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Sample records for marrow cells lacking

  1. Lack of Genomic Instability in Bone Marrow Cells of SCID Mice Exposed Whole-Body to Low-Dose Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Rithidech, Kanokporn Noy; Udomtanakunchai, Chatchanok; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that high-dose radiation is harmful. However, despite extensive research, assessment of potential health-risks associated with exposure to low-dose radiation (at doses below or equal to 0.1 Gy) is still challenging. Recently, we reported that 0.05 Gy of 137Cs gamma rays (the existing limit for radiation-exposure in the workplace) was incapable of inducing significant in vivo genomic instability (measured by the presence of late-occurring chromosomal damage at 6 months post-irradiation) in bone marrow (BM) cells of two mouse strains, one with constitutively high and one with intermediate levels of the repair enzyme DNA-dependent protein-kinase catalytic-subunit (DNA-PKcs). In this study, we present evidence for a lack of genomic instability in BM cells of the severely combined-immunodeficiency (SCID/J) mouse (which has an extremely low-level of DNA-PKcs activity) exposed whole-body to low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy). Together with our previous report, the data indicate that low-dose radiation (0.05 Gy) is incapable of inducing genomic instability in vivo (regardless of the levels of DNA-PKcs activity of the exposed mice), yet higher doses of radiation (0.1 and 1 Gy) do induce genomic instability in mice with intermediate and extremely low-levels of DNA-PKcs activity (indicating an important role of DNA-PKcs in DNA repair). PMID:23549227

  2. Transdifferentiation of autologous bone marrow cells on a collagen-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold for tissue engineering in complete lack of native urothelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J.; Zeiai, S.; Ekblad, Å.; Nordenskjöld, A.; Hilborn, J.; Götherström, C.; Fossum, M.

    2014-01-01

    Urological reconstructive surgery is sometimes hampered by a lack of tissue. In some cases, autologous urothelial cells (UCs) are not available for cell expansion and ordinary tissue engineering. In these cases, we wanted to explore whether autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow could be used to create urological transplants. MSCs from human bone marrow were cultured in vitro with medium conditioned by normal human UCs or by indirect co-culturing in culture well inserts. Changes in gene expression, protein expression and cell morphology were studied after two weeks using western blot, RT-PCR and immune staining. Cells cultured in standard epithelial growth medium served as controls. Bone marrow MSCs changed their phenotype with respect to growth characteristics and cell morphology, as well as gene and protein expression, to a UC lineage in both culture methods, but not in controls. Urothelial differentiation was also accomplished in human bone marrow MSCs seeded on a three-dimensional poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)–collagen construct. Human MSCs could easily be harvested by bone marrow aspiration and expanded and differentiated into urothelium. Differentiation could take place on a three-dimensional hybrid PCL-reinforced collagen-based scaffold for creation of a tissue-engineered autologous transplant for urological reconstructive surgery. PMID:24789561

  3. Systematic analysis of reportedly distinct populations of multipotent bone marrow-derived stem cells reveals a lack of distinction.

    PubMed

    Lodie, Tracey A; Blickarz, Courtney E; Devarakonda, Tara J; He, Chufa; Dash, Ajeeta B; Clarke, Jennifer; Gleneck, Kristen; Shihabuddin, Lamya; Tubo, Ross

    2002-10-01

    Adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells, having the ability to differentiate into cells of multiple lineages, have been isolated and propagated by varied protocols, including positive (CD105(+))/negative (CD45(-)GlyA(-)) selection with immunomagnetic beads, or direct plating into selective culture media. Each substratum-adherent cell population was subjected to a systematic analysis of their cell surface markers and differentiation potential. In the initial stages of culture, each cell population proliferated slowly, reaching confluence in 10-14 days. Adherent cells proliferated at similar rates whether cultured in serum-free medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor, medium containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS) supplemented with epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, or medium containing 10% FBS alone. Cell surface marker analysis revealed that more than 95% of the cells were positive for CD105/endoglin, a putative mesenchymal stem cell marker, and negative for CD34, CD31, and CD133, markers of hematopoietic, endothelial, and neural stem cells, respectively, regardless of cell isolation and propagation method. CD44 expression was variable, apparently dependent on serum concentration. Functional similarity of the stem cell populations was also observed, with each different cell population expressing the cell type-specific markers beta-tubulin, type II collagen, and desmin, and demonstrating endothelial tube formation when cultured under conditions favoring neural, cartilage, muscle, and endothelial cell differentiation, respectively. On the basis of these data, adult human bone marrow-derived stem cells cultured in adherent monolayer are virtually indistinguishable, both physically and functionally, regardless of the method of isolation or proliferative expansion.

  4. Bone Marrow Derived Kit-positive Cells Colonize the Gut but Fail to Restore Pacemaker Function in Intestines Lacking Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    McCann, Conor J; Hwang, Sung-Jin; Hennig, Grant W; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Several motility disorders are associated with disruption of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), which provide important functions, such as pacemaker activity, mediation of neural inputs and responses to stretch in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Restoration of ICC networks may be therapeutic for GI motor disorders. Recent reports have suggested that Kit+ cells can be restored to the GI tract via bone marrow (BM) transplantation. We tested whether BM derived cells can lead to generation of functional activity in intestines naturally lacking ICC. Methods BM cells from Kit+/copGFP mice, in which ICC are labeled with a green fluorescent protein, were transplanted into W/WV intestines, lacking ICC. After 12 weeks the presence of ICC was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and functional analysis of electrical behavior and contractile properties. Results After 12 weeks copGFP+ BM derived cells were found within the myenteric region of intestines from W/WV mice, typically populated by ICC. Kit+ cells failed to develop interconnections typical of ICC in the myenteric plexus. The presence of Kit+ cells was verified with Western analysis. BM cells failed to populate the region of the deep muscular plexus where normal ICC density, associated with the deep muscular plexus, is found in W/WV mice. Engraftment of Kit+-BM cells resulted in the development of unitary potentials in transplanted muscles, but slow wave activity failed to develop. Motility analysis showed that intestinal movements in transplanted animals were abnormal and similar to untransplanted W/WV intestines. Conclusions BM derived Kit+ cells colonized the gut after BM transplantation, however these cells failed to develop the morphology and function of mature ICC. PMID:24847840

  5. Successful bone marrow transplantation reveals the lack of endothelial progenitor cells mobilization in a patient with critical limb ischemia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cobellis, G; Botti, C; Taddeo, A; Silvestroni, A; Lillo, S; Da Ponte, A; Villa, M L; Sica, V; Della Bella, S

    2010-09-01

    Restoring blood flow to ischemic tissue is a prerequisite for treatment of ischemic diseases. Cell-based therapy based on bone marrow transplantation is a promising option for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). The efficacy of cell therapies to augment neovascularization seems to involve endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs); however, the mechanisms underlying the efficacy have not been fully elucidated. Herein we have described the case of a young patient with severe CLI, who experienced a 24-month beneficial clinical response to autologous bone marrow transplantation. The exceptional amelioration enabled him to perform standardized maximal treadmill exercise test that demonstrated lack of exercise-induced EPC mobilization, despite adequate stromal-derived factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor responses. Therefore, tissue ischemia is not sufficient to promote the recruitment of EPCs that have been demonstrated to be involved in the recovery from ischemia. The local implantation of marrow-derived elements may provide cells and/or trophic factors, which have the capacity to augment angiogenesis, opening new approaches to the etiopathogenesis of the disease. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lack of estrogen down-regulates CXCR4 expression on Treg cells and reduces Treg cell population in bone marrow in OVX mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, X-L; Duan, X-B; Chen, Z-H; Li, M; Xu, J-S; Ding, G-M

    2015-05-08

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) is the most common metabolic bone disease in women after menopausal. Recent works focused on cross—talk between immune regulation and bone metabolism pathways and suggested Treg cells suppressed bone resorption and osteoclasts (OC) differentiation in bone marrow via cell—cell contact interaction and/or secreting of IL—10 and TGF—beta. In this study, we investigated the impact of estrogen on regulatory T cells (Treg cells) trafficking and staying in bone marrow and we found that a significant reduction of Treg cell population in bone marrow in estrogen deficiency ovariectomied (OVX) mice. We then studied the expressions of chemokines CXCL12/CXCR4 axes, which were critical to Treg cells migration and our data show the expression of CXCR4 on Treg cells was relative with oestrogen in vivo, however, the expression of CXCL12 was not. Furthermore, the loss of trafficking ability of Treg cells in OVX mice was recoverable in our system. These findings may mechanistically explain why Treg cells lose their suppressive functions on the regulation of OC cells and demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for estrogen, which may be critical to the novel therapy in clinical practice of PMO patients.

  7. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Evidence for a donor cell population which increases allogeneic chimerism but which lacks the potential to produce GVHD

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sheard, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of alloengraftment present major obstacles to the application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across complete MHC barriers. The addition of syngeneic T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) to untreated fully allogeneic marrow inocula in lethally irradiated mice has been previously shown to provide protection from GVHD. We have used this model to study the effects of allogeneic T cells on levels of chimerism in recipients of mixed marrow inocula. The results indicate that T cells in allogeneic BM inocula eliminate both coadministered recipient-strain and radioresistant host hematopoietic elements to produce complete allogeneic chimerism without clinical GVHD. To determine the role of GVH reactivity in this phenomenon, we performed similar studies in an F1 into parent combination, in which the genetic potential for GVHD is lacking. The presence of T cells in F1 marrow inocula led to predominant repopulation with F1 lymphocytes in such chimeras, even when coadministered with TCD-recipient-strain BM. These results imply that the ability of allogeneic BM cells removed by T cell depletion to increase levels of allochimerism may be mediated by a population which is distinct from that which produces GVHD. These results may have implications for clinical BM transplantation.

  8. Lack of galectin-3 increases Jagged1/Notch activation in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and promotes dysregulation of T helper cell polarization.

    PubMed

    Fermino, Marise L; Dylon, L Sebastian D; Cecílio, Nerry T; Santos, Sofia N; Toscano, Marta A; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Roque-Barreira, Maria C; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Bernardes, Emerson S

    2016-08-01

    Galectin-3, an endogenous glycan-binding protein, is abundantly expressed at sites of inflammation and immune cell activation. Although this lectin has been implicated in the control of T helper (Th) polarization, the mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous galectin-3 during the course of experimental Leishmania major infection using galectin-3-deficient (Lgals3(-/-)) mice in a BALB/c background and the involvement of Notch signaling pathway in this process. Lgals3(-/-) mice displayed an augmented, although mixed Th1/Th2 responses compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Concomitantly, lymph node and footpad lesion cells from infected Lgals3(-/-) mice showed enhanced levels of Notch signaling components (Notch-1, Jagged1, Jagged2 and Notch target gene Hes-1). Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from uninfected Lgals3(-/-) mice also displayed increased expression of the Notch ligands Delta-like-4 and Jagged1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, activation of Notch signaling in BMDCs upon stimulation with Jagged1 was more pronounced in Lgals3(-/-) BMDCs compared to WT BMDCs; this condition resulted in increased production of IL-6 by Lgals3(-/-) BMDCs. Finally, addition of exogenous galectin-3 to Lgals3(-/-) BMDCs partially reverted the increased sensitivity to Jagged1 stimulation. Our results suggest that endogenous galectin-3 regulates Notch signaling activation in BMDCs and influences polarization of T helper responses, thus increasing susceptibility to L. major infection.

  9. Lack of cardiac nerve sprouting after intramyocardial transplantation of bone marrow-derived stem cells in a swine model of chronic ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Lai, Wing-Hon; Liao, Song-Yan; Siu, Chung-Wah; Yang, Yan-Zong; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2012-06-01

    Previous experimental studies suggested that mesenchymal stem cell transplantation causes cardiac nerve sprouting; however, whether bone marrow (BM)-derived mononuclear cells (MNC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) can also lead to cardiac nerve sprouting and alter gap junction expression remains unclear. We investigated the effect of electroanatomical mapping-guided direct intramyocardial transplantation of BM-MNC (n = 8) and CD31+EPC (n = 8) compared with saline control (n = 8) on cardiac nerve sprouting and gap junction expression in a swine model of chronic ischemic myocardium. At 12 weeks after transplantation, the distribution and density of cardiac nerve sprouting were determined by staining of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and growth associated protein 43(GAP-43) and expression of connexin 43 in the targeted ischemic and remote normal myocardium. After 12 weeks, no animal developed sudden death after the transplantation. There were no significant differences in the number of cells with positive staining of TH and GAP-43 in the ischemic and normal myocardium between three groups. Furthermore, expression of connexin 43 was also similar in the ischemic and normal myocardia in each group of animals (P > 0.05). The results of this study demonstrated that intramyocardial BM-derived MNC or EPC transplantation in a large animal model of chronic myocardial ischemia was not associated with increased cardiac nerve sprouting over the ischemic myocardium.

  10. Lack of Muc1-regulated beta-catenin stability results in aberrant expansion of CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid derived suppressor cells from the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Tze Wei; Bradley, Judy M.; Mukherjee, Pinku; Gendler, Sandra J.

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that inhibit T cell activity and contribute to the immune suppression characteristic of most tumors. We discovered that bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells from the Muc1 knockout (KO) mice differentiated into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs in vitro under GM-CSF and IL-4 signaling. MUC1 is a tumor-associated mucin and its cytoplasmic tail (MUC1-CT) can regulate beta-catenin to promote oncogenesis. Given the importance of beta-catenin in hematopoiesis, we hypothesized that the MUC1 regulation of beta-catenin is important for MDSC development. Our current study shows that the aberrant development of BM progenitors into CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs is dependent on the down regulation of beta-catenin levels that occurs in the absence of Muc1. In light of this, KO mice showed enhanced EL4 tumor growth and were able to better tolerate allogeneic BM185 tumor growth, with an accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the blood and tumor draining lymph nodes. WT mice were able to similarly tolerate allogeneic tumor growth when they were injected with CD11b+Gr1+ cells from tumor-bearing KO mice, suggesting that tolerance of allogeneic tumors is dependent on MDSC-mediated immune suppression. This further delineates the ability of Muc1 to control MDSC development which could directly impact tumorigenesis. Knowledge of the biology by which Muc1 regulates the development of myeloid progenitors into MDSCs would also be very useful in enhancing the efficacy of cancer vaccines in the face of tumor immune suppression. PMID:19351842

  11. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  12. Bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, Diane S

    2008-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived cells can take on the phenotype of epithelial cells and express epithelial-specific genes in multiple organs. Here, we focus on recent data on the appearance of marrow-derived epithelial cells in the adult lung. These findings have garnered significant skepticism because in most cases marrow-derived epithelial cells are very rare, the marrow cell of origin is not known, the techniques for detection have needed improvement, and there seem to be multiple mechanisms by which this occurs. Recent studies have focused on these concerns. Once these important concerns are addressed, further studies on the function(s) of these cells will need to be performed to determine whether this engraftment has any clinical significance-either beneficial or detrimental.

  13. [Characterization of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide

    Bones support the body as part of the human musculoskeletal system. They also contain bone marrow, which is a site of hematopoiesis. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells play a vital role by regulating skeletal tissue formation and maintaining hematopoiesis. While the presence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells has been indicated, they have yet to be fully understood in vivo. Recent studies using genetic mouse models revealed that perivascular stromal cells function as mesenchymal stem cells, and their differentiation status may vary during the early stage of life to adulthood. Furthermore, studies have investigated the underlying mechanisms that regulate the cell fate decision of mesenchymal stem cells. These findings could lead to the design of new therapeutic approaches for metabolic bone disease and hematopoietic disease.

  14. Bone marrow cells and myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Sheng; Trester, Cathy

    2004-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) plasticity and its clinical application have been studied profoundly in the past few years. Recent investigations indicate that HSC and other bone marrow stem cells can develop into other tissues. Because of the high morbidity and mortality of myocardial infarction and other heart disorders, myocardial regeneration is a good example of the clinical application of HSC plasticity in regenerative medicine. Preclinical studies in animals suggest that the use of this kind of treatment can reconstruct heart blood vessels, muscle, and function. Some clinical study results have been reported in the past 2 years. In 2003, reports of myocardial regeneration treatment increased significantly. Other studies include observations on the cell surface markers of transplanted cells and treatment efficacy. Some investigations, such as HSC testing, have focused on clinical applications using HSC plasticity and bone marrow transplantation to treat different types of disorders. In this review, we focus on the clinical application of bone marrow cells for myocardial regeneration.

  15. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  16. IMMUNOLOGIC MEMORY CELLS OF BONE MARROW ORIGIN

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Harold C.; Cudkowicz, Gustavo

    1972-01-01

    Individual immunocompetent precursor cells of (C57BL/10 x C3H)F1 mouse marrow generate, on transplantation, three to five times more antibody-forming cells localized in recipient spleens during secondary than during primary immune responses. The increased burst size is immunologically specific since antigens of horse and chicken erythrocytes and of Salmonella typhimurium do not cause this effect in marrow cells responsive to sheep red blood cells. Both sensitized and nonsensitized precursors require the helper function of thymus-derived cells and antigen for the final steps of differentiation and maturation. The burst size of primed precursor cells is the same after cooperative interactions with virgin or educated helper cells of thymic origin. The greater potential of these marrow precursors may be attributable to self-replication and migration before differentiation into antibody-forming descendants. In fact, the progeny cells of primed precursor units are distributed among a multiplicity of foci, whereas those of nonimmune precursors are clustered into one focus. The described properties of specifically primed marrow precursors are those underlying immunologic memory. It remains to be established whether memory cells are induced or selected by antigens and whether the thymus plays a role in this process. PMID:4553850

  17. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Roney, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    While much is understood about dendritic cells and their role in the immune system, the study of these cells is critical to gain a more complete understanding of their function. Dendritic cell isolation from mouse body tissues can be difficult and the number of cells isolated small. This protocol describes the growth of large number of dendritic cells from the culture of mouse bone marrow cells. The dendritic cells grown in culture facilitate experiments that may require large number of dendritic cells without great expense or use of large number of mice.

  18. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-06-12

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide.

  19. Neuropeptide Y regulates the hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment and prevents nerve injury in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min Hee; Jin, Hee Kyung; Min, Woo-Kie; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Herzog, Herbert; Enikolopov, Grigori N; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2015-01-01

    Many reports have revealed the importance of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in the control of the bone marrow environment. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process has not been systematically studied. Here we show that NPY-deficient mice have significantly reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) numbers and impaired regeneration in bone marrow due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Furthermore, pharmacological elevation of NPY prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while NPY injection into conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not relieve bone marrow dysfunction. These results indicate that NPY promotes neuroprotection and restores bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy-induced SNS injury through the Y1 receptor in macrophages. They also reveal a new role of NPY as a regulator of the bone marrow microenvironment and highlight the potential therapeutic value of this neuropeptide. PMID:25916827

  20. Evidence for transdifferentiation of human bone marrow-derived stem cells: recent progress and controversies.

    PubMed

    Tao, Helen; Ma, David D F

    2003-02-01

    Adult bone marrow-derived stem cells have traditionally been known as tissue-specific stem cells capable of producing blood cells. This concept is being challenged by a series of recent discoveries. It has been demonstrated that there are heterogeneous stem cell populations in adult bone marrow compartment. Under appropriate experimental conditions, a certain type of bone marrow stem cells appears to differentiate (or transdifferentiate) into a variety of non-haemopoietic cells of ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal origins (such as myocytes, neural cells and hepatocytes). The plasticity, that is, the ability to regenerate cells belonging to different organs and tissues of adult (postnatal) stem cells, has raised the therapeutic possibility of using these stem cells for tissue repair and regeneration. Presently, definitive evidence for plasticity or transdifferentiation of bone marrow stem cells is lacking. Despite controversies concerning the plasticity of bone marrow-derived stem cells, early clinical trials are being conducted in patients suffering from myocardial infarct, arthritic and neurological diseases using autologous bone marrow stem cells. This review summarises recent progresses and controversies in transdifferentiation of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells to non-haemopoietic tissues.

  1. Mobilised bone marrow-derived cells accelerate wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Sun, Yu; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Ji, Shi-Zhao; Han, Shu; Xia, Zhao-Fan

    2013-08-01

    Massive skin defects caused by severe burn and trauma are a clinical challenge to surgeons. Timely and effective wound closure is often hindered by the lack of skin donor site. Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) have been shown to 'differentiate' into multiple tissue cells. In this study we focused on the direct manipulation of endogenous BMDCs, avoiding the immunocompatibility issues and complicated cell isolation, purification, identification and amplification procedures in vitro on wound repair. We found that mobilisation of the BMDCs into the circulation significantly increased the amount of BMDCs at the injury site which in turn accelerated healing of large open wound. We used a chimeric green fluorescent protein (GFP) mouse model to track BMDCs and to investigate their role in full-thickness skin excisional wounds. We have shown that bone marrow mobilisation by granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) exerted multiple beneficial effects on skin repair, both by increasing the engraftment of BMDCs into the skin to differentiate into multiple skin cell types and by upregulating essential cytokine mRNAs critical to wound repair. The potential trophic effects of G-CSF on bone marrow stem cells to accelerate wound healing could have a significant clinical impact.

  2. Role of T cells in sex differences in syngeneic bone marrow transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Raveche, E.S.; Santoro, T.; Brecher, G.; Tjio, J.H.

    1985-11-01

    Transferred marrow cells will proliferate in normal mice not exposed to irradiation or any other type of stem cell depletion when five consecutive transfers of 40 million cells are given. Approximately 25% of the mitotic cells are of male donor origin observed cytogenetically in all of the female recipient spleens and marrow analyzed from two weeks to one and one-half years after transfusions. Male donor stem cells are accepted and form a stable component of the self-renewing stem cell pool. In contrast, only 5% female cells are found in male recipients. This sex difference in engraftment is not hormonal since castration of recipients does not alter the percentage of donor cells. Rigorous T depletion of female donor bone marrow, however, increases the percentage of donor engraftment to the level observed when male marrow, either whole or T depleted, is transferred to female recipients. The success of T-depleted female stem cells to seed male recipients is observed in both C57BL/6 and CBA/J. In addition, recipient nude BALB/c males, which lack a thymus, fail to accept whole bone marrow from BALB/c females. However, male bone marrow cells seed BALB/c nude females. These studies demonstrate that the poor engraftment of female cells in transfused male recipients is abrogated by the removal of T cells from the donor female marrow.

  3. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cell cultivation in vitro on decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Timothy F; French, Samuel W

    2010-02-01

    The in vitro biocompatibility of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix was evaluated. Following a freeze-thaw cycle, sectioned discs of fresh frozen rat metaphyseal bone were sequentially incubated in solutions of hypertonic, then hypotonic Ringer's solution, followed by deoxycholic acid, then DNAase I. The adequacy of decellularization of marrow stroma was examined by light microscopy. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cells were harvested by dispersion of rat long bone marrow, followed by concentration by discontinuous Ficoll-Paque gradient centrifugation. The fibroblastic cells were expanded by in vitro cultivation, and second passage cells were cryopreserved until needed. Cryopreserved marrow stromal cells were applied dropwise to sections of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix, and cultured in BJGb medium with 20% fetal bovine serum for ten days. Mature cultures were formalin fixed, decalcified, and embedded in paraffin. Light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections showed individual spindle cells invading the upper portion of the decellularized extracellular matrix, and also a monolayer of spindle cells on the upper surfaces of exposed trabecular and cortical bone. This experiment showed that decellularized marrow extracellular matrix is a biocompatible three dimensional in vitro substrate for marrow stromal fibroblastic cells.

  4. Cell survival kinetics in peripheral blood and bone marrow during total body irradiation for marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, B.; Andreeff, M.; Li, D.

    1983-11-01

    Cell survival kinetics in both peripheral blood and in bone marrow have been studied over the time course of hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Our unique TBI regimen allows the study of the in vivo radiation effect uncomplicated by prior cyclophosphamide, since this agent is given after TBI in our cytoreduction scheme. Peripheral blood cell concentrations were monitored with conventional laboratory cell counts and differentials. Absolute bone marrow cell concentrations were monitored by measuring cell concentrations in an aspirate sample and correcting for dilution with blood by a cell cycle kinetic method using cytofluorometry. For lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients in remission, the effective D/sub 0/ ranged from 373 rad in 10 children less than or equal to 10 y old, to 536 rad in the four patients between 11 to 17 y old, while n = 1.0 in all groups. There was no trend observed according to age. Granulocytes had a much higher effective D/sub 0/, approximately 1000 rad in vivo. Absolute nucleated cell concentration in marrow dropped slowly initially, due to an increased lymphocyte concentration in marrow during a concurrent drop in lymphocyte concentration in peripheral blood, but eventually fell on the last day of TBI ranging from 7 to 44% of the initial marrow nucleated cell concentration. Marrow myeloid elements, however, dropped continuously throughout the course of TBI.

  5. Bone marrow necrosis and myelophthisis: manifestations of T-cell lymphoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Kelton, Danielle R; Holbrook, Todd C; Gilliam, Lyndi L; Rizzi, Theresa E; Brosnahan, Margaret M; Confer, Anthony W

    2008-12-01

    A 14-year-old spayed American Paint mare was evaluated for mild colic, anorexia, pyrexia, and pancytopenia. Physical examination revealed mild tachycardia, tachypnea, and pale mucous membranes. Serial laboratory analyses revealed progressive pancytopenia, hyperfibrinogenemia, and hyperglobulinemia. A few large atypical cells were observed in peripheral blood smears. Results of tests for equine infectious anemia and antipenicillin antibody were negative. Serum protein electrophoresis indicated a polyclonal gammopathy. Smears of bone marrow aspirates contained hypercellular particles, but cell lines could not be identified because the cells were karyolytic, with pale basophilic smudged nuclei and lack of cellular detail. A diagnosis of bone marrow necrosis was made. Treatment consisted of antimicrobials, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and corticosteroids. The pyrexia resolved; however, the pancytopenia progressively worsened and petechiation and epistaxis developed. The horse was humanely euthanized. Postmortem examination revealed a diffuse round cell neoplasm infiltrating the kidneys, spleen, lymph nodes, lungs, and bone marrow. Immunophenotyping results (CD3+, CD79alpha-) indicated the neoplastic cells were of T-cell lineage. Infiltration of lymphoma cells into the bone marrow appeared to have resulted in severe myelophthisis and bone marrow necrosis. Bone marrow necrosis has been associated previously with lymphoma in humans and dogs. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of lymphoma resulting in bone marrow necrosis in a horse.

  6. Detection of Bone Marrow Derived Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Krause, Diane S.

    2010-01-01

    Studies on the ability of bone marrow derived cells to adopt the morphology and protein expression of epithelial cells in vivo have expanded rapidly over the last decade, and hundreds of publications report that bone marrow derived cells can become epithelial cells of multiple organs including lung, liver, GI tract, skin, pancreas and others. In this review, we critically evaluate the literature related to engraftment of bone marrow derived cells as epithelial cells in the lung. Over 40 manuscripts focused on whether bone marrow cells can differentiate into lung epithelial cells have been published, nearly all of which claim to identify marrow derived epithelial cells. A few investigations have concluded that no such cells are present and that the phenomenon of marrow derived epithelial cells is based on detection artifacts. Here we discuss the problems that exist in published papers identifying marrow derived epithelial cells, and propose standards for detection methods that provide the most definitive data. Identification of BM derived epithelial cells requires reliable and sensitive techniques for their detection, which must include cell identification based on the presence of an epithelial marker and the absence of blood cell markers as well as a marker for donor BM origin. In order for these studies to be rigorous, they must also use approaches to rule out cell overlap by microscopy or single cell isolation. Once these stringent criteria for identification of marrow derived epithelial cells are used universally, then the field can move forward to address the critical questions regarding which bone marrow derived cells are responsible for engraftment as epithelial cells, the mechanisms by which this occurs, whether these cells play a role in normal tissue repair, and whether specific cell subsets can be used for therapeutic benefit. PMID:20447442

  7. The transient appearance of small blastoid cells in the marrow after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S D; Seki, K; Suwa, N; Koama, C; Yamamoto, T; Aiba, K; Maruta, A; Matsuzaki, M; Fukawa, H; Kanamori, H

    1991-08-01

    Of 14 patients who underwent allogeneic or syngeneic bone marrow transplantation, 6 had a transient appearance of small blastoid cells in the bone marrow after transplantation. Most of these patients (11) had leukemia, although 3 had severe aplastic anemia. The cells were 8-18 micron in diameter and had scant cytoplasm and dense nuclei with smooth, homogeneous chromatin. They often had distinct nuclear clefts. These cells constituted 4.0-21.3% of the total number of bone marrow cells. They were not reactive with peroxidase, alpha-naphtyl butylate esterase, naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase, or periodic acid-Schiff stains. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the small blastoid cells expressed terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, Ia-like, CD19, and CD10 antigens and cytoplasmic mu heavy chains, indicating a precursor B-cell phenotype. CD20 antigen was not expressed on these cells. The data suggest that cytoplasmic mu may be expressed earlier than CD20 antigen in the differentiation of B-cell lineage. The morphologic, cytochemical, and immunophenotypic characteristics did not distinguish these nonneoplastic cells distinctly from leukemic lymphoblastic cells. The increase of small blastoid cells was a transient and self-limited phenomenon, in contrast to that of neoplastic blasts. These cells should be recognized as a common component of the bone marrow of marrow transplant recipients. The significance and role of these cells in immune recovery and hematopoiesis remain uncertain.

  8. Factors affecting mesenchymal stromal cells yield from bone marrow aspiration.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wong, Wilfred Hing-Sang; Chan, Shing; Chim, James Chor-San; Cheung, Kenneth Man-Chee; Lee, Tsz-Leung; Au, Wing-Yan; Ha, Shau-Yin; Lie, Albert Kwok-Wei; Lau, Yu-Lung; Liang, Raymond Hin-Suen; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2011-03-01

    This study was to investigate the variables in bone marrow harvesting procedure and individual donor factors which can potentially affect the yield of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). WE DETERMINED THE YIELD OF MSC FROM BONE MARROW UNDER DIFFERENT CLINICAL CONDITIONS BY COMPARING THE MSC COLONY NUMBERS FROM: (1) donors of different ages; (2) healthy donors and patients with leukemia; (3) bone marrow aspirated at different time points during marrow harvesting; (4) bone marrow harvested by different needles. During the process of harvesting, the number of MSC significantly decreased with increase number of aspiration, from 675/ml at the initial decreased to 60/ml after 100 ml bone marrow aspirated, and 50/ml after 200 ml bone marrow aspirated. The number of MSC retrieved from leukemia patients (99/ml bone marrow) was significantly lower than that of healthy donors (708/ml bone marrow). However, there was no significant difference in growth rate. There was no significant age-related difference of MSC yielded from donors <55 years. And there was no significant difference in MSC number between the samples from single end-holed needle and those from multiple-side-hole needle. The optimal bone marrow samples for MSC collection should be obtained earlier in the process of harvesting procedure. Bone marrow from donors <55 years was equally good as MSC sources. The autologous MSC from leukemia patients can be utilized for in-vitro MSC expansion.

  9. Performance of a gravitational marrow separator, multidirectional bone marrow aspiration needle, and repeated bone marrow collections on the production of concentrated bone marrow and separation of mesenchymal stem cells in horses.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Akikazu; Helbig, Holly J; Sanchez-Hodge, Rebekah B; Wellman, Maxey L; Landrigan, Matthew D; Bertone, Alicia L

    2013-06-01

    Objective-To determine the efficiency of a novel point-of-care gravitational marrow separator and bone marrow aspiration needle for concentrated bone marrow production and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) separation and assess the effect of repeated bone marrow collections in horses. Animals-8 healthy adult horses. Procedures-Bone marrow aspiration was performed twice (1 month apart) from sternebral bodies with a standard or prototype multidirectional needle. Concentrated bone marrow was obtained by gravitational marrow separation and evaluated for WBC and platelet counts, automated and cytomorphologic cell differential counts, MSCs, and cell viability. Results-Concentrated bone marrow samples obtained with the marrow separator had 5- to 19-fold bone marrow-derived MSC, WBC, and platelet counts, compared with original bone marrow samples. Use of a multidirectional needle increased the frequency of obtaining MSC-richer concentrated bone marrow. Repeating bone marrow aspiration at 1 month yielded greater MSC numbers but slightly lower cell viability after processing. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-The gravitational bone marrow separator and multidirectional needle were used to effectively harvest bone marrow and improve the quality of concentrated bone marrow. Comparable, or even greater, numbers of bone marrow-derived MSCs were collected by repeated bone marrow aspiration after a 1-month interval from the same aspiration sites. Use of the marrow separator and multidirectional bone marrow aspiration needle can facilitate a 1-step, point-of-care, nonlaboratory method to obtain concentrated bone marrow as a mixture of bone marrow-derived MSCs and growth factors from platelets and plasma.

  10. Role of whole bone marrow, whole bone marrow cultured cells, and mesenchymal stem cells in chronic wound healing.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Shareef, Shahjahan; Salgado, Marcela; Shabbir, Arsalan; Van Badiavas, Evangelos

    2015-03-13

    Recent evidence has shown that bone marrow cells play critical roles during the inflammatory, proliferative and remodeling phases of cutaneous wound healing. Among the bone marrow cells delivered to wounds are stem cells, which can differentiate into multiple tissue-forming cell lineages to effect, healing. Gaining insight into which lineages are most important in accelerating wound healing would be quite valuable in designing therapeutic approaches for difficult to heal wounds. In this report we compared the effect of different bone marrow preparations on established in vitro wound healing assays. The preparations examined were whole bone marrow (WBM), whole bone marrow (long term initiating/hematopoietic based) cultured cells (BMC), and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC). We also applied these bone marrow preparations in two murine models of radiation induced delayed wound healing to determine which had a greater effect on healing. Angiogenesis assays demonstrated that tube formation was stimulated by both WBM and BMC, with WBM having the greatest effect. Scratch wound assays showed higher fibroblast migration at 24, 48, and 72 hours in presence of WBM as compared to BM-MSC. WBM also appeared to stimulate a greater healing response than BMC and BM-MSC in a radiation induced delayed wound healing animal model. These studies promise to help elucidate the role of stem cells during repair of chronic wounds and reveal which cells present in bone marrow might contribute most to the wound healing process.

  11. Mice deficient in 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 lack bone marrow adipocytes, but maintain normal bone formation.

    PubMed

    Justesen, Jeannette; Mosekilde, Lis; Holmes, Megan; Stenderup, Karin; Gasser, Jürg; Mullins, John J; Seckl, Jonathan R; Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) exert potent, but poorly characterized, effects on the skeleton. The cellular activity of GCs is regulated at a prereceptor level by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (11betaHSDs). The type 1 isoform, which predominates in bone, functions as a reductase in intact cells and regenerates active cortisol (corticosterone) from circulating inert 11-keto forms. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of this intracrine activation of GCs on normal bone physiology in vivo using mice deficient in 11betaHSD1 (HSD1(-/-)). The HSD1(-/-) mice exhibited no significant changes in cortical or trabecular bone mass compared with wild-type (Wt) mice. Aged HSD1(-/-) mice showed age-related bone loss similar to that observed in Wt mice. Histomorphometric analysis showed similar bone formation and bone resorption parameters in HSD1(-/-) and Wt mice. However, examination of bone marrow composition revealed a total absence of marrow adipocytes in HSD1(-/-) mice. Cells from Wt and HSD1(-/-) mice exhibited similar growth rates as well as similar levels of production of osteoblastic markers. The adipocyte-forming capacity of in vitro cultured bone marrow stromal cells and trabecular osteoblasts was similar in HSD1(-/-) and Wt mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that 11betaHSD1 amplification of intracellular GC actions in mice may be required for bone marrow adipocyte formation, but not for bone formation. The clinical relevance of this observation remains to be determined.

  12. Efficient conditional gene expression following transplantation of retrovirally transduced bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jie-Yu; Mackay, Fabienne; Alderuccio, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral gene therapy combined with bone marrow stem cell transplantation can be used to generate mice with ectopic gene expression in the bone marrow compartment in a quick and cost effective manner when compared to generating and maintaining transgenic mouse lines. However a limitation of this procedure is the lack of cell specificity in gene expression that is associated with the use of endogenous retroviral promoters. Restricting gene expression to specific cell subsets utilising tissue-specific promoter driven retroviral vectors is a challenge. Here we describe the generation of conditional expression of retrovirally encoded genes in specific bone marrow derived cell lineages utilising a Cre-dependent retroviral vector. By utilising Lck and CD19 restricted Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells, we generate chimeric animals with T or B lymphocyte restricted gene expression respectively. The design of the Cre-dependent retroviral vector enables expression of encoded MOG and GFP genes only in association with Cre mediated DNA inversion. Importantly this strategy does not significantly increase the size of the retroviral vector; as such we are able to generate bone marrow chimeric animals with significantly higher chimerism levels than previous studies utilising Cre-dependent retroviral vectors and Cre transgenic bone marrow stem cells. This demonstrates that the use of Cre-dependent retroviral vectors is able to yield high chimerism levels for experimental use and represent a viable alternative to generating transgenic animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. PRIMARY MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS: ISOLATION AND MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. “MSC” also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSC do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we will describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded byproduct of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We will also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs – both primary and immortalized cell lines. PMID:23959984

  14. Primary marrow-derived stromal cells: isolation and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. "MSC" also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSCs do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded by-product of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs-both primary and immortalized cell lines.

  15. Granule cargo release from bone marrow-derived cells sustains cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Dong, Anping; Ahamed, Jasimuddin; Sunkara, Manjula; Smyth, Susan S

    2014-11-15

    Bone marrow-derived inflammatory cells, including platelets, may contribute to the progression of pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). However, the underlying mechanisms for this are still unclear. One potential mechanism is through release of granule cargo. Unc13-d(Jinx) (Jinx) mice, which lack Munc13-4, a limiting factor in vesicular priming and fusion, have granule secretion defects in a variety of hematopoietic cells, including platelets. In the current study, we investigated the role of granule secretion in the development of LVH and cardiac remodeling using chimeric mice specifically lacking Munc13-4 in marrow-derived cells. Pressure overload was elicited by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Chimeric mice were created by bone marrow transplantation. Echocardiography, histology staining, immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and mass spectrometry were used to study LVH progression and inflammatory responses. Wild-type (WT) mice that were transplanted with WT bone marrow (WT→WT) and WT mice that received Jinx bone marrow (Jinx→WT) developed LVH and a classic fetal reprogramming response early (7 days) after TAC. However, at late times (5 wk), mice lacking Munc13-4 in bone marrow-derived cells (Jinx→WT) failed to sustain the cardiac hypertrophy observed in WT chimeric mice. No difference in cardiac fibrosis was observed at early or late time points. Reinjection of WT platelets or platelet releasate partially restored cardiac hypertrophy in Jinx chimeric mice. These results suggest that sustained LVH in the setting of pressure overload depends on one or more factors secreted from bone marrow-derived cells, possibly from platelets. Inhibiting granule cargo release may represent a novel target for preventing sustained LVH.

  16. Bone marrow and bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells therapy for the chronically ischemic myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Waksman, Ron; Baffour, Richard

    2003-09-01

    Bone marrow stem cells have been shown to differentiate into various phenotypes including cardiomyocytes, vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle. Bone marrow stem cells are mobilized and home in to areas of injured myocardium where they are involved in tissue repair. In addition, bone marrow secretes multiple growth factors, which are essential for angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. In some patients, these processes are not enough to avert clinical symptoms of ischemic disease. Therefore, in vivo administration of an adequate number of stem cells would be a significant therapeutic advance. Unfractionated bone marrow derived mononuclear stem cells, which contain both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells may be more appropriate for cell therapy. Studies in animal models suggest that implantation of different types of stem cells improve angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, tissue perfusion as well as left ventricular function. Several unanswered questions remain. For example, the optimal delivery approach, dosage and timing of the administration of cell therapy as well as durability of improvements need to be studied. Early clinical studies have demonstrated safety and feasibility of various cell therapies in ischemic disease. Randomized, double blind and placebo-controlled clinical trials need to be completed to determine the effectiveness of stem cell.

  17. Memory T-cell competition for bone marrow seeding

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Santoni, Angela

    2003-01-01

    The presence in the bone marrow of memory CD8 T cells is well recognized. However, it is still largely unclear how T-cell migration from the lymphoid periphery to the bone marrow is regulated. In the present report, we show that antigen-specific CD4 T cells, as well as antigen-specific CD8 T cells, localize to the bone marrow of immunized mice, and are sustained there over long periods of time. To investigate the rules governing T-cell migration to the bone marrow, we generated chimeric mice in which the lymphoid periphery contained two genetically or phenotypically distinct groups of T cells, one of which was identical to the host. We then examined whether a distinct type of T cell had an advantage over the others in the colonization of bone marrow. Our results show that whereas ICAM1 and CD18 molecules are both involved in homing to lymph nodes, neither is crucial for T-cell bone marrow colonization. We also observed that memory-phenotype CD44high T cells, but not virgin-type CD44−/low T cells, preferentially home to the bone marrow upon adoptive transfer to normal young mice, but not to thymectomized old recipients where an existing memory T-cell pool precludes their free access. Thus, T-cell colonization of the bone marrow uses distinct molecules from those implicated in lymph node homing, and is regulated both by the properties of the T cell and by the competitive efficacy of other T cells inhabiting the same, saturable niche. This implies that the homing potential of an individual lymphocyte is not merely an intrinsic property of the cell, but rather a property of the lymphoid system taken as a whole. PMID:12603595

  18. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. III. Characterization of allogeneic bone marrow cell populations that increase allogeneic chimerism independently of graft-vs-host disease in mixed marrow recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Chester, C.H.; Sundt, T.M.; Romick, M.L.; Hoyles, K.A.; Sachs, D.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease vs failure of alloengraftment severely limit the success of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a therapeutic modality. We have recently used a murine bone marrow transplantation model involving reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with mixtures of allogeneic and syngeneic marrow to demonstrate that an allogeneic bone marrow subpopulation, removed by T cell depletion with rabbit anti-mouse brain serum and complement (RAMB/C), is capable of increasing levels of allogeneic chimerism. This effect was observed in an F1 into parent genetic combination lacking the potential for graft-vs-host disease, and radiation protection studies suggested that it was not due to depletion of stem cells by RAMB/C. We have now attempted to characterize the cell population responsible for increasing allogeneic chimerism in this model. The results indicate that neither mature T cells nor NK cells are responsible for this activity. However, an assay involving mixed marrow reconstitution in an Ly-5 congenic strain combination was found to be more sensitive to small degrees of stem cell depletion than radiation protection assays using three-fold titrations of bone marrow cells. Using this assay, we were able to detect some degree of stem cell depletion by treatment with RAMB/C, but not with anti-T cell mAb. Nevertheless, if the effects of alloresistance observed in this model are considered, the degree of stem cell depletion detected by such mixing studies in insufficient to account for the effects of RAMB/C depletion on levels of allogeneic chimerism, suggesting that another cell population with this property remains to be identified.

  19. Post-5-fluorouracil human marrow: stem cell characteristics and renewal properties after autologous marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stewart, F M; Temeles, D; Lowry, P; Thraves, T; Grosh, W W; Quesenberry, P J

    1993-05-01

    The effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) pretreatment on human bone marrow (BM) progenitor/stem cells and recovery of hematopoiesis after autologous marrow transplant was studied. Twenty-one patients were treated with 5-FU (15 mg/kg to 45 mg/kg) intravenously (IV) for 1 to 3 days administered 6 to 22 days before BM harvest. Post-FU marrow was infused into 15 patients after high-dose cyclophosphamide, carmustine (BCNU), and VP-16 (CBV). Seventeen patients (historical controls) were treated with CBV and autologous BM transplantation but did not receive 5-FU before marrow harvest. The groups were comparable for diagnosis and prior therapy. In the 5-FU-treated group and control group, median recovery times for platelet count to 50,000/mm3 were 20 and 30 days, respectively (P = .007), and for platelet count to 100,000/mm3, 23 and 38 days, respectively (P = .007), while neutrophil recovery was not significantly altered. In vitro cultures with 1 to 7 growth factors (interleukin-1 [IL-1], IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, colony-stimulating factor-1 [CSF-1], granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], and G-CSF) were performed. In 8 of 10 patients whose marrow was studied before and after 5-FU treatment, the numbers of CFU-C responsive to the combination of GM-CSF and IL-3 was increased 6.15-fold by 5-FU pretreatment. In 4 of these patients, thymidine suicide of GM-CSF- and IL-3-stimulated CFU-C ranged from 17% to 42%. High proliferative potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) was observed in low frequency in normal marrow and patient's marrow before 5-FU treatment. In 11 of 16 patients pretreated with 5-FU, increased numbers of HPP-CFC were noted. GM-CSF and IL-3 interacted synergistically to stimulate HPP-CFC. Multifactor combinations, especially GM-CSF + G-CSF + IL-3 + IL-6 + IL-1 + CSF-1 did not increase total colony count or classic HPP-CFC but did result in altered morphology, producing huge, loose colonies. The marrow from patients pretreated with 5-FU is enriched with

  20. Isolation of a mouse bone marrow population enriched in stem and progenitor cells by centrifugation on a Percoll gradient.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Ana-Maria; Burlacu, Alexandrina

    2010-04-12

    Given the complex composition of bone marrow, a cell separation technique that results in populations enriched in progenitor cells is required for cellular differentiation and transplantation studies. In the present study, we designed a method that allows for the isolation of a progenitor-enriched population of bone marrow by exploiting the physical properties of these cells. Bone marrow aspirate was separated on a discontinuous Percoll gradient (ranging from 1.050 to 1.083 g/cm3) that resulted in the recovery of six cell fractions. The fractions were characterized by FACS and RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analyses and evaluated for their capacity to differentiate into haematopoietic and mesenchymal cells. Fraction IV, including cells with a density of 1.070-1.076 g/ml, contained 11.68% of total bone marrow cells and was enriched in c-kit+ and Sca-1+ (stem cell antigen-1) progenitor cells as compared with total bone marrow. This fraction demonstrated an increase in clonogenic capacity under specific conditions as well as a potential to generate a mesenchymal stem cell culture in a shorter period than that using bone marrow aspirate. Furthermore, this fraction lacked differentiated cell types and contained cells positive for endothelial markers, which further increases its value in cellular transplant. In conclusion, a bone marrow subpopulation that is enriched in progenitor cells and may be valuable in cellular transplant therapy can be isolated by exploiting the physical properties of these cells.

  1. Antibody formation by bone marrow cells in irradiated mice

    PubMed Central

    Playfair, J. H. L.; Purves, Elizabeth C.

    1971-01-01

    Bone marrow-thymus cooperation experiments were carried out in lethally irradiated mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as the antigen and direct plaque-forming cells (PFC) as the end point. Various parameters were altered, with the following results: (1) Above 800 rad, the response by marrow cells alone, as well as the increase due to added thymus cells, was independent of irradiation dose. (2) The response of marrow cells was greatest at high SRBC concentrations, but the co-operative effect of thymus cells was most evident at lower SRBC levels, and completely absent at high levels. (3) Increasing the number of marrow cells, without thymus, gave increasing numbers of PFC, but the dose-response curve did not suggest cell synergism. (4) Thymectomy and antithymocyte serum treatment of host or donor did not prevent the response by marrow cells alone. It was concluded that this was a true IgM response by antibody-forming precursors from the marrow, unaided by thymus-derived cells. PMID:4934135

  2. Cell Fate and Differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jimi, Eijiro

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts and bone marrow adipocytes originate from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and there appears to be a reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis. Alterations in the balance between adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in BMMSCs wherein adipogenesis is increased relative to osteoblastogenesis are associated with decreased bone quality and quantity. Several proteins have been reported to regulate this reciprocal relationship but the exact nature of the signals regulating the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation within the bone marrow space remains to be determined. In this review, we focus on the role of Transducin-Like Enhancer of Split 3 (TLE3), which was recently reported to regulate the balance between osteoblast and adipocyte formation from BMMSCs. We also discuss evidence implicating canonical Wnt signalling, which plays important roles in both adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis, in regulating TLE3 expression. Currently, there is demand for new effective therapies that target the stimulation of osteoblast differentiation to enhance bone formation. We speculate that reducing TLE3 expression or activity in BMMSCs could be a useful approach towards increasing osteoblast numbers and reducing adipogenesis in the bone marrow environment. PMID:27298623

  3. Flow cytometry in the bone marrow evaluation of follicular and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Palacio, C; Acebedo, G; Navarrete, M; Ruiz-Marcellán, C; Sanchez, C; Blanco, A; López, A

    2001-09-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are routinely performed in the staging of patients with lymphoma. Despite the lack of evidence for its usefulness, many institutions include flow cytometry (FC) of bone-marrow aspirates in an attempt to increase sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of FC for the assessment of bone-marrow involvement by lymphoma in follicular (FL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL). Seventy-nine bone marrow biopsies from 65 patients diagnosed with FL or DLBCL were examined to compare histology and FC for the assessment of bone-marrow involvement by lymphoma. Bone marrow histology showed involvement (BM+) in 16 cases (20.3%), lack of infiltration (BM(-)) in 52 cases (65.8%) and undetermined or undiagnosed for involvement (BMu) in 11 cases (13.9%). FC was positive for involvement in 28 cases (35.4%) and negative in 51 cases (64.6%). 65 cases (95%) showed concordance between the results of morphology and FC (BM(+)/FC(+) or BM(-)/FC(-)). No BM(+)/FC(-) cases were observed. 3 cases showed discrepant results (BM(-)/FC(+)). In these 3 cases the molecular studies (PCR) demonstrated clonal rearrangement of the heavy immunoglobulin chain (IgH) and/or bcl2-IgH in agreement with the flow results. Among the 11 cases with BMu, all but 2 were FC(+) and concordance with the PCR results was seen in 9 cases (81.9%). We conclude that FC is just as sensitive or perhaps slightly more sensitive than histology in the detection of bone marrow involvement in FL and DLBCL. FC studies may be warranted in those cases in which the morphology is not diagnosed. The clinical relevance of the small clonal B-cell population in patients without histologic bone marrow involvement (BM(-)/FC(+) cases) remains an open question.

  4. [Bone and Stem Cells. Intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hiroki; Kikuta, Junichi; Ishii, Masaru

    2014-04-01

    Various kinds of cell types, such as osteoclasts, osteoblasts, hematopoietic cells, and mesenchymal cells, have been reported to exist in the bone marrow and communicate with each other. Although there have been many previous studies about bone marrow microenvironment, most of them were analyzed by conventional methods such as histological analysis and flow cytometry. These methods could not observe the dynamic cell movement in living bone marrow. Recently rapid development of fluorescent imaging techniques enables us to understand the cellular dynamics in vivo . That's why we have originally established an advanced imaging system for visualizing living bone tissues with intravital two-photon microscopy. Here we show the latest data and the detailed methodology of intravital imaging of bone marrow microenvironment, and also discuss its further application.

  5. Advances in bone marrow stem cell therapy for retinal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Park, Susanna S; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D; Grant, Maria B; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J; Werner, John S; Nolta, Jan A

    2017-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34(+) cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34(+) cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy.

  6. The separation of a mixture of bone marrow stem cells from tumor cells: an essential step for autologous bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, P.; Wheeler, K.T.; Keng, P.C.; Gregory, P.K.; Croizat, H.

    1981-10-01

    KHT tumor cells were mixed with mouse bone marrow to simulate a sample of bone marrow containing metastatic tumor cells. This mixture was separated into a bone marrow fraction and a tumor cell fraction by centrifugal elutriation. Elutriation did not change the transplantability of the bone marrow stem cells as measured by a spleen colony assay and an in vitro erythroid burst forming unit assay. The tumorogenicity of the KHT cells was similarly unaffected by elutriation. The data showed that bone marrow cells could be purified to less than 1 tumor cell in more than 10/sup 6/ bone marrow cells. Therefore, purification of bone marrow removed prior to lethal radiation-drug combined therapy for subsequent autologous transplantation appears to be feasible using modifications of this method if similar physical differences between human metastatic tumor cells and human bone marrow cells exist. This possibility is presently being explored.

  7. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M. Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R.; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A.; Anversa, Piero

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction. PMID:17965233

  8. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A; Anversa, Piero

    2007-11-06

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction.

  9. Role of neuropeptide Y in the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Hee; Min, Woo-Kie; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) or neurotransmitters in the bone marrow microenvironment has been known to regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions such as self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. However, the specific role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in this process remains relatively unexplored. In this study, we demonstrated that NPY deficient mice have significantly reduced HSC numbers and impaired bone marrow regeneration due to apoptotic destruction of SNS fibers and/or endothelial cells. Moreover, NPY treatment prevented bone marrow impairments in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced SNS injury, while conditional knockout mice lacking the Y1 receptor in macrophages did not restore bone marrow dysfunction in spite of NPY injection. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) secreted by NPY-mediated Y1 receptor stimulation in macrophages plays a key role in neuroprotection and HSC survival in the bone marrow. Therefore, this study reveals a new role of NPY in bone marrow HSC microenvironment, and provides an insight into the therapeutic application of this neuropeptide.

  10. [Modified method for whole bone marrow adherent culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qing; Zhong, Zhao-Dong; Chen, Zhi-Chao; Zou, Ping

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate a more convenient and efficient method to cultivate the human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by means of natural erythrocyte sedimentation principle, based on the whole bone marrow adherent method. The bone marrow was cultured with a six-well plate instead of the flasks.Firstly, the bone marrow specimen was cultivated with the MSC complete medium for 48 h, then the upper RBC-free supernatant layer was drawn and placed into the new wells to isolate MSC. Inverted microscope was used to observe the cell morphology and to record the adherent time of first cell passage, first passaging time. The traditional whole bone marrow adherent method was used as the control. The cell cycle and cell surface markers were detected by flow cytometry,and the differentiative capacity of MSC into osteocyte and adipocyte was identified by alkaline phosphatase kit and oil red O, respectively. Besides, the proliferative curve of P1,P3,P5 of BMSC was depicted by counting method. The results showed that MSC cultured by the modified method highly expressed CD90, CD105, CD13, CD44 and lowly expressed CD14, CD45, CD34. Concerning the cell cycle feature, it was found that most of the cells were in G0/G1 phase (88.76%) , followed by G2/M phase (3.04%) and S phase (8.2%), which was in accordance with stem cell cycle characteristics. The proliferative curve showed a typical "S" type, and both the oil red O and alkaline phosphatase staining of MSC were positive. Compared with the traditional method, the modified method had the advantage of high adherence rate (P = 0.0001) and shorter passaging time for the first passage (P = 0.001), with the statistically significant difference. It is concluded that there is a large number of adherent, active and suspended MSC in the RBC-free supernatant layer after the culture of bone marrow for 48 h. Isolating MSC by the modified method is more convenient and efficient than the traditional whole bone marrow adherent method.

  11. Cells Derived from Young Bone Marrow Alleviate Renal Aging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Rossini, Michele; Ma, Li-Jun; Zuo, Yiqin; Ma, Ji

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells may modulate renal injury, but the effects may depend on the age of the stem cells. Here we investigated whether bone marrow from young mice attenuates renal aging in old mice. We radiated female 12-mo-old 129SvJ mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from either 8-wk-old (young-to-old) or 12-mo-old (old-to-old) male mice. Transfer of young BMC resulted in markedly decreased deposition of collagen IV in the mesangium and less β-galactosidase staining, an indicator of cell senescence. These changes paralleled reduced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), PDGF-B (PDGF-B), the transdifferentiation marker fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), and senescence-associated p16 and p21. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular cells derived from the transplanted BMC did not show β-galactosidase activity, but after 6 mo, there were more FSP-1-expressing bone marrow-derived cells in old-to-old mice compared with young-to-old mice. Young-to-old mice also exhibited higher expression of the anti-aging gene Klotho and less phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor β. Taken together, these data suggest that young bone marrow-derived cells can alleviate renal aging in old mice. Direct parenchymal reconstitution by stem cells, paracrine effects from adjacent cells, and circulating anti-aging molecules may mediate the aging of the kidney. PMID:21965376

  12. Cells derived from young bone marrow alleviate renal aging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Chun; Rossini, Michele; Ma, Li-Jun; Zuo, Yiqin; Ma, Ji; Fogo, Agnes B

    2011-11-01

    Bone marrow-derived stem cells may modulate renal injury, but the effects may depend on the age of the stem cells. Here we investigated whether bone marrow from young mice attenuates renal aging in old mice. We radiated female 12-mo-old 129SvJ mice and reconstituted them with bone marrow cells (BMC) from either 8-wk-old (young-to-old) or 12-mo-old (old-to-old) male mice. Transfer of young BMC resulted in markedly decreased deposition of collagen IV in the mesangium and less β-galactosidase staining, an indicator of cell senescence. These changes paralleled reduced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), PDGF-B (PDGF-B), the transdifferentiation marker fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1), and senescence-associated p16 and p21. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular cells derived from the transplanted BMC did not show β-galactosidase activity, but after 6 mo, there were more FSP-1-expressing bone marrow-derived cells in old-to-old mice compared with young-to-old mice. Young-to-old mice also exhibited higher expression of the anti-aging gene Klotho and less phosphorylation of IGF-1 receptor β. Taken together, these data suggest that young bone marrow-derived cells can alleviate renal aging in old mice. Direct parenchymal reconstitution by stem cells, paracrine effects from adjacent cells, and circulating anti-aging molecules may mediate the aging of the kidney.

