoma, small non-cleaved cell lymphoma, large cell lymphoma, neuroblastoma, or non-small cell carcinoma. In addition, PBIs were not seen in alcohol-fixed, Papanicolaou-stained cytology specimens containing SCC. Ultrastructurally, PBIs may represent phagocytized nuclear/cellular material. PBIs are a feature of small cell carcinoma on air-dried, cytologic material stained with Romanowsky type stains. Their presence may provide diagnostic information with regard to the differential diagnosis of metastatic SCC in the bone marrow. Future studies evaluating non-bone marrow Wright's stained fine-needle aspiration specimens are needed to determine if PBIs are useful in distinguishing SCC from other poorly differentiated tumors in the cytology laboratory.

  18. Human osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells express adipogenic markers upon coculture with bone marrow adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Clabaut, Aline; Delplace, Séverine; Chauveau, Christophe; Hardouin, Pierre; Broux, Odile

    2010-07-01

    In osteoporosis, bone loss is accompanied by greater adiposity in the marrow. Given the cellular proximity within the bone marrow, we wondered whether adipocytes might have a paracrine impact on osteoblast differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we cocultured adipocytes with osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the absence of direct cell contact and then analyzed gene expression changes in the osteoblastic population by using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We found that, upon coculture, MSC-derived osteoblasts showed appearance of adipogenic (lipoprotein lipase, leptin) and decrease of osteogenic (osteocalcin) mRNA markers. Our results indicate that in vitro, MSC-derived adipocytes are capable of inducing MSC-derived osteoblasts to differentiate to an adipocyte phenotype. These new data suggest that (i) transdifferentiation of committed osteoblasts into adipocytes may contribute to the increase in marrow fat content at the expense of bone-forming cells and (ii) this switch might be initiated by the adipocytes themselves.

  19. Pure red-cell aplasia of long duration after major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Volin, L; Ruutu, T

    1990-01-01

    We describe a patient with an exceptionally long-lasting red-cell aplasia of 330 days following ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Before BMT, the anti-B titre was high, 1:1,024, and it was only temporarily reduced by extensive plasma exchange. The anti-B titre remained above the level of 1:64 for 270 days, and host-derived isoagglutinin could still be detected 3 years after BMT. In vitro bone marrow cultures during the red-cell aplasia showed greatly reduced numbers or total absence of CFU-E, while the number of BFU-E colonies was only moderately subnormal. Six years after BMT, bone marrow and peripheral-blood cell counts are normal.

  20. Differentiation potential and GFP labeling of sheep bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Czernik, Marta; Fidanza, Antonella; Sardi, Martina; Galli, Cesare; Brunetti, Dario; Malatesta, Daniela; Della Salda, Leonardo; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Ptak, Grazyna E; Loi, Pasqualino

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an important cell population in the bone marrow microenvironment. MSCs have the capacity to differentiate in vitro into several mesenchymal tissues including bone, cartilage, fat, tendon, muscle, and marrow stroma. This study was designed to isolate, expand, and characterize the differentiation ability of sheep bone marrow-derived MSCs and to demonstrate the possibility to permanently express a reporter gene. Bone marrow was collected from the iliac crest and mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation. Sheep MSCs cell lines were stable characterized as CD44+ and CD34- and then transfected with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. The GFP expression was maintained in about half (46.6%) of cloned blastocysts produced by nuclear transfer of GFP+ sheep MSCs, suggesting the possibility to establish multipotent embryonic cells' lines carrying the fluorescent tag for comparative studies on the differentiation capacity of adult stem cells (MSCs) versus embryonic stem cells. We found that sheep MSCs under appropriate culture conditions could be induced to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblast lineages. Our results confirm the plasticity of sheep MSCs and establish the foundation for the development of a pre-clinical sheep model to test the efficiency and safety of cell replacement therapy.

  1. Adipose Stem Cells as Alternatives for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oral Ulcer Healing

    PubMed Central

    Aziz Aly, Lobna Abdel; Menoufy, Hala El-; Ragae, Alyaa; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Sabry, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant, and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cells suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Methods and Results Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of dogs. Transplantation of undifferentiated GFP-labeled Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell (BMSCs), Adipose Derived Stem Cell (ADSCs) or vehicle (saline) was injected around the ulcer in each group. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored clinically and histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in MSCs by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of VEGF and collagen genes was detected in biopsies from all ulcers. Results: MSCs expressed mRNA for VEGF MSCs transplantation significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with controls. There was increased expression of both collagen and VEGF genes in MSCs-treated ulcers compared to controls. Conclusions MSCs transplantation may help to accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF together with increased intracellular matrix formation as detected by increased collagen gene expression. This body of work has provided evidence supporting clinical applications of adipose-derived cells in safety and efficacy trials as an alternative for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in oral ulcer healing. PMID:24298363

  2. The pro-metastatic role of bone marrow-derived cells: a focus on MSCs and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Bong Ihn; Kang, Yibin

    2012-01-01

    Several bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to promote tumour growth and progression. These cells can home to the primary tumour and become active components of the tumour microenvironment. Recent studies have also identified bone marrow-derived cells—such as mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells—as contributors to cancer metastasis. The innate versatility of these cells provides diverse functional aid to promote malignancy, ranging from structural support to signal-mediated suppression of the host immune response. Here, we review the role of mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of the bipolar nature of these bone marrow-derived cells in physiological and malignant contexts could pave the way for new therapeutics against metastatic disease. PMID:22473297

  3. [The cultivation of bone marrow cells and cell lines on polymeric films].

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, M S; Livak, D N; Krasheninnikov, M E; Onishchenko, N A

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells and cells of A-431, MDCK, Vero, 3T3 and Hep-G2 was performed on polymeric films (PVA) with different hydrophobic fatty acid residues. The cells of different types grew on these films with different intensity, but in the most cases comparable with the cultivation control on usual plastic. The examined films were nontoxic to cells and sufficiently adhesive. They did not changed pH of cultural media, were optically transparent under microscope and comfortable in the experimental work. These films can be used as a model for the artificial organ construction. The covalent binding of different fatty acids to PVA shows possibility of the adaptable changes of films properties (hydrophobity and adhesiveness), and therefore possibility of the creation of optimal conditions for different cell types attachement and growth.

  4. Bone marrow dosimetry via microCT imaging and stem cell spatial mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielar, Kayla N.

    In order to make predictions of radiation dose in patients undergoing targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer, an accurate model of skeletal tissues is necessary. Concerning these tissues, the dose-limiting factor in these therapies is the toxicity of the hematopoietically active bone marrow. In addition to acute effects, one must be concerned as well with long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced leukemia. Particular cells of interest for both toxicity and cancer risk are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), found within the active marrow regions of the skeleton. At present, cellular-level dosimetry models are complex, and thus we cannot model individual stem cells in an anatomic model of the patient. As a result, one reverts to looking at larger tissue regions where these cell populations may reside. To provide a more accurate marrow dose assessment, the skeletal dosimetry model must also be patient-specific. That is, it should be designed to match as closely as possible to the patient undergoing treatment. Absorbed dose estimates then can be tailored based on the skeletal size and trabecular microstructure of an individual for an accurate prediction of marrow toxicity. Thus, not only is it important to accurately model the target tissues of interest in a normal patient, it is important to do so for differing levels of marrow health. A skeletal dosimetry model for the adult female was provided for better predictions of marrow toxicity in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. This work is the first fully established gender specific model for these applications, and supersedes previous models in scalability of the skeleton and radiation transport methods. Furthermore, the applicability of using bone marrow biopsies was deemed sufficient in prediction of bone marrow health, specifically for the hematopoietic stem cell population. The location and concentration of the HSC in bone marrow was found to follow a spatial gradient from the bone trabeculae

  5. Sinusoidal ephrin receptor EPHB4 controls hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyeongil; Salvucci, Ombretta; Weigert, Roberto; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Henkemeyer, Mark; Poulos, Michael G.; Butler, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in the bone marrow. Stress signals from cancer and other conditions promote HSPC mobilization into circulation and subsequent homing to tissue microenvironments. HSPC infiltration into tissue microenvironments can influence disease progression; notably, in cancer, HSPCs encourage tumor growth. Here we have uncovered a mutually exclusive distribution of EPHB4 receptors in bone marrow sinusoids and ephrin B2 ligands in hematopoietic cells. We determined that signaling interactions between EPHB4 and ephrin B2 control HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. In mice, blockade of the EPHB4/ephrin B2 signaling pathway reduced mobilization of HSPCs and other myeloid cells to the circulation. EPHB4/ephrin B2 blockade also reduced HSPC infiltration into tumors as well as tumor progression in murine models of melanoma and mammary cancer. These results identify EPHB4/ephrin B2 signaling as critical to HSPC mobilization from bone marrow and provide a potential strategy for reducing cancer progression by targeting the bone marrow. PMID:27820703

  6. Marrow-inspired matrix cues rapidly affect early fate decisions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the physiological process where hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) continuously generate the body’s complement of blood and immune cells within unique regions of the bone marrow termed niches. Although previous investigations have revealed gradients in cellular and extracellular matrix (ECM) content across the marrow, and matrix elasticity and ligand type are believed to be strong regulators of stem cell fate, the impact of biophysical signals on HSC response is poorly understood. Using marrow-inspired ECM ligand–coated polyacrylamide substrates that present defined stiffness and matrix ligand cues, we demonstrate that the interplay between integrin engagement and myosin II activation processes affects the morphology, proliferation, and myeloid lineage specification of primary murine HSCs within 24 hours ex vivo. Notably, the impact of discrete biophysical signals on HSC fate decisions appears to be correlated to known microenvironmental transitions across the marrow. The combination of fibronectin and marrow matrix-associated stiffness was sufficient to maintain hematopoietic progenitor populations, whereas collagen and laminin enhanced proliferation and myeloid differentiation, respectively. Inhibiting myosin II–mediated contraction or adhesion to fibronectin via specific integrins (α5β1 and ανβ3) selectively abrogated the impact of the matrix environment on HSC fate decisions. Together, these findings indicate that adhesive interactions and matrix biophysical properties are critical design considerations in the development of biomaterials to direct HSC behavior in vitro. PMID:28070554

  7. Early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in mouse bone marrow: Subosteal localization of B220+ cells during postirradiation regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, K.; Tepper, J.; Osmond, D.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The localization of early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in the bone marrow of young mice has been studied during recovery from sublethal whole body gamma-irradiation (150 rad). Initial studies by double immunofluorescence labeling of the B-lineage-associated cell surface glycoprotein, B220, and of mu heavy chains in bone marrow cell suspensions, demonstrated a sequential wave of regeneration of early B precursor cells, pre-B cells, and B cells. Early B precursor cells expressing B220 but not mu chains were enriched at 1-3 days following irradiation. After in vivo administration of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody 14.8 to detect B220+ cells in situ, light and electron microscope radioautography of femoral bone marrow sections revealed concentrations of labeled B220+ cells located peripherally near the cortical bone at 1-3 days following irradiation, increasing in numbers in more central areas by 5-7 days. Proliferative B220+ precursor cells were found within layers of bone-lining cells and in a subosteal area characterized by a prominent electron-dense extracellular matrix, often associated with stromal reticular cells. The results demonstrate that the precursor cells that are active in the bone marrow early in the recovery of B lymphopoiesis after gamma-irradiation are located both within and near the endosteum of the surrounding bone. The distinctive extracellular matrix and stromal cell associations noted in this region may contribute to a supportive local microenvironment for early hemopoietic progenitor cells.

  8. Adult bone marrow-derived stem cells for organ regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Tögel, Florian; Westenfelder, Christof

    2007-12-01

    Stem cells have been recognized as a potential tool for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. There are in general two types of stem cells, embryonic and adult stem cells. While embryonic stem cell therapy has been riddled with problems of allogeneic rejection and ethical concerns, adult stem cells have long been used in the treatment of hematological malignancies. With the recognition of additional, potentially therapeutic characteristics, bone marrow-derived stem cells have become a tool in regenerative medicine. The bone marrow is an ideal source of stem cells because it is easily accessible and harbors two types of stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to all blood cell types and have been shown to exhibit plasticity, while multipotent marrow stromal cells are the source of osteocytes, chondrocytes, and fat cells and have been shown to support and generate a large number of different cell types. This review describes the general characteristics of these stem cell populations and their current and potential future applications in regenerative medicine.

  9. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. PMID:26211746

  10. Direct and indirect contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to cancer.

    PubMed

    Guest, Ian; Ilic, Zoran; Ma, Jun; Grant, Denise; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2010-05-15

    Stromal-epithelial interactions may control the growth and initiation of cancers. Here, we not only test the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived cells may effect development of cancers arising from other tissue cells by forming tumor stroma but also that sarcomas may arise by transformation of stem cells from the bone marrow and epithelial cancers may arise by transdifferentiation of bone marrow stem cells to epithelial cancers. Lethally irradiated female FVB/N mice were restored with bone marrow (BM) transplants from a male transgenic mouse carrying the polyoma middle T-oncoprotein under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (MMTV-PyMT) and followed for development of lesions. All of 8 lethally irradiated female FVB/N recipient mice, restored with BM transplants from a male MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse, developed Y-chromosome negative (Y-) cancers of various organs surrounded by Y+ stroma. One of the female FVB/N recipient mice also developed fibrosarcoma and 1, a diploid breast adenocarcinoma containing Y chromosomes. In contrast, only 1 of 12 control female mice restored with normal male BM developed a tumor (lymphoma) during the same time period. These results indicate not only that the transgenic BM-derived stromal cells may indirectly contribute to development of tumors in recipient mice but also that sarcomas may arise by transformation of BM stem cells and that breast cancers arise by transdifferentiation of BM stem cells, presumably by mesenchymal-epithelial transition.

  11. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells cooperate with bone marrow cells in therapy of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Veronika S; Kiss, Judit; Kovács, János; Gócza, Elen; Vas, Virág; Monostori, Eva; Uher, Ferenc

    2008-01-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that the adult bone marrow harbors cells that can influence beta-cell regeneration in diabetic animals. Other reports, however, have contradicted these findings. To address this issue, we used an animal model of type 1 diabetes in which the disease was induced with streptozotocin in mice. Freshly prepared sex-mismatched bone marrow cells (BMCs) and syngeneic or allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were concomitantly administrated into sublethally irradiated diabetic mice. Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations rapidly returned to normal levels, accompanied by efficient tissue regeneration after a single injection of a mixture of 10(6) BMCs per 10(5) MSCs. Neither BMC nor MSC transplantation was effective alone. Successful treatment of diabetic animals was not due to the reconstitution of the damaged islet cells from the transplant, since no donor-derived beta-cells were found in the recovered animals, indicating a graft-initiated endogenous repair process. Moreover, MSC injection caused the disappearance of beta-cell-specific T lymphocytes from diabetic pancreas. Therefore, we suggest that two aspects of this successful treatment regimen operate in parallel and synergistically in our model. First, BMCs and MSCs induce the regeneration of recipient-derived pancreatic insulin-secreting cells. Second, MSCs inhibit T-cell-mediated immune responses against newly formed beta-cells, which, in turn, are able to survive in this altered immunological milieu. Thus, the application of this therapy in human patients suffering from diabetes and/or other tissue destructive autoimmune diseases may be feasible.

  13. Effect of dexamethasone on moesin gene expression in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cornet, F; Broux, O; Anselme, K; Hardouin, P; Jeanfils, J

    2004-10-01

    The influence of dexamethasone on rabbit bone marrow stromal cells differentiation was studied by screening the action of dexamethasone on gene expression. Using differential display, we observed some differential amplifications. The use of five of thirteen different primers combination allowed to identify one or more differential bands. One of them was identified as moesin gene. Real-time PCR confirmed a significant reduction of moesin gene expression following dexamethasone treatment. The decrease of expression for this protein, involved in cytoskeletal organization, could explain the effects of dexamethasone treatment on bone marrow stromal cells differentiation.

  14. A simple technique for red blood cell removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, G; Wernet, D; Northoff, H; Schneider, W

    1994-01-01

    A simple technique for red blood cell (RBC) removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation is reported requiring two centrifugation steps, special blood bags and a mechanical device to separate the buffy coat from RBCs within the bag. In 42 transplantations an average of 84% of nucleated cells was recovered with an average contamination of 7.5 ml packed RBCs. The preparations were well tolerated in all patients whose isoagglutinin titers had not been reduced. Bone marrow engraftment was not significantly different from control groups.

  15. Heterogeneous proliferative potential of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with solid epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Solakoglu, Oender; Maierhofer, Christine; Lahr, Georgia; Breit, Elisabeth; Scheunemann, Peter; Heumos, Isabella; Pichlmeier, Uwe; Schlimok, Günter; Oberneder, Ralph; Köllermann, Manfred W.; Köllermann, Jens; Speicher, Michael R.; Pantel, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow is a major homing site for circulating epithelial tumor cells. The present study was aimed to assess the proliferative capacity of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with operable solid tumors especially with regard to their clinical outcome. We obtained bone marrow aspirates from 153 patients with carcinomas of the prostate (n = 46), breast (n = 45), colon (n = 33), and kidney (n = 29). Most of the patients (87%) had primary disease with no clinical signs of overt metastases [tumor-node-metastasis (TNM)-stage UICC (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer) I-III]. After bone marrow was cultured for 21–102 days under special cell culture conditions, viable epithelial cells were detected by cytokeratin staining in 124 patients (81%). The cultured epithelial cells harbored Ki-ras2 mutations and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The highest median number of expanded tumor cells was observed in prostate cancer (2,619 per flask). There was a significant positive correlation between the number of expanded tumor cells and the UICC-stage of the patients (P = 0.03) or the presence of overt metastases (P = 0.04). Moreover, a strong expansion of tumor cells was correlated to an increased rate of cancer-related deaths (P = 0.007) and a reduced survival of the patients (P = 0.006). In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients have viable tumor cells in their bone marrow at primary tumor diagnosis, and the proliferative potential of these cells determines the clinical outcome. PMID:11854519

  16. Bone marrow mast cell immunophenotyping in adults with mast cell disease: a prospective study of 33 patients.

    PubMed

    Pardanani, A; Kimlinger, T; Reeder, T; Li, C-Y; Tefferi, A

    2004-08-01

    The aberrant co-expression of CD2 and CD25 antigens is the immunophenotypic hallmark of neoplastic mast cells, and has been consistently identified on bone marrow mast cells from patients with indolent mast cell disease (MCD). We prospectively analyzed the bone marrow mast cell immunophenotype by multiparametric flow cytometry (FC) for 33 MCD cases, to examine the role of CD2 and CD25 expression in establishing diagnosis, detecting histologically occult bone marrow mast cell infiltration, and assessing treatment response. While CD25 was almost uniformly expressed, only 6 of 13 patients with indolent MCD, 1 of 8 with aggressive MCD, 2 of 7 with MCD and an associated hematological disorder, and none of the 2 patients with either mast cell leukemia or smoldering systemic mastocytosis, expressed CD2. One of three patients with cutaneous mastocytosis had an aberrant CD2+/CD25+ mast cell population suggesting histologically occult bone marrow involvement. CD25 expression was lost in one patient who achieved complete histologic remission with therapy, but not in two patients who achieved a partial remission. In conclusion, CD25, but not CD2, is a reliable marker for neoplastic mast cells, and CD25 expression indicates histologically occult bone marrow infiltration and residual disease after therapy.

  17. Cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Longhini-Dos-Santos, Nathalia; Barbosa-de-Oliveira, Valter Abraão; Kozma, Rodrigo Heras; Faria, Carolina Arruda de; Stessuk, Talita; Frei, Fernando; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2013-04-01

    Emphysema is characterized by destruction of alveolar walls with loss of gas exchange surface and consequent progressive dyspnea. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) in an animal model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. Emphysema was induced in C57Bl/J6 female mice by intranasal instillation of elastase. After 21 days, the mice received bone marrow mononuclear cells from EGFP male mice with C57Bl/J6 background. The groups were assessed by comparison and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed among the groups treated with BMMC and evaluated after 7, 14 and 21 days. Analysis of the mean linear intercept (Lm) values for the different groups allowed to observe that the group treated with BMMC and evaluated after 21 days showed the most significant result. The group that received no treatment showed a statistically significant difference when compared to other groups, except the group treated and evaluated after 21 days, evidencing the efficacy of cell therapy with BMMC in pulmonary emphysema.

  18. Bone marrow-derived cells serve as proangiogenic macrophages but not endothelial cells in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yuji; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Kishi, Kazuo; Suda, Toshio; Kubota, Yoshiaki

    2011-05-12

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) contribute to postnatal vascular growth by differentiating into endothelial cells or secreting angiogenic factors. However, the extent of their endothelial differentiation highly varies according to the angiogenic models used. Wound healing is an intricate process in which the skin repairs itself after injury. As a process also observed in cancer progression, neoangiogenesis into wound tissues is profoundly involved in this healing process, suggesting the contribution of BMDCs. However, the extent of the differentiation of BMDCs to endothelial cells in wound healing is unclear. In this study, using the green fluorescent protein-bone marrow chim-eric experiment and high resolution confocal microscopy at a single cell level, we observed no endothelial differentiation of BMDCs in 2 acute wound healing models (dorsal excisional wound and ear punch) and a chronic wound healing model (decubitus ulcer). Instead, a major proportion of BMDCs were macrophages. Indeed, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) inhibition depleted approximately 80% of the BMDCs at the wound healing site. CSF-1-mutant (CSF-1(op/op)) mice showed significantly reduced neoangiogenesis into the wound site, supporting the substantial role of BMDCs as macrophages. Our data show that the proangiogenic effects of macrophages, but not the endothelial differentiation, are the major contribution of BMDCs in wound healing.

  19. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-García, M. Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, José Á.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input–output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  20. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells Adhering to Adipocytes in Canine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsing-Yi; Fujita, Naoki; Endo, Kentaro; Morita, Maresuke; Takeda, Tae; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2017-03-15

    The ceiling culture method has been used to isolate mature adipocytes from adipose tissue that can be dedifferentiated into fibroblastic cells, also known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that self-renew and are multipotent, with much higher homogeneity and colony-forming efficiency than those of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. We cultured adipocytes from canine bone marrow using this technique, with the expectation of obtaining DFAT cells. However, contrary to our expectations, continuous monitoring of ceiling cultures by time-lapse microscopy revealed many small cells adhering to adipocytes that proliferated rapidly into cells with a fibroblastic morphology and without any dedifferentiation from adipocytes. We named these cells bone marrow peri-adipocyte cells (BM-PACs) and demonstrated the multipotent properties of BM-PACs compared to that of conventionally cultured canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). BM-PACs showed significantly greater clonogenicity and proliferation ability than BMMSCs. An in vitro trilineage differentiation assay revealed that BM-PACs possess adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic capacities superior to those of BMMSCs. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the expression of CD73, which plays an important role in cell growth and differentiation, was significantly higher in BM-PACs than in BMMSCs. These results indicate that canine BM-PACs have stem cell characteristics that are superior to those of BMMSCs, and that these mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear to be a feasible source for cell-based therapies in dogs.

  2. Characterization of natural killer cells cultured from human bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoda, Y.; Kawakami, Z.; Shibuya, A.; Abe, T.

    1988-09-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) cells, depleted of nylon wool-adherent cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells, were cultured in medium containing recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL2). After 21 or 24 days in culture, numerous lymphoid cells with multiple azurophilic granules and a morphology similar to large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were found. Two-color analysis of surface phenotype showed many of these cells to be NKH1-positive and a limited number of cells had other NK markers such as CD16, CD2, or CD8. The CD3 antigen was not coexpressed with NKH1. The cultured BM cells were cytotoxic for K562, Daudi, and Raji cell lines. The NKH1+, CD2-, CD3-, CD16- cells were sorted and, in addition to having the LGL morphology, were found to be cytotoxic for K562 cells (NK (K562)). The generation of NK(K562) activity was significantly suppressed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine plus ultraviolet light treatment, indicating that DNA synthesis is required. These experiments suggest that the described culture conditions allow differentiation of progenitor cells, into immature, but functionally active, NK cells.

  3. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells: their mobilization and homing to bone marrow and peripheral tissue.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Massberg, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are a rare population of precursor cells that possess the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. In the bone marrow (BM), HSPCs warrant blood cell homeostasis. In addition, they may also replenish tissue-resident myeloid cells and directly participate in innate immune responses once they home to peripheral tissues. In this review, we summarize recent data on the signaling molecules that modulate the mobilization of HSPCs from BM and their migration to peripheral tissues.

  4. Bone marrow regeneration promoted by biophysically sorted osteoprogenitors from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as "cell factories" that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies.

  5. The topologic and chronologic patterns of hematopoietic cell seeding in host femoral bone marrow after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Stein, Jeremiah; Yaniv, Isaac; Farkas, Daniel L

    2003-08-01

    The early stages of homing, seeding, and engraftment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are poorly characterized. We have developed an optical technique that allows in vivo tracking of transplanted, fluorescent-tagged cells in the host femurs. In this study we used fluorescence microscopy to monitor the topologic and chronologic patterns of hematopoietic cell seeding in the femoral bone marrow (BM) of mice. PKH-labeled cells homed to the femur within minutes after injection into a peripheral vein. Most cells drifted within the marrow space and gradually seeded in clusters close to the endosteal surface of the epiphyseal cortex. Three days after transplantation 85% to 94% (14%) of PKH-labeled cells in the femoral marrow were located within 100 microm of the epiphyseal bone surface (P <.001 versus the more central cells), whereas labeled cells were absent in the femoral diaphysis. Primary seeding of juxtaendosteal, epiphyseal marrow occurred independently of recipient conditioning (myeloablated and nonconditioned hosts), donor-recipient antigen disparity, or the phenotype of the injected cells (whole BM and lineage-negative cells) and was consistently observed in secondary recipients of BM-homed cells. Seeding in regions close to the epiphyseal bone was also observed in freshly excised femurs perfused ex vivo and in femurs assessed without prior placement of optical windows, indicating that the site of primary seeding was not affected by surgical placement of optical windows. Four to 5 days after transplantation, cellular clusters appeared in the more central regions of the epiphyses and in the diaphyses. Centrally located cells showed decreased PKH fluorescence, suggesting that they were progeny of the seeding cells, and brightly fluorescent cells (quiescent first-generation seeding cells) were observed close to the bone surface for as long as 24 days after transplantation. These data indicate that the periphery of the femoral marrow hosts primary seeding

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-09-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  7. Treatment with at Homeopathic Complex Medication Modulates Mononuclear Bone Marrow Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Beatriz; Abud, Ana Paula R.; de Oliveira, Carolina C.; Cardoso, Francolino; Bernardi, Raffaello Popa Di; Guimarães, Fernando S. F.; Gabardo, Juarez; de Freitas Buchi, Dorly

    2011-01-01

    A homeopathic complex medication (HCM), with immunomodulatory properties, is recommended for patients with depressed immune systems. Previous studies demonstrated that the medication induces an increase in leukocyte number. The bone marrow microenvironment is composed of growth factors, stromal cells, an extracellular matrix and progenitor cells that differentiate into mature blood cells. Mice were our biological model used in this research. We now report in vivo immunophenotyping of total bone marrow cells and ex vivo effects of the medication on mononuclear cell differentiation at different times. Cells were examined by light microscopy and cytokine levels were measured in vitro. After in vivo treatment with HCM, a pool of cells from the new marrow microenvironment was analyzed by flow cytometry to detect any trend in cell alteration. The results showed decreases, mainly, in CD11b and TER-119 markers compared with controls. Mononuclear cells were used to analyze the effects of ex vivo HCM treatment and the number of cells showing ring nuclei, niche cells and activated macrophages increased in culture, even in the absence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytokines favoring stromal cell survival and differentiation in culture were induced in vitro. Thus, we observe that HCM is immunomodulatory, either alone or in association with other products. PMID:19736221

  8. Proliferative activity of vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramvis, A.; Garnett, H.M.

    1987-11-01

    Vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cell population cultured in Fischer's medium supplemented with 12.5% fetal calf serum and 12.5% horse serum consists of two cell shapes: fusiform (type I) and polygonal (type II). Limiting-dilution cloning of the cells suggested that the two morphologically distinct cell types belong to the same cellular system even though they differ in their proliferative capabilities. The labeling index of type II cells, as measured by autoradiography, was found to be consistently lower than that of type I cells. It is probable that these two phenotypes represent different stages of differentiation, where progenitor type I gives rise to type II cells. The bone marrow-derived adherent cells were found to be cytokinetically at rest in vivo, using the thymidine suicide test, and relatively radioresistant with a D0 = 2.1 Gy and n = 2.36 at the time of explantation from the bone. Furthermore, in culture these cells are characterized by a relatively long cell cycle of 60 h, where the length of the S phase is 30 h, G2 is 12 h, M is 6 h, and G1 is 12 h. Thus, the vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells represent a cell population with a low turnover rate both in vivo and in vitro.

  9. The resistance of C57BL/6 mice to subcutaneous infection with Mycobacterium lepraemurium is dependent on both T cells and other cells of bone marrow origin.

    PubMed

    Adu, H O; Curtis, J; Turk, J L

    1983-06-01

    Thymectomized or sham-thymectomized C57BL/6 mice were irradiated and reconstituted with either C57BL/6 bone marrow cells or bone marrow cells from H-2 matched BALB/B mice. The ability to limit organism multiplication at the site of infection in response to a moderate dose of Mycobacterium lepraemurium is shown to be T-cell mediated and not dependent on the type of bone marrow cells used for reconstitution. Dissemination of the organisms on the other hand appeared to be dependent on both T cells and cells of bone marrow origin.

  10. Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Clinical Application: Harnessing Paracrine Roles and Niche Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backly, Rania M. El; Cancedda, Ranieri

    The being of any individual throughout life is a dynamic process relying on the capacity to retain processes of self-renewal and differentiation, both of which are hallmarks of stem cells. Although limited in the adult human organism, regeneration and repair do take place in virtue of the presence of adult stem cells. In the bone marrow, two major populations of stem cells govern the dynamic equilibrium of both hemopoiesis and skeletal homeostasis; the hematopoietic and the mesenchymal stem cells. Recent cell based clinical trials utilizing bone marrow-derived stem cells as therapeutic agents have revealed promising results, while others have failed to display as such. It is therefore imperative to strive to understand the mechanisms by which these cells function in vivo, how their properties can be maintained ex-vivo, and to explore further their recently highlighted immunomodulatory and trophic effects.

