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Sample records for marrow stromal osteoblast

  1. Effects of biodegradable polymer particles on rat marrow-derived stromal osteoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wake, M C; Gerecht, P D; Lu, L; Mikos, A G

    1998-07-01

    Effects of biodegradable particles of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) 50/50 with diameter ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 microm on rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in vitro have been investigated over a period of 28 days. This study examined the effects of three particle parameters, concentration, polymer molecular weight, and composition, on osteoblast proliferation and function. Cell cultures were challenged with particles at two different time points: upon cell seeding (Day 1), and after cells had begun to establish their own mineralized extracellular matrix (Day 14). The most significant trend observed in those cultures challenged with particles beginning on Day 1 was due to increasing the concentration of particles, resulting in decreased [3H]-thymidine incorporation, cell count, and mineralization. Those cultures challenged with particles beginning on Day 14 were significantly more mineralized than those challenged with particles beginning on Day 1. In addition, increasing osteocalcin secretion confirmed the osteoblastic phenotype of the derived stromal cells. These studies suggest that the particles may affect the bone remodeling process surrounding a degrading implant by direct interaction with osteoblasts in addition to their indirect contributions to the inflammatory mechanism via mediators secreted by macrophages upon their phagocytosis.

  2. TGF-beta1 release from biodegradable polymer microparticles: its effects on marrow stromal osteoblast function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, L.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controlled release of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) to a bone defect may be beneficial for the induction of a bone regeneration cascade. The objectives of this work were to assess the feasibility of using biodegradable polymer microparticles as carriers for controlled TGF-beta1 delivery and the effects of released TGF-beta1 on the proliferation and differentiation of marrow stromal cells in vitro. METHODS: Recombinant human TGF-beta1 was incorporated into microparticles of blends of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Fluorescein isothiocynate-labeled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) was co-encapsulated as a porogen. The effects of PEG content (0, 1, or 5% by weight [wt%]) and buffer pH (3, 5, or 7.4) on the protein release kinetics and the degradation of PLGA were determined in vitro for as long as 28 days. Rat marrow stromal cells were seeded on a biodegradable poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) substrate. The dose response and biological activity of released TGF-beta1 was determined after 3 days in culture. The effects of TGF-beta1 released from PLGA/PEG microparticles on marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation were assessed during a 21-day period. RESULTS: TGF-beta1 was encapsulated along with FITC-BSA into PLGA/PEG blend microparticles and released in a multiphasic fashion including an initial burst for as long as 28 days in vitro. Increasing the initial PEG content resulted in a decreased cumulative mass of released proteins. Aggregation of FITC-BSA occurred at lower buffer pH, which led to decreased release rates of both proteins. The degradation of PLGA was increased at higher PEG content and significantly accelerated at acidic pH conditions. Rat marrow stromal cells cultured on PPF substrates showed a dose response to TGF-beta1 released from the microparticles similar to that of added TGF-beta1, indicating that the activity of TGF-beta1 was retained during microparticle

  3. Osteochondral interface generation by rabbit bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts coculture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Teh, Thomas Kok Hiong; Ravi, Sujata; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2012-09-01

    Physiological osteochondral interface regeneration is a significant challenge. This study aims to investigate the effect of the coculture of chondrogenic rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) with rabbit osteoblasts in a specially designed two-dimensional (2D)-three-dimensional (3D) co-interface culture to develop the intermediate osteochondral region in vitro. The 2D-3D coculture system was set up by first independently culturing chondrogenic rBMSCs on a scaffold and osteoblasts in cell culture plates, and subsequently placed in contact and cocultured. As control, samples not cocultured with osteoblasts were used. The regulatory effects exerted by osteoblasts on chondrogenic rBMSCs were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. To study the effect of coculture on cells located in different parts of the scaffold, samples were separated into two parts and significantly different gene expression patterns were found between them. In comparison with the control group, a significant moderate downregulation of chondrogenic marker genes, such as Collagen II and Aggrecan was observed. However, the Sox-9 and Collagen I expression increased. More importantly, chondrogenic rBMSCs in the coculture system were shown to form the osteochondral interface layer by expressing calcified cartilage zone specific extracellular matrix marker Collagen X and the hypertrophic chondrocyte marker MMP-13, which were not observed in the control group. Specifically, only the chondrogenic rBMSC layer in contact with the osteoblasts expressed Collagen X and MMP-13, indicating the positive influence of the coculture upon interface formation. Biochemical analyses, histology results, and immunohistochemical staining further supported this observation. In conclusion, this study revealed that specific regulatory stimulations from osteoblasts in the 2D-3D interface coculture system could induce the formation of ostochondral interface for the purpose of osteochondral tissue engineering.

  4. In vitro growth and osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells supported by autologous plasma.

    PubMed

    Schecroun, N; Delloye, Ch

    2004-08-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells have been proposed as an adjuvant in the treatment of bone nonunion. This cell therapy requires the establishment of culture conditions that permit the rapid expansion of these cells ex vivo while retaining their potential for further differentiation. Several culture models have been proposed, all of them using fetal calf serum (FCS) as a source of growth factors. This is problematic for subsequent autologous implantation because of possible disease transmission. Here we report the establishment and characterization of a cell culture system in which standard FCS has been replaced by autologous plasma recovered from bone marrow (APM). Short-term cultures of human bone marrow stromal (HBMS) cells grown in mineralizing conditions with APM exhibited a significantly higher number of ALP-positive colonies than those grown with FCS, indicating an enhanced ability of APM to recruit osteoprogenitor cells for culture. Analyses of long-term cultures showed that the use of APM did not affect cell proliferation as cell number at confluence and proliferation rate were similar whether primary cultures had been maintained with APM or FCS. In first-passage cultures, an osteoblastic differentiation was observed in both cases as the cells expressed ALP and formed mineralized bone-like nodules. We noted that the age of donor had a negative effect on the number of osteoprogenitor cells recruited for culture. This effect had an impact on proliferation rate in primary cultures performed with APM, although the cell number obtained after expansion remained independent of age. Our study shows that proliferative capacity and osteoblastic differentiation potential of HBMS cells are maintained when cultured with APM. Thus, this cell culture system could provide a new and safer tool to elaborate an autologous cell therapy designed to enhance osteogenesis.

  5. Dexamethasone induction of osteoblast mRNAs in rat marrow stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Leboy, P S; Beresford, J N; Devlin, C; Owen, M E

    1991-03-01

    We have examined the ability of dexamethasone, retinoic acid, and vitamin D3 to induce osteogenic differentiation in rat marrow stromal cell cultures by measuring the expression of mRNAs associated with the differentiated osteoblast phenotype as well as analyzing collagen secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity. Marrow cells were cultured for 8 days in primary culture and 8 days in secondary culture, with and without 10 nM dexamethasone or 1 microM retinoic acid. Under all conditions, cultures produced high levels of osteonectin mRNA. Cells grown with dexamethasone in both primary and secondary culture contained elevated alkaline phosphatase mRNA and significant amounts of type I collagen and osteopontin mRNA. Addition of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 to these dexamethasone-treated cultures induced expression of osteocalcin mRNA and increased osteopontin mRNA. The levels of alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin mRNAs in Dex/Dex/VitD3 cultures were comparable to those of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-treated ROS 17/2.8 osteosarcoma cells. Omitting dexamethasone from either primary or secondary culture resulted in significantly less alkaline phosphatase mRNA, little osteopontin mRNA, and no osteocalcin mRNA. Retinoic acid increased alkaline phosphatase activity to a greater extent than did dexamethasone but did not have a parallel effect on the expression of alkaline phosphatase mRNA and induced neither osteopontin or osteocalcin mRNAs. In all conditions, marrow stromal cells synthesized and secreted a mixture of type I and III collagens. However, dexamethasone-treated cells also synthesized an additional collagen type, provisionally identified as type V. The synthesis and secretion of collagens type I and III was decreased by both dexamethasone and retinoic acid. Neither dexamethasone nor retinoic acid induced mRNAs associated with the chondrogenic phenotype. We conclude that dexamethasone, but not retinoic acid, promotes the expression of markers of the

  6. BST2 Mediates Osteoblast Differentiation via the BMP2 Signaling Pathway in Human Alveolar-Derived Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lim, Hyun-Dae; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Eui-Sic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem cells into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) influences differentiation toward the osteoblasts lineage. BST2 mRNA expression in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) increased during differentiation into osteoblasts. hAD-BMSCs differentiation into osteoblasts and the mRNA expression of the bone-specific markers alkaline phosphatase, collagen type α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were reduced by BST2 knockdown using siRNA. Furthermore, BST2 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs resulted in decreased RUNX2 mRNA and protein expression. We hypothesized that BST2 is involved in differentiation of into osteoblasts via the BMP2 signaling pathway. Accordingly, we evaluated the mRNA expression levels of BMP2, BMP receptors (BMPR1 and 2), and the downstream signaling molecules SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in BST2 knockdown cells. BMP2 expression following the induction of differentiation was significantly lower in BST2 knockdown cells than in cells treated with a non-targeting control siRNA. Similar results were found for the knockdown of the BMP2 receptor- BMPR1A. We also identified significantly lower expression of SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in the BST2 knockdown cells than control cells. Our data provide the first evidence that BST2 is involved in the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells via the regulation of the BMP2 signaling pathway. PMID:27359105

  7. BST2 Mediates Osteoblast Differentiation via the BMP2 Signaling Pathway in Human Alveolar-Derived Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Su-Hyang; Kim, Jae Goo; Kim, Beom-Su; Lee, Jun; Pi, Sung-Hee; Lim, Hyun-Dae; Shin, Hong-In; Cho, Eui-Sic; You, Hyung-Keun

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling the differentiation of bone marrow stromal stem cells into osteoblasts remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST2) influences differentiation toward the osteoblasts lineage. BST2 mRNA expression in human alveolar-derived bone marrow stromal cells (hAD-BMSCs) increased during differentiation into osteoblasts. hAD-BMSCs differentiation into osteoblasts and the mRNA expression of the bone-specific markers alkaline phosphatase, collagen type α 1, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osterix were reduced by BST2 knockdown using siRNA. Furthermore, BST2 knockdown in hAD-BMSCs resulted in decreased RUNX2 mRNA and protein expression. We hypothesized that BST2 is involved in differentiation of into osteoblasts via the BMP2 signaling pathway. Accordingly, we evaluated the mRNA expression levels of BMP2, BMP receptors (BMPR1 and 2), and the downstream signaling molecules SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in BST2 knockdown cells. BMP2 expression following the induction of differentiation was significantly lower in BST2 knockdown cells than in cells treated with a non-targeting control siRNA. Similar results were found for the knockdown of the BMP2 receptor- BMPR1A. We also identified significantly lower expression of SMAD1, SMAD4, and p-SMAD1/5/8 in the BST2 knockdown cells than control cells. Our data provide the first evidence that BST2 is involved in the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells via the regulation of the BMP2 signaling pathway.

  8. The effect of different implant biomaterials on the behavior of canine bone marrow stromal cells during their differentiation into osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Şen, B H; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of different implant biomaterials on cultured canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) undergoing differentiation into osteoblasts (dBMSC). BMSC were isolated from canine humerus by marrow aspiration, cultured and differentiated on calcium phosphate scaffold (CPS), hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite in gel form and titanium mesh. We used the MTT method to determine the effects of osteogenic media on proliferation. The characteristics of dBMSC were assessed using alizarin red (AR), immunocytochemistry and osteoblastic markers including alkaline phosphatase/von Kossa (ALP/VK), osteocalcin (OC) and osteonectin (ON), and ELISA. The morphology of dBMSC on the biomaterials was investigated using inverted phase contrast microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. We detected expression of ALP/VK, AR, OC and ON by day 7 of culture; expression increased from day 14 until day 21. CPS supported the best adhesion, cell spreading, proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. The effects of the biomaterials depended on their surface properties. Expression of osteoblastic markers showed that canine dBMSCs became functional osteoblasts. Tissue engineered stem cells can be useful clinically for autologous implants for treating bone wounds.

  9. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  10. A cost-effective method to enhance adenoviral transduction of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Buo, Atum M; Williams, Mark S; Kerr, Jaclyn P; Stains, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    We report here a method for the use of poly-l-lysine (PLL) to markedly improve the adenoviral transduction efficiency of primary murine osteoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in culture and in situ, which are typically difficult to transduce. We show by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry that the addition of PLL to the viral-containing medium significantly increases the number of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-positive osteoblasts and BMSCs transduced with an enhanced GFP-expressing adenovirus. We also demonstrate that PLL can greatly enhance the adenoviral transduction of osteoblasts and osteocytes in situ in ex vivo tibia and calvaria, as well as in long bone fragments. In addition, we validate that PLL can improve routine adenoviral transduction studies by permitting the use of low multiplicities of infection to obtain the desired biologic effect. Ultimately, the use of PLL to facilitate adenoviral gene transfer in osteogenic cells can provide a cost-effective means of performing efficient gene transfer studies in the context of bone research. PMID:27547486

  11. Marrow stromal osteoblast function on a poly(propylene fumarate)/beta-tricalcium phosphate biodegradable orthopaedic composite.

    PubMed

    Peter, S J; Lu, L; Kim, D J; Mikos, A G

    2000-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the osteoconductivity of a poly(propylene fumarate)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (PPF/beta-TCP) composite in vitro. We examined whether primary rat marrow stromal cells would attach, proliferate, and express differentiated osteoblastic function when seeded on PPF/beta-TCP substrates. Attachment studies showed that a confluent monolayer of cells had adhered to the substrates within an 8 h time frame for marrow stromal cells seeded at confluent numbers. Proliferation and differentiated function of the cells were then investigated for a period of 4 weeks for an initial seeding density of 42,000 cells/cm2. Rapid proliferation during the first 24 h as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation was mirrored by an initial rapid increase in total cell number by DNA assay. A lower proliferation rate and a gradual increase in cell number persisted for the remainder of the study, resulting in a final cell number of 128,000 cells/cm2. Differentiated cell function was assessed by measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OC) production throughout the time course. Both markers of osteoblastic differentiation increased significantly over a 4-week period. By day 28, cells grown on PPF/beta-TCP reached a maximal ALP activity of 11 (+/- 1) x 10(-7) micromol/min/cell, while the OC production reached 40 (+/- 1) x 10(-6) ng/cell. These data show that a PPF/beta-TCP composite exhibits in vitro osteoconductivity similar to or better than that of control tissue culture polystyrene.

  12. Bone marrow stromal/stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles regulate osteoblast activity and differentiation in vitro and promote bone regeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yunhao; Wang, Lian; Gao, Zhengliang; Chen, Genyin; Zhang, Changqing

    2016-02-25

    Emerging evidence suggests that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are secreted by diverse tissues and play important roles in cell-cell communication, organ interactions and tissue homeostasis. Studies have reported the use of EVs to stimulate tissue regeneration, such as hepatic cell regeneration, and to treat diseases, such as pulmonary hypertension. However, little is known about the osteogenic effect of EVs. In this study, we explore the role of bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs in the regulation of osteoblast activity and bone regeneration. We isolated bone marrow stromal/stem cell (BMSC)-derived EVs through gradient ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration, and tested the influence of the EVs on osteogenesis both in vivo and in vitro. The results indicated that EVs positively regulated osteogenic genes and osteoblastic differentiation but did not inhibit proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, we constructed an EVs delivery system to stimulate bone formation in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with calvarial defects. We found that BMSC-derived EVs led to more bone formation in the critical-size calvarial bone defects. Moreover, we found that miR-196a plays an essential role in the regulation of osteoblastic differentiation and the expression of osteogenic genes. We anticipate that our assay using bone marrow stromal cell-derived EVs will become a valuable tool for promoting bone regeneration.

  13. Up-regulation of BMP2/4 signaling increases both osteoblast-specific marker expression and bone marrow adipogenesis in Gja1Jrt/+ stromal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Zappitelli, Tanya; Chen, Frieda; Aubin, Jane E

    2015-03-01

    Gja1(Jrt)/+ mice carry a mutation in one allele of the gap junction protein α1 gene (Gja1), resulting in a G60S connexin 43 (Cx43) mutant protein that is dominant negative for Cx43 protein production of <50% of wild-type (WT) levels and significantly reduced gap junction formation and function in osteoblasts and other Cx43-expressing cells. Previously we reported that Gja1(Jrt)/+ mice exhibited early-onset osteopenia caused by activation of osteoclasts secondary to activation of osteoblast lineage cells, which expressed increased RANKL and produced an abnormal resorption-stimulating bone matrix high in BSP content. Gja1(Jrt)/+ mice also displayed early and progressive bone marrow atrophy, with a significant increase in bone marrow adiposity versus WT littermates but no increase in adipose tissues elsewhere in the body. BMP2/4 production and signaling were increased in Gja1(Jrt)/+ trabecular bone and osteogenic stromal cell cultures, which contributed to the up-regulated expression of osteoblast-specific markers (e.g., Bsp and Ocn) in Gja1(Jrt)/+ osteoblasts and increased Pparg2 expression in bone marrow-derived adipoprogenitors in vitro. The elevated levels of BMP2/4 signaling in G60S Cx43-containing cells resulted at least in part from elevated levels of cAMP. We conclude that up-regulation of BMP2/4 signaling in trabecular bone and/or stromal cells increases osteoblast-specific marker expression in hyperactive Gja1(Jrt)/+ osteoblasts and may also increase bone marrow adipogenesis by up-regulation of Pparg2 in the Cx43-deficient Gja1(Jrt)/+ mouse model.

  14. Development of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, degradable polymeric carrier for osteogenic cell populations. Part 1. Encapsulation of marrow stromal osteoblasts in surface crosslinked gelatin microparticles.

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard G; Yaszemski, Michael J; Yasko, Alan W; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the temporary encapsulation of rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in surface crosslinked gelatin microparticles. Cells were encapsulated in uncrosslinked gelatin microparticles of average diameter of 630 microm containing approximately 53 cells. Gelatin microparticles were crosslinked to shell thicknesses of approximately 75 microm via exposure to 1 mM dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) solution for 15 min or 5 mm DSP solution for 5 min for the production of microparticles dispersing approximately 60 min after placement into a physiologic fluid at 37 degrees C. Formed microparticles were placed into culture wells at a cell seeding density of 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm2 and, following the degradation and/or dissolution of gelatin, the cells were cultured in the presence of osteogenic supplements for 28 days. Samples were taken at specified time points and analyzed by a DNA assay for cell number and a 3H-thymidine incorporation assay for proliferative potential. Samples were also obtained and analyzed at several time points by alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and mineralization assays for early and late phenotypic expression markers of osteoblastic differentiation. The measurements from the different assays for encapsulated cells (EC) in uncrosslinked and crosslinked gelatin microparticles were normalized with the cell numbers from the DNA assay and compared with those for nonencapsulated control cells. The results demonstrated that the marrow stromal cells survived the encapsulation procedure in uncrosslinked gelatin microparticles and also retained their proliferative potential and osteoblastic phenotype over a 28 day period, although at a slightly lower level than the nonencapsulated cells. The results further showed that the marrow stromal cells survived the encapsulation in crosslinked gelatin microparticles prepared via exposure to 5mm DSP for 5 min and also retained their proliferative potential and osteoblastic phenotype over a 28 day

  15. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering. PMID:12242339

  16. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering.

  17. Osteoblastic phenotype of rat marrow stromal cells cultured in the presence of dexamethasone, beta-glycerolphosphate, and L-ascorbic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter, S. J.; Liang, C. R.; Kim, D. J.; Widmer, M. S.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the time course of addition of osteogenic supplements dexamethasone, beta-glycerolphosphate, and L-ascorbic acid to rat marrow stromal cells, and the exposure time on the proliferation and differentiation of the cells. It was the goal of these experiments to determine the time point for supplement addition to optimize marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation. To determine this, two studies were performed; one study was based on the age of the cells from harvest, and the other study was based on the duration of exposure to supplemented medium. Cells were seen to proliferate rapidly at early time points in the presence and absence of osteogenic supplements as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of replicating cells. These results were supported by cell counts ascertained through total DNA analysis. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin production at 21 days were highest for both experimental designs when the cells were exposed to supplemented medium immediately upon harvest. The ALP levels at 21 days were six times greater for cells maintained in supplements throughout than for control cells cultured in the absence of supplements for both studies, reaching an absolute value of 75 x 10(-7) micromole/min/cell. Osteocalcin production reached 20 x 10(-6) ng/cell at 21 days in both studies for cells maintained in supplemented medium throughout the study, whereas the control cells produced an insignificant amount of osteocalcin. These results suggest that the addition of osteogenic supplements to marrow-derived cells early in the culture period did not inhibit proliferation and greatly enhanced the osteoblastic phenotype of cells in a rat model.

  18. The effects of retinoic acid on reversing the adipocyte differentiation into an osteoblastic tendency in ST2 cells, a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Woo, J T; Nagai, K

    2001-07-01

    Although the mouse bone marrow stromal cell line ST2 has been known to be differentiated into osteoblasts, the differentiation characteristics of the cell into adipocyte and the concerned relationship between its adipogenesis and osteogenesis remains unknown. The adipogenic induction medium which is made up of insulin, dexamethasone (DEX) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine(IBMX), stimulated the expression of n early adipogenic marker PPAR gamma and a late marker GPDH in ST2 cells. The triglyceride accumulation and lipid stain level generated by the induction medium in ST2 cells was inhibited by RA with IC(50) at about 1 nM. The induction medium up-regulated expression of PPARgamma and GPDH was also inhibited by RA whereas RA (30 nM) exterted no effect on the cell growth. Interestingly, treatment of the cells with induction medium in the presense of RA caused a 3- or 10-fold higher in ALP activity respectively as compared to those treated with RA or the induction medium alone. RT-PCR analysis showed that such a synergistic effect of RA and the induction medium paralleled the process of inhibition on adipogenesis. Additional experiments showed that IBMX played a key role in increasing the effect of RA and ALP activity. Our results suggested that the relationship between adipogenesis and osteogenesis in ST2 cells was reciprocally interrelated and the process of adipogenesis could be potentially reversed into an osteoblastogenic tendency. This is the first report demonstrating that RA transforms adipogenic potential into an osteoblastic tendency.

  19. Effects of transforming growth factor beta1 released from biodegradable polymer microparticles on marrow stromal osteoblasts cultured on poly(propylene fumarate) substrates.

    PubMed

    Peter, S J; Lu, L; Kim, D J; Stamatas, G N; Miller, M J; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    2000-06-05

    Recombinant human transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) was incorporated into microparticles of blends of poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to create a delivery vehicle for the growth factor. The entrapment efficiency of TGF-beta1 in the microparticles containing 5% PEG was 40.3 +/- 1.2% for a TGF-beta1 loading density of 6.0 ng/1 mg of microparticles. For the same loading, 17.9 +/- 0.6 and 32.1 +/- 2.5% of the loaded TGF-beta1 was released after 1 and 8 days, respectively, followed by a plateau for the remaining 3 weeks. Rat marrow stromal cells showed a dose response to TGF-beta1 released from the microparticles similar to that of added TGF-beta1, indicating the activity of TGF-beta1 was retained during microparticle fabrication and after TGF-beta1 release. An optimal TGF-beta1 dosage of 1.0 ng/mL was determined through a 3-day dose response study for maximal alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The TGF-beta1 released from the microparticles loaded with 6.0 ng TGF-beta1/1 mg of microparticles for the optimal dosage of TGF-beta1 enhanced the proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation of marrow stromal cells cultured on poly(propylene fumarate) substrates. The cells showed significantly increased total cell number, ALP activity, and osteocalcin production with values reaching 138,700 +/- 3300 cells/cm(2), 22.8 +/- 1.5 x 10(-7) micromol/min/cell, and 15.9 +/- 1.5 x 10(-6) ng/cell, respectively, after 21 days as compared to cells cultured under control conditions without TGF-beta1. These results suggest that controlled release of TGF-beta1 from the PLGA/PEG blend microparticles may find applications in modulating cellular response during bone healing at a skeletal defect site.