  13. Leukemia cells induce changes in human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are multipotent cells that support angiogenesis, wound healing, and immunomodulation. In the hematopoietic niche, they nurture hematopoietic cells, leukemia, tumors and metastasis. BMSCs secrete of a wide range of cytokines, growth factors and matrix proteins which contribute to the pro-tumorigenic marrow microenvironment. The inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α change the BMSC secretome and we hypothesized that factors produced by tumors or leukemia would also affect the BMSC secretome and investigated the interaction of leukemia cells with BMSCs. Methods BMSCs from healthy subjects were co-cultured with three myeloid leukemia cell lines (TF-1, TF-1α and K562) using a trans-well system. Following co-culture, the BMSCs and leukemia cells were analyzed by global gene expression analysis and culture supernatants were analyzed for protein expression. As a control, CD34+ cells were also cocultured with BMSCs. Results Co-culture induced leukemia cell gene expression changes in stem cell pluripotency, TGF-β signaling and carcinoma signaling pathways. BMSCs co-cultured with leukemia cells up-regulated a number of proinflammatory genes including IL-17 signaling-related genes and IL-8 and CCL2 levels were increased in co-culture supernatants. In contrast, purine metabolism, mTOR signaling and EIF2 signaling pathways genes were up-regulated in BMSCs co-cultured with CD34+ cells. Conclusions BMSCs react to the presence of leukemia cells undergoing changes in the cytokine and chemokine secretion profiles. Thus, BMSCs and leukemia cells both contribute to the creation of a competitive niche more favorable for leukemia stem cells. PMID:24304929

  14. Genotoxicity of ibuprofen in mouse bone marrow cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rina; Pancholi, Shyam S; Tripathi, Pankaj

    2012-10-01

    Genotoxicity of ibuprofen was evaluated by employing the mouse in vivo chromosomal aberration (CA) test. Ibuprofen administered orally at doses of 10, 20, 40, and 60 mg/kg body weight to mice resulted in mitotic depression and induction of CAs. A dose-related decrease in mitotic index (MI) and an increase in the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations per cell (CAs/cell) were recorded in bone marrow cells. However, a statistically significant reduction in MI and an increase in CAs/cell were found for both the higher doses. The results obtained indicate that ibuprofen is capable of inducing dose-dependent genotoxicity in bone marrow cells of mice.

  15. Are bone marrow regenerative cells ideal seed cells for the treatment of cerebral ischemia?★

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Hua, Xuming; Hua, Fang; Mao, Wenwei; Wan, Liang; Li, Shiting

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow cells for the treatment of ischemic brain injury may depend on the secretion of a large number of neurotrophic factors. Bone marrow regenerative cells are capable of increasing the secretion of neurotrophic factors. In this study, after tail vein injection of 5-fluorouracil for 7 days, bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells were isolated from the tibias and femurs of rats, and then administered intravenously via the tail vein after focal cerebral ischemia. Immunohistological staining and reverse transcription-PCR detection showed that transplanted bone marrow cells and bone marrow regenerative cells could migrate and survive in the ischemic regions, such as the cortical and striatal infarction zone. These cells promote vascular endothelial cell growth factor mRNA expression in the ischemic marginal zone surrounding the ischemic penumbra of the cortical and striatal infarction zone, and have great advantages in promoting the recovery of neurological function, reducing infarct size and promoting angiogenesis. Bone marrow regenerative cells exhibited stronger neuroprotective effects than bone marrow cells. Our experimental findings indicate that bone marrow regenerative cells are preferable over bone marrow cells for cell therapy for neural regeneration after cerebral ischemia. Their neuroprotective effect is largely due to their ability to induce the secretion of factors that promote vascular regeneration, such as vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:25206414

  16. Cardiomyocyte regeneration from circulating bone marrow cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Yukio; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Migita, Makoto; Hayakawa, Jun; Hayashida, Mari; Uchikoba, Yohko; Fukumi, Daichi; Shimada, Takashi; Ogawa, Shunichi

    2003-09-01

    We investigated the role of circulating bone marrow cells (BMC) in cardiomyocyte regeneration. BMC, isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), were transplanted into lethally irradiated C57BL6 mice. Five weeks after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), flow cytometric analysis for GFP-positive cells confirmed reconstitution of transplanted bone marrow. Bone marrow transplant mice subsequently underwent left coronary artery ligation (myocardial infarction) or sham-operation, and were killed at 1 mo or 3 mo after operation. Infarct size was similar in bone marrow transplant mice at 1 mo (47.1 +/- 5.9%) and at 3 mo (45.3 +/- 7.8%), and echocardiography at 2 and 8 wk revealed decreasing left ventricular function. In infarcted heart, GFP-positive cells that expressed desmin and troponin T-C were identified by confocal microscopy. GFP and troponin T-C double-positive cells were predominantly in the peri-infarcted region (1 mo, 365 +/- 45 cells/50 sections; 3 mo: 458 +/- 100 cells/50 sections; p < 0.05 versus noninfarct, infarct, and sham-operated regions). Furthermore, BMC mobilization and differentiation into cardiomyocytes was found to be complete within 1 mo after myocardial infarction. These results demonstrate that circulating BMC undergo mobilization and differentiation in cardiac cells after myocardial infarction. Future studies are required to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon.

  17. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  18. Parathyroid Hormone Directs Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Hanai, Jun-Ichi; Le, Phuong T; Bi, Ruiye; Maridas, David; DeMambro, Victoria; Figueroa, Carolina A; Kir, Serkan; Zhou, Xuedong; Mannstadt, Michael; Baron, Roland; Bronson, Roderick T; Horowitz, Mark C; Wu, Joy Y; Bilezikian, John P; Dempster, David W; Rosen, Clifford J; Lanske, Beate

    2017-03-07

    Intermittent PTH administration builds bone mass and prevents fractures, but its mechanism of action is unclear. We genetically deleted the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R) in mesenchymal stem cells using Prx1Cre and found low bone formation, increased bone resorption, and high bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT). Bone marrow adipocytes traced to Prx1 and expressed classic adipogenic markers and high receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (Rankl) expression. RANKL levels were also elevated in bone marrow supernatant and serum, but undetectable in other adipose depots. By cell sorting, Pref1(+)RANKL(+) marrow progenitors were twice as great in mutant versus control marrow. Intermittent PTH administration to control mice reduced BMAT significantly. A similar finding was noted in male osteoporotic patients. Thus, marrow adipocytes exhibit osteogenic and adipogenic characteristics, are uniquely responsive to PTH, and secrete RANKL. These studies reveal an important mechanism for PTH's therapeutic action through its ability to direct mesenchymal cell fate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0297 TITLE: Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Raymond J...Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells Stem Cells ’ 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 5b...hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from damage or killing by endogenous aldehydes. Proof-of-concept for these experiments has been developed using isogenic

  20. Histochemistry of blood and bone marrow cells in pangolins.

    PubMed

    Caxton-Martins, A E

    1977-04-01

    Blood and bone marrow cells of pangolins have been examined histochemically. Sudanophilia, PAS positivity and acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase reactivity were confined to cells of the granulocytic and monocytic series, while peroxidase reactivity was confined to cells of the erythroid series. In this latter respect the pangolin is unique among mammals so far studied.

  1. Bone marrow myeloid cells in regulation of multiple myeloma progression.

    PubMed

    Herlihy, Sarah E; Lin, Cindy; Nefedova, Yulia

    2017-08-01

    Survival, growth, and response to chemotherapy of cancer cells depends strongly on the interaction of cancer cells with the tumor microenvironment. In multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells that localizes preferentially in the bone marrow, the microenvironment is highly enriched with myeloid cells. The majority of myeloid cells are represented by mature and immature neutrophils. The contribution of the different myeloid cell populations to tumor progression and chemoresistance in multiple myeloma is discussed.

  2. Effects of Spaceflight on Cells of Bone Marrow Origin

    PubMed Central

    Özçivici, Engin

    2013-01-01

    Once only a subject for science fiction novels, plans for establishing habitation on space stations, the Moon, and distant planets now appear among the short-term goals of space agencies. This article reviews studies that present biomedical issues that appear to challenge humankind for long-term spaceflights. With particularly focus on cells of bone marrow origin, studies involving changes in bone, immune, and red blood cell populations and their functions due to extended weightlessness were reviewed. Furthermore, effects of mechanical disuse on primitive stem cells that reside in the bone marrow were also included in this review. Novel biomedical solutions using space biotechnology will be required in order to achieve the goal of space exploration without compromising the functions of bone marrow, as spaceflight appears to disrupt homeostasis for all given cell types. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385745

  3. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.C.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasng the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-h interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplotype-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  4. Lasting engraftment of histoincompatible bone marrow cells in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Vriesendorp, H.M.; Klapwijk, W.M.; van Kessel, A.M.; Zurcher, C.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    Conditioning protocols were tested for their efficacy in increasing the incidence of engraftment of histoincompatible dog bone marrow cells. Cyclophosphamide and total body irradation (TBI), Corynebacterium parvum and TBI, a 3- or 5-day delayed transfusion of bone marrow cells after TBI, or an increase in the number of donor bone marrow cells or lymphocytes appeared to be ineffective. These protocols were previously reported to promote recovery of splenic hemopoiesis in mice in short-term assays. The noted discrepancy between studies with mice and dogs invalidated allogeneic resistance as measured in the mouse spleen assay as a model for bone marrow allograft rejection. Intravenous treatment with silica particles or L-asparaginase did improve the engraftment rate after 7.5 Gy TBI. Low efficiency and significant extra toxicity restrict the applicability of these procedures. The most promising conditioning schedule found appeared to be two fractions of 6.0 Gy TBI separated by a 72-hr interval. Prolonged survival was noted after transplantation of bone marrow cells from a one-DLA haplo-type-mismatched donor. Possibilities for further improvement of this protocol are discussed.

  5. Efficient generation of canine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Isotani, Mayu; Katsuma, Kensuke; Tamura, Kyoichi; Yamada, Misato; Yagihara, Hiroko; Azakami, Daigo; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2006-08-01

    Because of their unsurpassed potency in presenting antigens to naive T cells, dendritic cells are considered to be an important candidate in the development of immunotherapeutic strategies. Despite the high potential of dendritic cell-based immunotherapy, as a so-called dendritic cell vaccination, few clinical approaches using dendritic cell vaccination have been performed in the dog because of very limited information regarding the generation of canine dendritic cells and their functional properties. We therefore established a protocol for the efficient generation of dendritic cells from canine bone marrow cells using recombinant feline granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and canine interleukin-4. Dendritic cells were generated efficiently: a yield of 1-9 x 10(6) cells per approximately 0.5 ml of canine bone marrow aspiration was achieved. These dendritic cells showed features shared with mouse and human dendritic cells: dendrite morphology, expression of surface markers MHC class II and CD11c, and up-regulation of molecules related to antigen presentation (MHC class II, B7-1, and B7-2) by activation with lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, the dendritic cells demonstrated phagocytic activity, processing activity of pinocytosed proteins, and activation of allogeneic T cells far more potent than that by macrophages. Our findings suggest that the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells are functional for the capturing and processing of antigens and the initiation of T cell responses.

  6. Ventricular arrhythmias following intracoronary bone marrow stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Villa, Adolfo; Sanchez, Pedro L; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco

    2007-12-01

    We describe the appearance of delayed episodes of ventricular arrhythmias in 4 patients out of 72 undergoing intracoronary transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) following ST elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI). Two cases with severely depressed systolic function presented electrical storms with monomorphic sustained ventricular tachycardia (SVT) within 2 to 3 days following cell transplantation, even though there were no periprocedural complications. Both patients were implanted with an internal defibrillator (ICD) after ruling out coronary re-occlusion. The remaining 2 patients presented several asymptomatic episodes of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia within one month following cell transfer. Only one of the latter presented syncopal SVT through programmed ventricular stimulation, undergoing ICD implantation afterwards. Neither new arrhythmic episodes nor ICD interventions have occurred during later follow-up of the three ICD patients (639+/-59 days). Information from large multicenter databases and our historical cohort of STEMI patients indicates that the rate of VT occurring within the first weeks after the initial 48 hours of infarction is significantly lower than that observed in our cell-therapy experience. The lack of information regarding the appearance of malignant arrhythmias in patients with severe systolic dysfunction following this type of therapy after STEMI requires us to be extremely cautious. However, any claim of a mechanism related to cell transfer would be completely speculative with the available data. Therefore, our only aim when reporting our findings is to recommend a short but longer stay (2-3 days) following cell transplantation, particularly in patients with a natural tendency to develop arrhythmic events.

  7. Bones of contention: marrow-derived cells in myocardial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Mark A; Murry, Charles E

    2008-06-01

    Almost 7 years have passed since the initial publication reporting that bone marrow cells regenerate infarcted myocardium. The subsequent years produced hundreds of investigations that ran the gamut of findings from validation to disproof. Undeterred by the concurrent debate, clinical trials ensued to test the safety and efficacy of bone marrow-derived cell population for autologous therapy in clinical treatment of myocardial disease. In the following conversational exchange, two scientists with distinct perspectives weigh the pros and cons of pursuing bone marrow stem cell therapy and look toward finding a consensus of where the future lies for regenerative medicine and the heart. The conclusion is that the two camps may not be as far apart as it may seem from the rancor in literature and at meetings, and the potential of one day achieving regenerative therapy is indeed a vision that both parties enthusiastically share.

  8. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-12-09

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats.

  9. Unlocking bat immunology: establishment of Pteropus alecto bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Chionh, Yok Teng; Irac, Sergio Erdal; Ahn, Matae; Jia Ng, Justin Han; Fossum, Even; Bogen, Bjarne; Ginhoux, Florent; Irving, Aaron T; Dutertre, Charles-Antoine; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Bats carry and shed many emerging infectious disease agents including Ebola virus and SARS-like Coronaviruses, yet they rarely display clinical symptoms of infection. Bat epithelial or fibroblast cell lines were previously established to study the bat immune response against viral infection. However, the lack of professional immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages has greatly limited the significance of current investigations. Using Pteropus alecto (P. alecto) GM-CSF plus IL4, FLT3L and CSF-1, we successfully generated bat bone marrow-derived DC and macrophages. Cells with the phenotype, morphology and functional features of monocyte-derived DC, bona fide DC or macrophages were obtained in GM-CSF/IL4, FLT3L or CSF-1 cultures, respectively. The successful generation of the first bat bone marrow-derived immune cells paves the way to unlocking the immune mechanisms that confer host resilience to pathogens in bats. PMID:27934903

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into mast cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Sho; Yoshino, Hironori; Ishikawa, Junya; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Kouki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2015-11-01

    Mast cells, immune effector cells produced from bone marrow cells, play a major role in immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic responses. Ionizing radiation affects the functions of mast cells, which are involved in radiation-induced tissue damage. However, whether ionizing radiation affects the differential induction of mast cells is unknown. Here we investigated whether bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells. To induce mast cells, bone marrow cells from X-irradiated and unirradiated mice were cultured in the presence of cytokines required for mast cell induction. Although irradiation at 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy decreased the number of bone marrow cells 1 day post-irradiation, the cultured bone marrow cells of X-irradiated and unirradiated mice both expressed mast cell-related cell-surface antigens. However, the percentage of mast cells in the irradiated group was lower than in the unirradiated group. Similar decreases in the percentage of mast cells induced in the presence of X-irradiation were observed 10 days post irradiation, although the number of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice had recovered by this time. Analysis of mast cell function showed that degranulation of mast cells after immunoglobulin E-mediated allergen recognition was significantly higher in the X-irradiated group compared with in the unirradiated group. In conclusion, bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells, but ionizing radiation affected the differentiation efficiency and function of mast cells.

  11. Chemosensitizing AML cells by targeting bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Raphael C; Wasserstrom, Briana; Meacham, Amy; Wise, Elizabeth; Drusbosky, Leylah; Walter, Glenn A; Chaplin, David J; Siemann, Dietmar W; Purich, Daniel L; Cogle, Christopher R

    2016-05-01

    Refractory disease is the greatest challenge in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Blood vessels may serve as sanctuary sites for AML. When AML cells were co-cultured with bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs), a greater proportion of leukemia cells were in G0/G1. This led us to a strategy of targeting BMECs with tubulin-binding combretastatins, causing BMECs to lose their flat phenotype, degrade their cytoskeleton, cease growth, and impair migration despite unchanged BMEC viability and metabolism. Combretastatins also caused downregulation of BMEC adhesion molecules known to tether AML cells, including vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. When AML-BMEC co-cultures were treated with combretastatins, a significantly greater proportion of AML cells dislodged from BMECs and entered the G2/M cell cycle, suggesting enhanced susceptibility to cell cycle agents. Indeed, the combination of combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy enhanced additive AML cell death. In vivo mice xenograft studies confirmed this finding by revealing complete AML regression after treatment with combretastatins and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Beyond highlighting the pathologic role of BMECs in the leukemia microenvironment as a protective reservoir of disease, these results support a new strategy for using vascular-targeting combretastatins in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy to treat AML.

  12. Quantitative image analysis of cell colocalization in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Zeinab; Mech, Franziska; Zehentmeier, Sandra; Hauser, Anja E; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-06-01

    Long-term antibody production is a key property of humoral immunity and is accomplished by long-lived plasma cells. They mainly reside in the bone marrow, whose importance as an organ hosting immunological memory is becoming increasingly evident. Signals provided by stromal cells and eosinophils may play an important role for plasma cell maintenance, constituting a survival microenvironment. In this joint study of experiment and theory, we investigated the spatial colocalization of plasma cells, eosinophils and B cells by applying an image-based systems biology approach. To this end, we generated confocal fluorescence microscopy images of histological sections from murine bone marrow that were subsequently analyzed in an automated fashion. This quantitative analysis was combined with computer simulations of the experimental system for hypothesis testing. In particular, we tested the observed spatial colocalization of cells in the bone marrow against the hypothesis that cells are found within available areas at positions that were drawn from a uniform random number distribution. We find that B cells and plasma cells highly colocalize with stromal cells, to an extent larger than in the simulated random situation. While B cells are preferentially in contact with each other, i.e., form clusters among themselves, plasma cells seem to be solitary or organized in aggregates, i.e., loosely defined groups of cells that are not necessarily in direct contact. Our data suggest that the plasma cell bone marrow survival niche facilitates colocalization of plasma cells with stromal cells and eosinophils, respectively, promoting plasma cell longevity. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  13. Impaired Function of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Systemic Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, K.; Wilson, T.M.; Ren, J.J.; Sabatino, M.; Stroncek, D.F.; Krepuska, M.; Bai, Y.; Robey, P.G.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Mezey, E.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) have a wide variety of problems, including skeletal abnormalities. The disease results from a mutation of the stem cell receptor (c-kit) in mast cells and we wondered if the function of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs; also known as MSCs or mesenchymal stem cells) might be affected by the invasion of bone marrow by mutant mast cells. As expected, BMSCs from SM patients do not have a mutation in c-kit, but they proliferate poorly. In addition, while osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs seems to be deficient, their adipogenic potential appears to be increased. Since the hematopoietic supportive abilities of BMSCs are also important, we also studied the engraftment in NSG mice of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, after being co-cultured with BMSCs of healthy volunteers vs. BMSCs derived from patients with SM. BMSCs derived from the bone marrow of patients with SM could not support hematopoiesis to the extent that healthy BMSCs do. Finally, we performed an expression analysis and found significant differences between healthy and SM derived BMSCs in the expression of genes with a variety of functions, including the WNT signaling, ossification, and bone remodeling. We suggest that some of the symptoms associated with SM might be driven by epigenetic changes in BMSCs caused by dysfunctional mast cells in the bone marrow of the patients. PMID:26001169

  14. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  15. Characterization of Nestin, a Selective Marker for Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Liang; Zeng, Xin; Hu, Jing; Chen, Qianming

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and contributing to tissue repair and regeneration. Characterization of the physiological function of MSCs has been largely hampered by lack of unique markers. Nestin, originally found in neuroepithelial stem cells, is an intermediate filament protein expressed in the early stages of development. Increasing studies have shown a particular association between Nestin and MSCs. Nestin could characterize a subset of bone marrow perivascular MSCs which contributed to bone development and closely contacted with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Nestin expressing (Nes+) MSCs also play a role in the progression of various diseases. However, Nes+ cells were reported to participate in angiogenesis as MSCs or endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in several tissues and be a heterogeneous population comprising mesenchymal cells and endothelial cells in the developing bone marrow. In this review article, we will summarize the progress of the research on Nestin, particularly the function of Nes+ cells in bone marrow, and discuss the feasibility of using Nestin as a specific marker for MSCs. PMID:26236348

  16. Modeling selective elimination of quiescent cancer cells from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Cavnar, Stephen P; Rickelmann, Andrew D; Meguiar, Kaille F; Xiao, Annie; Dosch, Joseph; Leung, Brendan M; Cai Lesher-Perez, Sasha; Chitta, Shashank; Luker, Kathryn E; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D

    2015-08-01

    Patients with many types of malignancy commonly harbor quiescent disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow. These cells frequently resist chemotherapy and may persist for years before proliferating as recurrent metastases. To test for compounds that eliminate quiescent cancer cells, we established a new 384-well 3D spheroid model in which small numbers of cancer cells reversibly arrest in G1/G0 phase of the cell cycle when cultured with bone marrow stromal cells. Using dual-color bioluminescence imaging to selectively quantify viability of cancer and stromal cells in the same spheroid, we identified single compounds and combination treatments that preferentially eliminated quiescent breast cancer cells but not stromal cells. A treatment combination effective against malignant cells in spheroids also eliminated breast cancer cells from bone marrow in a mouse xenograft model. This research establishes a novel screening platform for therapies that selectively target quiescent tumor cells, facilitating identification of new drugs to prevent recurrent cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bone marrow-derived stem cells initiate pancreatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hess, David; Li, Li; Martin, Matthew; Sakano, Seiji; Hill, David; Strutt, Brenda; Thyssen, Sandra; Gray, Douglas A; Bhatia, Mickie

    2003-07-01

    We show that transplantation of adult bone marrow-derived cells expressing c-kit reduces hyperglycemia in mice with streptozotocin-induced pancreatic damage. Although quantitative analysis of the pancreas revealed a low frequency of donor insulin-positive cells, these cells were not present at the onset of blood glucose reduction. Instead, the majority of transplanted cells were localized to ductal and islet structures, and their presence was accompanied by a proliferation of recipient pancreatic cells that resulted in insulin production. The capacity of transplanted bone marrow-derived stem cells to initiate endogenous pancreatic tissue regeneration represents a previously unrecognized means by which these cells can contribute to the restoration of organ function.

  18. Spine fusion using cell matrix composites enriched in bone marrow-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Muschler, George F; Nitto, Hironori; Matsukura, Yoichi; Boehm, Cynthia; Valdevit, Antonio; Kambic, Helen; Davros, William; Powell, Kimerly; Easley, Kirk

    2003-02-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells including osteoblastic progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from bone marrow aspirates using the surface of selected implantable matrices for selective cell attachment. Concentration of cells in this way to produce an enriched cellular composite graft improves graft efficacy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the biologic milieu of a bone marrow clot will significantly improve the efficacy of such a graft. An established posterior spinal fusion model and cancellous bone matrix was used to compare an enriched cellular composite bone graft alone, bone matrix plus bone marrow clot, and an enriched bone matrix composite graft plus bone marrow clot. Union score, quantitative computed tomography, and mechanical testing were used to define outcome. The union score for the enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone and the bone matrix plus bone marrow clot. The enriched bone matrix plus bone marrow clot composite also was superior to the enriched bone matrix alone in fusion volume and in fusion area. These data confirm that the addition of a bone marrow clot to an enriched cell-matrix composite graft results in significant improvement in graft performance. Enriched composite grafts prepared using this strategy provide a rapid, simple, safe, and inexpensive method for intraoperative concentration and delivery of bone marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting.

  19. Ischemic stroke activates hematopoietic bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Courties, Gabriel; Herisson, Fanny; Sager, Hendrik B; Heidt, Timo; Ye, Yuxiang; Wei, Ying; Sun, Yuan; Severe, Nicolas; Dutta, Partha; Scharff, Jennifer; Scadden, David T; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Moskowitz, Michael A; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-30

    The mechanisms leading to an expanded neutrophil and monocyte supply after stroke are incompletely understood. To test the hypothesis that transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in mice leads to activation of hematopoietic bone marrow stem cells. Serial in vivo bioluminescence reporter gene imaging in mice with tMCAO revealed that bone marrow cell cycling peaked 4 days after stroke (P<0.05 versus pre tMCAO). Flow cytometry and cell cycle analysis showed activation of the entire hematopoietic tree, including myeloid progenitors. The cycling fraction of the most upstream hematopoietic stem cells increased from 3.34%±0.19% to 7.32%±0.52% after tMCAO (P<0.05). In vivo microscopy corroborated proliferation of adoptively transferred hematopoietic progenitors in the bone marrow of mice with stroke. The hematopoietic system's myeloid bias was reflected by increased expression of myeloid transcription factors, including PU.1 (P<0.05), and by a decline in lymphocyte precursors. In mice after tMCAO, tyrosine hydroxylase levels in sympathetic fibers and bone marrow noradrenaline levels rose (P<0.05, respectively), associated with a decrease of hematopoietic niche factors that promote stem cell quiescence. In mice with genetic deficiency of the β3 adrenergic receptor, hematopoietic stem cells did not enter the cell cycle in increased numbers after tMCAO (naive control, 3.23±0.22; tMCAO, 3.74±0.33, P=0.51). Ischemic stroke activates hematopoietic stem cells via increased sympathetic tone, leading to a myeloid bias of hematopoiesis and higher bone marrow output of inflammatory Ly6C(high) monocytes and neutrophils. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Generation of eosinophils from cryopreserved murine bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Schollaert, Kaila L; Stephens, Michael R; Gray, Jerilyn K; Fulkerson, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are produced in the bone marrow from CD34+ eosinophil lineage-committed progenitors, whose levels in the bone marrow are elevated in a variety of human diseases. These findings suggest that increased eosinophil lineage-committed progenitor production is an important process in disease-associated eosinophilia. The pathways central to the biology of the eosinophil lineage-committed progenitor remain largely unknown. Thus, developing new methods to investigate the regulators of eosinophil lineage-committed progenitor differentiation is needed to identify potential therapeutic targets to specifically inhibit eosinophil production. We tested cytokine regimens to optimize liquid cultures for the study of eosinophil lineage-committed progenitor and eosinophil precursor differentiation into mature eosinophils. Stem cell factor (but not fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand) was required for optimal yield of eosinophils. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of cell preservation and scale on the culture, successfully culturing functional eosinophils from fresh and frozen murine bone marrow cells and in a standard-sized and 96-well culture format. In summary, we have developed an adaptable culture system that yields functionally competent eosinophils from murine low-density bone marrow cells and whose cytokine regime includes expansion of progenitors with stem cell factor alone with subsequent differentiation with interleukin 5.

  1. Haematopoietic stem cells depend on Galpha(s)-mediated signalling to engraft bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Adams, Gregor B; Alley, Ian R; Chung, Ung-Il; Chabner, Karissa T; Jeanson, Nathaniel T; Lo Celso, Cristina; Marsters, Emily S; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Lin, Charles P; Kronenberg, Henry M; Scadden, David T

    2009-05-07

    Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) change location during development and circulate in mammals throughout life, moving into and out of the bloodstream to engage bone marrow niches in sequential steps of homing, engraftment and retention. Here we show that HSPC engraftment of bone marrow in fetal development is dependent on the guanine-nucleotide-binding protein stimulatory alpha subunit (Galpha(s)). HSPCs from adult mice deficient in Galpha(s) (Galpha(s)(-/-)) differentiate and undergo chemotaxis, but also do not home to or engraft in the bone marrow in adult mice and demonstrate a marked inability to engage the marrow microvasculature. If deleted after engraftment, Galpha(s) deficiency did not lead to lack of retention in the marrow, rather cytokine-induced mobilization into the blood was impaired. Testing whether activation of Galpha(s) affects HSPCs, pharmacological activators enhanced homing and engraftment in vivo. Galpha(s) governs specific aspects of HSPC localization under physiological conditions in vivo and may be pharmacologically targeted to improve transplantation efficiency.

  2. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Contribution to Pulmonary Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Lindsay T; LaRue, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of bone marrow stem cell plasticity and contribution of bone marrow stem cells to pathophysiology is evolving with the advent of innovative technologies. Recent data has led to new mechanistic insights in the field of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) research, and an increased appreciation for the plasticity of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). In this review, we discuss current research examining the origin of pulmonary cell types from endogenous lung stem and progenitor cells as well as bone marrow-derived stem cells (MSCs and HSCs) and their contributions to lung homeostasis and pathology. We specifically highlight recent findings from our laboratory that demonstrate an HSC origin for pulmonary fibroblasts based on transplantation of a clonal population of cells derived from a single HSC. These findings demonstrate the importance of developing an understanding of the sources of effector cells in disease state. Finally, a perspective is given on the potential clinical implications of these studies and others addressing stem cell contributions to lung tissue homeostasis and pathology. PMID:26798846

  3. Histochemistry of blood and bone marrow cells in pangolins.

    PubMed Central

    Caxton-Martins, A E

    1977-01-01

    Blood and bone marrow cells of pangolins have been examined histochemically. Sudanophilia, PAS positivity and acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase reactivity were confined to cells of the granulocytic and monocytic series, while peroxidase reactivity was confined to cells of the erythroid series. In this latter respect the pangolin is unique among mammals so far studied. Images Figs. 1, 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Figs. 7, 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:858692

  4. Can yoga therapy stimulate stem cell trafficking from bone marrow?

    PubMed

    Shree, Nitya; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    It has been established that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from bone marrow enter the peripheral circulation intermittently for possible tissue regeneration, repair and to take care of daily wear and tear. This is evident from the detection of MSCs from peripheral blood. The factors governing this migration remain elusive. These MSCs carry out the work of policing and are supposed to repair the injured tissues. Thus, these cells help in maintaining the tissue and organ homeostasis. Yoga and pranayama originated in India and is now being practiced all over the world for positive health. So far, the chemical stimulation of bone marrow has been widely used employing injection of colony stimulating factor. However, the role of physical factors such as mechanical stimulation and stretching has not been substantiated. It is claimed that practicing yoga delays senescence, improves the physiological functions of heart and lung and yoga postures make the body elastic. It remains to be seen whether the yoga therapy promotes trafficking of the stem cells from bone marrow for possible repair and regeneration of worn out and degenerating tissues. We cover in this short review, mainly the role of physical factors especially the yoga therapy on stem cells trafficking from bone marrow. Copyright © 2016 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juan; Chen, Jian; Kim, Jae Chan; Yao, Ke

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer and involved in its destructive and regenerative disease course, tissue specimens were collected from 3 eyes of 3 patients with Mooren's ulcer that underwent lamellar keratectomy. Three normal donor limbal corneoscleras served as controls. Immunohistochemical staining patterns were analyzed by using the following antibodies: CD34 (a marker of hematopoietic progenitor cells and endothelium), c-kit (a marker of hematopoietic and stromal progenitor cells) and STRO-1 (a differentiation antigen present on bone marrow fibroblast cells and on various nonhematopoietic progenitor cells). Strong positive CD34, c-kit and STRO-1 cells were revealed in Mooren's ulcer specimens, especially in the superficial stroma. A few weakly expressed CD34 stromal cells were seen in normal limbal cornea, but no immunoreactivity for c-kit and STRO-1 was found. Bone marrow-derived cells are present in Mooren's ulcer and contribute to its destructive and regeneration process by synergizing with other factors. Specific therapeutic strategies that target the role of these cells in Mooren's ulcer are anticipated.

  6. Citalopram increases the differentiation efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Verdi, Javad; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Sharif, Shiva; Verdi, Hadi; Shoae-Hassani, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants can promote neuronal cell proliferation and enhance neuroplasticity both in vitro and in vivo. It is hypothesized that citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, can promote the neuronal differentiation of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Citalopram strongly enhanced neuronal characteristics of the cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The rate of cell death was decreased in citalopram-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells than in control cells in neurobasal medium. In addition, the cumulative population doubling level of the citalopram-treated cells was significantly increased compared to that of control cells. Also BrdU incorporation was elevated in citalopram-treated cells. These findings suggest that citalopram can improve the neuronal-like cell differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by increasing cell proliferation and survival while maintaining their neuronal characteristics. PMID:25206899

  7. Citalopram increases the differentiation efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal-like cells.

    PubMed

    Verdi, Javad; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Sharif, Shiva; Verdi, Hadi; Shoae-Hassani, Alireza

    2014-04-15

    Several studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants can promote neuronal cell proliferation and enhance neuroplasticity both in vitro and in vivo. It is hypothesized that citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, can promote the neuronal differentiation of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Citalopram strongly enhanced neuronal characteristics of the cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The rate of cell death was decreased in citalopram-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells than in control cells in neurobasal medium. In addition, the cumulative population doubling level of the citalopram-treated cells was significantly increased compared to that of control cells. Also BrdU incorporation was elevated in citalopram-treated cells. These findings suggest that citalopram can improve the neuronal-like cell differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by increasing cell proliferation and survival while maintaining their neuronal characteristics.

  8. Confocal images of marrow stromal (Westen-Bainton) cells.

    PubMed

    Bianco, P; Boyde, A

    1993-08-01

    A cytochemical method was used for imaging a defined subset of marrow stromal cells (alkaline phosphatase-positive reticulum cells, hereinafter referred to as Westen-Bainton cells), which are endowed with membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase. The use of two different types of confocal microscopes was compared: a tandem scanning reflected light microscope and a laser scanning confocal microscope equipped with a 633 nm (helium-neon) laser. Sharp confocal reflection images of the cytochemically stained stromal cells were obtained with both microscopes. Three-dimensional reconstructions were generated with both systems, revealing morphological features of Westen-Bainton cells related to both their actual shape and organization within tissue architecture, which were not otherwise appreciated. The observations were extended to individual cases of bone pathology, and demonstrated the value of confocal microscopy for the investigation of marrow-bone relationships in physiology and disease.

  9. Bone marrow and splenic histology in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Andrew; Attygalle, Ayoma; Mendes, Larissa Sena Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia is a rare chronic neoplastic B-cell lymphoproliferation that characteristically involves blood, bone marrow and spleen with liver, lymph node and skin less commonly involved. Histologically, the cells have a characteristic appearance with pale/clear cytoplasm and round or reniform nuclei. In the spleen, the infiltrate involves the red pulp and is frequently associated with areas of haemorrhage (blood lakes). The cells stain for B-cell related antigens as well as with antibodies against tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, DBA44 (CD72), CD11c, CD25, CD103, CD123, cyclin D1 and annexin A1. Mutation of BRAF -V600E is present and antibody to the mutant protein can be used as a specific marker. Bone marrow biopsy is essential in the initial assessment of disease as the bone marrow may be inaspirable or unrepresentative of degree of marrow infiltration as a result of the tumour associated fibrosis preventing aspiration of the tumour cell component. Bone marrow biopsy is important in the assessment of therapy response but in this context staining for CD11c and Annexin A1 is not helpful as they are also markers of myeloid lineage and identification of low level infiltration may be obscured. In this context staining for CD20 may be used in conjunction with morphological assessment and staining of serial sections for cyclin D1 and DBA44 to identify subtle residual infiltration. Staining for CD79a and CD19 is not recommended as these antibodies will identify plasma cells and can lead to over-estimation of disease. Staining for CD20 should not be used in patients following with anti-CD20 based treatments. Down regulation of cyclin D1 and CD25 has been reported in patients following BRAF inhibitor therapy and assessment of these antigens should not be used in this context. Histologically, hairy cell leukaemia needs to be distinguished from other B-cell lymphoproliferations associated with splenomegaly including splenic marginal zone lymphoma, splenic

  10. Mature adipocytes in bone marrow protect myeloma cells against chemotherapy through autophagy activation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A major problem in patients with multiple myeloma is chemotherapy resistance, which develops in myeloma cells upon interaction with bone marrow stromal cells. However, few studies have determined the role of bone marrow adipocytes, a major component of stromal cells in the bone marrow, in myeloma ch...

  11. Hairy cell leukemia. Bone marrow findings in 24 patients.

    PubMed

    Vykoupil, K F; Thiele, J; Georgii, A

    1976-07-21

    In 24 patients with hairy cell leukemia, histological and fine structural findings from biopsies of the bone marrow are reported and their validity is compared with other diagnostic procedures available. Diagnosis by light microscopy of anterior iliac crest biopsies obtained by the method of myelotomy is possible with a high degree of accuracy. The differentiation of hairy cell leukemia from other myelo- or lymphoproliferative disorders based on cytomorphology as well as patterns of growth is emphasized. Morphological differences between fibrosis in this entity and other lesions such as malignant lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, osteomyelofibrosis and -sclerosis are emphasized. Electron microscopy of the bone marrow shows single fibroblastic cells with numerous slender cytoplasmic processes randomly dispersed among the hairy cells. These fibroblasts are probably responsible for the synthesis of the reticulin and collagen fibres in their surroundings. Moreover fine structur of the hairy cells demonstrates pinocytic activity but no apparent phagocytosis in contrast to the phagocytic reticulum cells (histiocytes, macrophages). In the bone marrow the precursor cells and the many immature forms of hairy cells exhibit an overall lymphocytoid appearance during their maturation, suggesting a lymphocytic origin.

  12. Bone marrow chimera experiments to determine the contribution of hematopoietic stem cells to cerebral angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Machein, Marcia Regina; Plate, Karl H

    2014-01-01

    The generation of bone marrow chimera in mice is a valuable tool to study a variety of cellular processes. Donor bone marrow cells expressing reporter genes have been used to study the process of cell differentiation and the mechanisms involved in bone marrow cell recruitment. Bone marrow cells bearing genetic manipulation have been used in bone marrow chimeras to elucidate the role of molecules in different physiological and pathological settings. Since in the normal adult brain angiogenesis does not occur, models of brain injury like ischemia and tumor growth have been used to study the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to the cerebral vasculature. This chapter describes the procedures to perform bone marrow transplantation in order to study the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to vascularization in an orthotopic glioma model.

  13. Phenotypic characteristics of hybrid cells generated by transferring neuronal nuclei into bone marrow stromal cell cytoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhujuan; Xu, Yan; Zhong, Qi; Zheng, Jian

    2012-02-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are promising donor cells for transplantation therapies for a variety of diseases. However, there still lack efficient ways to induce directional differentiation of BMSCs to promote their practical use in transplantation therapy. In this study, we constructed hybrid cells by transferring neuronal nuclei into BMSC cytoplasts and investigated the proliferative capacity and phenotypic characteristics of the hybrid cells. The neuronal nuclei were labeled with Hoechst 33342 before the transfer process, and the cell membrane antigen CD71 was used as a marker of BMSC cytoplasts. The BMSC cytoplasts and neuronal karyoplasts were separated by Ficoll density gradient ultracentrifugation. The hybrid cells were generated by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of BMSC cytoplasts with neuronal karyoplasts. The hybrid cells exhibited Hoechst 33342 staining in their nuclei and CD71 staining on their cytomembranes, which confirmed the success of cell fusion. The hybrid cells were positive for BrdU immunostaining. Viability analysis of the cultured hybrid cells by the MTT assay demonstrated their proliferative ability. Immunocytochemical staining revealed the expression of the neuron-specific markers NeuN and MAP2 in the third passage hybrid cells, which indicated their neuronal phenotypic characteristics. The results demonstrated that the hybrid cells produced by fusing neuronal karyoplasts with BMSC cytoplasts had proliferative capability and expressed the neuron-specific markers. Further study is required to investigate the phenotype of the hybrid cells both structurally and functionally.

  14. Isolation, characterization, and biologic features of bone marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Porada, G; Ascensão, J L

    1996-10-01

    Bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) are an integral part of the bone marrow microenvironment and are likely to play an important role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, either by producing growth factors or inhibitory cytokines or by displaying adhesion molecules that can interact with hematopoietic progenitors. In the present study we demonstrate the isolation, propagation, and characterization of BMECs with regard to morphology, growth characteristics, phenotype, and production of cytokines. Furthermore, we report the creation of a cell line with "BMEC-like" characteristics and compare the characteristics of primary BMEC cultures to those of the immortalized cell line. In addition, we demonstrate that BMECs are susceptible to infection by a laboratory strain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV), suggesting that CMV infection of endothelial cells in vivo could potentially play a role in the hematologic abnormalities observed during CMV infection.

  15. Exercise promotes bone marrow cell survival and recipient reconstitution post-bone marrow transplantation, which is associated with increased survival.

    PubMed

    De Lisio, Michael; Baker, Jeff M; Parise, Gianni

    2013-02-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is associated with a high risk of mortality, partially because of the harmful effects of the preconditioning myeloablative regimens. We have recently demonstrated increased bone marrow cell survival and proliferation in response to exercise training, which may be attributable to increased quality of the niche. The purpose of the present study was to determine the extent to which exercise preconditioning of recipients could increase the success of BMT. Recipient mice remained sedentary (SED) or were exercise-trained (EX) on a treadmill (3 d/wk for 8 weeks) before reconstitution with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled donor marrow. Recipient survival, both donor-derived and total (donor- and recipient-derived) blood reconstitution were measured by flow cytometry. The first and fourth day after BMT apoptosis, cellularity and donor cell homing were determined in the recipients' bone marrow cavity by flow cytometry. Whereas only 25% of SED mice survived, 82% of EX recipients survived the BMT. Homing of donor-derived marrow cells to the recipients' marrow cavity acutely after BMT was not altered in EX, but EX mice displayed decreased levels (10%; p < 0.05) of activated caspase-3/-7 one day after BMT, leading to a maintenance of marrow cellularity in mice preconditioned with exercise. The acute inhibition of marrow cell apoptosis in EX mice resulted in increased total blood cell reconstitution at 1 and 3.5 months after BMT in EX mice (42% and 43%, respectively; both p < 0.05). Short- and long-term donor-derived engraftment was not different between EX and SED recipients. Exercise training increases recipient survival after BMT with increased total blood cell reconstitution. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of long-term human marrow cultures to demonstrate progenitor cell precursors in marrow treated with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Winton, E.F.; Colenda, K.W.

    1987-07-01

    The continued retrieval of progenitor cells (CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, CFU-E, CFU-GM) from human long-term marrow cultures (LTMC) is not uncommonly used as evidence that proliferation and differentiation are occurring in more primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in these cultures. Alternatively, the continued presence of progenitors in LTMC could be the result of survival and/or limited self-renewal of progenitor cells present when the culture was initiated, and such progenitors would have little relevance to the parent HSC. The following studies were designed to determine the relative contributions of precursors of progenitor cells to the total progenitor cells present in LTMC using a two-stage regeneration model. The adherent layer in LTMC was established over 3 weeks, irradiated (875 rad) to permanently eliminate resident hematopoietic cells, and recharged with autologous cryo-preserved marrow that was either treated or not treated (control) with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC, 100 micrograms/ml for 30 min). The 4-HC-treated marrow contained no progenitor cells, yet based on clinical autologous bone marrow transplant experience, has intact HSC. Within 1-3 weeks, progenitor cells reappeared in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow, and were preferentially located in the adherent layer. By 2-6 weeks, the number of progenitor cells in the adherent layer of LTMC recharged with 4-HC marrow was equivalent to control LTMC. The progenitors regenerating in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow appear to originate from precursors of progenitor cells, perhaps HSC. We propose this model may be useful in elucidating cellular and molecular correlates of progenitor cell regeneration from precursors.

  17. Cutaneous mast cell maturation does not depend on an intact bone marrow microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Charley, M.R.; Mikhael, A.; Sontheimer, R.D.; Gilliam, J.N.; Bennett, M.

    1984-01-01

    A study was made to determine whether the maturation of murine cutaneous mast cells from stem cells depends on an intact bone marrow microenvironment. Normal bone marrow cells (+/+) were infused into 2 groups of mast cell-deficient mice: WBB6F1-W/Wv mice and /sup 89/Sr-pretreated W/Wv mice. /sup 89/Sr is a long-lived bone-seeking radioisotope which provides continuous irradiation of the marrow and thereby ablates the marrow microenvironment. Skin biopsies revealed that the /sup 89/Sr-pretreated mice and the controls had repopulated their skin with mast cells equally well. Natural killer cell function was significantly depressed in the /sup 89/Sr-treated mice, confirming that the marrow microenvironment had been functionally altered. It appears that, although the precursors for cutaneous mast cells are marrow derived, they do not need an intact marrow microenvironment for maturation.

  18. Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Enhances T Cell Recovery following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation1

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; King, Christopher G.; Nejat, Rebecca A.; Suh, David Y.; Smith, Odette M.; Bretz, Jamison C.; Samstein, Robert M.; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Chidgey, Ann P.; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Boyd, Richard L.; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.

    2009-01-01

    Posttransplant immunodeficiency, specifically a lack of T cell reconstitution, is a major complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. This immunosuppression results in an increase in morbidity and mortality from infections and very likely contributes to relapse. In this study, we demonstrate that sex steroid ablation using leuprolide acetate, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa), increases the number of lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow and developing thymocytes in the thymus. Although few differences are observed in the peripheral myeloid compartments, the enhanced thymic reconstitution following LHRHa treatment and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation leads to enhanced peripheral T cell recovery, predominantly in the naive T cell compartment. This results in an increase in T cell function in vivo and in vitro. Graft-versus-host-disease is not exacerbated by LHRHa treatment and graft-versus-tumor activity is maintained. Because LHRHa allows for reversible (and temporary) sex steroid ablation, has a strong safety profile, and has been clinically approved for diseases such as prostate and breast cancer, this drug treatment represents a novel therapeutic approach to reversal of thymic atrophy and enhancement of immunity following immunosuppression. PMID:19380833

  19. Leptin-receptor-expressing mesenchymal stromal cells represent the main source of bone formed by adult bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo O; Yue, Rui; Murphy, Malea M; Peyer, James G; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-08-07

    Studies of the identity and physiological function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been hampered by a lack of markers that permit both prospective identification and fate mapping in vivo. We found that Leptin Receptor (LepR) is a marker that highly enriches bone marrow MSCs. Approximately 0.3% of bone marrow cells were LepR(+), 10% of which were CFU-Fs, accounting for 94% of bone marrow CFU-Fs. LepR(+) cells formed bone, cartilage, and adipocytes in culture and upon transplantation in vivo. LepR(+) cells were Scf-GFP(+), Cxcl12-DsRed(high), and Nestin-GFP(low), markers which also highly enriched CFU-Fs, but negative for Nestin-CreER and NG2-CreER, markers which were unlikely to be found in CFU-Fs. Fate-mapping showed that LepR(+) cells arose postnatally and gave rise to most bone and adipocytes formed in adult bone marrow, including bone regenerated after irradiation or fracture. LepR(+) cells were quiescent, but they proliferated after injury. Therefore, LepR(+) cells are the major source of bone and adipocytes in adult bone marrow.

  20. Leptin Receptor-expressing mesenchymal stromal cells represent the main source of bone formed by adult bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bo O.; Yue, Rui; Murphy, Malea M.; Peyer, James; Morrison, Sean J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies of the identity and physiological function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been hampered by a lack of markers that permit both prospective identification and fate mapping in vivo. We found Leptin Receptor (LepR) is a marker that highly enriches bone marrow MSCs. Approximately 0.3% of bone marrow cells were LepR+, 10% of which were CFU-F, accounting for 94% of bone marrow CFU-F. LepR+ cells formed bone, cartilage, and adipocytes in culture and upon transplantation in vivo. LepR+ cells were Scf-GFP+, Cxcl12-DsRedhigh, and Nestin-GFPlow, markers which also highly enriched CFU-F, but negative for Nestin-CreER and NG2-CreER, markers which included few CFU-F. Fate-mapping showed LepR+ cells arose postnatally and gave rise to most bone and adipocytes formed in adult bone marrow, including bone regenerated after irradiation or fracture. LepR+ cells were quiescent but proliferated after injury. LepR+ cells are the major source of bone and adipocytes in adult bone marrow. PMID:24953181

  1. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles rescue radiation damage to murine marrow hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sicheng; Dooner, Mark; Cheng, Yan; Papa, Elaine; Del Tatto, Michael; Pereira, Mandy; Deng, Yanhui; Goldberg, Laura; Aliotta, Jason; Chatterjee, Devasis; Stewart, Connor; Carpanetto, Andrea; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Camussi, Giovanni; Quesenberry, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to reverse radiation damage to marrow stem cells. We have evaluated the capacity of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) to mitigate radiation injury to marrow stem cells at 4 hours to 7 days after irradiation. Significant restoration of marrow stem cell engraftment at 4, 24 and 168 hours post-irradiation by exposure to MSC-EVs was observed at 3 weeks to 9 months after transplant and further confirmed by secondary engraftment. Intravenous injection of MSC-EVs to 500cGy exposed mice led to partial recovery of peripheral blood counts and restoration of the engraftment of marrow. The murine hematopoietic cell line, FDC-P1 exposed to 500 cGy, showed reversal of growth inhibition, DNA damage and apoptosis on exposure to murine or human MSC-EVs. Both murine and human MSC-EVs reverse radiation damage to murine marrow cells and stimulate normal murine marrow stem cell/progenitors to proliferate. A preparation with both exosomes and microvesicles was found to be superior to either microvesicles or exosomes alone. Biologic activity was seen in freshly isolated vesicles and in vesicles stored for up to 6 months in 10% DMSO at −80°C. These studies indicate that MSC-EVs can reverse radiation damage to bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27150009

  2. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 10(6) rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells.

  3. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Khoradmehr, Arezoo; Sadeghian, Fatemeh; Fesahat, Farzaneh; Nabi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and administered 3 × 106 rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significantly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells. PMID:25206912

  4. Rare aggressive natural killer cell leukemia presented with bone marrow fibrosis - a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Dina S; Sabbagh, Ahmad Al; Omri, Halima El; Ibrahim, Firyal A; Amer, Aliaa M; Otazu, Ivone B

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia is an extraordinary rare aggressive malignant neoplasm of natural killer cells. Although its first recognition as a specific entity was approximately 20 years ago, this leukemia has not yet been satisfactorily characterized as fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the literature and up to our knowledge, this is the first case report in Qatar. Reaching a diagnosis of aggressive natural killer leukemia was a challenging experience, because in addition to being a rare entity, the relative scarcity of circulating neoplastic cells, failure to obtain an adequate aspirate sample sufficient to perform flow cytometric analysis, together with the absence of applicable method to prove NK clonality (as it lack specific clonal marker); our case had atypical confusing presentation of striking increase in bone marrow fibrosis that was misleading and complicated the case further. The bone marrow fibrosis encountered may be related to the neoplastic natural killer cells' chemokine profile and it may raise the awareness for considering aggressive natural killer leukemia within the differential diagnosis of leukemia with heightened marrow fibrosis.

  5. Bone marrow stromal stem cells: nature, biology, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Bianco, P; Riminucci, M; Gronthos, S; Robey, P G

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are progenitors of skeletal tissue components such as bone, cartilage, the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, and adipocytes. In addition, they may be experimentally induced to undergo unorthodox differentiation, possibly forming neural and myogenic cells. As such, they represent an important paradigm of post-natal nonhematopoietic stem cells, and an easy source for potential therapeutic use. Along with an overview of the basics of their biology, we discuss here their potential nature as components of the vascular wall, and the prospects for their use in local and systemic transplantation and gene therapy.

  6. Characterization of a subset of bone marrow-derived natural killer cells that regulates T cell activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Taba; Trivedi, Prachi P; Wolf, Norbert A; Roberts, Paul C; Swanborg, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    We report that bone marrow-derived natural killer (BMNK) cells from DA or F344 rats inhibit PMA/ionomycin-induced T cell proliferation. These NK-regulatory cells are NKR-P1A(dim), whereas a minor subpopulation is NKR-P1A(bright). Only the NKR-P1A(dim) BMNK cells inhibit T cell proliferation. If activated with rat Con A supernatant, the NKR-P1A(dim) cells become NKR-P1A(bright) and lose the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast to BMNK cells, all DA and F344 rat NK cells isolated from the blood, spleen, cervical, or mesenteric lymph nodes or Peyer's patches are NKR-P1A(bright) and lack the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. Inhibition of T cell proliferation correlates with significant down-regulation of CD3, suggesting that this may be the mechanism through which the NKR-P1A(dim) cells mediate suppression. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-arginine acetate-abrogated NKR-P1A(dim) cell inhibition of T cell proliferation. We conclude that rat bone marrow NKR-P1A(dim) cells represent a unique population that may play a role in maintaining immune homeostasis by regulating the clonal expansion of activated T cells.

  7. The effects of simulated hypogravity on murine bone marrow cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, Desales

    1989-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow cells grown in complete medium at unit gravity were compared with a similar population cultured in conditions that mimic some aspects of microgravity. After the cells adjusted to the conditions that simulated microgravity, they proliferated as fetal or oncogenic populations; their numbers doubled in twelve hour periods. Differentiated subpopulations were depleted from the heterogeneous mixture with time and the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem cells increased in numbers. The cells in the control groups in unit gravity and those in the bioreactors in conditions of microgravity were monitored under a number of parameters. Each were phenotyped as to cell surface antigens using a panel of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. Other parameters compared included: pH, glucose uptake, oxygen consumption and carbon-dioxide production. Nuclear DNA was monitored by flow cytometry. Functional responses were studied by mitogenic stimulation by various lectins. The importance of these findings should have relevance to the space program. Cells should behave predictably in zero gravity; specific populations can be eliminated from diverse populations and other populations isolated. The availability of stem cell populations will enhance both bone marrow and gene transplant programs. Stem cells will permit developmental biologists study the paths of hematopoiesis.

  8. Nonhematopoietic cells are the primary source of bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kassmer, Susannah H; Bruscia, Emanuela M; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Krause, Diane S

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow (BM)-derived cells differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells of multiple tissues. To date, it remains unknown which population(s) of BM cells are primarily responsible for this engraftment. To test the hypothesis that nonhematopoietic stem cells in the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells, either wild-type hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic BM cells were transplanted into irradiated surfactant-protein-C (SPC)-null mice. Donor-derived, SPC-positive type 2 pneumocytes were predominantly detected in the lungs of mice receiving purified nonhematopoietic cells and were absent from mice receiving purified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We conclude that cells contained in the nonhematopoietic fraction of the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells. These nonhematopoietic cells may represent a primitive stem cell population residing in adult BM.

  9. Nonhematopoietic Cells are the Primary Source of Bone Marrow-Derived Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Bruscia, Emanuela M.; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Krause, Diane S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow (BM)-derived cells differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells of multiple tissues. To date, it remains unknown which population(s) of BM cells are primarily responsible for this engraftment. To test the hypothesis that nonhematopoietic stem cells in the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells, either wild-type hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic BM cells were transplanted into irradiated surfactant-protein-C (SPC)-null mice. Donor-derived, SPC-positive type 2 pneumocytes were predominantly detected in the lungs of mice receiving purified nonhematopoietic cells and were absent from mice receiving purified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We conclude that cells contained in the nonhematopoietic fraction of the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells. These nonhematopoietic cells may represent a primitive stem cell population residing in adult BM. PMID:22162244

  10. [Bone and Stem Cells. Immune cell regulation by the bone marrow niche].

    PubMed

    Terashima, Asuka; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in the bone marrow and give rise to all blood cell types. The maintenance and the differentiation of blood cells including immune cells are essential for host defense and oxygen delivery. HSCs are maintained in microenvironments called stem cell niches, which consists of various cell types in bone marrow. Recently, new visualization technologies and assay systems brought advances in studies on the stem cell niche. In addition, several reports demonstrated that osteoblasts and osteocytes regulate not only HSC homeostasis but also immune cell differentiation, suggesting a close relationship between bone cells and HSCs.

  11. Tracheal regeneration: evidence of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell involvement.

    PubMed

    Seguin, Agathe; Baccari, Sonia; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Bruneval, Patrick; Carpentier, Alain; Taylor, Doris A; Martinod, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Recent advances in airway transplantation have shown the ability of ex vivo or in vivo tracheal regeneration with bioengineered conduits or biological substitutes, respectively. Previously, we established a process of in vivo-guided tracheal regeneration using vascular allografts as a biological scaffold. We theorized that tracheal healing was the consequence of a mixed phenomenon associating tracheal contraction and regeneration. The aim of the present study was to determine the role that bone marrow stem cells play in that regenerative process. Three groups of 12 rabbits underwent a gender-mismatched aortic graft transplantation after tracheal resection. The first group received no cells (control group), the second group had previously received autologous green fluorescent protein-labeled mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, and the third group received 3 labeled mesenchymal stem cell injections on postoperative days 0, 10, and 21. The clinical results were impaired by stent complications (obstruction or migration), but no anastomotic leakage, dehiscence, or stenosis was observed. The rabbits were killed, and the trachea was excised for analysis at 1 to 18 months after tracheal replacement. In all 3 groups, microscopic examination showed an integrated aortic graft lined by metaplastic epithelium. By 12 months, immature cartilage was detected among disorganized elastic fibers. Positive SRY gene detection served as evidence for engraftment of cells derived from the male recipient. EF-green fluorescent protein detection showed bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell involvement. The results of the present study imply a role for bone marrow stem cells in tracheal regeneration after aortic allografting. Studies are necessary to identify the local and systemic factors stimulating that regenerative process. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. FoxO4 inhibits atherosclerosis through its function in bone marrow derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Qing-Jun; Wang, Lin; Li, Hao; Liu, Zhi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Objectives FoxO proteins are transcription factors involved in varieties of cellular processes, including immune cell homeostasis, cytokine production, anti-oxidative stress, and cell proliferation and differentiation. Although these processes are implicated in the development of atherosclerosis, very little is known about the role of FoxO proteins in the context of atherosclerosis. Our objectives were to determine whether and how inactivation of Foxo4, a member of the FoxO family, in vivo promotes atherosclerosis. Methods and Results Apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE−/−) mice were crossbred with animals lacking Foxo4 (Foxo4−/−). After 10 weeks on a high fat diet (HFD), Foxo4−/−apoE−/− mice showed elevated atherosclerosis and increased amount of macrophages and T cells in the plaque compared to apoE−/− mice. Bone marrow transplantations of chimeric C57B/6 mice reconstituted with either wild-type or Foxo4−/− bone marrows indicate that Foxo4-deficiency in bone marrow derived cells sufficiently promoted atherosclerosis. Foxo4-null macrophages produced elevated inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in response to lipopolysaccharides in vitro. Serum levels of IL-6 were upregulated in HFD-fed Foxo4−/−apoE−/− mice compared to those of apoE−/− mice. Conclusions FoxO4 inhibits atherosclerosis through bone marrow derived cells, possibly by inhibition of ROS and inflammatory cytokines that promote monocyte recruitment and/or retention. PMID:22005198

  13. Lack of evidence for recipient precursor cells replenishing β-cells in transplanted islets.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Inada, Akari; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow and tissue precursor cells have been postulated to replenish grafts of transplanted islets. Several investigators have reported that bone marrow cells can promote the regeneration of injured islets. In this study, we investigated the potential of recipient-derived precursor cells to form new pancreatic endocrine cells in islet grafts transplanted under the kidney capsule. Mouse insulin promoter (MIP)-green fluorescence protein (GFP) mice, which express GFP only in β-cells, or β-actin GFP mice, which express GFP ubiquitously, were used to determine if the recipient-derived cells differentiate into β-cells or other types of endocrine cells. We transplanted MIP-GFP islets into wild-type mice, wild-type islets into MIP-GFP mice, β-actin GFP islets into wild-type mice, and wild-type islets into β-actin GFP mice. β-Actin GFP bone marrow cells were then injected into wild-type mice to evaluate the potential role of bone marrow stem cells to provide new islet cells to the graft. No β-cells with green fluorescence were seen in the graft when wild-type islets were transplanted into MIP-GFP mice. When wild-type islets were transplanted into β-actin GFP mice, no β-cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts. Similarly, no endocrine cells with GFP staining could be identified in the grafts after injection of β-actin GFP bone marrow cells into wild-type islet-transplanted wild-type mice. This study provides further support for the concept that recipient precursor cells do not produce new β-cells in grafts of transplanted islets.