  11. Effects of low-doses of Bacillus spp. from permafrost on differentiation of bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Kalyonova, L F; Novikova, M A; Kostolomova, E G

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a new microorganism species (Bacillus spp., strain M3) isolated from permafrost specimens from Central Yakutia (Mamontova Mountain) on the bone marrow hemopoiesis were studied on laboratory mice. Analysis of the count and immunophenotype of bone marrow cells indicated that even in low doses (1000-5000 microbial cells) these microorganisms modulated hemopoiesis and lymphopoiesis activity. The percentage of early hemopoietic precursors (CD117(+)CD34(-)) increased, intensity of lymphocyte precursor proliferation and differentiation (CD25(+)CD44(-)) decreased, and the percentage of lymphocytes released from the bone marrow (CD25(+)CD44(+)) increased on day 21 after injection of the bacteria. These changes in activity of hemopoiesis were associated with changes in the level of regulatory T lymphocytes (reduced expression of TCRαβ) and were most likely compensatory. The possibility of modulating hemopoiesis activity in the bone marrow by low doses of one microorganism strain isolated from the permafrost could be useful for evaluating the effects of other low dose bacteria on the bone marrow hemopoiesis.

  12. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Angélique; Poignard, Alexandre; Coquelin-Salsac, Laura; Léotot, Julie; Homma, Yasuhiro; Jullien, Nicolas; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hernigou, Philippe; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a frequent complication in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To delay hip arthroplasty, core decompression combined with concentrated total bone marrow (BM) treatment is currently performed in the early stages of the osteonecrosis. Cell therapy efficacy depends on the quantity of implanted BM stromal cells. For this reason, expanded bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) can be used to improve osteonecrosis treatment in SCD patients. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the function of BMSCs isolated from a large number of SCD patients with osteonecrosis (SCD-ON) compared with control groups (patients with osteonecrosis not related to SCD (ON) and normal donors (N)). BM total nuclear cells and colony-forming efficiency values (CFE) were significantly higher in SCD-ON patients than in age and sex-matched controls. The BMSCs from SCD-ON patients were similar to BMSCs from the control groups in terms of their phenotypic and functional properties. SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products.

  13. In vivo osteoinductive effect and in vitro isolation and cultivation bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Redzić, Amira; Smajilagić, Amer; Aljicević, Mufida; Berberović, Ljubomir

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow contains cell type termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), first recognized in bone marrow by a German pathologist, Julius Cohnheim in 1867. That MSCs have potential to differentiate in vitro in to the various cells lines as osteoblast, chondroblast, myoblast and adipoblast cells lines. Aims of our study were to show in vivo capacity of bone marrow MSC to produce bone in surgically created non critical size mandible defects New Zeland Rabbits, and then in second part of study to isolate in vitro MSC from bone marrow, as potential cell transplantation model in bone regeneration. In vivo study showed new bone detected on 3D CT reconstruction day 30, on all 3 animals non critical size defects, treated with bone marrow MSC exposed to the human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (rhBMP-7). Average values of bone mineral density (BMD), was 530 mg/cm3, on MSC treated animals, and 553 mg/cm3 on control group of 3 animals where non critical size defects were treated with iliac crest autologue bone graft. Activity of the Alkaline Phosphatase enzyme were measurement on 0.5, 14, 21, 30 day and increased activity were detected day 14 on animals treated with bone marrow MSCs compared with day 30 on iliac crest treated animals. That results indicates strong osteoinduction activity of the experimental bone marrow MSCs models exposed to the rhBMP-7 factor Comparing ALP activity, that model showed superiorly results than control group. That result initiates us in opinion that MSCs alone should be alternative for the autolologue bone transplantation and in vitro study we isolated singles MSCs from the bone marrow of rat's tibia and femora and cultivated according to the method of Maniatopoulos et all. The small initial colonies of fibroblast like cells were photo-documented after 2 days of primary culture. Such isolated and cultivated MSCs in future studies will be exposed to the growth factors to differentiate in osteoblast and indicate their clinically potential as alternative

  14. Effects of the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS350, a radiation mitigator, on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures and on radioresistance of marrow stromal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ashwin; Epperly, Michael W; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Sprachman, Melissa M; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The ionizing irradiation mitigator MMS350 prolongs survival of mice treated with total-body irradiation and prevents radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis when added to drinking water at day 100 after thoracic irradiation. The effects of MMS350 on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture and on the radiobiology of derived bone marrow stromal cell lines were tested. Long-term bone marrow cultures were established from C57BL/6NTac mice and maintained in a high-humidity incubator, with 7% CO2 and the addition of 100 μM MMS350 at the weekly media change. Over 10 weeks in culture, MMS350 had no significant effect on maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell production, or on nonadherent cells or colony-forming units of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Stromal cell lines derived from non MMS350-treated long-term cultures or control stromal cells treated with MMS350 were radioresistant in the clonogenic survival curve assay. MMS350 is a non-toxic, highly water-soluble radiation mitigator that exhibits radioprotective effects on bone marrow stromal cells.

  15. Mild cerebellar neurodegeneration of aged heterozygous PCD mice increases cell fusion of Purkinje and bone marrow-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz, David; Recio, Javier S; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have different plastic properties, especially regarding cell fusion, which increases with time and is prompted by tissue injury. Several recessive mutations, including Purkinje Cell Degeneration, affect the number of Purkinje cells in homozygosis; heterozygous young animals have an apparently normal phenotype but they undergo Purkinje cell loss as they age. Our findings demonstrate that heterozygous pcd mice undergo Purkinje cell loss at postnatal day 300, this slow but steadily progressing cell death starting sooner than has been reported previously and without massive reactive gliosis or inflammation. Here, transplantation of bone marrow stem cells was performed to assess the arrival of bone marrow-derived cells in the cerebellum in these heterozygous mice. Our results reveal that a higher number of cell fusion events occurs in heterozygous animals than in the controls, on days 150 and 300 postnatally. In sum, this study indicates that mild cell death promotes the fusion of bone marrow-derived cells with surviving Purkinje neurons. This phenomenon suggests new therapies for long-lasting neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Artificial niche combining elastomeric substrate and platelets guides vascular differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Allen, Robert; Gao, Jin; Wang, Yadong

    2011-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells are promising cell sources for vascular tissue engineering. However, conventional bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell expansion and induction strategies require plating on tissue culture plastic, a stiff substrate that may itself influence cell differentiation. Direct scaffold seeding avoids plating on plastic; to the best of our knowledge, there is no report of any scaffold that induces the differentiation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMNCs) to vascular cells in vitro. In this study, we hypothesize that an elastomeric scaffold with adsorbed plasma proteins and platelets will induce differentiation of BMNCs to vascular cells and promote vascular tissue formation by combining soft tissue mechanical properties with platelet-mediated tissue repairing signals. To test our hypothesis, we directly seeded rat primary BMNCs in four types of scaffolds: poly(lactide-co-glycolide), elastomeric poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), platelet-poor plasma-coated PGS, and PGS coated by plasma supplemented with platelets. After 21 days of culture, osteochondral differentiation of cells in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) was detected, but most of the adhered cells on the surface of all PGS scaffolds expressed calponin-I and α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting smooth muscle differentiation. Cells in PGS scaffolds also produced significant amount of collagen and elastin. Further, plasma coating improves seeding efficiency, and platelet increases proliferation, the number of differentiated cells, and extracellular matrix content. Thus, the artificial niche composed of platelets, plasma, and PGS is promising for artery tissue engineering using BMNCs.

  17. Osterix-cre labeled progenitor cells contribute to the formation and maintenance of the bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaling; Strecker, Sara; Wang, Liping; Kronenberg, Mark S; Wang, Wen; Rowe, David W; Maye, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma.

  18. Directed differentiation of airway epithelial cells of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Dong

    2016-11-01

    The ability to generate lung and airway epithelial cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) would have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening, and studies of human lung development. In this research, hBMSCs were cultured in specialized airway epithelial cell growth media for differentiation of airway epithelial cells, including keratinocyte growth factor transferrin, bovine pituitary extract, epinephrine, triiodothyronine and retinoic acid. The surfactant protein C, a specific marker of type II pneumocytes, and its corresponding protein were demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting after differentiation of airway epithelial cells, respectively. These cells were then transferred into an induced acute lung injury model. The results showed that the hBMSCs could induce differentiation in airway epithelial cells under the special conditions of the medium, the result for surfactant protein C was positive in differentiated airway epithelial cells using immunofluorescence and western blotting, and these cells were successfully colonized in the injured lung airway. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of airway epithelial cells can be specifically generated from hBMSCs and that induced cells may be allowed to participate in tissue repair.

  19. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell division in neuroblastoma cells and bone marrow macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sans-Fons, M Gloria; Sole, Sonia; Sanfeliu, Coral; Planas, Anna M

    2010-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix and carry out key functions in cell development, cancer, injury, and regeneration. In addition to its well recognized extracellular action, functional intracellular MMP activity under certain conditions is supported by increasing evidence. In this study, we observed higher gelatinase activity by in situ zymography and increased MMP-9 immunoreactivity in human neuroblastoma cells and in bone marrow macrophages undergoing mitosis compared with resting cells. We studied the pattern of immunoreactivity at the different stages of cell division by confocal microscopy. Immunostaining with different monoclonal antibodies against MMP-9 revealed a precise, dynamic, and well orchestrated localization of MMP-9 at the different stages of cell division. The cellular distribution of MMP-9 staining was studied in relation to that of microtubules. The spatial pattern of MMP-9 immunoreactivity suggested some participation in both the reorganization of the nuclear content and the process of chromatid segmentation. We then used several MMP-9 inhibitors to find out whether MMP-9 might be involved in the cell cycle. These drugs impaired the entry of cells into mitosis, as revealed by flow cytometry, and reduced cell culture growth. In addition, the silencing of MMP-9 expression with small interfering RNA also reduced cell growth. Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular MMP-9 is involved in the process of cell division in neuroblastoma cells and in primary cultures of macrophages.

  1. Native and bone marrow-derived cell mosaicism in gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected p27-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songhua; Kim, Woojin; Pham, Tu T.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Houghton, Jean Marie; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection promotes non-cardia gastric cancer. Some mouse models suggest that bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) contribute to Helicobacter-associated gastric carcinogenesis. We determined whether this increased susceptibility to Helicobacter-induced gastric carcinogenesis of p27-deficient mice is dependent upon their p27-null BMDC or their p27-null gastric epithelial cells. Design Female mice (recipients) were irradiated and transplanted with BMDC from male donors. Wild type (WT) mice in group 1 (control) received BMDC from male GFP-transgenic mice. Female WT and p27 KO mice were engrafted with male p27KO mice BMDC (Group 2) or GFP-transgenic WT BMDC (Group 3). Recipients were infected with H. pylori SS1 for one year. Results Mice lacking p27 in either the BM pool or gastric epithelium developed significantly more advanced gastric pathology, including high-grade dysplasia. Co-staining of donor BMDC in dysplastic gastric glands was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Gastric expression of IL-1 beta protein was reduced in groups 2 and 3 (p < 0.05 vs control) whereas expression of IFN-γ and chemokines MIP-1 beta, MIG, IP-10 and RANTES in group 2 were significantly higher than group 3. Conclusions Both bone marrow-derived and gastric epithelial cells contribute to the increased gastric cancer susceptibility of p27-deficient H. pylori-infected mice. PMID:27655701

  2. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad S; Stemig, Melissa E; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harvested immediately after irradiation, and at 1 and 5 days after irradiation. Cell cycle analysis, colony forming ability (CFU-F), differentiation ability, and expression of osteogenic-specific runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), oxidative stress-specific dismutase-1 (SOD1) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) were analyzed. Irradiation arrested cell cycle progression in BMMSCs and hESMSCs. Colony formation ability of irradiated MSCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiated hESMSCs showed higher adipogenic differentiation compared with BMMSCs, together with an increase in the adipogenic PPARγ expression. PPARγ expression was upregulated as early as 4 h after irradiation, along with the expression of SOD1. More than 70% downregulation was found in Wnt3A, Wnt4, Wnt 7A, Wnt10A and Wnt11 in BMMSCs, but not in hESMSCs. hESMSCs are highly proliferative but radiosensitive compared with BMMSCs. Increased PPARγ expression relative to RUNX2 and downregulation of Wnt ligands in irradiated MSCs suggest Wnt mediated the fate determination of irradiated MSCs.

  3. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  4. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A.; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo H.; Silva-Junior, Almir J.; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M.; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized. PMID:26649049

  5. Cell cycle regulation of embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking functional Pax7

    PubMed Central

    Czerwinska, Areta M.; Nowacka, Joanna; Aszer, Magdalena; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Ciemerych, Maria A.; Grabowska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and in adult organisms in that it sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Recently we have shown that lack of Pax7 does not prevent the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. In the current work we show that the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells modulates cell cycle facilitating their proliferation. Surprisingly, deregulation of Pax7 function also positively impacts at the proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Such phenotypes seem to be executed by modulating the expression of positive cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin E. PMID:27610933

  6. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Li, Zheng-Wei; Luo, Min; Li, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Ke-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was

  7. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  8. Lack of correlation between telomere length and telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Wysoki, Jacek; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Pernak, Monika; Nowicka, Karina; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Jerzy

    2003-12-01

    The expression of three components of telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT, TP1) along with telomerase activity and telomere length in leukemic cells was investigated. Cells were isolated from peripheral blood and/or bone marrow of children with acute lymphoblastic (ALL) and non-lymphoblastic (ANLL) leukemia. Expression of three components of telomerase as well as telomerase activity was found in all leukemic cells. Chemiluminescent detection of terminal restriction fragments (TRF) from DNA isolated from ALL cells showed variable patterns expressing considerable heterogeneity of telomere length. The ALL cells appeared to have both long and short telomere lengths, in contrast to normal peripheral lymphocytes, which produced limited pattern of TRF. The ANLL cells produced predominantly short telomere pattern despite high telomerase activity and expression. It can be concluded that high telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells is not always correlated with long telomeres (TRF pattern).

  9. Multipotent adult progenitor cells from bone marrow differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert E.; Reyes, Morayma; Koodie, Lisa; Jiang, Yuehua; Blackstad, Mark; Lund, Troy; Lenvik, Todd; Johnson, Sandra; Hu, Wei-Shou; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2002-01-01

    We have derived from normal human, mouse, and rat postnatal bone marrow primitive, multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) that can differentiate into most mesodermal cells and neuroectodermal cells in vitro and into all embryonic lineages in vivo. Here, we show that MAPCs can also differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rat MAPCs, cultured on Matrigel with FGF-4 and HGF, differentiated into epithelioid cells that expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β (HNF-3β), GATA4, cytokeratin 19 (CK19), transthyretin, and α-fetoprotein by day 7, and expressed CK18, HNF-4, and HNF-1α on days 14–28. Virtually all human, as well as a majority of rodent cells stained positive for albumin and CK18 on day 21; 5% (rodent) to 25% (human) cells were binucleated by day 21. These cells also acquired functional characteristics of hepatocytes: they secreted urea and albumin, had phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome p450, could take up LDL, and stored glycogen. MAPCs, which can be expanded in vitro and maintained in an undifferentiated state for more than 100 population doublings, can thus differentiate into cells with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. MAPCs may therefore be an ideal cell for in vivo therapies for liver disorders or for use in bioartificial liver devices. PMID:12021244

  10. Culturing bone marrow cells with dexamethasone and ascorbic acid improves osteogenic cell sheet structure

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, T.; Kira, T.; Onishi, T.; Uchihara, Y.; Imamura, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the structure and extracellular matrix molecule expression of osteogenic cell sheets created via culture in medium with both dexamethasone (Dex) and ascorbic acid phosphate (AscP) compared either Dex or AscP alone. Methods Osteogenic cell sheets were prepared by culturing rat bone marrow stromal cells in a minimal essential medium (MEM), MEM with AscP, MEM with Dex, and MEM with Dex and AscP (Dex/AscP). The cell number and messenger (m)RNA expression were assessed in vitro, and the appearance of the cell sheets was observed after mechanical retrieval using a scraper. β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) was then wrapped with the cell sheets from the four different groups and subcutaneously implanted into rats. Results After mechanical retrieval, the osteogenic cell sheets from the MEM, MEM with AscP, and MEM with Dex groups appeared to be fragmented or incomplete structures. The cell sheets cultured with Dex/AscP remained intact after mechanical retrieval, without any identifiable tears. Culture with Dex/AscP increased the mRNA and protein expression of extracellular matrix proteins and cell number compared with those of the other three groups. More bridging bone formation was observed after transplantation of the β-TCP scaffold wrapped with cell sheets cultured with Dex/AscP, than in the other groups. Conclusions These results suggest that culture with Dex/AscP improves the mechanical integrity of the osteogenic cell sheets, allowing retrieval of the confluent cells in a single cell sheet structure. This method may be beneficial when applied in cases of difficult tissue reconstruction, such as nonunion, bone defects, and osteonecrosis. Cite this article: M. Akahane, T. Shimizu, T. Kira, T. Onishi, Y. Uchihara, T. Imamura, Y. Tanaka. Culturing bone marrow cells with dexamethasone and ascorbic acid improves osteogenic cell sheet structure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:569–576. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0013.R1. PMID:27881440

  11. Mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit leukemia/lymphoma cell proliferation in vitro and in a mouse model of allogeneic bone marrow transplant.

    PubMed

    Song, Ningxia; Gao, Lei; Qiu, Huiying; Huang, Chongmei; Cheng, Hui; Zhou, Hong; Lv, Shuqing; Chen, Li; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-07-01

    The allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contributes to the reconstitution of hematopoiesis by ameliorating acute graft‑versus‑host disease (aGVHD). However, the role of MSCs in graft‑versus‑leukemia remains to be determined. In the present study, we co‑cultured C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow (BM)‑derived MSCs with A20 murine B lymphoma, FBL3 murine erythroleukemia and P388 murine acute lymphocytic leukemia cells. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and the amount of cytokine secretion were then measured using a Cell Counting kit‑8, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. We also established a model of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using BALB/c mice. Following the administration of A20 cells and MSCs, we recorded the symptoms and the survival of the mice for 4 weeks, assessed the T cell subsets present in peripheral blood, and, after the mice were sacrifice, we determined the infiltration of MSCs into the organs by histological staining. Our results revealed that the MSCs inhibited the proliferation of the mouse lymphoma and leukemia cells in vitro, leading to cell cycle arrest and reducing the secretion of interleukin (IL)‑10. In our model of allogeneic BMT, the intravenous injection of MSCs into the mice injected wth A20 cells decreased the incidence of lymphoma, improved survival, increased the fraction of CD3+CD8+ T cells, decreased the fraction of CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD4+CD25+ T cells in peripheral blood, and ameliorated the manifestation of aGVHD. The results from the present study indicate that MSCs may be safe and effective when used in allogeneic BMT for the treatment of hemotological malignancies.

  12. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  13. Bone-like nodules formed by human bone marrow stromal cells: comparative study and characterization.

    PubMed

    Schecroun, N; Delloye, C h

    2003-03-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells have been proposed as an adjuvant in the treatment of bone nonunion. This cell therapy would require the establishment of culture conditions that permit the rapid expansion of these cells ex vivo while retaining their potential for further differentiation. Our aim was to achieve a full differentiation process using human bone marrow aspirates. We first analyzed the effects of mineralization medium (with ascorbic acid and phosphate) and dexamethasone (dex) during the primary culture of human bone marrow stromal (HBMS) cells on the proliferation/differentiation behavior of first-passage cells. The most appropriate schedule was then selected to further characterize this differentiation model. We showed that primary culture of HBMS cells in proliferation medium (DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum), with a 48-h treatment by mineralization medium and dex resulted in a better osteoblastic differentiation of first-passage cells than primary culture carried out in mineralization medium with or without dex. We showed that culture of HBMS cells under these conditions (primary culture in proliferation medium, followed by subculture in mineralization medium) led to the formation of specifically mineralized bone-like nodules similar to the ones observed with rat bone marrow stromal cells. Our nodules exhibited three distinct cell types, reproducing in vitro a tissue-like structure. This treatment demonstrated an optimal proliferation and expression of osteoblastic markers such as alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and type I collagen. The primary culture allowed the multiplication of the number of adherent progenitor cells at the initial time of plating by a mean factor of 44,000, which was found to be negatively correlated with age. Thus, this differentiation model could provide a new tool to elaborate an autologous cell therapy designed to enhance osteogenesis.

  14. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Shengwei; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Lidong; Du, Guangyu; Sun, Chuanxiu; Sun, Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo. Materials and Methods: Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz) were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 α were measured. Results: Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 α were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Conclusion: Low frequency (25–50 Hz) vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury. PMID:28133520

  15. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injury in stroke rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi; Du, Shiwei; Yu, Xinguang; Han, Xiao; Hou, Jincai; Guo, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that intravenous transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the femoral vein could exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia via a mechanism associated with the ability to attenuate axonal injury. The results of behavioral tests, infarction volume analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that cerebral ischemia caused severe damage to the myelin sheath and axons. After rats were intravenously transplanted with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the levels of axon and myelin sheath-related proteins, including microtubule-associated protein 2, myelin basic protein, and growth-associated protein 43, were elevated, infarct volume was decreased and neural function was improved in cerebral ischemic rats. These findings suggest that intravenously transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote neural function. Possible mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects include resistance to demyelination after cerebral ischemia, prevention of axonal degeneration, and promotion of axonal regeneration. PMID:25657721

  16. The marrow niche controls the cancer stem cell phenotype of disseminated prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Berry, Janice E.; Eber, Matthew R.; Jung, Younghun; Yumoto, Kenji; Cackowski, Frank C.; Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Parsana, Princy; Mehra, Rohit; Wang, Jingcheng; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Nagrath, Sunitha; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    Dissemination of cancer stem cells (CSCs) serves as the basis of metastasis. Recently, we demonstrated that circulating prostate cancer targets the hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) ‘niche’ in marrow during dissemination. Once in the niche, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) may remain dormant for extended periods. As the major function of the HSC niche is to maintain stem cell functions, we hypothesized that the niche regulates CSC activities of DTCs. Here we show that DTCs recovered from marrow were significantly enriched for a CSC phenotype. Critically, the conversion of DTCs to CSCs is regulated by niche-derived GAS6 through the Mer/mTOR; molecules previously shown to regulate dormancy. The data demonstrate that the niche plays a significant role in maintaining tumor-initiating prostate cancer in marrow and suggests a functional relationship between CSCs and dormancy. Understanding how the marrow niche regulates the conversion of DTCs to CSCs is critical for the development of therapeutics specifically targeting skeletal bone metastasis and dormancy. PMID:27172799

  17. Enhanced adipogenic differentiation of bovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until now, the isolation and characterization of bovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bBM-MSCs) have not been established, which prompted us to optimize the differentiation protocol for bBM-MSCs. In this study, bBM-MSCs were freshly isolated from three 6-month-old cattle and used for p...

  18. Elevated marrow inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in subchondral osteosclerosis in human knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jeroen; Patel, Amit; Hirschmann, Michael T; Pagenstert, Geert I; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor; Hügle, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Subchondral osteosclerosis, characterized by an increase of hypomineralized bone material, is a pathological hallmark of osteoarthritis. The cellular components in the subchondral marrow compartment that participate in this aberrant bone remodeling process remain to be elucidated. This study assessed the presence of marrow inflammatory cells and their relative abundance between nonsclerotic and sclerotic tissues in knee osteoarthritis. Bone samples from osteoarthritic knee tibial plateaus were stratified for histological analyses using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. Immunohistological analysis revealed the presence of CD20 (B-lymphocyte) and CD68 (macrophage), but not CD3 (T-lymphocyte) immunoreactive mononuclear cells in subchondral marrow tissues and their relative abundance was significantly increased in sclerotic compared with nonsclerotic bone samples. Multinucleated osteoclasts that stained positive for CD68 and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, predominantly associated with CD34-positive blood vessels and their abundance was strongly increased in sclerotic samples. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity in outgrowth osteoblasts was induced by conditioned medium from nonsclerotic, but not sclerotic, bone pieces. These results suggest that an interaction between bone-resident cells and marrow inflammatory cells might play a role in aberrant bone remodeling leading to subchondral osteosclerosis. Elevated osteoclast activity in sclerotic bone suggests that bone formation and resorption activities are increased, yet uncoupled, in human knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling regulate prostate cancer stem cells in bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Decker, Ann M.; Wang, Jingcheng; Lee, Eunsohl; Kana, Lulia A.; Yumoto, Kenji; Cackowski, Frank C.; Rhee, James; Carmeliet, Peter; Buttitta, Laura; Morgan, Todd M.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    GAS6 and its receptors (Tryo 3, Axl, Mer or “TAM”) are known to play a role in regulating tumor progression in a number of settings. Previously we have demonstrated that GAS6 signaling regulates invasion, proliferation, chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We have also demonstrated that GAS6 secreted from osteoblasts in the bone marrow environment plays a critical role in establishing prostate tumor cell dormancy. Here we investigated the role that endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling plays in establishing prostate cancer stem cells in the bone marrow microenvironment. We first observed that high levels of endogenous GAS6 are expressed by disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow, whereas relatively low levels of endogenous GAS6 are expressed in PCa tumors grown in a s.c. setting. Interestingly, elevated levels of endogenous GAS6 were identified in putative cancer stem cells (CSCs, CD133+/CD44+) compared to non-CSCs (CD133–/CD44–) isolated from PCa/osteoblast cocultures in vitro and in DTCs isolated from the bone marrow 24 hours after intracardiac injection. Moreover, we found that endogenous GAS6 expression is associated with Mer receptor expression in growth arrested (G1) PCa cells, which correlates with the increase of the CSC populations. Importantly, we found that overexpression of GAS6 activates phosphorylation of Mer receptor signaling and subsequent induction of the CSC phenotype in vitro and in vivo. Together these data suggest that endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling contribute to the establishment of PCa CSCs in the bone marrow microenvironment, which may have important implications for targeting metastatic disease. PMID:27028863

  20. Cross-Talk between CLL Cells and Bone Marrow Endothelial Cells: Role of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3

    PubMed Central

    Badoux, Xavier; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Harris, David; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Burger, Jan; O’Brien, Susan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J.; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Summary Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) bone marrow is characterized by increased angiogenesis. However, the molecular mediators of neovascularization and the biological significance of increased endothelial cell proliferation in CLL require further investigation. Because signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 is constitutively activated in CLL we studied the role of STAT3 in modulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and the effect of vascular endothelial cells on CLL cells. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) we found that anti-STAT3 antibodies immunoprecipitated DNA of STAT3, VEGF and other STAT3-regulated genes. In addition, STAT3-short interfering RNA significantly reduced mRNA levels of VEGF in CLL cells suggesting that STAT3 induces VEGF expression in CLL. Remarkably, bone marrow CLL cells expressed high levels of VEGF and high VEGF levels were detected in the plasma of patients with untreated CLL and correlated with white blood cell count. CLL bone marrow biopsies revealed increased microvascular density and attachment of CLL cells to endothelial cells. Co-culture of CLL and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cells showed a similar attachment. Furthermore, co-culture studies with HUVEC showed that HUVEC protected CLL cells from spontaneous apoptosis by direct cell-to-cell contact as assessed by flow cytometry using Annexin V. Our data suggest that constitutively activated STAT3 induces VEGF production by CLL cells and CLL cells derive a survival advantage from endothelial cells via cell-to cell contact. PMID:21733558

  1. Human Cord Blood and Bone Marrow CD34+ Cells Generate Macrophages That Support Erythroid Islands

    PubMed Central

    Belay, Eyayu; Hayes, Brian J.; Blau, C. Anthony; Torok-Storb, Beverly

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we developed a small molecule responsive hyperactive Mpl-based Cell Growth Switch (CGS) that drives erythropoiesis associated with macrophages in the absence of exogenous cytokines. Here, we compare the physical, cellular and molecular interaction between the macrophages and erythroid cells in CGS expanded CD34+ cells harvested from cord blood, marrow or G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood. Results indicated that macrophage based erythroid islands could be generated from cord blood and marrow CD34+ cells but not from G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ cells. Additional studies suggest that the deficiency resides with the G-CSF-mobilized CD34+ derived monocytes. Gene expression and proteomics studies of the in vitro generated erythroid islands detected the expression of erythroblast macrophage protein (EMP), intercellular adhesion molecule 4 (ICAM-4), CD163 and DNASE2. 78% of the erythroblasts in contact with macrophages reached the pre reticulocyte orthochromatic stage of differentiation within 14 days of culture. The addition of conditioned medium from cultures of CD146+ marrow fibroblasts resulted in a 700-fold increase in total cell number and a 90-fold increase in erythroid cell number. This novel CD34+ cell derived erythroid island may serve as a platform to explore the molecular basis of red cell maturation and production under normal, stress and pathological conditions. PMID:28135323

  2. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Xu, Jun-jun; Deng, Zhi-hong; Feng, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs) were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs). Results showed these pbMNCs were fibroblast-like, had stromal morphology, were negative for CD34 and CD45, but positive for Vimentin and Collagen I, and had the multipotency to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. We named these induced peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ipbMSCs). Skin grafts in combination with ipbMSCs and collagen I were applied for wound healing, and results revealed ipbMSC exhibited similar potency and effectiveness in the promotion of wound healing to the bmMSCs. Hereafter, we speculate that the mixture of growth factors and chemokines secreted by bmMSCs may play an important roles in the induction of the proliferation and mesenchymal differentiation of mononuclear cells. Our results are clinically relevant because it provide a new method for the acquisition of MSCs which can be used as a candidate for the wound repair. PMID:21494428

  3. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Anna; Anginot, Adrienne; Mancini, Stéphane J C; Schiff, Claudine; Carle, Georges F; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine

    2011-07-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  4. Generation of clinical grade human bone marrow stromal cells for use in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robey, Pamela G; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Ren, Jiaqiang; Klein, Harvey G; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F

    2015-01-01

    In current orthopaedic practice, there is a need to increase the ability to reconstruct large segments of bone lost due to trauma, resection of tumors and skeletal deformities, or when normal regenerative processes have failed such as in non-unions and avascular necrosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells), when used in conjunction with appropriate carriers, represent a means by which to achieve bone regeneration in such cases. While much has been done at the bench and in pre-clinical studies, moving towards clinical application requires the generation of clinical grade cells. What is described herein is an FDA-approved cell manufacturing procedure for the ex vivo expansion of high quality, biologically active human BMSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem Cells and Bone.

  5. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells: Commitment and Regulation of Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage and regulation of BM adipocyte formation are not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pertaining to identification and characterization of adipocyte progenitor cells in BM and the regulation of differentiation into mature adipocytes. We have also emphasized the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:27708616

  6. The effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. /sup 51/Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras. These results raise the possibility that the fulminant GVHD seen in human marrow transplantation is in part due to the major contamination of bone marrow with peripheral blood that results from the techniques currently used for human bone marrow harvest.