  20. Ectopic bone formation by marrow stromal osteoblast transplantation using poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams implanted into the rat mesentery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishaug-Riley, S. L.; Crane, G. M.; Gurlek, A.; Miller, M. J.; Yasko, A. W.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Porous biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams were seeded with rat marrow stromal cells and implanted into the rat mesentery to investigate in vivo bone formation at an ectopic site. Cells were seeded at a density of 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 onto polymer foams having pore sizes ranging from either 150 to 300 to 710 microns and cultured for 7 days in vitro prior to implantation. The polymer/cell constructs were harvested after 1, 7, 28, or 49 days in vivo and processed for histology and gel permeation chromatography. Visual observation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and von Kossa-stained sections revealed the formation of mineralized bonelike tissue in the constructs within 7 days postimplantation. Ingrowth of vascular tissue was also found adjacent to the islands of bone, supplying the necessary metabolic requirements to the newly formed tissue. Mineralization and bone tissue formation were investigated by histomorphometry. The average penetration depth of mineralized tissue in the construct ranged from 190 +/- 50 microns for foams with 500-710-microns pores to 370 +/- 160 microns for foams with 150-300-microns pores after 49 days in vivo. The mineralized bone volume per surface area and total bone volume per surface area had maximal values of 0.28 +/- 0.21 mm (500-710-microns pore size, day 28) and 0.038 +/- 0.024 mm (150-300-microns, day 28), respectively. As much as 11% of the foam volume penetrated by bone tissue was filled with mineralized tissue. No significant trends over time were observed for any of the measured values (penetration depth, bone volume/surface area, or percent mineralized bone volume). These results suggest the feasibility of bone formation by osteoblast transplantation in an orthotopic site where not only bone formation from transplanted cells but also ingrowth from adjacent bone may occur.

  1. Ectopic bone formation by marrow stromal osteoblast transplantation using poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams implanted into the rat mesentery.

    PubMed

    Ishaug-Riley, S L; Crane, G M; Gurlek, A; Miller, M J; Yasko, A W; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    1997-07-01

    Porous biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams were seeded with rat marrow stromal cells and implanted into the rat mesentery to investigate in vivo bone formation at an ectopic site. Cells were seeded at a density of 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 onto polymer foams having pore sizes ranging from either 150 to 300 to 710 microns and cultured for 7 days in vitro prior to implantation. The polymer/cell constructs were harvested after 1, 7, 28, or 49 days in vivo and processed for histology and gel permeation chromatography. Visual observation of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and von Kossa-stained sections revealed the formation of mineralized bonelike tissue in the constructs within 7 days postimplantation. Ingrowth of vascular tissue was also found adjacent to the islands of bone, supplying the necessary metabolic requirements to the newly formed tissue. Mineralization and bone tissue formation were investigated by histomorphometry. The average penetration depth of mineralized tissue in the construct ranged from 190 +/- 50 microns for foams with 500-710-microns pores to 370 +/- 160 microns for foams with 150-300-microns pores after 49 days in vivo. The mineralized bone volume per surface area and total bone volume per surface area had maximal values of 0.28 +/- 0.21 mm (500-710-microns pore size, day 28) and 0.038 +/- 0.024 mm (150-300-microns, day 28), respectively. As much as 11% of the foam volume penetrated by bone tissue was filled with mineralized tissue. No significant trends over time were observed for any of the measured values (penetration depth, bone volume/surface area, or percent mineralized bone volume). These results suggest the feasibility of bone formation by osteoblast transplantation in an orthotopic site where not only bone formation from transplanted cells but also ingrowth from adjacent bone may occur.

  2. Upregulation of long non-coding RNA HIF 1α-anti-sense 1 induced by transforming growth factor-β-mediated targeting of sirtuin 1 promotes osteoblastic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    XU, YAO; WANG, SHILONG; TANG, CHAOLIANG; CHEN, WENJUN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the regulatory mechanism of long non-coding RNA hypoxia-inducible factor 1α-anti-sense 1 (lncRNA HIF1α-AS1) in osteoblast differentiation as well as its targeting by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), which may be inhibited by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blot analysis, lncRNA PCR arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitation were performed in order to examine the interference of SIRT1 expression by TGF-β, the effects of SIRT1 overexpression on lncRNA HIF1α-AS1 and the regulation of the expression of homeobox (HOX)D10, which promotes BMSC differentiation, by lncRNA HIF1α-AS1. The results showed that TGF-β interfered with SIRT1 expression. Furthermore, lncRNA HIF1α-AS1 was significantly downregulated following overexpression of SIRT1. In addition, low expression of HIF1α-AS1 was sufficient to block the expression of HOXD10. The present study further demonstrated that downregulation of HOXD10 by HIF1α-AS1 interfered with acetylation, and subsequently resulted in the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation. These results suggested that HIF1α-AS1 is an essential mediator of osteoblast differentiation, and may thus represent a gene-therapeutic agent for the treatment of human bone diseases. PMID:26460121

  3. Development of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, degradable polymeric carrier for osteogenic cell populations. Part 3. Proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated marrow stromal osteoblasts cultured on crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate).

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard G; McGonigle, Joseph S; Yaszemski, Michael J; Yasko, Alan W; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporary encapsulation of rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in crosslinked gelatin microparticles on long-term cell proliferation and phenotypic expression for microparticles placed on crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites using N-vinyl pyrollidinone (N-VP) as a crosslinking agent over a 28 day time period. Encapsulated cells (ECs) were seeded on actively crosslinking PPF composites 6 min after initiation of the crosslinking reaction, and also on fully crosslinked PPF composites and tissue culture polystyrene controls, with a cell seeding density of 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm2. Composites prepared with three PPF:N-VP ratios were examined: 1:0.5, 1:0.1, and 1:0.05. Samples were taken at specified time points and analyzed by DNA, 3H-thymidine, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and calcium assays, and the measurements were compared with those for nonencapsulated cells (NCs). The results showed that encapsulated marrow stromal cells exhibited much higher viability, proliferation, and phenotypic expression when placed on crosslinking PPF composites than NCs. The assay results for ECs on crosslinking PPF composites were also similar to those on fully crosslinked PPF composites. The data further demonstrated that the PPF:N-VP ratio had no effect on the viability, proliferation, or phenotypic expression of the ECs. These results suggest that cells encapsulated in crosslinked gelatin microparticles may be part of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, biodegradable polymeric composite for bone tissue engineering applications.

  4. Bone marrow osteoblast vulnerability to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gencheva, Marieta; Hare, Ian; Kurian, Susan; Fortney, Jim; Piktel, Debbie; Wysolmerski, Robert; Gibson, Laura F

    2013-06-01

    Osteoblasts are a major component of the bone marrow microenvironment, which provide support for hematopoietic cell development. Functional disruption of any element of the bone marrow niche, including osteoblasts, can potentially impair hematopoiesis. We have studied the effect of two widely used drugs with different mechanisms of action, etoposide (VP16) and melphalan, on murine osteoblasts at distinct stages of maturation. VP16 and melphalan delayed maturation of preosteoblasts and altered CXCL12 protein levels, a key regulator of hematopoietic cell homing to the bone marrow. Sublethal concentrations of VP16 and melphalan also decreased the levels of several transcripts which contribute to the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) including osteopontin (OPN), osteocalcin (OCN), and collagen 1A1 (Col1a1). The impact of chemotherapy on message and protein levels for some targets was not always aligned, suggesting differential responses at the transcription and translation or protein stability levels. As one of the main functions of a mature osteoblast is to synthesize ECM of a defined composition, disruption of the ratio of its components may be one mechanism by which chemotherapy affects the ability of osteoblasts to support hematopoietic recovery coincident with altered marrow architecture. Collectively, these observations suggest that the osteoblast compartment of the marrow hematopoietic niche is vulnerable to functional dysregulation by damage imposed by agents frequently used in clinical settings. Understanding the mechanistic underpinning of chemotherapy-induced changes on the hematopoietic support capacity of the marrow microenvironment may contribute to improved strategies to optimize patient recovery post-transplantation.

  5. Construction of microenvironment onto titanium substrates to regulate the osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vitro and osteogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lai, Min; Cai, Kaiyong; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Liqi; Luo, Zhong; Hou, Yanhua; Li, Jinghua; Ding, Xingwei; Chen, Xiuyong

    2013-03-01

    To mimic the extracellular matrix of natural bone, apatite/gelatin composite was deposited onto nanostructured titanium substrates via a coprecipitation method, which was pretreated by potassium hydroxide and heat treatment to generate an anticorrosive nanostructured layer. The successful formation of the apatite/gelatin nanocomposite onto titanium surfaces was revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and thin film X-ray diffraction (TF-XRD) measurements, respectively. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the apatite/gelatin nanocomposite deposited titanium substrate was favorable for cell adhesion. More importantly, bone marrow stromal cells cultured onto the apatite/gelatin nanocomposite deposited titanium substrates displayed significantly higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) proliferation and differentiation levels of alkaline phosphatase, mRNA expressions of osteocalcin (OC), osteopontin (OPN), and collagen type I (Col I), and OC content after culture for 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively, which was also revealed by the immunofluorescence analysis of OC and OPN expression. The deposition of apatite/gelatin nanocomposite improved bone density (p < 0.05) and bone-implant contact rate (p < 0.05), which was reflected by microcomputed tomography analysis and histological evaluation in vivo using a rabbit model. This work provides an approach to fabricate high-performance titanium-based implants with enhanced bone osseointegration.

  6. Modulation of marrow stromal osteoblast adhesion on biomimetic oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] hydrogels modified with Arg-Gly-Asp peptides and a poly(ethyleneglycol) spacer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Heungsoo; Jo, Seongbong; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-08-01

    Novel oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) hydrogels functionalized with cell adhesion peptides were prepared, and the effects of incorporated peptide density and macromolecular structure of hydrogels on attachment and morphology of marrow stromal cells (MSCs) were evaluated. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG; number average molecular weight of 930, 2860, and 6090) was used to synthesize OPF. A model peptide, Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp (GRGD), was incorporated into OPF hydrogels after being coupled to acrylated PEG of molecular weight 3400. The increase of incorporated peptide concentration enhanced MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels of PEG of molecular weight of 930 and 2860. However, the number of attached MSCs to OPF hydrogels of PEG (molecular weight 6090) remained constant regardless of the peptide density. The length of PEG in OPF also influenced cell attachment. When 1 micromole peptide/g hydrogel was incorporated into the OPF hydrogels, the degree of cell attachment at 12 h relative to the initial seeding density was 93.9 +/- 5.9%, 64.7 +/- 8.2%, and 9.3 +/- 6.6% for OPF hydrogels prepared with PEG of molecular weights of 930, 2860, and 6090, respectively. However, the crosslinking density of hydrogels did not significantly affect cell attachment. The interaction was sequence specific, in that MSC attachment to GRGD-modified hydrogels was competitively inhibited when cells were incubated in the presence of 0.5 mM soluble GRGD before cell seeding. These results suggest that we can modulate MSC attachment to OPF hydrogels by altering the peptide density and the molecular structure of OPF hydrogels.

  7. Development of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, degradable polymeric carrier for osteogenic cell populations. Part 2. Viability of encapsulated marrow stromal osteoblasts cultured on crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate).

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard G; McGonigle, Joseph S; Yaszemski, Michael J; Yasko, Alan W; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-11-01

    The effect of temporary encapsulation of rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in crosslinked gelatin microparticles on cell viability and proliferation was investigated in this study for microparticles placed on a crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composite over a 7 day time period. Encapsulated cells were seeded on crosslinking PPF composites at times up to 10 min following initiation of the crosslinking reaction, and also on fully crosslinked PPF composites and tissue culture polystyrene controls, with a cell seeding density of 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm2. The crosslinked PPF composite exhibited an average gel point of 10.3 min and an average maximum crosslinking temperature of 47.5 degrees C. Cell viability and proliferation were assessed by DNA and 3H-thymidine assays and the results were compared with those for nonencapsulated cells. The results showed that the addition time of cells to a crosslinking PPF composite had a large effect on cell viability and proliferation for both encapsulated and nonencapsulated cells with more surviving cells added at later time points. Most importantly, the temporary encapsulation of cells significantly enhanced cell viability at earlier time points. The data indicate that the presence of gelatin microparticles does not affect the crosslinking of a PPF composite. They further suggest that the temporary encapsulation of cells in crosslinked gelatin microparticles may preserve the viability of cells contained in an actively crosslinking PPF composite used as an injectable polymeric scaffold serving also as a carrier for osteogenic cell populations.

  8. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  9. Osterix marks distinct waves of primitive and definitive stromal progenitors during bone marrow development.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Pinho, Sandra; Ahmed, Jalal; Kunisaki, Yuya; Hanoun, Maher; Mendelson, Avital; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M; Frenette, Paul S

    2014-05-12

    Mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells (MSPCs) contribute to bone marrow (BM) homeostasis by generating multiple types of stromal cells. MSPCs can be labeled in the adult BM by Nestin-GFP, whereas committed osteoblast progenitors are marked by Osterix expression. However, the developmental origin and hierarchical relationship of stromal cells remain largely unknown. Here, by using a lineage-tracing system, we describe three distinct waves of contributions of Osterix(+) cells in the BM. First, Osterix(+) progenitors in the fetal BM contribute to nascent bone tissues and transient stromal cells that are replaced in the adult marrow. Second, Osterix-expressing cells perinatally contribute to osteolineages and long-lived BM stroma, which have characteristics of Nestin-GFP(+) MSPCs. Third, Osterix labeling in the adult marrow is osteolineage-restricted, devoid of stromal contribution. These results uncover a broad expression profile of Osterix and raise the intriguing possibility that distinct waves of stromal cells, primitive and definitive, may organize the developing BM.

  10. Osterix enhances proliferation and osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tu Qisheng; Valverde, Paloma . E-mail: paloma.valverde@tufts.edu; Chen, Jake

    2006-03-24

    Osterix (Osx) is a zinc-finger-containing transcription factor that is expressed in osteoblasts of all endochondral and membranous bones. In Osx null mice osteoblast differentiation is impaired and bone formation is absent. In this study, we hypothesized that overexpression of Osx in murine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) would be able to enhance their osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization in vitro. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC cultured in non-differentiating medium did not affect expression of Runx2/Cbfa1, another key transcription factor of osteoblast differentiation, but induced an increase in the expression of other markers associated with the osteoblastic lineage including alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, and osteopontin. Retroviral transduction of Osx in BMSC also increased their proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, and ability to form bone nodules. These events occurred without significant changes in the expression of {alpha}1(II) procollagen or lipoprotein lipase, which are markers of chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation, respectively.

  11. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  12. Asiatic acid inhibits adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Wei; Piao, Cheng-dong; Sun, Hong-hui; Ren, Xian-Sheng; Bai, Yun-Shen

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common precursors for both osteoblasts and adipocytes. With aging, BMSC osteoblast differentiation decreases whereas BMSC differentiation into adipocytes increases, resulting in increased adipogenesis and bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on adipocytic differentiation of BMSCs. AA inhibited the adipogenic induction of lipid accumulation, activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and expression of marker genes in adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (ap) 2, and adipsin. Further, we found that AA did not alter clonal expansion rate and expression of C/EBPβ, upstream key regulator of PPARγ, and binding activity of C/EBPβ to PPARγ promoter was not affected by AA as well. These findings suggest that AA may modulate differentiation of BMSCs to cause a lineage shift away from the adipocytes, and inhibition of PPARγ by AA is through C/EBPβ-independent mechanisms. Thus, AA could be a potential candidate for a novel drug against osteoporosis.

  13. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells: Commitment and Regulation of Adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage and regulation of BM adipocyte formation are not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pertaining to identification and characterization of adipocyte progenitor cells in BM and the regulation of differentiation into mature adipocytes. We have also emphasized the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:27708616

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 facilitates the growth and chemo-resistance of leukemia cells in the bone marrow by modulating osteoblast functions

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Keiki; Miyata, Yasuhiko; Nakayama, Takayuki; Saito, Shigeki; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Nishiwaki, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroki; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Kato, Hidefumi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Takami, Akiyoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells and osteoblasts play major roles in forming and modulating the bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic microenvironment. We have reported that FGF2 compromises stromal cell support of normal hematopoiesis. Here, we examined the effects of FGF2 on the leukemia microenvironment. In vitro, FGF2 significantly decreased the number of stromal-dependent and stromal-independent G0-leukemia cells in the stromal layers. Accordingly, CML cells placed on FGF2-treated stromal layers were more sensitive to imatinib. Conversely, FGF2 increased the proliferation of osteoblasts via FGFR1 IIIc, but its effects on osteoblast support of leukemia cell growth were limited. We next treated a human leukemia mouse model with Ara-C with/without systemic FGF2 administration. BM sections from FGF2-treated mice had thickened bone trabeculae and increased numbers of leukemia cells compared to controls. Leukemia cell density was increased, especially in the endosteal region in FGF2/Ara-C -treated mice compared to mice treated with Ara-C only. Interestingly, FGF2 did not promote leukemia cell survival in Ara-C treated spleen. Microarray analysis showed that FGF2 did not alter expression of many genes linked to hematopoiesis in osteoblasts, but modulated regulatory networks involved in angiogenesis and osteoblastic differentiation. These observations suggest that FGF2 promotes leukemia cell growth in the BM by modulating osteoblast functions. PMID:27481339

  15. Bone-like nodules formed by human bone marrow stromal cells: comparative study and characterization.

    PubMed

    Schecroun, N; Delloye, C h

    2003-03-01

    Autologous bone marrow stromal cells have been proposed as an adjuvant in the treatment of bone nonunion. This cell therapy would require the establishment of culture conditions that permit the rapid expansion of these cells ex vivo while retaining their potential for further differentiation. Our aim was to achieve a full differentiation process using human bone marrow aspirates. We first analyzed the effects of mineralization medium (with ascorbic acid and phosphate) and dexamethasone (dex) during the primary culture of human bone marrow stromal (HBMS) cells on the proliferation/differentiation behavior of first-passage cells. The most appropriate schedule was then selected to further characterize this differentiation model. We showed that primary culture of HBMS cells in proliferation medium (DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum), with a 48-h treatment by mineralization medium and dex resulted in a better osteoblastic differentiation of first-passage cells than primary culture carried out in mineralization medium with or without dex. We showed that culture of HBMS cells under these conditions (primary culture in proliferation medium, followed by subculture in mineralization medium) led to the formation of specifically mineralized bone-like nodules similar to the ones observed with rat bone marrow stromal cells. Our nodules exhibited three distinct cell types, reproducing in vitro a tissue-like structure. This treatment demonstrated an optimal proliferation and expression of osteoblastic markers such as alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and type I collagen. The primary culture allowed the multiplication of the number of adherent progenitor cells at the initial time of plating by a mean factor of 44,000, which was found to be negatively correlated with age. Thus, this differentiation model could provide a new tool to elaborate an autologous cell therapy designed to enhance osteogenesis.

  16. The bone marrow microenvironment contributes to type I diabetes induced osteoblast death.

    PubMed

    Coe, Lindsay M; Irwin, Regina; Lippner, Dennean; McCabe, Laura R

    2011-02-01

    Type I diabetes increases an individual's risk for bone loss and fracture, predominantly through suppression of osteoblast activity (bone formation). During diabetes onset, levels of blood glucose and pro-inflammatory cytokines (including tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)) increased. At the same time, levels of osteoblast markers are rapidly decreased and stay decreased chronically (i.e., 40 days later) at which point bone loss is clearly evident. We hypothesized that early bone marrow inflammation can promote osteoblast death and hence reduced osteoblast markers. Indeed, examination of type I diabetic mouse bones demonstrates a greater than twofold increase in osteoblast TUNEL staining and increased expression of pro-apoptotic factors. Osteoblast death was amplified in both pharmacologic and spontaneous diabetic mouse models. Given the known signaling and inter-relationships between marrow cells and osteoblasts, we examined the role of diabetic marrow in causing the osteoblast death. Co-culture studies demonstrate that compared to control marrow cells, diabetic bone marrow cells increase osteoblast (MC3T3 and bone marrow derived) caspase 3 activity and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression. Mouse blood glucose levels positively correlated with bone marrow induced osteoblast death and negatively correlated with osteocalcin expression in bone, suggesting a relationship between type I diabetes, bone marrow and osteoblast death. TNF expression was elevated in diabetic marrow (but not co-cultured osteoblasts); therefore, we treated co-cultures with TNFα neutralizing antibodies. The antibody protected osteoblasts from bone marrow induced death. Taken together, our findings implicate the bone marrow microenvironment and TNFα in mediating osteoblast death and contributing to type I diabetic bone loss.

  17. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  18. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Promotes Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue; Wang, Ning; Jia, Min; Bi, Long; Wang, Yunying; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Huinan; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Zhibin; He, Gonghao; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in regulating bone remodeling, and GLP-1 receptor agonist shows a positive relationship with osteoblast activity. However, GLP-1 receptor is not found in osteoblast, and the mechanism of GLP-1 receptor agonist on regulating bone remodeling is unclear. Here, we show that the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) promoted bone formation and increased bone mass and quality in a rat unloading-induced bone loss model. These functions were accompanied by an increase in osteoblast number and serum bone formation markers, while the adipocyte number was decreased. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor was detected in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), but not in osteoblast. Activation of GLP-1 receptor by Ex-4 promoted the osteogenic differentiation and inhibited BMSC adipogenic differentiation through regulating PKA/β-catenin and PKA/PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling. These findings reveal that GLP-1 receptor regulates BMSC osteogenic differentiation and provide a molecular basis for therapeutic potential of GLP-1 against osteoporosis. PMID:26947974

  19. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Promotes Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jingru; Ma, Xue; Wang, Ning; Jia, Min; Bi, Long; Wang, Yunying; Li, Mingkai; Zhang, Huinan; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Zhibin; He, Gonghao; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2016-04-12

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays an important role in regulating bone remodeling, and GLP-1 receptor agonist shows a positive relationship with osteoblast activity. However, GLP-1 receptor is not found in osteoblast, and the mechanism of GLP-1 receptor agonist on regulating bone remodeling is unclear. Here, we show that the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4) promoted bone formation and increased bone mass and quality in a rat unloading-induced bone loss model. These functions were accompanied by an increase in osteoblast number and serum bone formation markers, while the adipocyte number was decreased. Furthermore, GLP-1 receptor was detected in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), but not in osteoblast. Activation of GLP-1 receptor by Ex-4 promoted the osteogenic differentiation and inhibited BMSC adipogenic differentiation through regulating PKA/β-catenin and PKA/PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling. These findings reveal that GLP-1 receptor regulates BMSC osteogenic differentiation and provide a molecular basis for therapeutic potential of GLP-1 against osteoporosis.

  20. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cell cultivation in vitro on decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Dutra, Timothy F; French, Samuel W

    2010-02-01

    The in vitro biocompatibility of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix was evaluated. Following a freeze-thaw cycle, sectioned discs of fresh frozen rat metaphyseal bone were sequentially incubated in solutions of hypertonic, then hypotonic Ringer's solution, followed by deoxycholic acid, then DNAase I. The adequacy of decellularization of marrow stroma was examined by light microscopy. Marrow stromal fibroblastic cells were harvested by dispersion of rat long bone marrow, followed by concentration by discontinuous Ficoll-Paque gradient centrifugation. The fibroblastic cells were expanded by in vitro cultivation, and second passage cells were cryopreserved until needed. Cryopreserved marrow stromal cells were applied dropwise to sections of decellularized bone marrow extracellular matrix, and cultured in BJGb medium with 20% fetal bovine serum for ten days. Mature cultures were formalin fixed, decalcified, and embedded in paraffin. Light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections showed individual spindle cells invading the upper portion of the decellularized extracellular matrix, and also a monolayer of spindle cells on the upper surfaces of exposed trabecular and cortical bone. This experiment showed that decellularized marrow extracellular matrix is a biocompatible three dimensional in vitro substrate for marrow stromal fibroblastic cells.

  1. Vitamin D Metabolism and Action in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuanhu; LeBoff, Meryl S.; Glowacki, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin D metabolites are important effectors of bone and mineral homeostasis. Extrarenal conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) to the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D] is catalyzed in several cell types by the 1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), but little is known about the expression or regulation of CYP27B1 in human bones. We examined whether human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs, also known as mesenchymal stem cells) participate in vitamin D metabolism and whether vitamin D hydroxylases in hMSCs are influenced by the vitamin D status of the individual from whom the hMSCs were obtained. We also investigated the effects of vitamin D metabolites on osteoblast differentiation and the role of IGF-I in the regulation of CYP27B1. In a series of 27 subjects, vitamin D hydroxylases in hMSCs were expressed at different levels and were correlated with serum 25OHD, 1,25(OH)2D, and PTH. In vitro treatment with 25OHD up-regulated CYP27B1 and IGF-I in hMSCs; IGF-I also up-regulated CY27B1 expression and stimulated osteoblast differentiation. When hydroxylation of 25OHD was blocked by ketoconazole, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, 25OHD was no longer able to induce CYP27B1 expression. In summary, these findings show that human bone marrow stromal cells have the molecular machinery both to metabolize and respond to vitamin D. We propose that circulating 25OHD, by virtue of its local conversion to 1,25(OH)2D catalyzed by basal CYP27B1 in hMSCs, amplifies vitamin D signaling through IGF-I up-regulation, which in turn induces CYP27B1 in a feed-forward mechanism to potentiate osteoblast differentiation initiated by IGF-I. PMID:19966181

  2. Primary marrow-derived stromal cells: isolation and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. "MSC" also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSCs do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded by-product of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs-both primary and immortalized cell lines.