  14. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of bone marrow dendritic cells from multiple myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Rettig, M B; Ma, H J; Vescio, R A; Põld, M; Schiller, G; Belson, D; Savage, A; Nishikubo, C; Wu, C; Fraser, J; Said, J W; Berenson, J R

    1997-06-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was found in the bone marrow dendritic cells of multiple myeloma patients but not in malignant plasma cells or bone marrow dendritic cells from normal individuals or patients with other malignancies. In addition the virus was detected in the bone marrow dendritic cells from two out of eight patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a precursor to myeloma. Viral interleukin-6, the human homolog of which is a growth factor for myeloma, was found to be transcribed in the myeloma bone marrow dendritic cells. KSHV may be required for transformation from MGUS to myeloma and perpetuate the growth of malignant plasma cells.

  15. Hyaluronan scaffold supports osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow concentrate cells.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, C; Desando, G; Ferrari, A; Zini, N; Mariani, E; Grigolo, B

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions are considered a challenge for orthopedic surgeons. Currently, the treatments available are often unsatisfactory and unable to stimulate tissue regeneration. Tissue engineering offers a new therapeutic strategy, taking into account the role exerted by cells, biomaterial and growth factors in restoring tissue damage. In this light, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have been indicated as a fascinating tool for regenerative medicine thanks to their ability to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose tissue. However, in vitro-cultivation of MSCs could be associated with some risks such as de-differentiation/reprogramming, infection and contaminations of the cells. To overcome these shortcomings, a new approach is represented by the use of Bone Marrow Concentrate (BMC), that could allow the delivery of cells surrounded by their microenvironment in injured tissue. For this purpose, cells require a tridimensional scaffold that can support their adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. This study is focused on the potentiality of BMC seeded onto a hyaluronan-based scaffold (Hyaff-11) to differentiate into osteogenic lineage. This process depends on the specific interaction between cells derived from bone marrow (surrounded by their niche) and scaffold, that create an environment able to support the regeneration of damaged tissue. The data obtained from the present study demonstrate that BMC grown onto Hyaff-11 are able to differentiate toward osteogenic sense, producing specific osteogenic genes and matrix proteins.

  16. Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Lymphomas Cells And Normal Bone Marrow Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Pervaiz, Shazib; Nealon, Don G.; VanderMeulen, David L.

    1988-06-01

    Dye mediated, laser light induced photosensitization was tested in an in vitro model for its efficacy in eliminating the contaminating tumor cells for ex vivo autologous bone marrow purging. Daudi and U-937 cells (3 x 106/ml) in RPMI-1640 supplemented with 0.25% human albumin were mixed with 20 µg/ml and 25 µg/ml of MC-540, respectively. These cell-dye mixtures were then exposed to 514 nm argon laser light. Identical treatment was given to the normal bone marrow cells. Viability was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method. Results show that at 31.2 J/cm2 irradiation, 99.9999% Daudi cells were killed while 87% of the normal bone marrow cells survived. No regrowth of Daudi cells was observed for 30 days in culture. However, a light dose of 93.6 J/cm2 was required to obtain 99.999% U-937 cell kill with 80% normal bone marrow cell survival. Mixing of irradiated bone marrow cells with an equal number of lymphoma cells did not interfere with the photodynamic killing of lymphoma cells. Exposure of cells to low doses of recombinant interferon-alpha prior to photodynamic therapy increased the viability of lymphoma cells.

  17. Bone marrow extracellular matrix molecules improve gene transfer into human hematopoietic cells via retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Moritz, T; Patel, V P; Williams, D A

    1994-04-01

    Direct contact between hematopoietic cells and viral packaging cell lines or other sources of stroma has been shown to increase the efficiency of retroviral-mediated gene transfer into these target cells compared with infection with viral supernatant. We have investigated the role of defined bone marrow extracellular matrix molecules (ECM) in this phenomenon. Here we report that infection of cells adhering to the carboxy-terminal 30/35-kD fragment of the fibronectin molecule (30/35 FN), which contains the alternatively spliced CS-1 cell adhesion domain, significantly increases gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. Two retroviral vectors differing in recombinant viral titer were used. Gene transfer into committed progenitor cells and long-term culture-initiating cells, an in vitro assay for human stem cells, was significantly increased when the cells were infected while adherent to 30/35 FN-coated plates compared with cells infected on BSA-coated control plates or plates coated with other bone marrow ECM molecules. Although gene transfer into committed progenitor cells and to a lesser degree into long-term culture-initiating cells was increased on intact fibronectin as well, increased gene transfer efficiency into hematopoietic cells on 30/35 FN was dependent on CS-1 sequence since infection on a similar FN fragment lacking CS-1 (42 FN) was suboptimal. 30/35 FN has previously been shown by our laboratory and other investigators to mediate adhesion of primitive murine and human hematopoietic stem cells to the hematopoietic microenvironment. Additional studies showed that neither soluble 30/35 FN nor nonspecific binding of hematopoietic cells to poly-L-lysine-coated plates had any appreciable effect on the infection efficiency of these cells. Our findings indicate that hematopoietic stem cell adhesion to specific ECM molecules alters retroviral infection efficiency. These findings should aid in the design of gene transfer protocols using hematopoietic progenitor and

  18. Stem cell niche failure concerns bone marrow failure--a diagnostic and therapeutic consideration.

    PubMed

    Law, Sujata; Chaudhuri, Samaresh

    2011-01-01

    Diseases of the bone marrow often referred to as "Bone marrow failure" have complicated pathophysiological picture with respect to hematopoietic systemic function. The reason for such bone marrow disorder is not well understood till date, although some sporadic etiological sources have been described earlier. With the advent of current investigations, hematopoietic stem cell involvement together with the failure of signaling interaction within the bone marrow niche has been found to reveal interesting correlations with the disease onset. The present review furnishes justification for bone marrow failure as a concern of stem cell niche failure and hints at providing important clues for disease diagnosis and therapeutic maneuver.

  19. Comparison of hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Yang, Shao-Guang; Xing, Wen; Lu, Shi-Hong; Zhao, Qin-Jun; Ren, Hong-Ying; Chi, Ying; Ma, Feng-Xia; Han, Zhong-Chao

    2011-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) shift from fetal liver and spleen to bone marrow at neonatal stages and this movement may be due to inductive signals from different microenvironments. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are the precursors of stromal cells in bone marrow microenvironments such as osteoblasts and endothelial cells. Some researchers speculated that fetal bone marrow before birth might be not perfectly suit HSC growth. However, it is still lack of direct evidence to prove this hypothesis. This study was aimed to compare the hematopoietic supportive capacity between human fetal and adult bone marrow MSC in vitro. Adult bone marrow MSC (ABM-MSC) were isolated from three healthy donors and fetal bone marrow MSC (FBM-MSC) were isolated from three fetuses between gestations of 19 to 20 weeks. After irradiation, MSC were co-cultured with CD34(+) cells isolated from umbilical cord blood in long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assay. The colony number of colony forming cells (CFC) was counted and the phenotypic changes of co-cultured CD34(+) cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine expressions in both kinds of MSC were detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that ABM-MSC had a stronger hematopoietic supportive capacity than FBM-MSC. Both of them enhanced the differentiation of CD34(+) cells into myeloid lineages. Cytokines were expressed differently in ABM-MSC and FBM-MSC. It is concluded that ABM-MSC possess more potential application in some treatments than FBM-MSC, especially in hematopoietic reconstitution.

  20. Differential expression of collagenase by human fibroblasts and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, G W; Moran, D; Andrews, D F; Singer, J W

    1994-02-01

    The bone marrow stroma, represented in long-term marrow culture by cells of the adherent layer, is composed of a heterogenous mixture of macrophages and mesenchymal cells, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells and adipocytes, in association with a proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which is synthesized by the stroma, is capable of binding hematopoietic growth factors, and likely plays a major role in hematopoietic regulation. Clonally-derived non-transformed bone marrow stromal cells, propagated in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor, were studied for expression of collagenase, an enzyme whose substrate, collagen, is a major component of the extracellular matrix. Expression of steady-state collagenase mRNA was undetectable in both unstimulated dermal fibroblasts and non-transformed marrow stromal cells. However, stimulation with interleukin 1 alpha (10 U/ml) for 24 h resulted in marked accumulation of collagenase mRNA in dermal fibroblast cells, yet failed to elicit a similar response in bone marrow stromal cells. Both marrow stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts constitutively expressed transcripts of collagen I, and rhIL-1 alpha upregulated transcripts of interleukin 6 in both these cells as well. Although similar in morphology, these data indicate that bone marrow stromal cells differ from fibroblasts in their response to IL-1. In the marrow microenvironment, where IL-1 may be secreted by a variety of cell types, such suppression of collagenase expression may serve to prevent unwanted mobilization of collagen from the glycoprotein matrix by marrow stromal cells.

  1. Development of the fetal bone marrow niche and regulation of HSC quiescence and homing ability by emerging osteolineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Coşkun, Süleyman; Chao, Hsu; Vasavada, Hema; Heydari, Kartoosh; Gonzales, Naomi; Zhou, Xin; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) reside within a specialized niche where interactions with vasculature, osteoblasts and stromal components regulate their self-renewal and differentiation. Little is known about bone marrow niche formation or the role of its cellular components in HSC development; therefore, we established the timing of murine fetal long bone vascularization and ossification relative to the onset of HSC activity. Adult-repopulating HSC emerged at E16.5, coincident with marrow vascularization, and were contained within the c-Kit+Sca-1+Lin− (KSL) population. We used Osterix-null (Osx−/−) mice that form vascularized marrow, but lack osteolineage cells to dissect the role(s) of these cellular components in HSC development. Osx−/− fetal bone marrow cells formed multi-lineage colonies in vitro, but were hyper-proliferative and failed to home to and/or engraft transplant recipients. Thus, in developing bone marrow, the vasculature can sustain multi-lineage progenitors, but interactions with osteolineage cells are needed to regulate LT-HSC proliferation and potential. PMID:25310984

  2. Bone marrow aspiration (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... amount of bone marrow is removed during a bone marrow aspiration. The procedure is uncomfortable, but can be tolerated by both children and adults. The marrow can be studied to determine ... metabolic products are stored in certain bone marrow cells.

  3. GATA2 regulates differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Mayumi; Okitsu, Yoko; Fujiwara, Tohru; Kanehira, Masahiko; Nakajima, Shinji; Takahashi, Taro; Inoue, Ai; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment comprises multiple cell niches derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. However, the molecular mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation is poorly understood. The transcription factor GATA2 is indispensable for hematopoietic stem cell function as well as other hematopoietic lineages, suggesting that it may maintain bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in an immature state and also contribute to their differentiation. To explore this possibility, we established bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from GATA2 conditional knockout mice. Differentiation of GATA2-deficient bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into adipocytes induced accelerated oil-drop formation. Further, GATA2 loss- and gain-of-function analyses based on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells confirmed that decreased and increased GATA2 expression accelerated and suppressed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to adipocytes, respectively. Microarray analysis of GATA2 knockdowned human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells revealed that 90 and 189 genes were upregulated or downregulated by a factor of 2, respectively. Moreover, gene ontology analysis revealed significant enrichment of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, and the number of G1/G0 cells increased after GATA2 knockdown. Concomitantly, cell proliferation was decreased by GATA2 knockdown. When GATA2 knockdowned bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as well as adipocytes were cocultured with CD34-positive cells, hematopoietic stem cell frequency and colony formation decreased. We confirmed the existence of pathological signals that decrease and increase hematopoietic cell and adipocyte numbers, respectively, characteristic of aplastic anemia, and that suppress GATA2 expression in hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. PMID:25150255

  4. GATA2 regulates differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Mayumi; Okitsu, Yoko; Fujiwara, Tohru; Kanehira, Masahiko; Nakajima, Shinji; Takahashi, Taro; Inoue, Ai; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment comprises multiple cell niches derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. However, the molecular mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation is poorly understood. The transcription factor GATA2 is indispensable for hematopoietic stem cell function as well as other hematopoietic lineages, suggesting that it may maintain bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in an immature state and also contribute to their differentiation. To explore this possibility, we established bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from GATA2 conditional knockout mice. Differentiation of GATA2-deficient bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into adipocytes induced accelerated oil-drop formation. Further, GATA2 loss- and gain-of-function analyses based on human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells confirmed that decreased and increased GATA2 expression accelerated and suppressed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to adipocytes, respectively. Microarray analysis of GATA2 knockdowned human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells revealed that 90 and 189 genes were upregulated or downregulated by a factor of 2, respectively. Moreover, gene ontology analysis revealed significant enrichment of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, and the number of G1/G0 cells increased after GATA2 knockdown. Concomitantly, cell proliferation was decreased by GATA2 knockdown. When GATA2 knockdowned bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells as well as adipocytes were cocultured with CD34-positive cells, hematopoietic stem cell frequency and colony formation decreased. We confirmed the existence of pathological signals that decrease and increase hematopoietic cell and adipocyte numbers, respectively, characteristic of aplastic anemia, and that suppress GATA2 expression in hematopoietic stem cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  5. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  6. Dopamine regulates endothelial progenitor cell mobilization from mouse bone marrow in tumor vascularization.

    PubMed

    Chakroborty, Debanjan; Chowdhury, Uttio Roy; Sarkar, Chandrani; Baral, Rathindranath; Dasgupta, Partha Sarathi; Basu, Sujit

    2008-04-01

    Mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) from the bone marrow and their subsequent participation in neovessel formation are implicated in tumor growth and neovascularization. As the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) modulates adult endothelial cell function, we hypothesized that DA might have a regulatory role in mobilization of EPCs from the bone marrow niche. We show that there was a significant decrease in bone marrow DA content and an increase in EPC mobilization in tumor-bearing mice associated with tumor neovascularization. DA treatment of tumor-bearing mice inhibited EPC mobilization and tumor growth through its D2 receptors, as DA treatment failed to inhibit EPC mobilization in tumor-bearing mice treated with a specific DA D2 receptor antagonist and in tumor-bearing mice lacking the D2 receptor. In addition, we found that DA, through D2 receptors, exerted its inhibitory effect on EPC mobilization through suppression of VEGFA-induced ERK1/ERK2 phosphorylation and MMP-9 synthesis. These findings reveal a new link between DA and EPC mobilization and suggest a novel use for DA and D2 agents in the treatment of cancer and other diseases involving neovessel formation.

  7. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J

    2016-12-21

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Neural-crest Derived Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Chen, Mo; Yang, Guodong; Xiang, Lusai; He, Ling; Hei, Thomas K.; Chotkowski, Gregory; Tarnow, Dennis P.; Finkel, Myron; Ding, Lei; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the endosteum of mesoderm-derived appendicular bones have been extensively studied. Neural crest-derived bones differ from appendicular bones in developmental origin, mode of bone formation and pathological bone resorption. Whether neural crest-derived bones harbor HSCs is elusive. Here, we discovered HSC-like cells in postnatal murine mandible, and benchmarked them with donor-matched, mesoderm-derived femur/tibia HSCs, including clonogenic assay and long-term culture. Mandibular CD34 negative, LSK cells proliferated similarly to appendicular HSCs, and differentiated into all hematopoietic lineages. Mandibular HSCs showed a consistent deficiency in lymphoid differentiation, including significantly fewer CD229 + fractions, PreProB, ProB, PreB and B220 + slgM cells. Remarkably, mandibular HSCs reconstituted irradiated hematopoietic bone marrow in vivo, just as appendicular HSCs. Genomic profiling of osteoblasts from mandibular and femur/tibia bone marrow revealed deficiencies in several HSC niche regulators among mandibular osteoblasts including Cxcl12. Neural crest derived bone harbors HSCs that function similarly to appendicular HSCs but are deficient in the lymphoid lineage. Thus, lymphoid deficiency of mandibular HSCs may be accounted by putative niche regulating genes. HSCs in craniofacial bones have functional implications in homeostasis, osteoclastogenesis, immune functions, tumor metastasis and infections such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. PMID:28000662

  9. Adipose lineage specification of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Susan M.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy; Erickson, Paul F.; Kong, Raymond; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Nemenoff, Raphael; Moldovan, Radu; Morandi, Shelley A.; Davis, James A.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported the production of white adipocytes in adipose tissue from hematopoietic progenitors arising from bone marrow. However, technical challenges have hindered detection of this adipocyte population by certain other laboratories. These disparate results highlight the need for sensitive and definitive techniques to identify bone marrow progenitor (BMP)-derived adipocytes. In these studies we exploited new models and methods to enhance detection of this adipocyte population. Here we showed that confocal microscopy with spectrum acquisition could effectively identify green fluorescent protein (GFP) positive BMP-derived adipocytes by matching their fluorescence spectrum to that of native GFP. Likewise, imaging flow cytometry made it possible to visualize intact unilocular and multilocular GFP-positive BMP-derived adipocytes and distinguished them from non-fluorescent adipocytes and cell debris in the cytometer flow stream. We also devised a strategy to detect marker genes in flow-enriched adipocytes from which stromal cells were excluded. This technique also proved to be an efficient means for detecting genetically labeled adipocytes and should be applicable to models in which marker gene expression is low or absent. Finally, in vivo imaging of mice transplanted with BM from adipocyte-targeted luciferase donors showed a time-dependent increase in luciferase activity, with the bulk of luciferase activity confined to adipocytes rather than stromal cells. These results confirmed and extended our previous reports and provided proof-of-principle for sensitive techniques and models for detection and study of these unique cells. PMID:23700536

  10. [Bone and Stem Cells. Bone marrow microenvironment niches for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    In bone marrow, the special microenvironments known as niches control proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) . However, the identity and functions of the niches has been a subject of longstanding debate. Although it has been reported previously that osteoblasts lining the bone surface act as HSC niches, their precise role in HSC maintenance remains unclear. On the other hand, the adipo-osteogenic progenitors with long processes, termed CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, which preferentially express the chemokine CXCL12, stem cell factor (SCF) , leptin receptor and PDGF receptor-β were identified in the bone marrow. Recent studies revealed that endothelial cells of bone marrow vascular sinuses and CAR cells provided niches for HSCs. The identity and functions of various other candidate HSC niche cells, including nestin-expressing cells and Schwann cells would also be discussed in this review.

  11. An Enzymatic Method to Rescue Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Clotted Bone Marrow Samples

    PubMed Central

    Malonzo, Cherry; Poetzel, Tobias; Baur, Martin; Steffen, Frank; Stoyanov, Jivko

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) - usually obtained from bone marrow - often require expansion culture. Our protocol uses clinical grade urokinase to degrade clots in the bone marrow and release MSCs for further use. This protocol provides a rapid and inexpensive alternative to bone marrow resampling. Bone marrow is a major source of MSCs, which are interesting for tissue engineering and autologous stem cell therapies. Upon withdrawal bone marrow may clot, as it comprises all of the hematopoietic system. The resulting clots contain also MSCs that are lost for expansion culture or direct stem cell therapy. We experienced that 74% of canine bone marrow samples contained clots and yielded less than half of the stem cell number expected from unclotted samples. Thus, we developed a protocol for enzymatic digestion of those clots to avoid labor-intense and costly bone marrow resampling. Urokinase - a clinically approved and readily available thrombolytic drug – clears away the bone marrow clots almost completely. As a consequence, treated bone marrow aspirates yield similar numbers of MSCs as unclotted samples. Also, after urokinase treatment the cells kept their metabolic activity and the ability to differentiate into chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. Our protocol salvages clotted blood and bone marrow samples without affecting the quality of the cells. This obsoletes resampling, considerably reduces sampling costs and enables the use of clotted samples for research or therapy. PMID:25938767

  12. Expansion of Endothelial Progenitor Cells in High Density Dot Culture of Rat Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Kretlow, James D.; Zhou, Guangdong; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie

    2014-01-01

    In vitro expansion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) remains a challenge in stem cell research and its application. We hypothesize that high density culture is able to expand EPCs from bone marrow by mimicking cell-cell interactions of the bone marrow niche. To test the hypothesis, rat bone marrow cells were either cultured in high density (2×105 cells/cm2) by seeding total 9×105 cells into six high density dots or cultured in regular density (1.6×104 cells/cm2) with the same total number of cells. Flow cytometric analyses of the cells cultured for 15 days showed that high density cells exhibited smaller cell size and higher levels of marker expression related to EPCs when compared to regular density cultured cells. Functionally, these cells exhibited strong angiogenic potentials with better tubal formation in vitro and potent rescue of mouse ischemic limbs in vivo with their integration into neo-capillary structure. Global gene chip and ELISA analyses revealed up-regulated gene expression of adhesion molecules and enhanced protein release of pro-angiogenic growth factors in high density cultured cells. In summary, high density cell culture promotes expansion of bone marrow contained EPCs that are able to enhance tissue angiogenesis via paracrine growth factors and direct differentiation into endothelial cells. PMID:25254487

  13. Neurologic complications following bone marrow transplantation for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Abboud, M R; Jackson, S M; Barredo, J; Holden, K R; Cure, J; Laver, J

    1996-03-01

    A boy with sickle cell anemia underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT). He was normal on neurological examination, but had radiologic evidence of an old left frontal lobe infarct, multiple cerebral vascular stenoses and moyamoya collaterals. After BMT he developed seizures with extension of the infarct and subarachnoid hemorrhage. One year later angiography revealed worsening stenosis of the M1 segments of both middle cerebral arteries. At that time an increase in von Willebrand's factor with decreased large molecular weight multimers (LvWF) was observed. We speculate that LvWF dependent, shear-induced platelet aggregation, together with endothelial damage may have contributed to the development of neurologic complications in this patient.

  14. Clinical and experimental observations of peripheral blood leukocytes and nucleated bone marrow cells after local irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X G; Du, A N; Geng, C; Guo, F; He, M; Gu, F; Wang, J; Song, W B; Xu, H; Sheng, W; Liu, Y; Ye, T

    2014-02-01

    Aim of the study was to observe the impact of bone marrow damage induced by local irradiation on leukopenia. For the human study, five cancer patients received local radiation therapy. Bone marrow aspiration was conducted to measure nucleated cell count and 99mTc-Sc sulfur colloid ECT imaging was carried out to examine bone marrow function. For the animal study, fifty New Zealand white rabbits were divided into 3 groups: non-irradiated control group (N.=10), abdomen irradiation group (irradiation area did not cover bone marrow) (N.=20), chest irradiation group (irradiation area covered bone marrow) (N.=20). Nucleated cell counts were taken after confirming onset of leukopenia. Bone marrow of five patients proliferated normally. ECT imaging showed no abnormality in the pattern of red bone marrow distribution. Hematopoietic function was mildly active. Suppressed myeloproliferative function does not fully account for irradiation-induced leukopenia.

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  16. Generation of mesenchymal stem cell lines from murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Sreejit, P; Dilip, K B; Verma, R S

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), because of their multipotency and ease of purification and amplification, are an ideal stem cell source for cell therapies. Bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSC) can be used to develop MSC-like immortalized cell lines with large proliferation and differentiation potentialities. Their immortalized status prevents the maintenance of MSC function and characters; this can be negated by modifying the isolation and maintenance protocol. Adult murine BMSC were isolated and maintained in media without additional growth factors together with passage-dependent reseeding following trypsinization. Cells maintained over 25 passages were considered as putative cell lines and characterized. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics and multilineage differentiation potential of the cells were assessed by morphological, phenotypic, and molecular assays at various passages. The putative BMSC cell lines showed the characteristics of MSC and were able to maintain these characteristics, even after immortalization. The phenotypic data demonstrated difference among two cell lines; this was further validated by the difference in their multilineage differentiation potential following specific induction. More importantly, no changes were observed in the genotypic level in comparison with control cells, even after more than 50 passages. Our protocol thus advances the isolation and maintenance of BMSC and the development of putative BMSC cell lines that maintain characteristics of MSC, including multilineage differentiation potential, after more than 40 passages.

  17. Skeletal cell fate decisions within periosteum and bone marrow during bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Colnot, Céline

    2009-02-01

    Bone repair requires the mobilization of adult skeletal stem cells/progenitors to allow deposition of cartilage and bone at the injury site. These stem cells/progenitors are believed to come from multiple sources including the bone marrow and the periosteum. The goal of this study was to establish the cellular contributions of bone marrow and periosteum to bone healing in vivo and to assess the effect of the tissue environment on cell differentiation within bone marrow and periosteum. Results show that periosteal injuries heal by endochondral ossification, whereas bone marrow injuries heal by intramembranous ossification, indicating that distinct cellular responses occur within these tissues during repair. [corrected] Next, lineage analyses were used to track the fate of cells derived from periosteum, bone marrow, and endosteum, a subcompartment of the bone marrow. Skeletal progenitor cells were found to be recruited locally and concurrently from periosteum and/or bone marrow/endosteum during bone repair. Periosteum and bone marrow/endosteum both gave rise to osteoblasts, whereas the periosteum was the major source of chondrocytes. Finally, results show that intrinsic and environmental signals modulate cell fate decisions within these tissues. In conclusion, this study sheds light into the origins of skeletal stem cells/progenitors during bone regeneration and indicates that periosteum, endosteum, and bone marrow contain pools of stem cells/progenitors with distinct osteogenic and chondrogenic potentials that vary with the tissue environment.

  18. Sertoli cell condition medium can induce germ like cells from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Mahdieh Hajian; Minaee, Bagher; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Khrazinejad, Ebrahim; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Although many researchers have confirmed induction of germ cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), there are no reports that confirm spontaneous differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of adult Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) as a mutative factor in the induction of germ cells from BMMSCs. BMMSCs were collected from the bone marrow of 6-8-week old NMRI mice and their mesenchymal entities were proven using superficial markers (expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expresion of CD45 and CD11b) by fow cytometry. Their multi-potential entities were proved with differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic cells for 21 days. Also isolated Sertoli cells were enriched using lectin coated plates and Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) was collected. Sertoli cells were identified by immunocytochemistry and Vimentin marker. The cells were then differentiated into germ cells with SCCM for 2 weeks. Finally induced cells were evaluated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast and adipocyte showed their multi-potential property. Expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expression of CD45 and CD11b confirmed mesenchyme cells. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR results showed expression of germ cells specific marker (Mvh). This study confirmed the effect of SCCM as a motivational factor that can used for differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs.

  19. Sertoli cell condition medium can induce germ like cells from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Monfared, Mahdieh Hajian; Minaee, Bagher; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Khrazinejad, Ebrahim; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Although many researchers have confirmed induction of germ cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), there are no reports that confirm spontaneous differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of adult Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) as a mutative factor in the induction of germ cells from BMMSCs. Materials and Methods: BMMSCs were collected from the bone marrow of 6-8-week old NMRI mice and their mesenchymal entities were proven using superficial markers (expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expresion of CD45 and CD11b) by fow cytometry. Their multi-potential entities were proved with differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic cells for 21 days. Also isolated Sertoli cells were enriched using lectin coated plates and Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) was collected. Sertoli cells were identified by immunocytochemistry and Vimentin marker. The cells were then differentiated into germ cells with SCCM for 2 weeks. Finally induced cells were evaluated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results: Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast and adipocyte showed their multi-potential property. Expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expression of CD45 and CD11b confirmed mesenchyme cells. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR results showed expression of germ cells specific marker (Mvh). Conclusion: This study confirmed the effect of SCCM as a motivational factor that can used for differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. PMID:27917274

  20. Cardiomyocytes can be generated from marrow stromal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Shinji; Fukuda, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Shunichirou; Konishi, Fusako; Kodama, Hiroaki; Pan, Jing; Sano, Motoaki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hori, Shingo; Abe, Hitoshi; Hata, Jun-ichi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Ogawa, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    We have isolated a cardiomyogenic cell line (CMG) from murine bone marrow stromal cells. Stromal cells were immortalized, treated with 5-azacytidine, and spontaneously beating cells were repeatedly screened. The cells showed a fibroblast-like morphology, but the morphology changed after 5-azacytidine treatment in ∼30% of the cells; they connected with adjoining cells after one week, formed myotube-like structures, began spontaneously beating after two weeks, and beat synchronously after three weeks. They expressed atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide and were stained with anti-myosin, anti-desmin, and anti-actinin antibodies. Electron microscopy revealed a cardiomyocyte-like ultrastructure, including typical sarcomeres, a centrally positioned nucleus, and atrial granules. These cells had several types of action potentials, such as sinus node–like and ventricular cell–like action potentials. All cells had a long action potential duration or plateau, a relatively shallow resting membrane potential, and a pacemaker-like late diastolic slow depolarization. Analysis of the isoform of contractile protein genes, such as myosin heavy chain, myosin light chain, and α-actin, indicated that their muscle phenotype was similar to that of fetal ventricular cardiomyocytes. These cells expressed Nkx2.5/Csx, GATA4, TEF-1, and MEF-2C mRNA before 5-azacytidine treatment and expressed MEF-2A and MEF-2D after treatment. This new cell line provides a powerful model for the study of cardiomyocyte differentiation. J. Clin. Invest. 103:697–705 (1999) PMID:10074487

  1. Hematopoietic stem cells depend upon Gsα-mediated signalling to engraft bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Gregor B.; Alley, Ian R.; Chung, Ung-il; Chabner, Karissa T.; Jeanson, Nathaniel T.; Lo Celso, Cristina; Marsters, Emily S.; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.; Lin, Charles P.; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Scadden, David T.

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) transition in location during development1 and circulate in mammals throughout life2, moving into and out of the bloodstream to engage bone marrow (BM) niches in sequential steps of homing, engraftment and retention3–5. We show here that HSPC engraftment of BM in fetal development is dependent upon the guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory alpha subunit (Gsα). Adult Gsα−/− HSPCs differentiate and undergo chemotaxis, but also do not home to or engraft in the BM in adult mice and demonstrate marked inability to engage the marrow microvasculature. If deleted after engraftment, Gsα did not lead to lack of retention in the marrow, rather cytokine-induced mobilization into the blood was impaired. Testing whether activation of Gsα affects HSPC, pharmacologic activators enhanced homing and engraftment in vivo. Gsα governs specific aspects of HSPC localization under physiologic conditions in vivo and may be pharmacologically targeted to improve transplantation efficiency. PMID:19322176

  2. The characteristics of human cranial bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Mitsuhara, Takafumi; Okazaki, Takahito; Takeda, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Magaki, Takuro; Okura, Yunosuke; Uwatoko, Hiroyuki; Kawahara, Yumi; Yuge, Louis; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2015-10-08

    Recently, cell-based therapy has attracted attention for treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are considered to have good engraftment potential. Therefore, more efficient and less invasive methods to obtain donor cells are required. Here, we established human BMSCs from cranial bone waste (cBMSCs) obtained following routine neurosurgical procedures. cBMSCs and cells obtained from the iliac crest (iBMSCs, standard BMSCs) showed expression of cell surface markers associated with mesenchymal stem cells and multipotency traits such as differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. cBMSCs showed higher expression of the neural crest-associated mRNAs p75, Slug, and Snail than iBMSCs. Neurogenic induced cells from cBMSCs expressed the neural markers nestin, Pax6, neurofilament (NF)-L, and NF-M as seen with RT-PCR, and NF-M protein as seen with western blotting at higher levels than cells from iBMSCs. Immunostaining showed a significantly greater proportion of NF-M-positive cells in the population of induced cBMSCs compared with the population of iBMSCs. Thus, cBMSCs showed a greater tendency to differentiate into neuron-like cells than iBMSCs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells and cultured bone marrow stromal cells in dogs with orthopaedic lesions.

    PubMed

    Crovace, A; Favia, A; Lacitignola, L; Di Comite, M S; Staffieri, F; Francioso, E

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical application in veterinary orthopedics of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) and cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs) for the treatment of some orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The authors carried out a clinical study on 14 dogs of different breed, age and size with the following lesions: 1 bone cyst of the glenoid rime; 2 nonunion of the tibia; 3 nonunion of the femur; 2 lengthening of the radius; 1 large bone defect of the distal radius;1 nonunion with carpus valgus; 4 Legg-Calvé-Perthés disease. In 9 cases the BMMCNs were used in combination with a three dimensional resorbable osteogenic scaffold the chemical composition and size of which facilitates the ingrowth of bone. In these cases the BMMNCs were suspended in an adequate amount of fibrin glue and then distribuited uniformly on a Tricalcium-Phosphate (TCP) scaffold onto which were also added some drops of thrombin. In 1 case of nonunion of the tibia and in 3 cases of Legg-Calvè-Perthés (LCP) disease the cultured BMSCs were used instead because of the small size of the dogs and of the little amount of aspirated bone marrow. X-ray examinations were performed immediately after the surgery. Clinical, ultrasounds and X-ray examinations were performed after 20 days and then every month. Until now the treated dogs have shown very good clinical and X-ray results. One of the objectives of the study was to use the BMMNCs in clinical application in orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The advantages of using the cells immediately after the bone marrow is collected, are that the surgery can be performed the same day, the cells do not need to be expanded in vitro, they preserve their osteogenic potential to form bone and promote the proper integration of the implant with the bone and lastly, the technique is easier and the costs are lower.

  4. Multiple Myeloma Impairs Bone Marrow Localization of Effector Natural Killer Cells by Altering the Chemokine Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Ponzetta, Andrea; Benigni, Giorgia; Antonangeli, Fabrizio; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Sanseviero, Emilio; Zingoni, Alessandra; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Santoni, Angela; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2015-11-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key innate immune effectors against multiple myeloma, their activity declining in multiple myeloma patients with disease progression. To identify the mechanisms underlying NK cell functional impairment, we characterized the distribution of functionally distinct NK cell subsets in the bone marrow of multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Herein we report that the number of KLRG1(-) NK cells endowed with potent effector function rapidly and selectively decreases in bone marrow during multiple myeloma growth, this correlating with decreased bone marrow NK cell degranulation in vivo. Altered NK cell subset distribution was dependent on skewed chemokine/chemokine receptor axes in the multiple myeloma microenvironment, with rapid downmodulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on NK cells, increased CXCL9 and CXCL10, and decreased CXCL12 expression in bone marrow. Similar alterations in chemokine receptor/chemokine axes were observed in patients with multiple myeloma. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that KLRG1(-) NK cell migration to the bone marrow was more efficient in healthy than multiple myeloma-bearing mice. Furthermore, bone marrow localization of transferred CXCR3-deficient NK cells with respect to wild type was enhanced in healthy and multiple myeloma-bearing mice, suggesting that CXCR3 restrains bone marrow NK cell trafficking. Our results indicate that multiple myeloma-promoted CXCR3 ligand upregulation together with CXCL12 downmodulation act as exit signals driving effector NK cells outside the bone marrow, thus weakening the antitumor immune response at the primary site of tumor growth.

  5. Intravitreal Implantation of Genetically Modified Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells for Treating Retinal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Christopher J; Sanders, Douglas N; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Jensen, Cheryl A; Castaner, Leilani J; Kirk, Mark D; Katz, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    A number of retinal degenerative diseases may be amenable to treatment with continuous intraocular delivery of therapeutic agents that cannot be delivered effectively to the retina via systemic or topical administration. Among these disorders are lysosomal storage diseases resulting from deficiencies in soluble lysosomal enzymes. Most cells, including those of the retina, are able to take up these enzymes and incorporate them in active form into their lysosomes. In theory, therefore, continuous intraocular administration of a normal form of a soluble lysosomal enzyme should be able to cure the molecular defect in the retinas of subjects lacking this enzyme. Experiments were conducted to determine whether genetically modified bone marrow-derived stem cells implanted into the vitreous could be used as -vehicles for continuous delivery of such enzymes to the retina. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from normal mice were implanted into the vitreous of mice undergoing retinal degeneration as a result of a mutation in the PPT1 gene. The implanted cells appeared to survive indefinitely in the vitreous without proliferating or invading the retina. This indicates that intravitreal implantation of MSCs is likely a safe means of long-term delivery of proteins synthesized by the implanted cells. Experiments have been initiated to test the efficacy of using genetically modified autologous MSCs to inhibit retinal degeneration in a canine model of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

  6. Lack of viral control and development of cART escape mutations in macaques after bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    PETERSON, Christopher W.; HAWORTH, Kevin G.; POLACINO, Patricia; HUANG, Meei-Li; SYKES, Craig; OBENZA, Willimark M.; REPETTO, Andrea C.; KASHUBA, Angela; BUMGARNER, Roger; DeROSA, Stephen C.; WOOLFREY, Ann E.; JEROME, Keith R.; MULLINS, James I.; HU, Shiu-Lok; KIEM, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have previously demonstrated robust control of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV1157-ipd3N4) viremia following administration of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in pigtailed macaques. Here, we sought to determine the safety of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in cART-suppressed and unsuppressed animals. Design We compared disease progression in animals challenged with SHIV 100 days post-transplant (PT), to controls that underwent transplant following SHIV challenge and stable, cART-dependent viral suppression. Methods SHIV viral load, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) levels, and anti-SHIV antibodies were measured longitudinally from plasma/serum from each animal. Flow cytometry was used to assess T-cell subset frequencies in peripheral blood and gastrointestinal tract (GI). Deep sequencing was used to identify cART resistance mutations. Results In control animals, virus challenge induced transient peak viremia, viral set point, and durable suppression by cART. Subsequent HSCT was not associated with adverse events in these animals. PT animals were challenged during acute recovery following HSCT, and displayed sustained peak viremia and cART resistance. Although PT animals had comparable plasma levels of antiretroviral drugs and showed no evidence of enhanced infection of myeloid subsets in the periphery, they exhibited a drastic reduction in virus-specific antibody production and decreased T-cell counts. Conclusions These results suggest that virus challenge prior to complete transplant recovery impairs viral control and may promote drug resistance. These findings may also have implications for scheduled treatment interruption (STI) studies in patients on cART during post-HSCT recovery: premature STI could similarly result in lack of viral control and cART resistance. PMID:26372270

  7. Synapse formation during embryogenesis on ganglion cells lacking a periphery

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, Lynn; Pilar, G.

    1974-01-01

    1. The development of transmission was studied in chick ciliary ganglia that had been deprived of their periphery during early embryonic development. 2. Peripherally deprived neurones in the ganglion differentiate in normal numbers and send functional axons into the post-ganglionic nerve. 3. Ganglion cells lacking a periphery follow the normal developmental sequence sending out transient dendrites at the time ganglion cell synapses are formed, and later retracting them when calyces appear. 4. Synapses, which appear functionally and ultrastructurally normal, form on all ganglion cells at the normal time and transmission is normal until Stage 34. Therefore information from the periphery is not required for ganglion cell synapse formation per se. 5. From Stages 35 to 38 most cells die, so that only 8% of the original number of cells remain in the operated ganglion. Transmission fails in many cells during this same time, but precedes cell loss by only a short time, so that deafferentation probably does not contribute substantially to cell death. 6. Both ciliary and choroid cells achieve full cytologic differentiation and are distinct from each other, indicating that the periphery is not required for the elaboration of the distinctive characteristics of these cells. Presynaptic fibres also differentiate into typical bouton as well as calyciform endings. Therefore, the type of preganglionic ending does not depend on ganglion cells establishing proper peripheral contacts. 7. It has not been possible to ascertain whether ganglion cell specificity is affected by the periphery. 8. Peripheral removal affects ganglion cell migration, so that two ganglia are formed. Approximately half of the cells migrate into the remnant optic cup forming a second misplaced ganglion. Ciliary and choroid cells occur in both ganglia and these cells go through the typical sequence of events described above. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3 PMID:4373567

  8. PPARγ antagonist attenuates mouse immune-mediated bone marrow failure by inhibition of T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kazuya; Feng, Xingmin; Chen, Jichun; Li, Jungang; Muranski, Pawel; Desierto, Marie J.; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Malide, Daniela; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S.

    2016-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells target hematopoietic cells; at presentation, the bone marrow is replaced by fat. It was reported that bone marrow adipocytes were negative regulators of hematopoietic microenvironment. To examine the role of adipocytes in bone marrow failure, we investigated peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma, a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, utilizing an antagonist of this factor called bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether. While bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether inhibited adipogenesis as expected, it also suppressed T cell infiltration of bone marrow, reduced plasma inflammatory cytokines, decreased expression of multiple inflammasome genes, and ameliorated marrow failure. In vitro, bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether suppressed activation and proliferation, and reduced phospholipase C gamma 1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 expression, as well as inhibiting calcium flux in T cells. The in vivo effect of bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether on T cells was confirmed in a second immune-mediated bone marrow failure model, using different strains and non-major histocompatibility antigen mismatched: bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether ameliorated marrow failure by inhibition of T cell infiltration of bone marrow. Our data indicate that peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists may attenuate murine immune-mediated bone marrow failure, at least in part, by suppression of T cell activation, which might hold implications in the application of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists in immune-mediated pathophysiologies, both in the laboratory and in the clinic. Genetically “fatless” mice developed bone marrow failure with accumulation of marrow adipocytes in our model, even in the absence of body fat, suggesting different mechanisms of systematic and marrow adipogenesis and physiologic versus pathophysiologic fat accumulation. PMID:26589913

  9. PPARγ antagonist attenuates mouse immune-mediated bone marrow failure by inhibition of T cell function.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazuya; Feng, Xingmin; Chen, Jichun; Li, Jungang; Muranski, Pawel; Desierto, Marie J; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Malide, Daniela; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2016-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease, in which T cells target hematopoietic cells; at presentation, the bone marrow is replaced by fat. It was reported that bone marrow adipocytes were negative regulators of hematopoietic microenvironment. To examine the role of adipocytes in bone marrow failure, we investigated peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma, a key transcription factor in adipogenesis, utilizing an antagonist of this factor called bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether. While bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether inhibited adipogenesis as expected, it also suppressed T cell infiltration of bone marrow, reduced plasma inflammatory cytokines, decreased expression of multiple inflammasome genes, and ameliorated marrow failure. In vitro, bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether suppressed activation and proliferation, and reduced phospholipase C gamma 1 and nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 expression, as well as inhibiting calcium flux in T cells. The in vivo effect of bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether on T cells was confirmed in a second immune-mediated bone marrow failure model, using different strains and non-major histocompatibility antigen mismatched: bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-ether ameliorated marrow failure by inhibition of T cell infiltration of bone marrow. Our data indicate that peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists may attenuate murine immune-mediated bone marrow failure, at least in part, by suppression of T cell activation, which might hold implications in the application of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists in immune-mediated pathophysiologies, both in the laboratory and in the clinic. Genetically "fatless" mice developed bone marrow failure with accumulation of marrow adipocytes in our model, even in the absence of body fat, suggesting different mechanisms of systematic and marrow adipogenesis and physiologic versus pathophysiologic fat accumulation.

  10. Use of spleen organ cultures to monitor hemopoietic progenitor cell regeneration following irradiation and marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    von Melchner, H.; Metcalf, D.; Mandel, T.E.

    1980-11-01

    After lethal irradiation of C57BL mice followed by the injection of 10/sup 7/ marrow cells, total cellularity and progenitor cell levels exceeded pretreatment levels within 12 days in the spleen, but regeneration remained incomplete in the marrow. The exceptional regenerative capacity of progenitor populations in the spleen was observed in organ cultures of spleen slices prepared 24 h after irradiation and transplantation, excluding continuous repopulation from the marrow as a significant factor in splenic regeneration.

  11. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) stimulates the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Rougier, F.; Cornu, E.; Gachard, N.; Praloran, V.

    1997-01-01

    This study reports that TNF-α is a potent mitogen for human bone marrow sternal cells in vitro (assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and cell counts). In contrast, cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-6, LIF, SCF, M-CSF, G-CSF and GM-CSF had no effect. The effect of TNF-α on the growth of human bone marrow stromal cells could be of importance during inflammatory processes which take place in the marrow, for example marrow fibrosis. PMID:18472825

  12. Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells transplant in patients with critical leg ischemia: preliminary clinical results.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhou, Hua; Jin, Xing; Wang, Mo; Zhang, Shiyi; Xu, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Stem cell transplant can induce vasculogenesis and improve the blood supply to an ischemic region, offering hope for chronic lower extremity ischemic diseases. Bone marrow mononuclear cells are one of the sources for stem cell transplants. We sought to observe the safety and efficacy of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells transplant for treating critical limb ischemia. Eligible patients were randomized 1:1 to receive placebo (0.9% NaCl) or 1 × 107 piece/mL bone marrow mononuclear cell transplant. For 6 months, patients' skin ulcers, ankle-brachial index, and rest pain were examined and recorded before and after treatment. Six months after the bone marrow mononuclear cells transplant, clinical symptoms like rest pain and skin ulcers gradually abated (P < .05). Ankle-brachial index also increased after the transplant (P < .01). Autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells transplant for treatment of patients with chronic limb ischemia is safe, effective, and feasible.

  13. β1 integrin is critical for the maintenance of antigen-specific CD4 T cells in the bone marrow but not long-term immunological memory.

    PubMed

    DeNucci, Christopher C; Shimizu, Yoji

    2011-04-01

    The long-term maintenance of memory CD4 T cells promotes protective immunity against future pathogen reinfection. As a site rich in survival cytokines, the bone marrow is proposed to be a critical niche for the survival of memory CD4 T cells. We demonstrate that endogenous, polyclonal Ag-specific CD4 T cells rapidly enter and are recovered long-term from the bone marrow following i.v. infection with Listeria monocytogenes. β(1) integrin-deficient CD4 T cells also populate the bone marrow early following an infection, but their numbers in this site rapidly decline. This decline was not caused by increased death of T cells lacking β(1) integrin but rather by reduced retention in the bone marrow after the primary immune response. The loss of memory CD4 T cells from the bone marrow does not lead to a loss of the predominant source of memory CD4 T cells in the spleen or the ability to mount a memory response. Thus, β(1) integrin-dependent maintenance of memory CD4 T cells in the bone marrow is not required for long-term CD4 T cell memory.

  14. β1 INTEGRIN IS CRITICAL FOR THE MAINTENANCE OF ANTIGEN-SPECIFIC CD4 T CELLS IN THE BONE MARROW BUT NOT LONG-TERM IMMUNOLOGICAL MEMORY1

    PubMed Central

    DeNucci, Christopher C.; Shimizu, Yoji

    2011-01-01

    The long-term maintenance of memory CD4 T cells promotes protective immunity against future pathogen re-infection. As a site rich in survival cytokines, the bone marrow is proposed to be a critical niche for the survival of memory CD4 T cells. We demonstrate that endogenous, polyclonal Ag-specific CD4 T cells rapidly enter and are recovered long-term from the bone marrow following intravenous infection with Listeria monocytogenes. β1 integrin-deficient CD4 T cells also populate the bone marrow early following an infection, but their numbers in this site rapidly decline. This decline was not caused by increased death of T cells lacking β1 integrin but rather by reduced retention in the bone marrow after the primary immune response. The loss of memory CD4 T cells from the bone marrow does not lead to a loss of the predominant source of memory CD4 T cells in the spleen or the ability to mount a memory response. Thus, β1 integrin-dependent maintenance of memory CD4 T cells in the bone marrow is not required for long-term CD4 T cell memory. PMID:21357540

  15. Regulatory T cells in the bone marrow microenvironment in patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ende; Wang, Lin; Dai, Jinlu; Kryczek, Ilona; Wei, Shuang; Vatan, Linda; Altuwaijri, Saleh; Sparwasser, Tim; Wang, Guobin; Keller, Evan T.; Zou, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Human prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone marrow. What defines the cellular and molecular predilection for prostate cancer to metastasize to bone marrow is not well understood. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells contribute to self-tolerance and tumor immune pathology. We now show that functional Treg cells are increased in the bone marrow microenvironment in prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis, and that CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling pathway contributes to Treg cell bone marrow trafficking. Treg cells exhibit active cell cycling in the bone marrow, and bone marrow dendritic cells express high levels of receptor activator of NFκB (RANK), and promote Treg cell expansion through RANK and its ligand (RANKL) signals. Furthermore, Treg cells suppress osteoclast differentiation induced by activated T cells and M-CSF, adoptive transferred Treg cells migrate to bone marrow, and increase bone mineral intensity in the xenograft mouse models with human prostate cancer bone marrow inoculation. In vivo Treg cell depletion results in reduced bone density in tumor bearing mice. The data indicates that bone marrow Treg cells may form an immunosuppressive niche to facilitate cancer bone metastasis and contribute to bone deposition, the major bone pathology in prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis. These findings mechanistically explain why Treg cells accumulate in the bone marrow, and demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for Treg cells in patients with prostate cancer. Thus, targeting Treg cells may not only improve anti-tumor immunity, but also ameliorate bone pathology in prostate cancer patients with bone metastasis. PMID:22720236

  16. Blood and Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells for Transplantation: A Comparative Review.

    PubMed

    Janssen; Hiemenz; Fields; Zorsky; Ballester; Goldstein; Elfenbein

    1994-05-01

    Classical bone marrow transplantation collects bone marrow from a normal individual. This is infused into a patient rendered aplastic by high-dose chemoradiotherapy. Shortcomings include a limited donor pool and morbidity and mortality from graft-vs-host and graft rejection phenomena. Autologous marrow transplantation, in which the marrow of the patient to be transplanted is harvested, cryopreserved, and stored until needed, is not so constrained. Although marrow cannot be collected from some individuals due to hypocellularity, fibrosis, or infiltration with malignant disease, the presence of peripheral blood stem cells in the circulation allows these individuals to be treated with autologous transplantation therapy. It has been postulated that these hematopoietic progenitors have advantages over bone marrow collected stem cells, including safer and less expensive collections and accelerated rates of hematopoietic recovery following high-dose therapy and stem cell reinfusion.

  17. Bone marrow-derived pancreatic stellate cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Sparmann, Gisela; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Hofmeister-Mielke, Nicole; Koczan, Dirk; Jaster, Robert; Liebe, Stefan; Wolff, Daniel; Emmrich, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Origin and fate of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) before, during and after pancreatic injury are a matter of debate. The crucial role of PSCs in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis is generally accepted. However, the turnover of the cells remains obscure. The present study addressed the issue of a potential bone marrow (BM) origin of PSCs. We used a model of stable hematopoietic chimerism by grafting enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-expressing BM cells after irradiation of acceptor rats. Chimerism was detected by FACS analysis of eGFP-positive cells in the peripheral blood. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) was used to induce acute pancreatic inflammation with subsequent recovery over 4 weeks. Investigations have been focused on isolated cells to detect the resting PSC population. The incidence of eGFP-positive PSC obtained from the pancreas of chimeric rats was approximately 7% in healthy pancreatic tissue and increased significantly to a mean of 18% in the restored pancreas 4 weeks after DBTC-induced acute inflammation. Our results suggest that BM-derived progenitor cells represent a source of renewable stellate cells in the pancreas. Increased numbers of resting PSCs after regeneration point toward enhanced recruitment of BM-derived cells to the pancreas and/or re-acquisition of a quiescent state after inflammation-induced activation.

  18. Bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naozumi; Jin, Hong; Liu, Tianju; Chensue, Stephen W; Phan, Sem H

    2004-01-01

    The origin of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis is assumed to be intrapulmonary, but their extrapulmonary origin and especially derivation from bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells has not been ruled out. To examine this possibility directly, adult mice were durably engrafted with BM isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced GFP. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis in such chimera mice by endotracheal bleomycin (BLM) injection caused large numbers of GFP(+) cells to appear in active fibrotic lesions, while only a few GFP(+) cells could be identified in control lungs. Flow-cytometric analysis of lung cells confirmed the BLM-induced increase in GFP(+) cells in chimera mice and revealed a significant increase in GFP(+) cells that also express type I collagen. GFP(+) lung fibroblasts isolated from chimera mice expressed collagen and telomerase reverse transcriptase but not alpha-smooth muscle actin. Treatment of isolated GFP(+) fibroblasts with TGF-beta failed to induce myofibroblast differentiation. Cultured lung fibroblasts expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 and responded chemotactically to their cognate ligands, stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha and secondary lymphoid chemokine, respectively. Thus the collagen-producing lung fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis can also be derived from BM progenitor cells.

  19. LPS-stimulated human bone marrow stroma cells support myeloid cell development and progenitor cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Patrick; Boettcher, Steffen; Takizawa, Hitoshi; Manz, Markus G; Brümmendorf, Tim H

    2016-01-01

    The nonhematopoietic bone marrow (BM) microenvironment provides a functional niche for hematopoietic cell maintenance, recruitment, and differentiation. It consists of multiple cell types including vasculature, bone, adipose tissue, and fibroblast-like bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC), which can be summarized under the generic term niche cells. BMSC express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and are capable to respond to TLR-agonists by changing their cytokine expression pattern in order to more efficiently support hematopoiesis. Here, we show that in addition to enhanced myeloid colony formation from human CD34+ cells, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation retains overall higher numbers of CD34+ cells in co-culture assays using BMSC, with eightfold more CD34+ cells that underwent up to three divisions as compared to non-stimulated assays. When subjected to cytokine-supplemented myeloid colony-forming unit (CFU) assays or transplanted into newborn RAG2(-/-) γc (-/-) mice, CD34(+) cells from LPS-stimulated BMSC cultures give rise to the full spectrum of myeloid colonies and T and B cells, respectively, thus supporting maintenance of myeloid and lymphoid primed hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) under inflammatory conditions. Collectively, we suggest that BMSC enhance hematopoiesis during inflammatory conditions to support the replenishment of innate immune effector cells and to prevent the exhaustion of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) pool.

  20. Modeling Human Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes Using Pluripotent Stem Cells and Genome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Jung, Moonjung; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Winkler, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The combination of epigenetic reprogramming with advanced genome editing technologies opened a new avenue to study disease mechanisms, particularly of disorders with depleted target tissue. Bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) typically present with a marked reduction of peripheral blood cells due to a destroyed or dysfunctional bone marrow compartment. Somatic and germline mutations have been etiologically linked to many cases of BMFS. However, without the ability to study primary patient material, the exact pathogenesis for many entities remained fragmentary. Capturing the pathological genotype in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) allows studying potential developmental defects leading to a particular phenotype. The lack of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in these patients can also be overcome by differentiating patient-derived iPSCs into hematopoietic lineages. With fast growing genome editing techniques, such as CRISPR/Cas9, correction of disease-causing mutations in iPSCs or introduction of mutations in cells from healthy individuals enable comparative studies that may identify other genetic or epigenetic events contributing to a specific disease phenotype. In this review, we present recent progresses in disease modeling of inherited and acquired BMFS using reprogramming and genome editing techniques. We also discuss the challenges and potential shortcomings of iPSC-based models for hematological diseases.

  1. Treatment with bone marrow-derived stromal cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, David S; Gao, Xiaohua; Liu, Yong Bo; Dulchavsky, Deborah S; Danyluk, Andrew L; Bansal, Mona; Chopp, Michael; McIntosh, Kevin; Arbab, Ali S; Dulchavsky, Scott A; Gautam, Subhash C

    2008-06-01

    Bone marrow stem cells participate in tissue repair processes and may have a role in wound healing. Diabetes is characterised by delayed and poor wound healing. We investigated the potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) to promote healing of fascial wounds in diabetic rats. After manifestation of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic state for 5 weeks in male adult Sprague-Dawley rats, healing of fascial wounds was severely compromised. Compromised wound healing in diabetic rats was characterised by excessive polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, lack of granulation tissue formation, deficit of collagen and growth factor [transforming growth factor (TGF-beta), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor PDGF-BB and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] expression in the wound tissue and significant decrease in biomechanical strength of wounds. Treatment with BMSC systemically or locally at the wound site improved the wound-breaking strength (WBS) of fascial wounds. The improvement in WBS was associated with an immediate and significant increase in collagen levels (types I-V) in the wound bed. In addition, treatment with BMSCs increased the expression of growth factors critical to proper repair and regeneration of the damaged tissue moderately (TGF-beta, KGF) to markedly (EGF, VEGF, PDGF-BB). These data suggest that cell therapy with BMSCs has the potential to augment healing of the diabetic wounds.