  7. Bone marrow derived stem cells in joint and bone diseases: a concise review.

    PubMed

    Marmotti, Antonio; de Girolamo, Laura; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Mattia, Silvia; Rossi, Roberto; Montaruli, Angela; Dettoni, Federico; Castoldi, Filippo; Peretti, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Stem cells have huge applications in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Their use is currently not restricted to the life-threatening diseases but also extended to disorders involving the structural tissues, which may not jeopardize the patients' life, but certainly influence their quality of life. In fact, a particularly popular line of research is represented by the regeneration of bone and cartilage tissues to treat various orthopaedic disorders. Most of these pioneering research lines that aim to create new treatments for diseases that currently have limited therapies are still in the bench of the researchers. However, in recent years, several clinical trials have been started with satisfactory and encouraging results. This article aims to review the concept of stem cells and their characterization in terms of site of residence, differentiation potential and therapeutic prospective. In fact, while only the bone marrow was initially considered as a "reservoir" of this cell population, later, adipose tissue and muscle tissue have provided a considerable amount of cells available for multiple differentiation. In reality, recently, the so-called "stem cell niche" was identified as the perivascular space, recognizing these cells as almost ubiquitous. In the field of bone and joint diseases, their potential to differentiate into multiple cell lines makes their application ideally immediate through three main modalities: (1) cells selected by withdrawal from bone marrow, subsequent culture in the laboratory, and ultimately transplant at the site of injury; (2) bone marrow aspirate, concentrated and directly implanted into the injury site; (3) systemic mobilization of stem cells and other bone marrow precursors by the use of growth factors. The use of this cell population in joint and bone disease will be addressed and discussed, analysing both the clinical outcomes but also the basic research background, which has justified their use for the

  8. In vitro suppression of normal human bone marrow progenitor cells by human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, H N; Crumpacker, C S; Chatis, P A

    1991-01-01

    Incubation of normal human nonadherent and T-cell-depleted bone marrow cells with HIVIIIB at multiplicities of infection (MOI) ranging from 0.0001:1 to 1:1 reverse transcriptase (RT) units resulted in the dose-dependent suppression of the in vitro growth of erythroid burst-forming unit (BFU-E), granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM), and T-lymphocyte (CFU-TL) colonies of progenitor cells. Maximum inhibition of colony formation was observed at a 1:1 ratio of virus to bone marrow cells. At this MOI, BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies were inhibited by 60 to 80%, while CFU-TL colonies were totally suppressed. Inhibition of colony formation was also observed at an MOI of 0.1:1 but not with further log dilutions of the virus. Incubation of the virus with antibody to gp160 resulted in the complete reversal of stem cell suppression and the normalization of colony growth in vitro. For BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies, this reversal was observed with dilutions of antibody up to 1:100 and was no longer observed at titers greater than 1:500. The CFU-TL colony number normalized at titers between 1:10 and 1:50. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) also suppressed by 50% the growth of colonies derived from CD34+ stem cell fractions. Infection of CD34+ cells and T-cell-depleted, nonadherent cell fractions was demonstrated by detection with HIV-specific DNA probe following amplification by polymerase chain reaction. The results suggest that HIV can directly infect human bone marrow progenitor cells and affect their ability to proliferate and give rise to colonies in vitro. The results indicate a direct role for the virus in bone marrow suppression and a possible mechanism for the cytopenias observed in patients with AIDS. Images PMID:2002542

  9. Cells infected with Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus are detected in the bone marrow of asymptomatic sheep.

    PubMed

    Borobia, Marta; Ortín, Aurora; Ferrer, Luis M; Ramos, Juán J; Lacasta, Delia; De Las Heras, Marcelo

    2014-07-01

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a transmissible lung cancer caused by Jaggsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). It is difficult to identify animals infected with JSRV but are clinically healthy. The virus does not induce a specific antibody response and, although proviral DNA sequences of JSRV can be found in mononuclear blood cells, the detection is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of JSRV in the bone marrow of infected sheep and develop a more consistent screening method. Immunohistochemical examination of bone marrow samples from 8 asymptomatic JSRV-infected sheep revealed the presence of positively labelled cells. However, JSRV could not be detected by a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in bone marrow aspirates periodically collected from these animals. Results suggest that JSRV-infected cells may be present in the bone marrow of symptomless animals, but the number is below the detectable level for PCR. Therefore, this technique does not seem to be helpful for preclinical diagnosis of OPA.

  10. Presence of TT virus DNA in bone marrow cells from hematologic patients.

    PubMed

    Fanci, R; De Santis, R; Zakrzewska, K; Paci, C; Azzi, A

    2004-04-01

    Recent observations suggest that TT virus (TTV), in addition to liver, may also infect bone marrow. In this study, bone marrow samples and sera from 33 patients with haematological disorders and sera from 16 healthy controls were investigated for TTV DNA presence. Altogether TTV DNA sequences were demonstrated in bone marrow cells of 84.84% of patients. Moreover TTV DNA was detected in sera from 72.72% of patients and from 93.75% of controls. N22 sequences amplified from bone marrow cells and serum of 3 patients were analysed, after cloning: all these isolates were of type 2c and 2 or 3 variants were present in each isolate. After single strand DNA degradation, replicative forms were detectable in BM cells. This finding, in addition to the detection of variants similar in the BM and in the serum of the same patient could suggest that BM is a site of TTV replication (or one of the sites) from which the virus is spread in blood.

  11. Nanotopography Induced Human Bone Marrow Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) to Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) Transition

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Sara; Montali, Marina; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Meucci, Sandro; Parchi, Paolo D.; Barachini, Serena; Panvini, Francesca M.; Pacini, Simone; Petrini, Iacopo; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Mesangiogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) are a very peculiar population of cells present in the human adult bone marrow, only recently discovered and characterized. Owing to their differentiation potential, MPCs can be considered progenitors for mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and for this reason they potentially represent a promising cell population to apply for skeletal tissue regeneration applications. Here, we evaluate the effects of surface nanotopography on MPCs, considering the possibility that this specific physical stimulus alone can trigger MPC differentiation toward the mesenchymal lineage. In particular, we exploit nanogratings to deliver a mechanical, directional stimulus by contact interaction to promote cell morphological polarization and stretching. Following this interaction, we study the MPC-MSC transition by i. analyzing the change in cell morphotype by immunostaining of the key cell-adhesion structures and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and ii. quantifying the expression of cell-phenotype characterizing markers by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that the MPC mesengenic differentiation can be induced by the solely interaction with the NGs, in absence of any other external, chemical stimulus. This aspect is of particular interest in the case of multipotent progenitors as MPCs that, retaining both mesengenic and angiogenic potential, possess a high clinical appeal. PMID:28066765

  12. In vitro regulation of immunoglobulin synthesis after marrow transplantation. I. T-cell and B-cell deficiencies in patients with and without chronic graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lum, L.G.; Seigneuret, M.C.; Storb, R.F.; Witherspoon, R.P.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with aplastic anemia or acute leukemia were treated by marrow grafts from HLA-identical donors after conditioning with high doses of cyclophosphamide and/or today body irradiation. They were studied between 4 and 63 mo (median 14.2) after transplantation. Seventeen patients had chronic graft-versus-host disease (C-GVHD) and 7 were healthy. They were studied for defects in their T- and B-cell function using and indirect hemolytic plaque assay for Ig production after 6 days of culture in the presence of pokeweek mitogen. T or B cells from the patients with or without C-GVHD were cocultured with T or B cells from their HLA-identical marrow donors or unrelated normal controls. Intrinsic B-cell defects, lack of helper T-cell activity, and suppressor T-cell activity were more frequently found in patients with C-GVHD than in healthy patients. Fifteen of the 17 patients with C-GVHD showed on or more defects in their T-and B-cell function compared to only 3 of the 7 patients without C-GVHD. None of the healthy controls, including the marrow donors, showed defects in their T- and B-cell functions. These in vitro findings may be helpful in assessing the process of immune reconstitution and the immunologic aberration found after human marrow transplantation.

  13. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis.

  14. Bone marrow plasma cells are a primary source of serum HIV-1-specific antibodies in chronically infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Moir, Susan; Kardava, Lela; Buckner, Clarisa M; Louie, Aaron; Kim, Leo J Y; Santich, Brian H; Wang, Wei; Fankuchen, Olivia R; Diaz, Gabriella; Daub, Janine R; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Chun, Tae-Wook; Li, Yuxing; Braylan, Raul C; Calvo, Katherine R; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-03-15

    Several potent and broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 have been isolated recently from peripheral blood B cells of infected individuals, based on prescreening of Ab activity in the serum. However, little is known regarding the cells that make the Abs that circulate in the blood. Accordingly, we investigated the most likely source, the bone marrow, of chronically HIV-1-infected individuals who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Increased frequencies of plasma cells, as well as B cell precursors, namely preB-I and preB-II, and decreased frequencies of mature B cells were observed in bone marrow aspirates of these individuals compared with HIV-negative counterparts. Increased frequencies of bone marrow plasma cells are consistent with known hallmarks of HIV-1 infection, namely hypergammaglobulinemia and increased frequencies of peripheral blood plasmablasts. Levels of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-binding and HIV-1-neutralizing Abs were measured in serum, and corresponding frequencies of Ab-secreting or Env-binding cells were measured in the blood (plasmablasts and memory B cells) and in the bone marrow (plasma cells). A strong correlation was observed between serum HIV-1-specific Abs and Env-specific bone marrow-derived plasma cells, but not circulating plasmablasts or memory B cells. These findings demonstrate that, despite HIV-1-induced phenotypic and functional B cell dysregulation in the peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid tissues, bone marrow plasma cells remain a primary source for circulating HIV-1-specific Abs in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce nitric oxide synthase-dependent differentiation of CD11b+ cells that expedite hematopoietic recovery.

    PubMed

    Trento, Cristina; Marigo, Ilaria; Pievani, Alice; Galleu, Antonio; Dolcetti, Luigi; Wang, Chun-Yin; Serafini, Marta; Bronte, Vincenzo; Dazzi, Francesco

    2017-02-09

    Bone marrow microenvironment is fundamental for hematopoietic homeostasis. Numerous efforts have been made to reproduce or manipulate its activity to facilitate engraftment after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but clinical results remain unconvincing. This probably reflects the complexity of the hematopoietic niche. Recent data have demonstrated the fundamental role of stromal and myeloid cells in regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and mobilization in the bone marrow. In this study we unveil a novel interaction by which bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce the rapid differentiation of CD11b+ myeloid cells from bone marrow progenitors. Such an activity requires the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2. Importantly, the administration of these mesenchymal stromal cells-educated CD11b+ cells accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution in bone marrow transplant recipients. We conclude that the liaison between mesenchymal stromal cells and myeloid cells is fundamental in hematopoietic homeostasis and suggests that it can be harnessed in clinical transplantation.

  16. The signalling imprints of nanoparticle uptake by bone marrow derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Karlson, Tanya De L; Kong, Ying Ying; Hardy, Charles L; Xiang, Sue Dong; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) possess remarkable adjuvant and carrier capacity, therefore are used in the development of various vaccine formulations. Our previous studies demonstrated that inert non-toxic 40-50 nm polystyrene NP (PS-NP) can promote strong CD8 T cell and antibody responses to the antigen, in the absence of observable inflammatory responses. Furthermore, instillation of PS-NP inhibited the development of allergic airway inflammation by induction of an immunological imprint via modulation of dendritic cell (DC) function without inducing oxidative stress in the lungs in mice. This is in contrast to many studies which show that a variety of ambient and man-made NP promote lung immunopathology, raising concerns generally about the safe use of NPs in biomedicine. Most NPs are capable of inducing inflammatory pathways in DC largely mediated by signalling via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK). Herein, we investigate whether PS-NPs also activate ERK in DC in vitro. Our data show that PS-NP do not induce ERK activation in two different types of bone marrow derived (BM) DC cultures (expanded with GM-CSF or with GM-CSF together with IL-4). The absence of such signalling was not due to lack of PS-NP uptake by BM-DC as confirmed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The process of NP uptake by DC usually initiates ERK signalling, suggesting an unusual uptake pathway may be engaged by PS-NPs. Indeed, data herein showns that uptake of PS-NP by BM-DC was substantially inhibited by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) but not cytochalasin D (CCD), suggesting an uptake pathway utilising caveole for PS-NP. Together these data show that BM-DC take up PS-NP via a caveole-dependent pathway which does not trigger ERK signalling which may explain their efficient uptake by DC, without the concomitant activation of conventional inflammatory pathways.

  17. Increased incidence of murine graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by previous infusion of syngeneic bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; van der Schueren, E.; Vandeputte, M.

    1984-10-01

    Different groups of BALB/c mice received supralethal total-body irradiation (TBI; 8.5 Gy, day 0). When 30 x 10(6) allogeneic (C57B1) bone marrow (BM) cells were infused with or without 10 x 10(6) syngeneic (BALB/c) bM cells on day 1, many animals (60%) died from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Typing of peripheral blood leukocytes for donor antigens showed that, respectively, 22/22 and 17/21 of the mice in both groups became chimeric. When syngeneic bone marrow was given on day 1 and allogeneic bone marrow on day 2 after TBI, a similar number of animals (21/23) became chimeric, but GVHD occurred more frequently in this group (25/26 mice, P less than 0.01). When the syngeneic bone marrow cells were replaced by spleen cells, or when the transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow was delayed till days 3 or 6 after TBI, almost all mice rejected the allogeneic BM graft and became long-term survivors. BALB/c mice receiving 30 x 10(6) C57B1 BM cells after 17 daily fractions of 0.2 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), showed a high incidence of chimerism (15/17) and in none of the latter animals was GVHD observed. Despite the high incidence of GVHD in the mice receiving allogeneic BM after TBI and syngeneic BM transplantation, as compared with mice prepared with TLI which do not develop GVHD, suppressor cells were as easily induced after TBI and syngeneic BM transplantation as after TLI.

  18. Characterization and Expression of Senescence Marker in Prolonged Passages of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ridzuan, Noridzzaida; Al Abbar, Akram; Yip, Wai Kien; Maqbool, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The present study is aimed at optimizing the in vitro culture protocol for generation of rat bone marrow- (BM-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and characterizing the culture-mediated cellular senescence. The initial phase of generation and characterization was conducted using the adherent cells from Sprague Dawley (SD) rat's BM via morphological analysis, growth kinetics, colony forming unit capacity, immunophenotyping, and mesodermal lineage differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cells were successfully generated and characterized as delineated by the expressions of CD90.1, CD44H, CD29, and CD71 and lack of CD11b/c and CD45 markers. Upon induction, rBM-MSCs differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes and expressed osteocytes and adipocytes genes. However, a decline in cell growth was observed at passage 4 onwards and it was further deciphered through apoptosis, cell cycle, and senescence assays. Despite the enhanced cell viability at later passages (P4-5), the expression of senescence marker, β-galactosidase, was significantly increased at passage 5. Furthermore, the cell cycle analysis has confirmed the in vitro culture-mediated cellular senescence where cells were arrested at the G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. Although the currently optimized protocols had successfully yielded rBM-MSCs, the culture-mediated cellular senescence limits the growth of rBM-MSCs and its potential use in rat-based MSC research. PMID:27579045

  19. Requirement of soluble factors produced by bone marrow stromal cells on the growth of novel established human myeloma cell line.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shingo; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Megumi; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Yasukawa, Kiyotaka; Sawada, Umihiko; Horie, Takashi; Tsuboi, Isao; Aizawa, Shin

    2003-03-01

    The growth of myeloma cells is believed to be mediated by functional interactions between tumor cells and the marrow environment involving the action of several cytokines. We report on the establishment and characterization of a new human myeloma cell line (TAB1) that can be long-term maintained in the presence of conditioned medium of bone marrow stromal cells (BMCM) and a BMCM independent variant, C2-2. Both cell lines have plasma cell morphology and express plasma cell antigens (CD38, PCA-1 and immunoglobulin kappa light chain). In the absence of BMCM, TAB1 cells undergoing apoptosis were observed. Among the adherent molecules tested, these cells expressed VLA-4, ICAM-1 and H-CAM, but not VLA-5, suggesting that these were mostly immature plasmacytes. Introduction with exogenous IL-6 and/or GM-CSF, which were detected in BMCM, partially supported the proliferation of TAB1 cells. Treatment with anti-IL-6 antibody partially inhibited the proliferation of TAB1 cells cultured with BMCM. These findings strongly suggest that TAB1 required at least two or more factors on their growth in vitro; IL-6 was one of the factors necessary for cell growth. Further studies are required to clarify the precise molecules which support TAB1 cell growth in combination with IL-6, however, TAB1 and its variant C2-2 cells may offer an attractive model to unravel novel molecular mechanisms involved in bone marrow stroma-dependent growth of myeloma cells.

  20. PET/CT Scanner and Bone Marrow Biopsy in Detection of Bone Marrow Involvement in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    El Karak, Fadi; Bou-Orm, Ibrahim R.; Ghosn, Marwan; Kattan, Joseph; Farhat, Fadi; Ibrahim, Toni; Jreige, Mario; El Cheikh, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of bone marrow involvement (BMI) is paramount in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) for prognostic and therapeutic reasons. PET/CT scanner (PET) is now a routine examination for the staging of DLBCL with prognostic and therapeutic implications. This study evaluates the role of PET for detecting marrow involvement compared to bone marrow biopsy (BMB). This monocentric study included 54 patients diagnosed with DLBCL between 2009 and 2013 and who had FDG PET/CT in a pre-treatment setting. A correlation analysis of the detection of BMI by PET and BMB was performed. A prognostic evaluation of BMI by BMB and/or PET/CT and correlation with an overall 2-year survival were analyzed. PET was more sensitive for the detection of BMI than BMB (92.3% vs. 38.5%). It can be considered a discriminatory Pre-BMB test with a negative predictive value of 97.6%. In addition, BMI by PET had a prognostic value with strong correlation with progression-free survival (PFS) (HR = 3.81; p = 0.013) and overall survival (OS) (HR = 4.12; p = 0.03) while the BMB had not. PET shows superior performance to the BMB for the detection of marrow involvement in DLBCL. It may be considered as the first line examination of bone marrow instead of the biopsy. PMID:28099514

  1. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  2. Clinical significance of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Pantel, K

    2001-01-01

    The early and clinically occult spread of viable tumor cells to the organism is increasingly considered a hallmark in cancer progression, as emerging data suggest that these cells are precursors of subsequent distant relapse. Using monoclonal antibodies to epithelial cytokeratins or tumor-associated cell membrane glycoproteins, individual carcinoma cells can be detected on cytologic bone marrow preparations at frequencies of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of these immunostained cells in bone marrow, as a frequent site of overt metastases, is prognostically relevant with regard to relapse-free and overall survival. This screening approach may be, therefore, used to improve tumor staging and guide the stratification of patients for adjuvant therapy in clinical trials. Another promising application is monitoring the response of micrometastatic cells to adjuvant therapies, which, at present, can only be assessed retrospectively after an extended period of clinical follow-up. The present review summarizes the current data on the clinical significance of occult metastatic breast cancer cells in bone marrow.

  3. Cell Expansion-Dependent Inflammatory and Metabolic Profile of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Patricia; Fernández-Velasco, María; Fernández-Santos, María E.; Sánchez, Pedro L.; Terrón, Verónica; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Boscá, Lisardo

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new area in regenerative medicine allowing the recovery of viable tissues. Among the many sources of adult stem cells, bone marrow-derived are easy to expand in culture via plastic adherence and their multipotentiality for differentiation make them ideal for clinical applications. Interestingly, several studies have indicated that MSCs expansion in vitro may be limited mainly due to “cell aging” related to the number of cell divisions in culture. We have determined that MSCs exhibit a progressive decline across successive passages in the expression of stem cell markers, in plasticity and in the inflammatory response, presenting low immunogenicity. We have exposed human MSCs after several passages to TLRs ligands and analyzed their inflammatory response. These cells responded to pro-inflammatory stimuli (i.e., NOS-2 expression) and to anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., HO1 and Arg1) until two expansions, rapidly declining upon subculture. Moreover, in the first passages, MSCs were capable to release IL1β, IL6, and IL8, as well as to produce active MMPs allowing them to migrate. Interestingly enough, after two passages, anaerobic glycolysis was enhanced releasing high levels of lactate to the extracellular medium. All these results may have important implications for the safety and efficacy of MSCs-based cell therapies. PMID:27899899

  4. Effect of hypoxia on porphyrin metabolism in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Poleshko, A G; Lobanok, E S; Volotovskii, I D

    2014-05-01

    Under hypoxic conditions, aminolevulinic acid-induced accumulation of porphyrin pigments and increase in heme content was observed in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The expression of transferrin receptor CD71 responsible for Fe(2+) transport into the cell was also enhanced. Blockade of porphyrin-transporting protein ABCG2 with fumitremorgin C under conditions of normoxia and hypoxia induced accumulation of porphyrin pigments; in hypoxia, these changes were more pronounced.

  5. Modulation of hematopoiesis via alpha 1-adrenergic receptors on bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Maestroni, G J; Conti, A

    1994-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated that adrenergic agents can affect hematopoiesis after syngeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice. In particular, chemical sympathectomy by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and/or administration of the alpha 1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin were shown to increase the concentration of blood granulocytes, platelets, and bone marrow colony-forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), and to induce a granulocytic hyperplasia of the spleen. Here we show that prazosin can also enhance myelopoiesis and platelet formation in normal mice. Furthermore, noradrenaline and the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist methoxamine could directly inhibit the in vitro growth of GM-CFU. The effect of noradrenaline was counteracted by prazosin and by other alpha-adrenergic antagonists such as phentolamine and yohimbine, in the following order of potency: prazosin > phentolamine > yohimbine. In line with these results, we were able to demonstrate that 3H-prazosin binds specifically to both bone marrow cell membranes and intact bone marrow cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding to intact cells revealed the presence of two binding sites. A kd of 0.98 +/- 0.32 nM and a B max of 5 +/- 2.9 fM/2 x 10(6) cells characterized the higher affinity site, while the lower affinity site displayed a kd of 55.9 +/- 8.2 nM and a B max of 44 +/- 7.7 fM/mg protein. These saturation studies, together with competition experiments to evaluate the ability of various adrenergic compounds to displace 3H-prazosin binding, classified the higher affinity site as an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor. The remaining low affinity binding site remains to be characterized. Furthermore, separation of bone marrow cells by counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) showed that the high-affinity binding is due to a lymphoid/stem cell fraction with no blasts and no GM-CFU progenitors. The low-affinity site was apparent on the rotor-off fraction, which was enriched with GM-CFU progenitor cells. These findings

  6. Method for in vitro differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into endothelial progenitor cells and vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qihong; Zhang, Weifeng; He, Guifen; Sha, Huifang; Quan, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Vascular development is a regulated process and is dependent on the participation and differentiation of many cell types including the proliferation and migration of vascular endothelial cells and differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to mesodermal precursor cells. Thus, reconstitution of this process in vitro necessitates providing ambient conditions for generating and culturing EPCs in vitro and differentiating them to vascular endothelial cells. In the present study, we developed methods to differentiate bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into EPCs and to vascular endothelial cells. Bone marrow MSC from canines and human sources were differentiated in vitro in to EPCs. These EPCs were able to express a variety of endothelial markers following 7 days in culture. Further culturing led to the appearance of an increased number and proportion of endothelial cells. These cells were stable even after 30 generations in culture. There was a gradual loss of CD31 and increased expression of factor VIII, VEGFR and CD133. VEGF being highly angiogenic, helps in the vascular development. These results provide the basis for the possible development of vasculature in vitro conditions for biomedical applications and in vivo for organ/tissue reconstruction therapies. PMID:27878275

  7. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell plasticity and their application perspectives.

    PubMed

    Menabde, G; Gogilashvili, K; Kakabadze, Z; Berishvili, E

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize recent developments in research on the characteristics of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell plasticity. Stem cells are uncommitted entities capable of both self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. In general, there are certain types of stem cell populations that are identified from embryonic and postnatal tissues. Embryonic stem cells are derived from mammalian blastocytes and theoretically have the ability to generate differentiated cell types arising from the three germ layers: mesoderm, ectoderm and endoderm. In contrast, postnatal stem cells are thought to be tissue specific, committed precursors capable of developing into a restricted number of cell lineages. Bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, have been identified as a population of organized hierarchical postnatal stem cells with the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, cardiomyocytes, myoblasts and neural cells. Recently, studies on the plasticity of BMSSCs challenge the traditional dogma that the differentiation and commitment of postnatal stem cells are limited to cell populations resident in their local environment. Current boneregenerative techniques, such as autologous bone grafting, allografts and alloplastic materials, have limitations that hinder their use in a wider range of clinical conditions. Hence, the development of improved methods, such as BMSSC-mediated bone regeneration, is necessary for achieving future viable therapeutic alternatives.

  8. Dissecting the role of bone marrow stromal cells on bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Denise; Park, Serk In; Sterling, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-induced bone disease is a dynamic process that involves interactions with many cell types. Once metastatic cancer cells reach the bone, they are in contact with many different cell types that are present in the cell-rich bone marrow. These cells include the immune cells, myeloid cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and mesenchymal stem cells. Each of these cell populations can influence the behavior or gene expression of both the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment. Additionally, the tumor itself can alter the behavior of these bone marrow cells which further alters both the microenvironment and the tumor cells. While many groups focus on studying these interactions, much remains unknown. A better understanding of the interactions between the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment will improve our knowledge on how tumors establish in bone and may lead to improvements in diagnosing and treating bone metastases. This review details our current knowledge on the interactions between tumor cells that reside in bone and their microenvironment.

  9. Review of Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Bone Marrow-Derived Cell Therapies for Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Felipe Gonçalves; de Freitas, Gabriel Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, causing millions of deaths annually, and is also a major cause of disability-adjusted life years. Hemorrhagic stroke accounts for approximately 10 to 27% of all cases and has a fatality rate of about 50% in the first 30 days, with limited treatment possibilities. In the past two decades, the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived cells (particularly mesenchymal stem cells and mononuclear cells) has been intensively investigated in preclinical models of different neurological diseases, including models of intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. More recently, clinical studies, most of them small, unblinded, and nonrandomized, have suggested that the therapy with bone marrow-derived cells is safe and feasible in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. This review discusses the available evidence on the use of bone marrow-derived cells to treat hemorrhagic strokes. Distinctive properties of animal studies are analyzed, including study design, cell dose, administration route, therapeutic time window, and possible mechanisms of action. Furthermore, clinical trials are also reviewed and discussed, with the objective of improving future studies in the field. PMID:27698671

  10. The tale of early hematopoietic cell seeding in the bone marrow niche.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Farkas, Daniel L; Askenasy, Nadir

    2006-02-01

    Since introduction of the notion of a "niche" that hosts engraftment and activity of hematopoietic cells, there is a massive effort to discover its structure and decipher its function. Our understanding of the niche is continuously changing with reinterpretation of traditional concepts and apprehension of new insights into the biology of hematopoietic cell homing, seeding, and engraftment. Here we discuss some of the early events in hematopoietic stem cell seeding and engraftment and propose a perspective based on visualization of labeled bone marrow cells in real time in vivo. Primary seeding of hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow niches evolves as a complex and dynamic process; however, it follows discrete topological and chronological patterns. Initial seeding occurs on the endosteal surface of the marrow, which includes heterogeneous niches for primary seeding. Several days after transplantation the endosteal niches become more restrictive, hosting primarily mitotically quiescent cells, and gradual centripetal migration is accompanied by engagement in proliferation and differentiation. The hematopoietic niches evolve as heterogeneous three-dimensional microenvironments that are continuously changing over time.

  11. MarCell{trademark} software for modeling bone marrow radiation cell kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, J.S.; Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.

    1997-11-01

    Differential equations were used to model cellular injury, repair, and compensatory proliferation in the irradiated bone marrow. Recently, that model was implemented as MarCell{trademark}, a user-friendly MS-DOS computer program that allows users from a variety of technical disciplines to evaluate complex radiation exposure. The software allows menu selections for different sources of ionizing radiation. Choices for cell lineages include progenitor, stroma, and malignant, and the available species include mouse, rat, dog, sheep, swine, burro, and man. An attractive feature is that any protracted irradiation can be compared with an equivalent prompt dose (EPD) in terms of cell kinetics for either the source used or for a reference such as 250 kVp x rays or {sup 60}Co. EPD is used to mean a dose rate for which no meaningful biological recovery occurs during the period of irradiation. For human as species, output from MarCell{trademark} includes: risk of 30-day mortality; risk of whole-body cancer and leukemia based either on radiation-induced cytopenia or compensatory cell proliferation; cell survival and repopulation plots as functions of time or dose; and 4-week recovery following treatment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  12. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    PubMed Central

    Mindaye, Samuel T.; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R.; Alterman, Michail A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5], [6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results. PMID:26702413

  13. In vitro growth and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells supported by autologous plasma.

    PubMed

    Schecroun, N; Delloye, Ch

    2004-08-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells have been proposed as an adjuvant in the treatment of bone nonunion. This cell therapy requires the establishment of culture conditions that permit the rapid expansion of these cells ex vivo while retaining their potential for further differentiation. Several culture models have been proposed, all of them using fetal calf serum (FCS) as a source of growth factors. This is problematic for subsequent autologous implantation because of possible disease transmission. Here we report the establishment and characterization of a cell culture system in which standard FCS has been replaced by autologous plasma recovered from bone marrow (APM). Short-term cultures of human bone marrow stromal (HBMS) cells grown in mineralizing conditions with APM exhibited a significantly higher number of ALP-positive colonies than those grown with FCS, indicating an enhanced ability of APM to recruit osteoprogenitor cells for culture. Analyses of long-term cultures showed that the use of APM did not affect cell proliferation as cell number at confluence and proliferation rate were similar whether primary cultures had been maintained with APM or FCS. In first-passage cultures, an osteoblastic differentiation was observed in both cases as the cells expressed ALP and formed mineralized bone-like nodules. We noted that the age of donor had a negative effect on the number of osteoprogenitor cells recruited for culture. This effect had an impact on proliferation rate in primary cultures performed with APM, although the cell number obtained after expansion remained independent of age. Our study shows that proliferative capacity and osteoblastic differentiation potential of HBMS cells are maintained when cultured with APM. Thus, this cell culture system could provide a new and safer tool to elaborate an autologous cell therapy designed to enhance osteogenesis.