  3. PRIMARY MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS: ISOLATION AND MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. “MSC” also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSC do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we will describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded byproduct of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We will also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs – both primary and immortalized cell lines. PMID:23959984

  4. Characterization of Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Elsafadi, Mona; Manikandan, Muthurangan; Atteya, Muhammad; Hashmi, Jamil Amjad; Iqbal, Zafar; Aldahmash, Abdullah; Alfayez, Musaad

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (hBMSC) exhibit multiple functions, including differentiation into skeletal cells (progenitor function), hematopoiesis support, and immune regulation (nonprogenitor function). We have previously demonstrated the presence of morphological and functional heterogeneity of hBMSC cultures. In the present study, we characterized in detail two hTERT-BMSC clonal cell populations termed here CL1 and CL2 that represent an opposing phenotype with respect to morphology, markers expression: alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and CD146, and ex vivo differentiation potential. CL1 differentiated readily to osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes as shown by expression of lineage specific genes and proteins. Whole genome transcriptome profiling of CL1 versus CL2 revealed enrichment in CL1 of bone-, mineralization-, and skeletal muscle-related genes, for example, ALP, POSTN, IGFBP5 BMP4, and CXCL12. On the other hand, CL2 transcriptome was enriched in immune modulatory genes, for example, CD14, CD99, NOTCH3, CXCL6, CFB, and CFI. Furthermore, gene expression microarray analysis of osteoblast differentiated CL1 versus CL2 showed significant upregulation in CL1 of bone development and osteoblast differentiation genes which included several homeobox genes: TBX15, HOXA2 and HOXA10, and IGF1, FGFR3, BMP6, MCAM, ITGA10, IGFBP5, and ALP. siRNA-based downregulation of the ALP gene in CL1 impaired osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. Our studies demonstrate the existence of molecular and functional heterogeneity in cultured hBMSC. ALP can be employed to identify osteoblastic and adipocytic progenitor cells in the heterogeneous hBMSC cultures. PMID:27610142

  5. Enhancement of osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells cultured by selective combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2).

    PubMed

    Maegawa, Naoki; Kawamura, Kenji; Hirose, Motohiro; Yajima, Hiroshi; Takakura, Yoshinori; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that bone marrow contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which can show osteoblastic differentiation when cultured in osteogenic medium containing ascorbic acid, beta-glycerophosphate and dexamethasone. The differentiation results in the appearance of osteoblasts, together with the formation of bone matrix; thus, in vitro cultured bone (osteoblasts/bone matrix) could be fabricated by MSC culture. This type of cultured bone has already been used in clinical cases involving orthopaedic problems. To improve the therapeutic effect of the cultured bone, we investigated the culture conditions that contributed to extensive osteoblastic differentiation. Rat bone marrow was primarily cultured to expand the number of MSCs and further cultured in osteogenic medium for 12 days. The culture was also conducted in a medium supplemented with either bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) or fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2), or with sequential combinations of both supplements. Among them, the sequential supplementation of FGF-2 followed by BMP-2 showed high alkaline phosphatase activity, sufficient bone-specific osteocalcein expression and abundant bone matrix formation of the MSC culture. These data implied that the number of responding cells or immature osteoblasts was increased by the supplementation of FGF-2 in the early phase of the culture and that these cells can show osteoblastic differentiation, of which capability was augmented by BMP-2 in the late phase. The sequential supplementation of these cytokines into MSC culture might be suitable for the fabrication of ideal cultured bone for use in bone tissue engineering.

  6. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Xu, Jun-jun; Deng, Zhi-hong; Feng, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs) were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs). Results showed these pbMNCs were fibroblast-like, had stromal morphology, were negative for CD34 and CD45, but positive for Vimentin and Collagen I, and had the multipotency to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. We named these induced peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ipbMSCs). Skin grafts in combination with ipbMSCs and collagen I were applied for wound healing, and results revealed ipbMSC exhibited similar potency and effectiveness in the promotion of wound healing to the bmMSCs. Hereafter, we speculate that the mixture of growth factors and chemokines secreted by bmMSCs may play an important roles in the induction of the proliferation and mesenchymal differentiation of mononuclear cells. Our results are clinically relevant because it provide a new method for the acquisition of MSCs which can be used as a candidate for the wound repair. PMID:21494428

  7. The phytoestrogen genistein enhances osteogenesis and represses adipogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Heim, M; Frank, O; Kampmann, G; Sochocky, N; Pennimpede, T; Fuchs, P; Hunziker, W; Weber, P; Martin, I; Bendik, I

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the phytoestrogen genistein and 17beta-estradiol in human bone marrow stromal cells, undergoing induced osteogenic or adipogenic differentiation. Profiling of estrogen receptors (ERs)-alpha, -beta1, -beta2, -beta3, -beta4, -beta5, and aromatase mRNAs revealed lineage-dependent expression patterns. During osteogenic differentiation, the osteoblast-determining core binding factor-alpha1 showed a progressive increase, whereas the adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) was sequentially decreased. This temporal regulation of lineage-determining marker genes was strongly enhanced by genistein during the early osteogenic phase. Moreover, genistein increased alkaline phosphatase mRNA levels and activity, the osteoprotegerin:receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand gene expression ratio, and the expression of TGFbeta1. During adipogenic differentiation, down-regulation in the mRNA levels of PPARgamma and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha at d 3 and decreased lipoprotein lipase and adipsin mRNA levels at d 21 were observed after genistein treatment. This led to a lower number of adipocytes and a reduction in the size of their lipid droplets. At d 3 of adipogenesis, TGFbeta1 was strongly up-regulated by genistein in an ER-dependent manner. Blocking the TGFbeta1 pathway abolished the effects of genistein on PPARgamma protein levels and led to a reduction in the proliferation rate of precursor cells. Overall, genistein enhanced the commitment and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells to the osteoblast lineage but did not influence the late osteogenic maturation markers. Adipogenic differentiation and maturation, on the other hand, were reduced by genistein (and 17beta-estradiol) via an ER-dependent mechanism involving autocrine or paracrine TGFbeta1 signaling.

  8. Metallofullerene nanoparticles promote osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through BMP signaling pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kangning; Cao, Weipeng; Hao, Xiaohong; Xue, Xue; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuliang; Meng, Jie; Sun, Baoyun; Zhang, Jinchao; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis.Although endohedral metallofullerenol [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles have anti-tumor efficiency and mostly deposit in the bones of mice, how these nanoparticles act in bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) remains largely unknown. Herein, we observed that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles facilitated the differentiation of MSCs toward osteoblasts, as evidenced by the enhancement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized nodule formation upon [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticle treatment. Mechanistically, the effect of [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles on ALP activity was inhibited by the addition of noggin as an inhibitor of the BMP signaling pathway. Moreover, the in vivo results of the ovariectomized rats further indicated that [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles effectively improved bone density and prevented osteoporosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr33575a

  9. Human osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells express adipogenic markers upon coculture with bone marrow adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Clabaut, Aline; Delplace, Séverine; Chauveau, Christophe; Hardouin, Pierre; Broux, Odile

    2010-07-01

    In osteoporosis, bone loss is accompanied by greater adiposity in the marrow. Given the cellular proximity within the bone marrow, we wondered whether adipocytes might have a paracrine impact on osteoblast differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we cocultured adipocytes with osteoblasts derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the absence of direct cell contact and then analyzed gene expression changes in the osteoblastic population by using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We found that, upon coculture, MSC-derived osteoblasts showed appearance of adipogenic (lipoprotein lipase, leptin) and decrease of osteogenic (osteocalcin) mRNA markers. Our results indicate that in vitro, MSC-derived adipocytes are capable of inducing MSC-derived osteoblasts to differentiate to an adipocyte phenotype. These new data suggest that (i) transdifferentiation of committed osteoblasts into adipocytes may contribute to the increase in marrow fat content at the expense of bone-forming cells and (ii) this switch might be initiated by the adipocytes themselves.

  10. Substance P stimulates bone marrow stromal cell osteogenic activity, osteoclast differentiation, and resorption activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Zhao, Rong; Shi, Xiaoyou; Wei, Tzuping; Halloran, Bernard P.; Clark, David J.; Jacobs, Christopher R.; Kingery, Wade S.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction SP is a neuropeptide distributed in the sensory nerve fibers that innervate the medullar tissues of bone, as well as the periosteum. Previously we demonstrated that inhibition of neuropeptide signaling after capsaicin treatment resulted in a loss of bone mass and we hypothesized that SP contributes to bone integrity by stimulating osteogenesis. Materials and Methods Osteoblast precursors (bone marrow stromal cells, BMSCs) and osteoclast precursors (bone marrow macrophages, BMMs) derived from C57BL/6 mice were cultured. Expression of the SP receptor (NK1) was detected by using immunocytochemical staining and PCR. Effects of SP on proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs were studied by measuring BrdU incorporation, gene expression, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteocalcin and Runx2 protein levels with EIA and western blot assays, respectively. Effects of SP on BMMs were determined using a BrdU assay, counting multinucleated cells staining positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP+), measuring pit erosion area, and evaluating RANKL protein production and NF-κB activity with ELISA and western blot. Results The NK1 receptor was expressed in both BMSCs and BMMs. SP stimulated the proliferation of BMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. Low concentrations (10−12 M) of SP stimulated alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expression, increased alkaline phosphatase activity, and up-regulated Runx2 protein levels, and higher concentrations of SP (10−8 M) enhanced mineralization in differentiated BMSCs. SP also stimulated BMSCs to produce RANKL, but at concentrations too low to evoke osteoclastogenesis in co-culture with macrophages in the presence of SP. SP also activated NF-κB in BMMs and directly facilitate RANKL induced macrophage osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption activity. Conclusions NK1 receptors are expressed by osteoblast and osteoclast precursors and SP stimulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation and function in

  11. Bone marrow stromal stem cells: nature, biology, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Bianco, P; Riminucci, M; Gronthos, S; Robey, P G

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are progenitors of skeletal tissue components such as bone, cartilage, the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, and adipocytes. In addition, they may be experimentally induced to undergo unorthodox differentiation, possibly forming neural and myogenic cells. As such, they represent an important paradigm of post-natal nonhematopoietic stem cells, and an easy source for potential therapeutic use. Along with an overview of the basics of their biology, we discuss here their potential nature as components of the vascular wall, and the prospects for their use in local and systemic transplantation and gene therapy.

  12. Impaired Function of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Systemic Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, K.; Wilson, T.M.; Ren, J.J.; Sabatino, M.; Stroncek, D.F.; Krepuska, M.; Bai, Y.; Robey, P.G.; Metcalfe, D.D.; Mezey, E.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM) have a wide variety of problems, including skeletal abnormalities. The disease results from a mutation of the stem cell receptor (c-kit) in mast cells and we wondered if the function of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs; also known as MSCs or mesenchymal stem cells) might be affected by the invasion of bone marrow by mutant mast cells. As expected, BMSCs from SM patients do not have a mutation in c-kit, but they proliferate poorly. In addition, while osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs seems to be deficient, their adipogenic potential appears to be increased. Since the hematopoietic supportive abilities of BMSCs are also important, we also studied the engraftment in NSG mice of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, after being co-cultured with BMSCs of healthy volunteers vs. BMSCs derived from patients with SM. BMSCs derived from the bone marrow of patients with SM could not support hematopoiesis to the extent that healthy BMSCs do. Finally, we performed an expression analysis and found significant differences between healthy and SM derived BMSCs in the expression of genes with a variety of functions, including the WNT signaling, ossification, and bone remodeling. We suggest that some of the symptoms associated with SM might be driven by epigenetic changes in BMSCs caused by dysfunctional mast cells in the bone marrow of the patients. PMID:26001169

  13. Contribution of SATB2 to the stronger osteogenic potential of bone marrow stromal cells from craniofacial bones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Men, Jie; Fu, Yu; Shan, Tengfei; Ye, Jinhai; Wu, Yunong; Tao, Zhenjiang; Liu, Laikui; Jiang, Hongbing

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that craniofacial bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have a strong osteogenic potential. However, the mechanism by which BMSCs of various embryonic origins develop diverse osteogenic potentials remains unclear. To investigate the mechanisms regulating osteoblast differentiation in two different types of BMSCs, we compared the temporal and spatial mRNA and protein expression patterns of Satb2 and its downstream gene Hoxa2 by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and fluorescent immunostaining in mandible BMSCs (M-BMSCs) and tibia BMSCs (T-BMSCs) undergoing osteoblast differentiation. Higher levels of alkaline phosphatase, greater calcium accumulation and earlier expression of Runx2 were observed in osteogenic-induced M-BMSCs compared with T-BMSCs. Low levels of Satb2 were detected in both types of uninduced BMSCs but the majority of SATB2 was located in the nuclei of M-BMSCs. Notably, Satb2 was expressed earlier in M-BMSCs and Hoxa2, a downstream target of Satb2, was not expressed in uninduced M-BMSCs or during osteoblast differentiation, just as during embryonic mandible development. In contrast, Hoxa2 was reactivated in T-BMSCs during osteoblast differentiation. Based on these results, we conclude that SATB2 plays a different role during osteoblast differentiation of M-BMSCs and T-BMSCs. The earlier activation of Satb2 expression in M-BMSCs compared with T-BMSCs might explain the stronger osteogenic potential of M-BMSCs.

  14. Characterization of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamzic, Edita; Whiting, Karen; Gordon Smith, Edward; Pettengell, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In aplastic anaemia (AA), haemopoietic activity is significantly reduced and generally attributed to failure of haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the bone marrow (BM). The regulation of haemopoiesis depends on the interaction between HSC and various cells of the BM microenvironment, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). MSC involvement in the functional restriction of HSC in AA is largely unknown and therefore, the physical and functional properties of AA MSC were studied in vitro. MSC were characterized by their phenotype and ability to form adherent stromal layers. The functional properties of AA MSC were assessed through proliferative, clonogenic and cross-over culture assays. Results indicate that although AA MSC presented typical morphology and distinctive mesenchymal markers, stromal formation was reduced, with 50% of BM samples failing to produce adherent layers. Furthermore, their proliferative and clonogenic capacity was markedly decreased (P = 0·03 and P = 0·04 respectively) and the ability to sustain haemopoiesis was significantly reduced, as assessed by total cell proliferation (P = 0·032 and P = 0·019 at Week 5 and 6, respectively) and clonogenic potential of HSC (P = 0·02 at Week 6). It was concluded that the biological characteristics of AA MSC are different from those of control MSC and their in vitro haemopoiesis-supporting ability is significantly reduced.

  15. Effects of continuous and pulsatile PTH treatments on rat bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Chiming; Frei, Hanspeter Burt, Helen M.; Rossi, Fabio

    2009-03-20

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) differentiation and proliferation are controlled by numerous growth factors and hormones. Continuous parathyroid hormone (PTH) treatment has been shown to decrease osteoblast differentiation, whereas pulsatile PTH increases osteoblast differentiation. However, the effects of PTH treatments on MSCs have not been investigated. This study showed continuous PTH treatment in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX) promoted osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs in vitro, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, number of ALP expressing cells, and up-regulation of PTH receptor-1, ALP, and osteocalcin mRNA expressions. In contrast, pulsatile PTH treatment was found to suppress osteogenesis of rat MSCs, possibly by promoting the maintenance of undifferentiated cells. Additionally, the observed effects of PTH were strongly dependent on the presence of DEX. MSC proliferation however was not influenced by PTH independent of treatment regimen and presence or absence of DEX. Furthermore, our work raised the possibility that PTH treatment may modulate stem/progenitor cell activity within MSC cultures.

  16. Pleiotrophin commits human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells towards hypertrophy during chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouderlique, Thibault; Henault, Emilie; Lebouvier, Angelique; Frescaline, Guilhem; Bierling, Phillipe; Rouard, Helene; Courty, José; Albanese, Patricia; Chevallier, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a growth factor present in the extracellular matrix of the growth plate during bone development and in the callus during bone healing. Bone healing is a complicated process that recapitulates endochondral bone development and involves many cell types. Among those cells, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are able to differentiate toward chondrogenic and osteoblastic lineages. We aimed to determine PTN effects on differentiation properties of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) under chondrogenic induction using histological analysis and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. PTN dramatically potentiated chondrogenic differentiation as indicated by a strong increase of collagen 2 protein, and cartilage-related gene expression. Moreover, PTN increased transcription of hypertrophic chondrocyte markers such as MMP13, collagen 10 and alkaline phosphatase and enhanced calcification and the content of collagen 10 protein. These effects are dependent on PTN receptors signaling and PI3 K pathway activation. These data suggest a new role of PTN in bone regeneration as an inducer of hypertrophy during chondrogenic differentiation of hBMSC.

  17. Age-related BMAL1 change affects mouse bone marrow stromal cell proliferation and osteo-differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yijia; Xu, Xiaomei; Tan, Zhen; Ye, Cui; Chen, Yangxi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Aging people's bone regeneration potential is always impaired. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) contain progenitors of osteoblasts. Donor age may affect MSCs’ proliferation and differentiation potential, but the genomic base is still unknown. Due to recent research's indication that a core circadian component, brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 protein (BMAL1), has a role in premature aging, we investigated the normal aging mechanism in mice with their MSCs and Bmal1 gene/protein level. Material and methods 1, 6 and 16 month old C57BL/6 mice were used and the bone marrow stromal cells were gained and cultured at early passage. Bmal1 gene and protein level were detected in these cells. Marrow stromal cells were also induced to differentiate to osteoblasts or adipocytes. Three groups of mice MSCs were compared on proliferation by flow cytometry, on cell senescence by SA-β-gal expression and after osteo-induction on osteogenic potential by the expression of osterix (Osx), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin (OCN). Results Bmal1 gene and protein level as well as S-phase fraction of the cell cycle decreased in MSCs along with the aging process. At the same time, SA-β-gal+ levels increased, especially in the aged mice MSCs. When induced to be osteogenic, Osx gene expression and ALP activity declined in the mid-age and aged mice MSCs, while OCN protein secretion deteriorated in the aged mice MSCs. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that mouse MSCs changed with their proliferation and osteo-differentiation abilities at different aging stages, and that Bmal1 is related to the normal aging process in MSCs. PMID:22457671

  18. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 mediates changes of bone marrow stem cells during the bone repair process.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kiyotaka; Kawao, Naoyuki; Yano, Masato; Tamura, Yukinori; Kurashimo, Shinzi; Okumoto, Katsumi; Kojima, Kotarou; Kaji, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblasts, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, and macrophages that participate in the bone repair process are derived from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, the roles of these stem cells during the repair of injured bone tissue are still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effects of bone defect on HSCs and MSCs in bone marrow and spleen in 75 mice and its mechanism. We analyzed the HSC and MSC populations in these tissues of a mouse with femoral bone damage by using flow cytometry. The number of HSCs in the bone marrow of mice with damaged femurs was significantly lower than the number of these cells in the bone marrow of the contralateral intact femurs on day 2 after injury. Meanwhile, the number of MSCs in the bone marrow of mice with damaged femurs was significantly higher than that of the contralateral femurs. Both intraperitoneal administration of AMD3100, a C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) antagonist, and local treatment with an anti-stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) antibody blunted the observed decrease in HSC and increase in MSC populations within the bone marrow of injured femurs. In conclusion, the present study revealed that there is a concurrent decrease and increase in the numbers of HSCs and MSCs, respectively, in the bone marrow during repair of mouse femoral bone damage. Furthermore, the SDF-1/CXCR4 system was implicated as contributing to the changes in these stem cell populations upon bone injury.

  19. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells differentiate to osteoblast and chondroblast lineages upon incubation with conditioned media from dental pulp stem cell-derived osteoblasts and auricle cartilage chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Carbone, A; Valente, M; Annacontini, L; Castellani, S; Di Gioia, S; Parisi, D; Rucci, M; Belgiovine, G; Colombo, C; Di Benedetto, A; Mori, G; Lo Muzio, L; Maiorella, A; Portincasa, A; Conese, M

    2016-01-01

    The potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (ADSCs) to differentiate into either osteoblasts or chondrocytes is controversial. In this study we investigated the multicapacity potential of ADSCs to differentiate towards adipocyte, osteoblast, and chondrocyte lineages when cells are seeded onto plastic in comparison with incubation with conditioned media (CM) obtained from differentiated cell types.ADSCs, obtained from liposuctions, were characterized for mesenchymal and hematopoietic markers by cytofluorimetry. Their differentiation capacity towards adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes was investigated by histochemistry methods (Oil-Red-O staining, Safranin O and Alizarin Red staining, respectively). Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and dedifferentiated auricle derived-chondrocytes were differentiated towards osteoblastic and chondrocytic lineages respectively, and the CM obtained from these cultures was used to induce differentiation of ADSCs. ADSCs were positive for mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD105, CD73, CD44), but not for hematopoietic lineage markers (CD14, CD34, CD45) and this behavior was conserved from the isolation up to the fifth passage. While ADSCs were readily differentiated in adipocytes, they were not towards chondrocytes and osteoblastic lineages, a behavior different from that of bone marrow-derived MSCs that differentiated into the three lineages at two weeks post-induction. Only ADSCs treated with CM from cultured chondrocytes and DPSCs, produced glycosaminoglycans and mineralized matrix. These results indicate that ADSCs need growth/morphogenic factor supplementation from the tissue environment to be appropriately differentiated to mesodermic lineages.

  20. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) exhibit a similar but not identical phenotype to bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSC).

    PubMed

    Saeed, Hamid; Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Aldahmash, Abdullah M; Abdallah, Basem M; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-06-01

    Mouse embryonic fibroblasts have been utilized as a surrogate stem cell model for the postnatal bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (BMSC) to study mesoderm-type cell differentiation e.g. osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, no formal characterization of MEF phenotype has been reported. Utilizing standard in vitro and in vivo assays we performed a side-by-side comparison of MEF and BMSC to determine their ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells. BMSC were isolated from 8-10 weeks old mouse bone marrow by plastic adherence. MEF were established by trypsin/EDTA digestion from E13.5 embryos after removing heads and viscera, followed by plastic adherence. Compared to BMSC, MEF exhibited telomerase activity and improved cell proliferation as assessed by q-PCR based TRAP assay and cell number quantification, respectively. FACS analysis revealed that MEF exhibited surface markers characteristic of the BMSC: Sca-1(+), CD73(+), CD105(+), CD29(+), CD44(+), CD106(+), CD11b(-), and CD45(-). In contrast to BMSC, ex vivo osteoblast (OB) differentiation of MEF exhibited a less mature osteoblastic phenotype (less alkaline phosphatase, collagen type I and osteocalcin) as assessed by real-time PCR analysis. Compared to BMSC, MEF exhibited a more enhanced differentiation into adipocyte and chondrocyte lineages. Interestingly, both MEF and BMSC formed the same amount of heterotopic bone and bone marrow elements upon in vivo subcutaneous implantation with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate, in immune deficient mice. In conclusion, MEF contain a population of stem cells that behave in ex vivo and in vivo assays, similar but not identical, to BMSC. Due to their enhanced cell growth, they may represent a good alternative for BMSC in studying molecular mechanisms of stem cell commitment and differentiation to osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes.

  1. 3D-Cultivation of bone marrow stromal cells on hydroxyapatite scaffolds fabricated by dispense-plotting and negative mould technique.

    PubMed

    Detsch, R; Uhl, F; Deisinger, U; Ziegler, G

    2008-04-01

    The main principle of a bone tissue engineering (BTE) strategy is to cultivate osteogenic cells in an osteoconductive porous scaffold. Ceramic implants for osteogenesis are based mainly on hydroxyapatite (HA), since this is the inorganic component of bone. Rapid Prototyping (RP) is a new technology in research for producing ceramic scaffolds. This technology is particularly suitable for the fabrication of individually and specially tailored single implants. For tissue engineering these scaffolds are seeded with osteoblast or osteoblast precursor cells. To supply the cultured osteoblastic cells efficiently with nutrition in these 3D-geometries a bioreactor system can be used. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of differently fabricated HA-scaffolds on bone marrow stromal cells. For this, two RP-techniques, dispense-plotting and a negative mould method, were used to produce porous ceramics. The manufactured HA-scaffolds were then cultivated in a dynamic system (bioreactor) with an osteoblastic precursor cell line. In our study, the applied RP-techniques give the opportunity to design and process HA-scaffolds with defined porosity, interconnectivity and 3D pore distribution. A higher differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells could be detected on the negative mould fabricated scaffolds, while cell proliferation was higher on the dispense-plotted scaffolds. Nevertheless, both scaffold types can be used in tissue engineering applications.