  2. Evaluation of the genotoxicity of alpha-amanitin in mice bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, B; Łopaczyńska, D; Ferenc, T

    2017-10-01

    Alpha-amanitin is a known cytotoxic substance found in some mushroom species including Amanita phalloides. Its main mechanism of action is to block the transcription, which can lead to cell death. Lack of reports on the genotoxicity of this toxin was an inspiration for undertaking this experiment. Genotoxic effect of α-amanitin on balb/c mice bone marrow cells was tested using: comet assay and chromosomal aberration test. The tested substance was given once by intraperitoneal administration to animals at doses: 0.1 mg/kg, 0.15 mg/kg and 0.25 mg/kg (LD50) body weight with 48 h exposure. The comet assay demonstrated a statistically significant increase in DNA damage for all the investigated α-amanitin doses compared to the negative control (p < 0.0001). The exposure to 0.15 and 0.25 mg/kg doses of α-amanitin also generated a statistically significant increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of mice compared to the negative control (p < 0.05). The genotoxic effect induced by α-amanitin in mammalian cells can result in genome instability and its functional consequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Necroptosis in spontaneously-mutated hematopoietic cells induces autoimmune bone marrow failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Junping; Breslin, Peter; Wei, Wei; Li, Jing; Gutierrez, Rafael; Cannova, Joseph; Ni, Allen; Ng, Grace; Schmidt, Rachel; Chen, Haiyan; Parini, Vamsi; Kuo, Paul C.; Kini, Ameet R.; Stiff, Patrick; Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Jiwang

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an autoimmune-mediated bone marrow failure syndrome. The mechanism by which such an autoimmune reaction is initiated is unknown. Whether and how the genetic lesions detected in patients cause autoimmune bone marrow failure have not yet been determined. We found that mice with spontaneous deletion of the TGFβ-activated kinase-1 gene in a small subset of hematopoietic cells developed bone marrow failure which resembled the clinical manifestations of acquired aplastic anemia patients. Bone marrow failure in such mice could be reversed by depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes or blocked by knockout of interferon-γ, suggesting a Th1-cell-mediated autoimmune mechanism. The onset and progression of bone marrow failure in such mice were significantly accelerated by the inactivation of tumor necrosis factor-α signaling. Tumor necrosis factor-α restricts autoimmune bone marrow failure by inhibiting type-1 T-cell responses and maintaining the function of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Furthermore, we determined that necroptosis among a small subset of mutant hematopoietic cells is the cause of autoimmune bone marrow failure because such bone marrow failure can be prevented by deletion of receptor interacting protein kinase-3. Our study suggests a novel mechanism to explain the pathogenesis of autoimmune bone marrow failure. PMID:27634200

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Optimal Bone Marrow Site for the Isolation of Porcine Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, J. S.; Hurtgen, B. J.; Belenkiy, S.; Necsoiu, C.; Cancio, L. C.; Rathbone, C. R.; Batchinsky, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    Background. One of the most plentiful sources for MSCs is the bone marrow; however, it is unknown whether MSC yield differs among different bone marrow sites. In this study, we quantified cellular yield and evaluated resident MSC population from five bone marrow sites in the porcine model. In addition, we assessed the feasibility of a commercially available platelet concentrator (Magellan® MAR01™ Arteriocyte Medical Systems, Hopkinton, MA) as a bedside stem cell concentration device. Methods. Analyses of bone marrow aspirate (BMA) and concentrated bone marrow aspirate (cBMA) included bone marrow volume, platelet and nucleated cell yield, colony-forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) number, flow cytometry, and assessment of differentiation potential. Results. Following processing, the concentration of platelets and nucleated cells significantly increased but was not significantly different between sites. The iliac crest had significantly less bone marrow volume; however, it yielded significantly more CFUs compared to the other bone marrow sites. Culture-expanded cells from all tested sites expressed high levels of MSC surface markers and demonstrated adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation potential. Conclusions. All anatomical bone marrow sites contained MSCs, but the iliac crest was the most abundant source of MSCs. Additionally, the Magellan can function effectively as a bedside stem cell concentrator. PMID:28539939

  5. Canine Cranial Reconstruction Using Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mankani, Mahesh H.; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Shannon, Brian; Nalla, Ravi K.; Ritchie, Robert O.; Qin, Yixian; Robey, Pamela Gehron

    2006-01-01

    Limited-sized transplants of culture-expanded autologous or allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) form cortico-cancellous bone in rodent models. Initiation of clinical studies using autologous BMSC transplantation requires effective bone formation among sizable transplants in a large animal model as well as noninvasive techniques for evaluating transplant success. Here, we obtained bone marrow from the femurs of six dogs and expanded BMSCs in tissue culture. Autologous BMSC-hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP) transplants were introduced into critical-sized calvarial defects and contralateral control skull defects received HA/TCP vehicle alone. At intervals ranging from 2 to 20 months, transplants were biopsied or harvested for histological and mechanical analysis. Noninvasive studies, including quantitative computed tomography scans and ultrasound, were simultaneously obtained. In all animals, BMSC-containing transplants formed significantly more bone than their control counterparts. BMSC-associated bone possessed mechanical properties similar to the adjacent normal bone, confirmed by both ultrasound and ex vivo analysis. Evaluation by quantitative computed tomography confirmed that the extent of bone formation demonstrated by histology could be discerned through noninvasive means. These results show that autologous cultured BMSC transplantation is a feasible therapy in clinical-sized bone defects and that such transplants can be assessed noninvasively, suggesting that this technique has potential for use in patients with certain bone defects. PMID:16436668

  6. A T Cell View of the Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Adriana; Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Galvani, Rômulo Gonçalves; Balduino, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells present in the bone marrow (BM) represent an activated/memory phenotype and most of these, if not all, are circulating T cells. Their lodging in the BM keeps them activated, turning the BM microenvironment into a “memory reservoir.” This article will focus on how T cell activation in the BM results in both direct and indirect effects on the hematopoiesis. The hematopoietic stem cell niche will be presented, with its main components and organization, along with the role played by T lymphocytes in basal and pathologic conditions and their effect on the bone remodeling process. Also discussed herein will be how “normal” bone mass peak is achieved only in the presence of an intact adaptive immune system, with T and B cells playing critical roles in this process. Our main hypothesis is that the partnership between T cells and cells of the BM microenvironment orchestrates numerous processes regulating immunity, hematopoiesis, and bone remodeling. PMID:27242791

  7. Stemness Signature of Equine Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zahedi, Morteza; Parham, Abbas; Dehghani, Hesam; Mehrjerdi, Hossein Kazemi

    2017-01-01

    Background Application of competent cells such as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treatment of musculoskeletal disorders in equine athletes is increasingly needed. Moreover, similarities of horse and human in size, load and types of joint injuries, make horse as a good model for MSCs therapy studies. This study was designed to isolate and characterize stemness signature of equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). Methods BM of three mares was aspirated and the mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated using density gradient. The primary MNCs were cultured and analyzed after tree passages (P3) for growth characteristics, differentiation potentials, and the expression of genes including CD29, CD34, CD44, CD90, CD105, MHC-I, MHC-II and pluripotency related genes (Nanog, Oct-4, Sox-2, SSEA-1, -3, -4) using RT-PCR or immunocytochemistry techniques. Results The isolated cells in P3 were adherent and fibroblast-like in shape with doubling times of 78.15 h. Their clonogenic capacity was 8.67±4% and they were able to differentiate to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages. Cells showed expression of CD29, CD44, CD90, MHC-I and Sox-2 while no expression for CD34, MHC-II, CD105, and pluripotency stemness markers was detected. Conclusions In conclusion, data showed that isolated cells have the basic and minimal criteria for MSCs, however, expressing only one pluripotency gene (sox-2). PMID:28222255

  8. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  9. Effects of OK-432 on murine bone marrow and the production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Rosse, C.

    1985-01-01

    The streptococcal preparation, OK-432, which augments anti-tumor responses in humans and mice, has been shown to be a potent immunomodulator. Among its effects is a pronounced augmentation of natural killer (NK) activity. The hypothesis that OK-432 alters the rates of production and maturation of NK cells in the bone marrow was tested. Studies to determine the kinetic parameters of NK cell production in normal C57BL/6J mice using tritiated thymidine, /sup 3/H-TdR, as a DNA marker are described. We are now extending those studies to determine the effect of OK-432 on the bone marrow and on the production of NK cells in the marrow. Initial observations are reported which indicate that OK-432 has profound effects on the cellularity and mitotic activity of the bone marrow, and in particular, on cells with the characteristics of natural killer cells within the marrow. 17 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. NKT cells, Treg, and their interactions in bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Pillai, Asha B.; Lowsky, Robert; Strober, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Tumor eradication is promoted by the anti-tumor activity of donor T cells contained in the transplant; however, donor T cells also mediate the serious side effect of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Separation of GVHD from graft anti-tumor activity is an important goal of research in improving transplant outcome. One approach is to take advantage of the immunomodulatory activity of regulatory NKT cells and CD4+ CD25+ Treg of host and/or donor origin. Both host and donor NKT cells and donor Treg are able to prevent GVHD in murine models. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of NKT cell- and Treg-mediated protection against GVHD in mice while maintaining graft anti-tumor activity. In addition, we also examine the interactions between NKT cells and Treg in the context of BMT, and integrate the data from murine experimental models with the observations made in humans. PMID:20583031

  11. The Challenge and the Promise of Bone Marrow Cells for Human Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Chu, Constance R

    2015-04-01

    The cartilage repair potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells has been well described. Harnessing this potential for human articular cartilage repair remains challenging. Accessing bone marrow repair cells through marrow stimulation techniques such as microfracture is readily achieved with generally good but inconsistent results. Animal and human studies show feasibility for ex vivo processing of bone marrow to isolate, concentrate, and culture mesenchymal stem cells. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to show consistent and clinically meaningful improvement using bone marrow cell preparations above what has been achieved with microfracture. Consequently, microfracture continues to be the simplest and most commonly used method to enhance repair of focal articular cartilage defects. Emerging preclinical work in the equine model suggests a role for enhancing marrow-stimulation techniques through the use of natural scaffolds such as autologous platelet enriched fibrin as well as optimization of joint biology through localized gene therapy to support cartilage repair. In contrast to joint replacement where inert materials of known mechanical properties are used, host biology determines the relative success, failure, and durability of cartilage repair. As such, development of personalized strategies to improve the quality and durability of bone marrow cell-based articular cartilage repair represent exciting new areas of inquiry. Continued advances in stem cell biology, scaffold technologies, and methods to delineate and enhance host biology, both systemically and within the joint, hold promise for harnessing the full power of bone marrow cells to facilitate cartilage repair and regeneration.

  12. Comparative analyses of B cell populations in trout kidney and mouse bone marrow; establishing “B cell signatures”

    PubMed Central

    Zwollo, Patty; Mott, Katrina; Barr, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the frequency and distribution of developing B cell populations in the kidney of the rainbow trout, using four molecular B cell markers that are highly conserved between species, including two transcription factors, Pax5 and EBF1, recombination activating gene RAG1, and the immunoglobulin heavy chain mu. Three distinct B cell stages were defined: early developing B cells (CLP, pro-B, and early pre-B cells), late developing B cell (late pre-B, immature B, and mature B cells), and IgM-secreting cells. Developmental stage-specific, combinatorial expression of Pax5, EBF1, RAG1 and immunoglobulin mu was determined in trout anterior kidney cells by flow cytometry. Trout staining patterns were compared to a well-defined primary immune tissue, mouse bone marrow, and using mouse surface markers B220 and CD43. A remarkable level of similarity was uncovered between the primary immune tissues of both species. Subsequent analysis of the entire trout kidney, divided into five contiguous segments K1-K5, revealed a complex pattern of early developing, late developing, and IgM-secreting B cells. Patterns in anterior kidney segment K1 were most similar to those of mouse bone marrow, while the most posterior part of the kidney, K5, had many IgM-secreting cells, but lacked early developing B cells. A potential second B lymphopoiesis site was uncovered in segment K4 of the kidney. The B cell patterns, or “B cell signatures” described here provide information on the relative abundance of distinct developing B cell populations in the trout kidney, and can be used in future studies on B cell development in other vertebrate species. PMID:20705088

  13. Histological characterization of bone marrow in ectopic bone, induced by devitalized Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Nahar, Niru N; Tague, Sarah E; Wang, Jinxi; Danley, Marsha; Garimella, Rama; Anderson, H Clarke

    2013-01-01

    Devitalized Saos-2, cultured human osteosarcoma cells, or guanidinium-hydrochloride (GuHCl) extracts of these cells, induce ectopic bone and marrow formation when implanted subcutaneously in Nu/Nu mice. The aim of the present study was to characterize the bone marrow induced by Saos-2 cell extracts, specifically to determine which of the four major hematopoietic cell lineages: erythropoietic, granulopoietic, lymphopoietic and megakaryocytic, are induced by Saos-2 cell derivatives. Immunohistochemical localization of specific antigens was used to determine the presence of each major cell type (glycophorin A for erythropoietic, neutrophil elastase for granulopoietic, factor-VIII related antigen for megakaryocytes, and CD79a for B lymphocytes). Standard H & E stains confirmed the presence of normally organized apparently complete bone marrow within all newly induced bone at 3 weeks post-implantation of devitalized Saos-2 cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of erythropoietic cells, granulopoietic cells, megakaryocytes and B lymphocytes in the ectopic marrow. Saos-2 cells (freeze-dried) or their extracts, implanted subcutaneously into Nu/Nu mice, can induce normal marrow that is host-derived, and contains all major hematopoietic cell lineages. Saos-2 induced marrow could potentially restore deficient marrow and promote bone repair.

  14. Histological characterization of bone marrow in ectopic bone, induced by devitalized Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Niru N; Tague, Sarah E; Wang, Jinxi; Danley, Marsha; Garimella, Rama; Anderson, H Clarke

    2013-01-01

    Devitalized Saos-2, cultured human osteosarcoma cells, or guanidinium-hydrochloride (GuHCl) extracts of these cells, induce ectopic bone and marrow formation when implanted subcutaneously in Nu/Nu mice. The aim of the present study was to characterize the bone marrow induced by Saos-2 cell extracts, specifically to determine which of the four major hematopoietic cell lineages: erythropoietic, granulopoietic, lymphopoietic and megakaryocytic, are induced by Saos-2 cell derivatives. Methods: Immunohistochemical localization of specific antigens was used to determine the presence of each major cell type (glycophorin A for erythropoietic, neutrophil elastase for granulopoietic, factor-VIII related antigen for megakaryocytes, and CD79a for B lymphocytes). Results: Standard H & E stains confirmed the presence of normally organized apparently complete bone marrow within all newly induced bone at 3 weeks post-implantation of devitalized Saos-2 cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of erythropoietic cells, granulopoietic cells, megakaryocytes and B lymphocytes in the ectopic marrow. Conclusion: Saos-2 cells (freeze-dried) or their extracts, implanted subcutaneously into Nu/Nu mice, can induce normal marrow that is host-derived, and contains all major hematopoietic cell lineages. Clinical Significance: Saos-2 induced marrow could potentially restore deficient marrow and promote bone repair. PMID:23386915

  15. Cells lacking DNA topoisomerase II beta are resistant to genistein.

    PubMed

    López-Lazaro, Miguel; Willmore, Elaine; Austin, Caroline A

    2007-05-01

    Evidence suggests that DNA topoisomerases (topos) may be involved in the anticancer and carcinogenic properties attributed to flavonoids. Using the cell-based assay TARDIS, the dietary flavonoids genistein (1) and luteolin (2) have been evaluated as topo I and topo II poisons and catalytic inhibitors in K562 leukemia cells. Both flavonoids induced topo II-DNA complexes, but they did not induce significant levels of topo I-DNA complexes. Genistein decreased the topo II-DNA complexes induced by the topo II poison etoposide, suggestive of a catalytic inhibition of topo II, and luteolin decreased the topo I-DNA complexes induced by the topo I poison camptothecin, indicative of a catalytic inhibition of topo I. Murine transgenic cells lacking topo II beta were resistant to genistein-induced cell growth inhibition (XTT assays) and cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay). High levels of topo II beta-DNA complexes were also observed in K562 cells exposed to genistein. These data suggest that topo II beta has an important function in genistein-induced cell growth inhibition and cell death. The possible role of topoisomerases in the putative anticancer and carcinogenic properties of genistein and luteolin is discussed.

  16. Treatment of Adult Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Using Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0460 TITLE: TREATMENT OF ADULT SEVERE TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY USING AUTOLOGOUS BONE MARROW ...AUTOLOGOUS BONE MARROW MONONUCLEAR CELLS” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0460 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Charles S. Cox...Our primary hypothesis is that bone marrow mononuclear cell (BMMNC) autologous transplantation after TBI is safe. Our secondary hypothesis is that

  17. Establishment of Donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0234 TITLE: “Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP Cell Co-infusion” PRINCIPAL...Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Megan.sykes@columbia.edu Establishment of donor Chimerism Using Allogeneic Bone Marrow with AMP...promote the induction of durable mixed allogeneic chimerism in non-human primates. To this end, we have performed bone marrow transplantation in two

  18. Heme-Oxygenases during Erythropoiesis in K562 and Human Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Liliane R.; Costa, Elaine S.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara L.; Teodosio, Cristina; Bárcena, Paloma; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Bozza, Patrícia T.; Orfao, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, heme can be degraded by heme-oxygenases (HO). Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is known to be the heme inducible isoform, whereas heme-oxygenase 2 (HO-2) is the constitutive enzyme. Here we investigated the presence of HO during erythroid differentiation in human bone marrow erythroid precursors and K562 cells. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression levels were below limits of detection in K562 cells. Moreover, heme was unable to induce HO-1, at the protein and mRNA profiles. Surprisingly, HO-2 expression was inhibited upon incubation with heme. To evaluate the physiological relevance of these findings, we analyzed HO expression during normal erythropoiesis in human bone marrow. Erythroid precursors were characterized by lack of significant expression of HO-1 and by progressive reduction of HO-2 during differentiation. FLVCR expression, a recently described heme exporter found in erythroid precursors, was also analyzed. Interestingly, the disruption in the HO detoxification system was accompanied by a transient induction of FLVCR. It will be interesting to verify if the inhibition of HO expression, that we found, is preventing a futile cycle of concomitant heme synthesis and catabolism. We believe that a significant feature of erythropoiesis could be the replacement of heme breakdown by heme exportation, as a mechanism to prevent heme toxicity. PMID:21765894

  19. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Display Intact Functionality.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Elizabeth O; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Yuan, Shala; Garcia, Marco; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Galipeau, Jacques

    2017-01-26

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only cure for sickle cell disease (SCD), but engraftment remains challenging in patients lacking matched donors. Infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) at the time of HCT may promote hematopoiesis and ameliorate graft-versus-host disease. Experimental murine models suggest MSC major histocompatibility complex compatibility with recipient impacts their in vivo function, suggesting autologous MSCs could be superior to third-party MSCs for promoting HCT engraftment. Here we tested whether bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs from SCD subjects have comparable functionality compared with MSCs from healthy volunteers. SCD MSC doubling time and surface marker phenotype did not differ significantly from non-SCD. Third-party and autologous (SCD) T cell proliferation was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by all MSCs. SCD MSCs comparably expressed indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, which based on transwell and blocking experiments appeared to be the dominant immunomodulatory pathway. The expression of key genes involved in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-MSC interactions was minimally altered between SCD and non-SCD MSCs. Expression was, however, altered by IFN-γ stimulation, particularly CXCL14, CXCL26, CX3CL1, CKITL, and JAG1, indicating the potential to augment MSC expression by cytokine stimulation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of expanding BM-derived MSCs from SCD patients that phenotypically and functionally do not differ per International Society of Cell Therapy essential criteria from non-SCD MSCs, supporting initial evaluation (primarily for safety) of autologous MSCs to enhance haploidentical HSC engraftment in SCD.

  20. Engineering injectable bone using bone marrow stromal cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongyang; Zhong, Cuiping; Yao, Hong; Liu, Yanpu; Chen, Fulin; Li, Jianxue; Zhao, Jinlong; Mao, Tianqiu; Ren, Liling

    2011-06-01

    With the increasing popularity of minimally invasive surgery, to develop an injectable bone would be highly preferable for the repair of bone nonunions and defects. However, the use of dissociated cells and exogenous carriers to construct injectable bone faces several drawbacks. To circumvent these limitations, we first harvested a cell sheet from rabbit bone marrow stromal cells using a continuous culture method and a scraping technique. The obtained sheet was then cut into fragments of multicellular aggregates, each of which was composed of a certain number of cells, extracellular matrix, and intercellular connections. The aggregates showed apparent mineralization properties, high alkaline phosphatase activity, increased osteocalcin content, and upregulated bone markers, implying their in vitro osteogenic potential. Then, serum-free medium (the control group), dissociated cell suspension (the cell group), and suspension of multicellular aggregates (the aggregate group) were injected subcutaneously on the back of the nude mice to evaluate ectopic bone formation. The results revealed that the aggregate group showed significantly larger and denser bone at the injection sites than the cell group, whereas bone formation did not occur in the control group. Additionally, when injecting them locally into the mandibular fracture gap of delayed healing in a rabbit model, we observed the most improved bone healing in the aggregate group. More cells survive and retain at the injection sites in the aggregate group than that in the cell group postoperatively. Our study indicates that the multicellular aggregates might be considered a promising strategy to generate injectable bone tissue and improve the efficacy of cell therapy.

  1. Cytokeratin-positive cells in bone marrow of breast cancer patients and noncancer donors

    PubMed Central

    Krag, David N.; Kusminsky, Roberto; Manna, Edward; Weaver, Donald; Harlow, Seth P.; Covelli, Michael; Stanley, Mary A.; McCahill, Laurence; Ittleman, Frank; Leavitt, Bruce; Krag, Martin; Amarante, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Detection of disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow may provide important prognostic information in breast cancer patients. With few exceptions the number of stained cells scored as cancer is very low; there may be only one cell per slide. This makes definitive interpretation of cancer in marrow challenging. False-positive staining of marrow cells with cytokeratin (CK) antibody is relatively common and makes interpretation more difficult. In this report we focus on false-positive staining of marrow specimens from breast cancer patients and noncancer controls and demonstrate that the frequency of false positive events is common. Bone marrow was collected from 23 cancer-free donors and 60 breast cancer patients. Samples were processed by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation and slides were prepared for immunocytochemical staining with CK and irrelevant (IR) antibody. Slides were evaluated manually and positive cells were categorized as tumor cells (TCs), hematopoetic cells (HCs), or questionable cells (QCs). False-positive staining events were commonly observed in noncancer cases stained with CK or IR antibodies and in breast cancer cases stained with IR antibody. There was little difference in the number of breast cancer marrow specimens scored as tumor cells regardless of whether the antibody used was CK or IR. It is important to devise improved criteria and methods for accurate detection and interpretation of disseminated tumor cells in the marrow of breast cancer patients. PMID:19417625

  2. Quercetin potentiates transdifferentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into the beta cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miladpour, B; Rasti, M; Owji, A A; Mostafavipour, Z; Khoshdel, Z; Noorafshan, A; Zal, F

    2017-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease caused by the destruction of β-cells in the pancreas. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent and easy accessible adult stem cells that may provide options in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Injured pancreatic extract can promote the differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into β-cells. We aimed to observe the effect of quercetin in differentiation and insulin secretion in β-cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from the tibiae of rats. Cell surface markers were analyzed by flow cytometry. The cells were treated with rat injured pancreatic extract and quercetin for 2 weeks. Insulin secretion was measured by ELISA. Insulin expression and some islet factors were evaluated by RT-PCR. PDX1, a marker for β-cell function and differentiation, was evaluated by both immunocytochemistry and Western blot. β-cell count was determined by stereology and cell count assay. ELISA showed significant differences in insulin secretion in the cells treated with RIPE + 20 μM quercetin (0.55 ± 0.01 µg/L) compared with the cells treated with RIPE alone (0.48 ± 0.01 µg/L) (P = 0.026). RT-PCR results confirmed insulin expression in both groups. PDX1 protein was detected in both groups by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Stereology results showed a significant increase in β-cell number in the RIPE + quercetin-treated cells (47 ± 2.0) when compared with RIPE treatment alone (44 ± 2.5) (P = 0.015). Quercetin has a strengthening effect on the differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into β-cells and increases insulin secretion from the differentiated β-cells in vitro.

  3. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  4. Increased Bone Mass in Female Mice Lacking Mast Cell Chymase

    PubMed Central

    Lind, Thomas; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Calounova, Gabriela; Hu, Lijuan; Rasmusson, Annica; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Wernersson, Sara; Åbrink, Magnus; Andersson, Göran; Larsson, Sune; Melhus, Håkan; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Here we addressed the potential impact of chymase, a mast-cell restricted protease, on mouse bone phenotype. We show that female mice lacking the chymase Mcpt4 acquired a persistent expansion of diaphyseal bone in comparison with wild type controls, reaching a 15% larger diaphyseal cross sectional area at 12 months of age. Mcpt4-/- mice also showed increased levels of a bone anabolic serum marker and higher periosteal bone formation rate. However, they were not protected from experimental osteoporosis, suggesting that chymase regulates normal bone homeostasis rather than the course of osteoporosis. Further, the absence of Mcpt4 resulted in age-dependent upregulation of numerous genes important for bone formation but no effects on osteoclast activity. In spite of the latter, Mcpt4-/- bones had increased cortical porosity and reduced endocortical mineralization. Mast cells were found periosteally and, notably, bone-proximal mast cells in Mcpt4-/- mice were degranulated to a larger extent than in wild type mice. Hence, chymase regulates degranulation of bone mast cells, which could affect the release of mast cell-derived factors influencing bone remodelling. Together, these findings reveal a functional impact of mast cell chymase on bone. Further studies exploring the possibility of using chymase inhibitors as a strategy to increase bone volume may be warranted. PMID:27936149

  5. Differentiating functional roles of gene expression from immune and non-immune cells in mouse colitis by bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koon, Hon Wai; Ho, Samantha; Cheng, Michelle; Ichikawa, Ryan; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2012-10-01

    To understand the role of a gene in the development of colitis, we compared the responses of wild-type mice and gene-of-interest deficient knockout mice to colitis. If the gene-of-interest is expressed in both bone marrow derived cells and non-bone marrow derived cells of the host; however, it is possible to differentiate the role of a gene of interest in bone marrow derived cells and non- bone marrow derived cells by bone marrow transplantation technique. To change the bone marrow derived cell genotype of mice, the original bone marrow of recipient mice were destroyed by irradiation and then replaced by new donor bone marrow of different genotype. When wild-type mice donor bone marrow was transplanted to knockout mice, we could generate knockout mice with wild-type gene expression in bone marrow derived cells. Alternatively, when knockout mice donor bone marrow was transplanted to wild-type recipient mice, wild-type mice without gene-of-interest expressing from bone marrow derived cells were produced. However, bone marrow transplantation may not be 100% complete. Therefore, we utilized cluster of differentiation (CD) molecules (CD45.1 and CD45.2) as markers of donor and recipient cells to track the proportion of donor bone marrow derived cells in recipient mice and success of bone marrow transplantation. Wild-type mice with CD45.1 genotype and knockout mice with CD45.2 genotype were used. After irradiation of recipient mice, the donor bone marrow cells of different genotypes were infused into the recipient mice. When the new bone marrow regenerated to take over its immunity, the mice were challenged by chemical agent (dextran sodium sulfate, DSS 5%) to induce colitis. Here we also showed the method to induce colitis in mice and evaluate the role of the gene of interest expressed from bone-marrow derived cells. If the gene-of-interest from the bone derived cells plays an important role in the development of the disease (such as colitis), the phenotype of the

  6. Differentiating Functional Roles of Gene Expression from Immune and Non-immune Cells in Mouse Colitis by Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Hon Wai; Ho, Samantha; Cheng, Michelle; Ichikawa, Ryan; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2012-01-01

    To understand the role of a gene in the development of colitis, we compared the responses of wild-type mice and gene-of-interest deficient knockout mice to colitis. If the gene-of-interest is expressed in both bone marrow derived cells and non-bone marrow derived cells of the host; however, it is possible to differentiate the role of a gene of interest in bone marrow derived cells and non- bone marrow derived cells by bone marrow transplantation technique. To change the bone marrow derived cell genotype of mice, the original bone marrow of recipient mice were destroyed by irradiation and then replaced by new donor bone marrow of different genotype. When wild-type mice donor bone marrow was transplanted to knockout mice, we could generate knockout mice with wild-type gene expression in bone marrow derived cells. Alternatively, when knockout mice donor bone marrow was transplanted to wild-type recipient mice, wild-type mice without gene-of-interest expressing from bone marrow derived cells were produced. However, bone marrow transplantation may not be 100% complete. Therefore, we utilized cluster of differentiation (CD) molecules (CD45.1 and CD45.2) as markers of donor and recipient cells to track the proportion of donor bone marrow derived cells in recipient mice and success of bone marrow transplantation. Wild-type mice with CD45.1 genotype and knockout mice with CD45.2 genotype were used. After irradiation of recipient mice, the donor bone marrow cells of different genotypes were infused into the recipient mice. When the new bone marrow regenerated to take over its immunity, the mice were challenged by chemical agent (dextran sodium sulfate, DSS 5%) to induce colitis. Here we also showed the method to induce colitis in mice and evaluate the role of the gene of interest expressed from bone-marrow derived cells. If the gene-of-interest from the bone derived cells plays an important role in the development of the disease (such as colitis), the phenotype of the

  7. Multipotent Adult Progenitor Cells from Bone Marrow Differentiate into Chondrocyte-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lele; Weng, Yimin; Shui, Xiaolong; Fang, Wenlai; Zhang, Erge; Pan, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Cartilage tissue engineering has great potential for treating chondral and osteochondral injuries. Efficient seed cells are the key to cartilage tissue engineering. Multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have greater differentiation ability than other bone-marrow stem cells, and thus may be candidate seed cells. We attempted to differentiate MAPCs into chondrocyte-like cells to evaluate their suitability as seed cells for cartilage tissue engineering. Toluidine blue and Alcian blue staining suggested that glycosaminoglycan was expressed in differentiated cells. Immunofluorostaining indicated that differentiated human MAPCs (hMAPCs) expressed collagen II. Based on these results, we concluded that bone-marrow-derived hMAPCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells in vitro.

  8. The role of bone marrow-derived cells during the bone healing process in the GFP mouse bone marrow transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Tsujigiwa, Hidetsugu; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Katase, Naoki; Buery, Rosario Rivera; Tamamura, Ryo; Ito, Satoshi; Takagi, Shin; Iida, Seiji; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2013-03-01

    Bone healing is a complex and multistep process in which the origin of the cells participating in bone repair is still unknown. The involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in tissue repair has been the subject of recent studies. In the present study, bone marrow-derived cells in bone healing were traced using the GFP bone marrow transplantation model. Bone marrow cells from C57BL/6-Tg (CAG-EGFP) were transplanted into C57BL/6 J wild mice. After transplantation, bone injury was created using a 1.0-mm drill. Bone healing was histologically assessed at 3, 7, 14, and 28 postoperative days. Immunohistochemistry for GFP; double-fluorescent immunohistochemistry for GFP-F4/80, GFP-CD34, and GFP-osteocalcin; and double-staining for GFP and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase were performed. Bone marrow transplantation successfully replaced the hematopoietic cells into GFP-positive donor cells. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that osteoblasts or osteocytes in the repair stage were GFP-negative, whereas osteoclasts in the repair and remodeling stages and hematopoietic cells were GFP-positive. The results indicated that bone marrow-derived cells might not differentiate into osteoblasts. The role of bone marrow-derived cells might be limited to adjustment of the microenvironment by differentiating into inflammatory cells, osteoclasts, or endothelial cells in immature blood vessels.

  9. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Drive Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Maertens, Ludovic; Erpicum, Charlotte; Detry, Benoit; Blacher, Silvia; Lenoir, Bénédicte; Carnet, Oriane; Péqueux, Christel; Cataldo, Didier; Lecomte, Julie; Paupert, Jenny; Noel, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    It is now well accepted that multipotent Bone-Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM-MSC) contribute to cancer progression through several mechanisms including angiogenesis. However, their involvement during the lymphangiogenic process is poorly described. Using BM-MSC isolated from mice of two different backgrounds, we demonstrate a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC both in vivo and in vitro. Co-injection of BM-MSC and tumor cells in mice increased the in vivo tumor growth and intratumoral lymphatic vessel density. In addition, BM-MSC or their conditioned medium stimulated the recruitment of lymphatic vessels in vivo in an ear sponge assay, and ex vivo in the lymphatic ring assay (LRA). In vitro, MSC conditioned medium also increased the proliferation rate and the migration of both primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and an immortalized lymphatic endothelial cell line. Mechanistically, these pro-lymphangiogenic effects relied on the secretion of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF)-A by BM-MSC that activates VEGF Receptor (VEGFR)-2 pathway on LEC. Indeed, the trapping of VEGF-A in MSC conditioned medium by soluble VEGF Receptors (sVEGFR)-1, -2 or the inhibition of VEGFR-2 activity by a specific inhibitor (ZM 323881) both decreased LEC proliferation, migration and the phosphorylation of their main downstream target ERK1/2. This study provides direct unprecedented evidence for a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC via the production of VEGF-A which acts on LEC VEGFR-2. PMID:25222747

  10. Characterization of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamzic, Edita; Whiting, Karen; Gordon Smith, Edward; Pettengell, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In aplastic anaemia (AA), haemopoietic activity is significantly reduced and generally attributed to failure of haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the bone marrow (BM). The regulation of haemopoiesis depends on the interaction between HSC and various cells of the BM microenvironment, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). MSC involvement in the functional restriction of HSC in AA is largely unknown and therefore, the physical and functional properties of AA MSC were studied in vitro. MSC were characterized by their phenotype and ability to form adherent stromal layers. The functional properties of AA MSC were assessed through proliferative, clonogenic and cross-over culture assays. Results indicate that although AA MSC presented typical morphology and distinctive mesenchymal markers, stromal formation was reduced, with 50% of BM samples failing to produce adherent layers. Furthermore, their proliferative and clonogenic capacity was markedly decreased (P = 0·03 and P = 0·04 respectively) and the ability to sustain haemopoiesis was significantly reduced, as assessed by total cell proliferation (P = 0·032 and P = 0·019 at Week 5 and 6, respectively) and clonogenic potential of HSC (P = 0·02 at Week 6). It was concluded that the biological characteristics of AA MSC are different from those of control MSC and their in vitro haemopoiesis-supporting ability is significantly reduced.

  11. Stem cell plasticity revisited: The continuum marrow model and phenotypic changes mediated by microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Aliotta, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of marrow hematopoietic stem cells is determined by cell cycle state and microvesicle entry into the stem cells. The stem cell population is continually changing based on cell cycle transit and thus can only be defined on a population basis. Purification of marrow stem cells only addresses the heterogeneity of these populations. When whole marrow is studied, the long-term repopulating stem cells are in active cell cycle. However, with some variability, when highly purified stem cells are studied, the cells appear to be dormant. Thus, the study of purified stem cells is intrinsically misleading. Tissue-derived microvesicles enhanced by injury effect the phenotype of different cell classes. We propose that previously described stem cell plasticity is due to microvesicle modulation. We further propose a stem cell population model in which the individual cell phenotypes continually changes, but the population phenotype is relatively stable. This, in turn, is modulated by microvesicle and microenvironmental influences. PMID:20382199

  12. Cell interactions between hematopoietic and stromal cells in the embryonic chick bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, J M; Weiss, L

    1980-05-01

    Light microscopic, scanning electron microscopic, and transmission electron microscopic studies of the early developmental stages of chick embryonic bone marrow disclose characteristic associations of the first hematopoietic cells with stromal cells. The first hematopoietic cells, large basophilic cells that we have termed presumptive stem cells, segregate into erythropoietic and granulopoietic regions. Intravascular erythropoietic cells associate with sinusoidal endothelial cells, while granulopoietic cells associate with extravascular reticular cells. Extensive, intimate contacts between erythroid and endothelial cells are maintained, in part, by marginal arrays of microtubules, which promote a flattening of the adherent erythroid cell surface. In addition, cell surface components of opposing cells, visualized by ruthenium red staining, appear to merge and possibly to interact. Granulopoietic cells establish intimate but less extensive associations with reticular cells through cell-surface interactions. Stationary granuloid cells appear to be held in place by small, thin processes emanating from the sheet-like reticular cells. Granuloid cells are capable of moving within the extravascular region, using reticular cell surfaces as a substrate. Intimate associations also occur among granulopoietic cells, the significance of which is unclear. Thus, sinusoidal endothelial cells and reticular cells comprise the critical non-hematopoietic or stromal elements of avian bone marrow, where they have a putative role in segregating presumptive stem cells into erythrocyteic and granulocytic compartments. They serve as an architectual, and possibly regulatory, framework on which hematopoiesis occurs.

  13. [Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into Neuron-Like Cells In Vitro

    PubMed

    Guo, Zi-Kuan; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Hou, Chun-Mei; Li, Xiu-Sen; Mao, Ning

    2001-03-01

    Recent reports have clearly demonstrated that bone marrow cells can be differentiated into neurons, suggesting the existence of cells with the differentiation capacity in the bone marrow cell population. It is well known that hematopoietic stem cells as well as mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be transplanted and therefore, alternative of them might contribute to the process. In the present study it was addressed whether marrow MSCs could be coaxed into neuron-specific antigen bearing cells and if so, whether the differentiated cells possess the cytochemical features seen in neurons. The report here showed that high concentration of 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) could induce some of the MSCs into neuron-like cells expressing neurofilament (NF) and neuron specific enolase (NSE). The neuron-like cells were alkaline phosphotase positive while the others MSCs were kept negative. Cells treated with 2-ME were positive for alpha-naphthylacetate esterase and glycogen and negative for acetylchonlinesterase, which were similar with the results seen in untreated cells. Furthermore, Nissel body was not observed in treated cells shown by toluidine blue staining. Therefore, it is likely that the cells described here seem not belong to the neuronal lineage. These findings, however, reveal that human MSCs could alter their committed fates under some circumstances.

  14. T-cell acute leukaemia exhibits dynamic interactions with bone marrow microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Edwin D; Duarte, Delfim; Akinduro, Olufolake; Khorshed, Reema A; Passaro, Diana; Nowicka, Malgorzata; Straszkowski, Lenny; Scott, Mark K; Rothery, Steve; Ruivo, Nicola; Foster, Katie; Waibel, Michaela; Johnstone, Ricky W; Harrison, Simon J; Westerman, David A; Quach, Hang; Gribben, John; Robinson, Mark D; Purton, Louise E; Bonnet, Dominique; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2016-10-27

    It is widely accepted that complex interactions between cancer cells and their surrounding microenvironment contribute to disease development, chemo-resistance and disease relapse. In light of this observed interdependency, novel therapeutic interventions that target specific cancer stroma cell lineages and their interactions are being sought. Here we studied a mouse model of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) and used intravital microscopy to monitor the progression of disease within the bone marrow at both the tissue-wide and single-cell level over time, from bone marrow seeding to development/selection of chemo-resistance. We observed highly dynamic cellular interactions and promiscuous distribution of leukaemia cells that migrated across the bone marrow, without showing any preferential association with bone marrow sub-compartments. Unexpectedly, this behaviour was maintained throughout disease development, from the earliest bone marrow seeding to response and resistance to chemotherapy. Our results reveal that T-ALL cells do not depend on specific bone marrow microenvironments for propagation of disease, nor for the selection of chemo-resistant clones, suggesting that a stochastic mechanism underlies these processes. Yet, although T-ALL infiltration and progression are independent of the stroma, accumulated disease burden leads to rapid, selective remodelling of the endosteal space, resulting in a complete loss of mature osteoblastic cells while perivascular cells are maintained. This outcome leads to a shift in the balance of endogenous bone marrow stroma, towards a composition associated with less efficient haematopoietic stem cell function. This novel, dynamic analysis of T-ALL interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment in vivo, supported by evidence from human T-ALL samples, highlights that future therapeutic interventions should target the migration and promiscuous interactions of cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment

  15. T cell acute leukaemia exhibits dynamic interactions with bone marrow microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Edwin D; Duarte, Delfim; Akinduro, Olufolake; Khorshed, Reema A; Passaro, Diana; Nowicka, Malgorzata; Straszkowski, Lenny; Scott, Mark K; Rothery, Steve; Ruivo, Nicola; Foster, Katie; Waibel, Michaela; Johnstone, Ricky W; Harrison, Simon J; Westerman, David A; Quach, Hang; Gribben, John; Robinson, Mark D; Purton, Louise E; Bonnet, Dominique; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that complex interactions between cancer cells and their surrounding microenvironment contribute to disease development, chemo-resistance and disease relapse. In light of this observed interdependency, novel therapeutic interventions that target specific cancer stroma cell lineages and their interactions are being sought. To this end, we studied a mouse model of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) and used intravital microscopy to monitor the progression of disease within the bone marrow at both the tissue-wide and single cell level over time, from bone marrow seeding to development/selection of chemo-resistance. We observed highly dynamic cellular interactions and promiscuous distribution of leukaemia cells that migrated across the bone marrow, without showing any preferential association with bone marrow sub-compartments. Unexpectedly, this behaviour was maintained throughout disease development, from the earliest bone marrow seeding to response and resistance to chemotherapy. Our results reveal that T-ALL cells do not depend on specific bone marrow microenvironments for propagation of disease, nor for the selection of chemo-resistant clones, suggesting a stochastic mechanism underlies these processes. Yet, while T-ALL infiltration and progression are independent of the stroma, accumulated disease burden leads to rapid, selective remodelling of the endosteal space, resulting in a complete loss of mature osteoblastic cells whilst perivascular cells are maintained. This outcome leads to a shift in the balance of endogenous bone marrow stroma, towards a composition associated with less efficient haematopoietic stem cell function1. This novel, dynamic analysis of T-ALL interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment in vivo, supported by evidence from human T-ALL samples, highlights that future therapeutic interventions should target the migration and promiscuous interactions of cancer cells with the surrounding

  16. CNS disease diminishes the therapeutic functionality of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Alex; Bai, Lianhua; Shano, Genevieve; Karl, Molly; Garrison, Eric; Ranasinghe, Lahiru; Planchon, Sarah M; Cohen, Jeffrey; Miller, Robert H

    2017-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a potentially powerful cellular therapy for autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). Based on their success in treating animal models of MS like experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), MSCs have moved rapidly into clinical trials for MS. The majority of these trials use autologous MSCs derived from MS patients, although it remains unclear how CNS disease may affect these cells. Here, we report that bone marrow MSCs derived from EAE mice lack therapeutic efficacy compared to naïve MSCs in their ability to ameliorate EAE. Treatment with conditioned medium from EAE-MSCs also fails to modulate EAE, and EAE-MSCs secrete higher levels of many pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to naïve MSCs. Similarly, MSCs derived from MS patients have less therapeutic efficacy than naïve MSCs in treating EAE and secrete higher levels of some of the same pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus diseases like EAE and MS diminish the therapeutic functionality of bone marrow MSCs, prompting reevaluation about the ongoing use of autologous MSCs as a treatment for MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Roles of bone marrow cells in skeletal metastases: no longer bystanders.

    PubMed

    Park, Serk In; Soki, Fabiana N; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-12-01

    Bone serves one of the most congenial metastatic microenvironments for multiple types of solid tumors, but its role in this process remains under-explored. Among many cell populations constituting the bone and bone marrow microenvironment, osteoblasts (originated from mesenchymal stem cells) and osteoclasts (originated from hematopoietic stem cells) have been the main research focus for pro-tumorigenic roles. Recently, increasing evidence further elucidates that hematopoietic lineage cells as well as stromal cells in the bone marrow mediate distinct but critical functions in tumor growth, metastasis, angiogenesis and apoptosis in the bone microenvironment. This review article summarizes the key evidence describing differential roles of bone marrow cells, including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), megakaryocytes, macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the development of metastatic bone lesions. HSCs promote tumor growth by switching on angiogenesis, but at the same time compete with metastatic tumor cells for occupancy of osteoblastic niche. Megakaryocytes negatively regulate the extravasating tumor cells by inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation. Macrophages and myeloid cells have pro-tumorigenic roles in general, suggesting a similar effect in the bone marrow. Hematopoietic and stromal cell populations in the bone marrow, previously considered as simple by-standers in the context of tumor metastasis, have distinct and active roles in promoting or suppressing tumor growth and metastasis in bone. Further investigation on the extended roles of bone marrow cells will help formulate better approaches to treatment through improved understanding of the metastatic bone microenvironment.

  18. Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma-Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 .TITLE: Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert...the compound (Figure 1 ). The inhibitor was slightly more effective in T-47D cells than in MCF-7 cells, but did not eradicate dormant clones much past

  19. Antitumor immunomodulatory activity of allogenic bone marrow cells on TiNi scaffold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokorev, O. V.; Hodorenko, V. N.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.; Gunther, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of modulation of anti-tumor response by allogenic bone marrow cell transplantation into porous TiNi-based scaffold. Transplantation of bone marrow cells into porous TiNi-based scaffold leads to antitumor (35%) and antimetastatic (55%) effects. The lifetime of tumor-bearing animals and implanted allogenic bone marrow cells in incubator of TiNi increases up to 60%. The possible mechanisms of the effect of allogenic cells on tumor process are the stimulation of endogenous effectors of antitumor immunity.

  20. Primary bone marrow B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma successfully treated with R-CHOP.

    PubMed

    Qian, Liren; Zhang, Zhi; Shen, Jianliang; Liu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Primary isolated bone marrow disease as a presenting feature of lymphoma is very rare. We describe the case of a Chinese with isolated bone marrow small B-cell lymphoma as a first manifestation. A 55-year old woman was admitted to our hospital with fever. Her peripheral blood smear and laboratory findings were suggestive of bicytopenia. Bone marrow specimen showed diffusely distributed small-sized lymphocytes. Combined with immunophenotypic and chromosomal analysis, a diagnosis of primary bone marrow B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was made. The patient was treated with R-CHOP (rituximab and cyclophosphamide, epirubicin, vindesine, and prednisone) regimen for six cycles. She had complete remission and is still alive without relapse. We concluded that primary bone marrow mature small B-cell lymphoma is a rare but distinctive subtype of lymphoma. The prognosis for this entity is poor but rituximab-based treatment is promising for improving its outcomes.

  1. T cell regeneration after allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Favrot, Marie; Janossy, G.; Tidman, N.; Blacklock, Hilary; Lopez, Elisa; Bofill, Margarita; Lampert, I.; Morgenstein, G.; Powles, R.; Prentice, H. G.; Hoffbrand, A. V.

    1983-01-01

    Various T cell subsets were characterized by double immunofluorescent staining using monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) in blood, bone marrow (BM) and tissues of 29 patients after allogeneic BM transplantation (BMT). In an attempt to prevent graft versus host disease (GvHD), 15 patients received cyclosporin A (Cy A). In the remaining 14 patients the BM was pre-incubated with a MoAb, OKT3. The regeneration of T4+ subset was delayed and the level of T8+ cells was abnormally high even 1 year after engraftment. This did not have any predictive value for the appearance of complications such as GvHD or severe viral infections. The number of T8+ cells was lower in the group of patients who received Cy A than in the OKT3 group (0·7±0·2 vs 1·5±0·3×109/1 at day 90). In contrast to normal individuals, the T4/T8 ratio in both blood and regenerating BM of BMT patients was <1. A sizeable subset of circulating T cells expressed the phenotype T8+,T10+,HNK-1+,DR+. Circulating cells of this phenotype were transiently very high (up to 50%) in patients with active GvHD or suffering from severe viral infection. This subpopulation of lymphocytes was not found in the epidermal infiltrate that accompanied GvHD where the predominant phenotype was T8+,T1-,T10-,HNK-1-,DR-. We conclude therefore that after BMT the number and phenotype of circulating T cells reflects the T cell distribution seen in the regenerating BM. PMID:6352107

  2. Neuronal-like cell differentiation of non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxin; Zhang, Jinghan; Ben, Xiaoming

    2013-08-05

    Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells from C57BL/6J mice were separated and cultured using the "pour-off" method. Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells developed colony-forming unit-fibroblasts, and could be expanded by supplementation with epidermal growth factor. Immunocytochemistry showed that the non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells exposed to basic fibroblast growth factor/epidermal growth factor/nerve growth factor expressed the neuron specific markers, neurofilament-200 and NeuN, in vitro. Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells from β-galactosidase transgenic mice were also transplanted into focal ischemic brain (right corpus striatum) of C57BL/6J mice. At 8 weeks, cells positive for LacZ and β-galactosidase staining were observed in the ischemic tissues, and cells co-labeled with both β-galactosidase and NeuN were seen by double immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that the non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells could differentiate into neuronal-like cells in vitro and in vivo.

  3. The Role of Bone Marrow Cells in the Phenotypic Changes Associated with Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Cheng, Qingli; Liu, Sheng; Zhao, Jiahui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the role of bone marrow cells in the phenotypic changes that occur in diabetic nephropathy. Bone marrow cells were obtained from either streptozotocin-induced diabetic or untreated control C3H/He mice and transplanted into control C3H/He mice. Eight weeks after bone marrow cell transplantation, renal morphologic changes and clinical parameters of diabetic nephropathy, including the urine albumin/creatinine ratio and glucose tolerance, were measured in vivo. Expression levels of the genes encoding α1 type IV collagen and transforming growth factor-β1 in the kidney were assayed. Our results demonstrated that glucose tolerance was normal in the recipients of bone marrow transplants from both diabetic and control donors. However, compared with recipients of the control bone marrow transplant, the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, glomerular size, and the mesangial/glomerular area ratio increased 3.3-fold (p < 0.01), 1.23-fold (p < 0.01), and 2.13-fold (p < 0.001), respectively, in the recipients of the diabetic bone marrow transplant. Expression levels of the genes encoding glomerular α1 type IV collagen and transforming growth factor-β1 were also significantly increased (p < 0.01) in the recipients of the diabetic bone marrow transplant. Our data suggest that bone marrow cells from the STZ-induced diabetic mice can confer a diabetic phenotype to recipient control mice without the presence of hyperglycemia. PMID:26340671

  4. Anticonvulsant activity of bone marrow cells in electroconvulsive seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone marrow is an accessible source of progenitor cells, which have been investigated as treatment for neurological diseases in a number of clinical trials. Here we evaluated the potential benefit of bone marrow cells in protecting against convulsive seizures induced by maximum electroconvulsive shock (MES), a widely used model for screening of anti-epileptic drugs. Behavioral and inflammatory responses were measured after MES induction in order to verify the effects promoted by transplantation of bone marrow cells. To assess the anticonvulsant effects of bone marrow cell transplantation, we measured the frequency and duration of tonic seizure, the mortality rate, the microglial expression and the blood levels of cytokine IL-1, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α after MES induction. We hypothesized that these behavioral and inflammatory responses to a strong stimulus such as a convulsive seizure could be modified by the transplantation of bone marrow cells. Results Bone marrow transplanted cells altered the convulsive threshold and showed anticonvulsant effect by protecting from tonic seizures. Bone marrow cells modified the microglial expression in the analyzed brain areas, increased the IL-10 and attenuate IL-6 levels. Conclusions Bone marrow cells exert protective effects by blocking the course of electroconvulsive seizures. Additionally, electroconvulsive seizures induced acute inflammatory responses by altering the pattern of microglia expression, as well as in IL-6 and IL-10 levels. Our findings also indicated that the anticonvulsant effects of these cells can be tested with the MES model following the same paradigm used for drug testing in pharmacological screening. Studies on the inflammatory reaction in response to acute seizures in the presence of transplanted bone marrow cells might open a wide range of discussions on the mechanisms relevant to the pathophysiology of epilepsies. PMID:24011127

  5. Allospecific rejection of MHC class I-deficient bone marrow by CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Haspot, Fabienne; Li, Hao Wei; Lucas, Carrie L.; Fehr, Thomas; Beyaz, Semir; Sykes, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Avoidance of long-term immunosuppression is a desired goal in organ transplantation. Mixed chimerism offers a promising approach to tolerance induction, and we have aimed to develop low-toxicity, non-immunodepleting approaches to achieve this outcome. In a mouse model achieving fully MHC-mismatched allogeneic bone marrow engraftment with minimal conditioning (3 Gy total body irradiation followed by anti-CD154 and T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow cells), CD4 T cells in the recipient are required to promote tolerance of pre-existing alloreactive recipient CD8 T cells and thereby permit chimerism induction. We now demonstrate that mice devoid of CD4 T cells and NK cells reject MHC class-I deficient and class I/class II-deficient marrow in a CD8 T cell-dependent manner. This rejection is specific for donor alloantigens, since recipient hematopoiesis is not affected by donor marrow rejection and MHC class-I deficient bone marrow that is syngeneic to the recipient is not rejected. Recipient CD8 T cells are activated and develop cytotoxicity against MHC class I-deficient donor cells in association with rejection. These data implicate a novel CD8 T cell-dependent bone marrow rejection pathway, wherein recipient CD8 T cells indirectly activated by donor alloantigens promote direct killing, in a TCR-independent manner, of class I-deficient donor cells. PMID:24304495

  6. Markers for Characterization of Bone Marrow Multipotential Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boxall, Sally A.; Jones, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Given the observed efficacy of culture-expanded multipotential stromal cells, also termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), in the treatment of graft-versus host and cardiac disease, it remains surprising that purity and potency characterization of manufactured cell batches remains rather basic. In this paper, we will initially discuss surface and molecular markers that were proposed to serve as the indicators of the MSC potency, in terms of their proliferative potential or the ability to differentiate into desired lineages. The second part of this paper will be dedicated to a critical discussion of surface markers of uncultured (i.e., native) bone marrow (BM) MSCs. Although no formal consensus has yet been reached on which markers may be best suited for prospective BM MSC isolation, markers that cross-react with MSCs of animal models (such as CD271 and W8-B2/MSCA-1) may have the strongest translational value. Whereas small animal models are needed to discover the in vivo function on these markers, large animal models are required for safety and efficacy testing of isolated MSCs, particularly in the field of bone and cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:22666272

  7. The Analysis of Fixed Final State Optimal Control in Bilinear System Applied to Bone Marrow by Cell-Cycle Specific (CCS) Chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainarli, E.; E Dewi, K.

    2017-04-01

    The research conducted by Fister & Panetta shown an optimal control model of bone marrow cells against Cell Cycle Specific chemotherapy drugs. The model used was a bilinear system model. Fister & Panetta research has proved existence, uniqueness, and characteristics of optimal control (the chemotherapy effect). However, by using this model, the amount of bone marrow at the final time could achieve less than 50 percent from the amount of bone marrow before given treatment. This could harm patients because the lack of bone marrow cells made the number of leukocytes declining and patients will experience leukemia. This research would examine the optimal control of a bilinear system that applied to fixed final state. It will be used to determine the length of optimal time in administering chemotherapy and kept bone marrow cells on the allowed level at the same time. Before simulation conducted, this paper shows that the system could be controlled by using a theory of Lie Algebra. Afterward, it shows the characteristics of optimal control. Based on the simulation, it indicates that strong chemotherapy drug given in a short time frame is the most optimal condition to keep bone marrow cells spine on the allowed level but still could put playing an effective treatment. It gives preference of the weight of treatment for keeping bone marrow cells. The result of chemotherapy’s effect (u) is not able to reach the maximum value. On the other words, it needs to make adjustments of medicine’s dosage to satisfy the final treatment condition e.g. the number of bone marrow cells should be at the allowed level.

  8. Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiangzhi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Chaoyong; Sun, Yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Yuebei; Bao, Rongni; Zhao, Ningjian

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-µm Transwell inserts. The differentiation and biological activity of chondrocytes in the culture system were measured, and the inflammatory factors and OA-associated markers were also measured. The results indicated that coculture with human bone marrow stem cells increases cell proliferation of chondrocytes and inhibits inflammatory activity in osteoarthritis.

  9. Haematopoietic progenitor cells from adult bone marrow differentiate into cells that express oligodendroglial antigens in the neonatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Sonia; Alarcón, Pedro; Villaverde, Ramón; Aparicio, Pedro; Silva, Augusto; Martínez, Salvador

    2002-02-01

    Stem cells are self-renewable, pluripotent cells that, in adult life, proliferate by a characteristic asymmetric division in which one daughter cell is committed to differentiation whereas the other remains a stem cell. These cells are also characterized by their ability to differentiate into various cell types under heterotopic environmental influences. In the present study, we have explored the potential of adult haematopoietic bone marrow cells to differentiate into cells of oligodendroglial lineage under physiological, active myelinating conditions. We present evidence of generation of cells expressing oligodendroglial specific markers from a bone marrow subpopulation enriched on adult haematopoietic progenitor cells (CD117+) in vivo after intracerebral transplantation into the neonatal mouse brain. Our results suggest that adult bone marrow cells have the capacity to undergo differentiation from haematopoietic to oligodendroglial cells and add support the validity of bone marrow transplants as an alternative treatment for demyelinating diseases of the CNS including Multiple Sclerosis.

  10. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D/sub 0/ values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F/sub 1/+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/W/sup v/ mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bg/sup J//bg/sup J/, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the backs of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosenitive than those localized in the skin. D/sup 0/ value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  11. Different radiosensitivities of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and skin of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kitamura, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Sonoda, T.; Mori, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    Although tissue mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, some descendants of bone marrow-derived precursors retain the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mast cells even after localization in the skin. The purpose of the present study was to determine the D0 values for mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow and those localized in the skin. Bone marrow cells were removed from (WB X C57BL/6)F1-+/+ mice after various doses of irradiation and injected into the skin of the congenic W/Wv mice which were genetically without mast cells. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow was evaluated by determining the proportion of the injection sites at which mast cells did not appear. For the assay of the radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors localized in the skin, pieces of skin were removed from beige C57BL/6 (bgJ/bgJ. Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice after various doses of irradiation and grafted onto the back of the normal C57BL/6 mice. Radiosensitivity of mast-cell precursors in the skin was evaluated by determining the decrease of beige-type mast cells which possessed giant granules. Mast-cell precursors in the bone marrow were much more radiosensitive than those localized in the skin. D0 value was about 100 rad for the former and about 800 rad for the latter.

  12. Late outgrowth endothelial cells resemble mature endothelial cells and are not derived from bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Tura, Olga; Skinner, Elizabeth M; Barclay, G Robin; Samuel, Kay; Gallagher, Ronald C J; Brittan, Mairi; Hadoke, Patrick W F; Newby, David E; Turner, Marc L; Mills, Nicholas L

    2013-02-01

    A decade of research has sought to identify circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in order to harness their potential for cardiovascular regeneration. Endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) most closely fulfil the criteria for an EPC, but their origin remains obscure. Our aim was to identify the source and precursor of EOC and to assess their regenerative potential compared to mature endothelial cells. EOC are readily isolated from umbilical cord blood (6/6 donors) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (4/6 donors) but not from bone marrow (0/6) or peripheral blood following mobilization with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (0/6 donors). Enrichment and depletion of blood mononuclear cells demonstrated that EOC are confined to the CD34(+)CD133(-)CD146(+) cell fraction. EOC derived from blood mononuclear cells are indistinguishable from mature human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by morphology, surface antigen expression, immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, proliferation, and functional assessments. In a subcutaneous sponge model of angiogenesis, both EOC and HUVEC contribute to de novo blood vessel formation giving rise to a similar number of vessels (7.0 ± 2.7 vs. 6.6 ± 3.7 vessels, respectively, n = 9). Bone marrow-derived outgrowth cells isolated under the same conditions expressed mesenchymal markers rather than endothelial cell markers and did not contribute to blood vessels in vivo. In this article, we confirm that EOC arise from CD34(+)CD133(-)CD146(+) mononuclear cells and are similar, if not identical, to mature endothelial cells. Our findings suggest that EOC do not arise from bone marrow and challenge the concept of a bone marrow-derived circulating precursor for endothelial cells. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Demonstration of clonable alloreactive host T cells in a primate model for bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Reisner, Y.; Ben-Bassat, I.; Douer, D.; Kaploon, A.; Schwartz, E.; Ramot, B.