  14. Overexpression of microRNA-124 promotes the neuronal differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Defeng; Chen, Yi; Han, Yaxin; Lv, Chen; Tu, Guanjun

    2014-06-15

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important regulatory role in the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In this study, we examined the effects of miRNA-124 (miR-124) overexpression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In particular, we focused on the effect of overexpression on the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neurons. First, we used GeneChip technology to analyze the expression of miRNAs in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, neural stem cells and neurons. miR-124 expression was substantially reduced in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells compared with the other cell types. We constructed a lentiviral vector overexpressing miR-124 and transfected it into bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Intracellular expression levels of the neuronal early markers β-III tubulin and microtubule-associated protein-2 were significantly increased, and apoptosis induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation was reduced in transfected cells. After miR-124-transfected bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured rat spinal cord, a large number of cells positive for the neuronal marker neurofilament-200 were observed in the transplanted region. The Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotion scores showed that the motor function of the hind limb of rats with spinal cord injury was substantially improved. These results suggest that miR-124 plays an important role in the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neurons. Our findings should facilitate the development of novel strategies for enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury.

  15. The use of bone marrow stromal cells (bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) for alveolar bone tissue engineering: basic science to clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Hideaki; Agata, Hideki; Inoue, Minoru; Asahina, Izumi; Tojo, Arinobu; Yamashita, Naohide; Imai, Kohzoh

    2014-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising field of regenerative medicine in which cultured cells, scaffolds, and osteogenic inductive signals are used to regenerate bone. Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the most commonly used cell source for bone tissue engineering. Although it is known that cell culture and induction protocols significantly affect the in vivo bone forming ability of BMSCs, the responsible factors of clinical outcome are poorly understood. The results from recent studies using human BMSCs have shown that factors such as passage number and length of osteogenic induction significantly affect ectopic bone formation, although such differences hardly affected the alkaline phosphatase activity or gene expression of osteogenic markers. Application of basic fibroblast growth factor helped to maintain the in vivo osteogenic ability of BMSCs. Importantly, responsiveness of those factors should be tested under clinical circumstances to improve the bone tissue engineering further. In this review, clinical application of bone tissue engineering was reviewed with putative underlying mechanisms.

  16. Status and prospects of liver cirrhosis treatment by using bone marrow-derived cells and mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Terai, Shuji; Takami, Taro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Fujisawa, Koichi; Ishikawa, Tsuyoshi; Urata, Yohei; Tanimoto, Haruko; Iwamoto, Takuya; Mizunaga, Yuko; Matsuda, Takashi; Oono, Takashi; Marumoto, Miho; Burganova, Guzel; Fernando Quintanilha, Luiz; Hidaka, Isao; Marumoto, Yoshio; Saeki, Issei; Uchida, Koichi; Yamasaki, Takahiro; Tani, Kenji; Taura, Yasuho; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Nishina, Hiroshi; Okita, Kiwamu; Sakaida, Isao

    2014-06-01

    In 2003, we started autologous bone marrow cell infusion (ABMi) therapy for treating liver cirrhosis. ABMi therapy uses 400 mL of autologous bone marrow obtained under general anesthesia and infused mononuclear cells from the peripheral vein. The clinical study expanded and we treated liver cirrhosis induced by HCV and HBV infection and alcohol consumption. We found that the ABMi therapy was effective for cirrhosis patients and now we are treating patients with combined HIV and HCV infection and with metabolic syndrome-induced liver cirrhosis. Currently, to substantiate our findings that liver cirrhosis can be successfully treated by the ABMi therapy, we are conducting randomized multicenter clinical studies designated "Advanced medical technology B" for HCV-related liver cirrhosis in Japan. On the basis of our clinical study, we developed a proof-of-concept showing that infusion of bone marrow cells (BMCs) improved liver fibrosis and sequentially activated proliferation of hepatic progenitor cells and hepatocytes, further promoting restoration of liver functions. To treat patients with severe forms of liver cirrhosis, we continued translational research to develop less invasive therapies by using mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow. We obtained a small quantity of BMCs under local anesthesia and expanded them into mesenchymal stem cells that will then be used for treating cirrhosis. In this review, we present our strategy to apply the results of our laboratory research to clinical studies.

  17. Direct reprogramming of human bone marrow stromal cells into functional renal cells using cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-04-14

    The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes-formation of "domes" and tubule-like structures-and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  18. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  19. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  20. Autologous bone marrow Th cells can support multiple myeloma cell proliferation in vitro and in xenografted mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Fløisand, Y; Myklebust, C V; Bürgler, S; Parente-Ribes, A; Hofgaard, P O; Bogen, B; Tasken, K; Tjønnfjord, G E; Schjesvold, F; Dalgaard, J; Tveita, A; Munthe, L A

    2017-02-24

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy where MM cell growth is supported by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment with poorly defined cellular and molecular mechanisms. MM cells express CD40, a receptor known to activate autocrine secretion of cytokines and elicit proliferation. Activated T helper (Th) cells express CD40 ligand (CD40L) and BM Th cells are significantly increased in MM patients. We hypothesized that activated BM Th cells could support MM cell growth. We here found that activated autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in a contact- and CD40L-dependent manner in vitro. MM cells had retained the ability to activate Th cells that reciprocated and stimulated MM cell proliferation. Autologous BM Th cells supported MM cell growth in xenografted mice and were found in close contact with MM cells. MM cells secreted chemokines that attracted Th cells, secretion was augmented by CD40-stimulation. Within 14 days of culture of whole bone marrow aspirates in autologous serum, MM cells and Th cells mutually stimulated each other, and MM cells required Th cells for further expansion in vitro and in mice. The results suggest that Th cells may support the expansion of MM cells in patients.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 24 February 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.69.

  1. T helper 17 and T helper 1 cells are increased but regulatory T cells are decreased in subchondral bone marrow microenvironment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Li, Shufeng; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Kaining; Dong, Shixiao; Wang, Xiuhua; Liu, Xinguang; Ren, Yanjun; Zhang, Ming; Yan, Xinfeng; Li, Jianmin; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The present study is to investigate the profiles of Th17, Th1 and Treg cells in bone marrow of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Flow cytometry was used to analyze the frequencies of Th17, Th1 and Treg cells in paired peripheral blood and bone marrow of 26 RA patients and 11 osteoarthritis (OA) patients, as well as 10 healthy controls. In addition, the disease activity was analyzed by the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28). Results: The frequencies of Th17 and Th1 cells were significantly elevated in bone marrow of RA patients. Importantly, Th17 and Th1 cells were significantly elevated in bone marrow compared with the matched peripheral blood from RA patients. However, Treg cells were significantly decreased in bone marrow of RA patients compared with the matched peripheral blood of RA patients and bone marrow of osteoarthritis patients and healthy controls. Moreover, the frequencies of tumor necrosis factor-α-producing T cells were significantly elevated in bone marrow from RA patients. Additionally, Th17 and Th1 cells in bone marrow were positively correlated with DAS28, while Treg cells were negatively correlated with DAS28. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that Th17 and Th1 cells are markedly increased in bone marrow from RA patients. By contrast, Treg cells are significantly decreased in bone marrow from RA patients. These results suggest that local abnormality of Th17, Th1 and Treg cells in bone marrow of RA patients may contribute to bone destruction in skeletal system. PMID:27508016

  2. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Madaric, Juraj; Klepanec, Andrej; Mistrik, Martin; Altaner, Cestmir; Vulev, Ivan

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  3. VEGF treatment promotes bone marrow-derived CXCR4+ mesenchymal stromal stem cell differentiation into vessel endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiming; Xia, Shudong; Fang, Hanyun; Pan, Jiansheng; Jia, Yinfeng; Deng, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cells serve an important role in the process of blood vessel repair. However, the mechanism of vascular repair mediated by C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) following myocardial infarction remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on vessel endothelial differentiation from BMSCs. CXCR4+ BMSCs were isolated from the femoral bone marrow of 2-month-old mice and the cells were treated with VEGF. Expression of endothelial cell markers and the functional properties were assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry and vascular formation analyses. The results indicated that the CXCR4+ BMSCs from femoral bone marrow cells expressed putative cell surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells. Treatment with VEGF induced platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) expression at the transcriptional and translational levels, compared with untreated controls. Moreover, VEGF treatment induced CXCR4+ BMSCs to form hollow tube-like structures on Matrigel, suggesting that the differentiated endothelial cells had the functional properties of blood vessels. The results demonstrate that the CXCR4+ BMSCs were able to differentiate into vessel endothelial cells following VEGF treatment. For cell transplantation in vascular disease, it may be concluded that CXCR4+ BMSCs are a novel source of endothelial progenitor cells with high potential for application in vascular repair. PMID:28352314

  4. Application of cell sheet technology to bone marrow stromal cell transplantation for rat brain infarct.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplantation enhances functional recovery after cerebral infarct, but the optimal delivery route is undetermined. This study was aimed to assess whether a novel cell-sheet technology non-invasively serves therapeutic benefits to ischemic stroke. First, the monolayered cell sheet was engineered by culturing rat BMSCs on a temperature-responsive dish. The cell sheet was analysed histologically and then transplanted onto the ipsilateral neocortex of rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion at 7 days after the insult. Their behaviours and histology were compared with those in the animals treated with direct injection of BMSCs or vehicle over 4 weeks post-transplantation. The cell sheet was 27.9 ± 8.0 μm thick and was composed of 9.8 ± 2.4 × 10(5) cells. Cell sheet transplantation significantly improved motor function when compared with the vehicle-injected animals. Histological analysis revealed that the BMSCs were densely distributed to the neocortex adjacent to the cerebral infarct and expressed neuronal phenotype in the cell sheet-transplanted animals. These findings were almost equal to those for the animals treated with direct BMSC injection. The attachment of the BMSC sheet to the brain surface did not induce reactive astrocytes in the adjacent neocortex, although direct injection of BMSCs profoundly induced reactive astrocytes around the injection site. These findings suggest that the BMSCs in cell sheets preserve their biological capacity of migration and neural differentiation. Cell-sheet technology may enhance functional recovery after ischaemic stroke, using a less invasive method. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells to periodontal tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasuyuki; Komaki, Motohiro; Iwasaki, Kengo; Sata, Masataka; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) are considered to be a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in adults and are known to be effective in periodontal tissue regeneration. However, whether endogenous BMCs are involved in periodontal tissue repair process is uncertain. We therefore created periodontal tissue defects in the buccal alveolar bone of mandibular first molars in bone marrow chimeric mice, and immunohistochemically examined the expression of stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and the mobilization of BMCs. We found that SDF-1 expression was increased around the defects at as early as 1 week after injury and that BMCs were mobilized to the defects, while GFP+/CD45+ were rarely observed. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis demonstrated that the number of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (pdgfr) α+/Sca-1+ (PαS) cells in the bone marrow decreased after injury. Taken together, these results suggest that BMCs are mobilized to the periodontal tissue defects. Recruitment of BMCs, including a subset of MSCs could be a new target of periodontal treatment. PMID:25364726

  6. Facilitation of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by a T cell-specific immunotoxin containing daunomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.S.; Inazawa, M.; Sinha, N.; Sawada, S.; Vergidis, R.; Diener, E.

    1987-12-01

    Daunomycin coupled via an acid-sensitive spacer to monoclonal Thy-1.2-specific antibody was used to purge T lymphocytes from a 1:1 mixture of murine C57BL/6J bone marrow and spleen cells prior to engraftment in fully allogeneic, irradiated BALB/c recipients. Treatment of bone marrow with the immunotoxin at a concentration used for purging had no effect on the viability of committed hematopoietic progenitor or multipotent stem cells. All of the recipients of purged bone marrow were at least 80% chimeric for donor peripheral blood cells and none developed graft-versus-host disease. Out of 50 chimeras, 49 were still alive more than 200 days posttransplantation. The chimeras were shown to be tolerant to donor tissue as tested by mixed lymphocyte reactivity, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and skin grafting. The same tests revealed full immunocompetence of chimeras to third-party alloantigens. In vivo IgM and IgG antibody responses to sheep red blood cells were similar in magnitude in allogeneically and syngeneically reconstituted mice.

  7. Nonadherent culture method downregulates stem cell antigen-1 expression in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    DENG, BAOPING; DENG, WEIPING; XIAO, PINGNAN; ZENG, KUAN; ZHANG, SHINING; ZHANG, HONGWU; DENG, DAVID YB; YANG, YANQI

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are primarily isolated by their adherence to plastic and their in vitro growth characteristics. Expansion of these cells from an adherent culture is the only method to obtain a sufficient number of cells for use in clinical practice and research. However, little is known with regard to the effect of adherence to plastic on the phenotype of the cells. In the present study, bone marrow CD45−CD31−CD44− stem cell antigen (Sca)-1+ MSCs were sorted by flow cytometry and expanded in adherent cultures. The expression levels of the adhesion molecule, Sca-1, in the adherent cultures were compared with those from nonadherent cultures at different time points. The flow cytometry results indicated that the expression levels of Sca-1 decreased in the MSCs in the nonadherent cultures grown in ultra-low-adherent plates. Furthermore, the result was confirmed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction at the same time points. Therefore, the results demonstrated that the loss of plastic adherence downregulated the expression of Sca-1. The observations may provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying plastic adherent culture. PMID:26170908

  8. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  9. Human bone marrow-derived IgA is produced by IgA-committed B cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alley, C D

    1987-03-01

    Although human bone marrow has been implicated in the production of serum immunoglobulins, little information is available concerning the kinetics of antibody production (primary- or secondary-type humoral response) or the cells that are responsible for antibody production in human bone marrow. In this study, the kinetics of and cells responsible for antibody production in the bone marrow were investigated. Previous studies have demonstrated that human bone marrow mononuclear cells secrete a significant amount of IgA in vitro. This finding led to the focus of the present investigation on bone marrow IgA production. The results reported here demonstrate that IgA was synthesized de novo in cultures of bone marrow mononuclear cells; its peak concentration in the culture supernatants preceded that of IgM; its production was totally inhibited by the addition of microgram quantities of anti-alpha-chain antiserum, while milligram quantities of anti-mu-chain antiserum were required for even partial inhibition of IgA production; and the culture of isolated IgA-bearing cells resulted in a greater than 13-fold increase in IgA concentration in the culture supernatants as compared with those from unseparated bone marrow mononuclear cells. From this study, it was concluded that bone marrow produces IgA as a secondary or anamnestic response to some undetermined stimulus and that IgA-committed B cells residing in, although probably not stimulated in, the bone marrow compartment were responsible for the IgA synthesis and secretion in vitro.

  10. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  11. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saravana Kumar Sampath; Perumal, Saraswathi; Rajagopalan, Vijayaraghavan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% confluence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intravenous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106; intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacrificed for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells significantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions. PMID:25422634

  12. Bone deficit in ovariectomized rats. Functional contribution of the marrow stromal cell population and the effect of oral dihydrotachysterol treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, C; Simmons, D J; Fausto, A; Russell, J E; Binderman, I; Avioli, L V

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the proliferative and osteogenic role of marrow stromal/osteoprogenitor cells in the development of the cortical bone deficit in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. In vitro, clonal growth of marrow stromal cells from OVX rats was significantly impaired (vs. sham-operated controls). Yet in vivo, cells from sham-operated and OVX rats had equal osteogenic potential in several in vivo experimental situations, such as in intraperitoneally implanted millipore diffusion chambers and in intramuscular implants of marrow plus osteoinductive bone matrix (composite grafts). Long-term (6 mo) dihydrotachysterol (DHT) treatment of OVX rats enhanced their in vitro proliferative potential and clonal growth, as well as their osteogenic expression in composite grafts. The observation that the in vivo osteogenic performance of OVX rat marrow stromal cells was normal at extraosseous sites suggests that the mechanisms leading to osteopenia may involve an abnormality in cell-matrix interactions. PMID:3528218

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated with bovine tendon extract acquire the phenotype of mature tenocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Lívia Maria Mendonça; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; dos Santos Cavalcanti, Amanda; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, in tenocytes after treatment with bovine tendon extract. Methods Bovine tendons were used for preparation of the extract and were stored at −80 °C. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the bone marrow of three donors were used for cytotoxicity tests by means of MTT and cell differentiation by means of qPCR. Results The data showed that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated for up to 21 days in the presence of bovine tendon extract diluted at diminishing concentrations (1:10, 1:50 and 1:250) promoted activation of biglycan, collagen type I and fibromodulin expression. Conclusion Our results show that bovine tendon extract is capable of promoting differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in tenocytes. PMID:26962503

  14. Comparative sensitivity of small mammals to micronucleus induction in bone marrow cells by clastogenic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, J.R.; Wernsing, P.; Daniel, F.B.; Torsella, J.

    1995-12-31

    The bone marrow micronucleus assay is the most widely used method for detecting genetic damage in vivo, but this assay has received little attention for its possible application to biomonitoring terrestrial environments. The present study compared the responsiveness of three small mammalian species, Cryptotus parva (least shrew), Peromyscus leucopus (white-footed mouse), and strain CD-1 Mus musculus (house mouse), to the clastogen, methylmethanesulfonate (MMS). Five animals of each sex of each species were exposed for 24 h to four concentrations of MMS ranging from 0 to 50 mg/kg. Bone marrow cells were flushed from the femurs, and smears were stained with acridine orange and examined using fluorescence microscopy. The slides were scored for evidence of acute bone marrow toxicity (polychromatic to normochromatic erythrocyte ratio, PCE:NCE) and frequency of micronucleated PCE. PCE:NCE was depressed at 50 mg/kg in P. leucopus, but not in the other species. Dose-related increases in micronucleated PCE were observed in all three species, with males being more sensitive for P. leucopus and M. musculus, and females being more sensitive for C. parva. For both sexes, the two feral species, P. leucopus and C. parva, were more sensitive than M. musculus. These studies demonstrate the successful application of the bone marrow micronucleus assay to species other than standard laboratory strains of mice. The results also demonstrate heretofore unrecognized species differences in responsiveness.

  15. Ectopic bone regeneration by human bone marrow mononucleated cells, undifferentiated and osteogenically differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in beta-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xinhai; Yin, Xiaofan; Yang, Dawei; Tan, Jian; Liu, Guangpeng

    2012-07-01

    Tissue engineering approaches using the combination of porous ceramics and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) represent a promising bone substitute for repairing large bone defects. Nevertheless, optimal conditions for constructing tissue-engineered bone have yet to be determined. It remains unclear if transplantation of predifferentiated BMSCs is superior to undifferentiated BMSCs or freshly isolated bone marrow mononucleated cells (BMNCs) in terms of new bone formation in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in vitro osteogenic differentiation (β-glycerophosphate, dexamethasone, and l-ascorbic acid) of human BMSCs on the capability to form tissue-engineered bone in unloaded conditions after subcutaneous implantation in nude mice. After isolation from human bone marrow aspirates, BMNCs were divided into three parts: one part was seeded onto porous beta-tricalcium phosphate ceramics immediately and transplanted in a heterotopic nude mice model; two parts were expanded in vitro to passage 2 before cell seeding and in vivo transplantation, either under osteogenic conditions or not. Animals were sacrificed for micro-CT and histological evaluation at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks postimplantation. The results showed that BMSCs differentiated into osteo-progenitor cells after induction, as evidenced by the altered cell morphology and elevated alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition, but their clonogenicity, proliferating rate, and seeding efficacy were not significantly affected by osteogenic differentiation, compared with undifferentiated cells. Extensive new bone formed in the pores of all the scaffolds seeded with predifferentiated BMSCs at 4 weeks after implantation, and maintained for 20 weeks. On the contrary, scaffolds containing undifferentiated BMSCs revealed limited bone formation only in 1 out of 6 cases at 8 weeks, and maintained for 4 weeks. For scaffolds with BMNCs, woven bone was observed sporadically only in one

  16. Origanum vulgare leaf extract protects mice bone marrow cells against ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemnezhad Targhi, Reza; Changizi, Vahid; Haddad, Farhang; Homayoun, Mansour; Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ionizing radiation produces free radicals which induce DNA damage and cell death. Origanum vulgare leaf extract (OVLE) is a natural compound and its capability of scavenging free radicals and its antioxidant activity have been demonstrated by many researchers. In this study, using micronucleus assay, radioprotective effect of OVLE against clastogenic and cytotoxic effect of gamma irradiation has been investigated in mice bone marrow cells. Materials and Methods: OVLE was injected intraperitoneally to the BALB/c mice 1hr prior to gamma irradiation (3Gy) at the doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg. Twenty four hours after irradiation or treatment, animals were killed and smears were prepared from the bone marrow cells. The slides were stained with May Grunwald–Giemsa method and analyzed microscopically. The frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MnPCEs), micronucleated normochromatic erythrocyte (MnNCEs) and cell proliferation ratio PCE/PCE+NCE (polychromatic erythrocyte/polychromatic erythrocyte + normochromatic erythrocyte) were calculated. Results: The results showed that gamma irradiation (3Gy) increased the frequency of MnPCEs, MnNCEs and reduced the PCE/PCE+NCE ratio in mice bone marrow compared to the non-irradiated control group (p<0.0001). Injection of OVLE significantly reduced the frequency of MnPCEs (p<0.0001) and MnNCEs (p<0.05) and increased the PCE/PCE+NCE ratio as compared to the irradiated control group (p<0.05). Conclusion: It seems that OVLE with its antioxidant properties and its capability of scavenging free radicals and reactive oxygen species can reduce the cytotoxic effects of gamma irradiation in mice bone marrow cells. PMID:28078248

  17. Three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite scaffolds combined with bone marrow cells for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yao, Qingqiang; Guo, Yang; Mao, Fengyong; Liu, Shuai; Xu, Yan; Wang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the chondrogenic potential of three-dimensional polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite (PCL-HA) scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells in vitro and the effect of PCL-HA scaffolds on osteochondral repair in vivo. Here, bone marrow was added to the prepared PCL-HA scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium for 10 weeks. Osteochondral defects were created in the trochlear groove of 29 knees in 17 New Zealand white rabbits, which were then divided into four groups that underwent: implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds (left knee, n = 17; Group 1), microfracture (right knee, n = 6; Group 2), autologous osteochondral transplantation (right knee, n = 6; Group 3), and no treatment (right knee, n = 5; Control). Extracellular matrix produced by bone marrow cells covered the surface and filled the pores of PCL-HA scaffolds after 10 weeks in culture. Moreover, many cell-laden cartilage lacunae were observed, and cartilage matrix was concentrated in the PCL-HA scaffolds. After a 12-week repair period, Group 1 showed excellent vertical and lateral integration with host bone, but incomplete cartilage regeneration and matrix accumulation. An uneven surface of regenerated cartilage and reduced distribution of cartilage matrix were observed in Group 2. In addition, abnormal bone growth and unstable integration between repaired and host tissues were detected. For Group 3, the integration between transplanted and host cartilage was interrupted. Our findings indicate that the PCL-HA scaffolds loaded with bone marrow cells improved chondrogenesis in vitro and implantation of PCL-HA scaffolds for osteochondral repairenhanced integration with host bone. However, cartilage regeneration remained unsatisfactory. The addition of trophic factors or the use of precultured cell-PCL-HA constructs for accelerated osteochondral repair requires further investigation.

  18. In vivo visualizing the dynamics of bone marrow stem cells in mouse retina and choroidal-retinal circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heuy-Ching H.; Zwick, Harry; Edsall, Peter R.; Cheramie, Rachel D.; Lund, David J.; Stuck, Bruce

    2007-02-01

    It has recently been shown that bone marrow cells can differentiate into various lineage cells including neural cells in vitro and in vivo. Therefore it is an attractive therapeutic intervention to apply autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells that may offer neuroprotection to laser-induced retinal injuries. The purpose of this study is to develop a method with which to visualize bone marrow stem cells dynamics in mouse retinal circulation. We have used a physiological method, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO), to track the highly enriched stem/progenitor cells circulating in the retina. Stem cells were enriched by immunomagnetic depletion of cells committed to the T- and B lymphocytic, myeloid and erythorid lineages. CellTracker TM Green-labeled stem cells were injected into the tail veins of mice with laser-induced focal retinal injuries. Bone marrow stem cells labeled with CellTracker TM Green were visible in the retinal circulation for as long as 1 hour and 30 minutes. These studies suggest that stem cell-enriched bone marrow cells may have the ability to mobilize into laser-induced retinal injuries and possibly further proliferate, differentiate and functionally integrate into the retina.

  19. One-step bone marrow-derived cell transplantation in talarosteochondral lesions: mid-term results

    PubMed Central

    BUDA, ROBERTO; VANNINI, FRANCESCA; CAVALLO, MARCO; BALDASSARRI, MATTEO; NATALI, SIMONE; CASTAGNINI, FRANCESCO; GIANNINI, SANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Purpose to verify the capability of scaffold-supported bone marrow-derived cells to be used in the repair of osteochondral lesions of the talus. Methods using a device to concentrate bone marrow-derived cells, a scaffold (collagen powder or hyaluronic acid membrane) for cell support and platelet gel, a one-step arthroscopic technique was developed for cartilage repair. In a prospective clinical study, we investigated the ability of this technique to repair talar osteochondral lesions in 64 patients. The mean follow-up was 53 months. Clinical results were evaluated using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) scale score. We also considered the influence of scaffold type, lesion area, previous surgery, and lesion depth. Results the mean preoperative AOFAS scale score was 65.2 ± 13.9. The clinical results peaked at 24 months, before declining gradually to settle at a score of around 80 at the maximum follow-up of 72 months. Conclusions the use of bone marrow-derived cells supported by scaffolds to repair osteochondral lesions of the talus resulted in significant clinical improvement, which was maintained over time. Level of Evidence level IV, therapeutic case series. PMID:25606518

  20. Characteristics of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Wei; Zhang Guoping; Jin Huiming . E-mail: hmjin@shmu.edu.cn; Hu Renming

    2006-09-29

    Evidence for dysfunction of endothelial repair in aged mice was sought by studying the pattern of induced differentiation, quantity, and function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in aged mice. The CD117-positive stem cell population was separated from bone marrow by magnetic activated cell-sorting system (MACS), and EPCs were defined by demonstrating the expression of CD117{sup +}CD34{sup +}Flk-1{sup +} by flow cytometry. After 7 days of culture, the number of clones formed was counted, and proliferation and migration of EPCs were analyzed by MTT[3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] assay and modified Boyden chamber assay. The results demonstrated that compared to the control group, the quantity of bone marrow-derived CD117{sup +} stem cells and EPCs, as well as the proliferation, migration, the number of clones formed, and phagocytotic function of EPCs were significantly reduced in aged mice. There were no significant differences in the morphology and induced differentiation pattern of EPCs between the aged mouse group and the control group. Authors suggest that the dysfunction of EPCs may serve as a surrogate parameter of vascular function in old mice.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Self-Renewal, Migration and Development, As Well As Their Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Ludin, Aya; Gur-Cohen, Shiri; Golan, Karin; Kaufmann, Kerstin B.; Itkin, Tomer; Medaglia, Chiara; Lu, Xin-Jiang; Ledergor, Guy; Kollet, Orit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Blood forming, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) mostly reside in the bone marrow in a quiescent, nonmotile state via adhesion interactions with stromal cells and macrophages. Quiescent, proliferating, and differentiating stem cells have different metabolism, and accordingly different amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Importantly, ROS is not just a byproduct of metabolism, but also plays a role in stem cell state and function. Recent Advances: ROS levels are dynamic and reversibly dictate enhanced cycling and myeloid bias in ROShigh short-term repopulating stem cells, and ROSlow quiescent long-term repopulating stem cells. Low levels of ROS, regulated by intrinsic factors such as cell respiration or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (NADPH oxidase) activity, or extrinsic factors such as stem cell factor or prostaglandin E2 are required for maintaining stem cell self-renewal. High ROS levels, due to stress and inflammation, induce stem cell differentiation and enhanced motility. Critical Issues: Stem cells need to be protected from high ROS levels to avoid stem cell exhaustion, insufficient host immunity, and leukemic transformation that may occur during chronic inflammation. However, continuous low ROS production will lead to lack of stem cell function and opportunistic infections. Ultimately, balanced ROS levels are crucial for maintaining the small stem cell pool and host immunity, both in homeostasis and during stress situations. Future Directions: Deciphering the signaling pathway of ROS in HSC will provide a better understanding of ROS roles in switching HSC from quiescence to activation and vice versa, and will also shed light on the possible roles of ROS in leukemia initiation and development. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1605–1619. PMID:24762207

  2. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T.; Jhaveri, Hiral M.; Mishra, Gyan C.; Wani, Mohan R.

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  3. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingbin; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; Yu, Shuhui; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  4. 2013 report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR): current uses and outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplants for blood and bone marrow disorders.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo; Wang, Zhiwei; Horowitz, Mary M; Gale, Robert Peter

    2013-01-01

    Data reported herein indicate increasing use of hematopoietic cell transplants for persons with blood and bone marrow disorders. Recent trends include increasing use of alternative donors including human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched unrelated persons and HLA-matched umbilical cord blood cells, increasing use of blood cell rather than bone marrow grafts, and increasing use of reduced-intensity pretransplant conditioning regimens. Many of these shifts are driven by logistical considerations such as the need for donors in persons without an HLA-identical sibling or expanding use of allotransplants to older persons. Many changes in transplant practices are not supported by results of large randomized trials. More data are needed to critically-assess the impact of these changes.

  5. Bone-marrow-derived stem cells--our key to longevity?

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Machalinski, Boguslaw; Kucia, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) was for many years primarily regarded as the source of hematopoietic stem cells. In this review we discuss current views of the BM stem cell compartment and present data showing that BM contains not only hematopoietic but also heterogeneous non-hematopoietic stem cells. It is likely that similar or overlapping populations of primitive non-hematopoietic stem cells in BM were detected by different investigators using different experimental strategies and hence were assigned different names (e.g., mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells, or marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible cells). However, the search still continues for true pluripotent stem cells in adult BM, which would fulfill the required criteria (e.g. complementation of blastocyst development). Recently our group has identified in BM a population of very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs), which express several markers characteristic for pluripotent stem cells and are found during early embryogenesis in the epiblast of the cylinder-stage embryo.