  2. Effects of Ti, PMMA, UHMWPE, and Co-Cr wear particles on differentiation and functions of bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Jia, Tanghong; Gong, Weiming; Wooley, Paul H.; Yang, Shang-You

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigates the roles of orthopaedic biomaterial particles (Ti, PMMA, UHMWPE, Co-Cr) on the differentiation and functions of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Cells were isolated from femurs of BALB/c mice and cultured in complete osteoblast-induction medium in presence of micron-sized biomaterial particles at various doses. MTT assay and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay were performed for cell proliferation and cytotoxicity. Differentiation and function of osteoblasts were evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin, RANKL, OSX, and Runx2 expressions. Murine IL-1, IL-6 and TNFα in culture media were determined by ELISA. Challenge with low doses of Ti, UHMWPE, or Co-Cr particles markedly promoted the bone marrow cell proliferation while high dose of Co-Cr significantly inhibited cell growth (p<0.05). Cells challenged with low dose of PMMA or UHMWPE particles (0.63 mg/ml) exhibited strong ALP activity, whereas Ti, and Co-Cr groups showed minimal effects (p<0.05). UHMWPE and Ti particles also promoted higher expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Real-time PCR data suggested that cells treated with low dose (0.5mg/ml) particles resulted in distinctly diminished RANKL expression compared to those exposed to high concentrated (3mg/ml) particles. In conclusion, various types of wear debris particles behaved differently in the differentiation, maturation, and functions of osteogenic cells; and the particulate debris-interacted bone marrow stromal cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis and process of the debris-associated aseptic prosthetic loosening. PMID:24039045

  3. Adhesion and migration of marrow-derived osteoblasts on injectable in situ crosslinkable poly(propylene fumarate-co-ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels with a covalently linked RGDS peptide.

    PubMed

    Behravesh, Esfandiar; Zygourakis, Kyriacos; Mikos, Antonios G

    2003-05-01

    Marrow-derived osteoblasts were cultured on poly(propylene fumarate-co-ethylene glycol) (P(PF-co-EG)) based hydrogels modified in bulk with a covalently linked RGDS model peptide. A poly(ethylene glycol) spacer arm was utilized to covalently link the peptide to the hydrogel. Three P(PF-co-EG) block copolymers were synthesized with varying poly(ethylene glycol) block lengths relative to poly(ethylene glycol) spacer arm. A poly(ethylene glycol) block length of nominal molecular weight 2000 and spacer arm of nominal molecular weight 3400 were found to reduce nonspecific cell adhesion and show RGDS concentration dependent marrow-derived osteoblast adhesion. A concentration of 100 nmol/mL RGDS was sufficient to promote adhesion of 84 +/- 17% of the initial seeded marrow-derived osteoblasts compared with 9 +/- 1% for the unmodified hydrogel after 12 h. Cell spreading was quantified as a method for evaluating adhesivity of cells to the hydrogel. A megacolony migration assay was utilized to assess the migration characteristics of the marrow-derived osteoblasts on RGDS modified hydrogels. Marrow-stromal osteoblasts migration was greater on hydrogels modified with 100 nmol/mL linked RGDS when compared with hydrogels modified with 1000 nmol/mL linked RGDS, while proliferation was not affected. These P(PF-co-EG) hydrogels modified in the bulk with RGDS peptide are potential candidates as in situ forming scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications.

  4. Stromal cell migration precedes hemopoietic repopulation of the bone marrow after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Werts, E.D.; Gibson, D.P.; Knapp, S.A.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Circulation of hemopoietic stem cells into an irradiated site has been thoroughly documented, but migration of stromal cells to repair radiation damage has not. We determined the radiosensitivity of mouse bone marrow stroma and evaluated stromal and hemopoietic repopulation in x-irradiated marrow. The D/sub 0/ for growth of colonies of marrow stromal cells (MSC) was 215 to 230 rad. Total-body irradiation (TB) obliterated marrow stromal and hemopoietic cells within 3 days. In contrast, 1 day after 1000 rad leg irradiation (LI), MSC rose to 80% of normal, but fell to 34% by 3 days and recovered to 72% by 30 days. However, femoral nucleated cells diminished to 20% by 3 days and recovered to 74% of normal by 30 days. Likewise, differentiated marrow cells and hemopoietic stem cells were initially depleted. With 1000 rad LI followed 3 h later by 1000 rad to the body while shielding the leg, MSC and femoral nucleated cells recovered to values intermediate between 1000 rad TB and 1000 rad LI. We concluded that: (1) the D/sub 0/ for MSC was 215 to 230 rad, (2) stromal repopulation preceded hemopoietic recovery, and (3) immigration of stromal cells from an unirradiated sanctuary facilitated hemopoietic repopulation of a heavily irradiated site.

  5. Effects of the 1, 4-dihydropyridine L-type calcium channel blocker benidipine on bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhong-ping; Liao, Jia-cheng; Zhao, Chang; Cai, Dao-zhang

    2015-08-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) often increases the risk of bone fracture and other complications and is a major clinical problem. Previous studies have found that high blood pressure is associated with bone formation abnormalities, resulting in increased calcium loss. We have investigated the effect of the antihypertensive drug benidipine on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) differentiation into osteoblasts and bone formation under osteoporotic conditions. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to test the hypothesis that benidipine promotes murine BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (OCN), runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), β-catenin, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) protein expression was evaluated in primary femoral BMSCs from C57/BL6 mice cultured under osteogenic conditions for 2 weeks to examine the effects of benidipine. An ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model was used to investigate the effect of benidipine treatment for 3 months in vivo. We found that ALP, OCN, and RUNX2 expression was up-regulated and WNT/β-catenin signaling was enhanced in vitro and in vivo. In OVX mice that were intragastrically administered benidipine, bone parameters (trabecular thickness, bone mineral density, and trabecular number) in the distal femoral metaphysis were significantly increased compared with control OVX mice. Consistently, benidipine promoted BMSC differentiation into osteoblasts and protected against bone loss in OVX mice. Therefore, benidipine might be a suitable candidate for the treatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis and hypertension.

  6. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells: A Reliable, Challenging Tool for In Vitro Osteogenesis and Bone Tissue Engineering Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Ute; Müller, Katrin; Preissler, Carolin; Noack, Carolin; Boxberger, Sabine; Dieter, Peter; Bornhäuser, Martin; Wobus, Manja

    2016-01-01

    Adult human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) are important for many scientific purposes because of their multipotency, availability, and relatively easy handling. They are frequently used to study osteogenesis in vitro. Most commonly, hBMSC are isolated from bone marrow aspirates collected in clinical routine and cultured under the “aspect plastic adherence” without any further selection. Owing to the random donor population, they show a broad heterogeneity. Here, the osteogenic differentiation potential of 531 hBMSC was analyzed. The data were supplied to correlation analysis involving donor age, gender, and body mass index. hBMSC preparations were characterized as follows: (a) how many passages the osteogenic characteristics are stable in and (b) the influence of supplements and culture duration on osteogenic parameters (tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), octamer binding transcription factor 4, core-binding factor alpha-1, parathyroid hormone receptor, bone gla protein, and peroxisome proliferator-activated protein γ). The results show that no strong prediction could be made from donor data to the osteogenic differentiation potential; only the ratio of induced TNAP to endogenous TNAP could be a reliable criterion. The results give evidence that hBMSC cultures are stable until passage 7 without substantial loss of differentiation potential and that established differentiation protocols lead to osteoblast-like cells but not to fully authentic osteoblasts. PMID:27293446

  7. Prostaglandin E2 regulates macrophage colony stimulating factor secretion by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Besse, A; Trimoreau, F; Faucher, J L; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1999-07-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate marrow haematopoiesis by secreting growth factors such as macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) that regulates the proliferation, differentiation and several functions of cells of the mononuclear-phagocytic lineage. By using a specific ELISA we found that their constitutive secretion of M-CSF is enhanced by tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) markedly reduces in a time- and dose-dependent manner the constitutive and TNF-alpha-induced M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, other lipid mediators such as 12-HETE, 15-HETE, leukotriene B4, leukotriene C4 and lipoxin A4 have no effect. EP2/EP4 selective agonists (11-deoxy PGE1 and 1-OH PGE1) and EP2 agonist (19-OH PGE2) inhibit M-CSF synthesis by bone marrow stromal cells while an EP1/EP3 agonist (sulprostone) has no effect. Stimulation with PGE2 induces an increase of intracellular cAMP levels in bone marrow stromal cells. cAMP elevating agents (forskolin and cholera toxin) mimic the PGE2-induced inhibition of M-CSF production. In conclusion, PGE2 is a potent regulator of M-CSF production by human bone marrow stromal cells, its effects being mediated via cAMP and PGE receptor EP2/EP4 subtypes.

  8. Molecular signature and in vivo behavior of bone marrow endosteal and subendosteal stromal cell populations and their relevance to hematopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Balduino, Alex; Mello-Coelho, Valeria; Wang, Zhou; Taichman, Russell S.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Becker, Kevin G.; Mello, Wallace de; Taub, Dennis D.; Borojevic, Radovan

    2012-11-15

    In the bone marrow cavity, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been shown to reside in the endosteal and subendosteal perivascular niches, which play specific roles on HSC maintenance. Although cells with long-term ability to reconstitute full hematopoietic system can be isolated from both niches, several data support a heterogenous distribution regarding the cycling behavior of HSC. Whether this distinct behavior depends upon the role played by the stromal populations which distinctly create these two niches is a question that remains open. In the present report, we used our previously described in vivo assay to demonstrate that endosteal and subendosteal stromal populations are very distinct regarding skeletal lineage differentiation potential. This was further supported by a microarray-based analysis, which also demonstrated that these two stromal populations play distinct, albeit complementary, roles in HSC niche. Both stromal populations were preferentially isolated from the trabecular region and behave distinctly in vitro, as previously reported. Even though these two niches are organized in a very close range, in vivo assays and molecular analyses allowed us to identify endosteal stroma (F-OST) cells as fully committed osteoblasts and subendosteal stroma (F-RET) cells as uncommitted mesenchymal cells mainly represented by perivascular reticular cells expressing high levels of chemokine ligand, CXCL12. Interestingly, a number of cytokines and growth factors including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-7, IL-15, Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) were also found to be differentially expressed by F-OST and F-RET cells. Further microarray analyses indicated important mechanisms used by the two stromal compartments in order to create and coordinate the 'quiescent' and 'proliferative' niches in which hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors reside.

  9. Osteoblastic Wnts differentially regulate bone remodeling and the maintenance of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yong; Lu, Cheng; Cao, Jingjing; Zhou, Rujiang; Yao, Yiyun; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Lingling; Zhao, Haixia; Li, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianzhi; Zhu, Xuming; He, Lin; Liu, Yongzhong; Yao, Zhengju; Yang, Xiao; Guo, Xizhi

    2013-07-01

    Wnt signaling has important roles in embryonic bone development and postnatal bone remodeling, but inconsistent impact on bone property is observed in different genetic alterations of Lrp5 and β-catenin. More importantly, it is still controversial whether Lrp5 regulate bone formation locally or globally through gut-derived serotonin. Here we explored the function of Wnt proteins in osteoblastic niche through inactivation of the Wntless (Wls) gene, which abrogates the secretion of Wnts. The depletion of Wls in osteoblast progenitor cells resulted in severe osteopenia with more profound defects in osteoblastogenesis, osteoclastogenesis and maintenance of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) compared to that observed in Lrp5 and β-catenin mutants. These findings support the point of view that Wnt/Lrp5 signaling locally regulates bone mass accrual through multiple effects of osteoblastic Wnts on osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. Moreover, osteoblastic Wnts confer a niche role for maintenance of BMSCs, providing novel cues for the definition of BMSCs niche in bone marrow.

  10. Effect of dexamethasone on moesin gene expression in rabbit bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cornet, F; Broux, O; Anselme, K; Hardouin, P; Jeanfils, J

    2004-10-01

    The influence of dexamethasone on rabbit bone marrow stromal cells differentiation was studied by screening the action of dexamethasone on gene expression. Using differential display, we observed some differential amplifications. The use of five of thirteen different primers combination allowed to identify one or more differential bands. One of them was identified as moesin gene. Real-time PCR confirmed a significant reduction of moesin gene expression following dexamethasone treatment. The decrease of expression for this protein, involved in cytoskeletal organization, could explain the effects of dexamethasone treatment on bone marrow stromal cells differentiation.

  11. Bone formation by three-dimensional stromal osteoblast culture in biodegradable polymer scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishaug, S. L.; Crane, G. M.; Miller, M. J.; Yasko, A. W.; Yaszemski, M. J.; Mikos, A. G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Bone formation was investigated in vitro by culturing stromal osteoblasts in three-dimensional (3-D), biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams. Three polymer foam pore sizes, ranging from 150-300, 300-500, and 500-710 microns, and two different cell seeding densities, 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 and 22.1 x 10(5) cells/cm2, were examined over a 56-day culture period. The polymer foams supported the proliferation of seeded osteoblasts as well as their differentiated function, as demonstrated by high alkaline phosphatase activity and deposition of a mineralized matrix by the cells. Cell number, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineral deposition increased significantly over time for all the polymer foams. Osteoblast foam constructs created by seeding 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 on foams with 300-500 microns pores resulted in a cell density of 4.63 x 10(5) cells/cm2 after 1 day in culture; they had alkaline phosphatase activities of 4.28 x 10(-7) and 2.91 x 10(-6) mumol/cell/min on Days 7 and 28, respectively; and they had a cell density that increased to 18.7 x 10(5) cells/cm2 by Day 56. For the same constructs, the mineralized matrix reached a maximum penetration depth of 240 microns from the top surface of the foam and a value of 0.083 mm for mineralized tissue volume per unit of cross sectional area. Seeding density was an important parameter for the constructs, but pore size over the range tested did not affect cell proliferation or function. This study suggests the feasibility of using poly(alpha-hydroxy ester) foams as scaffolding materials for the transplantation of autogenous osteoblasts to regenerate bone tissue.

  12. Bone formation by three-dimensional stromal osteoblast culture in biodegradable polymer scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ishaug, S L; Crane, G M; Miller, M J; Yasko, A W; Yaszemski, M J; Mikos, A G

    1997-07-01

    Bone formation was investigated in vitro by culturing stromal osteoblasts in three-dimensional (3-D), biodegradable poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) foams. Three polymer foam pore sizes, ranging from 150-300, 300-500, and 500-710 microns, and two different cell seeding densities, 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 and 22.1 x 10(5) cells/cm2, were examined over a 56-day culture period. The polymer foams supported the proliferation of seeded osteoblasts as well as their differentiated function, as demonstrated by high alkaline phosphatase activity and deposition of a mineralized matrix by the cells. Cell number, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineral deposition increased significantly over time for all the polymer foams. Osteoblast foam constructs created by seeding 6.83 x 10(5) cells/cm2 on foams with 300-500 microns pores resulted in a cell density of 4.63 x 10(5) cells/cm2 after 1 day in culture; they had alkaline phosphatase activities of 4.28 x 10(-7) and 2.91 x 10(-6) mumol/cell/min on Days 7 and 28, respectively; and they had a cell density that increased to 18.7 x 10(5) cells/cm2 by Day 56. For the same constructs, the mineralized matrix reached a maximum penetration depth of 240 microns from the top surface of the foam and a value of 0.083 mm for mineralized tissue volume per unit of cross sectional area. Seeding density was an important parameter for the constructs, but pore size over the range tested did not affect cell proliferation or function. This study suggests the feasibility of using poly(alpha-hydroxy ester) foams as scaffolding materials for the transplantation of autogenous osteoblasts to regenerate bone tissue.

  13. Bone Marrow Stromal Stem Cells in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Polymeri, A; Giannobile, W V; Kaigler, D

    2016-11-01

    Bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are adult multipotent cells, which have the potential to differentiate into cell types of mesodermal origin, namely osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Due to their accessibility and expansion potential, BMSCs have historically held therapeutic promise in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. More recently, it has been demonstrated that not only can bone marrow stromal stem cells directly participate in tissue regeneration, but they also have the capacity to migrate to distant sites of tissue injury, where they can participate in tissue repair either directly through their differentiation or indirectly through paracrine mechanisms. Additionally, they can elicit various immunomodulatory signals, which can attenuate the inflammatory and immune responses. As such, bone marrow stromal stem cells have been explored clinically for treatment of a wide variety of different conditions including bone defects, graft-vs.-host disease, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and liver and kidney diseases. This review provides an overview of current clinical applications of bone marrow stromal stem cells and discusses their therapeutic properties, while also addressing limitations of their use. PubMed, Ovid, and Google Scholar online databases were searched using several keywords, including "stem cells", "tissue engineering", tissue regeneration" and "clinical trials". Additionally, Clinical trials.gov was used to locate completed clinical trials using bone marrow derived stem cells.

  14. Extracellular inorganic phosphate regulates gibbon ape leukemia virus receptor-2/phosphate transporter mRNA expression in rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Keinoshin; Mizuno, Morimichi; Komori, Takahide; Tamura, Masato

    2004-01-01

    In mammalian cells, several observations indicate not only that phosphate transport probably regulates local inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration, but also that Pi affects normal cellular metabolism, which in turn regulates apoptosis and the process of mineralization. To elucidate how extracellular Pi regulates cellular functions of pre-osteoblastic cells, we investigated the expression of type III sodium (Na)-dependent Pi transporters in rat bone marrow stromal cells and ROB-C26 pre-osteoblastic cells. The mRNA expression level of gibbon ape leukemia virus receptor (Glvr)-2 was increased by the addition of Pi in rat bone marrow stromal cells, but not in ROB-C26 or normal rat kidney (NRK) cells. In contrast, the level of Glvr-1 mRNA was not altered by the addition of extracellular Pi in these cells. The induction of Glvr-2 mRNA by Pi was inhibited in the presence of cycloheximide (CHX). Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) /extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway inhibitors; U0126 (1.4-diamino-2, 3-dicyano-1, 4-bis [2-amino-phenylthio] butadiene) and PD98059 (2'-Amino-3'-methoxyflavone) inhibited inducible Glvr-2 mRNA expression, but p38 MEK inhibitor SB203580 [4-(4'-fluorophenyl)-2-(4'-methyl-sulfinylphenyl)-5-(4'pyridyl) imidazole] did not inhibit the induction of Glvr-2 mRNA expression, suggesting that extracellular Pi regulates de novo protein synthesis and MEK/ERK activity in rat bone marrow stromal cells, and through these, induction of Glvr-2 mRNA. Although Pi also induced osteopontin mRNA expression in rat bone marrow stromal cells but not in ROB-C26 and NRK cells, changes in cell viability with the addition of Pi were similar in both cell types. These data indicate that extracellular Pi regulates Glvr-2 mRNA expression, provide insights into possible mechanisms whereby Pi may regulate protein phosphorylation, and suggest a potential role for the Pi transporter in rat bone marrow stromal cells.

  15. Glycosaminoglycans enhance osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Smitha; Mathew, Suja Ann; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Bhonde, Ramesh; Totey, Satish

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular matrix plays an important role in regulating cell growth and differentiation. The biomimetic approach of cell-based tissue engineering is based on mirroring this in vivo micro environment for developing a functional tissue engineered construct. In this study, we treated normal tissue culture plates with selected extracellular matrix components consisting of glycosaminoglycans such as chondroitin-4-sulphate, dermatan sulphate, chondroitin-6-sulphate, heparin and hyaluronic acid. Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from adult human bone marrow were cultured on the glycosaminoglycan treated culture plates to evaluate their regulatory role in cell growth and osteoblast differentiation. Although no significant improvement on human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation was observed on the glycosaminoglycan-treated tissue culture plates, there was selective osteoblast differentiation, indicating its potential role in differentiation rather than proliferation. Osteoblast differentiation studies showed high osteogenic potential for all tested glycosaminoglycans except chondroitin-4-sulphate. Osteoblast differentiation-associated genes such as osterix, osteocalcin, integrin binding sialoprotein, osteonectin and collagen, type 1, alpha 1 showed significant upregulation. We identified osterix as the key transcription factor responsible for the enhanced bone matrix deposition observed on hyaluronic acid, heparin and chondroitin-6-sulphate. Hyaluronic acid provided the most favourable condition for osteoblast differentiation and bone matrix synthesis. Our results confirm and emphasise the significant role of extracellular matrix in regulating cell differentiation. To summarise, glycosaminoglycans of extracellular matrix played a significant role in regulating osteoblast differentiation and could be exploited in the biomimetic approach of fabricating or functionalizing scaffolds for stem cell based bone tissue engineering.

  16. Dexamethasone Regulates EphA5, a Potential Inhibitory Factor with Osteogenic Capability of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Yasuda, Hiroaki; Okawa, Atsushi; Sotome, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the importance of quality management procedures for the handling of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) and provided evidence for the existence of osteogenic inhibitor molecules in BMSCs. One candidate inhibitor is the ephrin type-A receptor 5 (EphA5), which is expressed in hBMSCs and upregulated during long-term culture. In this study, forced expression of EphA5 diminished the expression of osteoblast phenotypic markers. Downregulation of endogenous EphA5 by dexamethasone treatment promoted osteoblast marker expression. EphA5 could be involved in the normal growth regulation of BMSCs and could be a potential marker for replicative senescence. Although Eph forward signaling stimulated by ephrin-B-Fc promoted the expression of ALP mRNA in BMSCs, exogenous addition of EphA5-Fc did not affect the ALP level. The mechanism underlying the silencing of EphA5 in early cultures remains unclear. EphA5 promoter was barely methylated in hBMSCs while histone deacetylation could partially suppress EphA5 expression in early-passage cultures. In repeatedly passaged cultures, the upregulation of EphA5 independent of methylation could competitively inhibit osteogenic signal transduction pathways such as EphB forward signaling. Elucidation of the potential inhibitory function of EphA5 in hBMSCs may provide an alternative approach for lineage differentiation in cell therapy strategies and regenerative medicine. PMID:27057165

  17. Osteogenic induction of bone marrow-derived stromal cells on simvastatin-releasing, biodegradable, nano- to microscale fiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Wadagaki, Ryu; Mizuno, Daiki; Yamawaki-Ogata, Aika; Satake, Makoto; Kaneko, Hiroaki; Hagiwara, Sumitaka; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Narita, Yuji; Hibi, Hideharu; Ueda, Minoru

    2011-07-01

    Tissue engineering is an effective approach for the treatment of bone defects. Statins have been demonstrated to promote osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs). Electrospun biodegradable fibers have also shown applicability to drug delivery in the form of bone tissue engineered scaffolds with nano- to microscale topography and high porosity similar to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a simvastatin-releasing, biodegradable, nano- to microscale fiber scaffold (SRBFS) for bone tissue engineering with BMSCs. Simvastatin was released from SRBFS slowly. BMSCs were observed to spread actively and rigidly adhere to SRBFS. BMSCs on SRBFS showed an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity 2 weeks after cell culture. Furthermore, osteoclastogenesis was suppressed by SRBFS in vitro. The new bone formation and mineralization in the SRBFS group were significantly better than in the biodegradable fiber scaffold (BFS) without simvastatin 12 weeks after implantation of the cell-scaffold construct into an ectopic site on the murine back. These results suggest that SRBFS promoted osteoblastic differentiation of BMSCs in vitro and in vivo, and demonstrate feasibility as a bone engineering scaffold.

  18. Low-frequency vibration treatment of bone marrow stromal cells induces bone repair in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Shengwei; Zhao, Wenzhi; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Lidong; Du, Guangyu; Sun, Chuanxiu; Sun, Xuegang

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): To study the effect of low-frequency vibration on bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and potential bone repair in vivo. Materials and Methods: Forty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups with eight rabbits in each group. For each group, bone defects were generated in the left humerus of four rabbits, and in the right humerus of the other four rabbits. To test differentiation, bones were isolated and demineralized, supplemented with bone marrow stromal cells, and implanted into humerus bone defects. Varying frequencies of vibration (0, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 Hz) were applied to each group for 30 min each day for four weeks. When the bone defects integrated, they were then removed for histological examination. mRNA transcript levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligan, and pre-collagen type 1 α were measured. Results: Humeri implanted with bone marrow stromal cells displayed elevated callus levels and wider, more prevalent, and denser trabeculae following treatment at 25 and 50 Hz. The mRNA levels of runt-related transcription factor 2, osteoprotegerin, receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand, and pre-collagen type 1 α were also markedly higher following 25 and 50 Hz treatment. Conclusion: Low frequency (25–50 Hz) vibration in vivo can promote bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and repair bone injury. PMID:28133520

  19. Notch signaling maintains bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors by suppressing osteoblast differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Matthew J.; Tu, Xiaolin; Wu, Ximei; Bai, Shuting; Zhao, Haibo; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Teitelbaum, Steven L.; Ross, F. Patrick; Kopan, Raphael; Long, Fanxin

    2009-01-01

    Postnatal bone marrow houses mesenchymal progenitor cells that are osteoblast precursors. These cells have established therapeutic potential 1 but they are difficult to maintain and expand in vitro, presumably because little is known about the mechanisms controlling their fate decisions. To investigate the potential role of Notch signaling in osteoblastogenesis, we used conditional alleles to genetically remove components of the Notch signaling system during skeletal development. We find that Notch disruption in the limb skeletogenic mesenchyme markedly enhanced trabecular bone mass in adolescent mice. Notably, mesenchymal progenitors were virtually depleted in the bone marrow of the high-bone-mass animals. As a result, these animals developed severe osteopenia as they aged. Moreover, Notch appeared to inhibit osteoblast differentiation through Hes/Hey proteins that diminished Runx2 transcriptional activity via physical interaction. These results support a model wherein Notch signaling in bone marrow normally acts to maintain a pool of mesenchymal progenitors by suppressing osteoblast differentiation. Thus, mesechymal progenitors may be expanded in vitro by activating Notch, whereas bone formation in vivo may be enhanced by transiently suppressing this pathway. PMID:18297083

  20. ERR{alpha} regulates osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Pollock, Hanna; Aarnisalo, Piia

    2010-05-28

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-{alpha} (ERR{alpha}) has been reported to have both a positive and a negative regulatory role in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. We have studied the role of ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from ERR{alpha} deficient mice and their differentiation capacities were compared to that of the wild-type cells. ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced cellular proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralization. In the complementary experiment, overexpression of ERR{alpha} in MC3T3-E1 cells increased the expression of osteoblastic markers and mineralization. Alterations in the expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) may at least partially explain the effects on mineralization as BSP expression was reduced in ERR{alpha} deficient MSCs and enhanced upon ERR{alpha} overexpression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter construct driven by the BSP promoter was efficiently transactivated by ERR{alpha}. Under adipogenic conditions, ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced adipocytic differentiation. Our data thus propose a positive role for ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. The variability in the results yielded in the different studies implies that ERR{alpha} may play different roles in bone under different physiological conditions.