    1986-06-01

    The phenomenon of marrow rejection following supralethal radiochemotherapy was explained in the past mainly by non-T-cell mechanisms known to be resistant to high-dose irradiation. In the present study a low but significant number of radiochemoresistant-clonable T cells was found in the peripheral blood and spleen of Rhesus monkeys following the cytoreductive protocol used for treatment of leukemia patients prior to bone marrow transplantation. More than 95% of the clonable cells are concentrated in the spleen 5 days after transplant. The cells possess immune memory as demonstrated by the generation of alloreactive-specific cytotoxicity. The present findings suggest that host-versus-graft activity may be mediated by alloreactive T cells. It is hoped that elimination of such cells prior to bone marrow transplantation will increase the engraftment rate of HLA-nonidentical marrow in leukemia patients.

  14. Mature adipocytes in bone marrow protect myeloma cells against chemotherapy through autophagy activation

    PubMed Central

    He, Jin; Liu, Huan; Lin, Pei; Wan, Xinhai; Navone, Nora M.; Tong, Qiang; Kwak, Larry W.; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    A major problem in patients with multiple myeloma is chemotherapy resistance, which develops in myeloma cells upon interaction with bone marrow stromal cells. However, few studies have determined the role of bone marrow adipocytes, a major component of stromal cells in the bone marrow, in myeloma chemotherapy resistance. We reveal that mature human adipocytes activate autophagy and upregulate the expression of autophagic proteins, thereby suppressing chemotherapy-induced caspase cleavage and apoptosis in myeloma cells. We found that adipocytes secreted known and novel adipokines, such as leptin and adipsin. The addition of these adipokines enhanced the expression of autophagic proteins and reduced apoptosis in myeloma cells. In vivo studies further demonstrated the importance of bone marrow-derived adipocytes in the reduced response of myeloma cells to chemotherapy. Our findings suggest that adipocytes, adipocyte-secreted adipokines, and adipocyte-activated autophagy are novel targets for combatting chemotherapy resistance and enhancing treatment efficacy in myeloma patients. PMID:26455377

  15. Treatment of hairy-cell leukemia with chemoradiotherapy and identical-twin bone-marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheever, M.A.; Fefer, A.; Greenberg, P.D.; Appelbaum, F.; Armitage, J.O.; Buckner, C.D.; Sale, G.E.; Storb, R.; Witherspoon, R.P.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-08-01

    A patient with progressive hairy-cell leukemia and a normal genetically identical twin presented an opportunity to determine the sensitivity of this disease to high-dose alkylating-agent chemotherapy and total-body irradiation, since the marrow aplasia induced could potentially be overcome by reconstitution with normal marrow stem cells from the twin. After such therapy the patient rapidly recovered normal marrow function with no evidence of infiltrating hairy cells; he is still in complete remission four years after transplantation. In contrast to other patients with this disorder, he has had no predisposition to infections since transplantation. These results demonstrate that hairy-cell leukemia is sensitive to high-dose cytotoxic therapy and is not associated with any microenvironmental abnormalities that prevent repopulation with normal stem cells. Thus, high-dose chemoradiotherapy followed by bone-marrow transplantation is an effective and potentially curative therapy for hairy-cell leukemia. (JMT)

  16. Analysis of CD14 Expression Levels in Putative Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Isolated from Equine Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Catherine H.; Flaminio, Maria Julia B.F.

    2011-01-01

    A long-term goal of mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) research is to identify cell-surface markers to facilitate MPC isolation. One reported MPC feature in humans and other species is lack of CD14 (lipopolysaccharide receptor) expression. The aim of this study was to evaluate CD14 as an MPC sorting marker. Our hypothesis was that cells negatively selected by CD14 expression would enrich MPC colony formation compared with unsorted and CD14-positive fractions. After validation of reagents, bone marrow aspirate was obtained from 12 horses. Fresh and cultured cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to assess dynamic changes in phenotype. In fresh samples, cells did not consistently express protein markers used for lineage classification. Short-term (2-day) culture allowed distinction between hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic populations. Magnetic activated cell sorting was performed on cells from 6 horses to separate adherent CD14+ from CD14− cells. MPC colony formation was assessed at 7 days. Cells positively selected for CD14 expression were significantly more likely to form MPC colonies than both unsorted and negatively selected cells (P ≤ 0.005). MPCs from all fractions maintained low levels of CD14 expression long term, and upregulated CD14 gene and protein expression when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. The equine CD14 molecule was trypsin-labile, offering a plausible explanation for the discrepancy with MPC phenotypes reported in other species. By definition, MPCs are considered nonhematopoietic because they lack expression of molecules such as CD14. Our results challenge this assumption, as equine MPCs appear to represent a descendant of a CD14-positive cell. PMID:20722500

  17. Bone marrow origin of Ia-positive cells in the medulla rat thymus

    SciTech Connect

    Barclay, A.N.; Mayrhofer, G.

    1981-06-01

    Irradiated rats were reconstituted with bone marrow from F1 hybrids. Ia antigen of donor-bone marrow origin was detected by an immunoperoxidase technique on cryostat sections and found predominantly in the medulla of rat thymus 2 wk after reconstitution. These Ia-bearing cells increased in number with time after reconstitution, but the Ia on the cortical epithelial cells remained of host origin. The nature of the bone marrow-derived cells and their implication for major histocompatibility complex restriction are discussed.

  18. L-leucyl-l-leucine methyl ester treatment of canine marrow and peripheral blood cells: Inhibition of proliferative responses with maintenance of the capacity for autologous marrow engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Raff, R.F.; Severns, E.; Storb, R.; Martin, P.; Graham, T.

    1988-11-01

    The success of allogeneic marrow transplantation as treatment for malignant and nonmalignant hematopoietic diseases has been restricted by the serious complications of graft-versus-host disease. Experiments in a variety of mammalian marrow transplant models have shown that removal of mature T cells from donor marrow permits engraftment without the development of GVHD. Incubation of canine marrow and peripheral blood mononuclear cells with L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester resulted in the inhibition of mitogen-and alloantigen induced blastogenesis, the elimination of allosensitized Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte and Natural Killer activity, and prevented the development of CTL from pCTL. The effects of these incubations were similar to those described in mice and humans. Additionally, in vitro CFU-GM growth from treated canine marrow was reduced, but could be regained when the Leu-Leu-OMe-treated marrow was cocultured with either untreated autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells or monocyte-enriched PBMC but not with untreated monocyte-depleted PBMC. Six of seven dogs conditioned with 920 cGy total-body irradiation engrafted successfully after receiving autologous marrow that was incubated with Leu-Leu-OMe prior to infusion. These cumulative results indicate that incubation with Leu-Leu-OMe is a feasible method to deplete canine marrows of alloreactive and cytotoxic T cells prior to transplantation.

  19. [Therapeutic potential of bone marrow stem cells in cerebral infarction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cruz, Gilberto; Milián-Rodríguez, Lismary

    2015-05-16

    Introduccion. Las celulas madre constituyen una alternativa terapeutica que se encuentra en fase de experimentacion para el infarto cerebral. Objetivo. Mostrar la evidencia cientifica existente sobre el potencial terapeutico de las celulas madre de la medula osea en esta enfermedad. Desarrollo. El infarto cerebral representa el 80% de las enfermedades cerebrovasculares. La trombolisis constituye la unica terapia aprobada, pero, por su estrecha ventana terapeutica, solo se aplica a un bajo porcentaje de los pacientes. De manera alternativa, los tratamientos neurorrestauradores, como el de celulas madre, pueden aplicarse en periodos mas prolongados. Por esta razon se efectuo una busqueda bibliografica en PubMed con el empleo de las palabras clave 'stem cells', 'bone marrow derived mononuclear cells' y 'stroke'. Se encontraron evidencias de seguridad y eficacia de dichas celulas en diferentes momentos evolutivos del infarto cerebral. Se identificaron estudios que en clinica y preclinica las recolectaron por puncion medular y en sangre periferica, y las trasplantaron directamente en el area infartada o por via intravascular. El efecto terapeutico se relaciona con sus propiedades de plasticidad celular y liberacion de factores troficos. Conclusiones. El concentrado de celulas mononucleares autologas, obtenido en sangre periferica o por puncion de la medula osea, y trasplantado por via intravenosa, es una factible opcion metodologica que permitira rapidamente incrementar el numero de ensayos clinicos en diferentes etapas evolutivas del infarto cerebral. Esta terapia muestra seguridad y eficacia; sin embargo, deben ampliarse las evidencias que avalen su generalizacion en humanos.

  20. The use of catalytic carbon deposits as 3D carriers for human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Yu A; Gurin, I V; Volkova, N A; Mazur, S P; Sandomirskii, B P

    2011-08-01

    We studied the possibility of using 3D structures based on carbon catalytic deposits as carriers for human bone marrow stromal cells. It was found that carbon catalytic deposits obtained by gas deposition method using FeCl(3) × 6H(2)O as the catalyst are a biocompatible material for human bone marrow stromal cells promoting adhesion, proliferation, and distribution of cells within the 3D carrier, and therefore can be used for tissue engineering.

  1. Selective interactions between epithelial tumour cells and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hombauer, H; Minguell, J J

    2000-01-01

    This work is a comparative study on the features displayed by an epithelial metastatic breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) when set in co-culture with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or a feeder layer of 3T3 fibroblasts. MSC, a subset of non-haematopoietic cells in the marrow stroma, display a potential for self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation into precursors for bone, cartilage, connective and muscular tissue. Adhesion of MCF-7 cells to monolayers of MSC or 3T3 was high (95 and 85% respectively). Once attached, MCF-7 grow well on both monolayers. Morphology of MCF-7 cells, as analysed by light and epifluorescence microscopy, revealed that MCF-7 cells grow in clusters on 3T3, but disperse on MSC. Concomitant with the lost of their aggregation status, MCF-7 on MSC express low levels of the intercellular adhesion molecules, E-cadherin and epithelial-specific antigen (ESA). These results suggest that MSC represent an appropriate cell target to investigate the cellular and molecular events occurring at the interface of epithelial-marrow stromal interactions. Together, the model here described should permit to further evaluate the significance and prognostic impact of the shift of micrometastatic cells from a cluster-aggregated into a single-cell status. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755403

  2. Bone marrow metastases in small cell lung cancer: detection with magnetic resonance imaging and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Trillet, V.; Revel, D.; Combaret, V.; Favrot, M.; Loire, R.; Tabib, A.; Pages, J.; Jacquemet, P.; Bonmartin, A.; Mornex, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of bone marrow involvement might be of prognostic value and may influence therapeutic decisions in small cell lung cancer. By unilateral bone marrow aspiration and biopsy, evidence of bone marrow metastases is seen in 15-30% of patients with this disease. Since magnetic resonance imaging of the lower body and immunostaining with monoclonal antibodies have recently been shown to be very sensitive detection methods, we investigated the value of these two techniques in detecting bone marrow involvement in 35 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer. The results were compared to those obtained with conventional cytohistological analysis. In all cases when cytology and/or bone marrow biopsy were positive, monoclonal antibodies immunostaining and magnetic resonance imaging also detected malignant cells. Furthermore, evidence of bone marrow involvement was shown with magnetic resonance imaging and/or immunostaining in 10 of 26 cases (38%) where routine procedures were unable to detect malignant cells. In one of these 26 patients, magnetic resonance imaging and immunostaining provided the only evidence of metastatic disease. These data suggest that the rate of bone marrow metastases is underestimated by routine procedures. Further investigation is needed to determine whether or not these new non-invasive methods have prognostic value or affect therapeutic choices in small cell lung carcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2553088

  3. Benefits of small volume and small syringe for bone marrow aspirations of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hernigou, Philippe; Homma, Yasuhiro; Flouzat Lachaniette, Charles Henri; Poignard, Alexandre; Allain, Jerome; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Helene

    2013-11-01

    Aspirating bone marrow from the iliac crest using small volumes of 1-4 ml with a 10-ml syringe has been historically proposed for harvesting adult mesenchymal stem cells and described as a standard technique to avoid blood dilution. The disadvantage of repeated small aspirations is that there is a significantly increased time to harvest the bone marrow. However, it is not known if a large volume syringe can improve the rate of bone marrow aspiration without increasing blood dilution, thus reducing the quality of the aspirate. We compared the concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells obtained under normal conditions with two different size syringes. Thirty adults (16 men and 14 women with a mean age of 49 ± 14 years) underwent surgery with aspiration of bone marrow from their iliac crest. Bilateral aspirates were obtained from the iliac crest of the same patients with a 10-ml syringe and a 50-ml syringe. Cell analysis determined the frequencies of mesenchymal stem cells (as determined by the number of colonies) from each size of syringe. The cell count, progenitor cell concentration (colonies/ml marrow) and progenitor cell frequency (per million nucleated cells) were calculated. All bone marrow aspirates were harvested by the same surgeon. Aspirates of bone marrow demonstrated greater concentrations of mesenchymal stem cells with a 10-ml syringe compared with matched controls using a 50-ml syringe. Progenitor cell concentrations were on average 300 % higher using a 10-ml syringe than matched controls using a 50-ml syringe (p < 0.01). In normal human donors, bone marrow aspiration from 30 patients demonstrated a reduced mesenchymal stem cell number in aspirates obtained using a larger volume syringe (50 ml) as compared with a smaller volume syringe (10 ml).

  4. Assessment of methylprednisolone purging efficacy on Daudi burkitt lymphoma cells from normal bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, N; Niewenhuis, L M

    1991-01-01

    Studies on normal bone marrow and Daudi Burkitt lymphoma cells were performed to determine the efficacy of selective, in vitro chemopurging with methylprednisolone (MP). We found that MP reduces the number of lymphoma cells without significant damage to bone marrow cells. This information is important because we need to improve the existing in vitro purging regimens used to cleanse autologous marrows of metastatic disease before transplantation into cancer patients who have received high-dose chemotherapy. Normal human bone marrow (NBM) and Daudi lymphoma cells were treated in parallel with various purging regimens, NBM death was evaluated using soft-agar culture, while Daudi cell death was evaluated using one-week liquid culture. A protocol of 2.0 mg/mL of MP for four hours demonstrated optimal selectivity. When treatment was followed by cryopreservation, a 1.7 log purge of Daudi cells was increased to 2.3 logs while preserving 36% of committed NBM precursors. We repeated these experiments on a simulated contaminated marrow to model closely the mixture of normal and malignant cells found in advanced, metastatic disease. We evaluated this mixed system by flow cytometric immunoanalysis using the two-color CD10/CD20 markers to detect residual, viable Daudi cells. Our initial results were reproducible in this mixed-cell system, further supporting the evidence for effective in vitro purging of bone marrow using MP.

  5. Characterization of bone marrow mononuclear cells on biomaterials for bone tissue engineering in vitro.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Dirk; Verboket, René; Schaible, Alexander; Kontradowitz, Kerstin; Oppermann, Elsie; Brune, Jan C; Nau, Christoph; Meier, Simon; Bonig, Halvard; Marzi, Ingo; Seebach, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMCs) are suitable for bone tissue engineering. Comparative data regarding the needs of BMC for the adhesion on biomaterials and biocompatibility to various biomaterials are lacking to a large extent. Therefore, we evaluated whether a surface coating would enhance BMC adhesion and analyze the biocompatibility of three different kinds of biomaterials. BMCs were purified from human bone marrow aspirate samples. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, without coating or coated with fibronectin or human plasma), demineralized bone matrix (DBM), and bovine cancellous bone (BS) were assessed. Seeding efficacy on β-TCP was 95% regardless of the surface coating. BMC demonstrated a significantly increased initial adhesion on DBM and β-TCP compared to BS. On day 14, metabolic activity was significantly increased in BMC seeded on DBM in comparison to BMC seeded on BS. Likewise increased VEGF-synthesis was observed on day 2 in BMC seeded on DBM when compared to BMC seeded on BS. The seeding efficacy of BMC on uncoated biomaterials is generally high although there are differences between these biomaterials. Beta-TCP and DBM were similar and both superior to BS, suggesting either as suitable materials for spatial restriction of BMC used for regenerative medicine purposes in vivo.

  6. Multiple myeloma cells promote migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by altering their translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Dabbah, Mahmoud; Attar-Schneider, Oshrat; Zismanov, Victoria; Tartakover Matalon, Shelly; Lishner, Michael; Drucker, Liat

    2016-10-01

    The role of the bone marrow microenvironment in multiple myeloma pathogenesis and progression is well recognized. Indeed, we have shown that coculture of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from normal donors and multiple myeloma cells comodulated translation initiation. Here, we characterized the timeline of mesenchymal stem cells conditioning by multiple myeloma cells, the persistence of this effect, and the consequences on cell phenotype. Normal donor mesenchymal stem cells were cocultured with multiple myeloma cell lines (U266, ARP1) (multiple myeloma-conditioned mesenchymal stem cells) (1.5 h,12 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 3 d) and were assayed for translation initiation status (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E; eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G; regulators: mechanistic target of rapamycin, MNK, 4EBP; targets: SMAD family 5, nuclear factor κB, cyclin D1, hypoxia inducible factor 1, c-Myc) (immunoblotting) and migration (scratch assay, inhibitors). Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases in mesenchymal stem cell conditioning and altered migration was also tested (immunoblotting, inhibitors). Multiple myeloma-conditioned mesenchymal stem cells were recultured alone (1-7 d) and were assayed for translation initiation (immunoblotting). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction of extracted ribonucleic acid was tested for microRNAs levels. Mitogen-activated protein kinases were activated within 1.5 h of coculture and were responsible for multiple myeloma-conditioned mesenchymal stem cell translation initiation status (an increase of >200%, P < 0.05) and elevated migration (16 h, an increase of >400%, P < 0.05). The bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells conditioned by multiple myeloma cells were reversible after only 1 d of multiple myeloma-conditioned mesenchymal stem cell culture alone. Decreased expression of microRNA-199b and microRNA-125a (an increase of <140%, P < 0.05) in multiple myeloma-conditioned mesenchymal stem cells supported elevated

  7. Application of Autologous Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells to an Ovine Model of Growth Plate Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Rosa C; Xian, Cory J; Gronthos, Stan; Zannettino, Andrew C.W; Foster, Bruce K

    2010-01-01

    Injury to growth plate cartilage in children can lead to bone bridge formation and result in bone growth deformities, a significant clinical problem currently lacking biological treatment. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) offer a promising therapeutic option for regeneration of damaged cartilage, due to their self renewing and multi-lineage differentiation attributes. Although some small animal model studies highlight the therapeutic potential of MSC for growth plate repair, translational research in large animal models, which more closely resemble the human condition, are lacking. Our laboratory has recently characterised MSCs derived from ovine bone marrow, and demonstrated these cells form cartilage-like tissue when transplanted within the gelatin sponge, Gelfoam, in vivo. In the current study, autologous bone marrow MSC were seeded into Gelfoam scaffold containing TGF-β1, and transplanted into a surgically created defect of the proximal ovine tibial growth plate. Examination of implants at 5 week post-operatively revealed transplanted autologous MSC failed to form new cartilage structure at the defect site, but contributed to an increase in formation of a dense fibrous tissue. Importantly, the extent of osteogenesis was diminished, and bone bridge formation was not accelerated due to transplantation of MSCs or the gelatin scaffold. The current study represents the first work that has utilised this ovine large animal model to investigate whether autologous bone marrow derived MSC can be used to initiate regeneration at the injured growth plate. PMID:20721323

  8. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of /sup 14/C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose.

  9. Derivation of hepatocytes from bone marrow cells in mice after radiation-induced myeloablation.

    PubMed

    Theise, N D; Badve, S; Saxena, R; Henegariu, O; Sell, S; Crawford, J M; Krause, D S

    2000-01-01

    Following a report of skeletal muscle regeneration from bone marrow cells, we investigated whether hepatocytes could also derive in vivo from bone marrow cells. A cohort of lethally irradiated B6D2F1 female mice received whole bone marrow transplants from age-matched male donors and were sacrificed at days 1, 3, 5, and 7 and months 2, 4, and 6 posttransplantation (n = 3 for each time point). Additionally, 2 archival female mice of the same strain who had previously been recipients of 200 male fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS)-sorted CD34(+)lin(-) cells were sacrificed 8 months posttransplantation under the same protocol. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the Y-chromosome was performed on liver tissue. Y-positive hepatocytes, up to 2.2% of total hepatocytes, were identified in 1 animal at 7 days posttransplantation and in all animals sacrificed 2 months or longer posttransplantation. Simultaneous FISH for the Y-chromosome and albumin messenger RNA (mRNA) confirmed male-derived cells were mature hepatocytes. These animals had received lethal doses of irradiation at the time of bone marrow transplantation, but this induced no overt, histologically demonstrable, acute hepatic injury, including inflammation, necrosis, oval cell proliferation, or scarring. We conclude that hepatocytes can derive from bone marrow cells after irradiation in the absence of severe acute injury. Also, the small subpopulation of CD34(+)lin(-) bone marrow cells is capable of such hepatic engraftment.

  10. BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS ARE PROGENITORS IN VITRO FOR INNER EAR HAIR CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sang-Jun; Oshima, Kazuo; Heller, Stefan; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been demonstrated in the inner ear but they do not spontaneously divide to replace damaged sensory cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow have been reported to differentiate into multiple lineages including neurons, and we therefore asked whether MSCs could generate sensory cells. Overexpression of the prosensory transcription factor, Math1, in sensory epithelial precursor cells induced expression of myosin VIIa, espin, Brn3c, p27Kip, and jagged2, indicating differentiation to inner ear sensory cells. Some of the cells displayed F-actin positive protrusions in the morphology characteristic of hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell markers were also induced by culture of mouse MSC-derived cells in contact with embryonic chick inner ear cells, and this induction was not due to a cell fusion event, because the chick hair cells could be identified with a chick-specific antibody and chick and mouse antigens were never found in the same cell. PMID:17113786

  11. In vivo cell kinetics of the bone marrow transplantation using dual colored transgenic rat system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Kotaro; Teraoka, Satoshi; Adachi, Yasushi; Ikehara, Susumu; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2008-02-01

    Because bone marrow is an adequate site for bone marrow stem cells, intra-bone marrow - bone marrow transplantation (IBM-BMT) is an efficient strategy for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, the fate of the transplanted cells remains unclear. Herein, we established a dual-colored transgenic rat system utilizing green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a luciferase (luc) marker. We then utilized this system to investigate the in vivo kinetics of transplanted bone marrow cells (BMCs) after authentic intravenous (IV)-BMT or IBM-BMT. The in vivo fate of the transplanted cells was tracked using an in vivo luminescent imaging technique; alterations in peripheral blood chimerism were also followed using flow cytometry. IBM-BMT and IV-BMT were performed using syngeneic and allogeneic rat combinations. While no difference in the proliferation pattern was observed between the two treatment groups at 7 days after BMT, different distribution patterns were clearly observed during the early phase. In the IBM-BMT-treated rats, the transplanted BMCs were engrafted immediately at the site of the injected bone marrow and expanded more rapidly than in the IV-BMT-treated rats during this phase. Graft-versus-host disease was also visualized. Our bio-imaging system using dual-colored transgenic rats is a powerful tool for performing quantitative and morphological assessments in vivo.

  12. Neural cell adhesion molecule expression in plasma cells in bone marrow biopsies and aspirates allows discrimination between multiple myeloma, monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and polyclonal plasmacytosis.

    PubMed

    Martín, P; Santón, A; Bellas, C

    2004-04-01

    Differential diagnosis between multiple myeloma (MM), monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS), and polyclonal plasmacytosis may be difficult in cases with not much bone marrow infiltration. Normal plasma cells express the antigens CD138, CD38, CD19, CD10 and D-related human leucocyte antigen (HLA-DR). Myelomatous plasma cells lack B lymphoid-associated markers and may express cell surface antigens associated with other haematopoietic lineages such as NCAM/CD56 (neural cell adhesion molecule). Recently, a monoclonal antibody, anti-CD56, has become available that can be used in fixed tissues embedded in paraffin, and it has been reported that osteoblastic cells of trabecular bone strongly express NCAM/CD56. We analysed NCAM molecule expression in 35 samples from patients with plasma cell disorders: 14 cases of MM, 16 cases of MGUS, and five cases of polyclonal plasmacytosis using immunohistochemistry in parallel in bone marrow core biopsies processed routinely and in bone marrow smears from the same patients. Of the MM samples 78% were CD56+ in smears and 92% positive in biopsies. We did not find strong CD56 expression in MGUS samples. One of five samples of polyclonal plasmacytosis was CD56+. A case was considered to be positive for CD56 expression if >50% of the CD138+ plasma cells expressed NCAM with an intensity on a par with that of the osteoblasts. We conclude that CD56 antibody is a very useful marker in the study of plasma cell proliferation in bone marrow biopsies and in bone marrow aspirates and is a great help in discriminating between MM, MGUS, and polyclonal plasmacytosis, especially in those cases with low infiltration.

  13. Stromal cells from human long-term marrow cultures, but not cultured marrow fibroblasts, phagocytose horse serum constituents: studies with a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a species-specific epitope common to multiple horse serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Charbord, P; Tippens, D; Wight, T S; Gown, A M; Singer, J W

    1987-01-01

    This report describes an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody derived after immunization of mice with washed stromal cells from human, long-term bone marrow cultures. The antigen recognized by the antibody (BMS-1) is a carbohydrate-containing prosthetic group that is common to and specific for multiple horse serum proteins. These proteins are avidly ingested by stromal cells and concentrated in endocytic vesicles. Cultured smooth muscle cells took up the horse proteins in a similar manner to marrow stromal cells while cultured marrow fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and hepatoma cells did not. These data indicate that marrow stromal cells specifically accumulate horse serum proteins which might partially explain the horse serum requirement for long-term marrow culture maintenance. The data also suggest further similarities between marrow stromal and smooth muscle cells and additional differences between marrow fibroblasts and marrow stromal cells.

  14. Contribution of transplanted bone marrow cells to Purkinje neurons in human adult brains

    PubMed Central

    Weimann, James M.; Charlton, Carol A.; Brazelton, Timothy R.; Hackman, Robert C.; Blau, Helen M.

    2003-01-01

    We show here that cells within human adult bone marrow can contribute to cells in the adult human brain. Cerebellar tissues from female patients with hematologic malignancies, who had received chemotherapy, radiation, and a bone marrow transplant, were analyzed. Brain samples were obtained at autopsy from female patients who received male (sex-mismatched) or female (sex-matched, control) bone marrow transplants. Cerebella were evaluated in 10-μm-thick, formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections that encompassed up to ≈50% of a human Purkinje nucleus. A total of 5,860 Purkinje cells from sex-mismatched females and 3,202 Purkinje cells from sex-matched females were screened for Y chromosomes by epifluorescence. Confocal laser scanning microscopy allowed definitive identification of the sex chromosomes within the morphologically distinct Purkinje cells. In the brains of females who received male bone marrow, four Purkinje neurons were found that contained an X and a Y chromosome and two other Purkinje neurons contained more than a diploid number of sex chromosomes. No Y chromosomes were detected in the brains of sex-matched controls. The total frequency of male bone marrow contribution to female Purkinje cells approximated 0.1%. This study demonstrates that although during human development Purkinje neurons are no longer generated after birth, cells within the bone marrow can contribute to these CNS neurons even in adulthood. The underlying mechanism may be caused either by generation de novo of Purkinje neurons from bone marrow-derived cells or by fusion of marrow-derived cells with existing recipient Purkinje neurons. PMID:12576546

  15. Asiatic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Piao, Cheng-dong; Sun, Hong-hui; Ren, Xian-Sheng; Bai, Yun-Shen

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes. With aging, BMSC osteoblast differentiation decreases whereas BMSC differentiation into adipocytes increases, resulting in increased adipogenesis and bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs. AA inhibited the adipogenic induction of lipid accumulation, activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and expression of marker genes in adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (ap) 2, and adipsin. Further, we found that AA did not alter clonal expansion rate and expression of C/EBPβ, upstream key regulator of PPARγ, and binding activity of C/EBPβ to PPARγ promoter was not affected by AA as well. These findings suggest that AA may modulate differentiation of BMSCs to cause a lineage shift away from the adipocytes, and inhibition of PPARγ by AA is through C/EBPβ-independent mechanisms. Thus, AA could be a potential candidate for a novel drug against osteoporosis.

  16. Bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in five painted storks.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martha A; Terrell, Scott P; Neiffer, Donald L; Miller, Michele A; Mangold, Barbara J

    2002-08-01

    Five painted storks were treated with fenbendazole for 5 days for internal parasitism. Four birds died following treatment. Profound heteropenia was a consistent finding in all samples evaluated; additionally, the 1 surviving bird had progressive anemia. Consistent necropsy findings in the 4 birds that died were small intestinal crypt cell necrosis and severe bone marrow depletion and necrosis. Fenbendazole has been associated with bone marrow hypoplasia and enteric damage in mammals and other species of birds. The dosages of fenbendazole used in birds are often substantially higher than those recommended for mammals, which may contribute to bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in birds.

  17. Stem cell transplantation for treatment of sickle cell disease: bone marrow versus cord blood transplants.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lisa Marie; Ceja, Maria Estela; Yang, Sonal Patel

    2012-08-01

    The transplantation of stem cells harvested from bone marrow and cord blood for the treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD) is reviewed. Current treatment options have lengthened the lifespan of patients with SCD. Hydroxyurea is the standard of care for the management of SCD, but it does not prevent serious complications in all patients. For those patients with severe disease, stem cell transplantation may be an appropriate curative option. However, less than one third of these patients find an appropriate matched related bone marrow donor. Cord blood offers a more readily available source of stem cells for transplantation. Donor morbidity is eliminated, since the cells come from banked cords, and the harvesting process is noninvasive for the donor. Another advantage of cord blood transplantation is the lower occurrence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). One disadvantage of transplantation with cord blood includes delayed time to engraftment. Due to the mortality associated with stem cell transplantation, it may be most appropriate to reserve the procedure for patients who have a more severe course of SCD. Although bone marrow, peripheral blood, and cord blood transplantation has been successfully performed in patients with SCD, data remain limited regarding the optimal preparative regimens, the most appropriate stem cell source, and the type of GVHD prophylaxis to be used after transplantation. More data are warranted before this treatment approach can be recommended as a standard of care for SCD.

  18. Identification of Bone Marrow-Derived Soluble Factors Regulating Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Li, Wan-Ju

    2017-02-14

    Maintaining properties of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in culture for regenerative applications remains a great challenge. An emerging approach of constructing a culture environment mimicking the bone marrow niche to regulate BMSC activities has been developed. In this study, we have demonstrated a systematic approach to identify soluble factors of interest extracted from human bone marrow and used them in BMSC culture for tissue regeneration. We have found that lipocalin-2 and prolactin are key factors in bone marrow, involved in regulating BMSC activities. Treating the cell with lipocalin-2 and prolactin delays cellular senescence of BMSCs and primes the cell for osteogenesis and chondrogenesis. We have also demonstrated that BMSCs pretreated with lipocalin-2 and prolactin can enhance the repair of calvarial defects in mice. Together, our study provides research evidence of using a viable approach to prime BMSC properties in vitro for improving cell-based tissue regeneration in vivo.

  19. Epithelial cells in bone marrow of oesophageal cancer patients: a significant prognostic factor in multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Thorban, S; Rosenberg, R; Busch, R; Roder, R J

    2000-01-01

    The detection of epithelial cells in bone marrow, blood or lymph nodes indicates a disseminatory potential of solid tumours. 225 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus were prospectively studied. Prior to any therapy, cytokeratin-positive (CK) cells in bone marrow were immunocytochemically detected in 75 patients with the monoclonal anti-epithelial-cell antibody A45-B/B3 and correlated with established histopathologic and patient-specific prognosis factors. The prognosis factors were assessed by multivariate analysis. Twenty-nine of 75 (38.7%) patients with oesophageal cancer showed CK-positive cells in bone marrow. The analyses of the mean and median overall survival time showed a significant difference between patients with and without epithelial cells in bone marrow (P< 0.001). Multivariate analysis in the total patient population and in patients with curative resection of the primary tumour confirmed the curative resection rate and the bone marrow status as the strongest independent prognostic factors, besides the T-category. The detection of epithelial cells in bone marrow of oesophageal cancer patients is a substantial prognostic factor proved by multivariate analysis and is helpful for exact preoperative staging, as well as monitoring of neoadjuvant therapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883665

  20. [Method for concentrating marrow stem cells using the IBM 2991 washer. Necessary preparation before in vitro treatment of bone marrow by pharmacologic or immunologic means].

    PubMed

    Hervé, P; Coffe, C; Peters, A

    1983-04-01

    The technique using the IBM 2991 blood cell processor is an effective technique for the concentration of mononuclear cells from large volumes of bone marrow. The marrow cells are layered on to Ficoll Metrizoate using the IBM processing set. The mononuclear cells and CFU-GM recoveries are in close relationship with the hematocrit of the cell suspension processed. Twenty two bone marrows have been collected and purified according to this protocol. The mononuclear cell recovery is an average of 78,3% (range: 44-92%) and the CFU-GM recovery is in average of 67,5% (range: 40-89%). At the end of the procedure the cell viability is satisfying (97,1% +/- 1,7 are trypan blue negatives). When it is necessary to remove from the bone marrow collected either malignant cells prior autologous bone marrow graft or T lymphocytes in an attempt to prevent GVHD in allogeneic BMT, the purity of marrow cell suspension become a fundamental parameter.

  1. Lack of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 Attenuates Foreign Body Inflammation because of Decreased Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Solowiej, Anna; Biswas, Purba; Graesser, Donnasue; Madri, Joseph A.

    2003-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kd member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of proteins, expressed on endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets. Antibody-blocking studies have implicated it in modulating leukocyte transmigration and angiogenesis. However, the generation of the PECAM-1 knockout mouse has shown that its function can be compensated for by similarly acting proteins because most acute inflammatory models proceed in a comparable manner in wild-type and knockout animals. We decided to examine the function of PECAM-1 in the chronic process of foreign body inflammation. We show that PECAM-1-deficient mice exhibit attenuated neutrophil infiltration in and around a subcutaneous polyvinyl acetyl implant. Bone marrow engraftment studies indicate that the lack of CD31 expression on the endothelium determines the diminished leukocyte accumulation in the knockout implants. Specifically, we find that decreased angiogenesis (as manifested by lower vessel density, decreased hemoglobin content, and less laminin deposition) correlates with lower neutrophil accumulation in the knockout animals. This study indicates that the absence of endothelial PECAM-1 results in decreased angiogenesis and therefore in diminished delivery of leukocytes to the foreign body implants. PMID:12598328

  2. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  3. Neuropeptide y and neuropeptide y y5 receptor interaction restores impaired growth potential of aging bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Igura, Koichi; Haider, Husnain Kh; Ahmed, Rafeeq P H; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    Abstract improved growth characteristics of the aging bone marrow cells subsequent to neuropeptide Y (NPY)/neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor (NPY Y5R) ligand-receptor interaction. Bone marrow cells were isolated from neonatal (2-3 weeks), young (8-12 weeks), and old (24-28 months) rats on the basis of their preferential adherence to plastic surface. After culturing the cells at initial seeding density of 1×10(4) cells/cm(2), we found that the proliferation potential of bone marrow cells declined with age. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting showed that bone marrow cells in different age groups constitutively expressed NPY and NPY receptor subtypes (Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R). However, NPY and Y5R expression increased by more than 130-fold and decreased by 28-fold, respectively, in old bone marrow cells as compared to young bone marrow cells. NPY (10 nM) stimulated the proliferation of all bone marrow cells age groups, and their proliferation was blocked by Y5R antagonist. However, the pro-proliferative effect of NPY on old bone marrow cells was weaker than other cell groups due to lower Y5R expression. Y5R gene transfection of old bone marrow cells with subsequent NPY(3-36) (10 nM) treatment significantly increased proliferation of old bone marrow cells (>56%) as compared to green fluorescence protein-transfected control old bone marrow cells. Stimulation of old bone marrow cells by NPY treatment rejuvenated the growth characteristics of aging bone marrow cells as a result of Y5R overexpression.

  4. Following damage, the majority of bone marrow-derived airway cells express an epithelial marker

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, Heather; Keir, Pamela A; Edwards, Carol J; Webb, Sheila; Dorin, Julia R

    2006-01-01

    Background Adult-derived bone marrow stem cells are capable of reconstituting the haematopoietic system. However there is ongoing debate in the literature as to whether bone marrow derived cells have the ability to populate other tissues and express tissue specific markers. The airway has been an organ of major interest and was one of the first where this was demonstrated. We have previously demonstrated that the mouse airway can be repopulated by side population bone marrow transplanted cells. Here we investigate the frequency and phenotypic nature of these bone marrow derived cells. Methods Female mice were engrafted with male whole bone marrow or side population (SP) cells and subjected to detergent-induced damage after 3 months. Donor cells were identified by Y chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation and their phenotype was assessed by immunohistochemistry on the same sections. Slides were visualised by a combination of widefield and deconvolved microscopy and whole cells were analysed on cytospin preparations. Results The frequencies of engraftment of male cells in the airway of mice that show this (9/10), range from 1.0 – 1.6% with whole marrow and 0.6 – 1.5% with SP cells. Undamaged controls have only between 0.1 and 0.2% male cells in the trachea. By widefield microscopy analysis we find 60.2% (53/88) of male donor derived cells express cytokeratins as a marker of epithelial cells. These results were reinforced using deconvolved microscopy and scored by two independent investigators. In addition cytospin analysis of cells dissociated from the damaged trachea of engrafted mice also reveals donor derived Y chromosome positive cells that are immunopositive for cytokeratin. Using cytokeratin and the universal haematopoietic marker CD45 immunohistochemistry, we find the donor derived cells fall into four phenotypic classes. We do not detect cytokeratin positive cells in whole bone marrow using cytokeratin immunostaining and we do not detect any

  5. [An experimental study on the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into vascular endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Fang, Li-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Bing; Sun, Tong-Zhu; Li, Jian-Fu; Cheng, Biao; Yang, Yin-Hui; Wang, Yu-Xin

    2003-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into vascular endothelial cells and the mechanism of its involvement in wound healing. Porcine MSCs were harvested from porcine marrow, and they were isolated and purified by density gradient centrifugation. After being cultured and amplified in vitro, the MSCs were labelled with BrdU (5-bromodeoxy-uridine). Full skin loss wound was created on the back of the mini-swine whose bone marrow was obtained. The labelled MSCs with fibrin glue as the vector were regrafted back to the donor animal wound. The wound tissue specimens were harvested at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 post-operation weeks and were immunohistochemically stained by BrdU and factor VIII (FVIII) for comparative study. Most BrdU positive cells aggregated around small blood vessels in the granulation tissue of the wounds. Only individual vascular endothelial cells were BrdU positive. There was FVIII expression in the cytoplasm of BrdU positive cells. MSCs were closely correlated with the formation of small blood vessels in granulation tissue during wound healing process. The porcine MSCs possessed the potential to differentiate into vascular entoehelial cells and to participate in wound healing under the micro-enviroment of the wound.

  6. Differences between chondrocytes and bone marrow-derived chondrogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hongsen; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Lin, Yun-Han; Lin, Shiming; Tsai-Wu, Jyy-Jih; Jiang, Ching-Chuan

    2011-12-01

    Implantation of autologous chondrogenic cells has become the mainstay strategy for repairing articular cartilage defects. Because the availability of autologous chondrocytes is extremely limited, many recent studies have used artificially induced mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) as substitutes for chondrocytes. In this study, we analyzed the differences between the iMSCs and chondrocytes, including their molecular biological and mechanical properties. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were collected and induced to exhibit the chondrogenic phenotype by culturing the pelleted MSCs in a chemically defined culture medium supplemented with transforming growth factor-beta 1. The molecular biological properties of iMSCs and culture-expanded chondrocytes, including their mRNA profiles and surface proteomics, were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry, respectively. The biomechanical properties of iMSCs and native chondrocytes, including their surface topology, adhesion force, and membrane stiffness, were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both iMSCs and chondrocytes presented type II collagen and glycosaminoglycan, whereas only chondrocytes presented type X collagen. Flow cytometric assays showed that the expression of type II collagen and integrin-1 was higher in the chondrocytes than in the iMSCs. AFM revealed that the MSCs, iMSCs, and chondrocytes greatly differed in their shape. The MSCs were spindle shaped and easily distinguishable from the spherical chondrocytes. The iMSCs appeared round and resembled the spherical chondrocytes; however, the iMSCs were flatter with a central hump of condensed mass and a surrounding thin and broad pleat. The mean adhesion force and mean surface stiffness were significantly lower for the iMSCs (4.54 nN and 0.109 N/m, respectively) than for the chondrocytes (6.86 nN and 0.134 N/m, respectively). To conclude, although the iMSCs exhibited the chondrogenic phenotype, they differed

  7. The development of NK cell activity in thymectomized bone marrow chimaeras.

    PubMed Central

    Sihvola, M; Hurme, M

    1984-01-01

    Most of the natural killer (NK) cells, recently derived from the bone marrow (14 days after injection of bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated mice), express the Thy-1 antigen; after some period of time (by day 28) a normal proportion (50%) of Thy-1+ NK cells is found. This study demonstrates that the shift of these Thy-1+ NK cells to Thy-1- NK cells is influenced by the thymus: NK cells developing in the total absence of the thymus--bone marrow (bm) cells from adult thymectomized (Tx) or nude (nu) mice injected into thymectomized recipients, (Tx) bm----(Tx) or nu bm----(Tx)--remain Thy-1+, while the presence of the thymus at some stage of the NK cell maturation--bone marrow cells injected into thymectomized recipients, bm----(Tx), or normal recipients reconstituted with bone marrow cells from thymectomized or nude mice, (Tx) bm----or nu bm----normal recipients--is sufficient for the development of normal ratio of Thy-1+ and Thy-1- NK cells. PMID:6147307

  8. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  9. HEMATOPOIETIC PROGENITOR CELL CONTENT OF VERTEBRAL BODY MARROW USED FOR COMBINED SOLID ORGAN AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Rybka, Witold B.; Fontes, Paulo A.; Rao, Abdul S.; Winkelstein, Alan; Ricordi, Camillo; Ball, Edward D.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    While cadaveric vertebral bodies (VB) have long been proposed as a suitable source of bone marrow (BM) for transplantation (BMT), they have rarely been used for this purpose. We have infused VB BM immediately following whole organ (WO) transplantation to augment donor cell chimerism. We quantified the hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) content of VB BM as well as BM obtained from the iliac crests (IC) of normal allogeneic donors (ALLO) and from patients with malignancy undergoing autologous marrow harvest (AUTO). Patients undergoing WOIBM transplantation also had AUTO BM harvested in the event that subsequent lymphohematopoietic reconstitution was required. Twenty-four VB BM, 24 IC BM-ALLO, 31 IC AUTO, and 24 IC WO-AUTO were harvested. VB BM was tested 12 to 72 hr after procurement and infused after completion ofWO grafting. IC BM was tested and then used or cryopreserved immediately. HPC were quantified by clonal assay measuring CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-GEMM, and by flow cytometry for CD34+ progenitor cells. On an average, 9 VB were processed during each harvest, and despite an extended processing time the number of viable nucleated cells obtained was significantly higher than that from IC. Furthermore, by HPC content, VB BM was equivalent to IC BM, which is routinely used for BMT. We conclude that VB BM is a clinically valuable source of BM for allogeneic transplantation. PMID:7701582

  10. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  11. Cadmium stimulates osteoclast-like multinucleated cell formation in mouse bone marrow cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Tatsuro; Takata, Masakazu; Miyata, Masaki; Nagai, Miyuki; Sugure, Akemi; Kozuka, Hiroshi; Kuze, Shougo )

    1991-08-01

    Most of cadmium (Cd)-treated animals have been reported to show osteoporosis-like changes in bones. This suggests that Cd may promote bone loss by a direct action on bone. It was found that Cd stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2}(PGE{sub 2}) production in the osteoblast-like cell, MC3T3-E1. Therefore, Cd stimulates bone resorption by increasing PGE{sub 2} production. Recently, several bone marrow cell culture systems have been developed for examining the formation of osteoclast-like multinucleated cells in vitro. As osteoblasts produce PGE{sub 2} by Cd-induced cyclooxygenase and may play an important role in osteoclast formation, the present study was undertaken to clarify the possibility that Cd might stimulate osteoclast formation in a mouse bone marrow culture system.

  12. Bone Marrow Homing and Engraftment Defects of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caocci, Giovanni; Greco, Marianna; La Nasa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to their microenvironment niches in the bone marrow is a complex process with a critical role in repopulation of the bone marrow after transplantation. This active process allows for migration of HSC from peripheral blood and their successful anchoring in bone marrow before proliferation. The process of engraftment starts with the onset of proliferation and must, therefore, be functionally dissociated from the former process. In this overview, we analyze the characteristics of stem cells (SCs) with particular emphasis on their plasticity and ability to find their way home to the bone marrow. We also address the problem of graft failure which remains a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Within this context, we discuss non-malignant and malignant hematological disorders treated with reduced-intensity conditioning regimens or grafts from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched donors. PMID:28512561

  13. Bone Marrow Homing and Engraftment Defects of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Caocci, Giovanni; Greco, Marianna; La Nasa, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Homing of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to their microenvironment niches in the bone marrow is a complex process with a critical role in repopulation of the bone marrow after transplantation. This active process allows for migration of HSC from peripheral blood and their successful anchoring in bone marrow before proliferation. The process of engraftment starts with the onset of proliferation and must, therefore, be functionally dissociated from the former process. In this overview, we analyze the characteristics of stem cells (SCs) with particular emphasis on their plasticity and ability to find their way home to the bone marrow. We also address the problem of graft failure which remains a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Within this context, we discuss non-malignant and malignant hematological disorders treated with reduced-intensity conditioning regimens or grafts from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched donors.

  14. Bone marrow CD34+ progenitor cells may harbour HIV-DNA even in successfully treated patients.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, V; Bibas, M; Abbate, I; Viola, D; Rozera, G; Agrati, C; Rinaldi, A; Amendola, A; Ammassari, A; Capobianchi, M R; Martini, F

    2015-03-01

    The issue about bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells harbouring HIV-DNA in infected patients is still under scrutiny. We studied nine HIV-infected individuals undergoing bone marrow aspiration for diagnostic purposes. In all patients, even in those receiving successful antiretroviral therapy for several years, HIV-DNA was detected in purified CD34+ lineage-bone marrow progenitor cells. This finding, although not conclusive due to the low number of patients examined, adds further evidence that current treatment strategies may be insufficient to resolve latent infection in bone marrow CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis to bone marrow chimeras. Endothelial cells are not a restricting element

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichs, D.J.; Wegmann, K.W.; Dietsch, G.N.

    1987-12-01

    The adoptive transfer of clinical and histopathologic signs of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) requires MHC compatibility between cell donor and cell recipient. The results of adoptive transfer studies using F1 to parent bone marrow chimeras as recipients of parental-derived BP-sensitive spleen cells indicate that this restriction is not expressed at the level of the endothelial cell but is confined to the cells of bone marrow derivation. Furthermore, these results indicate that the development of EAE is not dependent on the activity of MHC-restricted cytotoxic cells.

  16. Signaling Interplay between Bone Marrow Adipose Tissue and Multiple Myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Falank, Carolyne; Fairfield, Heather; Reagan, Michaela R.

    2016-01-01

    In the year 2000, Hanahan and Weinberg (1) defined the six Hallmarks of Cancer as: self-sufficiency in growth signals, evasion of apoptosis, insensitivity to antigrowth mechanisms, tissue invasion and metastasis, limitless replicative potential, and sustained angiogenesis. Eleven years later, two new Hallmarks were added to the list (avoiding immune destruction and reprograming energy metabolism) and two new tumor characteristics (tumor-promoting inflammation and genome instability and mutation) (2). In multiple myeloma (MM), a destructive cancer of the plasma cell that grows predominantly in the bone marrow (BM), it is clear that all these hallmarks and characteristics are in play, contributing to tumor initiation, drug resistance, disease progression, and relapse. Bone marrow adipose tissue (BMAT) is a newly recognized contributor to MM oncogenesis and disease progression, potentially affecting MM cell metabolism, immune action, inflammation, and influences on angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss the confirmed and hypothetical contributions of BMAT to MM development and disease progression. BMAT has been understudied due to technical challenges and a previous lack of appreciation for the endocrine function of this tissue. In this review, we define the dynamic, responsive, metabolically active BM adipocyte. We then describe how BMAT influences MM in terms of: lipids/metabolism, hypoxia/angiogenesis, paracrine or endocrine signaling, and bone disease. We then discuss the connection between BMAT and systemic inflammation and potential treatments to inhibit the feedback loops between BM adipocytes and MM cells that support MM progression. We aim for researchers to use this review to guide and help prioritize their experiments to develop better treatments or a cure for cancers, such as MM, that associate with and may depend on BMAT. PMID:27379019

  17. Imaging Sensitivity of Quiescent Cancer Cells to Metabolic Perturbations in Bone Marrow Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Cavnar, Stephen P.; Xiao, Annie; Gibbons, Anne E.; Rickelmann, Andrew D.; Neely, Taylor; Luker, Kathryn E.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant cells from breast cancer and other common cancers such as prostate and melanoma may persist in bone marrow as quiescent, non-dividing cells that remain viable for years or even decades before resuming proliferation to cause recurrent disease. This phenomenon, referred to clinically as tumor dormancy, poses tremendous challenges to curing patients with breast cancer. Quiescent tumor cells resist chemotherapy drugs that predominantly target proliferating cells, limiting success of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies. We recently developed a 3D spheroid model of quiescent breast cancer cells in bone marrow for mechanistic and drug testing studies. We combined this model with optical imaging methods for label-free detection of cells preferentially utilizing glycolysis versus oxidative metabolism to investigate the metabolic state of co-culture spheroids with different bone marrow stromal and breast cancer cells. Through imaging and biochemical assays, we identified different metabolic states of bone marrow stromal cells that control metabolic status and flexibilities of co-cultured breast cancer cells. We tested metabolic stresses and targeted inhibition of specific metabolic pathways to identify approaches to preferentially eliminate quiescent breast cancer cells from bone marrow environments. These studies establish an integrated imaging approach to analyze metabolism in complex tissue environments to identify new metabolically-targeted cancer therapies. PMID:27478871

  18. Phenotypic, genotypic, and functional characterization of normal and acute myeloid leukemia-derived marrow endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Russell J; Azadniv, Mitra; Guo, Naxin; Acklin, Joshua; Lacagnina, Kimberly; Coppage, Myra; Liesveld, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    In addition to participation in homing, egress, and transmigration of hematopoietic cells, marrow endothelium also contributes to cell proliferation and survival. Endothelial cells from multiple vascular beds are able to prevent spontaneous or therapy-induced apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. Marrow-derived endothelial cells from leukemia patients have not been well-characterized, and in this work, endothelial cells were purified from marrow aspirates from normal subjects or from newly diagnosed AML patients to compare these cells phenotypically and functionally. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, these cells express CD31, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), supporting endothelial origin. They take up acetyl low-density lipoprotein and are able to form tubular structures. Culture of AML cells with endothelial cells from both normal and AML subjects supported adhesion, transmigration, and leukemia colony-forming unit outgrowth. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed 130 genes significantly up- or downregulated in AML-derived endothelial cells as compared with those derived from normal marrow. The genes differentially expressed (p < 0.001) were included in biological function categories involving cancer, cell development, cell growth and proliferation, cell signaling, inflammatory response, and cell death and survival. Further pathway analysis revealed upregulation of c-Fos and genes involved in chemotaxis such as CXCL16. AML-derived endothelial cells are similar in phenotype and function to their normal marrow-derived counterparts, but genomic analysis suggests a differential signature with altered expression of genes, which could play a role in leukemogenesis or leukemia cell maintenance in the marrow microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective retention of bone marrow-derived cells to enhance spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Muschler, George F; Matsukura, Yoichi; Nitto, Hironori; Boehm, Cynthia A; Valdevit, Antonio D; Kambic, Helen E; Davros, William J; Easley, Kirk A; Powell, Kimerly A

    2005-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from fresh bone marrow aspirates using some porous matrices as a surface for cell attachment and selective retention, and for creating a cellular graft that is enriched with respect to the number of progenitor cells. We evaluated the potential value of this method using demineralized cortical bone powder as the matrix. Matrix alone, matrix plus marrow, and matrix enriched with marrow cells were compared in an established canine spinal fusion model. Fusions were compared based on union score, fusion mass, fusion volume, and by mechanical testing. Enriched matrix grafts delivered a mean of 2.3 times more cells and approximately 5.6 times more progenitors than matrix mixed with bone marrow. The union score with enriched matrix was superior to matrix alone and matrix plus marrow. Fusion volume and fusion area also were greater with the enriched matrix. These data suggest that the strategy of selective retention provides a rapid, simple, and effective method for concentration and delivery of marrow-derived cells and connective tissue progenitors that may improve the outcome of bone grafting procedures in various clinical settings.

  20. Injury mechanism dictates contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to murine hepatic vascular regeneration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stem and progenitor cells derived from adult marrow have been shown to regenerate vascular cells in response to injury. However, it is unclear whether the type of injury dictates the contribution of such cells to neovascularization and which subpopulations of cells contribute to vascular regeneratio...

  1. Bone Marrow Homing Enriches Stem Cells Responsible for Neogenesis of Insulin-Producing Cells, While Radiation Decreases Homing Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Iskovich, Svetlana; Askenasy, Nadir

    2015-10-01

    Small-sized adult bone marrow cells isolated by counterflow centrifugal elutriation and depleted of lineage markers (Fr25lin(-)) have the capacity to differentiate into insulin-producing cells and stabilize glycemic control. This study assessed competitive migration of syngeneic stem cells to the bone marrow and islets in a murine model of chemical diabetes. VLA-4 is expressed in ∼ 25% of these cells, whereas CXCR4 is not detected, however, it is transcriptionally upregulated (6-fold). The possibility to enrich stem cells by a bone marrow homing (BM-H) functional assay was assessed in sequential transplants. Fr25lin(-) cells labeled with PKH26 were grafted into primary myeloablated recipients, and mitotically quiescent Fr25lin(-)PKH(bright) cells were sorted from the bone marrow after 2 days. The contribution of bone marrow-homed stem cells was remarkably higher in secondary recipients compared to freshly elutriated cells. The therapeutic efficacy was further increased by omission of irradiation in the secondary recipients, showing a 25-fold enrichment of islet-reconstituting cells by the bone marrow homing assay. Donor cells identified by the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a genomic marker in sex-mismatched transplants upregulated PDX-1 and produced proinsulin, affirming the capacity of BM-H cells to convert in the injured islets. There was no evidence of transcriptional priming of freshly elutriated subsets to express PDX-1, insulin, and other markers of endocrine progenitors, indicating that the bone marrow harbors stem cells with versatile differentiation capacity. Affinity to the bone marrow can be used to enrich stem cells for pancreatic regeneration, and reciprocally, conditioning reduces the competitive incorporation in the injured islets.

  2. Intra-Bone Marrow Transplantation of Endosteal Bone Marrow Cells Facilitates Allogeneic Hematopoietic and Stromal Cells Engraftment Dependent on Early Expression of CXCL-12.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Su, Yingjun; Chen, Jianwu; Zhang, Dongliang; Song, Yajuan; Guo, Shuzhong

    2015-09-16

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been considered as an effective approach at inducing allogeneic hematopoietic reconstitution and immune tolerance. However, it remains critical to find the optimal HSCT delivery method and robust sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We introduced a new method by infusing allogeneic endosteal bone marrow cells (BMCs) harvested from long bones endosteum through intra-bone marrow transplantation (IBBMT) into irradiated mice. Recipient mice that were transplanted with central BMCs or through intravenous bone marrow transplantation (IVBMT) were used as controls (n=6 per group). We compared the new method with each control group for allogeneic HSCs homing pattern, peripheral blood chimerism level, skin allograft survival time, and donor stromal cell percentage in recipient BM. AMD3100 was injected to determine whether chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (CXCL-12) was critical for the new method. More allogeneic HSCs homed into spleen and bone marrow for the new method as compared to each control group. IBBMT of endosteal BMCs led to a higher peripheral blood chimerism and skin allograft survival. At 18 weeks, donor stromal cell percentage in recipient BMCs was higher for the new method than in each control group. By AMD3100 blockade at day 1, peripheral blood chimerism level and donor stromal cell percentage were significantly reduced as compared to the control group without AMD3100 blockade. Our study suggests that IBBMT of endosteal BMCs is an effective approach for HSCT in inducing allogeneic hematopoietic reconstitution. The advantage is dependent upon the early expression of CXCL-12 after bone marrow transplantation.

  3. Combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil causes trabecular bone loss, bone marrow cell depletion and marrow adiposity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chiaming; Georgiou, Kristen R; McKinnon, Ross A; Keefe, Dorothy M K; Howe, Peter R C; Xian, Cory J

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of anthracyclines to adjuvant chemotherapy has increased survival rates among breast cancer patients. Cyclophosphamide, epirubicin and 5-fluorouracil (CEF) combination therapy is now one of the preferred regimens for treating node-positive breast cancer due to better survival with less toxicity involved. Despite the increasing use of CEF, its potential in causing adverse skeletal effects remains unclear. Using a mature female rat model mimicking the clinical setting, this study examined the effects of CEF treatment on bone and bone marrow in long bones. Following six cycles of CEF treatment (weekly intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide at 10 mg/kg, epirubicin at 2.5 mg/kg and 5-flurouracil at 10 mg/kg), a significant reduction in trabecular bone volume was observed at the metaphysis, which was associated with a reduced serum level of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), increased trends of osteoclast density and osteoclast area at the metaphysis, as well as an increased size of osteoclasts being formed from the bone marrow cells ex vivo. Moreover, a severe reduction of bone marrow cellularity was observed following CEF treatment, which was accompanied by an increase in marrow adipose tissue volume. This increase in marrow adiposity was associated with an expansion in adipocyte size but not in marrow adipocyte density. Overall, this study indicates that six cycles of CEF chemotherapy may induce some bone loss and severe bone marrow damage. Mechanisms for CEF-induced bone/bone marrow pathologies and potential preventive strategies warrant further investigation.