  6. Standardization of the Immunocytochemical Detection of Neuroblastoma Cells in Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Swerts, Katrien; Ambros, Peter F.; Brouzes, Chantal; Navarro, José M. Fernandez; Gross, Nicole; Rampling, Dyanne; Schumacher-Kuckelkorn, Roswitha; Sementa, Angela R.; Ladenstein, Ruth; Beiske, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Standard cytomorphological examination of bone marrow (BM) aspirates does not appear to be sensitive enough to detect single neuroblastoma cells. The SIOPEN Neuroblastoma Bone Marrow Committee developed a sensitive and reproducible anti-GD2 immunocytochemical assay and introduced morphological and immunocytological criteria for the interpretation of results. Fixed cytospins were incubated with a commercially available anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody and an APAAP kit. Cells fulfilling all morphological and immunocytological criteria were called criteria-positive cells (CPCs). Not convincingly interpretable cells fulfilled some, but not all, criteria, and negative cells displayed only exclusion criteria. The genetic profile of doubtful cells was checked by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Ideally, 3 × 106 cells were analyzed to reach a 95% probability of detecting one tumor cell in 1 × 106 mononuclear cells. Four quality control rounds were organized to validate the method. A total of 111 quality control samples were analyzed. Two main improvements were achieved: in discordant cases, the range between the lowest and highest reported result was reduced by half, and discordant results were only found in samples with less than 10 CPCs per 1 × 106. This article describes the first internationally standardized protocol to detect and quantify rare neuroblastoma cells by immunocytochemistry. This method is an indispensable tool for multicenter studies evaluating the clinical significance of minimal residual disease in neuroblastoma. PMID:15956022

  7. Multiple hemopoietic lineages are found after stimulation of mouse bone marrow precursor cells with interleukin 3.

    PubMed Central

    Prystowsky, M. B.; Otten, G.; Naujokas, M. F.; Vardiman, J.; Ihle, J. N.; Goldwasser, E.; Fitch, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    When the murine T-lymphocyte clone L2 is stimulated with concanavalin A, it secretes at least two distinct factors that affect hemopoietic precursor cells, interleukin 3 (IL3) and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). IL3 accounts for approximately 10% of the colony-stimulating activity in L2-cell-conditioned medium. The IL3 secreted by L2 cells is similar antigenically to the IL3 secreted by WEHI-3 cells. Like the IL3 from WEHI-3 cells, IL3 secreted by L2 cells does not bind to DEAE Sephacel and can be separated from the L2-cell GM-CSF, which does bind to DEAE. By assessment of the functional, morphologic, surface phenotypic, and cytochemical characteristics of bone marrow cells 6 days after stimulation with IL3 in liquid culture, four hemopoietic lineages were found, including macrophage, neutrophilic granulocyte, megakaryocyte, and basophil/mast cell. In addition, when bone marrow cells were stimulated with IL3 in semisolid medium, several types of colonies were found, including mixed colonies containing macrophage, megakaryocyte, and granulocyte lineages. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 1 PMID:6437231

  8. Comparisons of rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell isolation and culture methods in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Zhang, Fangbiao; Shi, Hongcan; Tan, Rongbang; Han, Shi; Ye, Gang; Pan, Shu; Sun, Fei; Liu, Xingchen

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have great potential in tissue engineering and clinical therapy, and various methods for isolation and cultivation of BMSCs have been reported. However, the best techniques are still uncertain. Therefore, we sought the most suitable among the four most common methods for BMSC separation from rabbits. BMSCs were obtained from untreated whole bone marrow (BM) adherent cultures, 3 volumes of red blood cells (RBC) lysed with ammonium chloride, 6 volumes of RBC lysed with ammonium chloride, and Ficoll density gradient centrifugation. Then, isolated BMSCs were evaluated with respect to primary cell yield, number of CFU-F colonies, proliferative capacity, cell phenotype, and chondrogenic differentiation potential. Our data show that BMSCs were successfully isolated by all four methods, and each method was similar with regard to cell morphology, phenotype, and differentiation potential. However, BMSCs from untreated whole BM adherent cultures had greater primary cell yields, larger colonies, and the shortest primary culture time (P<0.05). Moreover, the 4(th) generation of cultured cells had the strongest proliferative activity, the fastest growth rate and the most numerous cells compared with other cell passage generations (P<0.05). In conclusion, untreated whole BM adherent cultures are best for rabbit BMSC isolation and the 4(th) generation of cells has the strongest proliferation capacity.

  9. Limiting-dilution analysis for the determination of leukemic cell frequencies after bone marrow decontamination with mafosfamide or merocyanine 540

    SciTech Connect

    Porcellini, A.; Talevi, N.; Marchetti-Rossi, M.T.; Palazzi, M.; Manna, A.; Sparaventi, G.; Delfini, C.; Valentini, M.

    1987-11-01

    To stimulate a leukemia remission marrow, cell suspensions of normal human bone marrow were mixed with human acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemic cells of the CCRF-SF, Nalm-6, and K-562 lines. The cell mixtures were incubated in vitro with mafosfamide (AZ) or with the photoreactive dye merocyanine 540 (MC-540). A quantity of 10(4) cells of the treated suspensions was dispensed into microculture plates, and graded cell numbers of the line used to contaminate the normal marrow were added. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to estimate the frequency of leukemia cells persisting after treatment with the decontaminating agents. Treatment with AZ or MC-540 produced a total elimination (ie, 6 logs or 5.3 logs respectively) of B cell acute leukemia cells (CCRF-SB), whereas nearly 1.7 logs and 2 logs of K-562 acute myelogenous blasts were still present in the cell mixtures after treatment with MC-540 and AZ, respectively. Treatment of the Nalm-6-contaminated cell mixtures with AZ resulted in 100% elimination of clonogenic cells, whereas nearly 80% decontamination was obtained with MC-540. Our results suggest that treatment with AZ could be an effective method of eliminating clonogenic tumor cells from human bone marrow. MC-540, shown by previous studies to spare sufficient pluripotential stem cells to ensure hemopoietic reconstitution in the murine model and in clinical application, has comparable effects and merits trials for possible clinical use in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  10. Quantification of nucleated cells, CD34-positive cells and CFU-GM colonies in single bone marrow samples and bone marrow harvests derived from healthy children.

    PubMed

    Schündeln, Michael M; Walde, Gabriele; Basu, Oliver; Havers, Werner; Kremens, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Little is known regarding bone marrow (BM) cellularity, CD34+ fraction, and CFU-GM colony formation in relation to age and whether healthy children require a reference range distinct from healthy adults. We therefore analyzed a series of single BM aspirates from 45 healthy children who were evaluated as potential BM donors. Thirty-three of these children subsequently donated BM. We quantified the nucleated cell count, fraction of CD34+ cells, and number of CFU-GM colonies in single aspirates and BM harvests. Single aspirates displayed a mean nucleated cell count of 31.3 × 10(6) cells/mL, a mean fraction of 1.17% CD34+ cells, and a mean colony forming potential of 66.6 CFU-GM/10(5) cells. Harvests yielded the same number of nucleated cells but increased numbers of CD34+ cells and CFU-GM compared with single aspirates. The mean nucleated cell count in BM harvests was 31.1 × 10(6) /mL with a mean fraction of 1.95% CD34+ cells and a mean of 112.4 CFU-GM colonies/10(5) cells. The concentration of nucleated cells was elevated compared with reported adult counts, while CD34+ percentage and CFU-GM counts were similar. In this series of healthy children, the fraction of CD34+ cells, CFU-GM colonies, and nucleated cells decreased with age. We did not identify gender specific differences. To our knowledge, this represents the first comprehensive study of CD34+ cell fraction, CFU-GM counts, and nucleated cell numbers in the BM of healthy children. The findings provide valuable information for practical use for BM transplantation and contribute to the understanding of hematopoiesis from birth to adulthood.

  11. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600-1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2), an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 10(6) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2) for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  12. The differentiation directions of the bone marrow stromal cells under modeling microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Olga; Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Within experiments on rats simulating microgravity by base load remove from back limbs (duration of the experiment 1,5 months) on marrow stromal cells cultures (ex vivo, in vitro) comprising osteogenic cells-predecessors, extracted from femurs, studied their peculiarities of the colony formation ablity, the cell structure, some cytological and ultra-structural characteristics and differentiation direction. It was found that that under microgravity conditions there is a decline of the stromal cells colony formation intensity, decrease of the colonies size and cells mitotic activity that indicates decrease of their growth potential. Both in control and in experiment the colonies were presented by population of low-differentiated cells, differentiated cells and mature cells. The comparative cytological and morphometric analysis have shown that the studied stromal cells in colonies have the smaller sizes, more elongated shape, and higher nucleocytoplasmic ratio. Cells composition in the experiment colonies is reliably different by the ratio of the low-differentiating to being differentiated cells; a ratio of low-differentiated to already differentiated cells; ratio of differentiated cells to total number of all cells. In comparison with control group, amount of the cells passed trough a differentiation stage and mature cells in colonies is decreased by 3 to 4 times. Among the differentiated stromal cells in colonies increasing amount of adipocytes was revealed. The analysis of electron microscope microphotographs showed that in osteogenic cells differentiated under microgravity conditions, there is a reduction of the specific volume of a granular endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi's complex and quantity of nuclei reduction that indicates depression of the specific biosyntheses process intensity in cells. The increase of lysosomes and myelinic structures quantity is linked to organelles partial reduction. Consolidation of mitochondrias is an evidence of the cells’ energy

  13. Demonstration That Mast Cells, T Cells, and B Cells Bearing the Activating Kit Mutation D816V Occur in Clusters within the Marrow of Patients with Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Marcia L.; Sehgal, Devinder; Raffeld, Mark; Obiakor, Harold; Akin, Cem; Mage, Rose G.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2004-01-01

    Mastocytosis is characterized by focal heterotypic clusters of mast cells and lymphocytes in the bone marrow and by a somatically acquired activating Kit mutation, D816V. The relationship of the occurrence of this mutation to the heterotypic clusters of mast cells and lymphocytes in bone marrow is unknown. We hypothesized that these two unique features of mastocytosis were related. To explore this hypothesis, laser capture microdissected mast cells, B cells, and T cells, from both lesional and non-lesional areas of bone marrow biopsy tissues from patients with mastocytosis, were examined for the D816V mutation in their DNA, using HinfI restriction digestion of nested PCR products amplified from extracts of dissected cells. The D816V mutation was detected in mast cells, B cells, and T cells from lesional but not non-lesional areas of bone marrow tissues. B cells obtained from lesional areas of tissue were also assessed for clonality and were found to at least represent an oligoclonal population. Thus, mast cells and lymphocytes within focal aggregates in the bone marrow of those with mastocytosis are more frequently positive for the codon 816 activating mutation. Further, the B cell population is oligoclonal, suggesting that clonal proliferation is unlikely to be the basis of clustering. PMID:15507672

  14. Concise Review: Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for the Treatment of Ischemic Syndromes: Medicinal Product or Cell Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Laura; Herrera, Concha

    2012-01-01

    In November of 2011, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published two scientific recommendations regarding the classification of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and autologous bone marrow-derived CD133+ cells as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), specifically tissue-engineered products, when intended for regeneration in ischemic heart tissue on the basis that they are not used for the same essential function (hematological restoration) that they fulfill in the donor. In vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that bone marrow cells are physiologically involved in adult neovascularization and tissue repair, making their therapeutic use for these purposes a simple exploitation of their own essential functions. Therefore, from a scientific/legal point of view, nonsubstantially manipulated BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells are not an ATMP, because they have a physiological role in the processes of postnatal neovascularization and, when used therapeutically for vascular restoration in ischemic tissues, they are carrying out one of their essential physiological functions (the legal definition recognizes that cells can have several essential functions). The consequences of classifying BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells as medicinal products instead of cellular transplantation, like bone marrow transplantation, in terms of costs and time for these products to be introduced into clinical practice, make this an issue of crucial importance. Therefore, the recommendations of EMA/CAT could be reviewed in collaboration with scientific societies, in light of organizational and economic consequences as well as scientific knowledge recently acquired about the mechanisms of postnatal neovascularization and the function of bone marrow in the regeneration of remote tissues. PMID:23197819

  15. Concise review: bone marrow mononuclear cells for the treatment of ischemic syndromes: medicinal product or cell transplantation?

    PubMed

    Cuende, Natividad; Rico, Laura; Herrera, Concha

    2012-05-01

    In November of 2011, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published two scientific recommendations regarding the classification of autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and autologous bone marrow-derived CD133+ cells as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), specifically tissue-engineered products, when intended for regeneration in ischemic heart tissue on the basis that they are not used for the same essential function (hematological restoration) that they fulfill in the donor. In vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrates that bone marrow cells are physiologically involved in adult neovascularization and tissue repair, making their therapeutic use for these purposes a simple exploitation of their own essential functions. Therefore, from a scientific/legal point of view, nonsubstantially manipulated BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells are not an ATMP, because they have a physiological role in the processes of postnatal neovascularization and, when used therapeutically for vascular restoration in ischemic tissues, they are carrying out one of their essential physiological functions (the legal definition recognizes that cells can have several essential functions). The consequences of classifying BM-MNCs and CD133+ cells as medicinal products instead of cellular transplantation, like bone marrow transplantation, in terms of costs and time for these products to be introduced into clinical practice, make this an issue of crucial importance. Therefore, the recommendations of EMA/CAT could be reviewed in collaboration with scientific societies, in light of organizational and economic consequences as well as scientific knowledge recently acquired about the mechanisms of postnatal neovascularization and the function of bone marrow in the regeneration of remote tissues.

  16. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuzhen; Yang, Libin; Yang, Lin; Zhao, Hongxing; Zhang, Chao; Wu, Dapeng

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal cord injury. These results indicate that neurotrophin-3 can promote the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into the region of spinal cord injury and potentially enhance the therapeutic effect in the repair of spinal cord injury. PMID:25317169

  17. Autologous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Adult Stem Cells for the Treatment of Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Ricardo João; Bueno, Ronaldo Rocha Loures; Galvão, Paulo Bezerra de Araújo; Zanis Neto, José; Souza, Juliano Mendes; Guérios, Ênio Eduardo; Senegaglia, Alexandra Cristina; Brofman, Paulo Roberto; Pasquini, Ricardo; da Cunha, Claudio Leinig Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Background Morbimortality in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy is high, even under optimal medical treatment. Autologous infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells has shown promising preliminary results in these patients. Objective Determine the effectiveness of autologous transplantation of bone marrow adult stem cells on systolic and diastolic left ventricular function, and on the degree of mitral regurgitation in patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Methods We administered 4,54 x 108 ± 0,89 x 108 bone marrow adult stem cells into the coronary arteries of 24 patients with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy in functional classes NYHA II and III. Changes in functional class, systolic and diastolic left ventricular function and degree of mitral regurgitation were assessed after 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Results During follow-up, six patients (25%) improved functional class and eight (33.3%) kept stable. Left ventricular ejection fraction improved 8.9%, 9.7% e 13.6%, after 3, 6 and 12 months (p = 0.024; 0.017 and 0.018), respectively. There were no significant changes neither in diastolic left ventricular function nor in mitral regurgitation degree. A combined cardiac resynchronization and implantable cardioversion defibrillation was implanted in two patients (8.3%). Four patients (16.6%) had sudden death and four patients died due to terminal cardiac failure. Average survival of these eight patients was 2.6 years. Conclusion Intracoronary infusion of bone marrow adult stem cells was associated with an improvement or stabilization of functional class and an improvement in left ventricular ejection fraction, suggesting the efficacy of this intervention. There were no significant changes neither in left ventricular diastolic function nor in the degree of mitral regurgitation. PMID:25590932

  18. Treatment of pressure ulcers with autologous bone marrow nuclear cells in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarasúa, J González; López, S Pérez; Viejo, M Álvarez; Basterrechea, M Pérez; Rodríguez, A Fernández; Gutiérrez, A Ferrero; Gala, J García; Menéndez, Y Menéndez; Augusto, D Escudero; Arias, A Pérez; Hernández, J Otero

    2011-01-01

    Context Pressure ulcers are especially difficult to treat in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and recurrence rates are high. Prompted by encouraging results obtained using bone marrow stem cells to treat several diseases including chronic wounds, this study examines the use of autologous stem cells from bone marrow to promote the healing of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI. Objective To obtain preliminary data on the use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to treat pressure ulcers in terms of clinical outcome, procedure safety, and treatment time. Participants Twenty-two patients with SCI (19 men, 3 women; mean age 56.41 years) with single type IV pressure ulcers of more than 4 months duration. Interventions By minimally invasive surgery, the ulcers were debrided and treated with BM-MNCs obtained by Ficoll density gradient separation of autologous bone marrow aspirates drawn from the iliac crest. Results In 19 patients (86.36%), the pressure ulcers treated with BM-MNCs had fully healed after a mean time of 21 days. The number of MNCs isolated was patient dependent, although similar clinical outcomes were observed in each case. Compared to conventional surgical treatment, mean intra-hospital stay was reduced from 85.16 to 43.06 days. Following treatment, 5 minutes of daily wound care was required per patient compared to 20 minutes for conventional surgery. During a mean follow-up of 19 months, none of the resolved ulcers recurred. Conclusions Our data indicate that cell therapy using autologous BM-MNCs could be an option to treat type IV pressure ulcers in patients with SCI, avoiding major surgical intervention. PMID:21756569

  19. [The karyotype of bone marrow cells in the preleukemic phase of chronic myelocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Bondare, D; Barawika, I; Kolodjasnaja, I

    1978-01-01

    The caryotype of bone-marrow cells of 19 patients affected with leukocytosis of obscure origin was examined by means of G-staining. A chronic myelogenous leukaemia in its preleukaemic stage was diagnosed in 11 patients by identifying Ph'-chromosomes in all metaphases observed and a lowered acid leukocyte phosphatase. Besides Ph'-chromosomes an aneuploida (47 chromosomes with trisomia 8) was observed in one patient. The diagnostic and prognostic significance of this pathological caryotype is discussed.

  20. A novel rat fibrosarcoma cell line from transformed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with maintained in vitro and in vivo stemness properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng-Yu; Nestvold, Janne; Rekdal, Øystein; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Fodstad, Øystein

    2017-02-09

    Increasing evidence suggests a possible relationship between mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and sarcoma. MSCs are hypothesized to be the cells initiating sarcomagenesis, and cancer stem cells (CSCs) sharing features of MSCs have been identified in sarcomas. Here, we report on the characteristics of a bone marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cell line that spontaneously transformed in long-term culture. The rat transformed mesenchymal stem cells (rTMSCs) produced soft-tissue fibrosarcomas in immunocompromised mice and immunocompetent rats. In vitro, the rTMSCs displayed increased proliferation capacity compared to the untransformed cell line. The transformed MSCs maintained the mesenchymal phenotype by expression of the stem cell marker CD 90 and the lack of hematopoietic and endothelial markers. Cytogenetic analysis detected trisomy 6 in the rTMSCs. Side population (SP) isolation and tumorsphere cultivation of the transformed cells confirmed the presence of CSCs among the rTMSCs. Importantly, the rTMSCs retained their differentiation capacity towards osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This transformed MSC-based cell line may be valuable in examining the balance in a mixed cell population between cancer stem cell properties and the ability to differentiate to specific non-transformed cell populations. Moreover, it may also be a useful tool to evaluate the efficacy of novel targeted immunotherapies in vivo.

  1. TRPC6 regulates cell cycle progression by modulating membrane potential in bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Jun; Inoue, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ca2+ influx is important for cell cycle progression, but the mechanisms involved seem to vary. We investigated the potential roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE)-related molecules STIM (stromal interaction molecule)/Orai in the cell cycle progression of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), a reliable therapeutic resource for regenerative medicine. Experimental Approach PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to examine mRNA and protein levels, fluorescence imaging and patch clamping for Ca2+ influx and membrane potential measurements, and flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. Key Results Cell cycle synchronization of BMSCs revealed S phase-specific enhancement of TRPC1, STIM and Orai mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, TRPC6 expression decreased in the S phase and increased in the G1 phase. Resting membrane potential (RMP) of BMSCs was most negative and positive in the S and G1 phases, respectively, and was accompanied by an enhancement and attenuation of SOCE respectively. Chemically depolarizing/hyperpolarizing the membrane erased these differences in SOCE magnitude during the cell cycle. siRNA knockdown of TRPC6 produced a negative shift in RMP, increased SOCE and caused redistribution of BMSCs with increased populations in the S and G2/M phases and accumulation of cyclins A2 and B1. A low concentration of Gd3+ (1 μM) suppressed BMSC proliferation at its concentration to inhibit SOC channels relatively specifically. Conclusions and Implications TRPC6, by changing the membrane potential, plays a pivotal role in controlling the SOCE magnitude, which is critical for cell cycle progression of BMSCs. This finding provides a new therapeutic strategy for regulating BMSC proliferation. PMID:25041367

  2. Rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3L exhibit distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics.

    PubMed

    N'diaye, Marie; Warnecke, Andreas; Flytzani, Sevasti; Abdelmagid, Nada; Ruhrmann, Sabrina; Olsson, Tomas; Jagodic, Maja; Harris, Robert A; Guerreiro-Cacais, Andre Ortlieb

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells are professional APCs that play a central role in the initiation of immune responses. The limited ex vivo availability of dendritic cells inspires the widespread use of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells as an alternative in research. However, the functional characteristics of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are incompletely understood. Therefore, we compared functional and phenotypic characteristics of rat bone marrow-derived dendritic cells generated with GM-CSF/IL-4 or FLT3 ligand bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. A comparison of surface markers revealed that FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD103, and CD4 and baseline levels of MHC class II, CD40, and CD86, which were highly up-regulated upon stimulation. Conversely, GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells constitutively expressed signal regulatory protein α, CD11c, and CD11b but only mildly up-regulated MHC class II, CD40, or CD86 following stimulation. Expression of dendritic cell-associated core transcripts was restricted to FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells . GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were superior at phagocytosis but were outperformed by FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells at antigen presentation and T cell stimulation in vitro. Stimulated GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more TNF, CCL5, CCL20, and NO, whereas FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells secreted more IL-6 and IL-12. Finally, whereas GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants added to resting T cell cultures promoted forkhead box p3(+) regulatory T cell populations, FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cell culture supernatants drove Th17 differentiation. We conclude that rat GM-CSF/IL-4-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and FLT3 ligand-bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functionally distinct. Our data support the current rationale that FLT3

  3. Chinese preparation Xuesaitong promotes the mobilization of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in rats with cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Sheng; Zhang, Bao-Xia; Du, Mei-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Ya; Li, Wei

    2016-02-01

    After cerebral ischemia, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are mobilized and travel from the bone marrow through peripheral circulation to the focal point of ischemia to initiate tissue regeneration. However, the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells mobilized into peripheral circulation is not enough to exert therapeutic effects, and the method by which blood circulation is promoted to remove blood stasis influences stem cell homing. The main ingredient of Xuesaitong capsules is Panax notoginseng saponins, and Xuesaitong is one of the main drugs used for promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis. We established rat models of cerebral infarction by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery and then intragastrically administered Xuesaitong capsules (20, 40 and 60 mg/kg per day) for 28 successive days. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that in rats with cerebral infarction, middle- and high-dose Xuesaitong significantly increased the level of stem cell factors and the number of CD117-positive cells in plasma and bone marrow and significantly decreased the number of CD54- and CD106-positive cells in plasma and bone marrow. The effect of low-dose Xuesaitong on these factors was not obvious. These findings demonstrate that middle- and high-dose Xuesaitong and hence Panax notoginseng saponins promote and increase the level and mobilization of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in peripheral blood.

  4. Repair of orbital bone defects in canines using grafts of enriched autologous bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgroud Bone tissue engineering is a new approach for the repair of orbital defects. The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of tissue-engineered bone constructed using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that were rapidly isolated and concentrated from bone marrow (BM) by the red cell lysis method, then combined with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to create grafts used to restore orbital bone defects in canines. Methods In the experimental group, grafts were constructed using BMSCs obtained by red cell lysis from 20 ml bone marrow, combined with β-TCP and BM via the custom-made stem cell-scaffold device, then used to repair 10 mm diameter medial orbital wall bony defects in canines. Results were compared with those in groups grafted with BM/β-TCP or β-TCP alone, or with defects left untreated as controls. The enrichment of BMSCs and nucleated cells (NCs) in the graft was calculated from the number in untreated bone marrow and in suspensions after red cell lysis. Spiral computed tomography (CT) scans were performed 1, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after implantation in all groups. Gross examination, micro-CT and histological measurements were performed 24 weeks after surgery. The results were analyzed to evaluate the efficacy of bone repair. Results The number of NCs and of colony-forming units within the scaffolds were increased 54.8 times and 53.4 times, respectively, compared with untreated bone marrow. In the BMSC-BM/β-TCP group, CT examination revealed that the scaffolds were gradually absorbed and the bony defects were restored. Micro-CT and histological examination confirmed that the implantations led to good repair of the defects, with 6 out 8 orbital defects completely restored in the experimental group, while by contrast, the grafts in the control groups did not fully repair the bony defects, a difference which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions Tissue-engineered bone, constructed using BMSCs isolated by red cell

  5. Multi-lineage potential research of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from Bama miniature pig.

    PubMed

    Bai, Chunyu; Chen, Shuming; Gao, Yuhua; Shan, Zhiqiang; Guan, Weijun; Ma, Yuehui

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are easy to obtain and thought to be ideal candidate cells for reconstruction of tissues and organs. Pigs are an appropriate animal model because their physiological structure, organ size, nutritional metabolism, and pathological reactions are similar to those of humans. In this study, bone marrow was collection from Bama miniature pigs to isolate BMSCs (B-BMSCs) by whole bone marrow culture method. We then examined their biological characteristics such as growth kinetics, surface antigen, and multi-lineage potential. B-BMSCs could be cultured for 36 passages in vitro. Growth kinetics and colony forming assay analyses indicated that B-BMSCs had a strong capacity for self-renewal in vitro and their proliferation rate appeared to decrease with passaging. These findings were supported by the animal cytophysiology in vitro. Surface antigen detection showed that B-BMSCs expressed CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, and CD90, but not the endothelial cell marker CD31 or hematopoietic cell-specific marker CD34. This result was consistent with the characteristics of B-BMSCs. Furthermore, under appropriate conditions for multidirectional differentiation, B-BMSCs were induced to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, neuron-like cells, islet cells, liver-like cells, and endothelial cells as indicated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence. These results verified the differentiation potential of B-BMSCs. In this study, B-BMSCs were isolated from Bama miniature pigs, and the self-renewal ability and differential potential was evaluated in vitro. The present study has important bearing on the potential application of B-BMSCs as a stem cell source for regenerative therapies. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 671-685, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Critical Role of Sensitized Serum in Rejection of Allogeneic Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu-Hong; Fang, Jian-Pei; Weng, Wen-Jun; Xu, Hong-Gui

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Humoral immunity has been clearly implicated in solid organ transplantation, but little is known about the relationship between humoral immunity and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This study was designed to investigate that relationship. Materials and Methods: Sensitized serum was obtained from a sensitized murine model established by allogeneic splenocyte transfusion. Sensitized serum was incubated with allogeneic bone marrow cells (BMCs) in vitro and the cytotoxicity was evaluated by the complement-dependent cytotoxicity method. Mice were transplanted with allogeneic BMCs incubated with sensitized serum after lethal irradiation. The engraftment was assayed by hematopoietic recovery and chimera analysis. Moreover, mice received passive transfer of sensitized serum 1 day prior to transplantation. Mortality was scored daily after bone marrow transplantation. Results: The in vitro experiments showed that sensitized serum was capable of impairing allogeneic BMCs through the complement-dependent cytotoxicity pathway. The animal studies showed that BMCs incubated with sensitized serum failed to rescue mice from lethal irradiation. The engraftment assay showed that the allogeneic BMCs incubated with sensitized serum were rejected with time in the recipients. Furthermore, the mice died of marrow graft rejection by transfer of sensitized serum prior to transplantation. Conclusion: Taken together, our results indicated that sensitized serum played a critical role in graft rejection during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25330519

  7. The fate of cells with chromosome aberrations after total-body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, F.; Ganser, A.; Fliedner, T.M.; Arnold, R.; Kubanek, B.

    1983-03-01

    Cytogenetic studies were done on bone marrow cells and peripheral lymphocytes of four patients (three with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, one with aplastic anemia) at various intervals up to 861 days after total-body X irradiation (TBI) at doses between 4.5 and 10 Gy (450-1000 rad) followed by syngeneic or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Whereas no radiation-induced aberrations could be found in the bone marrow, apart from a transient finding in the patient with the lowest radiation dose, aberrant metaphases were seen in the peripheral lymphocytes of three patients in the range from 2.5 to 46% even at 861 days after the exposure. There were no demonstrable aberrations related to TBI in the only patient developing graft-versus-host disease. The dicentric yield as determined in the aberrant metaphases with 46 centromeres ranged between 3.4 +/- 1.3 and 4.9 +/- 0.4. In one patient it was demonstrated by BUdR-labeling that after 10 Gy (1000 rad) TBI the surviving and heavily damaged lymphocytes can go into cell cycle and reach at least the third mitosis. The percentage of aberrant cells diminished by about 25% at each mitotic division.

  8. Interactions between acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow stromal cells influence response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Tesfai, Yordanos; Ford, Jette; Carter, Kim W; Firth, Martin J; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Cole, Catherine; Kees, Ursula R

    2012-03-01

    The cure rate for pediatric patients with B precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) is steadily improving, however relapses do occur despite initial response to therapy. To identify links between drug resistance and gene deregulation we used oligonucleotide microarray technology and determined in 184 pre-B ALL specimen genes differentially expressed compared to normal CD34(+) specimens. We identified 20 signature genes including CTGF, BMP-2, CXCR4 and IL7R, documented to regulate interactions in the bone marrow. We recorded remarkably similar levels of expression in three independent patient cohorts, and found distinct patterns in cytogenetically defined subgroups of pre-B ALL. The canonical pathways that were affected are involved in inter- and intra-cellular communication, regulating signaling within the microenvironment. We tested experimentally whether interaction with stromal cells conferred protection to four drugs used in current ALL therapy, and demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells significantly influenced resistance to vincristine and cytosine arabinoside. Compounds designed to block the identified cellular interactions within the bone marrow microenvironment are expected to mobilise the leukemic cells and make them more accessible to contemporary antileukemic agents. The data provide novel insight into the pathobiology of ALL and indicate new therapeutic targets for patients with ALL.