  1. Stromal cells from human long-term marrow cultures, but not cultured marrow fibroblasts, phagocytose horse serum constituents: studies with a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a species-specific epitope common to multiple horse serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Charbord, P; Tippens, D; Wight, T S; Gown, A M; Singer, J W

    1987-01-01

    This report describes an IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody derived after immunization of mice with washed stromal cells from human, long-term bone marrow cultures. The antigen recognized by the antibody (BMS-1) is a carbohydrate-containing prosthetic group that is common to and specific for multiple horse serum proteins. These proteins are avidly ingested by stromal cells and concentrated in endocytic vesicles. Cultured smooth muscle cells took up the horse proteins in a similar manner to marrow stromal cells while cultured marrow fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and hepatoma cells did not. These data indicate that marrow stromal cells specifically accumulate horse serum proteins which might partially explain the horse serum requirement for long-term marrow culture maintenance. The data also suggest further similarities between marrow stromal and smooth muscle cells and additional differences between marrow fibroblasts and marrow stromal cells.

  2. Strain energy density gradients in bone marrow predict osteoblast and osteoclast activity: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Webster, Duncan; Schulte, Friederike A; Lambers, Floor M; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2015-03-18

    Huiskes et al. hypothesized that mechanical strains sensed by osteocytes residing in trabecular bone dictate the magnitude of load-induced bone formation. More recently, the mechanical environment in bone marrow has also been implicated in bone׳s response to mechanical stimulation. In this study, we hypothesize that trabecular load-induced bone formation can be predicted by mechanical signals derived from an integrative µFE model, incorporating a description of both the bone and marrow phase. Using the mouse tail loading model in combination with in vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) we tracked load induced changes in the sixth caudal vertebrae of C57BL/6 mice to quantify the amount of newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes. To identify the mechanical signals responsible for adaptation, local morphometric changes were compared to micro-finite element (µFE) models of vertebrae prior to loading. The mechanical parameters calculated were strain energy density (SED) on trabeculae at bone forming and resorbing surfaces, SED in the marrow at the boundary between bone forming and resorbing surfaces, along with SED in the trabecular bone and marrow volumes. The gradients of each parameter were also calculated. Simple regression analysis showed mean SED gradients in the trabecular bone matrix to significantly correlate with newly mineralized and eroded bone volumes R(2)=0.57 and 0.41, respectively, p<0.001). Nevertheless, SED gradients in the marrow were shown to be the best predictor of osteoblastic and osteoclastic activity (R(2)=0.83 and 0.60, respectively, p<0.001). These data suggest that the mechanical environment of the bone marrow plays a significant role in determining osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated with bovine tendon extract acquire the phenotype of mature tenocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Lívia Maria Mendonça; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; dos Santos Cavalcanti, Amanda; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, in tenocytes after treatment with bovine tendon extract. Methods Bovine tendons were used for preparation of the extract and were stored at −80 °C. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the bone marrow of three donors were used for cytotoxicity tests by means of MTT and cell differentiation by means of qPCR. Results The data showed that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated for up to 21 days in the presence of bovine tendon extract diluted at diminishing concentrations (1:10, 1:50 and 1:250) promoted activation of biglycan, collagen type I and fibromodulin expression. Conclusion Our results show that bovine tendon extract is capable of promoting differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in tenocytes. PMID:26962503

  4. Disruption of the Fgf2 Gene Activates the Adipogenic and Suppresses the Osteogenic Program in Mesenchymal Marrow Stromal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Liping; Sobue, Takanori; Eisliger, Alycia; Kronenberg, Mark. S; Coffin, J. Douglas; Doetschman, Thomas; Hurley, Marja M.

    2010-01-01

    Here we determine the Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (FGF2) dependency of the time course of changes in bone mass in female mice. This study extends our earlier reports that knockout of the FGF2 gene (Fgf2) caused low turnover bone loss in Fgf2−/− male mice by examining bone loss with age in Fgf2−/− female mice, and by assessing whether reduced bone formation is associated with differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) towards the adipocyte lineage. Bone mineral density (BMD) was similar in 3 month old female Fgf2+/+ and Fgf2−/− mice but was significantly reduced as early as 5 months of age in Fgf2−/− mice. In vivo studies showed that there was a greater accumulation of marrow fat in long bones of 14 and 20 month old Fgf2−/− mice compared with Fgf2+/+ littermates. To study the effect of disruption of FGF2 on osteoblastogenesis and adipogenesis, BMSCs from both genotypes were cultured in osteogenic or adipogenic media. Reduced alkaline phosphatase positive (ALP), mineralized colonies and a marked increase in adipocytes were observed in Fgf2−/− BMSC cultures. These cultures also showed an increase in the mRNA of the adipogenic transcription factor PPARγ2 as well as the downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. Treatment with exogenous FGF2 blocked adipocyte formation and increased ALP colony formation and ALP activity in BMSC cultures of both genotypes. These results support an important role for endogenous FGF2 in osteoblast (OB) lineage determination. Alteration in FGF2 signaling may contribute to impaired OB bone formation capacity and to increased bone marrow fat accumulation both of which are characteristics of aged bone. PMID:20510392

  5. Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Generate Muscle Cells and Repair Muscle Degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Itokazu, Yutaka; Yoshihara, Tomoyuki; Hoshino, Mikio; Takeda, Shin-ichi; Ide, Chizuka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-07-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents. We report a method for inducing skeletal muscle lineage cells from human and rat general adherent MSCs with an efficiency of 89%. Induced cells differentiated into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. The induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contributed to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. These MSCs represent a more ready supply of myogenic cells than do the rare myogenic stem cells normally found in muscle and bone marrow.

  6. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML.

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles rescue radiation damage to murine marrow hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sicheng; Dooner, Mark; Cheng, Yan; Papa, Elaine; Del Tatto, Michael; Pereira, Mandy; Deng, Yanhui; Goldberg, Laura; Aliotta, Jason; Chatterjee, Devasis; Stewart, Connor; Carpanetto, Andrea; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Camussi, Giovanni; Quesenberry, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to reverse radiation damage to marrow stem cells. We have evaluated the capacity of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) to mitigate radiation injury to marrow stem cells at 4 hours to 7 days after irradiation. Significant restoration of marrow stem cell engraftment at 4, 24 and 168 hours post-irradiation by exposure to MSC-EVs was observed at 3 weeks to 9 months after transplant and further confirmed by secondary engraftment. Intravenous injection of MSC-EVs to 500cGy exposed mice led to partial recovery of peripheral blood counts and restoration of the engraftment of marrow. The murine hematopoietic cell line, FDC-P1 exposed to 500 cGy, showed reversal of growth inhibition, DNA damage and apoptosis on exposure to murine or human MSC-EVs. Both murine and human MSC-EVs reverse radiation damage to murine marrow cells and stimulate normal murine marrow stem cell/progenitors to proliferate. A preparation with both exosomes and microvesicles was found to be superior to either microvesicles or exosomes alone. Biologic activity was seen in freshly isolated vesicles and in vesicles stored for up to 6 months in 10% DMSO at −80°C. These studies indicate that MSC-EVs can reverse radiation damage to bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27150009

  8. Role of Nanog in the maintenance of marrow stromal stem cells during post natal bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Bais, Manish V.; Shabin, Zabrina M.; Young, Megan; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Kotton, Darrell N.; Gerstnefeld, Louis C.

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog is related to marrow stromal stem cell maintenance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nanog expression is seen during post natal surgical bone repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanog knockdown decreases post surgical bone regeneration. -- Abstract: Post natal bone repair elicits a regenerative mechanism that restores the injured tissue to its pre-injury cellular composition and structure and is believed to recapitulate the embryological processes of bone formation. Prior studies showed that Nanog, a central epigenetic regulator associated with the maintenance of embryonic stem cells (ESC) was transiently expressed during fracture healing, Bais et al. . In this study, we show that murine bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) before they are induced to undergo osteogenic differentiation express {approx}50 Multiplication-Sign the background levels of Nanog seen in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and the W20-17 murine marrow stromal cell line stably expresses Nanog at {approx}80 Multiplication-Sign the MEF levels. Nanog expression in this cell line was inhibited by BMP7 treatment and Nanog lentivrial shRNA knockdown induced the expression of the terminal osteogenic gene osteocalcin. Lentivrial shRNA knockdown or lentiviral overexpression of Nanog in bone MSCs had inverse effects on proliferation, with knockdown decreasing and overexpression increasing MSC cell proliferation. Surgical marrow ablation of mouse tibia by medullary reaming led to a {approx}3-fold increase in Nanog that preceded osteogenic differentiation during intramembranous bone formation. Lentiviral shRNA knockdown of Nanog after surgical ablation led to an initial overexpression of osteogenic gene expression with no initial effect on bone formation but during subsequent remodeling of the newly formed bone a {approx}50% decrease was seen in the expression of terminal osteogenic gene expression and a {approx}50% loss in trabecular bone mass. This

  9. The influence of stereolithographic scaffold architecture and composition on osteogenic signal expression with rat bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyobum; Dean, David; Wallace, Jonathan; Breithaupt, Rob; Mikos, Antonios G.; Fisher, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Scaffold design parameters, especially physical construction factors such as mechanical stiffness of substrate materials, pore size of 3D porous scaffolds, and channel geometry, are known to influence the osteogenic signal expression and subsequent differentiation of a transplanted cell population. In this study of photocrosslinked poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) and diethyl fumarate (DEF) scaffolds, the effect of DEF incorporation ratio and pore size on the osteogenic signal expression of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was investigated. Results demonstrated that DEF concentrations and pore sizes that led to increased scaffold mechanical stiffness also upregulated osteogenic signal expression, including bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), fibroblast growth factors-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Runx2 transcriptional factor. Similar scaffold fabrication parameters supported rapid BMSC osteoblastic differentiation, as demonstrated by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and osteocalcin expression. When scaffolds with random architecture, fabricated by porogen leaching, were compared to those with controlled architecture, fabricated by stereolithography (SLA), results showed that SLA scaffolds with the highly permeable and porous channels also have significantly higher expression of FGF-2, TGF-β1, and VEGF. Subsequent ALP expression and osteopontin secretion were also significantly increased in SLA scaffolds. Based upon these results, we conclude that scaffold properties provided by additive manufacturing techniques such as SLA fabrication, particularly increased mechanical stiffness and high permeability, may stimulate dramatic BMSC responses that promote rapid bone tissue regeneration. PMID:21396709

  10. Selection of highly osteogenic and chondrogenic cells from bone marrow stromal cells in biocompatible polymer-coated plates.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Iwata, K; Ogasawara, T; Watanabe, J; Fukazawa, K; Ishihara, K; Asawa, Y; Fujihara, Y; Chung, U-L; Moro, T; Takatori, Y; Takato, T; Nakamura, K; Kawaguchi, H; Hoshi, K

    2010-03-15

    To enrich the subpopulation that preserves self-renewal and multipotentiality from conventionally prepared bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs), we attempted to use 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) polymer-coated plates that selected the MSCs with strong adhesion ability and evaluated the proliferation ability or osteogenic/chondrogenic potential of the MPC polymer-selected MSCs. The number of MSCs that were attached to the MPC polymer-coated plates decreased with an increase in the density of MPC unit (0-10%), whereas no significant difference in the proliferation ability was seen among these cells. The surface epitopes of CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and not CD34 or CD45, were detectable in the cells of all MPC polymer-coated plates, implying that they belong to the MSC category. In the osteogenic and chondrogenic induction, the MSCs selected by the 2-5% MPC unit composition showed higher expression levels of osteoblastic and chondrocytic markers (COL1A1/ALP, or COL2A1/COL10A1/Sox9) at passage 2, compared with those of 0-1% or even 10% MPC unit composition, while the enhanced effects continued by passage 5. The selection based on the adequate cell adhesiveness by the MPC polymer-coated plates could improve the osteogenic and chondrogenic potential of MSCs, which would provide cell sources that can be used to treat the more severe and various bone/cartilage diseases.

  11. Mechanical stimulation promote the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells through epigenetic regulation of Sonic Hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuandong; Shan, Shengzhou; Wang, Chenglong; Wang, Jing; Li, Jiao; Hu, Guoli; Dai, Kerong; Li, Qingfeng; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2017-03-15

    Mechanical unloading leads to bone loss and disuse osteoporosis partly due to impaired osteoblastogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS) promotes osteoblastogenesis of BMSCs both in vivo and in vitro. Besides, we found that Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway was activated in this process. Inhibition of which by either knockdown of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) or treating BMSCs with Hh inhibitors attenuated the osteogenic effect of CMS on BMSCs, suggesting that Hh signaling pathway acts as an endogenous mediator of mechanical stimuli on BMSCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Shh expression level was regulated by DNA methylation mechanism. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that DNA methyltransferase 3b (Dnmt3b) binds to Shh gene promoter, leading to DNA hypermethylation in mechanical unloading BMSCs. However, mechanical stimulation down-regulates the protein level of Dnmt3b, results in DNA demethylation and Shh expression. More importantly, we found that inhibition of Dnmt3b partly rescued bone loss in HU mice by mechanical unloading. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that mechanical stimulation regulates osteoblastic genes expression via direct regulation of Dnmt3b, and the therapeutic inhibition of Dnmt3b may be an efficient strategy for enhancing bone formation under mechanical unloading.

  12. Flow perfusion enhances the calcified matrix deposition of marrow stromal cells in biodegradable nonwoven fiber mesh scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sikavitsas, Vassilios I; Bancroft, Gregory N; Lemoine, Jeremy J; Liebschner, Michael A K; Dauner, Martin; Mikos, Antonios G

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we report on the ability of resorbable poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) nonwoven scaffolds to support the attachment, growth, and differentiation of marrow stromal cells (MSCs) under fluid flow. Rat MSCs were isolated from young male Wistar rats and expanded using established methods. The cells were then seeded on PLLA nonwoven fiber meshes. The PLLA nonwoven fiber meshes had 99% porosity, 17 microm fiber diameter, 10 mm scaffold diameter, and 1.7-mm thickness. The nonwoven PLLA meshes were seeded with a cell suspension of 5 x 10(5) cells in 300 microl, and cultured in a flow perfusion bioreactor and under static conditions. Cell/polymer nonwoven scaffolds cultured under flow perfusion had significantly higher amounts of calcified matrix deposited on them after 16 days of culture. Microcomputed tomography revealed that the in vitro generated extracellular matrix in the scaffolds cultured under static conditions was denser at the periphery of the scaffold while in the scaffolds cultured in the perfusion bioreactor the extracellular matrix demonstrated a more homogeneous distribution. These results show that flow perfusion accelerates the proliferation and differentiation of MSCs, seeded on nonwoven PLLA scaffolds, toward the osteoblastic phenotype, and improves the distribution of the in vitro generated calcified extracellular matrix.

  13. The Role of the Bone Marrow Stromal Compartment in the Hematopoietic Response to Microbial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nombela-Arrieta, César; Isringhausen, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Continuous production of blood cells unfolds within a complex three-dimensional tissue scaffold established by highly organized stromal cell networks of mesenchymal, neural, and vascular origin inside bone marrow (BM) cavities. Collectively, stromal cells have been shown to serve two principal roles; first as primary participants of bone remodeling and metabolism and second as master regulators of different stages of blood cell development and production. Indeed, ample evidence demonstrates that stromal cells can sense and integrate systemic signals to shape hematopoietic responses and that these regulatory mechanisms are subverted in multiple pathologic conditions. Microbial infections are stressors that elicit potent inflammatory reactions and induce substantial alterations of hematopoietic output. Whether the cellular components of the BM stromal microenvironment are targeted by infections and participate in infection-induced hematopoiesis has not been investigated in sufficient detail to date. In this manuscript, we provide a succinct updated overview of the different cell populations that are currently known to form BM stroma. We discuss experimental evidence demonstrating that different stromal components are actively damaged or functionally altered by pathogens and/or ensuing inflammatory signals and review how these effects are known to contribute to the hematologic manifestations observed during infections. PMID:28163704

  14. Ephrin B1 regulates bone marrow stromal cell differentiation and bone formation by influencing TAZ transactivation via complex formation with NHERF1.

    PubMed

    Xing, Weirong; Kim, Jonghyun; Wergedal, Jon; Chen, Shin-Tai; Mohan, Subburaman

    2010-02-01

    Mutations of ephrin B1 in humans result in craniofrontonasal syndrome. Because little is known of the role and mechanism of action of ephrin B1 in bone, we examined the function of osteoblast-produced ephrin B1 in vivo and identified the molecular mechanism by which ephrin B1 reverse signaling regulates bone formation. Targeted deletion of the ephrin B1 gene in type 1alpha2 collagen-producing cells resulted in severe calvarial defects, decreased bone size, bone mineral density, and trabecular bone volume, caused by impairment in osterix expression and osteoblast differentiation. Coimmunoprecipitation of the TAZ complex with TAZ-specific antibody revealed a protein complex containing ephrin B1, PTPN13, NHERF1, and TAZ in bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells. Activation of ephrin B1 reverse signaling with soluble EphB2-Fc led to a time-dependent increase in TAZ dephosphorylation and shuttling from cytoplasm to nucleus. Treatment of BMS cells with exogenous EphB2-Fc resulted in a 4-fold increase in osterix expression as determined by Western blotting. Disruption of TAZ expression using specific lentivirus small hairpin RNA (shRNA) decreased TAZ mRNA by 80% and ephrin B1 reverse signaling-mediated increases in osterix mRNA by 75%. Knockdown of NHERF1 expression reduced basal levels of osterix expression by 90% and abolished ephrin B1-mediated induction of osterix expression. We conclude that locally produced ephrin B1 mediates its effects on osteoblast differentiation by a novel molecular mechanism in which activation of reverse signaling leads to dephosphorylation of TAZ and subsequent release of TAZ from the ephrin B1/NHERF1/TAZ complex to translocate to the nucleus to induce expression of the osterix gene and perhaps other osteoblast differentiation genes. Our findings provide strong evidence that ephrin B1 reverse signaling in osteoblasts is critical for BMS cell differentiation and bone formation.

  15. Glycitin regulates osteoblasts through TGF-β or AKT signaling pathways in bone marrow stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liyan; Chen, Jiying; Chai, Wei; Ni, Min; Sun, Xin; Tian, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of glycitin on the regulation of osteoblasts from bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) through transforming growth factor (TGF)-β or protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathways. BMSCs were extracted from New Zealand white rabbits and used to analyze the effect of glycitin on BMSCs. BMSCs were cleared using xylene and observed via light microscopy. BMSCs were subsequently induced with glycitin (0.01, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10 µM) for 7 days, and stained with Oil Red O. The mechanism of action of glycitin on BMSCs was investigated, in which contact with collagen type I (Col I), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), TGF-β and AKT was studied. Firstly, BMSCs appeared homogeneously mazarine blue, and which showed that BMSCs were successful extracted. Administration of glycitin increased cell proliferation and promoted osteoblast formation from BMSCs. Furthermore, glycitin activated the gene expression of Col I and ALP in BMSCs. Notably, glycitin suppressed protein expression of TGF-β and AKT in BMSCs. These results indicated that glycitin may regulate osteoblasts through TGF-β or AKT signaling pathways in BMSCs. PMID:27882117

  16. Gene expression profile of human bone marrow stromal cells: high-throughput expressed sequence tag sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Libin; Young, Marian F; Powell, John; Yang, Liming; Ho, Nicola C; Hotchkiss, Robert; Robey, Pamela Gehron; Francomano, Clair A

    2002-01-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSC) are pluripotent cells with the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myelosupportive stroma, and marrow adipocytes. We used high-throughput DNA sequencing analysis to generate 4258 single-pass sequencing reactions (known as expressed sequence tags, or ESTs) obtained from the 5' (97) and 3' (4161) ends of human cDNA clones from a HBMSC cDNA library. Our goal was to obtain tag sequences from the maximum number of possible genes and to deposit them in the publicly accessible database for ESTs (dbEST of the National Center for Biotechnology Information). Comparisons of our EST sequencing data with nonredundant human mRNA and protein databases showed that the ESTs represent 1860 gene clusters. The EST sequencing data analysis showed 60 novel genes found only in this cDNA library after BLAST analysis against 3.0 million ESTs in NCBI's dbEST database. The BLAST search also showed the identified ESTs that have close homology to known genes, which suggests that these may be newly recognized members of known gene families. The gene expression profile of this cell type is revealed by analyzing both the frequency with which a message is encountered and the functional categorization of expressed sequences. Comparing an EST sequence with the human genomic sequence database enables assignment of an EST to a specific chromosomal region (a process called digital gene localization) and often enables immediate partial determination of intron/exon boundaries within the genomic structure. It is expected that high-throughput EST sequencing and data mining analysis will greatly promote our understanding of gene expression in these cells and of growth and development of the skeleton.

  17. Transcriptomic profile induced in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after interaction with multiple myeloma cells: implications in myeloma progression and myeloma bone disease.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; De Las Rivas, Javier; Ocio, Enrique M; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Montero, Juan C; Martín, Montserrat; Blanco, Juan F; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermín M; Pandiella, Atanasio; San Miguel, Jesús F; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-09-30

    Despite evidence about the implication of the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment in multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth and survival, little is known about the effects of myelomatous cells on BM stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from healthy donors (dMSCs) or myeloma patients (pMSCs) were co-cultured with the myeloma cell line MM.1S, and the transcriptomic profile of MSCs induced by this interaction was analyzed. Deregulated genes after co-culture common to both d/pMSCs revealed functional involvement in tumor microenvironment cross-talk, myeloma growth induction and drug resistance, angiogenesis and signals for osteoclast activation and osteoblast inhibition. Additional genes induced by co-culture were exclusively deregulated in pMSCs and predominantly associated to RNA processing, the ubiquitine-proteasome pathway, cell cycle regulation, cellular stress and non-canonical Wnt signaling. The upregulated expression of five genes after co-culture (CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 in d/pMSCs, and Neuregulin 3 and Norrie disease protein exclusively in pMSCs) was confirmed, and functional in vitro assays revealed putative roles in MM pathophysiology. The transcriptomic profile of pMSCs co-cultured with myeloma cells may better reflect that of MSCs in the BM of myeloma patients, and provides new molecular insights to the contribution of these cells to MM pathophysiology and to myeloma bone disease.