  4. Effects of GSM-modulated radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Prisco, Maria Grazia; Nasta, Francesca; Rosado, Maria Manuela; Lovisolo, Giorgio Alfonso; Marino, Carmela; Pioli, Claudio

    2008-12-01

    We examined the effects of in vivo exposure to a GSM-modulated 900 MHz RF field on the ability of bone marrow cells to differentiate, colonize lymphatic organs, and rescue lethally X-irradiated mice from death. X-irradiated mice were injected with medium alone or containing bone marrow cells from either RF-field-exposed (SAR 2 W/kg, 2 h/day, 5 days/ week, 4 weeks) or sham-exposed or cage control donor mice. Whereas all mice injected with medium alone died, mice that received bone marrow cells survived. Three and 6 weeks after bone marrow cell transplantation, no differences in thymus cellularity and in the frequencies of differentiating cell subpopulations (identified by CD4/CD8 expression) were observed among the three transplanted groups. Mitogen-induced thymocyte proliferation yielded comparable levels in all transplanted groups. As to the spleen, no effects of the RF-field exposure on cell number, percentages of B and T (CD4 and CD8) cells, B- and T-cell proliferation, and IFN-gamma production were found in transplanted mice. In conclusion, our results show no effect of in vivo exposure to GSM-modulated RF fields on the ability of bone marrow precursor cells to home and colonize lymphoid organs and differentiate in phenotypically and functionally mature T and B lymphocytes.

  5. Stromal cell migration precedes hemopoietic repopulation of the bone marrow after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Werts, E.D.; Gibson, D.P.; Knapp, S.A.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Circulation of hemopoietic stem cells into an irradiated site has been thoroughly documented, but migration of stromal cells to repair radiation damage has not. We determined the radiosensitivity of mouse bone marrow stroma and evaluated stromal and hemopoietic repopulation in x-irradiated marrow. The D/sub 0/ for growth of colonies of marrow stromal cells (MSC) was 215 to 230 rad. Total-body irradiation (TB) obliterated marrow stromal and hemopoietic cells within 3 days. In contrast, 1 day after 1000 rad leg irradiation (LI), MSC rose to 80% of normal, but fell to 34% by 3 days and recovered to 72% by 30 days. However, femoral nucleated cells diminished to 20% by 3 days and recovered to 74% of normal by 30 days. Likewise, differentiated marrow cells and hemopoietic stem cells were initially depleted. With 1000 rad LI followed 3 h later by 1000 rad to the body while shielding the leg, MSC and femoral nucleated cells recovered to values intermediate between 1000 rad TB and 1000 rad LI. We concluded that: (1) the D/sub 0/ for MSC was 215 to 230 rad, (2) stromal repopulation preceded hemopoietic recovery, and (3) immigration of stromal cells from an unirradiated sanctuary facilitated hemopoietic repopulation of a heavily irradiated site.

  6. Factors affecting directional migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peng; Pan, Su; Cheng, Jieping; Yang, Maoguang; Qi, Zhiping; Hou, Tingting; Yang, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-15

    Microtubule-associated protein 1B plays an important role in axon guidance and neuronal migration. In the present study, we sought to discover the mechanisms underlying microtubule-associated protein 1B mediation of axon guidance and neuronal migration. We exposed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to okadaic acid or N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine (an inhibitor and stimulator, respectively, of protein phosphatase 2A) for 24 hours. The expression of the phosphorylated form of type I microtubule-associated protein 1B in the cells was greater after exposure to okadaic acid and lower after N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine. We then injected the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the ear vein into rabbit models of spinal cord contusion. The migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards the injured spinal cord was poorer in cells exposed to okadaic acid- and N-acetyl-D-erythro-sphingosine than in non-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, we blocked phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathways in rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells using the inhibitors LY294002 and U0126, respectively. LY294002 resulted in an elevated expression of phosphorylated type I microtubule-associated protein 1B, whereas U0126 caused a reduction in expression. The present data indicate that PI3K and ERK1/2 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells modulate the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 1B via a cross-signaling network, and affect the migratory efficiency of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells towards injured spinal cord.

  7. Adeno associated viral-mediated intraosseous labeling of bone marrow derived cells for CNS tracking.

    PubMed

    Selenica, Maj-Linda B; Reid, Patrick; Pena, Gabriela; Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Jerry B; Nash, Kevin R; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N; Lee, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation, including microglial activation in the CNS, is an important hallmark in many neurodegenerative diseases. Microglial stimuli not only impact the brain microenvironment by production and release of cytokines and chemokines, but also influence the activity of bone marrow derived cells and blood born macrophage populations. In many diseases including brain disorders and spinal cord injury, researchers have tried to harbor the neuroprotective and repair properties of these subpopulations. Hematopoietic bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) are of great interest, especially during gene therapy because certain hematopoietic cell subpopulations traffic to the sites of injury and inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a method of labeling endogenous bone marrow derived cells through intraosseous impregnation of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) or lentivirus. We utilized rAAV serotype 9 (rAAV-9) or lentivirus for gene delivery of green florescence protein (GFP) to the mouse bone marrow cells. Flow cytometry showed that both viruses were able to efficiently transduce mouse bone marrow cells in vivo. However, the rAAV9-GFP viral construct transduced BMDCs more efficiently than the lentivirus (11.2% vs. 6.8%), as indicated by cellular GFP expression. We also demonstrate that GFP labeled cells correspond to bone marrow cells of myeloid origin using CD11b as a marker. Additionally, we characterized the ability of bone marrow derived, GFP labeled cells to extravasate into the brain parenchyma upon acute and subchronic neuroinflammatory stimuli in the mouse CNS. Viral mediated over expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or intracranial injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recruited GFP labeled BMDCs from the periphery into the brain parenchyma compared to vehicle treated mice. Altogether our findings demonstrate a useful method of labeling endogenous BMDCs via viral transduction and the ability to track subpopulations throughout the body

  8. The effect of bone marrow microenvironment on the functional properties of the therapeutic bone marrow-derived cells in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment of acute myocardial infarction with stem cell transplantation has achieved beneficial effects in many clinical trials. The bone marrow microenvironment of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients has never been studied even though myocardial infarction is known to cause an imbalance in the acid-base status of these patients. The aim of this study was to assess if the blood gas levels in the bone marrow of STEMI patients affect the characteristics of the bone marrow cells (BMCs) and, furthermore, do they influence the change in cardiac function after autologous BMC transplantation. The arterial, venous and bone marrow blood gas concentrations were also compared. Methods Blood gas analysis of the bone marrow aspirate and peripheral blood was performed for 27 STEMI patients receiving autologous stem cell therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention. Cells from the bone marrow aspirate were further cultured and the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) proliferation rate was determined by MTT assay and the MSC osteogenic differentiation capacity by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay. All the patients underwent a 2D-echocardiography at baseline and 4 months after STEMI. Results As expected, the levels of pO2, pCO2, base excess and HCO3 were similar in venous blood and bone marrow. Surprisingly, bone marrow showed significantly lower pH and Na+ and elevated K+ levels compared to arterial and venous blood. There was a positive correlation between the bone marrow pCO2 and HCO3 levels and MSC osteogenic differentiation capacity. In contrast, bone marrow pCO2 and HCO3 levels displayed a negative correlation with the proliferation rate of MSCs. Patients with the HCO3 level below the median value exhibited a more marked change in LVEF after BMC treatment than patients with HCO3 level above the median (11.13 ± 8.07% vs. 2.67 ± 11.89%, P = 0.014). Conclusions Low bone marrow pCO2 and HCO3 levels may represent the optimal environment

  9. Cigarette smoke inhibits recruitment of bone-marrow-derived stem cells to the uterus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuping; Gan, Ye; Taylor, Hugh S

    2011-02-01

    Cigarette smoking leads to female infertility and a decreased incidence of endometriosis. Bone marrow derived stem cells are recruited to uterine endometrium and endometriosis. The effect of cigarette smoking on stem cell recruitment to any organ is uncharacterized. We hypothesized that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell recruitment to the uterus and differentiation would be diminished by cigarette smoke. We used human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in vitro and a mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure. After myeloablation female C57BL/6J received bone marrow cells from males. Mice were exposed to room air or smoke from unfiltered cigarettes. Immunofluorescence and Y-FISH was performed on uterine sections. In vitro hMSCs were treated with 8-Br-cAMP to induce endometrial cell differentiation with or without cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and decidualization assessed morphologically and by prolactin expression. After 4 weeks the total number of Y-chromosome cells in the uterus was reduced by 68% in the smoke exposed mice. Both leukocytes and bone marrow derived endometrial cells were reduced by 60% and 73%, respectively. Differentiation of bone marrow derived cell to endometrial epithelial cells was reduced by 84%. hMSC treated with CSE failed to show cytological characteristics of decidualization. mRNA levels of the decidualization marker prolactin were decreased by 90% in CSE treated cells. Smoking inhibits both recruitment of bone marrow derived stem cells to uterus and stem cell differentiation. Inhibition of stem cells recruitment may be a general mechanism by which smoking leads to long term organ damage through inability to repair or regenerate multiple tissues.

  10. Different Procoagulant Activity of Therapeutic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Placental Decidua.

    PubMed

    Moll, Guido; Ignatowicz, Lech; Catar, Rusan; Luecht, Christian; Sadeghi, Behnam; Hamad, Osama; Jungebluth, Philipp; Dragun, Duska; Schmidtchen, Artur; Ringdén, Olle

    2015-10-01

    While therapeutic mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have usually been obtained from bone marrow, perinatal tissues have emerged as promising new sources of cells for stromal cell therapy. In this study, we present a first safety follow-up on our clinical experience with placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs), used as supportive immunomodulatory and regenerative therapy for patients with severe complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that DSCs are smaller, almost half the volume of MSCs, which may favor microvascular passage. DSCs also show different hemocompatibility, with increased triggering of the clotting cascade after exposure to human blood and plasma in vitro. After infusion of DSCs in HSCT patients, we observed a weak activation of the fibrinolytic system, but the other blood activation markers remained stable, excluding major adverse events. Expression profiling identified differential levels of key factors implicated in regulation of hemostasis, such as a lack of prostacyclin synthase and increased tissue factor expression in DSCs, suggesting that these cells have intrinsic blood-activating properties. The stronger triggering of the clotting cascade by DSCs could be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft reconstitution before infusion, for example, by use of low-dose heparin anticoagulant in the cell infusion buffer. We conclude that DSCs are smaller and have stronger hemostatic properties than MSCs, thus triggering stronger activation of the clotting system, which can be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft preparation before infusion. Our results highlight the importance of hemocompatibility safety testing for every novel cell therapy product before clinical use, when applied using systemic delivery.

  11. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui-ping; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yin; Li, Jian-ding; Xie, Jun

    2015-01-01

    An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T7-8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:25878588

  12. Bone Marrow Stromal Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Polymeri, A; Giannobile, W V; Kaigler, D

    2016-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are adult multipotent cells, which have the potential to differentiate into cell types of mesodermal origin, namely osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Due to their accessibility and expansion potential, BMSCs have historically held therapeutic promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. More recently, it has been demonstrated that not only can bone marrow stromal stem cells directly participate in tissue regeneration, but they also have the capacity to migrate to distant sites of tissue injury, where they can participate in tissue repair either directly through their differentiation or indirectly through paracrine mechanisms. Additionally, they can elicit various immunomodulatory signals, which can attenuate the inflammatory and immune responses. As such, bone marrow stromal stem cells have been explored clinically for treatment of a wide variety of different conditions including bone defects, graft-vs.-host disease, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and liver and kidney diseases. This review provides an overview of current clinical applications of bone marrow stromal stem cells and discusses their therapeutic properties, while also addressing limitations of their use. PubMed, Ovid, and Google Scholar online databases were searched using several keywords, including "stem cells", "tissue engineering", tissue regeneration" and "clinical trials". Additionally, Clinical trials.gov was used to locate completed clinical trials using bone marrow derived stem cells.

  13. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Jong-Seok; Shin, Sung Jae; Ko, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs), IONPs, and iron citrate) and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26389886

  14. Bone marrow B cell precursor number after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and GVHD development.

    PubMed

    Fedoriw, Yuri; Samulski, T Danielle; Deal, Allison M; Dunphy, Cherie H; Sharf, Andrew; Shea, Thomas C; Serody, Jonathan S; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2012-06-01

    Patients without chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) have robust B cell reconstitution and are able to maintain B cell homeostasis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To determine whether B lymphopoiesis differs before cGVHD develops, we examined bone marrow (BM) biopsies for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and PAX5 immunostaining early post-HSCT at day 30 when all patients have been shown to have high B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels. We found significantly greater numbers of BM B cell precursors in patients who did not develop cGVHD compared with those who developed cGVHD (median = 44 vs 2 cells/high powered field [hpf]; respectively; P < .001). Importantly, a significant increase in precursor B cells was maintained when patients receiving high-dose steroid therapy were excluded (median = 49 vs 20 cells/hpf; P = .017). Thus, we demonstrate the association of BM B cell production capacity in human GVHD development. Increased BM precursor B cell number may serve to predict good clinical outcome after HSCT. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hydroxyapatite ceramics as a carrier of gene-transduced bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Manabu; Ohgushi, Hajime; Kuriyama, Shigeki; Akahane, Takemi; Takakura, Yoshinori

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an efficient exogenous gene delivery system using cultured marrow cells and porous hydroxyapatite ceramics. Bone marrow cells were obtained from the femoral shaft of a Fischer 344 rat and cultured in a medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum until confluent. After trypsinization, cells were subcultured at a cell density of 1 x 10(4) cells/cm2 in the presence of fetal bovine serum. The subcultured bone marrow cells were infected with recombinant retroviruses carrying the lacZ gene. The retrovirus infection was performed seven times from day 1 to day 7 during the culturing procedure. Cells expressing the lacZ gene were stained blue with the X-gal staining and represented approximately 80%. Composites of virus-infected bone marrow cells and hydroxyapatite ceramics were implanted at the subcutaneous site of recipient Fischer 344 rats. Four weeks after the implantation the ceramics were harvested. The histological sections of the ceramics showed abundant bone formation in the pores of the ceramics and obviously blue-stained osteoblasts and osteocytes. Other cell types that were stained blue were some fibroblastic cells and endothelial cells in the newly formed capillaries. These findings indicate that osteoblasts and osteocytes in the newly formed bone were derived from the cultured bone marrow cells, and therefore gene transfection by retroviruses did not disturb the bone formation process. Because of the durability of the newly formed bone tissue, creating composites of cultured bone marrow cells and hydroxyapatite ceramics might be an ideal method for exogenous gene transfection.

  16. Effect of peripheral lymphoid cells on the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease following allogeneic mouse bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Almaraz, R.; Ballinger, W.; Sachs, D.H.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1983-02-01

    Experiments were performed to study the role of circulating lymphoid cells in the incidence of lethal graft versus host disease (GVHD) in radiation-induced fully allogeneic mouse chimeras. The incidence of GVHD was reduced significantly in BALB/c leads to C57BL/6 radiation chimeras if bone marrow donors were exsanguinated immediately prior to marrow harvest. Chimeras resulting from the injection of bone marrow from bled donors exhibited only donor cells in spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood and normal levels of Thy 1+ and Ia+ cells were found in each of these lymphoid compartments. The addition of as few as 3 X 10(4) peripheral mononuclear cells to the marrow from exsanguinated donors uniformly led to lethal GVHD. /sup 51/Cr-labeled cell traffic studies revealed that prior exsanguination of marrow donors led to about a 70% reduction in the number of circulating mononuclear cells contaminating the bone marrow at the time of marrow harvest. This decrease in contaminating peripheral cells was calculated to be in the appropriate range to account for the decreased GVHD seen when marrow from exsanguinated donors was used. It thus appears that peripheral cells contaminating marrow can be an important factor in causing lethal GVHD in allogeneic radiation chimeras.

  17. BMP4 can generate primordial germ cells from bone-marrow-derived pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Soleimani, Masoud; Abdolvahabi, Mir Abbas; Nayernia, Karim; Ragerdi Kashani, Iraj

    2012-01-01

    Evidence of germ cell derivation from embryonic and somatic stem cells provides an in vitro model for the study of germ cell development, associated epigenetic modification and mammalian gametogenesis. More importantly, in vitro derived gametes also represent a potential strategy for treating infertility. In mammals, male and female gametes, oocyte and sperm, are derived from a specific cell population, PGCs (primordial germ cells) that segregate early in embryogenesis. We have isolated pluripotent SSEA-1+ (stage-specific embryonic antigen-1+) cells from mice bone marrow using a MACS (magnetic-activated cell sorting) system. SSEA-1+ cells were directly separated from the suspension of MMCs (murine mononuclear cells) harvested from bone marrow of 2-4-week-old mice. Flow-cytometry assay immediately after sorting and culturing under undifferentiated condition showed 55±7% and 87±4% purity respectively. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) analysis after differentiation of SSEA-1+ cells into derivations of three germ layers showed the pluripotency properties of isolated cells. SSEA-1+ cells were induced to differentiate along germ cell lineage by adding BMP4 (bone morphogenic factor-4) to the medium. Regarding the expression of germ cell markers (PGCs, male and female germ cell lineage), it was found that adding exogenous BMP4 to culture medium could differentiate pluripotent SSEA-1+ cells isolated from an adult tissue into gamete precursors, PGCs. Differentiated cells expressed specific molecular markers of PGCs, including Oct4, fragilis, Stella and Mvh (mouse vasa homologue). Therefore BMP4 is insufficient to induce SSEA-1+ cells derived from PGCs to develop further into late germ cells in vitro.

  18. Gender difference in the neuroprotective effect of rat bone marrow mesenchymal cells against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Yu, Jian-Xiong

    2016-05-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can reduce retinal ganglion cell death and effectively prevent vision loss. Previously, we found that during differentiation, female rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells acquire a higher neurogenic potential compared with male rhesus monkey bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests that female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a stronger neuroprotective effect than male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Here, we first isolated and cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from female and male rats by density gradient centrifugation. Retinal tissue from newborn rats was prepared by enzymatic digestion to obtain primary retinal ganglion cells. Using the transwell system, retinal ganglion cells were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and caspase-3 activity assay. We found a marked increase in apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells after 24 hours of hypoxia compared with normoxia. Moreover, apoptotic rate and caspase-3 activity of retinal ganglion cells significantly decreased with both female and male bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell co-culture under hypoxia compared with culture alone, with more significant effects from female bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results indicate that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells exert a neuroprotective effect against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and also that female cells have greater neuroprotective ability compared with male cells.

  19. T Regulatory Cells Support Plasma Cell Populations in the Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Glatman Zaretsky, Arielle; Konradt, Christoph; Dépis, Fabien; Wing, James B; Goenka, Radhika; Atria, Daniela Gomez; Silver, Jonathan S; Cho, Sunglim; Wolf, Amaya I; Quinn, William J; Engiles, Julie B; Brown, Dorothy C; Beiting, Daniel; Erikson, Jan; Allman, David; Cancro, Michael P; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Lu, Li-Fan; Benoist, Christophe O; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-02-21

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) in the bone marrow (BM) are a critical source of antibodies after infection or vaccination, but questions remain about the factors that control PCs. We found that systemic infection alters the BM, greatly reducing PCs and regulatory T (Treg) cells, a population that contributes to immune privilege in the BM. The use of intravital imaging revealed that BM Treg cells display a distinct behavior characterized by sustained co-localization with PCs and CD11c-YFP(+) cells. Gene expression profiling indicated that BM Treg cells express high levels of Treg effector molecules, and CTLA-4 deletion in these cells resulted in elevated PCs. Furthermore, preservation of Treg cells during systemic infection prevents PC loss, while Treg cell depletion in uninfected mice reduced PC populations. These studies suggest a role for Treg cells in PC biology and provide a potential target for the modulation of PCs during vaccine-induced humoral responses or autoimmunity.

  20. [The effect of cells presenting the erythroblast antigen on the natural suppressor activity of nonadhesive bone marrow cells].

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, S A; Agranovich, I M; Bel'skiĭ, Iu P; Goncharskaia, M A

    1993-06-01

    Concanavalin A-induced proliferation of spleen cells of C57B1/6 mice was inhibited by syngeneic normal bone marrow cells. Elimination of Ag-Eb-positive cells by panning was shown to result in markedly reduced inhibitory activity of bone marrow cells. To evaluate the role of Ag-Eb in natural suppressor activity, bone marrow cells were preincubated with different dilutions of MAE-15 monoclonal antibody and then added to spleen cells. The inhibitory effect of bone marrow cells decreased with the increasing concentration of the monoclonal antibody in a dose-dependent manner and nearly disappeared at a concentration of MAE-15 of 150 m micrograms/ml and 300 m micrograms/ml. In control experiments, bone marrow cells were preincubated with antibodies non-reactive with Ag-Eb under the same conditions. It is concluded that the decrease of natural suppressor activity after incubation of bone marrow cells with MAE-15 monoclonal antibody is specific for anti-Ag-Eb antibodies.

  1. Tributyltin alters the bone marrow microenvironment and suppresses B cell development.

    PubMed

    Baker, Amelia H; Wu, Ting Hua; Bolt, Alicia M; Gerstenfeld, Louis C; Mann, Koren K; Schlezinger, Jennifer J

    2017-04-07

    Organotins are industrial chemicals and agricultural pesticides, and they contaminate both outdoor and indoor environments. Organotins are detectable in human sera at biologically active concentrations and are immuno-and neuro-toxicants. Triphenyltin, tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC) and promote adipogenesis. TBT also has been shown to suppress osteogenesis; osteoblasts not only support bone homeostasis but also support B lymphopoiesis. In addition, developing B cells are highly sensitive to exogenous insults. Thus, we hypothesized that bone marrow B cells may be negatively affected by TBT exposure both directly, through activation of apoptosis, and indirectly, through alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment. TBT activated apoptosis in developing B cells at environmentally relevant concentrations (as low as 80 nM) in vitro, via a mechanism that is distinct from that induced by high dose (μM) TBT and that requires p53. TBT suppressed the proliferation of hematopoietic cells in an ex vivo bone marrow model. Concurrent treatment of stromal cells and B cells or pretreatment of stromal cells with TBT induced adipogenesis in the stromal cells and reduced the progression of B cells from the early pro B (Hardy fraction B) to the pre B stage (Hardy fraction D). In vivo, TBT induced adipogenesis in bone marrow, reduced "aging-sensitive" AA4+CD19+ B cells in bone marrow, and reduced splenic B cell numbers. Immunosenescence and osteoporosis are adverse health effects of aging, we postulate that TBT exposure may mimic, and possibly intensify, these pathologies.

  2. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Bruno José Martins; Rodrigues, Ana Paula D; Farias, Luis Henrique S; Hage, Amanda Anastácia P; Do Nascimento, Jose Luiz M; Silva, Edilene O

    2014-10-03

    The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent.

  3. Physalis angulata induces in vitro differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The bone marrow is a hematopoietic tissue that, in the presence of cytokines and growth factors, generates all of the circulating blood cells. These cells are important for protecting the organism against pathogens and for establishing an effective immune response. Previous studies have shown immunomodulatory effects of different products isolated from plant extracts. This study aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory properties of aqueous Physalis angulata (AEPa) extract on the differentiation of bone marrow cells. Results Increased cellular area, higher spreading ability and several cytoplasmatic projections were observed in the treated cells, using optical microscopy, suggesting cell differentiation. Furthermore, AEPa did not promote the proliferation of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, however promotes increased the number of macrophages in the culture. The ultrastructural analysis by Transmission Electron Microscopy of treated cells showed spreading ability, high number of cytoplasmatic projections and increase of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, a high level of LC3b expression by treated cells was detected by flow cytometry, suggesting an autophagic process. Cell surface expression of F4/80 and CD11b also indicated that AEPa may stimulate differentiation of bone marrow cells mainly into macrophages. In addition, AEPa did not differentiate cells into dendritic cells, as assessed by CD11c analysis. Furthermore, no cytotoxic effects were observed in the cells treated with AEPa. Conclusion Results demonstrate that AEPa promotes the differentiation of bone marrow cells, particularly into macrophages and may hold promise as an immunomodulating agent. PMID:25281406

  4. Encapsulated Whole Bone Marrow Cells Improve Survival in Wistar Rats after 90% Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Cruz, Carolina; Kieling, Carlos Oscar; López, Mónica Luján; Osvaldt, Alessandro; Ochs de Muñoz, Gustavo; da Silveira, Themis Reverbel; Giugliani, Roberto; Matte, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. The use of bone marrow cells has been suggested as an alternative treatment for acute liver failure. In this study, we investigate the effect of encapsulated whole bone marrow cells in a liver failure model. Methods. Encapsulated cells or empty capsules were implanted in rats submitted to 90% partial hepatectomy. The survival rate was assessed. Another group was euthanized at 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours after hepatectomy to study expression of cytokines and growth factors. Results. Whole bone marrow group showed a higher than 10 days survival rate compared to empty capsules group. Gene expression related to early phase of liver regeneration at 6 hours after hepatectomy was decreased in encapsulated cells group, whereas genes related to regeneration were increased at 12, 24, and 48 hours. Whole bone marrow group showed lower regeneration rate at 72 hours and higher expression and activity of caspase 3. In contrast, lysosomal-β-glucuronidase activity was elevated in empty capsules group. Conclusions. The results show that encapsulated whole bone marrow cells reduce the expression of genes involved in liver regeneration and increase those responsible for ending hepatocyte division. In addition, these cells favor apoptotic cell death and decrease necrosis, thus increasing survival. PMID:26649048

  5. Monoclonal antibodies in the detection of bone marrow metastases in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Skov, B G; Hirsch, F R; Bobrow, L

    1992-04-01

    Using conventional examination (CE) of H&E stained slides from bone marrow aspirates, metastases can be detected in approximately 25% of patients with small cell lung cancer. We investigated a panel of monoclonal antibodies using immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of bone marrow infiltration from SCLC and compared the results with CE. Seven monoclonal antibodies raised against epithelial antigens (CAM 5.2, MOV 15, NCCST 433, PE 35, LCA1/L38, HMFG 1 AND HMFG 2) were applied on bone marrow sections from three groups of patients (pts): (1) 19 pts in whom SCLC-metastases were detected by CE, (2) 44 pts with SCLC in whom metastases could not be detected by CE, and (3) 20 pts with non-malignant bone marrow diseases. All the antibodies except LCA1/L38 were positive in 60-90% of the slides with infiltrating tumour cells in group 1. No positive tumour cells were detected in group 2. A few plasma cells and megakaryocytes were slightly positive for MOV 15 and NCCST 433, but no other positive cells were detected in group 3. In conclusion, the monoclonal antibodies used in this study may be useful for diagnostic purposes when a suspicious looking infiltration is detected by CE. However, these antibodies could not detect metastatic tumour cells in the bone marrow sections from patients in whom CE did not reveal any tumour cells.

  6. Impaired endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and dysfunctional bone marrow stroma in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Westerweel, Peter E; Teraa, Martin; Rafii, Shahin; Jaspers, Janneke E; White, Ian A; Hooper, Andrea T; Doevendans, Pieter A; Verhaar, Marianne C

    2013-01-01

    Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC) levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired -at least partly- due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment. Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1(+)Flk-1(+) EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell-endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed. In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro. EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients.

  7. Functional signature of human islet-derived precursor cells compared to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Limbert, Catarina; Ebert, Regina; Schilling, Tatjana; Path, Gunter; Benisch, Peggy; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Seufert, Jochen; Jakob, Franz

    2010-05-01

    Pancreatic islet beta-cell replenishment can be driven by epithelial cells from exocrine pancreas via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the reverse process MET, while specified pancreatic mesenchymal cells control islet cell development and maintenance. The role of human islet-derived precursor cells (hIPCs) in regeneration and support of endocrine islets is under investigation. Here, we analyzed hIPCs as to their immunophenotype, multilineage differentiation capacity, and gene profiling, in comparison to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). hIPCs and hBM-MSCs display a common mesenchymal character and express lineage-specific marker genes upon induction toward pancreatic endocrine and mesenchymal pathways of differentiation. hIPCs can go further along endocrine pathways while lacking some core mesenchymal differentiation attributes. Significance analysis of microarray (SAM) from 5 hBM-MSC and 3 hIPC donors mirrored such differences. Candidate gene cluster analysis disclosed differential expression of key lineage regulators, indicated a HoxA gene-associated positional memory in hIPCs and hBM-MSCs, and showed as well a clear transition state from mesenchyme to epithelium or vice versa in hIPCs. Our findings raise new research platforms to further clarify the potential of hIPCs to undergo complete MET thus contributing to islet cell replenishment, maintenance, and function.

  8. CD87-positive tumor cells in bone marrow aspirates identified by confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Noack, F; Helmecke, D; Rosenberg, R; Thorban, S; Nekarda, H; Fink, U; Lewald, J; Stich, M; Schutze, K; Harbeck, N; Magdolen, V; Graeff, H; Schmitt, M

    1999-10-01

    Dissemination of single tumor cells to the bone marrow is a common event in cancer. The clinical significance of cytokeratin-positive cells detected in the bone marrow of cancer patients is still a matter of debate. In gastric cancer, overexpression of the receptor (uPAR or CD87) for the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in disseminated cancer cells indicates shorter survival of cancer patients. A new immunofluorescence approach, applying confocal laser scanning microscopy, is introduced to locate CD87 antigen in cytokeratin-positive tumor cells and to quantify the CD87 antigen by consecutive scanning. At first, cytokeratin 8/18/19-positive carcinoma cells are identified at excitation wavelength 488 nm using monoclonal antibody A45B/B3 to the cytokeratins and goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with the fluorochrome Alexa488. Next, CD87 in tumor cells is identified by chicken antibody HU277 to the uPA-receptor and goat anti-chicken IgY labeled with fluorochrome Alexa568 (excitation wavelength 568 nm) and the fluorescence signal quantified on a single cell basis using fluorescently labeled latex beads as the fluorescence reference. From 16 patients with gastric or esophageal carcinoma, bone marrow aspirates were obtained, stained for cytokeratins and CD87 and then subjected to laser scanning fluorescence microscopy. Three of six gastric cancer patients had tumor cells present in the bone marrow of which 2 stained for CD87. Three of ten esophageal carcinoma patients had tumor cells in the bone marrow, all three samples stained for CD87. CD87-positive tumor cells were also dissected from stained bone marrow aspirates by laser microdissection microscope to allow analysis of single cells at the gene level.

  9. Characterization of Insulin-Secreting Porcine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Ex Vivo and Autologous Cell Therapy In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Do, Hai Van Thi; Loke, Wan Ting; Kee, Irene; Liang, Vivienne; David, Sebastian J; Gan, Shu Uin; Lee, Sze Sing; Ng, Wai Har; Koong, Heng Nung; Ong, Hock Soo; Lee, Kok Onn; Calne, Roy Y; Kon, Oi Lian

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy could potentially meet the need for pancreas and islet transplantations in diabetes mellitus that far exceeds the number of available donors. Bone marrow stromal cells are widely used in clinical trials mainly for their immunomodulatory effects with a record of safety. However, less focus has been paid to developing these cells for insulin secretion by transfection. Although murine models of diabetes have been extensively used in gene and cell therapy research, few studies have shown efficacy in large preclinical animal models. Here we report optimized conditions for ex vivo expansion and characterization of porcine bone marrow stromal cells and their permissive expression of a transfected insulin gene. Our data show that these cells resemble human bone marrow stromal cells in surface antigen expression, are homogeneous, and can be reproducibly isolated from outbred Yorkshire-Landrace pigs. Porcine bone marrow stromal cells were efficiently expanded in vitro to >10(10) cells from 20 ml of bone marrow and remained karyotypically normal during expansion. These cells were electroporated with an insulin expression plasmid vector with high efficiency and viability, and secreted human insulin and C-peptide indicating appropriate processing of proinsulin. We showed that autologous insulin-secreting bone marrow stromal cells implanted and engrafted in the liver of a streptozotocin-diabetic pig that modeled type 1 diabetes resulted in partial, but significant, improvement in hyperglycemia that could not be ascribed to regeneration of endogenous β-cells. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vivo from implanted cells in the treated pig was documented by a rise in serum human C-peptide levels during intravenous glucose tolerance tests. Compared to a sham-treated control pig, this resulted in significantly reduced fasting hyperglycemia, a slower rise in serum fructosamine, and prevented weight loss. Taken together, this study suggests that bone marrow stromal

  10. Impaired Endothelial Progenitor Cell Mobilization and Dysfunctional Bone Marrow Stroma in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Jaspers, Janneke E.; White, Ian A.; Hooper, Andrea T.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Verhaar, Marianne C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cell (EPC) levels are reduced in diabetes mellitus. This may be a consequence of impaired mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow. We hypothesized that under diabetic conditions, mobilization of EPC from the bone marrow to the circulation is impaired –at least partly– due to dysfunction of the bone marrow stromal compartment. Methods Diabetes was induced in mice by streptozotocin injection. Circulating Sca-1+Flk-1+ EPC were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry at baseline and after mobilization with G-CSF/SCF injections. In vivo hemangiogenic recovery was tested by 5-FU challenge. Interaction within the bone marrow environment between CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and supporting stroma was assessed by co-cultures. To study progenitor cell–endothelial cell interaction under normoglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions, a co-culture model using E4Orf1-transfected human endothelial cells was employed. Results In diabetic mice, bone marrow EPC levels were unaffected. However, circulating EPC levels in blood were lower at baseline and mobilization was attenuated. Diabetic mice failed to recover and repopulate from 5-FU injection. In vitro, primary cultured bone marrow stroma from diabetic mice was impaired in its capacity to support human CFU-forming HPC. Finally, hyperglycemia hampered the HPC supportive function of endothelial cells in vitro. Conclusion EPC mobilization is impaired under experimental diabetic conditions and our data suggest that diabetes induces alterations in the progenitor cell supportive capacity of the bone marrow stroma, which could be partially responsible for the attenuated EPC mobilization and reduced EPC levels observed in diabetic patients. PMID:23555959

  11. Regenerating bone marrow produces a potent growth-promoting activity to osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Bab, I; Gazit, D; Muhlrad, A; Shteyer, A

    1988-07-01

    It is well documented that injury to bone marrow is followed by an osteogenic phase that precedes the complete tissue regeneration. We have recently shown that postablation healing of bone marrow in rat tibiae is associated with a systemic increase in osteogenesis. It was hypothesized that a growth factor(s) with an effect on osteogenic cells is produced in the healing limb, is transferred to the blood circulation, and enhances osteogenesis systemically. To test growth factor production, healing bone marrow-conditioned medium was prepared with tissue separated from rat tibias during the osteogenic phase and assayed for enhancement of mitogenic activity in culture of osteogenic rat osteosarcoma cells (ROS 17/2). Partial purification of healing bone marrow-conditioned medium-derived growth factor(s) consisted of gel filtration on Sephadex G-25, boiling, chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, and gel filtration on Sephadex G-75. Mitogenic activity eluted in the void volume of the Sephadex G-25 column (mol wt greater than 5,000). Potent activity resolved from heparin-Sepharose with PBS, and on filtration by Sephadex G-75 this activity recovered in 3 peaks with mol wt estimates of 35,000, 19,000, and less than 10,000. The partially purified factor also showed considerable stimulatory effect on DNA synthesis in osteoblastic fetal rat calvarial cells and on in vitro elongation of fetal long bone; it had only a small effect on nonosteoblastic ROS and fetal rat calvarial cells. These data indicate that healing bone marrow produces growth factor activity with a preferential effect on osteogenic cells. It is suggested that local growth factors have a role as mediators in the sequence of events whereby bone marrow expresses its osteogenic potential. During postablation healing of bone marrow these factors may also function as systemic promoters to osteogenic cells.

  12. Mixed chimerism renders residual host dendritic cells incapable of alloimmunization of the marrow donor in the canine model of allogeneic marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rosinski, Steven L; Graves, Scott S; Higginbotham, Deborah A; Storb, Rainer

    2015-10-02

    This study tested whether an alloimmune response can occur in the marrow donor when infused or injected with leukocytes from their mixed chimeric transplant recipient. Two mixed chimeras were produced after conditioning with three Gray total body irradiation, donor marrow infusion, and post-grafting immunosuppression. The marrow donors were then repeatedly infused and injected with leukocytes from their respective chimeric recipient. A donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) into their mixed chimeras had no effect, even after the experiments were repeated. The presence of blood dendritic cells (DCs) of recipient origin was confirmed in chimeric recipients, as well as the presence of microchimerism in the marrow donors. Donor sensitization did occur following placement of a recipient skin graft that was confirmed following DLI into recipients that changed the mixed chimeras into full donor chimeras. These observations suggest that mixed chimerism renders recipient peripheral blood DCs incapable of inducing a donor T cell response.

  13. Busulfan and total body irradiation as antihematopoietic stem cell agents in the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders for allogenic bone marrow transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Parkman, R.; Rappeport, J.M.; Hellman, S.; Lipton, J.; Smith, B.; Geha, R.; Nathan, D.G.

    1984-10-01

    The capacity of busulfan and total body irradiation to ablate hematopoietic stem cells as preparation for the allogeneic bone marrow transplantation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorders was studied. Fourteen patients received 18 transplants; busulfan was used in the preparatory regimen of eight transplants and total body irradiation in the regimens of six transplants. Sustained hematopoietic ablation was achieved in six of eight patients prepared with busulfan and in all six patients prepared with total body irradiation. Three patients prepared with total body irradiation died with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, whereas no patients receiving busulfan developed interstitial pneumonitis. The optimal antihematopoietic stem cell agent to be used for the preparation of patients with congenital bone marrow disorder for bone marrow transplantation is not certain.

  14. Assessment of bone marrow plasma cell infiltrates in multiple myeloma: the added value of CD138 immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Al-Quran, Samer Z; Yang, Lijun; Magill, James M; Braylan, Raul C; Douglas-Nikitin, Vonda K

    2007-12-01

    Assessment of bone marrow involvement by malignant plasma cells is an important element in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias. Microscope-based differential counts of bone marrow aspirates are used as the primary method to evaluate bone marrow plasma cell percentages. However, multiple myeloma is often a focal process, a fact that impacts the accuracy and reliability of the results of bone marrow plasma cell percentages obtained by differential counts of bone marrow aspirate smears. Moreover, the interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of counting bone marrow plasma cells microscopically has not been adequately tested. CD138 allows excellent assessment of plasma cell numbers and distribution in bone marrow biopsies. We compared estimates of plasma cell percentages in bone marrow aspirates and in hematoxylin-eosin- and CD138-stained bone marrow biopsy sections (CD138 sections) in 79 bone marrows from patients with multiple myeloma. There was a notable discrepancy in bone marrow plasma cell percentages using the different methods of observation. In particular, there was a relatively poor concordance of plasma cell percentage estimation between aspirate smears and CD138 sections. Estimates of plasma cell percentage using CD138 sections demonstrated the highest interobserver concordance. This observation was supported by computer-assisted image analysis. In addition, CD138 expression highlighted patterns of plasma cell infiltration indicative of neoplasia even in the absence of plasmacytosis. We conclude that examination of CD138 sections should be considered for routine use in the estimation of plasma cell load in the bone marrow.

  15. Characterizing and Targeting Bone Marrow-Derived Inflammatory Cells in Driving the Malignancy and Progression of Childhood Astrocytic Brain Tumors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0303 TITLE: Characterizing and Targeting Bone Marrow-Derived Inflammatory Cells in Driving the Malignancy and...W81XWH-13-1-0303 Characterizing and Targeting Bone Marrow-Derived Inflammatory Cells in Driving the Malignancy and Progression of Childhood Astrocytic...lineages during the progression of gliomas, and We observed bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells have only minimal effort on tumor progression. We

  16. Quantitative MRI analysis of craniofacial bone marrow in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Elias, E J; Liao, J H; Jara, H; Watanabe, M; Nadgir, R N; Sakai, Y; Erbay, K; Saito, N; Ozonoff, A; Steinberg, M H; Sakai, O

    2013-03-01

    Assessment of bone marrow is most commonly performed qualitatively in the spine or other large long bones. The craniofacial bones are less ideal for bone marrow analysis because of the relatively small bone marrow volume. Because patients with SCD often undergo repeated brain imaging to evaluate for cerebral vaso-occlusive disease, quantitative assessment of craniofacial bone marrow is a reasonable possibility in these patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate specific sickle cell disease changes in craniofacial bone marrow quantitatively by analyzing T1, T2, and secular-T2 relaxation times and volume with the use of quantitative MRI. Fourteen patients with SCD and 17 control subjects were imaged with the mixed TSE pulse sequence at 1.5T. The craniofacial bones were manually segmented by using 3D Slicer to generate bone marrow volumes and to provide T1, T2, and secular-T2 relaxation times. All subjects exhibited a bimodal T1 histogram. In the SCD group, there was a decrease in amplitude in the first T1 peak and an increase in amplitude in the second T1 peak. The first T1 peak showed a significant increase in relaxation time compared with control subjects (P < .0001), whereas there was no significant difference in the second T1 peak. T2 and secular-T2 relaxation times were significantly shorter in the SCD group (T2, P < .0001; secular-T2, P < .0001). Increasing numbers of blood transfusions resulted in a decrease in T2 and secular-T2 times. Patients with SCD exhibited a larger bone marrow volume compared with control subjects, even after standardization. Patients with SCD exhibited significant quantifiable changes in the craniofacial bone marrow because of failure of red-to-yellow marrow conversion and iron deposition that can be identified by qMRI relaxometry and volumetry. Both qMRI relaxometry and volumetry may be used as noninvasive tools for assessment of disease severity.

  17. Bone marrow-derived cells are differentially involved in pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, He; Otani, Atsushi; Oishi, Akio; Yodoi, Yuko; Kameda, Takanori; Kojima, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2010-01-08

    Purpose: Bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to play roles in angiogenesis. Although these cells have been shown to promote angiogenesis, it is not yet clear whether these cells affect all types of angiogenesis. This study investigated the involvement of bone marrow-derived cells in pathological and physiological angiogenesis in the murine retina. Materials and methods: The oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model was used as a retinal angiogenesis model in newborn mice. To block the influence of bone marrow-derived cells, the mice were irradiated with a 4-Gy dose of radiation from a {sup 137}Cs source. Irradiation was performed in four different conditions with radio dense 2-cm thick lead disks; (1) H group, the head were covered with these discs to protect the eyes from radiation; (2) A group, all of the body was covered with these discs; (3) N group, mice were completely unshielded; (4) C group, mice were put in the irradiator but were not irradiated. On P17, the retinal areas showing pathological and physiological retinal angiogenesis were measured and compared to the retinas of nonirradiated mice. Results: Although irradiation induced leukocyte depletion, it did not affect the number of other cell types or body weight. Retinal nonperfusion areas were significantly larger in irradiated mice than in control mice (P < 0.05), indicating that physiological angiogenesis was impaired. However, the formation of tuft-like angiogenesis processes was more prominent in the irradiated mice (P < 0.05), indicating that pathological angiogenesis was intact. Conclusions: Bone marrow-derived cells seem to be differentially involved in the formation of physiological and pathological retinal vessels. Pathological angiogenesis in the murine retina does not require functional bone marrow-derived cells, but these cells are important for the formation of physiological vessels. Our results add a new insight into the pathology of retinal angiogenesis and bolster the hypothesis that

  18. Studies on canine bone marrow long-term culture: effect of stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Neuner, E; Schumm, M; Schneider, E M; Guenther, W; Kremmer, E; Vogl, C; Büttner, M; Thierfelder, S; Kolb, H J

    1998-02-16

    Long-term culture of canine marrow cells allows in vitro studies of the hematopoietic system of the dog and characterization of early progenitor cells. Colonies of fresh marrow cells grew equally good in both agar or methylcellulose supplemented with fetal calf serum, while colonies of long-term cultures required agar-based medium containing human serum. Optimum colony growth was obtained when stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were used as growth stimuli of colony forming units (CFU). Similar results were achieved with several cell culture media. Addition of hydrocortisone to long-term cultures improved clonogenic growth of cultured cells. Addition of 2-mercaptoethanol had no effect. Strong differences were observed in long-term culture with different horse serum lots and the addition of fetal calf serum to long-term culture suppressed CFU growth of cultured cells. Recharging of cultures with fresh marrow cells on day 7 of culture improved CFU growth only in the following week but had little effect on the outcome. Adding SCF to long-term cultures led to differentiation of more primitive cells and destruction of the stromal layer. Investigation of purified and cultured cell populations was possible when preestablished long-term cultures as stromal layers were used. Loss of long-term culture-initiating ability could be demonstrated in this system with lineage negative marrow cells expanded ex vivo with SCF and GM-CSF.

  19. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation promotes beta-cell regeneration after acute injury through BM cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogihara, Takehide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Gao, Junhong; Kaneko, Keizo; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Sasano, Hironobu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2007-05-01

    There is controversy regarding the roles of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in pancreatic beta-cell regeneration. To examine these roles in vivo, mice were treated with streptozotocin (STZ), followed by bone marrow transplantation (BMT; lethal irradiation and subsequent BM cell infusion) from green fluorescence protein transgenic mice. BMT improved STZ-induced hyperglycemia, nearly normalizing glucose levels, with partially restored pancreatic islet number and size, whereas simple BM cell infusion without preirradiation had no effects. In post-BMT mice, most islets were located near pancreatic ducts and substantial numbers of bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells were detected in islets and ducts. Importantly, green fluorescence protein-positive, i.e. BM-derived, cells were detected around islets and were CD45 positive but not insulin positive. Then to examine whether BM-derived cell mobilization contributes to this process, we used Nos3(-/-) mice as a model of impaired BM-derived cell mobilization. In streptozotocin-treated Nos3(-/-) mice, the effects of BMT on blood glucose, islet number, bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells in islets, and CD45-positive cells around islets were much smaller than those in streptozotocin-treated Nos3(+/+) controls. A series of BMT experiments using Nos3(+/+) and Nos3(-/-) mice showed hyperglycemia-improving effects of BMT to correlate inversely with the severity of myelosuppression and delay of peripheral white blood cell recovery. Thus, mobilization of BM-derived cells is critical for BMT-induced beta-cell regeneration after injury. The present results suggest that homing of donor BM-derived cells in BM and subsequent mobilization into the injured periphery are required for BMT-induced regeneration of recipient pancreatic beta-cells.

  20. Bone marrow plasmacytoid dendritic cells can differentiate into myeloid dendritic cells upon virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga, Elina I; McGavern, Dorian B; Pruneda-Paz, Jose L; Teng, Chao; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2017-01-01

    Two subsets of dendritic cell (DCs), plasmacytoid (p) and myeloid (m) DCs, have been described in humans and mice. These subsets are known to have divergent roles during an immune response, but their developmental course is unclear. Here we report that virus infection induces bone marrow pDCs to differentiate into mDCs, thereby undergoing profound phenotypic and functional changes including the acquisition of enhanced antigen-presenting capacity and the ability to recognize different microbial structures through Toll-like receptor 4. The conversion of pDCs into mDCs is also induced by the injection of double-stranded RNA and requires type I interferons. Our results establish a precursor-product developmental relationship between these two DC subsets and highlight unexpected plasticity of bone marrow pDCs. PMID:15531885

  1. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-03-03

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ(0)). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ(0) cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ(0) cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ(0) cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent.

  2. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent. PMID:28357227

  3. Effects of GSM-modulated 900 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on the hematopoietic potential of mouse bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Maria Manuela; Nasta, Francesca; Prisco, Maria Grazia; Lovisolo, Giorgio Alfonso; Marino, Carmela; Pioli, Claudio

    2014-12-01

    Studies describing the influence of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on bone marrow cells (BMC) often lack functional data. We examined the effects of in vivo exposure to a Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) modulated 900 MHz RF fields on BMC using two transplantation models. X-irradiated syngeneic mice were injected with BMC from either RF-field-exposed, sham-exposed or cage control mice. Twelve weeks after transplantation, no differences in thymocyte number, frequency of subpopulations and cell proliferation were found in mice receiving BMC from either group. Also, in the spleen cell number, percentages of B/T cells, B/T-cell proliferation, and interferon γ (IFN-γ) production were similar in all groups. In parallel, a mixture of BMC from congenic sham- and RF-exposed mice were co-transplanted into lymphopenic Rag2 deficient mice. BMC from RF-exposed and sham-exposed mice displayed no advantage or disadvantage when competing for the replenishment of lymphatic organs with mature lymphocytes in Rag2 deficient mice. This model revealed that BMC from sham-exposed and RF-exposed mice were less efficient than BMC from cage control mice in repopulating the thymus, an effect likely due to restraint stress. In conclusion, our results showed no effects of in vivo exposure to GSM-modulated RF-fields on the ability of bone marrow (BM) precursors to long-term reconstitute peripheral T and B cell compartments.

  4. Tracking Intracavernously Injected Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Qiu, Xuefeng; Fandel, Thomas; Banie, Lia; Wang, Guifang; Lue, Tom F.; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2012-01-01

    Intracavernous (IC) injection of stem cells (SCs) has been shown to improve erectile function in various erectile dysfunction (ED) animal models. However, the tissue distribution of the injected cells remains unknown. In this study we tracked IC injected adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in various tissues. Rat paratesticular fat was processed for ADSC isolation and culture. The animals were then subject to cavernous nerve (CN) crush injury or sham operation, followed by IC injection of one million autologous or allogeneic ADSCs that were labeled with 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU). Another group of rats received IC injection of EdU-labeled allogeneic penile smooth muscle cells (PSMCs). At 2 and 7 days post-injection, penises and femoral bone marrow were processed for histological analyses. Whole femoral bone marrows were also analyzed for EdU-positive cells by flow cytometry. The results show that ADSCs exited the penis within days of IC injection and migrated preferentially to bone marrow. Allogenicity did not affect ADSC's bone marrow appearance either at 2 or 7 days, while CN injury reduced the number of ADSCs in bone marrow significantly at 7 but not 2 days. The significance of these results in relation to SC therapy for ED is discussed. PMID:21796145

  5. Bone marrow long label-retaining cells reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Yoshiaki; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio

    2008-02-08

    In response to changing signals, quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can be induced to an activated cycling state and provide multi-lineage hematopoietic cells to the whole body via blood vessels. However, the precise localization of quiescent HSCs in bone marrow microenvironment is not fully characterized. Here, we performed whole-mount immunostaining of bone marrow and found that BrdU label-retaining cells (LRCs) definitively reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic zone distant from the 'vascular niche'. Although LRCs expressed very low level of a well-known HSC marker, c-kit in normal circumstances, myeloablation by 5-FU treatment caused LRCs to abundantly express c-kit and proliferate actively. These results demonstrate that bone marrow LRCs reside in the sinusoidal hypoxic niche, and function as a regenerative cell pool of HSCs.

  6. Resveratrol Increases the Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Lofek-Czubek, Sébastien; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that has shown protective effects against many disorders including, several types of cancers and other age-associated diseases as well as blood disorders in cultured cells and/or animal models. However, whether resveratrol has any impact specifically on normal blood stem cells remains unknown. Here we show that a three-week treatment of resveratrol increases the frequency and total numbers of normal bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) without any impact on their competitive repopulation capacity. In addition, we show that resveratrol enhances the bone marrow multipotent progenitor capacity in vivo. These results have therapeutic value for disorders of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) as well as for bone marrow transplantation settings. PMID:25163926

  7. Bone Marrow Transplantation in Mice to Study the Role of Hematopoietic Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or bone marrow transplantation is a common approach to reconstitute the immune system of mice that have been subjected to marrow-ablative doses of radiation. This method can be used in the field of atherosclerosis to assess the contribution of hematopoietic cells of a desired genotype to disease pathogenesis. The engraftment of atherosclerosis-prone mice with donor cells that contain genetic alterations in cells of the innate or adaptive immune system has been invaluable to define the role of multiple gene products in atherosclerosis. Here, we describe the different steps involved in the bone marrow transplantation protocol along with specific guidelines regarding the theoretical and technical details of the procedure.

  8. Induction of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fatma, N.; Khan, S.G.; Aslam, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1992-04-01

    In the present study, cytogenetic effects of Indian chrysotile asbestos in rat bone marrow cells after 290 days of intratracheal inoculation, when it develops massive pulmonary fibrosis, were investigated. The pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed by both histopathological studies and increased collagen content in the lung of the treated animals. In the asbestotic rats a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations was recorded and a decrease in mitotic index of bone marrow cells. The types of chromosomal aberrations in these cells were chromatid gaps and breaks. The results indicate the significant cytogenetic changes in the bone marrow cells of asbestotic rats and also suggest that these changes directly or indirectly may be one of the biological events involved in eliciting the asbestos-mediated toxic responses.

  9. Isolation and characterization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells with myogenic and neuronal properties.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Mitsutaka; Heike, Toshio; Haruyama, Munetada; Baba, Shiro; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Fujino, Hisanori; Kobayashi, Hirohiko; Kato, Takeo; Umeda, Katsutsugu; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi

    2007-03-10

    Sphere formation has been utilized as a way to isolate multipotent stem/progenitor cells from various tissues. However, very few studies on bone marrow-derived spheres have been published and assessed their multipotentiality. In this study, multipotent marrow cell populations were isolated using a three-step method. First, after elimination of hematopoietic cells, murine marrow-derived adherent cells were cultured in plastic dishes until small cells gradually appeared and multiplied. Cells were then cultured under non-adherent conditions and formed spheres that were immunopositive for a neural precursor marker, nestin. RT-PCR analysis also revealed that the spheres were positive for nestin in addition to PPARgamma, osf2, SOX9, and myoD, which are markers of precursors of adipocytic, osteoblastic, chondrocytic, and skeletal myeloblastic lineages, respectively. Finally, spheres were dissociated into single cells and expanded in adherent cultures. Under appropriate induction conditions, the sphere-derived cells acquired the phenotypic properties in vitro of neurons, skeletal myoblasts, and beating cardiomyocytes, as well as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes. Next, sphere-derived cells were transplanted into murine myocardial infarction models. One month later, they had become engrafted as cardiomyocytes, and cardiac catheterization showed significant functional improvements. Thus, sphere-derived cells represent a new approach to enhance the multi-differentiation potential of murine bone marrow.

  10. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka; Inoue-Yokoo, Tomoko; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+) cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+) c-Kit(+) cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  11. Iliac bone marrow mast cells in relation to the renal osteodystrophy of patients treated by haemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, H A; Peart, K M

    1976-01-01

    Mast cells have been counted in iliac bone biopsies from patients with chronic renal failure treated by haemodialysis, and attempts made to relate mast cells to the various features of azotaemic renal osteodystrophy. There was a significant increase in the number of marrow mast cells in comparison with controls, and haemodialysis has no favourable effect on the marrow mast cell hyperplasia which occurs in chronic renal failure. There was a general tendency towards greater numbers of mast cells in cases with most marked ostetis fibrosa but it was not possible consistently to relate hyperparathyroidism to mast cell numbers. Patients treated by parathyroidectomy, aluminium hydroxide, or the newer vitamin D metabolites failed to show any consistent fall in marrow mast cell numbers in spite of improvement in the ostetis fibrosa. The number of marrow mast cells was related to the duration of haemodialysis and to the amount of osteoid present and iversely to the percentage mineralization of bone. It was not possible to identify any causal relationship between the presence or severity of osteomalacia and the number of mast cells in the haemodialysed patients although mast cell hyperplasia was also observed in patients with osteomalacia unassociated with renal disease. Images PMID:939806

  12. HGF Expressing Stem Cells in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia Originate from the Bone Marrow and Are Antifibrotic

    PubMed Central

    Gazdhar, Amiq; Susuri, Njomeza; Hostettler, Katrin; Gugger, Mathias; Knudsen, Lars; Roth, Michael; Ochs, Matthias; Geiser, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary fibrosis may result from abnormal alveolar wound repair after injury. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) improves alveolar epithelial wound repair in the lung. Stem cells were shown to play a major role in lung injury, repair and fibrosis. We studied the presence, origin and antifibrotic properties of HGF-expressing stem cells in usual interstitial pneumonia. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed in lung tissue sections and primary alveolar epithelial cells obtained from patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, n = 7). Bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSC) from adult male rats were transfected with HGF, instilled intratracheally into bleomycin injured rat lungs and analyzed 7 and 14 days later. Results In UIP, HGF was expressed in specific cells mainly located in fibrotic areas close to the hyperplastic alveolar epithelium. HGF-positive cells showed strong co-staining for the mesenchymal stem cell markers CD44, CD29, CD105 and CD90, indicating stem cell origin. HGF-positive cells also co-stained for CXCR4 (HGF+/CXCR4+) indicating that they originate from the bone marrow. The stem cell characteristics were confirmed in HGF secreting cells isolated from UIP lung biopsies. In vivo experiments showed that HGF-expressing BMSC attenuated bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis in the rat, indicating a beneficial role of bone marrow derived, HGF secreting stem cells in lung fibrosis. Conclusions HGF-positive stem cells are present in human fibrotic lung tissue (UIP) and originate from the bone marrow. Since HGF-transfected BMSC reduce bleomycin induced lung fibrosis in the bleomycin lung injury and fibrosis model, we assume that HGF-expressing, bone-marrow derived stem cells in UIP have antifibrotic properties. PMID:23840329

  13. [Origin of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Bone Marrow--Endothelial to Hematopoietic Transition (EHT)?].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Yuan, Yan; Chen, Tong

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to primitive hematopoiesis, during embryonic definitive hematopoiesis, it has been demonstrated that multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) arise from hemogenic endothelium, and the endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT) exists within the yolk sac, placenta, AGM, mouse head vascular and extraembryonic vessels. However, whether hemogenic endothelial cells contribute to blood cell development at other sites of definitive hematopoiesis, including fetal liver and bone marrow, remains largely unknown. Recently, more and more researches showed that hematopoiesis within bone marrow had a close relationship with vascular endothelium development, too. This review summarizes the mechanism of EHT during embryo development, and discuss whether EHT exists in adult hematopoiesis.