  9. In Vivo Functional and Transcriptional Profiling of Bone Marrow Stem Cells after Transplantation into Ischemic Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Ahmad Y.; Huber, Bruno C.; Narsinh, Kazim H.; Spin, Joshua M.; van der Bogt, Koen; de Almeida, Patricia E.; Ransohoff, Katherine J.; Kraft, Daniel L.; Fajardo, Giovanni; Ardigo, Diego; Ransohoff, Julia; Bernstein, Daniel; Fischbein, Michael P.; Robbins, Robert C.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Clinical trials of bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for the heart have yielded variable results. The basic mechanism(s) that underlie their potential efficacy remains unknown. In the present study, we evaluate the survival kinetics, transcriptional response, and functional outcome of intramyocardial bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMC) transplantation for cardiac repair in murine myocardial infarction model. Methods and Results We utilized molecular-genetic bioluminescence imaging and high throughput transcriptional profiling to evaluate the in vivo survival kinetics and gene expression changes of transplanted BMMCs after their engraftment into ischemic myocardium. Our results demonstrate short-lived survival of cells following transplant, with less than 1% of cells surviving by 6 weeks post-transplantation. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis of BMMCs revealed non-specific upregulation of various cell regulatory genes with a marked downregulation of cell differentiation and maturation pathways. BMMC therapy caused limited improvement of heart function as assessed by echocardiography, invasive hemodynamics, and positron emission tomography (PET). Histological evaluation of cell fate further confirmed findings of the in vivo cell tracking and transcriptomic analysis. Conclusions Collectively, these data suggest that BMMC therapy, in its present iteration, may be less efficacious than once thought. Additional refinement of existing cell delivery protocols should be considered to induce better therapeutic efficacy. PMID:22034515

  10. Nutrient restriction enhances the proliferative potential of cells lacking the tumor suppressor PTEN in mitotic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Seisenbacher, Gerhard; Hafen, Ernst; Stocker, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    How single cells in a mitotic tissue progressively acquire hallmarks of cancer is poorly understood. We exploited mitotic recombination in developing Drosophila imaginal tissues to analyze the behavior of cells devoid of the tumor suppressor PTEN, a negative regulator of PI3K signaling, under varying nutritional conditions. Cells lacking PTEN strongly overproliferated specifically in nutrient restricted larvae. Although the PTEN mutant cells were sensitive to starvation, they successfully competed with neighboring cells by autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms distinct from cell competition. The overgrowth was strictly dependent on the activity of the downstream components Akt/PKB and TORC1, and a reduction in amino acid uptake by reducing the levels of the amino acid transporter Slimfast caused clones of PTEN mutant cells to collapse. Our findings demonstrate how limiting nutritional conditions impact on cells lacking the tumor suppressor PTEN to cause hyperplastic overgrowth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00380.001 PMID:23853709

  11. Differentiation of functionally active mouse T lymphocytes from functionally inactive bone marrow precursors II. Limited recovery of T-cell responses from mouse bone marrow in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, M; MacRae, S

    1977-11-01

    The limited differentiation of mature T cell function from mouse bone marrow in tissue culture is described and compared with similar differentiation occuring in vivo in irradiated bone marrow protected mice. Data are presented to show that a pool of precursors, similar in size to that able to produce early (transient?) regeneration in thymectomized recipients, is responsible for the development of mitogen responsive T cells active in MLC (proliferation) and CML (development of cytotoxic cells) assays. In contrast, a helper cell population which augments antibody formation from T-depleted normal spleen cells derives from a pool of similar precursors yet does not seem to be theta positive. Similarly, larger cells (perhaps typical of those giving rise to suppressor T cells in vivo) give rise to a suppressor cell pool after 4 days of culture, though again only a fraction of this suppressor activity could be attributed to theta positive cells. It is suggested that much of the data for regenration of T lymphocytes in vitro from T-depleted sources needs to be re-interpreted in terms of this evidence for a pool of post-thymic precursors of T cells in such T-deficient cell populations.

  12. Differentiation of functionally active mouse T lymphocytes from functionally inactive bone marrow precursors II. Limited recovery of T-cell responses from mouse bone marrow in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, M; MacRae, S

    1977-01-01

    The limited differentiation of mature T cell function from mouse bone marrow in tissue culture is described and compared with similar differentiation occuring in vivo in irradiated bone marrow protected mice. Data are presented to show that a pool of precursors, similar in size to that able to produce early (transient?) regeneration in thymectomized recipients, is responsible for the development of mitogen responsive T cells active in MLC (proliferation) and CML (development of cytotoxic cells) assays. In contrast, a helper cell population which augments antibody formation from T-depleted normal spleen cells derives from a pool of similar precursors yet does not seem to be theta positive. Similarly, larger cells (perhaps typical of those giving rise to suppressor T cells in vivo) give rise to a suppressor cell pool after 4 days of culture, though again only a fraction of this suppressor activity could be attributed to theta positive cells. It is suggested that much of the data for regenration of T lymphocytes in vitro from T-depleted sources needs to be re-interpreted in terms of this evidence for a pool of post-thymic precursors of T cells in such T-deficient cell populations. PMID:304032

  13. Molecular cloning of complementary DNA for human medullasin: an inflammatory serine protease in bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Okano, K; Aoki, Y; Sakurai, T; Kajitani, M; Kanai, S; Shimazu, T; Shimizu, H; Naruto, M

    1987-07-01

    Medullasin, an inflammatory serine protease in bone marrow cells, modifies the functions of natural killer cells, monocytes, and granulocytes. We have cloned a medullasin cDNA from a human acute promyelocytic cell (ML3) cDNA library using oligonucleotide probes synthesized from the information of N-terminal amino acid sequence of natural medullasin. The cDNA contained a long open reading frame encoding 237 amino acid residues beginning from the second amino acid of natural meduallasin. The deduced amino acid sequence of medullasin shows a typical serine protease structure, with 41% homology with pig elastase 1.

  14. A simple and efficient method for deriving neurospheres from bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qin; Mu Jun; Li Qi; Li Ao; Zeng Zhilei; Yang Jun; Zhang Xiaodong; Tang Jin; Xie Peng

    2008-08-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be differentiated into neuronal and glial-like cell types under appropriate experimental conditions. However, previously reported methods are complicated and involve the use of toxic reagents. Here, we present a simplified and nontoxic method for efficient conversion of rat MSCs into neurospheres that express the neuroectodermal marker nestin. These neurospheres can proliferate and differentiate into neuron, astrocyte, and oligodendrocyte phenotypes. We thus propose that MSCs are an emerging model cell for the treatment of a variety of neurological diseases.

  15. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells: a systematic reappraisal via the genostem experience.

    PubMed

    Charbord, Pierre; Livne, Erella; Gross, Gerhard; Häupl, Thomas; Neves, Nuno M; Marie, Pierre; Bianco, Paolo; Jorgensen, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Genostem (acronym for "Adult mesenchymal stem cells engineering for connective tissue disorders. From the bench to the bed side") has been an European consortium of 30 teams working together on human bone marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) biological properties and repair capacity. Part of Genostem activity has been dedicated to the study of basic issues on undifferentiated MSCs properties and on signalling pathways leading to the differentiation into 3 of the connective tissue lineages, osteoblastic, chondrocytic and tenocytic. We have evidenced that native bone marrow MSCs and stromal cells, forming the niche of hematopoietic stem cells, were the same cellular entity located abluminally from marrow sinus endothelial cells. We have also shown that culture-amplified, clonogenic and highly-proliferative MSCs were bona fide stem cells, sharing with other stem cell types the major attributes of self-renewal and of multipotential priming to the lineages to which they can differentiate (osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells/pericytes). Extensive transcription profiling and in vitro and in vivo assays were applied to identify genes involved in differentiation. Thus we have described novel factors implicated in osteogenesis (FHL2, ITGA5, Fgf18), chondrogenesis (FOXO1A) and tenogenesis (Smad8). Another part of Genostem activity has been devoted to studies of the repair capacity of MSCs in animal models, a prerequisite for future clinical trials. We have developed novel scaffolds (chitosan, pharmacologically active microcarriers) useful for the repair of both bone and cartilage. Finally and most importantly, we have shown that locally implanted MSCs effectively repair bone, cartilage and tendon.

  16. Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Human Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue Niche1

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zach S.; Lie, Wen-Rong; Wang, Weiqi; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Tamaresis, John S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Lee, Kitty; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bone is a preferred site of breast cancer metastasis, suggesting the presence of tissue-specific features that attract and promote the outgrowth of breast cancer cells. We sought to identify parameters of human bone tissue associated with breast cancer cell osteotropism and colonization in the metastatic niche. METHODS: Migration and colonization patterns of MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP (luciferase-enhanced green fluorescence protein) and MCF-7-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cells were studied in co-culture with cancellous bone tissue fragments isolated from 14 hip arthroplasties. Breast cancer cell migration into tissues and toward tissue-conditioned medium was measured in Transwell migration chambers using bioluminescence imaging and analyzed as a function of secreted factors measured by multiplex immunoassay. Patterns of breast cancer cell colonization were evaluated with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Enhanced MDA-MB-231-fLuc-EGFP breast cancer cell migration to bone-conditioned versus control medium was observed in 12/14 specimens (P = .0014) and correlated significantly with increasing levels of the adipokines/cytokines leptin (P = .006) and IL-1β (P = .001) in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry of fragments underscored the extreme adiposity of adult human bone tissues and revealed extensive breast cancer cell colonization within the marrow adipose tissue compartment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that breast cancer cells migrate to human bone tissue-conditioned medium in association with increasing levels of leptin and IL-1β, and colonize the bone marrow adipose tissue compartment of cultured fragments. Bone marrow adipose tissue and its molecular signals may be important but understudied components of the breast cancer metastatic niche. PMID:26696367

  17. Isolation, characterization, and gene modification of dairy goat mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Fan, Yixuan; Wang, Ziyu; Wan, Yongjie; Zhou, Zhengrong; Zhong, Bushuai; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Feng

    2012-08-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult pluripotent cells that are considered to be an attractive cell type for therapy models and for nuclear transfer transgenesis. To date, MSCs from various species have been studied, but only a limited amount of information regarding dairy goat MSCs (gMSCs) is available. The objectives of this study were to isolate, induce the multilineage mesenchymal differentiation, and investigate the gene modification efficiency of gMSCs, thereby initiating further research on these cells. The gMSCs isolated from bone marrow grew, attached to plastic with a typical fibroblast-like morphology, and expressed the mesenchymal surface marker CD44, CD29, CD90, and CD166, but not the hematopoietic marker CD45. Furthermore, the gMSCs expressed the transcription factors Oct-4 and Nanog, which have been shown to be critical for stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency. The multilineage differentiation potential of gMSCs was revealed by their ability to undergo adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation when exposed to specific inducing conditions. Transient transduction of gMSCs with a plasmid containing the GFP gene resulted in higher transfection rate compared with fetal fibroblasts (FFs). Furthermore, cell colonies with stable genetic modifications were obtained when gMSCs were transfected with a mammary-specific expression vector containing human lysosomal acid beta-glucosidase gene (hGCase). In conclusion, these results demonstrated that typical mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from dairy goat bone marrow, possessed the characteristics of pluripotent stem cells, and had the potential of specific genetic modifications for gene therapy and producing transgenic goats.

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of mast cells from normal and pathological human bone marrow samples: identification and enumeration.

    PubMed Central

    Orfao, A.; Escribano, L.; Villarrubia, J.; Velasco, J. L.; Cerveró, C.; Ciudad, J.; Navarro, J. L.; San Miguel, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    In the present paper we have used a three-color immunofluorescence procedure combined with flow cytometry cell analysis and sorting for the identification and enumeration of human mast cells in both normal and pathological bone marrow samples. Our results show that bone marrow mast cells are clearly identifiable on the basis of their light-scatter properties and strong CD117 expression. These cells were negative for the CD34, CD38, and BB4 antigens. In addition, they were CD33+ and displayed a high reactivity for the anti-IgE monoclonal antibody. The identity of the CD117-strong+ cells (mast cells) was confirmed by both microscopic examination and flow cytometry analysis. The overall frequency of mast cells in the bone marrow samples analyzed in the present study was constantly lower than 1%. The lowest frequencies corresponded to normal human bone marrow samples (0.0080 +/- 0.0082%) and the highest to those patients suffering from indolent systemic mast cell disease (0.40 +/- 0.13%). In summary, our results show that the identification and enumeration of bone marrow mast cells can be achieved using multiparametric flow cytometry. Moreover, once identified, mast cells are suitable for being characterized from the phenotypic and the functional point of view, facilitating the comparison between normal and abnormal mast cells. Images Figure 3 PMID:8909239

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene delivery into the CNS using bone marrow cells as vehicles in mice.

    PubMed

    Makar, T K; Trisler, D; Eglitis, M A; Mouradian, M M; Dhib-Jalbut, S

    2004-02-19

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, is protective in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, BDNF has a short half-life and its efficacy in the CNS when delivered peripherally is limited due to the blood-brain barrier. In the present study, bone marrow cells were used as vehicles to deliver the BDNF gene into the CNS. Marrow cells obtained from 6 to 8 week-old SJL/J mice were transduced with BDNF expressing pro-virus. RT-PCR analysis revealed that BDNF mRNA was expressed in transduced but not in non-transduced marrow cells. Additionally, virus transduced marrow cells expressed the BDNF protein (296+/-1.2 unit/ml). BDNF-transduced marrow cells were then transplanted into irradiated mice through the tail vein. Three months post-transplantation, significant increases in BDNF as well as glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD(67)) mRNA were detected in the brains of BDNF transplanted mice compared to untransplanted animals, indicating biological activity of the BDNF transgene. Thus, bone marrow cells can be used as vehicles to deliver the BDNF gene into the brain with implications for the treatment of neurological diseases.

  20. Cultivation and identification of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ke; Huang, Mengqi; Shi, Qi; Du, Tianfeng; Cao, Yingguang

    2014-08-01

    Bone marrow‑derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have the potential to form a variety of mesenchymal tissue types, which are a source of cells for bone tissue engineering applications. The present study attempted to establish an effective and convenient method for culturing BMSCs. Total bone marrow cells, which were harvested from rat femurs, were cultured and BMSCs were selected and expanded through passaging in vitro. Furthermore, the biological properties of BMSCs were investigated, specific surface antigen expression was assessed using flow cytometry and the multipotent differentiation potential characteristics were demonstrated using standard in vitro conditions. Monoptychial heterogeneous cells were obtained. A total of 98.4% of cells at passage 3 expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)29 and CD90, but not CD45. The cells were able to differentiate into osteogenic and adipogenic cells. In conclusion, BMSCs that are isolated from the rat bone marrow and exhibit the identified characteristics may be used as seed cells in bone tissue engineering.

  1. Bone Marrow Derived Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Infiltrate Allogeneic and Syngeneic Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Z.; Enjoji, K.; Tigges, J. C.; Toxavidis, V.; Tchipashivili, V.; Gong, W.; Strom, T. B.; Koulmanda, M.

    2015-01-01

    Lineage (CD3e, CD11b, GR1, B220 and Ly-76) negative hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) infiltrate islet allografts within 24 h posttransplantation. In fact, lineagenegative Sca-1+cKit+ (“LSK”) cells, a classic signature for HSCs, were also detected among these graft infiltrating cells. Lineage negative graft infiltrating cells are functionally multi-potential as determined by a standard competitive bone marrow transplant (BMT) assay. By 3 months post-BMT, both CD45.1 congenic, lineage negative HSCs/HPCs and classic “LSK” HSCs purified from islet allograft infiltrating cells, differentiate and repopulate multiple mature blood cell phenotypes in peripheral blood, lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow and thymus of CD45.2 hosts. Interestingly, “LSK” HSCs also rapidly infiltrate syngeneic islet transplants as well as allogeneic cardiac transplants and sham surgery sites. It seems likely that an inflammatory response, not an adaptive immune response to allo-antigen, is responsible for the rapid infiltration of islet and cardiac transplants by biologically active HSCs/HPCs. The pattern of hematopoietic differentiation obtained from graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs, cells that are recovered from inflammatory sites, as noted in the competitive BMT assay, is not precisely the same as that of intra-medullary HSCs. This does not refute the obvious multi-lineage potential of graft infiltrating HSCs/HPCs. PMID:25387427

  2. The Lectin ArtinM Induces Recruitment of Rat Mast Cells from the Bone Marrow to the Peritoneal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Buranello, Patricia Andressa; Moulin, Maria Raquel Isnard; Souza, Devandir Antonio; Jamur, Maria Célia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Oliver, Constance

    2010-01-01

    Background The D-mannose binding lectin ArtinM is known to recruit neutrophils, to degranulate mast cells and may have potential therapeutic applications. However, the effect of ArtinM on mast cell recruitment has not been investigated. Methodology Male Wistar rats were injected i.p. with ArtinM or ConA (control). The ability of the lectin to degranulate peritoneal and mesenteric mast cells was examined. Recruitment of mast cells to the peritoneal cavity and mesentery after ArtinM injection was examined with or without depletion of peritoneal mast cells by distilled water. Results ArtinM degranulated both peritoneal and mesentery mast cells in vitro. Three days after i.p. injection of the lectin there were reduced numbers of mast cells in the peritoneal lavage, while at 7 days post injection of ArtinM, the number of peritoneal mast cells was close to control values. Since immature mast cells are recruited from the bone marrow, the effect of the lectin on bone marrow mast cells was examined. Injection of ArtinM resulted in an increased number of mast cells in the bone marrow. To determine if degranulation of mast cells in the peritoneal cavity was required for the increase in bone marrow mast cells, the peritoneal cavity was depleted of mast cells with ultrapure water. Exposure to ArtinM increased the number of mast cells in the bone marrow of rats depleted of peritoneal mast cells. Conclusions The ArtinM induced recruitment of mast cells from the bone marrow to the peritoneal cavity may partially explain the therapeutic actions of ArtinM. PMID:20339538

  3. Evaluation of hematopoietic cells and myeloid/erythroid ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Haghjoo, Rahil

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the normal hematopoiesis, cellular components and myeloid/erythroid (M/E) ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), bone marrow samples were collected from the proximal tibiotarsus bone of 16 clinically healthy adult pheasant. The bone marrow smears were stained using the Giemsa stain. The results indicated that the development and formation of blood cells in the bone marrow of pheasant were similar to other birds, whereas the morphology of the cells was similar to chickens, ducks, quail, and black-head gull. The mean M/E ratio was 1.24, the mean erythroid percentage was 42.24, the mean myeloid percentage was 52.62, and the mean percentage of all other cells percentage was 5.38. There was no significant difference in any of the cellular composition between male and female.

  4. [Analysis of sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to 5-fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Paiushina, O V; Damaratskaia, E I; Bueverova, E I; Nikonova, T M; Butorina, N N; Molchanova, E A; Starostin, V I

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was compared in vivo and in vitro. Cells from both tissues demonstrated a similar resistance to 5-FU in vitro; however, stromal stem cells from fetal liver proved notably more sensitive to 5-FU compared to marrow CFU-f in vivo. Cells forming colonies of different size were identified in stem cell populations from both tissues. Cells giving rise to small colonies had a higher resistance to 5-FU both in vivo and in vitro.

  5. Prognostic relevance of pretreatment proliferative rapidity of marrow blast cells in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Trerè, D.; Pession, A.; Basso, G.; Rondelli, R.; Masera, G.; Paolucci, G.; Derenzini, M.

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation rate is a well-established prognostic factor in cancer, but it has not been considered to identify the risk group of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) at presentation. We carried out a study to demonstrate the prognostic importance of the rapidity of cell proliferation in patients with ALL. To measure the rapidity of cell proliferation we used the parameter relative to the area of silver-stained nucleolar organiser regions (AgNORs) as evaluated by morphometric analysis on smeared marrow blast cells. The mean AgNOR area of leukaemic marrow cells was measured in 119 children. By using a cut-off value of 3 microns2, we identified a group of 91 children with low proliferating blast activity (mean AgNOR value 2.11 microns2) and a group of 28 children with high proliferating activity (mean AgNOR value 3.29 microns2). The group of patients with a mean AgNOR value > 3 microns2 was characterised by a higher number of deaths, more frequent relapse and shorter time interval to relapse than the group of patients with mean AgNOR value < 3 microns2 (P < 0.01). Multivariate analysis performed to include T-cell immunophenotype, FAB morphology, leucocyte count and presence of mediastinal mass showed that the mean AgNOR value was the only independent predictor of unfavourable event-free survival probability (P > 0.01). Our results indicate that the rapidity of marrow blast cell proliferation is an important prognostic parameter in childhood ALL and should be routinely introduced in the group risk definition. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7981077

  6. Spinal cord injury in rats treated using bone marrow mesenchymal stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Bing; Jia, Quan-Zhang; Li, Dong-Jun; Sun, Jing-Hai; Xi, Shuang; Liu, Li-Ping; Gao, De-Xuan; Jiang, Da-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem-cell transplantation (BMSCs) in repairing acute spinal cord damage in rats and to examine the potential beneficial effects. 192 Wistar rats were randomized into 8 groups. Spinal cord injury was created. Behavior and limb functions were scored. Repairing effects of BMSCs transplantation was evaluated and compared. In vitro 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)-tagged BMSCs were observed, and whether they migrated to the area of spinal cord injury after intravenous tail injection was investigated. The expression of neuron-specific protein (NSE) on BMSCs was examined. Fifteen days after transplantation, the BMSCs-treated groups scored significantly higher in limb function tests than the untreated group. Pathological sections of the bone marrow after operation showed significant recovery in treated groups in comparison to the control group. After transplantation, small amounts of fluorescent-tagged BMSCs can be found in the blood vessels in the area of spinal cord injury, and fluorescent-tagged BMSCs were diffused in extravascular tissues, whereas the DAPI-tagged BMSCs could not be detected,and BrdU/NSE double-labeled cells were found in the injured marrow. BMSCs improve behavioral responses and can repair spinal cord injuries by migrating to the injured area, where they can differentiate into neurons.

  7. Bone Marrow-Infiltrating Human Neuroblastoma Cells Express High Levels of Calprotectin and HLA-G Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Fabio; Stigliani, Sara; Moretti, Stefano; Bonassi, Stefano; Gambini, Claudio; Mazzocco, Katia; Fardin, Paolo; Haupt, Riccardo; Arcamone, Giampaolo; Pistoia, Vito; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Corrias, Maria Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Metastases in the bone marrow (BM) are grim prognostic factors in patients with neuroblastoma (NB). In spite of extensive analysis of primary tumor cells from high- and low-risk NB patients, a characterization of freshly isolated BM-infiltrating metastatic NB cells is still lacking. Our aim was to identify proteins specifically expressed by metastatic NB cells, that may be relevant for prognostic and therapeutic purposes. Sixty-six Italian children over 18 months of age, diagnosed with stage 4 NB, were included in the study. Metastatic NB cells were freshly isolated from patients' BM by positive immunomagnetic bead manipulation using anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody. Gene expression profiles were compared with those obtained from archived NB primary tumors from patients with 5y-follow-up. After validation by RT-qPCR, expression/secretion of the proteins encoded by the up-regulated genes in the BM-infiltrating NB cells was evaluated by flow cytometry and ELISA. Compared to primary tumor cells, BM-infiltrating NB cells down-modulated the expression of CX3CL1, AGT, ATP1A2 mRNAs, whereas they up-regulated several genes commonly expressed by various lineages of BM resident cells. BM-infiltrating NB cells expressed indeed the proteins encoded by the top-ranked genes, S100A8 and A9 (calprotectin), CD177 and CD3, and secreted the CXCL7 chemokine. BM-infiltrating NB cells also expressed CD271 and HLA-G. We have identified proteins specifically expressed by BM-infiltrating NB cells. Among them, calprotectin, a potent inflammatory protein, and HLA-G, endowed with tolerogenic properties facilitating tumor escape from host immune response, may represent novel biomarkers and/or targets for therapeutic intervention in high-risk NB patients. PMID:22253825

  8. Potentiation of osteoclastogenesis by adipogenic conversion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Keisuke; Suzuki, Keiji; Hozumi, Akira; Goto, Hisataka; Tomita, Masato; Koseki, Hironobu; Yamashita, Shunichi; Osaki, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are the indispensable component of the bone marrow, being the common precursors for adipocytes and osteoblasts. We show here that adipogenic differentiation resulted in increase in the production of adipocyte markers, such as adiponectin,fatty-acid binding proteins (FABP4), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), as well as the receptor activator of nuclear-κB ligand (RANKL). Co-culture of osteoclast precursors (OCPs) with BMSCs-derived adipocytes significantly enhanced osteoclast differentiation with low-dose RANKL, whose levels alone could not promote osteoclastogenesis. These results demonstrate for the first time that adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs plays a pivotal role in maintaining bone homeostasis.

  9. Hypermethylation of Wnt antagonist gene promoters and activation of Wnt pathway in myelodysplastic marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Masala, Erico; Valencia, Ana; Buchi, Francesca; Nosi, Daniele; Spinelli, Elena; Gozzini, Antonella; Sassolini, Francesca; Sanna, Alessandro; Zecchi, Sandra; Bosi, Alberto; Santini, Valeria

    2012-10-01

    We observed aberrant gene methylation of Wnt antagonists: sFRP1, sFRP2, sFRP4, sFRP5 and DKK1 in marrow cells of 55 MDS cases. Methylation of Wnt antagonist genes was associated with activation of the Wnt signaling pathway, consistent with the up-regulation of the Wnt downstream genes TCF1 and LEF1. Azacitidine exposure induced demethylation of Wnt-antagonist gene promoters and reduction of the non-phosphorylated β-catenin (NPBC) which is prevalent during Wnt pathway inactivation. Presence of ≥5% of bone marrow blasts was associated with methylation of sFRP1 and DKK1 and with methylation of more than two of the five Wnt antagonist genes.

  10. Proteome Changes of Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by 1,4-Benzoquinone

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is metabolized to hydroquinone in liver and subsequently transported to bone marrow for further oxidization to 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ), which may be related to the leukemia and other blood disorders. In the present study, we investigated the proteome profiles of human primary bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) treated by 1,4-BQ. We identified 32 proteins that were differentially expressed. Two of them, HSP27 and Vimentin, were verified at both mRNA and protein levels and their cellular localization was examined by immunofluorescence. We also found increased mRNA level of RAP1GDS1, a critical factor of metabolism that has been identified as a fusion partner in various hematopoietic malignancies. Therefore, these differentially expressed proteins can play important roles in benzene-mediated hematoxicity. PMID:28119923

  11. Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells Protect Neurons and Modulate Microglia in Cell Culture Models of Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sushil; Yang, Bing; Strong, Roger; Xi, Xiao Pei; Brenneman, Miranda; Grotta, James C.; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Although several studies have provided evidence for the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) in animal models of stroke, the mechanisms underlying their benefits remain largely unknown. We have determined the neuroprotective potential of MNCs in primary neuronal cultures exposed to various injuries in vitro. Methods Cortical neurons in culture were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation, hypoxia, or hydrogen peroxide and cell death was assayed by MTT, caspase-3 activation or TUNEL labelling at 24 hrs. Cultures were randomized to co-treatment with MNC-derived supernatants or media before injury exposure. In separate experiments, macrophage or microglial cultures were exposed to lipopolypolysacharide (LPS) in the presence and absence of MNC-derived supernatants. Neuronal cultures were then exposed to conditioned media derived from activated macrophages or microglia. Cytokines from the supernantants of MNC cultures exposed to normoxia or hypoxia were also estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Results MNC-derived supernatants attenuated neuronal death induced by OGD, hypoxia, hydrogen peroxide, and conditioned macrophage/microglial media and contain a number of trophic factors including IL-10, IGF-1, VEGF, and SDF-1. Conclusion MNCs provide broad neuroprotection against a variety of injuries relevant to stroke. PMID:20629187

  12. Progenitor cells of erythroblasts: an in vitro investigation of erythropoietin-responsive cells of guinea pig bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Rosse, C; Beaufait, D W

    1978-06-01

    The experiments were designed to test whether or not erythroblast progenitor cell function could be demonstrated in a morphological cell type designated as "transitional cells." Two cell fractions, were obtained from the bone marrow of normal and polycythemic guinea pigs. One fraction (F1) was enriched in transitional cells and contained few, if any, other cell types which could be considered as candidates for erythropoietin responsive cells (ERC). The other fraction (F2) contained undifferentiated blast cells as well as transitional cells. The effect of human urinary erythropoiesis stimulating factors (ESF) on heme synthesis was compared in these two fractions by measuring 59Fe incorporation into heme. ESF was more effective in stimulating heme synthesis in guinea pig bone marrow cells than homologous sera obtained from anemic or hypoxic animals. The majority of ERC sedimented in F2, but the stimulation index was comparable in the two fractions. It was confirmed by radioautography that the ESF response in F1 was due to the generation of proerythroblasts and basophilic erythroblasts that incorporated 55Fe. The generation of these cells in F1 was dependent on the addition of ESF to the cultures, whereas 55Fe-labeled erythroblasts were recovered from cultured of F2 not supplemented with ESF. ESF induced a proportion of transitional cells to incorporate 55Fe in both F1 and F2. Transitional cells were the only cell type in which heme synthesis was dependent on ESF. in other cells of clearly nonerythroid morphology (mononuclear phagocytes and reticular cells), 55Fe incorporation occurred independent of ESF. Although the fractionation procedure employed is unsuitable for the separation of ERC from bone marrow, it permitted the enrichment of transitional cells, a cell type defined by morphology. Radioautography with 55Fe identified a proportion of these cells as ERC in both F1 and F2 fractions of bone marrow obtained from normal and polycythemic guinea pigs. Although

  13. Characterization of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akifumi; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Nobukiyo, Asako; Yamaoka, Emi; Hiyama, Eiso

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could be useful for regenerative medicine because they can beharvested easily from the bone marrow of living donors and the cells can be differentiated into adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages in vitro. To apply MSCs for the medical treatment of human diseases as regenerative medicine, detailed experimental characterization of the cells is required. Recently, a New World primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), has been widely used as a new human disease model because of its ease of handling and breeding. Although common marmoset MSCs have been established and will be used in preclinical studies of regenerative medicine, the characteristics of these cells remain unclear. Aiming to characterize common marmoset MSCs further, we harvested common marmoset bone marrow-derived cells (cmBMDCs) from the femurs of newborn males. We revealed that the morphology of the cells was similar to common marmoset fibroblasts, and extracellular matrix components, such as gelatin and fibronectin, were effective for their proliferation and formation of colony-forming unit fibroblasts. Furthermore, we were able to differentiate cmBMDCs into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro, and they expressed the MSCmarkers CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105, but their expression decreased with increasing passage number. The data demonstrate that cmBMDCs exhibit characteristics of MSCs and thus it would be beneficial to use these cells in preclinical studies.