  18. Transcriptomic profile induced in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after interaction with multiple myeloma cells: implications in myeloma progression and myeloma bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Las Rivas, Javier De; Ocio, Enrique M.; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Montero, Juan C.; Martín, Montserrat; Blanco, Juan F.; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermín M.; Pandiella, Atanasio; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Despite evidence about the implication of the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment in multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth and survival, little is known about the effects of myelomatous cells on BM stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from healthy donors (dMSCs) or myeloma patients (pMSCs) were co-cultured with the myeloma cell line MM.1S, and the transcriptomic profile of MSCs induced by this interaction was analyzed. Deregulated genes after co-culture common to both d/pMSCs revealed functional involvement in tumor microenvironment cross-talk, myeloma growth induction and drug resistance, angiogenesis and signals for osteoclast activation and osteoblast inhibition. Additional genes induced by co-culture were exclusively deregulated in pMSCs and predominantly associated to RNA processing, the ubiquitine-proteasome pathway, cell cycle regulation, cellular stress and non-canonical Wnt signaling. The upregulated expression of five genes after co-culture (CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 in d/pMSCs, and Neuregulin 3 and Norrie disease protein exclusively in pMSCs) was confirmed, and functional in vitro assays revealed putative roles in MM pathophysiology. The transcriptomic profile of pMSCs co-cultured with myeloma cells may better reflect that of MSCs in the BM of myeloma patients, and provides new molecular insights to the contribution of these cells to MM pathophysiology and to myeloma bone disease. PMID:25268740

  19. Bone deficit in ovariectomized rats. Functional contribution of the marrow stromal cell population and the effect of oral dihydrotachysterol treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Tabuchi, C; Simmons, D J; Fausto, A; Russell, J E; Binderman, I; Avioli, L V

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the proliferative and osteogenic role of marrow stromal/osteoprogenitor cells in the development of the cortical bone deficit in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. In vitro, clonal growth of marrow stromal cells from OVX rats was significantly impaired (vs. sham-operated controls). Yet in vivo, cells from sham-operated and OVX rats had equal osteogenic potential in several in vivo experimental situations, such as in intraperitoneally implanted millipore diffusion chambers and in intramuscular implants of marrow plus osteoinductive bone matrix (composite grafts). Long-term (6 mo) dihydrotachysterol (DHT) treatment of OVX rats enhanced their in vitro proliferative potential and clonal growth, as well as their osteogenic expression in composite grafts. The observation that the in vivo osteogenic performance of OVX rat marrow stromal cells was normal at extraosseous sites suggests that the mechanisms leading to osteopenia may involve an abnormality in cell-matrix interactions. PMID:3528218

  20. Extracellular calcium (Ca2+(o))-sensing receptor in a murine bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2): potential mediator of the actions of Ca2+(o) on the function of ST2 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Kifor, O.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor that plays key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+(o)) homeostasis by mediating the actions of Ca2+(o) on parathyroid gland and kidney. Bone marrow stromal cells support the formation of osteoclasts from their progenitors as well as the growth of hematopoietic stem cells by secreting humoral factors and through cell to cell contact. Stromal cells also have the capacity to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. Bone resorption by osteoclasts probably produces substantial local increases in Ca2+(o) that could provide a signal for stromal cells in the immediate vicinity, leading us to determine whether such stromal cells express the CaR. In this study, we used the murine bone marrow-derived, stromal cell line, ST2. Both immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis, using an antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in ST2 cells. We also identified CaR transcripts in ST2 cells by Northern analysis using a CaR-specific probe and by RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products. Exposure of ST2 cells to high Ca2+(o) (4.8 mM) or to the polycationic CaR agonists, neomycin (300 microM) or gadolinium (100 microM), stimulated both chemotaxis and DNA synthesis in ST2 cells. Therefore, taken together, our data strongly suggest that the bone marrow-derived stromal cell line, ST2, possesses both CaR protein and messenger RNA that are very similar if not identical to those in parathyroid and kidney. Furthermore, as ST2 cells have the potential to differentiate into osteoblasts, the CaR in stromal cells could participate in bone turnover by stimulating the proliferation and migration of such cells to sites of bone resorption as a result of local, osteoclast-mediated release of Ca2+(o) and, thereafter, initiating bone formation after their differentiation into osteoblasts.

  1. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis.

  2. The differentiation directions of the bone marrow stromal cells under modeling microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Olga; Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Within experiments on rats simulating microgravity by base load remove from back limbs (duration of the experiment 1,5 months) on marrow stromal cells cultures (ex vivo, in vitro) comprising osteogenic cells-predecessors, extracted from femurs, studied their peculiarities of the colony formation ablity, the cell structure, some cytological and ultra-structural characteristics and differentiation direction. It was found that that under microgravity conditions there is a decline of the stromal cells colony formation intensity, decrease of the colonies size and cells mitotic activity that indicates decrease of their growth potential. Both in control and in experiment the colonies were presented by population of low-differentiated cells, differentiated cells and mature cells. The comparative cytological and morphometric analysis have shown that the studied stromal cells in colonies have the smaller sizes, more elongated shape, and higher nucleocytoplasmic ratio. Cells composition in the experiment colonies is reliably different by the ratio of the low-differentiating to being differentiated cells; a ratio of low-differentiated to already differentiated cells; ratio of differentiated cells to total number of all cells. In comparison with control group, amount of the cells passed trough a differentiation stage and mature cells in colonies is decreased by 3 to 4 times. Among the differentiated stromal cells in colonies increasing amount of adipocytes was revealed. The analysis of electron microscope microphotographs showed that in osteogenic cells differentiated under microgravity conditions, there is a reduction of the specific volume of a granular endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi's complex and quantity of nuclei reduction that indicates depression of the specific biosyntheses process intensity in cells. The increase of lysosomes and myelinic structures quantity is linked to organelles partial reduction. Consolidation of mitochondrias is an evidence of the cells’ energy

  3. The use of bone marrow stromal cells (bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells) for alveolar bone tissue engineering: basic science to clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Kagami, Hideaki; Agata, Hideki; Inoue, Minoru; Asahina, Izumi; Tojo, Arinobu; Yamashita, Naohide; Imai, Kohzoh

    2014-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering is a promising field of regenerative medicine in which cultured cells, scaffolds, and osteogenic inductive signals are used to regenerate bone. Human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the most commonly used cell source for bone tissue engineering. Although it is known that cell culture and induction protocols significantly affect the in vivo bone forming ability of BMSCs, the responsible factors of clinical outcome are poorly understood. The results from recent studies using human BMSCs have shown that factors such as passage number and length of osteogenic induction significantly affect ectopic bone formation, although such differences hardly affected the alkaline phosphatase activity or gene expression of osteogenic markers. Application of basic fibroblast growth factor helped to maintain the in vivo osteogenic ability of BMSCs. Importantly, responsiveness of those factors should be tested under clinical circumstances to improve the bone tissue engineering further. In this review, clinical application of bone tissue engineering was reviewed with putative underlying mechanisms.

  4. Interactions between acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow stromal cells influence response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Tesfai, Yordanos; Ford, Jette; Carter, Kim W; Firth, Martin J; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Cole, Catherine; Kees, Ursula R

    2012-03-01

    The cure rate for pediatric patients with B precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) is steadily improving, however relapses do occur despite initial response to therapy. To identify links between drug resistance and gene deregulation we used oligonucleotide microarray technology and determined in 184 pre-B ALL specimen genes differentially expressed compared to normal CD34(+) specimens. We identified 20 signature genes including CTGF, BMP-2, CXCR4 and IL7R, documented to regulate interactions in the bone marrow. We recorded remarkably similar levels of expression in three independent patient cohorts, and found distinct patterns in cytogenetically defined subgroups of pre-B ALL. The canonical pathways that were affected are involved in inter- and intra-cellular communication, regulating signaling within the microenvironment. We tested experimentally whether interaction with stromal cells conferred protection to four drugs used in current ALL therapy, and demonstrated that bone marrow stromal cells significantly influenced resistance to vincristine and cytosine arabinoside. Compounds designed to block the identified cellular interactions within the bone marrow microenvironment are expected to mobilise the leukemic cells and make them more accessible to contemporary antileukemic agents. The data provide novel insight into the pathobiology of ALL and indicate new therapeutic targets for patients with ALL.

  5. The role of osteoblasts in regulating hematopoietic stem cell activity and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Neiva, K; Sun, Y-X; Taichman, R S

    2005-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are critical regulators of hematopoiesis. Osteoblasts are part of the stromal cell support system in bone marrow and may be derived from a common precursor. Several studies suggested that osteoblasts regulate hematopoiesis, yet the entire mechanism is not understood. It is clear, however, that both hematopoietic precursors and osteoblasts interact for the production of osteoclasts and the activation of resorption. We observed that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) regulate osteoblastic secretion of various growth factors, and that osteoblasts express some soluble factors exclusively in the presence of HSCs. Osteoblasts and hematopoietic cells are closely associated with each other in the bone marrow, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between them to develop the HSC niche. One critical component regulating the niche is stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptor CXCR4 which regulates stem cell homing and, as we have recently demonstrated, plays a crucial role in facilitating those tumors which metastasize to bone. Osteoblasts produce abundant amounts of SDF-1 and therefore osteoblasts play an important role in metastasis. These findings are discussed in the context of the role of osteoblasts in marrow function in health and disease.

  6. A simple and efficient method for deriving neurospheres from bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qin; Mu Jun; Li Qi; Li Ao; Zeng Zhilei; Yang Jun; Zhang Xiaodong; Tang Jin; Xie Peng

    2008-08-08

    Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be differentiated into neuronal and glial-like cell types under appropriate experimental conditions. However, previously reported methods are complicated and involve the use of toxic reagents. Here, we present a simplified and nontoxic method for efficient conversion of rat MSCs into neurospheres that express the neuroectodermal marker nestin. These neurospheres can proliferate and differentiate into neuron, astrocyte, and oligodendrocyte phenotypes. We thus propose that MSCs are an emerging model cell for the treatment of a variety of neurological diseases.

  7. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    PubMed Central

    Mindaye, Samuel T.; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R.; Alterman, Michail A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5], [6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results. PMID:26702413

  8. [Effect of extracellular matrix components on adhesion of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to polytetrafluoroethylene].

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Rozanova, I A; Poveshchenko, O V; Lykov, A P; Bondarenko, N A; Kim, I I; Nikonorova, Iu V; Podkhvatilina, N A; Sergeevichev, D S; Popova, I V; Konenkov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Search for new bioengineering materials for creation of small-diameter vascular grafts is currently a priority task. One of the promising trends of creating tissue engineering constructions is coating the internal layer of implants made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with autologous mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. In the study we assessed the ability of separate components of the extracellular matrix such as fibronectin, type I collagen and type IV collagen to influence adhesion, proliferation and morphology of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells being cultured on PTFE. Bone marrow multipotent stromal cells taken from second-passage Wistar rats in the amount of 106 per 1 cm2 were applied onto PTFE. We used the following variants of preliminary treatment of the material prior to seeding: fibronectin with type I collagen, fibronectin with type IV collagen, fibronectin with a mixture of type I and IV collagens, as well as a control group without coating. After six weeks of cell growth on PTFE patches the samples were subjected to fixation in 10% formalin followed by haematoxylin-eosin stain and morphometric assessment of adhered cells by calculation using the software AxioVision (Carl Zeiss), assessing the number of cells, area of the cellular monolayer, dimensions and ratios of the area of separate cells and the area of cellular nuclei. The maximal area of the monolayer from mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on the PTFE surface was revealed while culturing with a mixture of fibronectin and type I and IV collagens. Cell colonization density while treatment of the synthetic material with mixtures of fibronectin with type I collagen, type IV collagen and type I and IV collagens demonstrated the results exceeding the parameters of the control specimen 5-, 2.5- and 7-fold, respectively. Hence, extracellular matrix components considerably increase enhance adhesion of cells to PTFE, as well as improve formation of a monolayer from mesenchymal multipotent

  9. Prostaglandin E2 acts via bone marrow macrophages to block PTH-stimulated osteoblast differentiation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shilpa; Blackwell, Katherine; Voznesensky, Olga; Roy, Abhijit Deb; Pilbeam, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent PTH is the major anabolic therapy for osteoporosis while continuous PTH causes bone loss. PTH acts on the osteoblast (OB) lineage to regulate bone resorption and formation. PTH also induces cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), producing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that can act on both OBs and osteoclasts (OCs). Because intermittent PTH is more anabolic in Cox-2 knockout (KO) than wild type (WT) mice, we hypothesized COX-2 might contribute to the effects of continuous PTH by suppressing PTH-stimulated differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into OBs. We compared effects of continuous PTH on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and primary OBs (POBs) from Cox-2 KO mice, mice with deletion of PGE2 receptors (Ptger4 and Ptger2 KO mice), and WT controls. PTH increased OB differentiation in BMSCs only in the absence of COX-2 expression or activity. In the absence of COX-2, PTH stimulated differentiation if added during the first week of culture. In Cox-2 KO BMSCs, PTH-stimulated differentiation was prevented by adding PGE2 to cultures. Co-culture of POBs with M-CSF-expanded bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) showed that the inhibition of PTH-stimulated OB differentiation required not only COX-2 or PGE2 but also BMMs. Sufficient PGE2 to mediate the inhibitory effect was made by either WT POBs or WT BMMs. The inhibitory effect mediated by COX-2/PGE2 was transferred by conditioned media from RANKL-treated BMMs and could be blocked by osteoprotegerin, which interferes with RANKL binding to its receptor on OC lineage cells. Deletion of Ptger4, but not Ptger2, in BMMs prevented the inhibition of PTH-stimulated OB differentiation. As expected, PGE2 also stimulated OB differentiation, but when given in combination with PTH, the stimulatory effects of both were abrogated. These data suggest that PGE2, acting via EP4R on BMMs committed to the OC lineage, stimulated secretion of a factor or factors that acted to suppress PTH-stimulated OB differentiation. This suppression of OB

  10. Generation of clinical grade human bone marrow stromal cells for use in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Robey, Pamela G; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Ren, Jiaqiang; Klein, Harvey G; Sabatino, Marianna; Stroncek, David F

    2015-01-01

    In current orthopaedic practice, there is a need to increase the ability to reconstruct large segments of bone lost due to trauma, resection of tumors and skeletal deformities, or when normal regenerative processes have failed such as in non-unions and avascular necrosis. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells), when used in conjunction with appropriate carriers, represent a means by which to achieve bone regeneration in such cases. While much has been done at the bench and in pre-clinical studies, moving towards clinical application requires the generation of clinical grade cells. What is described herein is an FDA-approved cell manufacturing procedure for the ex vivo expansion of high quality, biologically active human BMSCs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Stem Cells and Bone.

  11. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 enhances the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from human bone marrow and umbilical cord

    PubMed Central

    Marupanthorn, Kulisara; Tantrawatpan, Chairat; Kheolamai, Pakpoom; Tantikanlayaporn, Duangrat; Manochantr, Sirikul

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can give rise to different cell types of the mesodermal lineages. They are powerful sources for cell therapy in regenerative medicine as they can be isolated from various tissues, and can be expanded and induced to differentiate into multiple lineages. Recently, the umbilical cord has been suggested as an alternative source of MSCs. Although MSCs derived from the umbilical cord can be induced to differentiate into osteoblasts with a phenotypic similarity to that of bone marrow-derived MSCs, the differentiation ability is not consistent. In addition, MSCs from the umbilical cord require a longer period of time to differentiate into osteoblasts. Previous studies have demonstrated the benefits of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in bone tissue regeneration. In addition, several studies have supported the use of BMP-2 in periodontal regeneration, sinus lift bone-grafting and non-unions in oral surgery. Although the use of BMP-2 for bone tissue regeneration has been extensively investigated, the BMP-2-induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs derived from the umbilical cord has not yet been fully examined. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to examine the effects of BMP-2 on the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs derived from umbilical cord compared to that of MSCs derived from bone marrow. The degree of osteogenic differentiation following BMP-2 treatment was determined by assessing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and the expression profiles of osteogenic differentiation marker genes, osterix (Osx), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osteocalcin (Ocn). The results revealed that BMP-2 enhanced the osteogenic differentiation capacity of MSCs derived from both bone marrow and umbilical cord as demonstrated by increased ALP activity and the upregulation of osteogenic differentiation marker genes. The enhancement of the osteogenic differentiation capacity of MSCs by BMP-2 suggests that these

  12. Nanostructured TiO2 Surfaces Promote Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation to Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vercellino, Marco; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Cristofaro, Francesco; Balli, Martina; Bertoglio, Federico; Bruni, Gianna; Benedetti, Laura; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2016-01-01

    Micro- and nano-patterning/modification are emerging strategies to improve surfaces properties that may influence critically cells adherence and differentiation. Aim of this work was to study the in vitro biological reactivity of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) to a nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) surface in comparison to a coverglass (Glass) in two different culture conditions: with (osteogenic medium (OM)) and without (proliferative medium (PM)) osteogenic factors. To evaluate cell adhesion, hBMSCs phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) foci were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at 24 h: the TiO2 surface showed a higher number of pFAK foci with respect to Glass. The hBMSCs differentiation to osteoblasts was evaluated in both PM and OM culture conditions by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), CLSM and real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) at 28 days. In comparison with Glass, TiO2 surface in combination with OM conditions increased the content of extracellular bone proteins, calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity. The qRT-PCR analysis revealed, both in PM and OM, that TiO2 surface increased at seven and 28 days the expression of osteogenic genes. All together, these results demonstrate the capability of TiO2 nanostructured surface to promote hBMSCs osteoblast differentiation and its potentiality in biomedical applications. PMID:28335251

  13. [Analysis of sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to 5-fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Paiushina, O V; Damaratskaia, E I; Bueverova, E I; Nikonova, T M; Butorina, N N; Molchanova, E A; Starostin, V I

    2006-01-01

    The sensitivity of stromal stem cells (CFU-f) from rat bone marrow and fetal liver to the cytotoxic effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was compared in vivo and in vitro. Cells from both tissues demonstrated a similar resistance to 5-FU in vitro; however, stromal stem cells from fetal liver proved notably more sensitive to 5-FU compared to marrow CFU-f in vivo. Cells forming colonies of different size were identified in stem cell populations from both tissues. Cells giving rise to small colonies had a higher resistance to 5-FU both in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Restoration of the GM2 ganglioside metabolism in bone marrow-derived stromal cells from Tay-Sachs disease animal model.

    PubMed

    Martino, S; Cavalieri, C; Emiliani, C; Dolcetta, D; Cusella De Angelis, M G; Chigorno, V; Severini, G M; Sandhoff, K; Bordignon, C; Sonnino, S; Orlacchio, A

    2002-08-01

    The therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived stromal cells for the therapy of Tay-Sachs disease is primarily related to the restoration of their own GM2 ganglioside storage. With this aim, we produced bone marrow-derived stromal cells from the adult Tay-Sachs animal model and transduced them with a retroviral vector encoding for the alpha-subunit of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase A (E.C. 3.2.1.52). Our results demonstrate that transduced Tay-Sachs bone marrow-derived stromal cells have beta-hexosaminidase A comparable to that of bone marrow-derived stromal cells from wild-type mice. Moreover, beta-hexosaminidase A in transduced Tay-Sachs bone marrow-derived stromal cells was able to hydrolyze the GM2 ganglioside in a feeding experiment, thus demonstrating the correction of the altered phenotype.

  15. Effects of the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS350, a radiation mitigator, on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures and on radioresistance of marrow stromal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Ashwin; Epperly, Michael W; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Sprachman, Melissa M; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    The ionizing irradiation mitigator MMS350 prolongs survival of mice treated with total-body irradiation and prevents radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis when added to drinking water at day 100 after thoracic irradiation. The effects of MMS350 on hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow culture and on the radiobiology of derived bone marrow stromal cell lines were tested. Long-term bone marrow cultures were established from C57BL/6NTac mice and maintained in a high-humidity incubator, with 7% CO2 and the addition of 100 μM MMS350 at the weekly media change. Over 10 weeks in culture, MMS350 had no significant effect on maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell production, or on nonadherent cells or colony-forming units of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Stromal cell lines derived from non MMS350-treated long-term cultures or control stromal cells treated with MMS350 were radioresistant in the clonogenic survival curve assay. MMS350 is a non-toxic, highly water-soluble radiation mitigator that exhibits radioprotective effects on bone marrow stromal cells.

  16. β-Caryophyllene promotes osteoblastic mineralization, and suppresses osteoclastogenesis and adipogenesis in mouse bone marrow cultures in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Levy, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is induced by the reduction in bone mass through decreased osteoblastic osteogenesis and increased osteoclastic bone resorption, and it is associated with obesity and diabetes. Osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The prevention of osteoporosis is an important public health concern in aging populations. β-caryophyllene, a component of various essential oils, is a selective agonist of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 and exerts cannabimimetic anti-inflammatory effects in animals. The present study aimed to identify the effect of β-caryophyllene on adipogenesis, osteoblastic mineralization and osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow cell cultures in vitro. Bone marrow cells obtained from mouse femoral tissues were cultured in the presence of β-caryophyllene (0.1–100 µM) in vitro. The results revealed that β-caryophyllene stimulated osteoblastic mineralization, and suppressed adipogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. Thus, β-caryophyllene may be used as a therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:28105093

  17. Enhanced accumulation of adipocytes in bone marrow stromal cells in the presence of increased extracellular and intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Nakamura, Kyoko; Itoh, Seigo; Iesaki, Takafumi; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances adipocyte accumulation in the presence of adipogenic inducers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhances both proliferation and adipocyte differentiation in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppresses the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Controlling [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} may govern the balance of adipocyte and osteoblast development. -- Abstract: The bone marrow stroma contains osteoblasts and adipocytes that have a common precursor: the pluripotent mesenchymal stem cell found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Local bone marrow Ca{sup 2+} levels can reach high concentrations due to bone resorption, which is one of the notable features of the bone marrow stroma. Here, we describe the effects of high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} on the accumulation of adipocytes in the bone marrow stroma. Using primary mouse BMSCs, we evaluated the level of adipocyte accumulation by measuring Oil Red O staining and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity. High [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} enhanced the accumulation of adipocytes following treatment with both insulin and dexamethasone together but not in the absence of this treatment. This enhanced accumulation was the result of both the accelerated proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Using the fura-2 method, we also showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. An intracellular Ca{sup 2+} chelator suppressed the enhancement in adipocyte accumulation due to increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} in BMSCs. These data suggest a new role for extracellular Ca{sup 2+} in the bone marrow stroma: increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} induces an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels, which in turn enhances the accumulation of

  18. Silicate bioceramics enhanced vascularization and osteogenesis through stimulating interactions between endothelia cells and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Xue, Ke; Kong, Ni; Liu, Kai; Chang, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    The facts that biomaterials affect the behavior of single type of cells have been widely accepted. However, the effects of biomaterials on cell-cell interactions have rarely been reported. Bone tissue engineering involves osteoblastic cells (OCs), endothelial cells (ECs) and the interactions between OCs and ECs. It has been reported that silicate biomaterials can stimulate osteogenic differentiation of OCs and vascularization of ECs. However, the effects of silicate biomaterials on the interactions between ECs and OCs during vascularization and osteogenesis have not been reported, which are critical for bone tissue regeneration in vivo. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effects of calcium silicate (CS) bioceramics on interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and on stimulation of vascularization and osteogenesis in vivo through combining co-cultures with CS containing scaffolds. Specifically, the effects of CS on the angiogenic growth factor VEGF, osteogenic growth factor BMP-2 and the cross-talks between VEGF and BMP-2 in the co-culture system were elucidated. Results showed that CS stimulated co-cultured HBMSCs (co-HBMSCs) to express VEGF and the VEGF activated its receptor KDR on co-cultured HUVECs (co-HUVECs), which was also up-regulated by CS. Then, BMP-2 and nitric oxide expression from the co-HUVECs were stimulated by CS and the former stimulated osteogenic differentiation of co-HBMSCs while the latter stimulated vascularization of co-HVUECs. Finally, the poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)/CS composite scaffolds with the co-cultured HBMSCs and HUVECs significantly enhanced vascularization and osteogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo, which indicates that it is a promising way to enhance bone regeneration by combining scaffolds containing silicate bioceramics and co-cultures of ECs and OCs.