  14. Analysis of bone marrow aspiration fluid using automated blood cell counters.

    PubMed

    d'Onofrio, Giuseppe; Zini, Gina

    2015-03-01

    Cytomorphological examination of aspirate smears remains the basic method to diagnose hematologic disorders and to evaluate treatment-related changes. Last-generation hematological analyzers can count, besides cells normally circulating in peripheral blood, some types of immature and abnormal cells, such as erythroblasts and immature granulocytes. The complex nature of bone marrow fluid, however, has prevented until now the routine utilization of blood cell counters in this area. Recent studies have shown the possibility of using bone marrow fluid as a substitute for peripheral blood for clinical tests in particular situations and for repetitive cytologic examinations in specific clinical and research fields. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bone Marrow Adipocytes Facilitate Fatty Acid Oxidation Activating AMPK and a Transcriptional Network Supporting Survival of Acute Monocytic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shinichi; Saitoh, Kaori; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Monma, Norikazu; Ikeo, Kazuho; Mogushi, Kaoru; Shikami, Masato; Ruvolo, Vivian; Ishizawa, Jo; Hail, Numsen; Kazuno, Saiko; Igarashi, Mamoru; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Yasunari; Arai, Hajime; Nagaoka, Isao; Miida, Takashi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Konopleva, Marina; Andreeff, Michael

    2017-03-15

    Leukemia cells in the bone marrow must meet the biochemical demands of increased cell proliferation and also survive by continually adapting to fluctuations in nutrient and oxygen availability. Thus, targeting metabolic abnormalities in leukemia cells located in the bone marrow is a novel therapeutic approach. In this study, we investigated the metabolic role of bone marrow adipocytes in supporting the growth of leukemic blasts. Prevention of nutrient starvation-induced apoptosis of leukemic cells by bone marrow adipocytes, as well as the metabolic and molecular mechanisms involved in this process, was investigated using various analytic techniques. In acute monocytic leukemia (AMoL) cells, the prevention of spontaneous apoptosis by bone marrow adipocytes was associated with an increase in fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO) along with the upregulation of PPARγ, FABP4, CD36, and BCL2 genes. In AMoL cells, bone marrow adipocyte coculture increased adiponectin receptor gene expression and its downstream target stress response kinase AMPK, p38 MAPK with autophagy activation, and upregulated antiapoptotic chaperone HSPs. Inhibition of FAO disrupted metabolic homeostasis, increased reactive oxygen species production, and induced the integrated stress response mediator ATF4 and apoptosis in AMoL cells cocultured with bone marrow adipocytes. Our results suggest that bone marrow adipocytes support AMoL cell survival by regulating their metabolic energy balance and that the disruption of FAO in bone marrow adipocytes may be an alternative, novel therapeutic strategy for AMoL therapy. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1453-64. ©2017 AACR.

  16. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 mediates changes of bone marrow stem cells during the bone repair process.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kiyotaka; Kawao, Naoyuki; Yano, Masato; Tamura, Yukinori; Kurashimo, Shinzi; Okumoto, Katsumi; Kojima, Kotarou; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, and macrophages that participate in the bone repair process are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, the roles of these stem cells during the repair of injured bone tissue are still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of bone defect on HSCs and MSCs in bone marrow and spleen in 75 mice and its mechanism. We analyzed the HSC and MSC populations in these tissues of a mouse with femoral bone damage by using flow cytometry. The number of HSCs in the bone marrow of mice with damaged femurs was significantly lower than the number of these cells in the bone marrow of the contralateral intact femurs on day 2 after injury. Meanwhile, the number of MSCs in the bone marrow of mice with damaged femurs was significantly higher than that of the contralateral femurs. Both intraperitoneal administration of AMD3100, a C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonist, and local treatment with an anti-stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) antibody blunted the observed decrease in HSC and increase in MSC populations within the bone marrow of injured femurs. In conclusion, the present study revealed that there is a concurrent decrease and increase in the numbers of HSCs and MSCs, respectively, in the bone marrow during repair of mouse femoral bone damage. Furthermore, the SDF-1/CXCR4 system was implicated as contributing to the changes in these stem cell populations upon bone injury.

  17. Fibrillin-1 Regulates Skeletal Stem Cell Differentiation by Modulating TGFβ Activity Within the Marrow Niche.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Silvia; Clayton, Nicholas P; del Solar, Maria; Pascual, Gemma; Cheng, Seng H; Wentworth, Bruce M; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Ramirez, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A full understanding of the microenvironmental factors that control the activities of skeletal stem cells (also known as mesenchymal stem cells [MSCs]) in the adult bone marrow holds great promise for developing new therapeutic strategies to mitigate age-related diseases of bone and cartilage degeneration. Bone loss is an understudied manifestation of Marfan syndrome, a multisystem disease associated with mutations in the extracellular matrix protein and TGFβ modulator fibrillin-1. Here we demonstrate that progressive loss of cancellous bone in mice with limbs deficient for fibrillin-1 (Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice) is accounted for by premature depletion of MSCs and osteoprogenitor cells combined with constitutively enhanced bone resorption. Longitudinal analyses of Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice showed incremental bone loss and trabecular microarchitecture degeneration accompanied by a progressive decrease in the number and clonogenic potential of MSCs. Significant paucity of marrow fat cells in the long bones of Fbn1(Prx1-/-) mice, together with reduced adipogenic potential of marrow stromal cell cultures, indicated an additional defect in MSC differentiation. This postulate was corroborated by showing that an Fbn1-silenced osteoprogenitor cell line cultured in the presence of insulin yielded fewer than normal adipocytes and exhibited relatively lower PPARγ levels. Consonant with fibrillin-1 modulation of TGFβ bioavailability, cultures of marrow stromal cells from Fbn1(Prx1-/-) limb bones showed improper overactivation of latent TGFβ. In line with this finding, systemic TGFβ neutralization improved bone mass and trabecular microarchitecture along with normalizing the number of MSCs, osteoprogenitor cells, and marrow adipocytes. Collectively, our findings show that fibrillin-1 regulates MSC activity by modulating TGFβ bioavailability within the microenvironment of marrow niches.

  18. Differentiation of lymphatic endothelial cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with VEGFs.

    PubMed

    Wei, Luwan; Liu, Yanli; Chen, Guoling; Fang, Yunhai; Song, Xianrang; Dong, Ping; Gao, Jie; Liu, Rong; Ding, Zhaoxi; Bi, Yushun; Liu, Zhiyu

    2012-12-01

    Although there have been many experimental studies demonstrating that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into mesenchymal tissues such as osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes in vivo and in vitro, little information is available regarding their potential to differentiate into lymphatic endothelial cells. Therefore, we chose to investigate differentiation of MSCs into lymphatic endothelial cells using stimulation with members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFs) family. Rat MSCs were isolated from bone marrow aspirate of Sprague-Dawley rats as previously described and characterized with flow cytometry for surface markers CD14, CD34, CD29, and CD90. Purified MSCs were plated and cultured in the presence of VEGF-A, VEGF-C, or the combination of both for 10 days. We examined the cells for Prox-1 and LYVE-1 by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis. Results demonstrated that compared to controls, cell differentiated with VEGF-A, VEGF-C and VEGF-A+VEGF-C expressed Prox-1 and LYVE-1. Our results indicate that MSCs induced by VEGFs are capable of differentiating into lymphatic endothelial-like cells in vitro, and this response has the potential to make them attractive candidates for the development of autologous tissue grafts for future therapy.

  19. [Protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling-Zhen; Yin, Song-Mei; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jia-Yu; Wei, Bo-Xiong; Zhan, Yu; Yu, Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Qu, Jia; Guo, Zi-Kuan

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the protective effects of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on hematopoietic organs of irradiated mice. Human bone marrow MSC were isolated, ex vivo expanded, and identified by cell biological tests. Female BALB/c mice were irradiated with (60)Co γ-ray at a single dose of 6 Gy, and received different doses of human MSC and MSC lysates or saline via tail veins. The survival of mice was record daily, and the femurs and spleens were harvested on day 9 and 16 for pathologic examination. The histological changes were observed and the cellularity was scored. The results showed that the estimated survival time of MSC- and MSC lysate-treated mice was comparable to that of controls. The hematopoiesis in the bone marrow of mice that received high-dose (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates was partially restored on day 9 and the capacity of hemopoietic tissue and cellularity scorings were significantly elevated as compared with that of controls (P < 0.05). Proliferative nudes were also obviously observed in the spleens of mice that received high-dose of MSC or MSC lysates on d 9 after irradiation. The histological structures of the spleen and bone marrow of the mice that received high-doses (5×10(6)) of MSC or MSC lysates were restored to normal, the cell proliferation displayed extraordinarily active. Further, the cellularity scores of the bone marrow were not significantly different between the high-dose MSC and MSC lysate-treated mice. It is concluded that the bone marrow MSC can promote the hematopoietic recovery of the irradiated mice, which probably is associated with the bioactive materials inherently existed in bone marrow cells.

  20. Bone Marrow Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells: New Generation of Autologous Cell Therapy Soon Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M

    2017-04-01

    Very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) are major pluripotent stem cells described in human and mouse. In this issue of Stem Cell Reviews and Reports, Shaikh and colleagues show in a valuable work that mouse bone marrow collected after 5FU treatment contains VSELs able to undergo in vitro multi-lineage differentiation into cells from all three germ layers and also in germ and hematopoietic cells. These findings are robust since no confounding factor such as feeder cell fusion with VSELs can occur here. This paper allows one to better appreciate bone marrow-VSELs differentiation potential and opens new perspectives for autologous cell therapy. Furthermore, it might help explaining lots of contradictive data from the past 20 years, in particular related to ability of bone marrow cells to differentiate into cardiomyocytes.

  1. The preleukemic state of mice reconstituted with Mixl1-transduced marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Donald; Glaser, Stefan; Mifsud, Sandra; Di Rago, Ladina; Robb, Lorraine

    2007-01-01

    Murine granulocytic cells, in becoming leukemic, need to acquire enhanced self-generation and a capacity for autocrine growth stimulation. Mice transplanted with bone marrow cells transduced with the Mixl1 homeobox gene develop a very high frequency of myeloid leukemia derived from the transduced cells. Preleukemic mice contained a high frequency of transduced clonogenic granulocytic cells. They exhibited an abnormally high capacity for self-replication and could generate immortalized granulocytic cell lines that remained absolutely dependent on either GM-CSF or IL-3 and were not leukemic. Organs from mice repopulated by marrow cells transduced either with Mixl1 or the control murine stem cell virus vector exhibited a capacity to produce IL-3 in vitro, activity being highest with the lungs, marrow, bladder, and thymus. Supporting evidence for the in vivo production of IL-3 was the frequent development of mast cells in the marrow. Overexpression of Mixl1 appears capable of inducing an abnormal self-renewal capacity in granulocytic precursors. Aberrant production of IL-3 was not present in the continuous Mixl cell lines and was therefore not in itself likely to be a leukemogenic change but it could support the enhanced survival and proliferation of the Mixl1 granulocytic populations until a final leukemogenic mutation occurs in them. PMID:18056627

  2. Cure of murine thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation without eradication of endogenous stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagemaker, G.; Visser, T.P.; van Bekkum, D.W.

    1986-09-01

    alpha-Thalassemic heterozygous (Hbath/+) mice were used to investigate the possible selective advantage of transplanted normal (+/+) hemopoietic cells. Without conditioning by total-body irradiation (TBI), infusion of large numbers of normal bone marrow cells failed to correct the thalassemic peripheral blood phenotype. Since the recipients' stem cells are normal with respect to number and differentiation capacity, it was thought that the transplanted stem cells were not able to lodge, or that they were not stimulated to proliferate. Therefore, a nonlethal dose of TBI was given to temporarily reduce endogenous stem cell numbers and hemopoiesis. TBI doses of 2 or 3 Gy followed by infusion of normal bone marrow cells proved to be effective in replacing the thalassemic red cells by normal red cells, whereas a dose of 1 Gy was ineffective. It is concluded that cure of thalassemia by bone marrow transplantation does not necessarily require eradication of thalassemic stem cells. Consequently, the objectives of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation of thalassemic patients (and possibly other nonmalignant hemopoietic disorders) should be reconsidered.

  3. Human blood and marrow side population stem cell and Stro-1 positive bone marrow stromal cell numbers decline with age, with an increase in quality of surviving stem cells: correlation with cytokines.

    PubMed

    Brusnahan, S K; McGuire, T R; Jackson, J D; Lane, J T; Garvin, K L; O'Kane, B J; Berger, A M; Tuljapurkar, S R; Kessinger, M A; Sharp, J G

    2010-01-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging leading to anemias, reduced hematopoietic stress responses and myelodysplasias. This study tested the hypothesis that side population hematopoietic stem cells (SP-HSC) would decrease with aging, correlating with IGF-1 and IL-6 levels and increases in bone marrow fat. Marrow was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur at surgery for total hip replacement (N=100). Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle and cellularity and fat content determined. Marrow and blood mononuclear cells were stained with Hoechst dye and the SP-HSC profiles acquired. Marrow stromal cells (MSC) were enumerated flow cytometrically employing the Stro-1 antibody, and clonally in the colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. Plasma levels of IGF-1 (ng/ml) and IL-6 (pg/ml) were measured by ELISA. SP-HSC in blood and bone marrow decreased with age but the quality of the surviving stem cells increased. MSC decreased non-significantly. IGF-1 levels (mean=30.7, SEM=2) decreased and IL-6 levels (mean=4.4, SEM=1) increased with age as did marrow fat (mean=1.2mmfat/g, SEM=0.04). There were no significant correlations between cytokine levels or fat and SP-HSC numbers. Stem cells appear to be progressively lost with aging and only the highest quality stem cells survive.

  4. Human blood and marrow side population stem cell and Stro-1 positive bone marrow stromal cell numbers decline with age, with an increase in quality of surviving stem cells: Correlation with cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Brusnahan, S.K.; McGuire, T.R.; Jackson, J.D.; Lane, J.T.; Garvin, K.L.; O’Kane, B.J.; Berger, A.M.; Tuljapurkar, S.R.; Kessinger, M.A.; Sharp, J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging leading to anemias, reduced hematopoietic stress responses and myelodysplasias. This study tested the hypothesis that side population hematopoietic stem cells (SP-HSC) would decrease with aging, correlating with IGF-1 and IL-6 levels and increases in bone marrow fat. Marrow was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur at surgery for total hip replacement (N = 100). Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle and cellularity and fat content determined. Marrow and blood mononuclear cells were stained with Hoechst dye and the SP-HSC profiles acquired. Marrow stromal cells (MSC) were enumerated flow cytometrically employing the Stro-1 antibody, and clonally in the colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. Plasma levels of IGF-1 (ng/ml) and IL-6 (pg/ml) were measured by ELISA. SP-HSC in blood and bone marrow decreased with age but the quality of the surviving stem cells increased. MSC decreased non-significantly. IGF-1 levels (mean = 30.7, SEM = 2) decreased and IL-6 levels (mean = 4.4, SEM = 1) increased with age as did marrow fat (mean = 1.2 mm fat/g, SEM = 0.04). There were no significant correlations between cytokine levels or fat and SP-HSC numbers. Stem cells appear to be progressively lost with aging and only the highest quality stem cells survive. PMID:21035480

  5. In vitro hematotoxicity of Aplidine on human bone marrow and cord blood progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gómez, S G; Faircloth, G; López-Lázaro, L; Jimeno, J; Bueren, J A; Albella, B

    2001-01-01

    Aplidine is a cyclic depsipeptide that was isolated from a Mediterranean marine tunicate, Aplidium albicans. In experimental animals, Aplidine mediated an in vivo inhibitory effect in a number of tumor cell types. In humans, Aplidine is currently used in phase I clinical trials. Aiming to predict the hematotoxicity of Aplidine in humans, samples from human bone marrow (BM) and cord blood (CB) were exposed in vitro to increasing concentrations of the drug and then assayed for the clonogenic ability of myeloid (CFU-GM), erythroid (BFU-E), megakaryocitic (CFU-Meg) and pluripotent (CFU-Mix) hematopoietic progenitors. We investigated whether predictions of the hematotoxicity of Aplidine based on bone marrow (BM) cultures were reproduced when a more readily available source of human hematopoietic cells, cord blood cells, was used in experiments involving 24-h exposures. Although hematopoietic progenitors derived from bone marrow were generally more sensitive than those derived from cord blood, differences on the IC50, IC70 and IC90 varied within a relatively small range of 1.6-6.2-fold. Moreover, data obtained from cord blood cultures confirmed the observation made in bone marrow assays indicating that the myeloid (CFU-GM) and the erythroid (BFU-E) progenitors were the least sensitive to Aplidine. Regardless of the origin of the hematopoietic progenitors (bone marrow or cord blood) the toxicity of Aplidine in human hematopoietic progenitors (IC50: 150-2250 nM) was lower than that observed in previous studies with tumoral cell lines.

  6. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  7. In vivo derivation of glucose-competent pancreatic endocrine cells from bone marrow without evidence of cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ianus, Andreea; Holz, George G.; Theise, Neil D.; Hussain, Mehboob A.

    2003-01-01

    Bone marrow harbors cells that have the capacity to differentiate into cells of nonhematopoietic tissues of neuronal, endothelial, epithelial, and muscular phenotype. Here we demonstrate that bone marrow–derived cells populate pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Bone marrow cells from male mice that express, using a CRE-LoxP system, an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) if the insulin gene is actively transcribed were transplanted into lethally irradiated recipient female mice. Four to six weeks after transplantation, recipient mice revealed Y chromosome and EGFP double-positive cells in their pancreatic islets. Neither bone marrow cells nor circulating peripheral blood nucleated cells of donor or recipient mice had any detectable EGFP. EGFP-positive cells purified from islets express insulin, glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2), and transcription factors typically found in pancreatic β cells. Furthermore, in vitro these bone marrow–derived cells exhibit — as do pancreatic β cells — glucose-dependent and incretin-enhanced insulin secretion. These results indicate that bone marrow harbors cells that have the capacity to differentiate into functionally competent pancreatic endocrine β cells and that represent a source for cell-based treatment of diabetes mellitus. The results generated with the CRE-LoxP system also suggest that in vivo cell fusion is an unlikely explanation for the “transdifferentiation” of bone marrow–derived cells into differentiated cell phenotypes. PMID:12639990

  8. CD30 expression by bone marrow mast cells from different diagnostic variants of systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Morgado, José M; Perbellini, Omar; Johnson, Ryan C; Teodósio, Cristina; Matito, Almudena; Álvarez-Twose, Iván; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Zamò, Alberto; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Mayado, Andrea; Garcia-Montero, Andrés; Mollejo, Manuela; George, Tracy I; Zanotti, Roberta; Orfao, Alberto; Escribano, Luis; Sánchez-Muñoz, Laura

    2013-12-01

    CD30 expression by bone marrow (BM) mast cells (MC) has been reported recently in systemic mastocytosis (SM) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential diagnostic and prognostic value of CD30 expression in SM as assessed by multiparameter flow cytometry. A total of 163 consecutive BM samples corresponding to 142 SM patients and 21 non-mastocytosis cases were studied. CD30 was positive in most SM patients (80%), but in only one non-mastocytosis case (4.8%). When combined with CD25, CD30 contributed to an improved accuracy over that of CD25 alone (98% versus 93%) mainly because most (eight of nine) of the well-differentiated SM (WDSM), who lacked CD25, were CD30(+). Similar levels of expression of CD30 were observed among all different subgroups of SM except mast cell leukaemia; among indolent SM (ISM) patients, no significant association was observed between the levels of CD30 expression and other clinical and biological features of the disease. The increased expression of CD30 associated with absence of CD25 contributes to the diagnosis of WDSM and its distinction from other subtypes of SM. By contrast, CD30 expression did not contribute either to prognostic stratification of ISM or to the differential diagnosis between ISM and aggressive SM cases. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Cell-autonomous sex differences in gene expression in chicken bone marrow-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Carla; Nandi, Sunil; Zhao, Debiao; Sauter, Kristin A; Vervelde, Lonneke; McBride, Derek; Sang, Helen M; Clinton, Mike; Hume, David A

    2015-03-01

    We have identified differences in gene expression in macrophages grown from the bone marrow of male and female chickens in recombinant chicken M-CSF (CSF1). Cells were profiled with or without treatment with bacterial LPS for 24 h. Approximately 600 transcripts were induced by prolonged LPS stimulation to an equal extent in the male and female macrophages. Many transcripts encoded on the Z chromosome were expressed ∼1.6-fold higher in males, reflecting a lack of dosage compensation in the homogametic sex. A smaller set of W chromosome-specific genes was expressed only in females. LPS signaling in mammals is associated with induction of type 1 IFN-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, because IFNs are encoded on the Z chromosome of chickens, unstimulated macrophages from the female birds expressed a set of known IFN-inducible genes at much higher levels than male cells under the same conditions. To confirm that these differences were not the consequence of the actions of gonadal hormones, we induced gonadal sex reversal to alter the hormonal environment of the developing chick and analyzed macrophages cultured from male, female, and female sex-reversed embryos. Gonadal sex reversal did not alter the sexually dimorphic expression of either sex-linked or IFN-responsive genes. We suggest that female birds compensate for the reduced dose of inducible IFN with a higher basal set point of IFN-responsive genes.

  10. Ultrastructural localization of stem cell factor in canine marrow-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Huss, R; Hong, D S; Beckham, C; Kimball, L; Myerson, D H; Storb, R; Deeg, H J

    1995-01-01

    Stromal cell lines derived from canine long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) were characterized regarding the expression of growth factors and especially the localization of stem cell factor (SCF) (c-kit ligand). One cell line (DO64) was immortalized by transformation with a retroviral vector containing the open reading frames (ORFs) E6 and E7 of the human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16). Transfection did not change cellular characteristics but rendered the cell line more independent from culture conditions. The transformed line DO64 consisted mainly of fibroblast-like cells. In addition, some cells showed endothelial and some smooth-muscle cell features. Stromal cells expressed a broad spectrum of surface markers, including low levels of major histocompatibility-complex (MHC) class-II antigens. A new murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), RG7.6 (IgG1), specific for canine SCF, recognized the majority of fibroblast-like stromal cells. The staining pattern for SCF showed perinuclear and intracytoplasmic dense areas. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the localization of SCF in secretory vesicles, the perivesicular cytoplasm, and bound to the cytoplasmatic membrane. RNA analysis showed that stromal cells transcribed, in addition to SCF, messages for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-monocyte CSF (GM-CSF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). In summary, we have established and characterized canine marrow-derived stromal cell lines, and using the new MAb RG7.6, we have localized SCF to cytoplasmatic vesicles as well as the membrane of stromal cells.

  11. Deletion of EP4 on bone marrow-derived cells enhances inflammation and angiotensin II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Eva H C; Shvartz, Eugenia; Shimizu, Koichi; Rocha, Viviane Z; Zheng, Chunyu; Fukuda, Daiju; Shi, Guo-Ping; Sukhova, Galina; Libby, Peter

    2011-02-01

    To examine whether a lack of prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) on bone marrow-derived cells would increase local inflammation and enhance the formation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in vivo. Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) through activation of EP4, can mute inflammation. Hypercholesterolemic low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout (LDLR(-/-)) mice transplanted with either EP4(+/+) (EP4(+/+)/LDLR(-/-)) or EP4(-/-) (EP4(-/-)/LDLR(-/-)) bone marrow received infusions of angiotensin II to induce AAA. Deficiency of EP4 on bone marrow-derived cells increased the incidence (50% of male EP4(+/+)/LDLR(-/-) mice versus 88.9% of male EP4(-/-)/LDLR(-/-) mice developed AAA; and 22% of female EP4(+/+)/LDLR(-/-) mice versus 83.3% of female EP4(-/-)/LDLR(-/-) mice developed AAA) and severity of AAA, increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (2.72-fold in males and 1.64-fold in females), and enhanced infiltration of macrophages (3.8-fold in males and 2.44-fold in females) and T cells (1.88-fold in males and 1.66-fold in females) into AAA lesions. Lack of EP4 on bone marrow-derived cells augmented elastin fragmentation, increased apoptotic markers, and decreased smooth muscle cell accumulation within AAA lesions. Deficiency of EP4 on bone marrow-derived cells boosted inflammation and AAA formation induced by angiotensin II in hyperlipidemic mice. This study affirms the pathophysiologic importance of PGE(2) signaling through EP4 as an endogenous anti-inflammatory pathway involved in experimental aneurysm formation.

  12. Cell cycle regulation of embryonic stem cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking functional Pax7.

    PubMed

    Czerwinska, Areta M; Nowacka, Joanna; Aszer, Magdalena; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Archacka, Karolina; Fogtman, Anna; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Jańczyk-Ilach, Katarzyna; Koblowska, Marta; Ciemerych, Maria A; Grabowska, Iwona

    2016-11-01

    The transcription factor Pax7 plays a key role during embryonic myogenesis and in adult organisms in that it sustains the proper function of satellite cells, which serve as adult skeletal muscle stem cells. Recently we have shown that lack of Pax7 does not prevent the myogenic differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. In the current work we show that the absence of functional Pax7 in differentiating embryonic stem cells modulates cell cycle facilitating their proliferation. Surprisingly, deregulation of Pax7 function also positively impacts at the proliferation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Such phenotypes seem to be executed by modulating the expression of positive cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin E.

  13. Paranuclear blue inclusions in metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Wittchow, R; Laszewski, M; Walker, W; Dick, F

    1992-09-01

    Paranuclear blue inclusions (PBIs) are frequently identified within metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma (SCC) cells on air-dried bone marrow aspirates stained with Wright's stain. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of this finding, 116 bone marrow aspirates containing metastatic neoplasms were evaluated for the presence and frequency of PBIs. Bone marrow specimens included 47 cases of metastatic SCC of the lung, 13 cases of large cell lymphoma, 19 cases of neuroblastoma, five cases of small, noncleaved cell lymphoma, seven cases of rhabdomyosarcoma, three cases of Ewing's sarcoma, three cases of other sarcomas, and 19 cases of non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). PBIs were identified in 40 of 47 (85%) cases of SCC and their frequency varied from 0 to 24% of tumor cells among different cases. In approximately half the cases of SCC, PBIs were identified in 1 to 4% tumor cells; and in eight cases, PBIs were present in 5% or more of tumor cells. PBIs were also identified in two of seven (29%) cases of rhabdomyosarcoma and one case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, but they were not seen in Ewing's sarcoma, small non-cleaved cell lymphoma, large cell lymphoma, neuroblastoma, or non-small cell carcinoma. In addition, PBIs were not seen in alcohol-fixed, Papanicolaou-stained cytology specimens containing SCC. Ultrastructurally, PBIs may represent phagocytized nuclear/cellular material. PBIs are a feature of small cell carcinoma on air-dried, cytologic material stained with Romanowsky type stains. Their presence may provide diagnostic information with regard to the differential diagnosis of metastatic SCC in the bone marrow. Future studies evaluating non-bone marrow Wright's stained fine-needle aspiration specimens are needed to determine if PBIs are useful in distinguishing SCC from other poorly differentiated tumors in the cytology laboratory.

  14. Pure red-cell aplasia of long duration after major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Volin, L; Ruutu, T

    1990-01-01

    We describe a patient with an exceptionally long-lasting red-cell aplasia of 330 days following ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Before BMT, the anti-B titre was high, 1:1,024, and it was only temporarily reduced by extensive plasma exchange. The anti-B titre remained above the level of 1:64 for 270 days, and host-derived isoagglutinin could still be detected 3 years after BMT. In vitro bone marrow cultures during the red-cell aplasia showed greatly reduced numbers or total absence of CFU-E, while the number of BFU-E colonies was only moderately subnormal. Six years after BMT, bone marrow and peripheral-blood cell counts are normal.

  15. Human osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells express adipogenic markers upon coculture with bone marrow adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Clabaut, Aline; Delplace, Séverine; Chauveau, Christophe; Hardouin, Pierre; Broux, Odile

    2010-07-01

    In osteoporosis, bone loss is accompanied by greater adiposity in the marrow. Given the cellular proximity within the bone marrow, we wondered whether adipocytes might have a paracrine impact on osteoblast differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we cocultured adipocytes with osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the absence of direct cell contact and then analyzed gene expression changes in the osteoblastic population by using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We found that, upon coculture, MSC-derived osteoblasts showed appearance of adipogenic (lipoprotein lipase, leptin) and decrease of osteogenic (osteocalcin) mRNA markers. Our results indicate that in vitro, MSC-derived adipocytes are capable of inducing MSC-derived osteoblasts to differentiate to an adipocyte phenotype. These new data suggest that (i) transdifferentiation of committed osteoblasts into adipocytes may contribute to the increase in marrow fat content at the expense of bone-forming cells and (ii) this switch might be initiated by the adipocytes themselves.

  16. Bone marrow-resident NK cells prime monocytes for regulatory function during infection

    PubMed Central

    Askenase, Michael H.; Han, Seong-Ji; Byrd, Allyson L.; da Fonseca, Denise Morais; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Wilhelm, Christoph; Konkel, Joanne E.; Hand, Timothy W.; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Grainger, John R.; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Tissue-infiltrating Ly6Chi monocytes play diverse roles in immunity, ranging from pathogen killing to immune regulation. How and where this diversity of function is imposed remains poorly understood. Here we show that during acute gastrointestinal infection, priming of monocytes for regulatory function preceded systemic inflammation and was initiated prior to bone marrow egress. Notably, natural killer (NK) cell-derived IFN-γ promoted a regulatory program in monocyte progenitors during development. Early bone marrow NK cell activation was controlled by systemic interleukin-12 (IL-12) produced by Batf3-dependent dendritic cells (DC) in the mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). This work challenges the paradigm that monocyte function is dominantly imposed by local signals following tissue recruitment, and instead proposes a sequential model of differentiation in which monocytes are pre-emptively educated during development in the bone marrow to promote their tissue-specific function. PMID:26070484

  17. Case Report Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in the primary bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Chen, S L; Huang, Z X; Gao, W; An, N

    2015-06-11

    This study aimed to improve understanding of the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of primary bone marrow (PBM) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), a rare illness. We report a 56-year-old man with pancytopenia and hyperbilirubinemia but without lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, or splenomegaly. Bone marrow aspiration, flow cytometry, biopsy, and immunohistochemistry confirmed DLBCL. Two cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone were administered. Blood cell numbers and hyperbilirubinemia improved. Although the patient did not completely recover, he survived for at least 3 years after chemotherapy and receiving blood transfusions. PBM DLBCL is a distinct, aggressive lymphoma characterized by lymphoma cells only in the bone marrow and effectively treated via chemotherapy. Prognoses for PBM DLBCL vary.

  18. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma developed 11 years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute lymphatic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Yutaka; Imoto, Issei; Tokairin, Yutaka; Kawada, Kenro; Nakajima, Yasuaki; Nishikage, Tetsuro; Nagai, Kagami; Kajiwara, Michiko; Inazawa, Johji; Kawano, Tatsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Younger patients (aged <30 years) presenting with esophageal cancer are rare. Bone marrow transplantation offers a curative therapy in patients with malignant and nonmalignant lymphohematopoietic diseases and other disorders. However, one important late complication in transplantation survivors is the development of secondary malignancies including solid tumors. Although some solid cancers have been demonstrated to occur after bone marrow transplantation, only a few cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma have thus far been reported. We herein describe the case of a 27-year-old male with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, who was diagnosed with T-cell-type acute lymphatic leukemia at the age of 12 and relapsed 5 years later. He achieved a second complete remission and underwent bone marrow transplantation at the age of 17. A genetic analysis revealed germ-line lineage-derived chimeric cellular populations of the donor and patient on both the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and non tumorous portions of the patient's esophageal mucosa with a preponderance of the patient's germ-line lineage-derived cells, suggesting that repopulated donor-derived hemopoietic stem cells in the esophageal epithelia only partially contributed to the carcinogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma several years after bone marrow transplantation. Multiple events occurring during the course of treatment for primary hematological disorder may play an important role in the development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

  19. Differentiation potential and GFP labeling of sheep bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Czernik, Marta; Fidanza, Antonella; Sardi, Martina; Galli, Cesare; Brunetti, Dario; Malatesta, Daniela; Della Salda, Leonardo; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Ptak, Grazyna E; Loi, Pasqualino

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an important cell population in the bone marrow microenvironment. MSCs have the capacity to differentiate in vitro into several mesenchymal tissues including bone, cartilage, fat, tendon, muscle, and marrow stroma. This study was designed to isolate, expand, and characterize the differentiation ability of sheep bone marrow-derived MSCs and to demonstrate the possibility to permanently express a reporter gene. Bone marrow was collected from the iliac crest and mononuclear cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation. Sheep MSCs cell lines were stable characterized as CD44+ and CD34- and then transfected with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene. The GFP expression was maintained in about half (46.6%) of cloned blastocysts produced by nuclear transfer of GFP+ sheep MSCs, suggesting the possibility to establish multipotent embryonic cells' lines carrying the fluorescent tag for comparative studies on the differentiation capacity of adult stem cells (MSCs) versus embryonic stem cells. We found that sheep MSCs under appropriate culture conditions could be induced to differentiate into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblast lineages. Our results confirm the plasticity of sheep MSCs and establish the foundation for the development of a pre-clinical sheep model to test the efficiency and safety of cell replacement therapy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Adipose stem cells as alternatives for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in oral ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Aziz Aly, Lobna Abdel; Menoufy, Hala El-; Ragae, Alyaa; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Sabry, Dina

    2012-11-01

    Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant, and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cells suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of dogs. Transplantation of undifferentiated GFP-labeled Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell (BMSCs), Adipose Derived Stem Cell (ADSCs) or vehicle (saline) was injected around the ulcer in each group. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored clinically and histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in MSCs by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of VEGF and collagen genes was detected in biopsies from all ulcers. MSCs expressed mRNA for VEGF MSCs transplantation significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with controls. There was increased expression of both collagen and VEGF genes in MSCs-treated ulcers compared to controls. MSCs transplantation may help to accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF together with increased intracellular matrix formation as detected by increased collagen gene expression. This body of work has provided evidence supporting clinical applications of adipose-derived cells in safety and efficacy trials as an alternative for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in oral ulcer healing.

  1. Adipose Stem Cells as Alternatives for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oral Ulcer Healing

    PubMed Central

    Aziz Aly, Lobna Abdel; Menoufy, Hala El-; Ragae, Alyaa; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Sabry, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant, and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cells suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Methods and Results Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of dogs. Transplantation of undifferentiated GFP-labeled Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell (BMSCs), Adipose Derived Stem Cell (ADSCs) or vehicle (saline) was injected around the ulcer in each group. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored clinically and histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in MSCs by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of VEGF and collagen genes was detected in biopsies from all ulcers. Results: MSCs expressed mRNA for VEGF MSCs transplantation significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with controls. There was increased expression of both collagen and VEGF genes in MSCs-treated ulcers compared to controls. Conclusions MSCs transplantation may help to accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF together with increased intracellular matrix formation as detected by increased collagen gene expression. This body of work has provided evidence supporting clinical applications of adipose-derived cells in safety and efficacy trials as an alternative for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in oral ulcer healing. PMID:24298363

  2. The pro-metastatic role of bone marrow-derived cells: a focus on MSCs and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Bong Ihn; Kang, Yibin

    2012-01-01

    Several bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to promote tumour growth and progression. These cells can home to the primary tumour and become active components of the tumour microenvironment. Recent studies have also identified bone marrow-derived cells—such as mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells—as contributors to cancer metastasis. The innate versatility of these cells provides diverse functional aid to promote malignancy, ranging from structural support to signal-mediated suppression of the host immune response. Here, we review the role of mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of the bipolar nature of these bone marrow-derived cells in physiological and malignant contexts could pave the way for new therapeutics against metastatic disease. PMID:22473297

  3. [The cultivation of bone marrow cells and cell lines on polymeric films].

    PubMed

    Dolgikh, M S; Livak, D N; Krasheninnikov, M E; Onishchenko, N A

    2011-01-01

    The cultivation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells and cells of A-431, MDCK, Vero, 3T3 and Hep-G2 was performed on polymeric films (PVA) with different hydrophobic fatty acid residues. The cells of different types grew on these films with different intensity, but in the most cases comparable with the cultivation control on usual plastic. The examined films were nontoxic to cells and sufficiently adhesive. They did not changed pH of cultural media, were optically transparent under microscope and comfortable in the experimental work. These films can be used as a model for the artificial organ construction. The covalent binding of different fatty acids to PVA shows possibility of the adaptable changes of films properties (hydrophobity and adhesiveness), and therefore possibility of the creation of optimal conditions for different cell types attachement and growth.

  4. Bone marrow dosimetry via microCT imaging and stem cell spatial mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielar, Kayla N.

    In order to make predictions of radiation dose in patients undergoing targeted radionuclide therapy of cancer, an accurate model of skeletal tissues is necessary. Concerning these tissues, the dose-limiting factor in these therapies is the toxicity of the hematopoietically active bone marrow. In addition to acute effects, one must be concerned as well with long-term stochastic effects such as radiation-induced leukemia. Particular cells of interest for both toxicity and cancer risk are the hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), found within the active marrow regions of the skeleton. At present, cellular-level dosimetry models are complex, and thus we cannot model individual stem cells in an anatomic model of the patient. As a result, one reverts to looking at larger tissue regions where these cell populations may reside. To provide a more accurate marrow dose assessment, the skeletal dosimetry model must also be patient-specific. That is, it should be designed to match as closely as possible to the patient undergoing treatment. Absorbed dose estimates then can be tailored based on the skeletal size and trabecular microstructure of an individual for an accurate prediction of marrow toxicity. Thus, not only is it important to accurately model the target tissues of interest in a normal patient, it is important to do so for differing levels of marrow health. A skeletal dosimetry model for the adult female was provided for better predictions of marrow toxicity in patients undergoing radionuclide therapy. This work is the first fully established gender specific model for these applications, and supersedes previous models in scalability of the skeleton and radiation transport methods. Furthermore, the applicability of using bone marrow biopsies was deemed sufficient in prediction of bone marrow health, specifically for the hematopoietic stem cell population. The location and concentration of the HSC in bone marrow was found to follow a spatial gradient from the bone trabeculae

  5. Marrow-inspired matrix cues rapidly affect early fate decisions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the physiological process where hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) continuously generate the body’s complement of blood and immune cells within unique regions of the bone marrow termed niches. Although previous investigations have revealed gradients in cellular and extracellular matrix (ECM) content across the marrow, and matrix elasticity and ligand type are believed to be strong regulators of stem cell fate, the impact of biophysical signals on HSC response is poorly understood. Using marrow-inspired ECM ligand–coated polyacrylamide substrates that present defined stiffness and matrix ligand cues, we demonstrate that the interplay between integrin engagement and myosin II activation processes affects the morphology, proliferation, and myeloid lineage specification of primary murine HSCs within 24 hours ex vivo. Notably, the impact of discrete biophysical signals on HSC fate decisions appears to be correlated to known microenvironmental transitions across the marrow. The combination of fibronectin and marrow matrix-associated stiffness was sufficient to maintain hematopoietic progenitor populations, whereas collagen and laminin enhanced proliferation and myeloid differentiation, respectively. Inhibiting myosin II–mediated contraction or adhesion to fibronectin via specific integrins (α5β1 and ανβ3) selectively abrogated the impact of the matrix environment on HSC fate decisions. Together, these findings indicate that adhesive interactions and matrix biophysical properties are critical design considerations in the development of biomaterials to direct HSC behavior in vitro. PMID:28070554

  6. Sinusoidal ephrin receptor EPHB4 controls hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyeongil; Salvucci, Ombretta; Weigert, Roberto; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Henkemeyer, Mark; Poulos, Michael G.; Butler, Jason M.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in the bone marrow. Stress signals from cancer and other conditions promote HSPC mobilization into circulation and subsequent homing to tissue microenvironments. HSPC infiltration into tissue microenvironments can influence disease progression; notably, in cancer, HSPCs encourage tumor growth. Here we have uncovered a mutually exclusive distribution of EPHB4 receptors in bone marrow sinusoids and ephrin B2 ligands in hematopoietic cells. We determined that signaling interactions between EPHB4 and ephrin B2 control HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. In mice, blockade of the EPHB4/ephrin B2 signaling pathway reduced mobilization of HSPCs and other myeloid cells to the circulation. EPHB4/ephrin B2 blockade also reduced HSPC infiltration into tumors as well as tumor progression in murine models of melanoma and mammary cancer. These results identify EPHB4/ephrin B2 signaling as critical to HSPC mobilization from bone marrow and provide a potential strategy for reducing cancer progression by targeting the bone marrow. PMID:27820703

  7. Bone marrow and peripheral blood globin chain synthesis in sickle cell beta zero thalassaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Costa, F F; Zago, M A

    1986-01-01

    A similar imbalance of globin chain synthesis, with low non-alpha/alpha ratios, was shown in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of compound heterozygotes for both the Hb S and beta zero thalassaemia genes (S/beta zero thalassaemia). Previous purification of whole cell globin obtained from the bone marrow did not change the non-alpha/alpha ratio. The mean non-alpha/alpha ratios were 0.57 +/- 0.13 (means +/- SD) for the peripheral blood of 12 patients, 0.52 +/- 0.10 for five patients using bone marrow globin purified on Sephadex G100, and 0.55 +/- 0.16 for the unfiltered bone marrow globin of five patients. The data show that patients with S/beta zero thalassaemia have a similar beta chain deficiency in reticulocytes and in bone marrow cells, provided whole cell globin is used which avoids the removal of the free alpha chains. The non-alpha/alpha ratios in the peripheral blood of an S/beta zero thalassaemia patient and a beta thalassaemia heterozygote from the same family were compared in seven families and no significant difference was found. PMID:3723554

  8. Early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in mouse bone marrow: Subosteal localization of B220+ cells during postirradiation regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, K.; Tepper, J.; Osmond, D.G. )

    1990-05-01

    The localization of early B-lymphocyte precursor cells in the bone marrow of young mice has been studied during recovery from sublethal whole body gamma-irradiation (150 rad). Initial studies by double immunofluorescence labeling of the B-lineage-associated cell surface glycoprotein, B220, and of mu heavy chains in bone marrow cell suspensions, demonstrated a sequential wave of regeneration of early B precursor cells, pre-B cells, and B cells. Early B precursor cells expressing B220 but not mu chains were enriched at 1-3 days following irradiation. After in vivo administration of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibody 14.8 to detect B220+ cells in situ, light and electron microscope radioautography of femoral bone marrow sections revealed concentrations of labeled B220+ cells located peripherally near the cortical bone at 1-3 days following irradiation, increasing in numbers in more central areas by 5-7 days. Proliferative B220+ precursor cells were found within layers of bone-lining cells and in a subosteal area characterized by a prominent electron-dense extracellular matrix, often associated with stromal reticular cells. The results demonstrate that the precursor cells that are active in the bone marrow early in the recovery of B lymphopoiesis after gamma-irradiation are located both within and near the endosteum of the surrounding bone. The distinctive extracellular matrix and stromal cell associations noted in this region may contribute to a supportive local microenvironment for early hemopoietic progenitor cells.

  9. Adult bone marrow-derived stem cells for organ regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Tögel, Florian; Westenfelder, Christof

    2007-12-01

    Stem cells have been recognized as a potential tool for the development of innovative therapeutic strategies. There are in general two types of stem cells, embryonic and adult stem cells. While embryonic stem cell therapy has been riddled with problems of allogeneic rejection and ethical concerns, adult stem cells have long been used in the treatment of hematological malignancies. With the recognition of additional, potentially therapeutic characteristics, bone marrow-derived stem cells have become a tool in regenerative medicine. The bone marrow is an ideal source of stem cells because it is easily accessible and harbors two types of stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to all blood cell types and have been shown to exhibit plasticity, while multipotent marrow stromal cells are the source of osteocytes, chondrocytes, and fat cells and have been shown to support and generate a large number of different cell types. This review describes the general characteristics of these stem cell populations and their current and potential future applications in regenerative medicine.

  10. Hdac3 Deficiency Increases Marrow Adiposity and Induces Lipid Storage and Glucocorticoid Metabolism in Osteochondroprogenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Carpio, Lomeli R; Schulze, Ryan J; Pierce, Jessica L; McNiven, Mark A; Farr, Joshua N; Khosla, Sundeep; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss and increased marrow adiposity are hallmarks of aging skeletons. Conditional deletion of histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in murine osteochondroprogenitor cells causes osteopenia and increases marrow adiposity, even in young animals, but the origins of the increased adiposity are unclear. To explore this, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) from Hdac3-depleted and control mice were cultured in osteogenic medium. Hdac3-deficient cultures accumulated lipid droplets in greater abundance than control cultures and expressed high levels of genes related to lipid storage (Fsp27/Cidec, Plin1) and glucocorticoid metabolism (Hsd11b1) despite normal levels of Pparγ2. Approximately 5% of the lipid containing cells in the wild-type cultures expressed the master osteoblast transcription factor Runx2, but this population was threefold greater in the Hdac3-depleted cultures. Adenoviral expression of Hdac3 restored normal gene expression, indicating that Hdac3 controls glucocorticoid activation and lipid storage within osteoblast lineage cells. HDAC3 expression was reduced in bone cells from postmenopausal as compared to young women, and in osteoblasts from aged as compared to younger mice. Moreover, phosphorylation of S424 in Hdac3, a posttranslational mark necessary for deacetylase activity, was suppressed in osseous cells from old mice. Thus, concurrent declines in transcription and phosphorylation combine to suppress Hdac3 activity in aging bone, and reduced Hdac3 activity in osteochondroprogenitor cells contributes to increased marrow adiposity associated with aging. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Direct and indirect contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to cancer.

    PubMed

    Guest, Ian; Ilic, Zoran; Ma, Jun; Grant, Denise; Glinsky, Gennadi; Sell, Stewart

    2010-05-15

    Stromal-epithelial interactions may control the growth and initiation of cancers. Here, we not only test the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived cells may effect development of cancers arising from other tissue cells by forming tumor stroma but also that sarcomas may arise by transformation of stem cells from the bone marrow and epithelial cancers may arise by transdifferentiation of bone marrow stem cells to epithelial cancers. Lethally irradiated female FVB/N mice were restored with bone marrow (BM) transplants from a male transgenic mouse carrying the polyoma middle T-oncoprotein under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (MMTV-PyMT) and followed for development of lesions. All of 8 lethally irradiated female FVB/N recipient mice, restored with BM transplants from a male MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse, developed Y-chromosome negative (Y-) cancers of various organs surrounded by Y+ stroma. One of the female FVB/N recipient mice also developed fibrosarcoma and 1, a diploid breast adenocarcinoma containing Y chromosomes. In contrast, only 1 of 12 control female mice restored with normal male BM developed a tumor (lymphoma) during the same time period. These results indicate not only that the transgenic BM-derived stromal cells may indirectly contribute to development of tumors in recipient mice but also that sarcomas may arise by transformation of BM stem cells and that breast cancers arise by transdifferentiation of BM stem cells, presumably by mesenchymal-epithelial transition.

  12. Transcoronary bone marrow-derived progenitor cells in a child with myocardial infarction: first pediatric experience.

    PubMed

    Limsuwan, Alisa; Pienvichit, Pavit; Limpijankit, Thosaphol; Khowsathit, Pongsak; Hongeng, Suradej; Pornkul, Ratanaporn; Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn; Boonbaichaiyapruk, Sarana

    2010-08-01

    Recent advances in stem cell therapy to restore cardiac function have great promise for patients with congestive heart failure after myocardial infarction in an adult population. We examined the benefits of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells treatment modality for the pediatric patient. We present our first case of transcoronary autologous stem cell transplantation in a 9-year-old girl with refractory congestive heart failure secondary to myocardial infarction 1 year after transcatheter revascularization. The child received daily injections of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for 3 days prior to the bone marrow aspiration. The bone marrow cells were isolated to constitute CD133+/CD34+ more than 90% of the total number. Subsequently, the progenitor cell suspension was injected via a transcoronary catheter without any complication. Three months after stem cell therapy, her cardiac function, assessed by both cardiac magnetic resonance and echocardiogram, has been improved with the left ventricular ejection fraction at 47% compared to the baseline of 30%. This is the first reported pediatric case of successful transcoronary injection of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells for end-stage heart disease. The procedure is considered safe and feasible for the pediatric population.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells cooperate with bone marrow cells in therapy of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Urbán, Veronika S; Kiss, Judit; Kovács, János; Gócza, Elen; Vas, Virág; Monostori, Eva; Uher, Ferenc

    2008-01-01

    Several recent studies have suggested that the adult bone marrow harbors cells that can influence beta-cell regeneration in diabetic animals. Other reports, however, have contradicted these findings. To address this issue, we used an animal model of type 1 diabetes in which the disease was induced with streptozotocin in mice. Freshly prepared sex-mismatched bone marrow cells (BMCs) and syngeneic or allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were concomitantly administrated into sublethally irradiated diabetic mice. Blood glucose and serum insulin concentrations rapidly returned to normal levels, accompanied by efficient tissue regeneration after a single injection of a mixture of 10(6) BMCs per 10(5) MSCs. Neither BMC nor MSC transplantation was effective alone. Successful treatment of diabetic animals was not due to the reconstitution of the damaged islet cells from the transplant, since no donor-derived beta-cells were found in the recovered animals, indicating a graft-initiated endogenous repair process. Moreover, MSC injection caused the disappearance of beta-cell-specific T lymphocytes from diabetic pancreas. Therefore, we suggest that two aspects of this successful treatment regimen operate in parallel and synergistically in our model. First, BMCs and MSCs induce the regeneration of recipient-derived pancreatic insulin-secreting cells. Second, MSCs inhibit T-cell-mediated immune responses against newly formed beta-cells, which, in turn, are able to survive in this altered immunological milieu. Thus, the application of this therapy in human patients suffering from diabetes and/or other tissue destructive autoimmune diseases may be feasible.

  14. A simple technique for red blood cell removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mayer, G; Wernet, D; Northoff, H; Schneider, W

    1994-01-01

    A simple technique for red blood cell (RBC) removal in major ABO-incompatible bone marrow transplantation is reported requiring two centrifugation steps, special blood bags and a mechanical device to separate the buffy coat from RBCs within the bag. In 42 transplantations an average of 84% of nucleated cells was recovered with an average contamination of 7.5 ml packed RBCs. The preparations were well tolerated in all patients whose isoagglutinin titers had not been reduced. Bone marrow engraftment was not significantly different from control groups.

  15. Bone marrow transplantation for CVID-like humoral immune deficiency associated with red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Sayour, Elias J; Mousallem, Talal; Van Mater, David; Wang, Endi; Martin, Paul; Buckley, Rebecca H; Barfield, Raymond C

    2016-10-01

    Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) have a higher incidence of autoimmune disease, which may mark the disease onset; however, anemia secondary to pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon presenting feature. Here, we describe a case of CVID-like humoral immune deficiency in a child who initially presented with red cell aplasia and ultimately developed progressive bone marrow failure. Although bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been associated with high mortality in CVID, our patient was successfully treated with a matched sibling BMT and engrafted with >98% donor chimerism and the development of normal antibody titers to diphtheria and tetanus toxoids. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effect of dexamethasone on moesin gene expression in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cornet, F; Broux, O; Anselme, K; Hardouin, P; Jeanfils, J

    2004-10-01

    The influence of dexamethasone on rabbit bone marrow stromal cells differentiation was studied by screening the action of dexamethasone on gene expression. Using differential display, we observed some differential amplifications. The use of five of thirteen different primers combination allowed to identify one or more differential bands. One of them was identified as moesin gene. Real-time PCR confirmed a significant reduction of moesin gene expression following dexamethasone treatment. The decrease of expression for this protein, involved in cytoskeletal organization, could explain the effects of dexamethasone treatment on bone marrow stromal cells differentiation.

  17. Bone Marrow Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that help with blood clotting. With bone marrow disease, there are problems with the stem cells or ... marrow makes too many white blood cells Other diseases, such as lymphoma, can spread into the bone ...

  18. Modeling invasion of metastasizing cancer cells to bone marrow utilizing ecological principles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Wan; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2011-10-03

    The invasion of a new species into an established ecosystem can be directly compared to the steps involved in cancer metastasis. Cancer must grow in a primary site, extravasate and survive in the circulation to then intravasate into target organ (invasive species survival in transport). Cancer cells often lay dormant at their metastatic site for a long period of time (lag period for invasive species) before proliferating (invasive spread). Proliferation in the new site has an impact on the target organ microenvironment (ecological impact) and eventually the human host (biosphere impact). Tilman has described mathematical equations for the competition between invasive species in a structured habitat. These equations were adapted to study the invasion of cancer cells into the bone marrow microenvironment as a structured habitat. A large proportion of solid tumor metastases are bone metastases, known to usurp hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) homing pathways to establish footholds in the bone marrow. This required accounting for the fact that this is the natural home of hematopoietic stem cells and that they already occupy this structured space. The adapted Tilman model of invasion dynamics is especially valuable for modeling the lag period or dormancy of cancer cells. The Tilman equations for modeling the invasion of two species into a defined space have been modified to study the invasion of cancer cells into the bone marrow microenvironment. These modified equations allow a more flexible way to model the space competition between the two cell species. The ability to model initial density, metastatic seeding into the bone marrow and growth once the cells are present, and movement of cells out of the bone marrow niche and apoptosis of cells are all aspects of the adapted equations. These equations are currently being applied to clinical data sets for verification and further refinement of the models.

  19. Heterogeneous proliferative potential of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with solid epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Solakoglu, Oender; Maierhofer, Christine; Lahr, Georgia; Breit, Elisabeth; Scheunemann, Peter; Heumos, Isabella; Pichlmeier, Uwe; Schlimok, Günter; Oberneder, Ralph; Köllermann, Manfred W.; Köllermann, Jens; Speicher, Michael R.; Pantel, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow is a major homing site for circulating epithelial tumor cells. The present study was aimed to assess the proliferative capacity of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with operable solid tumors especially with regard to their clinical outcome. We obtained bone marrow aspirates from 153 patients with carcinomas of the prostate (n = 46), breast (n = 45), colon (n = 33), and kidney (n = 29). Most of the patients (87%) had primary disease with no clinical signs of overt metastases [tumor-node-metastasis (TNM)-stage UICC (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer) I-III]. After bone marrow was cultured for 21–102 days under special cell culture conditions, viable epithelial cells were detected by cytokeratin staining in 124 patients (81%). The cultured epithelial cells harbored Ki-ras2 mutations and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The highest median number of expanded tumor cells was observed in prostate cancer (2,619 per flask). There was a significant positive correlation between the number of expanded tumor cells and the UICC-stage of the patients (P = 0.03) or the presence of overt metastases (P = 0.04). Moreover, a strong expansion of tumor cells was correlated to an increased rate of cancer-related deaths (P = 0.007) and a reduced survival of the patients (P = 0.006). In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients have viable tumor cells in their bone marrow at primary tumor diagnosis, and the proliferative potential of these cells determines the clinical outcome. PMID:11854519

  20. Cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells in elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Longhini-Dos-Santos, Nathalia; Barbosa-de-Oliveira, Valter Abraão; Kozma, Rodrigo Heras; Faria, Carolina Arruda de; Stessuk, Talita; Frei, Fernando; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2013-04-01

    Emphysema is characterized by destruction of alveolar walls with loss of gas exchange surface and consequent progressive dyspnea. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of cell therapy with bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) in an animal model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema. Emphysema was induced in C57Bl/J6 female mice by intranasal instillation of elastase. After 21 days, the mice received bone marrow mononuclear cells from EGFP male mice with C57Bl/J6 background. The groups were assessed by comparison and statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed among the groups treated with BMMC and evaluated after 7, 14 and 21 days. Analysis of the mean linear intercept (Lm) values for the different groups allowed to observe that the group treated with BMMC and evaluated after 21 days showed the most significant result. The group that received no treatment showed a statistically significant difference when compared to other groups, except the group treated and evaluated after 21 days, evidencing the efficacy of cell therapy with BMMC in pulmonary emphysema.

  1. Bone marrow-derived cells serve as proangiogenic macrophages but not endothelial cells in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Yuji; Nakamura-Ishizu, Ayako; Kishi, Kazuo; Suda, Toshio; Kubota, Yoshiaki

    2011-05-12

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) contribute to postnatal vascular growth by differentiating into endothelial cells or secreting angiogenic factors. However, the extent of their endothelial differentiation highly varies according to the angiogenic models used. Wound healing is an intricate process in which the skin repairs itself after injury. As a process also observed in cancer progression, neoangiogenesis into wound tissues is profoundly involved in this healing process, suggesting the contribution of BMDCs. However, the extent of the differentiation of BMDCs to endothelial cells in wound healing is unclear. In this study, using the green fluorescent protein-bone marrow chim-eric experiment and high resolution confocal microscopy at a single cell level, we observed no endothelial differentiation of BMDCs in 2 acute wound healing models (dorsal excisional wound and ear punch) and a chronic wound healing model (decubitus ulcer). Instead, a major proportion of BMDCs were macrophages. Indeed, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) inhibition depleted approximately 80% of the BMDCs at the wound healing site. CSF-1-mutant (CSF-1(op/op)) mice showed significantly reduced neoangiogenesis into the wound site, supporting the substantial role of BMDCs as macrophages. Our data show that the proangiogenic effects of macrophages, but not the endothelial differentiation, are the major contribution of BMDCs in wound healing.