  14. Bone marrow-derived stem cell transplantation for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fotino, Carmen; Ricordi, Camillo; Lauriola, Vincenzo; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Pileggi, Antonello

    2010-01-01

    The bone marrow is an invaluable source of adult pluripotent stem cells, as it gives rise to hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and mesenchymal cells, amongst others. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMC) transplantation (BMT) may be of assistance in achieving tissue repair and regeneration, as well as in modulating immune responses in the context of autoimmunity and transplantation. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effects of BMC to preserve functional beta-cell mass in subjects with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and to favor engraftment and survival of transplanted islets. Additional trials are evaluating the impact of BMT (i.e., mesenchymal stem cells) on the progression of diabetes complications. This article reviews the progress in the field of BMC for the treatment of subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes, and summarizes clinical data of pilot studies performed over the last two decades at our research center by combining allogeneic islet transplantation with donor-specific BMC. Clinical data is summarized from pilot studies performed at our research center over the last two decades.

  15. Comparison of manual and automated cultures of bone marrow stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Asako; Ichimura, Masaki; Tone, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Masaru; Inoue, Minoru; Tojo, Arinobu; Kagami, Hideaki

    2015-11-01

    The development of an automated cell culture system would allow stable and economical cell processing for wider clinical applications in the field of regenerative medicine. However, it is crucial to determine whether the cells obtained by automated culture are comparable to those generated by manual culture. In the present study, we focused on the primary culture process of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) for bone tissue engineering and investigated the feasibility of its automation using a commercially available automated cell culture system in a clinical setting. A comparison of the harvested BMSCs from manual and automated cultures using clinically acceptable protocols showed no differences in cell yields, viabilities, surface marker expression profiles, and in vivo osteogenic abilities. Cells cultured with this system also did not show malignant transformation and the automated process was revealed to be safe in terms of microbial contamination. Taken together, the automated procedure described in this report provides an approach to clinical bone tissue engineering.

  16. Quality of harvest and role of cell dose in unrelated bone marrow transplantation: an Italian Bone Marrow Donor Registry-Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo Study.

    PubMed

    Fagioli, Franca; Quarello, Paola; Pollichieni, Simona; Lamparelli, Teresa; Berger, Massimo; Benedetti, Fabio; Barat, Veronica; Marciano, Renato; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Sacchi, Nicoletta

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the factors affecting cell dose harvest and the role of cell dose on outcome. We analysed data from a cohort of 703 patients who underwent unrelated bone marrow transplantation facilitated by IBMDR in GITMO centers between 2002 and 2008. The median-infused cell doses is 3.7 × 10(8)/kg, the correlation between the nucleated cells requested from transplant centers and those harvested by collection centers was adequate. A harvested/requested cells ratio lower than 0.5 was observed only in 3% of harvests. A volume of harvested marrow higher than the median value of 1270 ml was related to a significant lower infused cell dose (χ(2): 44.4; P < 0.001). No patient- or donor-related variables significantly influenced the cell dose except for the recipient younger age (χ(2): 95.7; P < 0.001) and non-malignant diseases (χ(2): 33.8; P < 0.001). The cell dose resulted an independent predictor factor for a better outcome in patients affected by non-malignant disease (P = 0.05) while early disease malignant patients receiving a lower cell dose showed a higher risk of relapse (P = 0.05).

  17. Enhancement of bone marrow allografts from nude mice into mismatched recipients by T cells void of graft-versus-host activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lapidot, T.; Lubin, I.; Terenzi, A.; Faktorowich, Y.; Erlich, P.; Reisner, Y. )

    1990-06-01

    Transplantation of 8 x 10(6) C57BL/6-Nu+/Nu+ (nude) bone marrow cells into C3H/HeJ recipients after conditioning with 8 Gy of total body irradiation has resulted in a markedly higher rate of graft rejection or graft failure compared to that found in recipients of normal C57BL/6 or C57BL/6-Bg+/Bg+ (beige) T-cell-depleted bone marrow. Mixing experiments using different numbers of nude bone marrow cells with or without mature thymocytes (unagglutinated by peanut agglutinin) revealed that engraftment of allogeneic T-cell-depleted bone marrow is T-cell dependent. To ensure engraftment, a large inoculum of nude bone marrow must be supplemented with a trace number of donor T cells, whereas a small bone marrow dose from nude donors requires a much larger number of T cells for engraftment. Marked enhancement of donor type chimerism was also found when F1 thymocytes were added to nude bone marrow cells, indicating that the enhancement of bone marrow engraftment by T cells is not only mediated by alloreactivity against residual host cells but may rather be generated by growth factors, the release of which may require specific interactions between T cells and stem cells or between T cells and bone marrow stroma cells.

  18. Generation of Valpha14 NKT cells in vitro from hematopoietic precursors residing in bone marrow and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Michio; Kobayashi, Kumi; Watanabe, Hiroko; Huang, Yi-Ying; Okamoto, Naoki; Kanie, Osamu; Goji, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masumi

    2004-03-01

    We previously reported the generation of Valpha14 invariant TCR+ (Valpha14i) NK1.1+ natural killer T (NKT) cells in the cytokine-activated suspension culture of murine fetal liver cells. In this study, we attempted to apply this finding to the induction of Valpha14i NKT cell differentiation in the culture of hematopoietic precursors residing in bone marrow or peripheral blood. Preferential generation of NKT cells was found in the culture of Thy-1(+)-depleted bone marrow cells in the presence of culture supernatant from Con A-stimulated spleen T cells and a combination of recombinant IL-3, IL-4, IL-7 and GM-CSF. NKT cell development from peripheral blood hematopoietic precursors was induced when they were cultured on stromal cell monolayers prepared from Thy-1(+)-depleted bone marrow or fetal liver cells, suggesting that certain environments derived from hematopoietic organs are required for the induction of NKT cells from precursors in vitro. A significant fraction of NKT cells generated in the culture were positive for staining with CD1-alpha-galactosylceramide tetramer, indicating that Valpha14i NKT cells were the major subset among the NKT cells. The present methods for obtaining NKT cells in the culture of bone marrow or peripheral blood cells are applicable to the treatment of patients suffering from diseases with numerical and functional disorders of NKT cells.

  19. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  20. Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharide induces differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into cardiomyocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X H; Du, H W; Guo, X H; Wang, S W; Zhou, R B; Li, Y; Li, Z B; Zhao, Y S; Zhu, Q L

    2016-10-17

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of Rehmannia glutinosa oligosaccharide (RGO) on differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into cardiomyocyte-like cells . Rat MSCs were isolated, treated, and grouped as follows: RGO treatment group, 5-azacytidine (5-aza) treatment group, RGO + 5-aza treatment group, and control group. Following a four-week induction period, cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels in MSCs were quantified by chemiluminescence, and the levels of myocardial enzymes creatine kinase (CK) and creatine kinase isoenzyme-MB (CK-MB) were measured using a dry chemistry analyzer. The cTnI- and connexin 43 (Cx43)-positive MSC population was identified by immunofluorescence, and expression levels of cTnI and Cx43 were analyzed by western blots. Following induction, cTnI, CK, and CK-MB levels were significantly higher in the RGO + 5-aza group as compared with the RGO and 5-aza groups (P < 0.05). In addition, fluorescence intensity of cTnI and Cx43 was higher in the RGO + 5-aza group as compared with the RGO and 5-aza groups. No cTnI- or Cx43-positive cells were detected in the control group. Western blot analysis further confirmed that cTnI and Cx43 were not expressed in the control group, while cTnI and Cx43 was higher in the RGO + 5-aza group than in the RGO and 5-aza groups. These results suggest that MSCs can be induced by RGO to differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells in vitro, and that RGO in combination with 5-aza enhance differentiation of MSCs.

  1. In Vivo Growing of New Cell Colonies in a Portion of Bone Marrow: Potential Use for Indirect Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manzanedo, Ana; Rodriguez, Fidel; Obeso, Jose A.; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The ability of bone marrow cells (BMCs) to migrate to different organs can be used for indirect cell therapy, a procedure based on the engraftment of therapeutic cells in a different place from where they will finally move to and perform their action and which could be particularly useful for chronic illness where a persistent and long-lasting therapeutic action is required. Thus, establishing a stable colony of engineered BMCs is a requisite for the chronic provision of damaged tissues with engineered cells. Reported here is a procedure for creating such a cell colony in a portion of the bone marrow (BM). The study was performed in C57BL/6j mice and consisted of developing a focal niche in a portion of the bone marrow with focal irradiation so that it could be selectively colonized by BM cells (C57BL/6-FG-VC-GFP mice) injected in the blood stream. Both the arrival of cells coming from the nonirradiated BM (week 1 after irradiation) and the proliferation of cells in the irradiated BM (week 2) prevented the homing of injected cells in the BM niche. However, when BMCs were injected in a time window about 48 h after irradiation they migrated to the BM niche where they established a cell colony able to: 1) survive for a long period of time [the percentage of injected cells increased in the BM from day 30 postinjection (15%) to day 110 postinjection 28%)]; 2) express cell differentiation markers (90% of them were lineage committed 4 weeks after engraftment); and 3) colonize to the blood stream (with 5% and 9% of all blood cells being computed 1 and 3 months after engraftment, respectively). The intravenous injection of BMCs in combination with a previous transitory focal myeloablation is a safe and easy method for creating the long-lasting colony of modified BMCs needed for treating chronic and progressive illness with indirect cell therapy. PMID:26966633

  2. Treatment of Severe Adult Traumatic Brain Injury Using Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, Charles S; Hetz, Robert A; Liao, George P; Aertker, Benjamin M; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Juranek, Jenifer; Savitz, Sean I; Jackson, Margaret L; Romanowska-Pawliczek, Anna M; Triolo, Fabio; Dash, Pramod K; Pedroza, Claudia; Lee, Dean A; Worth, Laura; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Choi, Huimahn A; Holcomb, John B; Kitagawa, Ryan S

    2017-04-01

    Preclinical studies using bone marrow derived cells to treat traumatic brain injury have demonstrated efficacy in terms of blood-brain barrier preservation, neurogenesis, and functional outcomes. Phase 1 clinical trials using bone marrow mononuclear cells infused intravenously in children with severe traumatic brain injury demonstrated safety and potentially a central nervous system structural preservation treatment effect. This study sought to confirm the safety, logistic feasibility, and potential treatment effect size of structural preservation/inflammatory biomarker mitigation in adults to guide Phase 2 clinical trial design. Adults with severe traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale 5-8) and without signs of irreversible brain injury were evaluated for entry into the trial. A dose escalation format was performed in 25 patients: 5 controls, followed 5 patients in each dosing cohort (6, 9, 12 ×10(6) cells/kg body weight), then 5 more controls. Bone marrow harvest, cell processing to isolate the mononuclear fraction, and re-infusion occurred within 48 hours after injury. Patients were monitored for harvest-related hemodynamic changes, infusional toxicity, and adverse events. Outcome measures included magnetic resonance imaging-based measurements of supratentorial and corpus callosal volumes as well as diffusion tensor imaging-based measurements of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity of the corpus callosum and the corticospinal tract at the level of the brainstem at 1 month and 6 months postinjury. Functional and neurocognitive outcomes were measured and correlated with imaging data. Inflammatory cytokine arrays were measured in the plasma pretreatment, posttreatment, and at 1 and 6 month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events. There was a mild pulmonary toxicity of the highest dose that was not clinically significant. Despite the treatment group having greater injury severity, there was structural preservation of critical regions of interest

  3. SCE frequencies induced by ethanol, tequila and brandy in mouse bone marrow cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Piña Calva, A; Madrigal-Bujaidar, E

    1993-01-01

    The genotoxicity of ethanol, tequila and brandy was evaluated by scoring the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) and determining the values of the average generation time (AGT). We studied four dosages of each substance i.p. inoculated into mice. The cytogenetic analysis was performed in bone marrow cells. The results showed that all three substances were weak genotoxicants. Tequila showed the strongest response followed by brandy and ethanol. None of them modified the cell proliferation kinetics as demonstrated by the AGT results.

  4. Successful treatment of refractory acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Müller, B U; Tichelli, A; Passweg, J R; Nissen, C; Wodnar-Filipowicz, A; Gratwohl, A

    1999-06-01

    This case describes a 16-year-old woman treated successfully by a bone marrow transplant from her HLA-identical brother for refractory acquired pure red cell aplasia. Conditioning was as for severe aplastic anaemia with cyclophosphamide 4 x 50 mg/kg and antithymocyte globulin. Complete donor type engraftment at 3 months reversed to full autologous reconstitution at 2 years with normal haemopoiesis. The potential implications on pathogenesis of the disease as well as on treatment of autoimmune disorders by stem cell transplantation are discussed.

  5. Bone marrow niche-mediated survival of leukemia stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia: Yin and Yang

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Carter, Bing Z.; Andreeff, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of circulating immature blasts that exhibit uncontrolled growth, lack the ability to undergo normal differentiation, and have decreased sensitivity to apoptosis. Accumulating evidence shows the bone marrow (BM) niche is critical to the maintenance and retention of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), including leukemia stem cells (LSC), and an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that crosstalk between LSC and the stromal cells associated with this niche greatly influences leukemia initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Undeniably, stromal cells in the BM niche provide a sanctuary in which LSC can acquire a drug-resistant phenotype and thereby evade chemotherapy-induced death. Yin and Yang, the ancient Chinese philosophical concept, vividly portrays the intricate and dynamic interactions between LSC and the BM niche. In fact, LSC-induced microenvironmental reprogramming contributes significantly to leukemogenesis. Thus, identifying the critical signaling pathways involved in these interactions will contribute to target optimization and combinatorial drug treatment strategies to overcome acquired drug resistance and prevent relapse following therapy. In this review, we describe some of the critical signaling pathways mediating BM niche-LSC interaction, including SDF1/CXCL12, Wnt/β-catenin, VCAM/VLA-4/NF-κB, CD44, and hypoxia as a newly-recognized physical determinant of resistance, and outline therapeutic strategies for overcoming these resistance factors. PMID:27458532

  6. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML.

  7. Bone Marrow Derivation of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in Small Intestine Following Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dengqun; Wang, Fengchao; Zou, Zhongmin; Dong, Shiwu; Wang, Junping; Ran, Xinze; Li, Chunxue; Shi, Chunmeng; Su, Yongping

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) in gastrointestinal tract are specialized cells serving as pacemaker cells. The origin of ICCs is currently not fully characterized. In this work, we aimed to study whether bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) could contribute to the origin of ICCs in the muscular plexus of small intestine using GFP-C57BL/6 chimeric mice.Engraftment of BMDCs in the intestine was investigated for GFP expression. GFP positive bone marrow mononuclear cells reached a proportion of 95.65% ± 3.72% at different times in chimerism. Donor-derived cells distributed widely in all the layers of the gastrointestinal tract. There were GFP positive BMDCs in the myenteric plexus, which resembled characteristics of ICCs, including myenteric location, c-Kit positive staining, and ramified morphology. Donor-derived ICCs in the myenteric plexus contributed to a percentage ranging 9.25% ± 4.9% of all the ICCs in the myenteric plexus. In conclusion, here we described that donor-derived BMDCs might differentiate into gastrointestinal ICCs after radiation injury, which provided an alternative source for the origin of the ICCs in the muscular plexus of adult intestine. These results further identified the plasticity of BMDCs and indicated therapeutic implications of BMDCs for the gastrointestinal dysmotility caused by ICCs disorders. PMID:20396598

  8. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D; Matsushima, Glenn K; Tabas, Ira

    2016-12-13

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl(-/-) or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr(-/-) mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis.

  9. The bone marrow niche, stem cells, and leukemia: impact of drugs, chemicals, and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Greim, Helmut; Kaden, Debra A.; Larson, Richard A.; Palermo, Christine M.; Rice, Jerry M.; Ross, David; Snyder, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a unique population of somatic stem cells that can both self-renew for long-term reconstitution of HSCs and differentiate into hematopoietic progenitor cells, which in turn give rise, in a hierarchical manner, to the entire myeloid and lymphoid lineages. The differentiation and maturation of these lineages occurs in the bone marrow niche, a microenvironment that regulates self-renewal, survival, differentiation, and proliferation, with interactions among signaling pathways in the HSCs and the niche required to establish and maintain homeostasis. The accumulation of genetic mutations and cytogenetic abnormalities within cells of the partially differentiated myeloid lineage, particularly as a result of exposure to benzene or cytotoxic anticancer drugs, can give rise to malignancies like acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Better understanding of the mechanisms driving these malignancies and susceptibility factors, both within hematopoietic progenitor cells and cells within the bone marrow niche, may lead to the development of strategies for prevention of occupational and cancer therapy–induced disease. PMID:24495159

  10. Deficiency of AXL in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells Does Not Affect Advanced Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Manikandan; Proto, Jonathan D.; Matsushima, Glenn K.; Tabas, Ira

    2016-01-01

    AXL, a member of the TAM (Tyro3, Axl, MerTK) family of receptors, plays important roles in cell survival, clearance of dead cells (efferocytosis), and suppression of inflammation, which are processes that critically influence atherosclerosis progression. Whereas MerTK deficiency promotes defective efferocytosis, inflammation, and plaque necrosis in advanced murine atherosclerosis, the role of Axl in advanced atherosclerosis progression is not known. Towards this end, bone marrow cells from Axl−/− or wild-type mice were transplanted into lethally irradiated Ldlr−/− mice. These chimeric mice were then fed the Western-type diet (WD) for 17 weeks. We demonstrate that lesional macrophages in WT mice express Axl but that Axl deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells does not affect lesion size, cellularity, necrosis, or inflammatory parameters in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Moreover, apoptosis of lesional cells was unaffected, and we found no evidence of defective lesional efferocytosis. In contrast to previously reported findings with MerTK deficiency, hematopoietic cell-Axl deficiency in WD-fed Ldlr−/− mice does not affect the progression of advanced atherosclerosis or lesional processes associated with TAM receptor signaling. These findings suggest a heretofore unappreciated TAM receptor hierarchy in advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:27958361

  11. Osteoprogenitor cells from bone marrow and cortical bone: understanding how the environment affects their fate.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Bruna; Taraballi, Francesca; Powell, Sebastian; Sung, David; Minardi, Silvia; Ferrari, Mauro; Weiner, Bradley K; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2015-05-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ where skeletal progenitors and hematopoietic cells share and compete for space. Presumptive mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified and harvested from the bone marrow (BM-MSC) and cortical bone fragments (CBF-MSC). In this study, we demonstrate that despite the cells sharing a common ancestor, the differences in the structural properties of the resident tissues affect cell behavior and prime them to react differently to stimuli. Similarly to the bone marrow, the cortical portion of the bone contains a unique subset of cells that stains positively for the common MSC-associated markers. These cells display different multipotent differentiation capability, clonogenic expansion, and immunosuppressive potential. In particular, when compared with BM-MSC, CBF-MSC are bigger in size, show a lower proliferation rate at early passages, have a greater commitment toward the osteogenic lineage, constitutively produce nitric oxide as a mediator for bone remodeling, and more readily respond to proinflammatory cytokines. Our data suggest that the effect of the tissue's microenvironment makes the CBF-MSC a superior candidate in the development of new strategies for bone repair.

  12. Identification of unsuspected PNH-type cells in flow cytometric immunophenotypic analysis of peripheral blood and bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Ronald W; Papiez, Joseph; Lee, Ronald V; Szczarkowski, Wlodek

    2004-07-01

    In this report, the flow cytometric expression patterns for CD14 on monocytic cells and CD16 on granulocytic cells in peripheral blood or bone marrow specimens are illustratedfor 15 patients proven to have a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) phenotype by flow cytometric analysis for CD55 and CD59. The varied clinical manifestations of PNH and its rarity may make it difficult to recognize clinically. As a result, blood or bone marrow samples may be submitted for flow cytometric analysis to exclude bone marrow neoplasia or dysplasia in patients with cytopenias rather than to exclude PNH. This was true in 5 of 15 study cases. Unlike CD55 and CD59, CD14 and/or CD16 are assessed routinely in the flow cytometric analysis of blood and bone marrow samples. Recognition of abnormal patterns of CD14 and CD16 expression might permit the identification of clinically unsuspected PNH by routine flow cytometric analysis.

  13. Periarticular osteopenia in adjuvant induced arthritis: role of interleukin-1 in decreased osteogenic and increased resorptive potential of bone marrow cells.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y; Tanihara, M; Ichikawa, Y; Osanai, A; Nakagawa, M; Ide, M; Mizushima, Y

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To clarify the local osteogenic and bone resorptive potential of periarticular bone in adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA). METHODS--Formation of fibroblast colony forming units (FCFU; osteogenic precursor cells) and osteoclast-like cells in bone marrow culture was studied in AIA rats. Osteoclast-inducing activity in the AIA rat bone marrow was assayed by the addition of the marrow supernatant from rats with AIA to control cultures. Bone mineral density was determined by dual x ray absorptiometry. RESULTS--Marrow from AIA rats and that from animals receiving recombinant human interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta for seven days grew significantly fewer FCFU than control marrow. Formation of osteoclast-like cells was increased in bone marrow cultures from rats with AIA, especially when bone marrow cells were cultured in the presence of marrow supernatant. Formation of resorption lacunae on ivory slices was increased in the marrow cultures from rats with AIA, especially from the right (adjuvant inoculated) tibia. AIA rat marrow supernatant promoted osteoclast-like cell formation in control culture, and this was significantly suppressed by an anti-IL-1 antibody. Rats with AIA showed a significant decrease in the bone mineral density of the periarticular regions of the tibia and femur. CONCLUSION--An uncoupled state in bone resorption-formation linkage, possibly mediated through an increase of IL-1 in the bone marrow, may contribute to the development of periarticular osteopenia in inflammatory arthritis. Images PMID:7632091

  14. Deflazacort increases osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow culture and the ratio of RANKL/OPG mRNA expression in marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, H.; Kang, Y. S.; Hwang, C. S.; Moon, I. K.; Yim, C. H.; Choi, K. H.; Han, K. O.; Jang, H. C.; Yoon, H. K.; Han, I. K.

    2001-01-01

    Information on precise effects of deflazacort on bone cell function, especially osteoclasts, is quite limited. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to test effects of deflazacort on osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow cultures and on the regulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and its ligand (RANKL) mRNA expressions by RT-PCR in the ST2 marrow stromal cells. TRAP-positive mononuclear cells increased after the treatment of deflazacort at 10(-9) to 10(-7) M alone for 6 days in a dose-dependent manner. Number of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells (MNCs) increased significantly with combined treatment of deflazacort at 10(-7) M and 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M compared to that of cultures treated with 1,25-(OH)2D3 alone (p<0.05). Exposure to deflazacort at 10(-7) M in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M in the last 3-day culture had greater stimulatory effect on osteoclast-like cell formation than that of the first 3-day culture did. Deflazacort at 10(-10) -10(-6) M downregulated OPG and upregulated RANKL in mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. These observations suggest that deflazacort stimulate osteoclast precursor in the absence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and enhance differentiation of osteoclasts in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3. These effects are, in part, thought to be mediated by the regulation of the expression of OPG and RANKL mRNA in marrow stromal cells. PMID:11748360

  15. Transplantation of bone marrow derived cells promotes pancreatic islet repair in diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiaodong; Song Lujun; Shen Kuntang; Wang Hongshan; Niu Weixin Qin Xinyu

    2008-06-20

    The transplantation of bone marrow (BM) derived cells to initiate pancreatic regeneration is an attractive but as-yet unrealized strategy. Presently, BM derived cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were transplanted into diabetic mice. Repair of diabetic islets was evidenced by reduction of hyperglycemia, increase in number of islets, and altered pancreatic histology. Cells in the pancreata of recipient mice co-expressed BrdU and insulin. Double staining revealed {beta} cells were in the process of proliferation. BrdU{sup +} insulin{sup -} PDX-1{sup +} cells, Ngn3{sup +} cells and insulin{sup +} glucagon{sup +} cells, which showed stem cells, were also found during {beta}-cell regeneration. The majority of transplanted cells were mobilized to the islet and ductal regions. In recipient pancreas, transplanted cells simultaneously expressed CD34 but did not express insulin, PDX-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pax6, and CD45. It is concluded that BM derived cells especially CD34{sup +} cells can promote repair of pancreatic islets. Moreover, both proliferation of {beta} cells and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells contribute to the regeneration of {beta} cells.

  16. Transplantation of bone marrow derived cells promotes pancreatic islet repair in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaodong; Song, Lujun; Shen, Kuntang; Wang, Hongshan; Niu, Weixin; Qin, Xinyu

    2008-06-20

    The transplantation of bone marrow (BM) derived cells to initiate pancreatic regeneration is an attractive but as-yet unrealized strategy. Presently, BM derived cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were transplanted into diabetic mice. Repair of diabetic islets was evidenced by reduction of hyperglycemia, increase in number of islets, and altered pancreatic histology. Cells in the pancreata of recipient mice co-expressed BrdU and insulin. Double staining revealed beta cells were in the process of proliferation. BrdU(+) insulin(-) PDX-1(+) cells, Ngn3(+) cells and insulin(+) glucagon(+) cells, which showed stem cells, were also found during beta-cell regeneration. The majority of transplanted cells were mobilized to the islet and ductal regions. In recipient pancreas, transplanted cells simultaneously expressed CD34 but did not express insulin, PDX-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pax6, and CD45. It is concluded that BM derived cells especially CD34(+) cells can promote repair of pancreatic islets. Moreover, both proliferation of beta cells and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells contribute to the regeneration of beta cells.

  17. [Role of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Resistance of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors -Review].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wan, Qian; Fang, Li-Jun; Li, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a disease originated from malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorder. In CML, mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) have been changed in the bone marrow microenvironment, which can protect the leukemia cells from apoptosis induced by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) and lead to the resistance to TKI by the secretion of soluble factors, involvement in cell-cell adhesion, and so on. This review mainly focuses on the changes of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in CML, as well as the role and mechanism of MSC in the CML resistance of TKI. The concrete probrems dicussing in this review are role of MSC in bone marrow microenviroment, characteristics of MSC in CML, the related mechanisms of MSC in drug resistance and so on.

  18. A Quiescent, Regeneration-Responsive Tissue Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cell Bone Marrow Niche Model via Magnetic Levitation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Emily Elizabeth Louise; Wheadon, Helen; Lewis, Natasha; Yang, Jingli; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Dalby, Matthew John; Berry, Catherine Cecilia

    2016-09-27

    The bone marrow niche represents a specialized environment that regulates mesenchymal stem cell quiescence and self-renewal, yet fosters stem cell migration and differentiation upon demand. An in vitro model that embodies these features would open up the ability to perform detailed study of stem cell behavior. In this paper we present a simple bone marrow-like niche model, which comprises of nanomagnetically levitated stem cells cultured as multicellular spheroids within a type I collagen gel. The stem cells maintained are nestin positive and remain quiescent until regenerative demand is placed upon them. In response to coculture wounding, they migrate and appropriately differentiate upon engraftment. This tissue engineered regeneration-responsive bone marrow-like niche model will allow for greater understanding of stem cell response to injury and also facilitate as a testing platform for drug candidates in a multiwell plate format.

  19. Effect of human milk on blood and bone marrow cells in a malnourished mice model; comparative study with cow milk.

    PubMed

    García, Isabel; Salva, Susana; Zelaya, Hortensia; Villena, Julio; Agüero, Graciela

    2013-11-01

    We studied the impact of human (HM) and cow (CM) milk on the recovery of blood and bone marrow cells in malnourished mice. Results: both milks normalized serum albumin levels and improved thymus weight. HM was less effective than CM to increase body weight and serum transferrin levels. In contrast, HM was more effective than CM to increase the number of leukocytes and lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Both milks induced an increment in mitotic pool cells in bone marrow and α-naphthyl butyrate esterase positive cells in peripheral blood. They also normalized phagocytic function in blood neutrophils and oxidative burst in peritoneal cells. Conclusion: both milks were equally effective to exert favorable effects on the number of the bone marrow cells and the functions of the blood and peritoneal cells involved in immune response. However, only HM normalized the number of leukocytes and increased the number of neutrophils in peripheral blood.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    HAN, ZHONG-MIN; HUANG, HE-MEI; WANG, FEI-FEI

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) on the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neuron-like cells. Lentiviral vectors carrying the hBDNF gene were used to modify the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The rat BMSCs were isolated, cultured and identified. A lentivirus bearing hBDNF and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) genes was subcultured and used to infect the SD rat BMSCs. The expression of eGFP was observed under a fluorescence microscope to determine the infection rate and growth of the transfected cells. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used to detect the proliferation rate of cells following transfection. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis were used to detect the expression levels of hBDNF. Differentiation of neuron-like cells was induced in vitro and the differentiation rate of the induced neural-like cells was compared with that in control groups and analyzed statistically. In the cultured cells, flow cytometry demonstrated positive expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)90 and CD44, and negative expression of CD34 and CD45. The proliferation rate of the rat BMSCs increased following gene transfection. The expression of hBDNF-eGFP was detected in the BMSCs of the experimental group. The differentiation rate of hBDNF-modified cells into neuron-like cells in the experimental group was higher compared with that in empty plasmid and untransfected negative control groups. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Thus, BDNF gene transfection is able to promote the differentiation of BMSCs into neuron-like cells. BDNF may play an important role in the differentiation of MSCs into neuron-like cells. PMID:25574226

  1. Clastogenic Effects of Glyphosate in Bone Marrow Cells of Swiss Albino Mice

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Srivastava, Smita; Singh, Madhulika; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2009-01-01

    Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine, C3H8NO5P), a herbicide, used to control unwanted annual and perennial plants all over the world. Nevertheless, occupational and environmental exposure to pesticides can pose a threat to nontarget species including human beings. Therefore, in the present study, genotoxic effects of the herbicide glyphosate were analyzed by measuring chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and micronuclei (MN) in bone marrow cells of Swiss albino mice. A single dose of glyphosate was given intraperitoneally (i.p) to the animals at a concentration of 25 and 50 mg/kg b.wt. Animals of positive control group were injected i.p. benzo(a)pyrene (100 mg/kg b.wt., once only), whereas, animals of control (vehicle) group were injected i.p. dimethyl sulfoxide (0.2 mL). Animals from all the groups were sacrificed at sampling times of 24, 48, and 72 hours and their bone marrow was analyzed for cytogenetic and chromosomal damage. Glyphosate treatment significantly increases CAs and MN induction at both treatments and time compared with the vehicle control (P < .05). The cytotoxic effects of glyphosate were also evident, as observed by significant decrease in mitotic index (MI). The present results indicate that glyphosate is clastogenic and cytotoxic to mouse bone marrow. PMID:20107585

  2. Single cell PCR from archival stained bone marrow slides: a method for molecular diagnosis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zanssen, Stefanie

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of isolated single cells is a powerful tool for clarifying issues of cell origin and clonality. Previous reports have described PCR amplifications from total DNA and RNA extracted from archival bone marrow and peripheral blood smears and have also shown the feasibility of amplifications from single cells, microdissected from stained histological sections. In this study, a method is described for performing PCR from morphologically defined single cells isolated from archival May-Gruenwald-Giemsa-stained bone-marrow and blood smears. Using three DNA extraction procedures, the organic lysis showed reproducible high efficiencies of amplifications. With this method, we were able to amplify long range amplicons up to 14.5 kb from mitochondrial DNA as well as PCR products of conventional length. The usability of such products for molecular diagnosis is demonstrated by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)characterization of a mitochondrial disorder. In conclusion, this method has the power to perform molecular diagnosis and characterization of diseases on the single cell level, and should provide valuable information to aid disease treatment and prognosis of hematological disorders.