  19. Asperosaponin VI promotes bone marrow stromal cell osteogenic differentiation through the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in an osteoporosis model

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Ke; Li, Qi; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xie, Zhijian; Wang, Yu; Shi, Jue; Chi, Linfeng; Xu, Weijian; Hu, Lingling; Shi, Huali

    2016-01-01

    Asperosaponin VI (ASA VI), a natural compound isolated from the well-known traditional Chinese herb Radix Dipsaci, has an important role in promoting osteoblast formation. However, its effects on osteoblasts in the context of osteoporosis is unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects and mechanism of ASA VI action on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells isolated from the ovariectomized rats (OVX rBMSCs). The toxicity of ASA VI and its effects on the proliferation of OVX rBMSCs were measured using a CCK-8 assay. Various osteogenic differentiation markers were also analyzed, such as ALP activity, calcified nodule formation, and the expression of osteogenic genes, i.e., ALP, OCN, COL 1 and RUNX2. The results indicated that ASA VI promoted the proliferation of OVX rBMSCs and enhanced ALP activity and calcified nodule formation. In addition, while ASA VI enhanced the expression of ALP, OCN, Col 1 and RUNX2, treatment with LY294002 reduced all of these osteogenic effects and reduced the p-AKT levels induced by ASA VI. These results suggest that ASA VI promotes the osteogenic differentiation of OVX rBMSCs by acting on the phosphatidylinositol—3 kinase/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27756897

  20. Bone marrow regeneration promoted by biophysically sorted osteoprogenitors from mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poon, Zhiyong; Lee, Wong Cheng; Guan, Guofeng; Nyan, Lin Myint; Lim, Chwee Teck; Han, Jongyoon; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2015-01-01

    Human tissue repair deficiencies can be supplemented through strategies to isolate, expand in vitro, and reimplant regenerative cells that supplant damaged cells or stimulate endogenous repair mechanisms. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), a subset of which is described as mesenchymal stem cells, are leading candidates for cell-mediated bone repair and wound healing, with hundreds of ongoing clinical trials worldwide. An outstanding key challenge for successful clinical translation of MSCs is the capacity to produce large quantities of cells in vitro with uniform and relevant therapeutic properties. By leveraging biophysical traits of MSC subpopulations and label-free microfluidic cell sorting, we hypothesized and experimentally verified that MSCs of large diameter within expanded MSC cultures were osteoprogenitors that exhibited significantly greater efficacy over other MSC subpopulations in bone marrow repair. Systemic administration of osteoprogenitor MSCs significantly improved survival rates (>80%) as compared with other MSC subpopulations (0%) for preclinical murine bone marrow injury models. Osteoprogenitor MSCs also exerted potent therapeutic effects as "cell factories" that secreted high levels of regenerative factors such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor A, bone morphogenetic protein 2, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 1, and angiopoietin-1; this resulted in increased cell proliferation, vessel formation, and reduced apoptosis in bone marrow. This MSC subpopulation mediated rescue of damaged marrow tissue via restoration of the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, as well as subsequent hematopoiesis. Together, the capabilities described herein for label-freeisolation of regenerative osteoprogenitor MSCs can markedly improve the efficacy of MSC-based therapies.

  1. Use of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells and cultured bone marrow stromal cells in dogs with orthopaedic lesions.

    PubMed

    Crovace, A; Favia, A; Lacitignola, L; Di Comite, M S; Staffieri, F; Francioso, E

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical application in veterinary orthopedics of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) and cultured bone marrow stromal cells (cBMSCs) for the treatment of some orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The authors carried out a clinical study on 14 dogs of different breed, age and size with the following lesions: 1 bone cyst of the glenoid rime; 2 nonunion of the tibia; 3 nonunion of the femur; 2 lengthening of the radius; 1 large bone defect of the distal radius;1 nonunion with carpus valgus; 4 Legg-Calvé-Perthés disease. In 9 cases the BMMCNs were used in combination with a three dimensional resorbable osteogenic scaffold the chemical composition and size of which facilitates the ingrowth of bone. In these cases the BMMNCs were suspended in an adequate amount of fibrin glue and then distribuited uniformly on a Tricalcium-Phosphate (TCP) scaffold onto which were also added some drops of thrombin. In 1 case of nonunion of the tibia and in 3 cases of Legg-Calvè-Perthés (LCP) disease the cultured BMSCs were used instead because of the small size of the dogs and of the little amount of aspirated bone marrow. X-ray examinations were performed immediately after the surgery. Clinical, ultrasounds and X-ray examinations were performed after 20 days and then every month. Until now the treated dogs have shown very good clinical and X-ray results. One of the objectives of the study was to use the BMMNCs in clinical application in orthopaedic lesions in the dog. The advantages of using the cells immediately after the bone marrow is collected, are that the surgery can be performed the same day, the cells do not need to be expanded in vitro, they preserve their osteogenic potential to form bone and promote the proper integration of the implant with the bone and lastly, the technique is easier and the costs are lower.

  2. Increased extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} lead to adipocyte accumulation in bone marrow stromal cells by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Ryota; Katoh, Youichi; Miyamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Seigo; Daida, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Yuji; Okada, Takao

    2015-02-20

    Mesenchymal stem cells found in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are the common progenitors for both adipocyte and osteoblast. An increase in marrow adipogenesis is associated with age-related osteopenia and anemia. Both extracellular and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) are versatile signaling molecules that are involved in the regulation of cell functions, including proliferation and differentiation. We have recently reported that upon treatment of BMSCs with insulin and dexamethasone, both high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} enhanced adipocyte accumulation, which suggested that increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} caused by bone resorption may accelerate adipocyte accumulation in aging and diabetic patients. In this study, we used primary mouse BMSCs to investigate the mechanisms by which high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} may enhance adipocyte accumulation. In the process of adipocyte accumulation, two important keys are adipocyte differentiation and the proliferation of BMSCs, which have the potential to differentiate into adipocytes. Use of MTT assay and real-time RT-PCR revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (ionomycin)-dependent adipocyte accumulation is caused by enhanced proliferation of BMSCs but not enhanced differentiation into adipocytes. Using fura-2 fluorescence-based approaches, we showed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} (addition of CaCl{sub 2}) leads to increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Flow cytometric methods revealed that high [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK independently of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. The inhibition of ERK by U0126 and PD0325901 enhanced the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes. These data suggest that increased extracellular Ca{sup 2+} provides the differentiation of BMSCs into adipocytes by the suppression of ERK activity independently of increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+}, which results in BMSC proliferation. - Highlights:

  3. Rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitors by AMD3100 and catecholamines is mediated by CXCR4-dependent SDF-1 release from bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalinkovich, Alexander; Itkin, Tomer; Ludin, Aya; Kao, Wei-Ming; Battista, Michela; Tesio, Melania; Kollet, Orit; Cohen, Neta Netzer; Margalit, Raanan; Buss, Eike C.; Baleux, Francoise; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Larochelle, Andre; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2014-01-01

    Steady-state egress of hematopoietic progenitor cells can be rapidly amplified by mobilizing agents such as AMD3100, the mechanism, however, is poorly understood. We report that AMD3100 increased the homeostatic release of the chemokine SDF-1 to the circulation in mice and non-human primates. Neutralizing antibodies against CXCR4 or SDF-1 inhibited both steady-state and AMD3100-induced SDF-1 release and reduced egress of murine progenitor cells over mature leukocytes. Intra-bone injection of biotinylated SDF-1 also enhanced release of this chemokine and murine progenitor cell mobilization. AMD3100 directly induced SDF-1 release from CXCR4+ human bone marrow osteoblasts and endothelial cells and activated uPA in a CXCR4/JNK-dependent manner. Additionally, ROS inhibition reduced AMD3100-induced SDF-1 release, activation of circulating uPA and mobilization of progenitor cells. Norepinephrine treatment, mimicking acute stress, rapidly increased SDF-1 release and progenitor cell mobilization, while β2-adrenergic antagonist inhibited both steady-state and AMD3100-induced SDF-1 release and progenitor cell mobilization in mice. In conclusion, this study reveals that SDF-1 release from bone marrow stromal cells to the circulation emerges as a pivotal mechanism essential for steady state egress and rapid mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells, but not mature leukocytes. PMID:21494253

  4. Bone marrow-derived osteoblast progenitor cells in circulating blood contribute to ectopic bone formation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuru, Satoru; Tamai, Katsuto . E-mail: tamai@gts.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yamazaki, Takehiko; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-03-09

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of osteoblastic cells in the circulation, but the origin and role of these cells in vivo are not clear. Here, we examined how these cells contribute to osteogenesis in a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced model of ectopic bone formation. Following lethal dose-irradiation and subsequent green fluorescent protein-transgenic bone marrow cell-transplantation (GFP-BMT) in mice, a BMP-2-containing collagen pellet was implanted into muscle. Three weeks later, a significant number of GFP-positive osteoblastic cells were present in the newly generated ectopic bone. Moreover, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) from the BMP-2-implanted mouse were then shown to include osteoblast progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Passive transfer of the PBMNCs isolated from the BMP-2-implanted GFP-mouse to the BMP-2-implanted nude mouse led to GFP-positive osteoblast accumulation in the ectopic bone. These data provide new insight into the mechanism of ectopic bone formation involving bone marrow-derived OPCs in circulating blood.

  5. [Reorganization of actin cytoskeleton in the initial stage of transendothelial migration of bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova, S A; Pinaev, G P

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of actin cytoskeleton reorganization in rat bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells after one hour adhesion to a monolayer of endothelial cell line EA.hy 926 allowed us to identify three types of cells interacting with the endothelial cells. Approximately half of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells retained a rounded shape, most of them contained large round actin aggregates, had irregular borders and contacted with the surface of the endothelial cells by microvilli or protrusions similar to small lamellae. Almost all other cells were surrounded by narrow lamellae along the entire perimeter. In addition, a small amount.of elongated flattened cells that contacting with endothelial cells by means of focal contacts was observed. Microenvironmental factors such as proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α or plasma proteins affected the ratio of stromal cell types, with different types of organization of the actin cytoskeleton in multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells population.

  6. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce nitric oxide synthase-dependent differentiation of CD11b+ cells that expedite hematopoietic recovery.

    PubMed

    Trento, Cristina; Marigo, Ilaria; Pievani, Alice; Galleu, Antonio; Dolcetti, Luigi; Wang, Chun-Yin; Serafini, Marta; Bronte, Vincenzo; Dazzi, Francesco

    2017-02-09

    Bone marrow microenvironment is fundamental for hematopoietic homeostasis. Numerous efforts have been made to reproduce or manipulate its activity to facilitate engraftment after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation but clinical results remain unconvincing. This probably reflects the complexity of the hematopoietic niche. Recent data have demonstrated the fundamental role of stromal and myeloid cells in regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and mobilization in the bone marrow. In this study we unveil a novel interaction by which bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells induce the rapid differentiation of CD11b+ myeloid cells from bone marrow progenitors. Such an activity requires the expression of nitric oxide synthase-2. Importantly, the administration of these mesenchymal stromal cells-educated CD11b+ cells accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution in bone marrow transplant recipients. We conclude that the liaison between mesenchymal stromal cells and myeloid cells is fundamental in hematopoietic homeostasis and suggests that it can be harnessed in clinical transplantation.

  7. Differences in xenobiotic detoxifying activities between bone marrow stromal cells from mice and rats: Implications for benzene-induced hematotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Li, Yunbo; Trush, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    benzene is a human carcinogen; exposure can result in aplastic anemia and leukemia. Data from animal models are frequently used in benzene risk assessment. In rodent studies, mice are more sensitive to benzene-induced hematotoxicity than rats. Bone marrow stromal cells from mice were significantly more susceptible to the cytotoxicity induced by the benzene metabolites hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) than cells from rats. Since cellular gluthathione (GSH) and quinone reductase (QR) are known to play critical roles in modulating HQ-induced cytotoxicity, the GSH content and the QR and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in stromal cells from both species was measured. In rat cells, the GSH content and the QR specific activity were 2 and 28 times as much as those from mice, respectively. GSH and QR in both mouse and rat stromal cells were inducible by 1,2-dithiole-3-thione (D3T). D3T pretreatment of both mouse and rat stromal cells resulted in a marked protection against HQ-induced toxicity. Pretreatment of both mouse and rat stromal cells with GSH ethyl ester also provided a dramatic protection against HQ-induced toxicity. Conversely, dicoumarol, an inhibitor of QR, enhanced the HQ-induced toxicity in stromal cells from both mice and rats, indicating an important role for QR in modulating HQ-induced stromal toxicity. Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which depleted GSH significantly in both species, potentiated the HQ-induced toxicity in mouse but not in rat stromal cells. Surprisingly, incubation of stromal cells with BSO resulted in a significant induction of QR, especially in rats. Overall, this study demonstrates that the differences in stromal cellular GSH content and QR activity between mice and rats contribute to their respective susceptibility to HQ-induced cytotoxicity in vitro, and may be involved in the greater in vivo sensitivity of mice to benzene-induced hematotoxicity. 51 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Polydatin induces bone marrow stromal cells migration by activation of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Chen, ZhenQiu; Wei, QiuShi; Hong, GuoJu; Chen, Da; Liang, Jiang; He, Wei; Chen, Mei Hui

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have proven to be useful for the treatment of numerous human diseases. However, the reparative ability of BMSCs is limited by their poor migration. Polydatin, widely used in traditional Chinese remedies, has proven to exert protective effects to BMSCs. However, little is known about its role in BMSCs migration. In this study, we studied the effects of polydatin on rat BMSCs migration using the scratch wound healing and transwell migration assays. Our results showed polydatin could promote BMSCs migration. Further experiments showed activation of ERK 1/2, but not JNK, was required for polydatin-induced BMSCs migration, suggesting that polydatin may promote BMSCs migration via the ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin might be beneficial for stem cell replacement therapy by improving BMSCs migration.

  9. Expression of brain natriuretic peptide by human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Kamath, S; Mosquera, D; Zigova, T; Sanberg, P; Vesely, D L; Sanchez-Ramos, J

    2004-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) have been shown to generate neural cells under experimental conditions in vitro and following transplantation into animal models of stroke and traumatic CNS injury. Hastened recovery from the neurological deficit has not correlated with structural repair of the lesion in the stroke model. Secretory functions of BMSC, such as the elaboration of growth factors and cytokines, have been hypothesized to play a role in the enhanced recovery of neurological function. Using gene expression arrays, real time RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, we have found that brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is synthesized and released by BMSC at physiologically relevant levels in vitro. BNP, like its close homolog atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), exerts powerful natriuretic, diuretic and vasodilatory effects. We speculate that transplanted BMSCs facilitate recovery from brain and spinal cord lesions by releasing BNP and other vasoactive factors that reduce edema, decrease intracranial pressure and improve cerebral perfusion.

  10. Comparison of manual and automated cultures of bone marrow stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Asako; Ichimura, Masaki; Tone, Hiroshi; Nakatani, Masaru; Inoue, Minoru; Tojo, Arinobu; Kagami, Hideaki

    2015-11-01

    The development of an automated cell culture system would allow stable and economical cell processing for wider clinical applications in the field of regenerative medicine. However, it is crucial to determine whether the cells obtained by automated culture are comparable to those generated by manual culture. In the present study, we focused on the primary culture process of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) for bone tissue engineering and investigated the feasibility of its automation using a commercially available automated cell culture system in a clinical setting. A comparison of the harvested BMSCs from manual and automated cultures using clinically acceptable protocols showed no differences in cell yields, viabilities, surface marker expression profiles, and in vivo osteogenic abilities. Cells cultured with this system also did not show malignant transformation and the automated process was revealed to be safe in terms of microbial contamination. Taken together, the automated procedure described in this report provides an approach to clinical bone tissue engineering.

  11. The tropism of neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells towards C6 glioma.

    PubMed

    Long, Qianfa; Liu, Weiping; Zhong, Jun; Yi, Xicai; Liu, Yang; Liu, Yuanyang; Yang, Yang; Han, Rui; Fei, Zhou

    2011-10-24

    Recent studies have indicated that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have significant tropism towards glioma which makes them play an important role in carrying genes/drugs to inhibit the growth of glioma as cell vehicles. But BMSCs may differentiate into neural cells under entocranial environment and few researches support the idea that neurally differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (N-D-BMSCs) still hold the capacity of migrating to the tumor sites. The aim of our study was to investigate the tropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma. In vitro migration assay was employed by transwell co-culture system and Student's t-test analysis indicated that N-D-BMSCs had the significant tropism towards C6 glioma-conditioned medium (GCM) (P<0.01). Furthermore, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) bioactivity of the C6 GCM was neutralized by the anti-rat VEGF antibody and our data suggested that the VEGF from C6 GCM hold chemoattraction for N-D-BMSCs and some other cytokines from the C6 GCM may be responsible for the chemoattraction for N-D-BMSCs. In vivo migration assay was carried out with cells transplantation and one way ANOVA analysis indicated that the tropism of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites presented time variation (P-value=2.9E-20). Moreover, multiple comparisons for the time variables with the Student's t-test and the results suggested that the migration capacity of N-D-BMSCs towards C6 glioma sites reach the peak on the 7th day after transplantation. These results demonstrate that N-D-BMSCs as well as BMSCs have significant tropism towards C6 glioma.

  12. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Soares, P.B.; Jeremias, T.S.; Alvarez-Silva, M.; Licínio, M.A.; Santos-Silva, M.C.; Vituri, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25 µM) reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and α-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5 µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5 µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells) increased. At higher concentrations (15 µM), the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control). Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15 µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved. PMID:23011404

  13. Different Procoagulant Activity of Therapeutic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Bone Marrow and Placental Decidua.

    PubMed

    Moll, Guido; Ignatowicz, Lech; Catar, Rusan; Luecht, Christian; Sadeghi, Behnam; Hamad, Osama; Jungebluth, Philipp; Dragun, Duska; Schmidtchen, Artur; Ringdén, Olle

    2015-10-01

    While therapeutic mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have usually been obtained from bone marrow, perinatal tissues have emerged as promising new sources of cells for stromal cell therapy. In this study, we present a first safety follow-up on our clinical experience with placenta-derived decidual stromal cells (DSCs), used as supportive immunomodulatory and regenerative therapy for patients with severe complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that DSCs are smaller, almost half the volume of MSCs, which may favor microvascular passage. DSCs also show different hemocompatibility, with increased triggering of the clotting cascade after exposure to human blood and plasma in vitro. After infusion of DSCs in HSCT patients, we observed a weak activation of the fibrinolytic system, but the other blood activation markers remained stable, excluding major adverse events. Expression profiling identified differential levels of key factors implicated in regulation of hemostasis, such as a lack of prostacyclin synthase and increased tissue factor expression in DSCs, suggesting that these cells have intrinsic blood-activating properties. The stronger triggering of the clotting cascade by DSCs could be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft reconstitution before infusion, for example, by use of low-dose heparin anticoagulant in the cell infusion buffer. We conclude that DSCs are smaller and have stronger hemostatic properties than MSCs, thus triggering stronger activation of the clotting system, which can be antagonized by optimizing the cell graft preparation before infusion. Our results highlight the importance of hemocompatibility safety testing for every novel cell therapy product before clinical use, when applied using systemic delivery.

  14. Dissecting the role of bone marrow stromal cells on bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Buenrostro, Denise; Park, Serk In; Sterling, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-induced bone disease is a dynamic process that involves interactions with many cell types. Once metastatic cancer cells reach the bone, they are in contact with many different cell types that are present in the cell-rich bone marrow. These cells include the immune cells, myeloid cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and mesenchymal stem cells. Each of these cell populations can influence the behavior or gene expression of both the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment. Additionally, the tumor itself can alter the behavior of these bone marrow cells which further alters both the microenvironment and the tumor cells. While many groups focus on studying these interactions, much remains unknown. A better understanding of the interactions between the tumor cells and the bone microenvironment will improve our knowledge on how tumors establish in bone and may lead to improvements in diagnosing and treating bone metastases. This review details our current knowledge on the interactions between tumor cells that reside in bone and their microenvironment.

  15. Age- and gender-related changes in the cellularity of human bone marrow and the prevalence of osteoblastic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Muschler, G F; Nitto, H; Boehm, C A; Easley, K A

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow harvested by aspiration contains connective tissue progenitor cells which can be induced to express a bone phenotype in vitro. The number of osteoblastic progenitors can be estimated by counting the colony-forming units which express alkaline phosphatase (CFU-APs). This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that human aging is associated with a significant change in the number or prevalence of osteoblastic progenitors in the bone marrow. Four 2-ml bone marrow aspirates were harvested bilaterally from the anterior iliac crest of 57 patients, 31 men (age 15-83) and 26 women (age 13-79). A mean of 64 million nucleated cells was harvested per aspirate. The mean prevalence of CFU-APs was found to be 55 per million nucleated cells. These data revealed a significant age-related decline in the number of nucleated cells harvested per aspirate for both men and women (P = 0.002). The number of CFU-APs harvested per aspirate also decreased significantly with age for women (P = 0.02), but not for men (P = 0.3). These findings are relevant to the harvest of bone marrow derived connective tissue progenitors for bone grafting and other tissue engineering applications, and may also be relevant to the pathophysiology of age-related bone loss and post-menopausal osteoporosis.

  16. Paracrine Factors Produced by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Induce Apoptosis and Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chu; Soori, Mehrnoosh; Miles, Fayth; Sikes, Robert A.; Carson, Daniel D.; Chung, Leland L.W.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Preferential bony metastasis of human prostate cancer (PCa) cells contributes to disease mortality and morbidity. Local factors in bone stromal extracellular matrix microenvironment affect tumor growth through paracrine interactions between tumor and stromal cells. Methods Using co-culture and medium transfer, we used several methods to assess interactions between PCa and bone stromal cells using three PCa cell lines: PC3, LNCaP, and the LNCaP derivative, C4-2B. Results Co-culture of LNCaP and C4-2B cells with bone marrow stromal cell lines, HS27a and HS5, decreased cell number, as did culture with conditioned medium (CM) harvested from these two cell lines suggesting a soluble paracrine factor was responsible. PC3 cell growth was unaffected. CM harvested from bone stromal cell lines triggered apoptosis in LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not in PC3 cells. Surviving C4-2B cells grown in bone stromal cell CM over several days were growth arrested, suggesting presence of a growth inhibitor. Apoptosis induced by CM was dose-dependent. Flow cytometry demonstrated that over a five day culture period in stromal cell CM, LNCaP and C4-2B cell lines, but not PC3 cells, underwent greater apoptosis than parallel cultures in SF medium. The LNCaP and C4-2B cells showed morphology and biomarker expression consistent with transdifferentiation towards a neuroendocrine phenotype after exposure to stromal cell CM. Conclusions The reactive bone stromal microenvironment initially is hostile to PCa cells producing widespread apoptosis. Activation of transdifferentiation in a subset of apoptotic resistant cells may support phenotypic adaptation during disease progression in bone, eventually favoring lethal disease. PMID:20665531

  17. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  18. Treatment with bone marrow-derived stromal cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, David S; Gao, Xiaohua; Liu, Yong Bo; Dulchavsky, Deborah S; Danyluk, Andrew L; Bansal, Mona; Chopp, Michael; McIntosh, Kevin; Arbab, Ali S; Dulchavsky, Scott A; Gautam, Subhash C

    2008-06-01

    Bone marrow stem cells participate in tissue repair processes and may have a role in wound healing. Diabetes is characterised by delayed and poor wound healing. We investigated the potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) to promote healing of fascial wounds in diabetic rats. After manifestation of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic state for 5 weeks in male adult Sprague-Dawley rats, healing of fascial wounds was severely compromised. Compromised wound healing in diabetic rats was characterised by excessive polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, lack of granulation tissue formation, deficit of collagen and growth factor [transforming growth factor (TGF-beta), epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor PDGF-BB and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF)] expression in the wound tissue and significant decrease in biomechanical strength of wounds. Treatment with BMSC systemically or locally at the wound site improved the wound-breaking strength (WBS) of fascial wounds. The improvement in WBS was associated with an immediate and significant increase in collagen levels (types I-V) in the wound bed. In addition, treatment with BMSCs increased the expression of growth factors critical to proper repair and regeneration of the damaged tissue moderately (TGF-beta, KGF) to markedly (EGF, VEGF, PDGF-BB). These data suggest that cell therapy with BMSCs has the potential to augment healing of the diabetic wounds.

  19. Evaluation of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Frisbie, David D; Kisiday, John D; Kawcak, Chris E; Werpy, Natasha M; McIlwraith, C Wayne

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was the assessment of clinical, biochemical, and histologic effects of intraarticular administered adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis was induced arthroscopically in the middle carpal joint of all horses, the contralateral joint being sham-operated. All horses received treatment on Day 14. Eight horses received placebo treatment and eight horses received adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction in their osteoarthritis-affected joint. The final eight horses were treated the in osteoarthritis-affected joint with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Evaluations included clinical, radiographic, synovial fluid analysis, gross, histologic, histochemical, and biochemical evaluations. No adverse treatment-related events were observed. The model induced a significant change in all but two parameters, no significant treatment effects were demonstrated, with the exception of improvement in synovial fluid effusion PGE2 levels with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to placebo. A greater improvement was seen with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells when compared to adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and placebo treatment. Overall, the findings of this study were not significant enough to recommend the use of stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis represented in this model.