  2. Osteogenic ability of bone marrow stem cells intraoperatively enriched by a novel matrix

    PubMed Central

    YE, QING; CHEN, KAINING; HUANG, WU; HE, YUNSONG; NONG, MINGSHAN; LI, CHUNXIANG; LIANG, TIANSEN

    2015-01-01

    Poly-L-lysine (PLL) is commonly used as an adhibiting agent due to its good viscosity, and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is a common enriched matrix for selective cell retention technology. Therefore, the aim of this study was to use PLL to coat the surface and interspaces of DBM to form a novel type of enriched matrix [DBM coated with PLL (PLL-DBM)], in order to effectively improve the enrichment effects of bone marrow stem cells and enhance their osteogenic ability. Electron microscope scanning and the infrared spectrum were used to observe the structure of PLL-DBM and the optimal conditions for the combination of PLL and DBM. Enriching effects on bone marrow nucleated cells (NCs) and platelets (PLTs) were detected with an automated hematology analyzer. The osteogenesis of the following four groups was assessed with a grafting bone model in a goat spinal transverse process: IA, tissue engineered bone (TEB) fabricated following enrichment of bone marrow with PLL-DBM; IB, autogenous iliac bone; IIC, TEB fabricated following enrichment of bone marrow with DBM; IID, blank DBM. The goats were sacrificed in one batch at week 16 after the surgery and the fusion specimens were examined using X-ray and three-dimensional computed tomography (CT). In addition, the CT value was determined and the histology and biomechanics were analyzed in order to evaluate the osteogenic ability. The results showed that PLL and DBM combined well and that PLL-DBM exhibited a natural mesh pore structure. The fold enrichment of NCs and PLTs with PLL-DBM was significantly higher than that with DBM. The fusion effects of the IA and IB groups were similar and significantly enhanced compared with those of the IIC and IID groups. The results confirmed that PLL-DBM is an ideal enriched matrix for bone marrow stem cells, and TEB rapidly fabricated by PLL-DBM intraoperatively enriched bone marrow stem cells exhibits an improved osteogenic ability. PMID:25452771

  3. Bone marrow findings of the newly described TEMPI syndrome: when erythrocytosis and plasma cell dyscrasia coexist.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Flavia G; Oliveira, Jennifer L; Sohani, Aliya R; Schroyens, Wilfried; Sykes, David B; Kenderian, Saad S; Lacy, Martha Q; Kyle, Robert A; Hoyer, James D

    2015-03-01

    TEMPI syndrome (telangiectasias, elevated erythropoietin level and erythrocytosis, monoclonal gammopathy, perinephric fluid collections, and intrapulmonary shunting) is a recently described syndrome that, owing to erythrocytosis, may be confused with polycythemia vera. It is best classified as a type of plasma cell dyscrasia with paraneoplastic manifestations, similar to POEMS syndrome (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, and skin abnormalities). To date, 11 patients have been identified. This is the first morphologic review of TEMPI syndrome bone marrow samples, in order to define pathologic features that may aid in the recognition of the syndrome and to identify post-therapy changes. Seven bone marrow aspirates and biopsies from three patients, including two post-treatment marrows, were examined. Patients were 36, 49, and 49 years old at time of diagnosis. In all cases, erythropoietin levels were extremely elevated at >5000 IU/l, the paraprotein was IgG kappa, JAK2 V617F was negative and vascular endothelial growth factor levels were normal. In one case, the increase in clonal plasma cells reached levels of smoldering myeloma (18%), but remaining marrows showed few monoclonal plasma cells (<5%). All pre-treatment biopsies showed erythroid hyperplasia, with mild nonspecific megakaryocytic, and erythroid cytologic atypia in one marrow. Prominent plasma cell vacuolization and reactive-appearing lymphoid aggregates were noted in one case. Findings of myeloproliferative neoplasms, including megakaryocyte clusters and fibrosis, were not identified. In conclusion, TEMPI syndrome should be considered when erythrocytosis and plasma cell dyscrasia coexist. The bone marrow findings, although nonspecific, differ significantly from polycythemia vera. Peculiar clinical and laboratorial findings of TEMPI, including elevated erythropoietin and normal vascular endothelial growth factor level, allow the diagnosis and distinction from POEMS syndrome

  4. Characterization of natural killer cells cultured from human bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoda, Y.; Kawakami, Z.; Shibuya, A.; Abe, T.

    1988-09-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) cells, depleted of nylon wool-adherent cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells, were cultured in medium containing recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL2). After 21 or 24 days in culture, numerous lymphoid cells with multiple azurophilic granules and a morphology similar to large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were found. Two-color analysis of surface phenotype showed many of these cells to be NKH1-positive and a limited number of cells had other NK markers such as CD16, CD2, or CD8. The CD3 antigen was not coexpressed with NKH1. The cultured BM cells were cytotoxic for K562, Daudi, and Raji cell lines. The NKH1+, CD2-, CD3-, CD16- cells were sorted and, in addition to having the LGL morphology, were found to be cytotoxic for K562 cells (NK (K562)). The generation of NK(K562) activity was significantly suppressed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine plus ultraviolet light treatment, indicating that DNA synthesis is required. These experiments suggest that the described culture conditions allow differentiation of progenitor cells, into immature, but functionally active, NK cells.

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells Adhering to Adipocytes in Canine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsing-Yi; Fujita, Naoki; Endo, Kentaro; Morita, Maresuke; Takeda, Tae; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2017-03-15

    The ceiling culture method has been used to isolate mature adipocytes from adipose tissue that can be dedifferentiated into fibroblastic cells, also known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that self-renew and are multipotent, with much higher homogeneity and colony-forming efficiency than those of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. We cultured adipocytes from canine bone marrow using this technique, with the expectation of obtaining DFAT cells. However, contrary to our expectations, continuous monitoring of ceiling cultures by time-lapse microscopy revealed many small cells adhering to adipocytes that proliferated rapidly into cells with a fibroblastic morphology and without any dedifferentiation from adipocytes. We named these cells bone marrow peri-adipocyte cells (BM-PACs) and demonstrated the multipotent properties of BM-PACs compared to that of conventionally cultured canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). BM-PACs showed significantly greater clonogenicity and proliferation ability than BMMSCs. An in vitro trilineage differentiation assay revealed that BM-PACs possess adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic capacities superior to those of BMMSCs. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the expression of CD73, which plays an important role in cell growth and differentiation, was significantly higher in BM-PACs than in BMMSCs. These results indicate that canine BM-PACs have stem cell characteristics that are superior to those of BMMSCs, and that these mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear to be a feasible source for cell-based therapies in dogs.

  6. Early derivation of IgM memory cells and bone marrow plasmablasts.

    PubMed

    Papillion, Amber M; Kenderes, Kevin J; Yates, Jennifer L; Winslow, Gary M

    2017-01-01

    IgM memory cells are recognized as an important component of B cell memory in mice and humans. Our studies of B cells elicited in response to ehrlichial infection identified a population of CD11c-positive IgM memory cells, and an IgM bone marrow antibody-secreting cell population. The origin of these cells was unknown, although an early T-independent spleen CD11c- and T-bet-positive IgM plasmablast population precedes both, suggesting a linear relationship. A majority of the IgM memory cells detected after day 30 post-infection, also T-bet-positive, had undergone somatic hypermutation, indicating they expressed activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Therefore, to identify early AID-expressing precursor B cells, we infected an AID-regulated tamoxifen-inducible Cre-recombinase-EYFP reporter strain. Tamoxifen administration led to the labeling of both IgM memory cells and bone marrow ASCs on day 30 and later post-infection. High frequencies of labeled cells were identified on day 30 post-infection, following tamoxifen administration on day 10 post-infection, although IgM memory cells were marked when tamoxifen was administered as early as day 4 post-infection. Transcription of Aicda in the early plasmablasts was not detected in the absence of CD4 T cells, but occurred independently of TLR signaling. Unlike the IgM memory cells, the bone marrow IgM ASCs were elicited independent of T cell help. Moreover, Aicda was constitutively expressed in IgM memory cells, but not in bone marrow ASCs. These studies demonstrate that two distinct long-term IgM-positive B cell populations are generated early in response to infection, but are maintained via separate mechanisms.

  7. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells: their mobilization and homing to bone marrow and peripheral tissue.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Christian; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Massberg, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are a rare population of precursor cells that possess the capacity for self-renewal and multilineage differentiation. In the bone marrow (BM), HSPCs warrant blood cell homeostasis. In addition, they may also replenish tissue-resident myeloid cells and directly participate in innate immune responses once they home to peripheral tissues. In this review, we summarize recent data on the signaling molecules that modulate the mobilization of HSPCs from BM and their migration to peripheral tissues.

  8. Bone marrow regeneration promoted by biophysically sorted osteoprogenitors from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as "cell factories" that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies.

  9. Unstimulated diagnostic marrow tap--a minimally invasive and reliable source for mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Purushotham Reddy; Polisetti, Naresh; Vemuganti, Geeta K

    2010-02-05

    BMMNCs (bone marrow mononuclear cells) were isolated by density gradient centrifugation from unstimulated diagnostic marrow tap to propagate and characterize hBMSCs (human bone marrow stromal cells) and to explore their plasticity towards neuronal and other lineages. hBMSCs were characterized by flow cytometry for established markers, serially passaged and differentiated into adipo, osteo, chondro and neuronal lineages. Neural differentiation was analysed by RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-PCR), ICC (immunocytochemistry) and Western blotting. The hBMSCs (n = 39) were spindle-shaped and immunoreactive for mesenchymal markers such as CD71, CD106, CD105, CD90 and Vimentin and negative for haematopoietic markers such as CD11c, CD34 and CD45. These cells showed differentiation into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. Upon neuronal differentiation, hBMSCs expressed neuronal markers, i.e. beta-III tubulin, GAP43 (growth-associated proteins), neurofilament by ICC, RT-PCR and Western blotting. Our study demonstrates that minimal volumes of unstimulated diagnostic marrow tap forms a minimally invasive and reliable source for isolation of BMMNCs to establish cultures of mesenchymal stem cells and expand them. The plasticity observed in these cells towards mesenchymal (adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrocytic) and non-mesenchymal lineage (neural) substantiates the nature of mesenchymal stem cells and warrants further studies to evaluate their functional role.

  10. The topologic and chronologic patterns of hematopoietic cell seeding in host femoral bone marrow after transplantation.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Stein, Jeremiah; Yaniv, Isaac; Farkas, Daniel L

    2003-08-01

    The early stages of homing, seeding, and engraftment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are poorly characterized. We have developed an optical technique that allows in vivo tracking of transplanted, fluorescent-tagged cells in the host femurs. In this study we used fluorescence microscopy to monitor the topologic and chronologic patterns of hematopoietic cell seeding in the femoral bone marrow (BM) of mice. PKH-labeled cells homed to the femur within minutes after injection into a peripheral vein. Most cells drifted within the marrow space and gradually seeded in clusters close to the endosteal surface of the epiphyseal cortex. Three days after transplantation 85% to 94% (14%) of PKH-labeled cells in the femoral marrow were located within 100 microm of the epiphyseal bone surface (P <.001 versus the more central cells), whereas labeled cells were absent in the femoral diaphysis. Primary seeding of juxtaendosteal, epiphyseal marrow occurred independently of recipient conditioning (myeloablated and nonconditioned hosts), donor-recipient antigen disparity, or the phenotype of the injected cells (whole BM and lineage-negative cells) and was consistently observed in secondary recipients of BM-homed cells. Seeding in regions close to the epiphyseal bone was also observed in freshly excised femurs perfused ex vivo and in femurs assessed without prior placement of optical windows, indicating that the site of primary seeding was not affected by surgical placement of optical windows. Four to 5 days after transplantation, cellular clusters appeared in the more central regions of the epiphyses and in the diaphyses. Centrally located cells showed decreased PKH fluorescence, suggesting that they were progeny of the seeding cells, and brightly fluorescent cells (quiescent first-generation seeding cells) were observed close to the bone surface for as long as 24 days after transplantation. These data indicate that the periphery of the femoral marrow hosts primary seeding

  11. Subdivision of bone marrow microenvironments: purpose built homes for haematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Edwin D; Lo Celso, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    EMBO J (2013) 32 2, 219–230 doi:10.1038/emboj.2012.308; published online 11272012 The identification of distinct bone marrow microenvironments that support haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) survival and function is one of the most significant recent advances in our understanding of HSC biology. While the intricate organization of these structures and their effect on HSC is on its own a fascinating biological question, solving this puzzle remains a key step in the development of more efficient stem cell therapies through improved in vitro HSC culture systems. In this issue, a study conducted by Wang and colleagues describes a novel structure within the bone marrow and provides evidence for an additional layer of complexity and compartmentalisation within the bone marrow microenvironment, suggesting the presence of specialised structures that support clonal HSC expansion. PMID:23249987

  12. Hematopoietic bone marrow cells participate in endothelial, but not epithelial or mesenchymal cell renewal in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Odörfer, Kathrin I; Egerbacher, Monika; Unger, Nina J; Weber, Karin; Jamnig, Angelika; Lepperdinger, Günter; Kleiter, Miriam; Sandgren, Eric P; Erben, Reinhold G

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which bone marrow (BM) contributes to physiological cell renewal is still controversial. Using the marker human placental alkaline phosphatase (ALPP) which can readily be detected in paraffin and plastic sections by histochemistry or immunohistochemistry, and in ultrathin sections by electron microscopy after pre-embedding staining, we examined the role of endogenous BM in physiological cell renewal by analysing tissues from lethally irradiated wild-type inbred Fischer 344 (F344) rats transplanted (BMT) with unfractionated BM from ALPP-transgenic F344 rats ubiquitously expressing the marker. Histochemical, immunohistochemical and immunoelectron microscopic analysis showed that the proportion of ALPP+ capillary endothelial cells (EC) profoundly increased from 1 until 6 months after BMT in all organs except brain and adrenal medulla. In contrast, pericytes and EC in large blood vessels were ALPP–. Epithelial cells in kidney, liver, pancreas, intestine and brain were recipient-derived at all time-points. Similarly, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, striated muscle and smooth muscle cells were exclusively of recipient origin. The lack of mesenchymal BM-derived cells in peripheral tissues prompted us to examine whether BMT resulted in engraftment of mesenchymal precursors. Four weeks after BMT, all haematopoietic BM cells were of donor origin by flow cytometric analysis, whereas isolation of BM mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) failed to show engraftment of donor MSC. In conclusion, our data show that BM is an important source of physiological renewal of EC in adult rats, but raise doubt whether reconstituted irradiated rats are an apt model for BM-derived regeneration of mesenchymal cells in peripheral tissues. PMID:21091631

  13. Proliferative activity of vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramvis, A.; Garnett, H.M.

    1987-11-01

    Vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cell population cultured in Fischer's medium supplemented with 12.5% fetal calf serum and 12.5% horse serum consists of two cell shapes: fusiform (type I) and polygonal (type II). Limiting-dilution cloning of the cells suggested that the two morphologically distinct cell types belong to the same cellular system even though they differ in their proliferative capabilities. The labeling index of type II cells, as measured by autoradiography, was found to be consistently lower than that of type I cells. It is probable that these two phenotypes represent different stages of differentiation, where progenitor type I gives rise to type II cells. The bone marrow-derived adherent cells were found to be cytokinetically at rest in vivo, using the thymidine suicide test, and relatively radioresistant with a D0 = 2.1 Gy and n = 2.36 at the time of explantation from the bone. Furthermore, in culture these cells are characterized by a relatively long cell cycle of 60 h, where the length of the S phase is 30 h, G2 is 12 h, M is 6 h, and G1 is 12 h. Thus, the vervet monkey bone marrow-derived adherent cells represent a cell population with a low turnover rate both in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Treatment with at Homeopathic Complex Medication Modulates Mononuclear Bone Marrow Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Beatriz; Abud, Ana Paula R.; de Oliveira, Carolina C.; Cardoso, Francolino; Bernardi, Raffaello Popa Di; Guimarães, Fernando S. F.; Gabardo, Juarez; de Freitas Buchi, Dorly

    2011-01-01

    A homeopathic complex medication (HCM), with immunomodulatory properties, is recommended for patients with depressed immune systems. Previous studies demonstrated that the medication induces an increase in leukocyte number. The bone marrow microenvironment is composed of growth factors, stromal cells, an extracellular matrix and progenitor cells that differentiate into mature blood cells. Mice were our biological model used in this research. We now report in vivo immunophenotyping of total bone marrow cells and ex vivo effects of the medication on mononuclear cell differentiation at different times. Cells were examined by light microscopy and cytokine levels were measured in vitro. After in vivo treatment with HCM, a pool of cells from the new marrow microenvironment was analyzed by flow cytometry to detect any trend in cell alteration. The results showed decreases, mainly, in CD11b and TER-119 markers compared with controls. Mononuclear cells were used to analyze the effects of ex vivo HCM treatment and the number of cells showing ring nuclei, niche cells and activated macrophages increased in culture, even in the absence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Cytokines favoring stromal cell survival and differentiation in culture were induced in vitro. Thus, we observe that HCM is immunomodulatory, either alone or in association with other products. PMID:19736221

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells repair spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting axonal growth and anti-autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fei; Meng, Chunyang; Lu, Rifeng; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Hao; Qin, Yonggang; Guo, Li

    2014-09-15

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neurons and astrocytes after transplantation in the spinal cord of rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are known to protect against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury through anti-apoptotic effects, the precise mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and proliferated, then transplanted into rats with ischemia/reperfusion injury via retro-orbital injection. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence with subsequent quantification revealed that the expression of the axonal regeneration marker, growth associated protein-43, and the neuronal marker, microtubule-associated protein 2, significantly increased in rats with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Furthermore, the expression of the autophagy marker, microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B, and Beclin 1, was significantly reduced in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation compared with those in rats with spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament-H increased but light chain 3B and Beclin 1 decreased in rats with the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Our results therefore suggest that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes neurite growth and regeneration and prevents autophagy. These responses may likely be mechanisms underlying the protective effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  16. Image-guided transplantation of single cells in the bone marrow of live animals.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Raphaël; Alt, Clemens; Runnels, Judith M; Ito, Kyoko; Wu, Juwell W; Zaher, Walid; Mortensen, Luke J; Silberstein, Lev; Côté, Daniel C; Kung, Andrew L; Ito, Keisuke; Lin, Charles P

    2017-06-20

    Transplantation of a single hematopoietic stem cell is an important method for its functional characterization, but the standard transplantation protocol relies on cell homing to the bone marrow after intravenous injection. Here, we present a method to transplant single cells directly into the bone marrow of live mice. We developed an optical platform that integrates a multiphoton microscope with a laser ablation unit for microsurgery and an optical tweezer for cell micromanipulation. These tools allow image-guided single cell transplantation with high spatial control. The platform was used to deliver single hematopoietic stem cells. The engraftment of transplants was tracked over time, illustrating that the technique can be useful for studying both normal and malignant stem cells in vivo.

  17. Bone Marrow Stem Cells in Clinical Application: Harnessing Paracrine Roles and Niche Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backly, Rania M. El; Cancedda, Ranieri

    The being of any individual throughout life is a dynamic process relying on the capacity to retain processes of self-renewal and differentiation, both of which are hallmarks of stem cells. Although limited in the adult human organism, regeneration and repair do take place in virtue of the presence of adult stem cells. In the bone marrow, two major populations of stem cells govern the dynamic equilibrium of both hemopoiesis and skeletal homeostasis; the hematopoietic and the mesenchymal stem cells. Recent cell based clinical trials utilizing bone marrow-derived stem cells as therapeutic agents have revealed promising results, while others have failed to display as such. It is therefore imperative to strive to understand the mechanisms by which these cells function in vivo, how their properties can be maintained ex-vivo, and to explore further their recently highlighted immunomodulatory and trophic effects.

  18. Effects of low-doses of Bacillus spp. from permafrost on differentiation of bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Kalyonova, L F; Novikova, M A; Kostolomova, E G

    2015-01-01

    The effects of a new microorganism species (Bacillus spp., strain M3) isolated from permafrost specimens from Central Yakutia (Mamontova Mountain) on the bone marrow hemopoiesis were studied on laboratory mice. Analysis of the count and immunophenotype of bone marrow cells indicated that even in low doses (1000-5000 microbial cells) these microorganisms modulated hemopoiesis and lymphopoiesis activity. The percentage of early hemopoietic precursors (CD117(+)CD34(-)) increased, intensity of lymphocyte precursor proliferation and differentiation (CD25(+)CD44(-)) decreased, and the percentage of lymphocytes released from the bone marrow (CD25(+)CD44(+)) increased on day 21 after injection of the bacteria. These changes in activity of hemopoiesis were associated with changes in the level of regulatory T lymphocytes (reduced expression of TCRαβ) and were most likely compensatory. The possibility of modulating hemopoiesis activity in the bone marrow by low doses of one microorganism strain isolated from the permafrost could be useful for evaluating the effects of other low dose bacteria on the bone marrow hemopoiesis.

  19. The resistance of C57BL/6 mice to subcutaneous infection with Mycobacterium lepraemurium is dependent on both T cells and other cells of bone marrow origin.

    PubMed

    Adu, H O; Curtis, J; Turk, J L

    1983-06-01

    Thymectomized or sham-thymectomized C57BL/6 mice were irradiated and reconstituted with either C57BL/6 bone marrow cells or bone marrow cells from H-2 matched BALB/B mice. The ability to limit organism multiplication at the site of infection in response to a moderate dose of Mycobacterium lepraemurium is shown to be T-cell mediated and not dependent on the type of bone marrow cells used for reconstitution. Dissemination of the organisms on the other hand appeared to be dependent on both T cells and cells of bone marrow origin.

  20. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Angélique; Poignard, Alexandre; Coquelin-Salsac, Laura; Léotot, Julie; Homma, Yasuhiro; Jullien, Nicolas; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hernigou, Philippe; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a frequent complication in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To delay hip arthroplasty, core decompression combined with concentrated total bone marrow (BM) treatment is currently performed in the early stages of the osteonecrosis. Cell therapy efficacy depends on the quantity of implanted BM stromal cells. For this reason, expanded bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) can be used to improve osteonecrosis treatment in SCD patients. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the function of BMSCs isolated from a large number of SCD patients with osteonecrosis (SCD-ON) compared with control groups (patients with osteonecrosis not related to SCD (ON) and normal donors (N)). BM total nuclear cells and colony-forming efficiency values (CFE) were significantly higher in SCD-ON patients than in age and sex-matched controls. The BMSCs from SCD-ON patients were similar to BMSCs from the control groups in terms of their phenotypic and functional properties. SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products.

  1. Peripheral-blood stem cells versus bone marrow from unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Anasetti, Claudio; Logan, Brent R; Lee, Stephanie J; Waller, Edmund K; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Wingard, John R; Cutler, Corey S; Westervelt, Peter; Woolfrey, Ann; Couban, Stephen; Ehninger, Gerhard; Johnston, Laura; Maziarz, Richard T; Pulsipher, Michael A; Porter, David L; Mineishi, Shin; McCarty, John M; Khan, Shakila P; Anderlini, Paolo; Bensinger, William I; Leitman, Susan F; Rowley, Scott D; Bredeson, Christopher; Carter, Shelly L; Horowitz, Mary M; Confer, Dennis L

    2012-10-18

    Randomized trials have shown that the transplantation of filgrastim-mobilized peripheral-blood stem cells from HLA-identical siblings accelerates engraftment but increases the risks of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), as compared with the transplantation of bone marrow. Some studies have also shown that peripheral-blood stem cells are associated with a decreased rate of relapse and improved survival among recipients with high-risk leukemia. We conducted a phase 3, multicenter, randomized trial of transplantation of peripheral-blood stem cells versus bone marrow from unrelated donors to compare 2-year survival probabilities with the use of an intention-to-treat analysis. Between March 2004 and September 2009, we enrolled 551 patients at 48 centers. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to peripheral-blood stem-cell or bone marrow transplantation, stratified according to transplantation center and disease risk. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 36 months (interquartile range, 30 to 37). The overall survival rate at 2 years in the peripheral-blood group was 51% (95% confidence interval [CI], 45 to 57), as compared with 46% (95% CI, 40 to 52) in the bone marrow group (P=0.29), with an absolute difference of 5 percentage points (95% CI, -3 to 14). The overall incidence of graft failure in the peripheral-blood group was 3% (95% CI, 1 to 5), versus 9% (95% CI, 6 to 13) in the bone marrow group (P=0.002). The incidence of chronic GVHD at 2 years in the peripheral-blood group was 53% (95% CI, 45 to 61), as compared with 41% (95% CI, 34 to 48) in the bone marrow group (P=0.01). There were no significant between-group differences in the incidence of acute GVHD or relapse. We did not detect significant survival differences between peripheral-blood stem-cell and bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors. Exploratory analyses of secondary end points indicated that peripheral-blood stem cells may reduce the risk of graft failure

  2. In vivo osteoinductive effect and in vitro isolation and cultivation bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Redzić, Amira; Smajilagić, Amer; Aljicević, Mufida; Berberović, Ljubomir

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow contains cell type termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), first recognized in bone marrow by a German pathologist, Julius Cohnheim in 1867. That MSCs have potential to differentiate in vitro in to the various cells lines as osteoblast, chondroblast, myoblast and adipoblast cells lines. Aims of our study were to show in vivo capacity of bone marrow MSC to produce bone in surgically created non critical size mandible defects New Zeland Rabbits, and then in second part of study to isolate in vitro MSC from bone marrow, as potential cell transplantation model in bone regeneration. In vivo study showed new bone detected on 3D CT reconstruction day 30, on all 3 animals non critical size defects, treated with bone marrow MSC exposed to the human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (rhBMP-7). Average values of bone mineral density (BMD), was 530 mg/cm3, on MSC treated animals, and 553 mg/cm3 on control group of 3 animals where non critical size defects were treated with iliac crest autologue bone graft. Activity of the Alkaline Phosphatase enzyme were measurement on 0.5, 14, 21, 30 day and increased activity were detected day 14 on animals treated with bone marrow MSCs compared with day 30 on iliac crest treated animals. That results indicates strong osteoinduction activity of the experimental bone marrow MSCs models exposed to the rhBMP-7 factor Comparing ALP activity, that model showed superiorly results than control group. That result initiates us in opinion that MSCs alone should be alternative for the autolologue bone transplantation and in vitro study we isolated singles MSCs from the bone marrow of rat's tibia and femora and cultivated according to the method of Maniatopoulos et all. The small initial colonies of fibroblast like cells were photo-documented after 2 days of primary culture. Such isolated and cultivated MSCs in future studies will be exposed to the growth factors to differentiate in osteoblast and indicate their clinically potential as alternative

  3. Treating Achilles tendon rupture in rats with bone-marrow-cell transplantation therapy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Naofumi; Kushida, Taketoshi; Oe, Kenichi; Umeda, Masayuki; Ikehara, Susumu; Iida, Hirokazu

    2010-12-01

    Bone marrow cells possess multipotentiality and have been used for several treatments. We hypothesized that bone marrow cells might differentiate into regenerated tendon and that several cytokines within bone marrow cells might accelerate tendon healing. Therefore, we treated Achilles tendon ruptures in a rat model with transplantation of whole bone marrow cells. Nine F344/Nslc (Fisher) rats were the source of bone marrow cells and mesenchymal stem cells as well as normal Achilles tendons. Eighty-seven Fisher rats were used for the experiments. The rats were divided into three groups: the BMC group (bone marrow cells injected around the tendon), the MSC group (mesenchymal stem cells injected around the tendon), and the non-treated control group (incision only). Outcome measures included mechanical testing, collagen immunohistochemistry, histological analysis, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to detect expression of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The ultimate failure load in the BMC group was significantly greater than that in the non-treated or the MSC group at seven days after incision (3.8 N vs. 0.9 N or 2.1 N, p < 0.016) and at fourteen days after incision (10.2 N vs. 6.1 N or 8.2 N, p < 0.016). The ultimate failure load in the BMC group at twenty-eight days after incision (33.8 N) was the same as that of normal tendon (34.8 N). The BMC group demonstrated stronger staining for type-III collagen at seven days after incision and stronger staining for type-I collagen at twenty-eight days than did the MSC group. Expression of TGF-β and VEGF in the BMC group was significantly increased compared with that in the other groups at four days after incision (TGF-β: 1.6 vs. 1.3 or 0.6, p < 0.01; VEGF: 1.7 vs. 1.1 or 0.9, p < 0.01). Transplantation of whole bone marrow cells may be a better and more readily available treatment for Achilles tendon rupture than cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

  4. Melphalan exposure induces an Interleukin-6 deficit in bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Rellick, Stephanie L.; Piktel, Debbie; Walton, Cheryl; Hall, Brett; Petros, William; Fortney, James E.; Gencheva, Marieta; Denvir, Jim; Hobbs, Gerald; Craig, Michael; Gibson, Laura F.

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and osteoblasts are critical components of the microenvironment that support hematopoietic recovery following bone marrow transplantation. Aggressive chemotherapy not only affects tumor cells, but also influences additional structural and functional components of the microenvironment. Successful reconstitution of hematopoiesis following stem cell or bone marrow transplantation after aggressive chemotherapy is dependent upon components of the microenvironment maintaining their supportive function. This includes secretion of soluble factors and expression of cellular adhesion molecules that impact on development of hematopoietic cells. In the current study, we investigated the effects of chemotherapy treatment on BMSC and human osteoblast (HOB) expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as one regulatory factor. IL-6 is a pleiotrophic cytokine which has diverse effects on hematopoietic cell development. In the current study we demonstrate that exposure of BMSC or HOB to melphalan leads to decreases in IL-6 protein expression. Decreased IL-6 protein is the most pronounced following melphalan exposure compared to several other chemotherapeutic agents tested. We also observed that melphalan decreased IL-6 mRNA in both BMSC and HOB. Finally, using a model of BMSC or HOB co-cultured with myeloma cells exposed to melphalan, we observed that IL-6 protein was also decreased, consistent with treatment of adherent cells alone. Collectively, these observations are of dual significance. First, suggesting that chemotherapy induced IL-6 deficits in the bone marrow occur which may result in defective hematopoietic support of early progenitor cells. In contrast, the decrease in IL-6 protein may be a beneficial mechanism by which melphalan acts as a valuable therapeutic agent for treatment of multiple myeloma, where IL-6 present in the bone marrow acts as a proliferative factor and contributes to disease progression. Taken together, these data emphasize the

  5. Deep imaging of bone marrow shows non-dividing stem cells are mainly perisinusoidal

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Melih; Kocherlakota, Kiranmai S.; Murphy, Malea M.; Peyer, James G.; Oguro, Hideyuki; Inra, Christopher N.; Jaiyeola, Christabel; Zhao, Zhiyu; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Morrison, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in a perivascular niche but the location remains controversial1. HSCs are rare and few can be found in thin tissue sections2,3 or upon live imaging4, making it difficult to comprehensively localize dividing and non-dividing HSCs. We discovered that α-catulinGFP/+ was expressed by only 0.02% of bone marrow hematopoietic cells, including virtually all HSCs. One in 3.5 α-catulin-GFP+c-kit+ cells gave long-term multilineage reconstitution of irradiated mice, indicating that α-catulin-GFP+c-kit+ cells contain HSCs with a purity comparable to the best markers available. We were able to optically clear the bone marrow to perform deep confocal imaging, making it possible to image thousands of α-catulin-GFP+c-kit+ cells and to digitally reconstruct large segments of bone marrow. The distribution of α-catulin-GFP+c-kit+ cells indicated that HSCs were more common in central marrow than near bone surfaces and in the diaphysis relative to the metaphysis. Nearly all HSCs contacted Leptin Receptor+ and Cxcl12high niche cells. Approximately 85% of HSCs were within 10μm of a sinusoidal blood vessel. Most HSCs were distant from arterioles, transition zone vessels, and bone surfaces. This was true of Ki-67+ dividing HSCs and Ki-67− non-dividing HSCs. Dividing and non-dividing HSCs thus reside mainly in perisinusoidal niches with Leptin Receptor+Cxcl12high cells throughout the bone marrow. PMID:26416744

  6. Cytogenetic evaluation of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube in mice bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Patlolla, Anita K; Patra, Prabir K; Flountan, Moyesha; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    With their unique structure and physicochemical properties, single\\-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have many potential new applications in medicine and industry. However, there is lack of detailed information concerning their impact on human health and the environment. The aim of this study was to assess the effects, after intraperitoneal injection of functionalized SWCNTs (f-SWCNT) on the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), frequency of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA), frequency of micronuclei induction, mitotic index, and DNA damage in Swiss-Webster mice. Three doses of f-SWCNTs (0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mg/kg) and two controls (negative and positive) were administered to mice, once a day for 5 days. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were collected 24 h after the last treatment following standard protocols. F-SWCNT exposure significantly enhanced ROS, increased (p < 0.05) the number of SCA and the frequency of micronucleated cells, increased DNA damage, and decreased the mitotic index in exposed groups compared to negative control. The scientific findings reported here suggest that purified f-SWCNT have the potential to induce oxidative stress mediated genotoxicity in Swiss-Webster mice at higher level of exposure. Further characterization of their systemic toxicity, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity is also essential. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1091-1102, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cytogenetic Evaluation of Functionalized Single – Walled Carbon Nanotube in Mice Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patlolla, Anita K.; Patra, Prabir K.; Flountan, Moyesha; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    With their unique structure and physico-chemical properties, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have many potential new applications in medicine and industry. However, there is lack of detailed information concerning their impact on human health and the environment. The aim of this study was to assess the effects, after intra peritoneal injection of functionalized SWCNTs (f-SWCNT) on the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), frequency of structural chromosomal aberrations (SCA), frequency of micronuclei (MN) induction, mitotic index (MI) and DNA damage in Swiss-Webster mice. Three doses of f-SWCNTs (0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mg/Kg) and two controls (negative and positive) were administered to mice, once a day for five days. Bone marrow and peripheral blood samples were collected 24 hours after the last treatment following standard protocols. F-SWCNT exposure significantly enhanced ROS, increased (p<0.05) the number of SCA and the frequency of micro-nucleated cells, increased DNA damage, and decreased the mitotic index in exposed groups compared to negative control. The scientific findings reported here suggest that purified f-SWCNT have the potential to induce oxidative stress mediated genotoxicity in Swiss-Webster mice at higher level of exposure. Further characterization of their systemic toxicity, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity is also essential. PMID:25689286

  8. Effects of the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS350, a radiation mitigator, on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures and on radioresistance of marrow stromal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ashwin; Epperly, Michael W; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Sprachman, Melissa M; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The ionizing irradiation mitigator MMS350 prolongs survival of mice treated with total-body irradiation and prevents radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis when added to drinking water at day 100 after thoracic irradiation. The effects of MMS350 on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture and on the radiobiology of derived bone marrow stromal cell lines were tested. Long-term bone marrow cultures were established from C57BL/6NTac mice and maintained in a high-humidity incubator, with 7% CO2 and the addition of 100 μM MMS350 at the weekly media change. Over 10 weeks in culture, MMS350 had no significant effect on maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell production, or on nonadherent cells or colony-forming units of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Stromal cell lines derived from non MMS350-treated long-term cultures or control stromal cells treated with MMS350 were radioresistant in the clonogenic survival curve assay. MMS350 is a non-toxic, highly water-soluble radiation mitigator that exhibits radioprotective effects on bone marrow stromal cells.

  9. Mild cerebellar neurodegeneration of aged heterozygous PCD mice increases cell fusion of Purkinje and bone marrow-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz, David; Recio, Javier S; Weruaga, Eduardo; Alonso, José R

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells have different plastic properties, especially regarding cell fusion, which increases with time and is prompted by tissue injury. Several recessive mutations, including Purkinje Cell Degeneration, affect the number of Purkinje cells in homozygosis; heterozygous young animals have an apparently normal phenotype but they undergo Purkinje cell loss as they age. Our findings demonstrate that heterozygous pcd mice undergo Purkinje cell loss at postnatal day 300, this slow but steadily progressing cell death starting sooner than has been reported previously and without massive reactive gliosis or inflammation. Here, transplantation of bone marrow stem cells was performed to assess the arrival of bone marrow-derived cells in the cerebellum in these heterozygous mice. Our results reveal that a higher number of cell fusion events occurs in heterozygous animals than in the controls, on days 150 and 300 postnatally. In sum, this study indicates that mild cell death promotes the fusion of bone marrow-derived cells with surviving Purkinje neurons. This phenomenon suggests new therapies for long-lasting neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum.

  11. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-García, M. Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, José Á.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input–output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  12. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Jennifer; Sariyer, Ilker K.; De La Fuente-Granada, Marisol; Augelli, Brian J.; Otte, Jessica; Azizi, S. Ausim; Amini, Shohreh; Khalili, Kamel; Krynska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    JC virus (JCV), a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases and the

  13. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type.

  14. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell division in neuroblastoma cells and bone marrow macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sans-Fons, M Gloria; Sole, Sonia; Sanfeliu, Coral; Planas, Anna M

    2010-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade the extracellular matrix and carry out key functions in cell development, cancer, injury, and regeneration. In addition to its well recognized extracellular action, functional intracellular MMP activity under certain conditions is supported by increasing evidence. In this study, we observed higher gelatinase activity by in situ zymography and increased MMP-9 immunoreactivity in human neuroblastoma cells and in bone marrow macrophages undergoing mitosis compared with resting cells. We studied the pattern of immunoreactivity at the different stages of cell division by confocal microscopy. Immunostaining with different monoclonal antibodies against MMP-9 revealed a precise, dynamic, and well orchestrated localization of MMP-9 at the different stages of cell division. The cellular distribution of MMP-9 staining was studied in relation to that of microtubules. The spatial pattern of MMP-9 immunoreactivity suggested some participation in both the reorganization of the nuclear content and the process of chromatid segmentation. We then used several MMP-9 inhibitors to find out whether MMP-9 might be involved in the cell cycle. These drugs impaired the entry of cells into mitosis, as revealed by flow cytometry, and reduced cell culture growth. In addition, the silencing of MMP-9 expression with small interfering RNA also reduced cell growth. Taken together, these results suggest that intracellular MMP-9 is involved in the process of cell division in neuroblastoma cells and in primary cultures of macrophages.

  15. Directed differentiation of airway epithelial cells of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Dong

    2016-11-01

    The ability to generate lung and airway epithelial cells from human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) would have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening, and studies of human lung development. In this research, hBMSCs were cultured in specialized airway epithelial cell growth media for differentiation of airway epithelial cells, including keratinocyte growth factor transferrin, bovine pituitary extract, epinephrine, triiodothyronine and retinoic acid. The surfactant protein C, a specific marker of type II pneumocytes, and its corresponding protein were demonstrated by immunofluorescence and western blotting after differentiation of airway epithelial cells, respectively. These cells were then transferred into an induced acute lung injury model. The results showed that the hBMSCs could induce differentiation in airway epithelial cells under the special conditions of the medium, the result for surfactant protein C was positive in differentiated airway epithelial cells using immunofluorescence and western blotting, and these cells were successfully colonized in the injured lung airway. In conclusion, our research shows that a population of airway epithelial cells can be specifically generated from hBMSCs and that induced cells may be allowed to participate in tissue repair.

  16. Osterix-cre labeled progenitor cells contribute to the formation and maintenance of the bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaling; Strecker, Sara; Wang, Liping; Kronenberg, Mark S; Wang, Wen; Rowe, David W; Maye, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma.

  17. Osterix-Cre Labeled Progenitor Cells Contribute to the Formation and Maintenance of the Bone Marrow Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaling; Strecker, Sara; Wang, Liping; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Wang, Wen; Rowe, David W.; Maye, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma. PMID:23951132

  18. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad S; Stemig, Melissa E; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harvested immediately after irradiation, and at 1 and 5 days after irradiation. Cell cycle analysis, colony forming ability (CFU-F), differentiation ability, and expression of osteogenic-specific runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), oxidative stress-specific dismutase-1 (SOD1) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) were analyzed. Irradiation arrested cell cycle progression in BMMSCs and hESMSCs. Colony formation ability of irradiated MSCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiated hESMSCs showed higher adipogenic differentiation compared with BMMSCs, together with an increase in the adipogenic PPARγ expression. PPARγ expression was upregulated as early as 4 h after irradiation, along with the expression of SOD1. More than 70% downregulation was found in Wnt3A, Wnt4, Wnt 7A, Wnt10A and Wnt11 in BMMSCs, but not in hESMSCs. hESMSCs are highly proliferative but radiosensitive compared with BMMSCs. Increased PPARγ expression relative to RUNX2 and downregulation of Wnt ligands in irradiated MSCs suggest Wnt mediated the fate determination of irradiated MSCs.

  19. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  20. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mesentier-Louro, Louise A.; Zaverucha-do-Valle, Camila; Rosado-de-Castro, Paulo H.; Silva-Junior, Almir J.; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro M.; Mendez-Otero, Rosalia; Santiago, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized. PMID:26649049

  1. Gene Therapy with Hematopoietic Stem Cells: The Diseased Bone Marrow's Point of View.

    PubMed

    Cavazzana, Marina; Ribeil, Jean-Antoine; Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; André-Schmutz, Isabelle

    2017-01-15

    When considering inherited diseases that can be treated by gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), there are only two in which the HSC and progenitor cell distribution inside the bone marrow and its microenvironment are exactly the same as in a healthy subject: metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In all other settings [X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID), adenosine deaminase deficiency, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and β-hemoglobinopathies], the bone marrow content of the different stem and precursor cells and the cells' relationship with the stroma have very specific characteristics. These peculiarities can influence the cells' harvesting and behavior in culture, and the postgraft uptake and further behavior of the gene-modified hematopoietic/precursor cells. In the present mini-review, we shall briefly summarize these characteristics and outline the possible consequences and challenges.

  2. State of the antioxidative enzymes of rat bone marrow cells after irradiation, fractures, and a combination of both

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanova, I.A.; Ovchinnikov, K.G.; Torbenko, V.P.; Gerasimov, A.M.

    1987-11-01

    The authors study bone marrow levels of antioxidative (antiradical) defensive systems (ADS) enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GP), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione: dehydroascorbate oxidoreductase (GDAR), rats and changes in their activity in the bone marrow at various times after irradiation, mechanical trauma, and a combination of both. Development of acute radiation sickness as a result of a single irradiation was accompanied by marked changes in the enzymic antioxidative system of rat bone marrow cells.

  3. Native and bone marrow-derived cell mosaicism in gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected p27-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songhua; Kim, Woojin; Pham, Tu T.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Houghton, Jean Marie; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection promotes non-cardia gastric cancer. Some mouse models suggest that bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) contribute to Helicobacter-associated gastric carcinogenesis. We determined whether this increased susceptibility to Helicobacter-induced gastric carcinogenesis of p27-deficient mice is dependent upon their p27-null BMDC or their p27-null gastric epithelial cells. Design Female mice (recipients) were irradiated and transplanted with BMDC from male donors. Wild type (WT) mice in group 1 (control) received BMDC from male GFP-transgenic mice. Female WT and p27 KO mice were engrafted with male p27KO mice BMDC (Group 2) or GFP-transgenic WT BMDC (Group 3). Recipients were infected with H. pylori SS1 for one year. Results Mice lacking p27 in either the BM pool or gastric epithelium developed significantly more advanced gastric pathology, including high-grade dysplasia. Co-staining of donor BMDC in dysplastic gastric glands was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Gastric expression of IL-1 beta protein was reduced in groups 2 and 3 (p < 0.05 vs control) whereas expression of IFN-γ and chemokines MIP-1 beta, MIG, IP-10 and RANTES in group 2 were significantly higher than group 3. Conclusions Both bone marrow-derived and gastric epithelial cells contribute to the increased gastric cancer susceptibility of p27-deficient H. pylori-infected mice. PMID:27655701

  4. Bone marrow-derived cells are recruited by the melanoma tumor with endothelial cells contributing to tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Bonfim-Silva, R; Souza, L E B; Melo, F U F; Oliveira, V C; Magalhães, D A R; Oliveira, H F; Covas, D T; Fontes, A M

    2017-01-01

    Tumor expansion is dependent on neovascularization, a process that requires sustained new vessel formation. Although the critical role of angiogenesis by endothelial sprouting in this process, controversy still prevails on whether angiogenesis involving bone marrow-derived endothelial cells, does contribute to this process. This study aims to evaluate the recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells by the melanoma tumor, including endothelial cells, and if they contribute to angiogenesis. A chimeric mouse model of GFP bone marrow was used to induce melanoma tumors derived from murine B16-F10 cell line. These tumors were evaluated for the presence of myeloid cells (CD11b), T lymphocytes (CD3, CD4 and CD8) and endothelial cells (VEGFR2 and CD31) derived from bone marrow. Mice transplanted with GFP+ cells showed significant bone marrow chimerism (90.9 ± 0.87 %) when compared to the GFP transgenic mice (90.66 ± 2.1 %, p = 0.83) demonstrating successful engraftment of donor bone marrow stem/progenitor cells. Analysis of the murine melanoma tumor showed the presence of donor cells in the tumors (3.5 ± 1.7 %) and interestingly, these cells represent endothelial cells (CD31+ cells; 11.5 ± 6.85 %) and myeloid cells (CD11b+ cells; 80 ± 21 %), but also tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (CD8+ T cells, 13.31 ± 0.2 %; CD4+ T-cells, 2.1 ± 1.2 %). Examination of the tumor endothelium by confocal microscopy suggests the presence of donor CD31+/GFP+ cells in the wall of some blood vessels. This study demonstrates that bone marrow-derived cells are recruited by the murine melanoma tumor, with myeloid cells and CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes migrating as antitumor immune response, and endothelial cells participating of the tumor blood vessels formation.

  5. Donor age and cell passage affects differentiation potential of murine bone marrow-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D; Jin, Yu-Qing; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie; Hong, Tan-Hui; Zhou, Guangdong; Baggett, L Scott; Mikos, Antonios G; Cao, Yilin

    2008-01-01

    Background Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are a widely researched adult stem cell population capable of differentiation into various lineages. Because many promising applications of tissue engineering require cell expansion following harvest and involve the treatment of diseases and conditions found in an aging population, the effect of donor age and ex vivo handling must be understood in order to develop clinical techniques and therapeutics based on these cells. Furthermore, there currently exists little understanding as to how these two factors may be influenced by one another. Results Differences in the adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation capacity of murine MSCs harvested from donor animals of different age and number of passages of these cells were observed. Cells from younger donors adhered to tissue culture polystyrene better and proliferated in greater number than those from older animals. Chondrogenic and osteogenic potential decreased with age for each group, and adipogenic differentiation decreased only in cells from the oldest donors. Significant decreases in differentiation potentials due to passage were observed as well for osteogenesis of BMSCs from the youngest donors and chondrogenesis of the cells from the oldest donors. Conclusion Both increasing age and the number of passages have lineage dependent effects on BMSC differentiation potential. Furthermore, there is an obvious interplay between donor age and cell passage that in the future must be accounted for when developing cell-based therapies for clinical use. PMID:18957087

  6. Multipotent adult progenitor cells from bone marrow differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert E.; Reyes, Morayma; Koodie, Lisa; Jiang, Yuehua; Blackstad, Mark; Lund, Troy; Lenvik, Todd; Johnson, Sandra; Hu, Wei-Shou; Verfaillie, Catherine M.

    2002-01-01

    We have derived from normal human, mouse, and rat postnatal bone marrow primitive, multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) that can differentiate into most mesodermal cells and neuroectodermal cells in vitro and into all embryonic lineages in vivo. Here, we show that MAPCs can also differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rat MAPCs, cultured on Matrigel with FGF-4 and HGF, differentiated into epithelioid cells that expressed hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β (HNF-3β), GATA4, cytokeratin 19 (CK19), transthyretin, and α-fetoprotein by day 7, and expressed CK18, HNF-4, and HNF-1α on days 14–28. Virtually all human, as well as a majority of rodent cells stained positive for albumin and CK18 on day 21; 5% (rodent) to 25% (human) cells were binucleated by day 21. These cells also acquired functional characteristics of hepatocytes: they secreted urea and albumin, had phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome p450, could take up LDL, and stored glycogen. MAPCs, which can be expanded in vitro and maintained in an undifferentiated state for more than 100 population doublings, can thus differentiate into cells with morphological, phenotypic, and functional characteristics of hepatocytes. MAPCs may therefore be an ideal cell for in vivo therapies for liver disorders or for use in bioartificial liver devices. PMID:12021244

  7. Bone Marrow B cell Precursor Number after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation and GVHD Development

    PubMed Central

    Fedoriw, Yuri; Samulski, T. Danielle; Deal, Allison M.; Dunphy, Cherie H.; Sharf, Andrew; Shea, Thomas C.; Serody, Jonathan S.; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    Patients without chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) have robust B cell reconstitution and are able to maintain B cell homeostasis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To determine whether B lymphopoiesis differs before cGVHD develops, we examined bone marrow (BM) biopsies for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and PAX5 immunostaining early post-HSCTat day 30 when all patients have been shown to have high B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels. We found significantly greater numbers of BM B cell precursors in patients who did not develop cGVHD compared with those who developed cGVHD (median = 44 vs 2 cells/high powered field [hpf]; respectively; P < .001). Importantly, a significant increase in precursor B cells was maintained when patients receiving high-dose steroid therapy were excluded (median = 49 vs 20 cells/hpf; P =.017). Thus, we demonstrate the association of BM B cell production capacity in human GVHD development. Increased BM precursor B cell number may serve to predict good clinical outcome after HSCT. PMID:22446015

  8. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Li, Zheng-Wei; Luo, Min; Li, Ya-Jun; Zhang, Ke-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better regeneration was

  9. Culturing bone marrow cells with dexamethasone and ascorbic acid improves osteogenic cell sheet structure.

    PubMed

    Akahane, M; Shimizu, T; Kira, T; Onishi, T; Uchihara, Y; Imamura, T; Tanaka, Y

    2016-11-01

    To assess the structure and extracellular matrix molecule expression of osteogenic cell sheets created via culture in medium with both dexamethasone (Dex) and ascorbic acid phosphate (AscP) compared either Dex or AscP alone. Osteogenic cell sheets were prepared by culturing rat bone marrow stromal cells in a minimal essential medium (MEM), MEM with AscP, MEM with Dex, and MEM with Dex and AscP (Dex/AscP). The cell number and messenger (m)RNA expression were assessed in vitro, and the appearance of the cell sheets was observed after mechanical retrieval using a scraper. β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) was then wrapped with the cell sheets from the four different groups and subcutaneously implanted into rats. After mechanical retrieval, the osteogenic cell sheets from the MEM, MEM with AscP, and MEM with Dex groups appeared to be fragmented or incomplete structures. The cell sheets cultured with Dex/AscP remained intact after mechanical retrieval, without any identifiable tears. Culture with Dex/AscP increased the mRNA and protein expression of extracellular matrix proteins and cell number compared with those of the other three groups. More bridging bone formation was observed after transplantation of the β-TCP scaffold wrapped with cell sheets cultured with Dex/AscP, than in the other groups. These results suggest that culture with Dex/AscP improves the mechanical integrity of the osteogenic cell sheets, allowing retrieval of the confluent cells in a single cell sheet structure. This method may be beneficial when applied in cases of difficult tissue reconstruction, such as nonunion, bone defects, and osteonecrosis.Cite this article: M. Akahane, T. Shimizu, T. Kira, T. Onishi, Y. Uchihara, T. Imamura, Y. Tanaka. Culturing bone marrow cells with dexamethasone and ascorbic acid improves osteogenic cell sheet structure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:569-576. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0013.R1. © 2016 Akahane et al.

  10. Culturing bone marrow cells with dexamethasone and ascorbic acid improves osteogenic cell sheet structure

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, T.; Kira, T.; Onishi, T.; Uchihara, Y.; Imamura, T.; Tanaka, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the structure and extracellular matrix molecule expression of osteogenic cell sheets created via culture in medium with both dexamethasone (Dex) and ascorbic acid phosphate (AscP) compared either Dex or AscP alone. Methods Osteogenic cell sheets were prepared by culturing rat bone marrow stromal cells in a minimal essential medium (MEM), MEM with AscP, MEM with Dex, and MEM with Dex and AscP (Dex/AscP). The cell number and messenger (m)RNA expression were assessed in vitro, and the appearance of the cell sheets was observed after mechanical retrieval using a scraper. β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) was then wrapped with the cell sheets from the four different groups and subcutaneously implanted into rats. Results After mechanical retrieval, the osteogenic cell sheets from the MEM, MEM with AscP, and MEM with Dex groups appeared to be fragmented or incomplete structures. The cell sheets cultured with Dex/AscP remained intact after mechanical retrieval, without any identifiable tears. Culture with Dex/AscP increased the mRNA and protein expression of extracellular matrix proteins and cell number compared with those of the other three groups. More bridging bone formation was observed after transplantation of the β-TCP scaffold wrapped with cell sheets cultured with Dex/AscP, than in the other groups. Conclusions These results suggest that culture with Dex/AscP improves the mechanical integrity of the osteogenic cell sheets, allowing retrieval of the confluent cells in a single cell sheet structure. This method may be beneficial when applied in cases of difficult tissue reconstruction, such as nonunion, bone defects, and osteonecrosis. Cite this article: M. Akahane, T. Shimizu, T. Kira, T. Onishi, Y. Uchihara, T. Imamura, Y. Tanaka. Culturing bone marrow cells with dexamethasone and ascorbic acid improves osteogenic cell sheet structure. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:569–576. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.511.BJR-2016-0013.R1. PMID:27881440

  11. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  12. Mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells inhibit leukemia/lymphoma cell proliferation in vitro and in a mouse model of allogeneic bone marrow transplant.

    PubMed

    Song, Ningxia; Gao, Lei; Qiu, Huiying; Huang, Chongmei; Cheng, Hui; Zhou, Hong; Lv, Shuqing; Chen, Li; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-07-01

    The allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contributes to the reconstitution of hematopoiesis by ameliorating acute graft‑versus‑host disease (aGVHD). However, the role of MSCs in graft‑versus‑leukemia remains to be determined. In the present study, we co‑cultured C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow (BM)‑derived MSCs with A20 murine B lymphoma, FBL3 murine erythroleukemia and P388 murine acute lymphocytic leukemia cells. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and the amount of cytokine secretion were then measured using a Cell Counting kit‑8, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. We also established a model of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using BALB/c mice. Following the administration of A20 cells and MSCs, we recorded the symptoms and the survival of the mice for 4 weeks, assessed the T cell subsets present in peripheral blood, and, after the mice were sacrifice, we determined the infiltration of MSCs into the organs by histological staining. Our results revealed that the MSCs inhibited the proliferation of the mouse lymphoma and leukemia cells in vitro, leading to cell cycle arrest and reducing the secretion of interleukin (IL)‑10. In our model of allogeneic BMT, the intravenous injection of MSCs into the mice injected wth A20 cells decreased the incidence of lymphoma, improved survival, increased the fraction of CD3+CD8+ T cells, decreased the fraction of CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD4+CD25+ T cells in peripheral blood, and ameliorated the manifestation of aGVHD. The results from the present study indicate that MSCs may be safe and effective when used in allogeneic BMT for the treatment of hemotological malignancies.

  13. Origins and Properties of Dental, Thymic, and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Cells and Their Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Komada, Yukiya; Yamane, Toshiyuki; Kadota, Daiji; Isono, Kana; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal cells arise from the neural crest (NC) or mesoderm. However, it is difficult to distinguish NC-derived cells from mesoderm-derived cells. Using double-transgenic mouse systems encoding P0-Cre, Wnt1-Cre, Mesp1-Cre, and Rosa26EYFP, which enabled us to trace NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells as YFP-expressing cells, we demonstrated for the first time that both NC-derived (P0- or Wnt1-labeled) and mesoderm-derived (Mesp1-labeled) cells contribute to the development of dental, thymic, and bone marrow (BM) mesenchyme from the fetal stage to the adult stage. Irrespective of the tissues involved, NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells contributed mainly to perivascular cells and endothelial cells, respectively. Dental and thymic mesenchyme were composed of either NC-derived or mesoderm-derived cells, whereas half of the BM mesenchyme was composed of cells that were not derived from the NC or mesoderm. However, a colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay indicated that CFU-Fs in the dental pulp, thymus, and BM were composed of NC-derived and mesoderm-derived cells. Secondary CFU-F assays were used to estimate the self-renewal potential, which showed that CFU-Fs in the teeth, thymus, and BM were entirely NC-derived cells, entirely mesoderm-derived cells, and mostly NC-derived cells, respectively. Colony formation was inhibited drastically by the addition of anti-platelet–derived growth factor receptor-β antibody, regardless of the tissue and its origin. Furthermore, dental mesenchyme expressed genes encoding critical hematopoietic factors, such as interleukin-7, stem cell factor, and cysteine-X-cysteine (CXC) chemokine ligand 12, which supports the differentiation of B lymphocytes and osteoclasts. Therefore, the mesenchymal stem cells found in these tissues had different origins, but similar properties in each organ. PMID:23185234

  14. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  15. A gravimetric simplified method for nucleated marrow cell counting using an injection needle.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Toshiki; Fang, Liu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi

    2005-08-01

    A simplified gravimetric marrow cell counting method for rats is proposed for a regular screening method. After fresh bone marrow was aspirated by an injection needle, the marrow cells were suspended in carbonate buffered saline. The nucleated marrow cell count (NMC) was measured by an automated multi-blood cell analyzer. When this gravimetric method was applied to rats, the NMC of the left and right femurs had essentially identical values due to careful handling. The NMC at 4 to 10 weeks of age in male and female Crj:CD(SD)IGS rats was 2.72 to 1.96 and 2.75 to 1.98 (x10(6) counts/mg), respectively. More useful information for evaluation could be obtained by using this gravimetric method in addition to myelogram examination. However, some difficulties with this method include low NMC due to blood contamination and variation of NMC due to handling. Therefore, the utility of this gravimetric method for screening will be clarified by the accumulation of the data on myelotoxicity studies with this method.

  16. Elevated marrow inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in subchondral osteosclerosis in human knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Jeroen; Patel, Amit; Hirschmann, Michael T; Pagenstert, Geert I; Müller-Gerbl, Magdalena; Valderrabano, Victor; Hügle, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Subchondral osteosclerosis, characterized by an increase of hypomineralized bone material, is a pathological hallmark of osteoarthritis. The cellular components in the subchondral marrow compartment that participate in this aberrant bone remodeling process remain to be elucidated. This study assessed the presence of marrow inflammatory cells and their relative abundance between nonsclerotic and sclerotic tissues in knee osteoarthritis. Bone samples from osteoarthritic knee tibial plateaus were stratified for histological analyses using computed tomography osteoabsorptiometry. Immunohistological analysis revealed the presence of CD20 (B-lymphocyte) and CD68 (macrophage), but not CD3 (T-lymphocyte) immunoreactive mononuclear cells in subchondral marrow tissues and their relative abundance was significantly increased in sclerotic compared with nonsclerotic bone samples. Multinucleated osteoclasts that stained positive for CD68 and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, predominantly associated with CD34-positive blood vessels and their abundance was strongly increased in sclerotic samples. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase activity in outgrowth osteoblasts was induced by conditioned medium from nonsclerotic, but not sclerotic, bone pieces. These results suggest that an interaction between bone-resident cells and marrow inflammatory cells might play a role in aberrant bone remodeling leading to subchondral osteosclerosis. Elevated osteoclast activity in sclerotic bone suggests that bone formation and resorption activities are increased, yet uncoupled, in human knee osteoarthritis.

  17. The marrow niche controls the cancer stem cell phenotype of disseminated prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Berry, Janice E.; Eber, Matthew R.; Jung, Younghun; Yumoto, Kenji; Cackowski, Frank C.; Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Parsana, Princy; Mehra, Rohit; Wang, Jingcheng; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Nagrath, Sunitha; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2016-01-01

    Dissemination of cancer stem cells (CSCs) serves as the basis of metastasis. Recently, we demonstrated that circulating prostate cancer targets the hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) ‘niche’ in marrow during dissemination. Once in the niche, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) may remain dormant for extended periods. As the major function of the HSC niche is to maintain stem cell functions, we hypothesized that the niche regulates CSC activities of DTCs. Here we show that DTCs recovered from