  3. Direct comparison of progenitor cells derived from adipose, muscle, and bone marrow from wild-type or craniosynostotic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    GM, Cooper; EL, Lensie; JJ, Cray; MR, Bykowski; GE, DeCesare; MA, Smalley; MP, Mooney; PG, Campbell; JE, Losee

    2010-01-01

    Background Reports have identified cells capable of osteogenic differentiation in bone marrow, muscle, and adipose tissues, but there are few direct comparisons of these different cell-types. Also, few have investigated the potential connection between a tissue-specific pathology and cells derived from seemingly unrelated tissues. Here, we compare cells isolated from wild-type rabbits or rabbits with nonsyndromic craniosynostosis, defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. Methods Cells were derived from bone marrow, adipose, and muscle of 10 day-old wild-type rabbits (WT; n=17) or from age-matched rabbits with familial nonsyndromic craniosynostosis (CS; n=18). Cells were stimulated with bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) and alkaline phosphatase expression and cell proliferation were assessed. Results In WT rabbits, cells derived from muscle had more alkaline phosphatase activity than cells derived from either adipose or bone marrow. The cells derived from CS rabbit bone marrow and muscle were significantly more osteogenic than WT. Adipose-derived cells demonstrated no significant differences. While muscle-derived cells were most osteogenic in WT rabbits, bone marrow-derived cells were most osteogenic in CS rabbits. Conclusions Results suggest that cells from different tissues have different potentials for differentiation. Furthermore, cells derived from rabbits with craniosynostosis were different from wild-type derived cells. Interestingly, cells derived from the craniosynostotic rabbits were not uniformly more responsive compared with wild-type cells, suggesting that specific tissue-derived cells may react differently in individuals with craniosynostosis. PMID:20871482

  4. Bone marrow mast cell burden and serum tryptase level as markers of response in patients with systemic mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Sever, Matjaz; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2016-01-01

    Two important response criteria in systemic mastocytosis (SM) are the elimination or reduction in percentage of bone marrow mast cells (MCs) and the reduction of serum tryptase levels. We investigated the accuracy of a single time point reduction of bone marrow MCs and serum tryptase level as response criteria in 50 patients with SM with available serial assessments. Bone marrow MC percentage varied significantly, with an average coefficient of variation (CV) of 65% (range, 6–173%) and 44% of patients having a CV higher than the average. The average CV for serum tryptase level was 19% (range, 0–96%), with 36% of patients having a CV higher than average. These wide variations in bone marrow MC burden and serum tryptase level were independent of the administration of SM-directed therapy, type of therapy or disease subtype. Furthermore, the achievement of a single time point therapy-induced bone marrow complete response (no histological evidence of malignant bone marrow MCs) did not correlate with tryptase level or symptomatic improvement. In conclusion, the value of single measurements of bone marrow MC percentage and serum tryptase level as response criteria in SM is not supported by clinical data. Incorporation of an assessment of the degree in reduction of MCs and tryptase, and assessment of response durability, would make response criteria more clinically meaningful. PMID:23278641

  5. The future for treatment by bone marrow transplantation for adrenoleukodystrophy, metachromatic leukodystrophy, globoid cell leukodystrophy and Hurler syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krivit, W; Lockman, L A; Watkins, P A; Hirsch, J; Shapiro, E G

    1995-01-01

    Within the past decade, bone marrow transplantation has been applied to over 200 patients worldwide with the intention of treating storage diseases. Bone marrow transplantation has provided a method for treatment of adrenoleukodystrophy, metachromatic leukodystrophy, globoid cell leukodystrophy and Hurler syndrome. After engraftment, significant improvement in the clinical course of each of these diseases occurs. Survival data of engrafted patients are superior to those of non-transplanted. Engraftment and the resulting enzymatic reconstitution are concordant. Outcomes based on neuropsychological tests indicate continued maintenance and in some cases increase in cognitive function. Magnetic resonance imaging as well as spectroscopic examinations of the brain provide further evidence that positive changes occur in the central nervous system following long-term engraftment. A better quality of life follows engraftment. Greater gains from use of bone marrow transplantation for these particular storage diseases will occur in the future. Earlier diagnosis will allow bone marrow transplantation in the presymptomatic stage at a younger age, providing an enhancement of positive effects noted from such treatment. At the same time, advances in bone marrow technology will serve to reduce the risk factors involved with the bone marrow transplantation process itself. These two factors taken together will be more than additive in providing benefits from use of bone marrow transplantation.

  6. Regeneration of dental pulp following pulpectomy by fractionated stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Ryo; Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Fukuta, Osamu; Nakashima, Misako

    2012-03-01

    Pulp stem/progenitor cells can induce complete pulp regeneration. However, due to the limited availability of pulp tissue with age, there is a need to examine other sources for fractions of side population (SP) cells. In the present investigation bone marrow and adipose tissues of the same individual were evaluated as alternate sources. Pulp CD31(-) SP cells have higher migration activity and higher expression of angiogenic/neurotrophic factors than bone marrow and adipose CD31(-) SP cells. Adipose tissue CD31(-) SP cell transplantation yielded the same amount of regenerated tissue as pulp derived cells. However, bone marrow CD31(-) SP cell transplantation yielded significantly less regenerated tissue in pulpectomized root canals in dogs. The rate of matrix formation was much higher in adipose CD31(-) SP cell transplantation compared to pulp CD31(-) SP cell transplantation on day 28. Microarray analysis demonstrated similar qualitative and quantitative patterns of mRNA expression characteristic of pulp in the regenerated tissues from all three cell sources. Expression of many angiogenic/neurotrophic factors in the transplanted cells demonstrated trophic effects. Our results demonstrate that bone marrow and adipose CD31(-) SP cells might be suitable alternative cell sources for pulp regeneration.

  7. Middle ear adenomas stain for two cell populations and lack myoepithelial cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lott Limbach, Abberly A; Hoschar, Aaron P; Thompson, Lester D R; Stelow, Edward B; Chute, Deborah J

    2012-09-01

    Middle ear adenomas (MEAs) are benign neoplasms along a spectrum with neuroendocrine neoplasms (carcinoid tumors). Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for myoepithelial markers has not been reported in these tumors. The archives of the Cleveland Clinic, University of Virginia and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology were retrospectively searched for tumors arising within the middle ear with material available for IHC staining. Twelve cases of MEAs, four cases of jugulotympanic paragangliomas (JPGs), 10 cases of ceruminous adenomas (CAs) and four cases of ceruminous adenocarcinomas (CACs) were obtained. IHC staining was performed for smooth muscle actin (SMA), p63, S-100 protein, cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6), and cytokeratin 7 (CK7). The MEAs were positive for: CK7 (92 %, luminal), CK5/6 (92 %, abluminal), p63 (83 %, abluminal), and negative for SMA and S-100 protein. The JPGs were negative for CK7, CK5/6, p63 and SMA; S-100 protein highlighted sustentacular cells. The CAs were positive for: CK7 (100 %, luminal), CK5/6 (100 %, abluminal), S-100 protein (80 %, abluminal), p63 (100 %, abluminal), and SMA (90 %, abluminal). CACs demonstrated two patterns, (1) adenoid cystic carcinoma-type: positive for CK7 (100 %, luminal), CK5/6, S-100 protein, p63, and SMA (all 100 %, abluminal); and (2) conventional-type: CK7 (50 % luminal), and no CK5/6, SMA, S-100 protein, or p63 expression. The IHC profile of MEAs suggests that these tumors harbor at least two cell populations, including luminal and basal cells. However, unlike ceruminous adenomas, MEAs lack true myoepithelial differentiation given the absence of S-100 protein and SMA staining in all cases.

  8. Cytogenetic Effects of 1,1-Dichloroethane in Mice Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patlolla, Babu P.; Patlolla, Anita K.; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2005-01-01

    The major concern for the halogenated compounds is their widespread distribution, in addition to occupational exposures. Several chlorinated alkanes and alkenes were found to induce toxic effects. In this study, we investigated the genotoxic potential of 1,1-dichloroethane in the bone marrow cells obtained from Swiss-Webster mice, using chromosomal aberrations (CA), mitotic index (MI), and micronuclei (MN) formation as toxicological endpoints. Five groups of three male mice each, weighing an average of 24 ± 2 g, were injected intraperitoneally, once with doses of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 mg/kg body weight (BW) of 1,1-dichloroethane dissolved in ethanol. A control group was also made of three animals injected with ethanol (1%) without the chemical. All animals were sacrificed 24 hours after the treatment. Chromosome and micronuclei preparations were obtained from bone marrow cells following standard protocols. Chromatid and chromosome aberrations were investigated in 100 metaphase cells per animal and percent micronuclei frequencies were investigated in 1,000 metaphase cells per animal. 1,1-dichloroethane exposures significantly increased the number of chromosomal aberrations and the frequency of micronucleated cells in the bone marrow cells of Swiss-Webster mice. Percent chromosomal aberrations of 2.67 ± 0.577, 7.66 ± 2.89, 8.33 ± 2.08, 14.67 ± 2.51, 20.3 ± 3.21, 28 ± 3.61; mitotic index of 9.4%, 7.9%, 6.2%, 4.3%, 3.0%, 2.6% and micronuclei frequencies of 3.33 ± 0.7, 7.33 ± 0.9, 8.00 ± 1.0, 11.67 ± 1.2, 15.33 ± 0.7, 18.00 ± 1.7 were recorded for the control, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mg/kg BW respectively; indicating a gradual increase in number of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei formation, with increasing dose of 1,1,-dichloroethane. Our results indicate that 1,1-dichloroethane has a genotoxic potential as measured by the bone marrow CA and MN tests in Swiss-Webster mice. PMID:16705807

  9. Dexamethasone induction of osteoblast mRNAs in rat marrow stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Leboy, P S; Beresford, J N; Devlin, C; Owen, M E

    1991-03-01

    We have examined the ability of dexamethasone, retinoic acid, and vitamin D3 to induce osteogenic differentiation in rat marrow stromal cell cultures by measuring the expression of mRNAs associated with the differentiated osteoblast phenotype as well as analyzing collagen secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity. Marrow cells were cultured for 8 days in primary culture and 8 days in secondary culture, with and without 10 nM dexamethasone or 1 microM retinoic acid. Under all conditions, cultures produced high levels of osteonectin mRNA. Cells grown with dexamethasone in both primary and secondary culture contained elevated alkaline phosphatase mRNA and significant amounts of type I collagen and osteopontin mRNA. Addition of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to these dexamethasone-treated cultures induced expression of osteocalcin mRNA and increased osteopontin mRNA. The levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin mRNAs in Dex/Dex/VitD3 cultures were comparable to those of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cells. Omitting dexamethasone from either primary or secondary culture resulted in significantly less alkaline phosphatase mRNA, little osteopontin mRNA, and no osteocalcin mRNA. Retinoic acid increased alkaline phosphatase activity to a greater extent than did dexamethasone but did not have a parallel effect on the expression of alkaline phosphatase mRNA and induced neither osteopontin or osteocalcin mRNAs. In all conditions, marrow stromal cells synthesized and secreted a mixture of type I and III collagens. However, dexamethasone-treated cells also synthesized an additional collagen type, provisionally identified as type V. The synthesis and secretion of collagens type I and III was decreased by both dexamethasone and retinoic acid. Neither dexamethasone nor retinoic acid induced mRNAs associated with the chondrogenic phenotype. We conclude that dexamethasone, but not retinoic acid, promotes the expression of markers of the

  10. Consistent quantitative gene product expression: #2. Antigen intensities on bone marrow cells are invariant between individuals

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Andrew P.; Eidenschink Brodersen, Lisa; Fritschle, Wayne; Menssen, Andrew J.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Wells, Denise A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Five reference populations in bone marrow specimens were identified by flow cytometry using specific combinations of reagents in order define the variation of gene product expression intensities both within and between individuals. Mature lymphocytes, uncommitted progenitor cells, promyelocytes, mature monocytes and mature neutrophils can be reproducibly identified as distinct clusters of events in heterogeneous, maturing bone marrow specimens. Support Vector Machines were used to identify the reference populations in order to reduce subjective bias in manually defining boundaries of these populations since they were not discretely separated from the remainder of the cells. Reference populations were identified in 50 randomly selected bone marrow aspirates obtained over a period spanning 3 years and 6 months from pediatric patients following chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The quantitative expression of gene products (cell surface antigens) and light scattering characteristics on these stressed specimens were demonstrated to be tightly regulated both within individuals and between individuals. Within an individual most gene products (CD45, CD34, CD14, CD16, CD64, CD33) demonstrated limited variability with a standard deviation of <0.20 log units while CD13 and CD36 exhibited broader variation >0.25 log units. Surprisingly, with the exception of CD33, the variation of the mean intensities of each antigen between individuals was even less than the variation within an individual. These data confirm that the amounts of gene products expressed on normal developing cells are highly regulated but differ in intensities between different lineages and during the maturational pathway of those lineages. The amounts of gene products expressed at specific stages of development of each lineage are a biologic constant with minimal variation within or between individuals. © 2016 The Authors. Cytometry Part A Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  11. Bone marrow-derived cells in the population of spinal microglia after peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Ryoichi; Mikuriya, Satsuki; Tomiyama, Daisuke; Shiratori-Hayashi, Miho; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Kohro, Yuta; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Tsuda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that peripheral nerve injury (PNI) activates spinal microglia that are necessary for neuropathic pain. Recent studies using bone marrow (BM) chimeric mice have reported that after PNI, circulating BM-derived cells infiltrate into the spinal cord and differentiate into microglia-like cells. This raises the possibility that the population of spinal microglia after PNI may be heterogeneous. However, the infiltration of BM cells in the spinal cord remains controversial because of experimental adverse effects of strong irradiation used for generating BM chimeric mice. In this study, we evaluated the PNI-induced spinal infiltration of BM-derived cells not only by irradiation-induced myeloablation with various conditioning regimens, but also by parabiosis and mice with genetically labelled microglia, models without irradiation and BM transplantation. Results obtained from these independent approaches provide compelling evidence indicating little contribution of circulating BM-derived cells to the population of spinal microglia after PNI. PMID:27005516

  12. CURRENT PROTOCOLS IN TOXICOLOGY: Evaluation of toxicity in mouse bone marrow progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ezeh, Peace C.; Xu, Huan; Wang, Shu Chun; Medina, Sebastian; Burchiel, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Development of blood cells through hematopoiesis occurs in the bone marrow (BM), and can be adversely impacted by various substances and/or conditions ranging from known therapeutic, intentionally administered xenobiotics to unintentional food additives and exposure to environmental chemicals. The principles underlying the techniques for evaluating toxicity to BM progenitors (erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid) exploit changes in the normal hematopoietic process, biochemical cell surface and intracellular markers, as well as components of the BM microenvironment. Toxicological investigations following in vivo exposures of mice or in vitro exposures of mouse primary BM cell cultures allow the assessment of the developmental and functional integrity of BM cells, cell population shifts, and adverse biochemical effects due to toxicity. Colony forming unit (CFU) assays and flow cytometry are indispensable techniques in these toxicity studies. PMID:26828331

  13. Haematopoietic ESL-1 enables stem cell proliferation in the bone marrow by limiting TGFβ availability.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Magdalena; Quintana, Juan A; Ligos, José M; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2016-01-08

    The life-long maintenance of haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) critically relies on environmental signals produced by cells that constitute the haematopoietic niche. Here we report a cell-intrinsic mechanism whereby haematopoietic cells limit proliferation within the bone marrow, and show that this pathway is repressed by E-selectin ligand 1 (ESL-1). Mice deficient in ESL-1 display aberrant HSPC quiescence, expansion of the immature pool and reduction in niche size. Remarkably, the traits were transplantable and dominant when mutant and wild-type precursors coexisted in the same environment, but were independent of E-selectin, the vascular receptor for ESL-1. Instead, quiescence is generated by unrestrained production of the cytokine TGFβ by mutant HSPC, and in vivo or in vitro blockade of the cytokine completely restores the homeostatic properties of the haematopoietic niche. These findings reveal that haematopoietic cells, including the more primitive compartment, can actively shape their own environment.

  14. Generation and characterization of bovine bone marrow-derived macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiajia; Xie, Rongxia; Li, Qiaoqiao; Chen, Wuju; Zhang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages, as the forefront of innate immune defense, have an important role in the host responses to mycobacterial infection. Therefore, a stable macrophage cell line is needed for future bovine immune system research on the bacterial infection. In this study, we established a bovine macrophage cell line by introducing the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into bovine bone marrow-derived macrophages (bBMMs). The TERT-bBMMs cells expressed macrophage surface antigen (CD11b, CD282) and upregulated expression of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α in response to bacterial invasion. These results demonstrate that this cell line provide reliable cell model system for future studies on interactions between the bovine macrophages and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  15. Differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells into cells with a neural phenotype: diverse effects of two specific treatments

    PubMed Central

    Scintu, Franca; Reali, Camilla; Pillai, Rita; Badiali, Manuela; Sanna, Maria Adele; Argiolu, Francesca; Ristaldi, Maria Serafina; Sogos, Valeria

    2006-01-01

    Background It has recently been demonstrated that the fate of adult cells is not restricted to their tissues of origin. In particular, it has been shown that bone marrow stem cells can give rise to cells of different tissues, including neural cells, hepatocytes and myocytes, expanding their differentiation potential. Results In order to identify factors able to lead differentiation of stem cells towards cells of neural lineage, we isolated stromal cells from human adult bone marrow (BMSC). Cells were treated with: (1) TPA, forskolin, IBMX, FGF-1 or (2) retinoic acid and 2-mercaptoethanol (BME). Treatment (1) induced differentiation into neuron-like cells within 24 hours, while a longer treatment was required when using retinoic acid and BME. Morphological modifications were more dramatic after treatment (1) compared with treatment (2). In BMSC both treatments induced the expression of neural markers such as NF, GFAP, TUJ-1 and neuron-specific enolase. Moreover, the transcription factor Hes1 increased after both treatments. Conclusion Our study may contribute towards the identification of mechanisms involved in the differentiation of stem cells towards cells of neural lineage. PMID:16483379

  16. Simultaneous concentration of platelets and marrow cells: a simple and useful technique to obtain source cells and growth factors for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Soh; Oyama, Tomoki; Matsuda, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has attracted attention as a safe and cost-effective source of growth factors that stimulate cells to regenerate tissue. Bone marrow aspirate was processed with the same protocol to obtain PRP from peripheral blood. This concentrate contained condensed nucleated bone marrow cells, which are useful for regenerative medicine, as well as condensed platelets. In PRP derived from bone marrow aspirate, the density of platelets and levels of growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta) were the same as in PRP derived from peripheral blood. Condensation of nucleated cells, especially small-sized cells, was confirmed. With a simple and cost-effective technique, source cells and growth factors can be obtained at the same time. This simultaneous concentration of platelets and bone marrow cells has great potential as a source of materials for regenerative medicine.

  17. The effect of deletion of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin receptor EP2, or EP4 in bone marrow cells on osteoclasts induced by mouse mammary cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuhiro; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Kugai, Nobuo; Pilbeam, Carol C; Raisz, Lawrence G

    2003-11-01

    The inducible prostaglandin (PG) synthesis enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is involved in osteoclast (OC) formation in cocultures of mouse mammary cancer cell lines (MMT060562 or BALB/c-MC) and bone marrow cells through production of PGE(2). There are four PGE(2) receptors but only the EP2 and EP4 receptors are reported to be important for OC formation. We have investigated the role of COX-2, EP2 receptor, and EP4 receptor in marrow cells for osteoclastogenesis in cocultures of cancer cells and bone marrow cells. We cocultured cancer cell lines with bone marrow cells from COX-2 knockout (-/-), EP2 -/- or EP4 -/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, an EP4 receptor antagonist (EP4 RA) was added in some cocultures. Disruption of COX-2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with MMT060562, while it abrogated PGE(2) production and OC formation in cocultures with BALB/c-MC. Disruption of the EP2 gene in bone marrow cells had no effect on OC formation in the cocultures, while disruption of the EP4 gene in bone marrow cells abrogated OC formation in the cocultures. Furthermore, EP4 RA suppressed OC formation and prevented the increase in receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) mRNA levels in the cocultures. We conclude that COX-2 in cancer cells is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with MMT060562, while COX-2 in bone marrow cells, not cancer cells, is responsible for PGE(2) and OC production in cocultures with BALB/c-MC, and EP4 receptors are essential for OC formation in both cocultures.

  18. Development and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Bone Marrow Cells in Porous Permeable Titanium Nickelide Implants In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kokorev, O V; Khodorenko, V N; Radkevich, A A; Dambaev, G Ts; Gunter, V E

    2016-08-01

    We studied the structure of porous permeable titanium nickelide used as the scaffold. In vitro population of the porous scaffold with multipotent mesenchymal stem bone marrow cells on days 7, 14, 21, and 28 was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Stage-by-stage histogenesis of the tissues formed from the bone marrow cells in the titanium nickelide scaffold in vivo is described in detail. Using mesenchymal stem cells, we demonstrated that porous permeable titanium nickelide scaffolds are unique incubators for cell cultures applicable for tissue engineering.

  19. Automated morphological analysis of bone marrow cells in microscopic images for diagnosis of leukemia: nucleus-plasma separation and cell classification using a hierarchical tree model of hematopoesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krappe, Sebastian; Wittenberg, Thomas; Haferlach, Torsten; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The morphological differentiation of bone marrow is fundamental for the diagnosis of leukemia. Currently, the counting and classification of the different types of bone marrow cells is done manually under the use of bright field microscopy. This is a time-consuming, subjective, tedious and error-prone process. Furthermore, repeated examinations of a slide may yield intra- and inter-observer variances. For that reason a computer assisted diagnosis system for bone marrow differentiation is pursued. In this work we focus (a) on a new method for the separation of nucleus and plasma parts and (b) on a knowledge-based hierarchical tree classifier for the differentiation of bone marrow cells in 16 different classes. Classification trees are easily interpretable and understandable and provide a classification together with an explanation. Using classification trees, expert knowledge (i.e. knowledge about similar classes and cell lines in the tree model of hematopoiesis) is integrated in the structure of the tree. The proposed segmentation method is evaluated with more than 10,000 manually segmented cells. For the evaluation of the proposed hierarchical classifier more than 140,000 automatically segmented bone marrow cells are used. Future automated solutions for the morphological analysis of bone marrow smears could potentially apply such an approach for the pre-classification of bone marrow cells and thereby shortening the examination time.

  20. Mertk gene expression and photoreceptor outer segment phagocytosis by cultured rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rong-mei; Jin, Ying; Sun, Yu-zhao; Sun, Yi-qian; Zhang, Pei

    2017-01-01

    Background Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are multipotential stem cells that have been used for a broad spectrum of indications. Several investigations have used BM-MSCs to promote photoreceptor survival and suggested that BM-MSCs are a potential source of cell replacement therapy for some forms of retinal degeneration. Purpose To investigate the expression of the MER proto-oncogene, tyrosine kinase (Mertk), involved in the disruption of RPE phagocytosis and the onset of autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in rat BM-MSCs and to compare phagocytosis of the photoreceptor outer segment (POS) by BM-MSCs and RPE cells in vitro. Methods MSCs were isolated from the bone marrow of Brown Norway rats. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT–PCR) and western blot analyses were used to examine the expression of Mertk. The phagocytized POS was detected with double fluorescent labeling, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Results Mertk expression did not differ among the first three passages of BM-MSCs. Mertk gene expression was greater in the BM-MSCs than the RPE cells. Mertk protein expression in the BM-MSCs was similar to that in the RPE cells in the primary passage and was greater than that in the RPE cells in the other two passages. BM-MSCs at the first three passages phagocytized the POS more strongly than the RPE cells. The process of BM-MSC phagocytosis was similar to that of the RPE cells. Conclusions BM-MSCs may be an effective cell source for treating retinal degeneration in terms of phagocytosis of the POS. PMID:28210098

  1. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  2. Blood and marrow transplantation for sickle cell disease: is less more?

    PubMed

    Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Brodsky, Robert A

    2014-11-01

    Blood and marrow transplantation is a curative therapy for patients with sickle cell disease yet this option is seldom used. Clinical studies have shown however that children transplanted for this condition can achieve excellent results. In children with sickle cell disease transplanted following conditioning with busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and anti-thymocyte globulin, cure rates in excess of 80% can be obtained when an HLA-matched sibling is used as the donor. However, the large majority of patients with sickle cell disease will not have such a donor, or will not be able to tolerate high dose conditioning regimens. Therefore novel approaches such as non-myeloablative regimes, and alternative donors such as haploidentical, unrelated, or cord blood grafts are currently being explored in clinical trials. Recent reports on non-myeloablative conditioning (HLA-matched or haploidentical donors) highlight the safety and efficacy of these approaches with low mortality and high efficacy suggesting that in the near future non-myeloablation could be the preferred type of conditioning and donor availability will not be a barrier anymore to proceed to transplant. This review will focus on the results obtained when bone marrow transplants are used to treat sickle cell disease and will discuss the results obtained with these novel approaches.

  3. Effects of spaceflight on rat peripheral blood leukocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichiki, A. T.; Gibson, L. A.; Jago, T. L.; Strickland, K. M.; Johnson, D. L.; Lange, R. D.; Allebban, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The white blood cell (WBC) elements and the bone marrow myeloid progenitor cell populations were analyzed to ascertain adaptation to micro-gravity and subsequent readaptation to 1 G in rats flown on the 14-day Spacelab Life Sciences-2 (SLS-2) mission. Bone marrow cells were harvested from one group of rats killed inflight (FD13) and blood was drawn from three other groups at various times. The WBC level was normal on FD14 with the exception of neutrophilia. On FD13, numbers of colony-forming units-granulocyte (CFU-G), CFU-GM, and CFU-M from flight animals were decreased compared with ground controls when incubated with recombinant rat interleukin-3 (rrIL-3) alone or in combination with recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEpo). On recovery (R + 0), flight rats had decreased numbers of total leukocytes and absolute numbers of lymphocytes and monocytes with elevated neutrophils compared with control rats. They had lower numbers of CD4, CD8, CD2, CD3, and B cells in the peripheral blood but no differences in spleen lymphocytes.

  4. Impaired phagocytosis of apoptotic cells causes accumulation of bone marrow-derived macrophages in aged mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Kim, Hyojung; Kang, Jinku; Yang, Dongki; Kang, Yu-Hoi; Lee, Dae Ho; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Park, Sang Chul; Oh, Byung-Chul

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of tissue macrophages is a significant characteristic of disease-associated chronic inflammation, and facilitates the progression of disease pathology. However, the functional roles of these bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in aging are unclear. Here, we identified age-dependent macrophage accumulation in the bone marrow, showing that aging significantly increases the number of M1 macrophages and impairs polarization of BMDMs. We found that age-related dysregulation of BMDMs is associated with abnormal overexpression of the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. BMDM dysregulation in aging impairs the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and genes involved in B-cell maturation and activation. Phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by BMDMs was reduced because of low expression of phagocytic receptor CD14, indicating that increased apoptotic cells may result from defective phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in the BM of aged mice. Therefore, CD14 may represent a promising target for preventing BMDM dysregulation, and macrophage accumulation may provide diagnostic and therapeutic clues. PMID:27866511

  5. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of feline bone marrow cells and haematopoietic progenitor cells using anti-human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Araghi, Atefeh; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Atyabi, Nahid; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Mohammadi, Elham

    2014-04-01

    There is a paucity of species-specific antibodies available for feline haematopoietic conditions. The purpose of this study was to broaden the panel of antibodies available for use in the immunophenotypic characterisation of feline haematopoietic cells by testing clones of anti-human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on normal, neoplastic and cultured feline haematopoietic progenitors to determine cross-reactivity to feline counterparts. In this study, 24 clones of anti-human mAbs were tested on normal or neoplastic feline bone marrow and peripheral blood cells. Six of these mAbs, including anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)61, anti-CD18, anti-CD14, anti-CD235a, anti-CD41 and anti-CD29, cross-reacted with normal feline bone marrow cells, whereas anti-CD33 and anti-CD117 cross-reacted with the blast cells in the bone marrow of two cats with myelodysplastic syndrome, and anti-CD71, anti-235a, anti-41 and anti-42 cross-reacted with immature erythroid cells in a cat with erythroleukaemia. In a feline immunodeficiency virus-positive cat, bone marrow cells were labelled with anti-CD33, anti-14 and anti-45. Anti-CD18, anti-CD14, anti-CD41 and anti-CD61 also reacted with the peripheral blood cells of the healthy cats. The feline haematopoietic progenitors formed colonies in the methylcellulose-based semisolid medium with significant enrichment of colony-forming unit-granulocyte, monocyte and burst-forming unit-erythroid. A panel of six anti-feline mAbs (anti-CD21-like, anti-T lymphocytes, anti-CD172a, anti-granulocyte, anti-CD45-like and anti-CD18) and eight anti-human antibodies (anti-CD71, anti-CD33, anti-CD235a, anti-CD41, anti-CD61, anti-CD117, anti-CD38 and anti-CD34) were used for the immunophenotypic characterisation of the feline bone marrow progenitors. CD45, CD33, CD235a and CD18 were expressed by the feline haematopoietic progenitor cells, with the highest expression level for CD45.

  6. GM-CSF Grown Bone Marrow Derived Cells Are Composed of Phenotypically Different Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Na, Yi Rang; Jung, Daun; Gu, Gyo Jeong; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has a role in inducing emergency hematopoiesis upon exposure to inflammatory stimuli. Although GM-CSF generated murine bone marrow derived cells have been widely used as macrophages or dendritic cells in research, the exact characteristics of each cell population have not yet been defined. Here we discriminated GM-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs) from dendritic cells (GM-BMDCs) in several criteria. After C57BL/6J mice bone marrow cell culture for 7 days with GM-CSF supplementation, two main populations were observed in the attached cells based on MHCII and F4/80 marker expressions. GM-BMMs had MHCIIlowF4/80high as well as CD11c+CD11bhig