  20. Manipulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by coculture on human bone marrow stromal cells: potential utility for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ohishi, Kohshi; Orito, Yuki; Nakamori, Yoshiki; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Ino, Kazuko; Suzuki, Kei; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Masuya, Masahiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Mineno, Junichi; Ono, Ryoichi; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Shiku, Hiroshi; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2013-04-01

    T cell precursors are an attractive target for adoptive immunotherapy. We examined the regulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by human bone marrow stromal cells to explore in vitro manipulation of human T cell precursors in a human-only coculture system. The generation of CD7(+)CD56(-)cyCD3(-) proT cells from human hematopoietic progenitors on telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells was enhanced by stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, but these stimulatory effects were suppressed by interleukin 3. Expression of Notch ligands Delta-1 and -4 on stromal cells additively promoted T cell differentiation into the CD7(+)cyCD3(+) pre-T cell stage, while cell growth was strongly inhibited. By combining these coculture systems, we found that initial coculture with telomerized stromal cells in the presence of stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, followed by coculture on Delta-1- and -4-coexpressing stromal cells led to a higher percentage and number of pre-T cells. Adoptive immunotherapy using peripheral blood T cells transduced with a tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) is a promising strategy but has several limitations, such as the risk of forming a chimeric TCR with the endogenous TCR. We demonstrated that incubation of TCR-transduced hematopoietic progenitors with the combination of coculture systems gave rise to CD7(+)TCR(+)CD3(+)CD1a(-) T cell precursors that rapidly proliferated and differentiated under the culture condition to induce mature T cell differentiation. These data show the regulatory mechanism of early T lymphopoiesis on human stromal cells and the potential utility of engineered human stromal cells to manipulate early T cell development for clinical application.

  1. Radiologic differences between bone marrow stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cell lines from Fanconi Anemia (Fancd2(-/-)) mice.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Hebist; Epperly, Michael W; Goff, Julie; Kalash, Ronny; Cao, Shaonan; Franicola, Darcy; Zhang, Xichen; Shields, Donna; Houghton, Frank; Wang, Hong; Wipf, Peter; Parmar, Kalindi; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    FancD2 plays a central role in the human Fanconi anemia DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Fancd2(-/-) mice exhibit many features of human Fanconi anemia including cellular DNA repair defects. Whether the DNA repair defect in Fancd2(-/-) mice results in radiologic changes in all cell lineages is unknown. We measured stress of hematopoiesis in long-term marrow cultures and radiosensitivity in clonogenic survival curves, as well as comet tail intensity, total antioxidant stores and radiation-induced gene expression in hematopoietic progenitor compared to bone marrow stromal cell lines. We further evaluated radioprotection by a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant GS-nitroxide, JP4-039. Hematopoiesis longevity in Fancd2(-/-) mouse long-term marrow cultures was diminished and bone marrow stromal cell lines were radiosensitive compared to Fancd2(+/+) stromal cells (Fancd2(-/-) D0 = 1.4 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 5.0 ± 0.6 vs. Fancd2(+/+) D0 = 1.6 ± 0.1 Gy, ñ = 6.7 ± 1.6), P = 0.0124 for D0 and P = 0.0023 for ñ, respectively). In contrast, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cells were radioresistant (D0 = 1.71 ± 0.04 Gy and ñ = 5.07 ± 0.52) compared to Fancd2(+/+) (D0 = 1.39 ± 0.09 Gy and ñ = 2.31 ± 0.85, P = 0.001 for D0). CFU-GM from freshly explanted Fancd2(-/-) marrow was also radioresistant. Consistent with radiosensitivity, irradiated Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells had higher DNA damage by comet tail intensity assay compared to Fancd2(+/+) cells (P < 0.0001), slower DNA damage recovery, lower baseline total antioxidant capacity, enhanced radiation-induced depletion of antioxidants, and increased CDKN1A-p21 gene transcripts and protein. Consistent with radioresistance, Fancd2(-/-) IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cells had higher baseline and post irradiation total antioxidant capacity. While, there was no detectable alteration of radiation-induced cell cycle arrest with Fancd2(-/-) stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells showed reduced G2/M cell cycle

  2. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  3. Repair of orbital bone defects in canines using grafts of enriched autologous bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgroud Bone tissue engineering is a new approach for the repair of orbital defects. The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of tissue-engineered bone constructed using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that were rapidly isolated and concentrated from bone marrow (BM) by the red cell lysis method, then combined with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to create grafts used to restore orbital bone defects in canines. Methods In the experimental group, grafts were constructed using BMSCs obtained by red cell lysis from 20 ml bone marrow, combined with β-TCP and BM via the custom-made stem cell-scaffold device, then used to repair 10 mm diameter medial orbital wall bony defects in canines. Results were compared with those in groups grafted with BM/β-TCP or β-TCP alone, or with defects left untreated as controls. The enrichment of BMSCs and nucleated cells (NCs) in the graft was calculated from the number in untreated bone marrow and in suspensions after red cell lysis. Spiral computed tomography (CT) scans were performed 1, 4, 12 and 24 weeks after implantation in all groups. Gross examination, micro-CT and histological measurements were performed 24 weeks after surgery. The results were analyzed to evaluate the efficacy of bone repair. Results The number of NCs and of colony-forming units within the scaffolds were increased 54.8 times and 53.4 times, respectively, compared with untreated bone marrow. In the BMSC-BM/β-TCP group, CT examination revealed that the scaffolds were gradually absorbed and the bony defects were restored. Micro-CT and histological examination confirmed that the implantations led to good repair of the defects, with 6 out 8 orbital defects completely restored in the experimental group, while by contrast, the grafts in the control groups did not fully repair the bony defects, a difference which was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions Tissue-engineered bone, constructed using BMSCs isolated by red cell

  4. Transforming growth factor-{beta} inhibits CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein expression and PPAR{gamma} activity in unloaded bone marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ahdjoudj, S.; Kaabeche, K.; Holy, X.; Fromigue, O.; Modrowski, D.; Zerath, E.; Marie, P.J. . E-mail: pierre.marie@larib.inserm.fr

    2005-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms regulating the adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects of transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-{beta}2) on transcription factors involved in adipogenic differentiation induced by hind limb suspension in rat bone marrow stromal cells in vivo. Time course real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of gene expression showed that skeletal unloading progressively increases the expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP){alpha} and C/EBP{beta} {alpha} at 5 days in bone marrow stromal cells resulting in increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}2) transcripts at 7 days. TGF-{beta}2 administration in unloaded rats corrected the rise in C/EBP{alpha} and C/EBP{beta} transcripts induced by unloading in bone marrow stromal cells. This resulted in inhibition of PPAR{gamma}2 expression that was associated with increased Runx2 expression. Additionally, the inhibition of C/EBP{alpha} and C/EBP{beta} expression by TGF-{beta}2 was associated with increased PPAR{gamma} serine phosphorylation in bone marrow stromal cells, a mechanism that inhibits PPAR{gamma} transactivating activity. The sequential inhibitory effect of TGF-{beta}2 on C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{beta}, and PPAR{gamma}2 resulted in reduced LPL expression and abolition of bone marrow stromal cell adipogenic differentiation, which contributed to prevent bone loss induced by skeletal unloading. We conclude that TGF-{beta}2 inhibits the excessive adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells induced by skeletal unloading by inhibiting C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{beta}, and PPAR{gamma} expression and activity, which provides a sequential mechanism by which TGF-{beta}2 regulates adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vivo.

  5. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) may serve as the marker for osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xu; He, Jiaxue; Shi, Yingai; Pi, Chenchen; Yang, Yue; Sun, Yanan; Ma, Cao; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Yulin; Li, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Decreased bone volume and strength with aging and enhanced risk of fractures are in part due to reduced number of bone-forming mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cellular dysfunction. In a previous study, we found that osteogenic differentiation of the multipotent and omnipotent preosteoblasts are accompanied by the alterations of intracellular NAD metabolism in which nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) plays a regulatory role. The increased Nampt during osteoblast differentiation, the enzyme catalyzing NAD resynthesis from nicotinamide was noted. However, whether Nampt will also be able to affect osteogenic differentiation of primary bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), it is still uncertain. Here we report the role of Nampt in regulating osteoblast differentiation in primary mouse BM-MSCs. We found that Nampt expression was progressively elevated during BM-MSCs osteogenic differentiation. The Nampt inhibitor FK866 or knock-down of Nampt in BM-MSCs led to declined osteoblastogenesis, including attenuated ALP activity, diminished matrix mineralization and down-regulated osteoblast specific marker genes. In addition, declined osteoblastogenesis by Nampt deficiency or addition of FK866 was related to lower intracellular NAD concentration and decreased Sirt1 activity. The present findings demonstrate that osteogenic differentiation in MSCs can be modulated by intracellular NAD metabolism, in which Nampt may serve as an applicable marker for the osteoblast determination.

  6. TRPC6 regulates cell cycle progression by modulating membrane potential in bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Jun; Inoue, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ca2+ influx is important for cell cycle progression, but the mechanisms involved seem to vary. We investigated the potential roles of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels and store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE)-related molecules STIM (stromal interaction molecule)/Orai in the cell cycle progression of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), a reliable therapeutic resource for regenerative medicine. Experimental Approach PCR and immunoblot analyses were used to examine mRNA and protein levels, fluorescence imaging and patch clamping for Ca2+ influx and membrane potential measurements, and flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. Key Results Cell cycle synchronization of BMSCs revealed S phase-specific enhancement of TRPC1, STIM and Orai mRNA and protein expression. In contrast, TRPC6 expression decreased in the S phase and increased in the G1 phase. Resting membrane potential (RMP) of BMSCs was most negative and positive in the S and G1 phases, respectively, and was accompanied by an enhancement and attenuation of SOCE respectively. Chemically depolarizing/hyperpolarizing the membrane erased these differences in SOCE magnitude during the cell cycle. siRNA knockdown of TRPC6 produced a negative shift in RMP, increased SOCE and caused redistribution of BMSCs with increased populations in the S and G2/M phases and accumulation of cyclins A2 and B1. A low concentration of Gd3+ (1 μM) suppressed BMSC proliferation at its concentration to inhibit SOC channels relatively specifically. Conclusions and Implications TRPC6, by changing the membrane potential, plays a pivotal role in controlling the SOCE magnitude, which is critical for cell cycle progression of BMSCs. This finding provides a new therapeutic strategy for regulating BMSC proliferation. PMID:25041367

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Limit the Ability of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Support Hematopoietic Reconstitution in Aging Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Rahul; Krishnan, Shyam; Roy, Sushmita; Chattopadhyay, Saborni; Kumar, Vikash

    2016-01-01

    Aging of organ and abnormal tissue regeneration are recurrent problems in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This is most crucial in case of high-turnover tissues, like bone marrow (BM). Using reciprocal transplantation experiments in mouse, we have shown that self-renewal potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and BM cellularity are markedly influenced with the age of the recipient mice rather than donor mice. Moreover, accumulation of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) in BM stromal cells compared to HSPC compartment, in time-dependent manner, suggests that oxidative stress is involved in suppression of BM cellularity by affecting microenvironment in aged mice. Treatment of these mice with a polyphenolic antioxidant curcumin is found to partially quench ROS, thereby rescues stromal cells from oxidative stress-dependent cellular injury. This rejuvenation of stromal cells significantly improves hematopoietic reconstitution in 18-month-old mice compared to age control mice. In conclusion, this study implicates the role of ROS in perturbation of stromal cell function upon aging, which in turn affects BM's reconstitution ability in aged mice. Thus, a rejuvenation therapy using curcumin, before HSPC transplantation, is found to be an efficient strategy for successful marrow reconstitution in older mice. PMID:27140293

  8. Cyclic mechanical stretching promotes migration but inhibits invasion of rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Jinghui; Xu, Baiyao; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also broadly known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are multipotent stem cells that have a self-renewal capacity and multilineage differentiation potential. Mechanical stretching plays a vital role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. However, little is known about the effects of cyclic stretching on BMSC migration and invasion. In this study, using a custom-made cell-stretching device, we studied the effects of cyclic mechanical stretching on rat BMSC migration and invasion using a Transwell Boyden Chamber. The protein secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was detected by gelatin zymography, and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) was measured by western blot. We found that cyclic mechanical stretching with 10% amplitude at 1Hz frequency for 8h promotes BMSC migration, but reduces BMSC invasion. FAK and ERK1/2 signals were activated in BMSCs after exposure to cyclic stretching. In the presence of the FAK phosphorylation blocker PF573228 or the ERK1/2 phosphorylation blocker PD98059, the cyclic-stretch-promoted migration of BMSCs was completely suppressed. On the other hand, cyclic mechanical stretching reduced the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in BMSCs, and PF573228 suppressed the cyclic-stretch-reduced secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The decrease of BMSC invasion induced by mechanical stretching is partially restored by PF573228 but remained unaffected by PD98059. Taken together, these data show that cyclic mechanical stretching promotes BMSC migration via the FAK-ERK1/2 signalling pathway, but reduces BMSC invasion by decreasing secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via FAK, independent of the ERK1/2 signal.

  9. PS1/γ-Secretase-Mediated Cadherin Cleavage Induces β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Rhayra B.; Fortuna-Costa, Anneliese; Chicaybam, Leonardo; Lopes, Daiana V.; Dutra, Hélio S.; Borojevic, Radovan; Bonamino, Martin; Mermelstein, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are considered a promising tool for bone bioengineering. However, the mechanisms controlling osteoblastic commitment are still unclear. Osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs requires the activation of β-catenin signaling, classically known to be regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway. However, BMSCs treatment with canonical Wnts in vitro does not always result in osteogenic differentiation and evidence indicates that a more complex signaling pathway, involving cadherins, would be required to induce β-catenin signaling in these cells. Here we showed that Wnt3a alone did not induce TCF activation in BMSCs, maintaining the cells at a proliferative state. On the other hand, we verified that, upon BMSCs osteoinduction with dexamethasone, cadherins were cleaved by the PS1/γ-secretase complex at the plasma membrane, and this event was associated with an enhanced β-catenin translocation to the nucleus and signaling. When PS1/γ-secretase activity was inhibited, the osteogenic process was impaired. Altogether, we provide evidence that PS1/γ-secretase-mediated cadherin cleavage has as an important role in controlling β-catenin signaling during the onset of BMSCs osteogenic differentiation, as part of a complex signaling pathway responsible for cell fate decision. A comprehensive map of these pathways might contribute to the development of strategies to improve bone repair. PMID:28053606

  10. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing.

  11. Inferior ectopic bone formation of mesenchymal stromal cells from adipose tissue compared to bone marrow: rescue by chondrogenic pre-induction.

    PubMed

    Brocher, J; Janicki, P; Voltz, P; Seebach, E; Neumann, E; Mueller-Ladner, U; Richter, W

    2013-11-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells derived from bone marrow (BMSC) and adipose tissue (ATSC) represent a valuable source of progenitor cells for cell therapy and tissue engineering. While ectopic bone formation is a standard activity of human BMSC on calcium phosphate ceramics, the bone formation capacity of human ATSC has so far been unclear. The objectives of this study were to assess the therapeutic potency of ATSC for bone formation in an ectopic mouse model and determine molecular differences by standardized comparison with BMSC. Although ATSC contained less CD146(+) cells, exhibited better proliferation and displayed similar alkaline phosphatase activity upon osteogenic in vitro differentiation, cells did not develop into bone-depositing osteoblasts on β-TCP after 8weeks in vivo. Additionally, ATSC expressed less BMP-2, BMP-4, VEGF, angiopoietin and IL-6 and more adiponectin mRNA, altogether suggesting insufficient osteochondral commitment and reduced proangiogenic activity. Chondrogenic pre-induction of ATSC/β-TCP constructs with TGF-β and BMP-6 initiated ectopic bone formation in >75% of samples. Both chondrogenic pre-induction and the osteoconductive microenvironment of β-TCP were necessary for ectopic bone formation by ATSC pointing towards a need for inductive conditions/biomaterials to make this more easily accessible cell source attractive for future applications in bone regeneration.

  12. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaowei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-01-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum–host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. PMID:26843518

  13. IL-6 Contributes to the Defective Osteogenesis of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells from the Vertebral Body of the Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporotic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan-yuan; Yang, Hui-lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most prevalent skeletal system diseases. It is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and microarchitectural changes in bone tissue that lead to an attenuation of bone resistance and susceptibility to fracture. Vertebral fracture is by far the most prevalent osteoporotic fracture. In the musculoskeletal system, osteoblasts, originated from bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC), are responsible for osteoid synthesis and mineralization. In osteoporosis, BMSC osteogenic differentiation is defective. However, to date, what leads to the defective BMSC osteogenesis in osteoporosis remains an open question. In the current study, we made attempts to answer this question. A mouse model of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis (GIO) was established and BMSC were isolated from vertebral body. The impairment of osteogenesis was observed in BMSC of osteoporotic vertebral body. The expression profiles of thirty-six factors, which play important roles in bone metabolisms, were compared through antibody array between normal and osteoporotic BMSC. Significantly higher secretion level of IL-6 was observed in osteoporotic BMSCs compared with normal control. We provided evidences that IL-6 over-secretion impaired osteogenesis of osteoporotic BMSC. Further, it was observed that β-catenin activity was inhibited in response to IL-6 over-secretion. More importantly, in vivo administration of IL-6 neutralizing antibody was found to be helpful to rescue the osteoporotic phenotype of mouse vertebral body. Our study provides a deeper insight into the pathophysiology of osteoporosis and identifies IL-6 as a promising target for osteoporosis therapy. PMID:27128729

  14. Effects of wollastonite on proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells in PHBV/wollastonite composite scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Zhai, Wanying; Chang, Jiang

    2009-09-01

    In this study, the effects of wollastonite on proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) have been investigated based on a polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV)/ wollastonite (W) composite scaffolds system. Cell morphology, proliferation, and differentiation were measured. The results showed that the incorporation of wollastonite benefited hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation rate. In addition, an increase of proliferation and differentiation rate was observed when the wollastonite content in the PHBV/W composite scaffolds increased from 10 to 20 wt%. Based on our previous studies on PHBV/W composite discs, the differentiation measurements in this paper further proved that the wollastonite itself can stimulate the hBMSCs to differentiate toward osteoblasts without any osteogenic medium, and the ionic products (Ca and Si) released from wollastonite might contribute to this advantage. It is also suggested that the osteogenic differentiation of the hBMSCs can be affected by adjusting the wollastonite content in the composite scaffolds.

  15. A method for measurement of drug sensitivity of myeloma cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Misund, Kristine; Baranowska, Katarzyna A; Holien, Toril; Rampa, Christoph; Klein, Dionne C G; Børset, Magne; Waage, Anders; Sundan, Anders

    2013-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment can profoundly affect tumor cell survival as well as alter antitumor drug activity. However, conventional anticancer drug screening typically is performed in the absence of stromal cells. Here, we analyzed survival of myeloma cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) using an automated fluorescence microscope platform, ScanR. By staining the cell nuclei with DRAQ5, we could distinguish between BMSC and myeloma cells, based on their staining intensity and nuclear shape. Using the apoptotic marker YO-PRO-1, the effects of drug treatment on the viability of the myeloma cells in the presence of stromal cells could be measured. The method does not require cell staining before incubation with drugs, and less than 5000 cells are required per condition. The method can be used for large-scale screening of anticancer drugs on primary myeloma cells. This study shows the importance of stromal cell support for primary myeloma cell survival in vitro, as half of the cell samples had a marked increase in their viability when cultured in the presence of BMSC. Stromal cell-induced protection against common myeloma drugs is also observed with this method.

  16. Bystander effect in glioma suicide gene therapy using bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyi; Gu, Chunyu; Gao, Yun; Amano, Shinji; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    An established rat intracranial glioma was successfully treated through the tumoricidal bystander effect generated by intratumoral injection of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (BMSCtk cells) followed by systemic ganciclovir administration. In the present study, we tested the bystander effect of this treatment strategy when using human BMSCs as the vector cells. Human BMSCtk cells were mixed with various kinds of brain tumor cell lines (human and rat glioma cells) and examined in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal bystander effects, by co-culture study and co-implantation study in the nude mouse, respectively. A significant in vitro bystander effect was observed between human BMSCtk cells and any of the tumor cells examined in the ganciclovir-containing medium. A potent in vivo bystander effect against human and rat glioma cells was also demonstrated when ganciclovir was administered. Migratory activity of the human BMSCs toward the tumor cells was enhanced by the conditioned media obtained from both human and rat glioma cells compared to the fresh media. The results of this study have demonstrated that the bystander effect generated by BMSCtk cells and ganciclovir is not cell type-specific, suggesting that the strategy would be quite feasible for clinical use.

  17. Cerium oxide nanoparticles protect primary mouse bone marrow stromal cells from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qun; Ge, Kun; Duan, Jianlei; Chen, Shizhu; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Cuimiao; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2014-11-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have been widely used in industries and biomedical fields due to its unique properties. Previous biodistribution studies of nanoceria in vivo have shown that they are accumulated in the bone of mice after intravenous administration, about 20 % of the total intake, however, the potential effect and the mechanism of nanoceria on bone metabolism are not well-understood. Our results showed that both 25 and 50 nm nanceria decreased the damage of cell viability induced by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. The apoptosis ratio of pre-incubated group with nanoceria was lower than the H2O2 group. The cellular uptake studies indicated that there was a dose-dependent accumulation of both two size nanoparticles in bone marrow stromal cells. Nanoceria could be uptaken by cells due to the synergistic effect of multiple endocytosis mechanisms, and then evenly distributed in the cytoplasm without entering the nucleus. Our results suggest that nanoceria could reduce intracellular ROS level induced by H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner, moreover, maintain the normal function of mitochondria, suggesting nanoceria may have potent applications for preventing or treating osteoporosis.

  18. Sulfated hyaluronan alters fibronectin matrix assembly and promotes osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Sarah; Arnoldini, Simon; Möller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Hempel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and structural integrity is one of many factors that influence cellular differentiation. Fibronectin (FN) which is in many tissues the most abundant ECM protein forms a unique fibrillary network. FN homes several binding sites for sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), such as heparin (Hep), which was previously shown to influence FN conformation and protein binding. Synthetically sulfated hyaluronan derivatives (sHA) can serve as model molecules with a well characterized sulfation pattern to study sGAG-FN interaction. Here is shown that the low-sulfated sHA (sHA1) interacts with FN and influences fibril assembly. The interaction of FN fibrils with sHA1 and Hep, but not with non-sulfated HA was visualized by immunofluorescent co-staining. FRET analysis of FN confirmed the presence of more extended fibrils in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC)-derived ECM in response to sHA1 and Hep. Although both sHA1 and Hep affected FN conformation, exclusively sHA1 increased FN protein level and led to thinner fibrils. Further, only sHA1 had a pro-osteogenic effect and enhanced the activity of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase. We hypothesize that the sHA1-triggered change in FN assembly influences the entire ECM network and could be the underlying mechanism for the pro-osteogenic effect of sHA1 on hBMSC. PMID:27808176

  19. Phenotypic characteristics of hybrid cells generated by transferring neuronal nuclei into bone marrow stromal cell cytoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhujuan; Xu, Yan; Zhong, Qi; Zheng, Jian

    2012-02-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are promising donor cells for transplantation therapies for a variety of diseases. However, there still lack efficient ways to induce directional differentiation of BMSCs to promote their practical use in transplantation therapy. In this study, we constructed hybrid cells by transferring neuronal nuclei into BMSC cytoplasts and investigated the proliferative capacity and phenotypic characteristics of the hybrid cells. The neuronal nuclei were labeled with Hoechst 33342 before the transfer process, and the cell membrane antigen CD71 was used as a marker of BMSC cytoplasts. The BMSC cytoplasts and neuronal karyoplasts were separated by Ficoll density gradient ultracentrifugation. The hybrid cells were generated by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of BMSC cytoplasts with neuronal karyoplasts. The hybrid cells exhibited Hoechst 33342 staining in their nuclei and CD71 staining on their cytomembranes, which confirmed the success of cell fusion. The hybrid cells were positive for BrdU immunostaining. Viability analysis of the cultured hybrid cells by the MTT assay demonstrated their proliferative ability. Immunocytochemical staining revealed the expression of the neuron-specific markers NeuN and MAP2 in the third passage hybrid cells, which indicated their neuronal phenotypic characteristics. The results demonstrated that the hybrid cells produced by fusing neuronal karyoplasts with BMSC cytoplasts had proliferative capability and expressed the neuron-specific markers. Further study is required to investigate the phenotype of the hybrid cells both structurally and functionally.

  20. Grafted bone marrow stromal cells: a contributor to glial repair after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Xin; Yin, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Deng, Ling-Xiao

    2015-06-01

    In the CNS, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and microglias are involved in not only development but also pathology such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Glial cells play dual roles (negative vs. positive effects) in these processes. After SCI, detrimental effects usually dominate and significantly retard functional recovery, and curbing these effects is critical for promoting neurological improvement. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) represent a new therapeutic approach for SCI by enabling improved sensory and motor functions in animal models. Although transdifferentiation to spinal neurons was poor, because of their pleiotropic nature, the protective effects of BMSCs are broad and are primarily mediated through modulation of transdifferentiation into host spinal glial components. Transplantation of BMSCs can positively alter the spinal microenvironment and enhance recovery. The objective of this review is to discuss these and other related mechanisms. Since BMSCs transplantation has been applied in other clinical fields, we hope to provide useful clues for the clinical application of BMSCs to treat the SCI in the near future.

  1. Identification of differentiation-inducing activity produced by human bone marrow stromal cell line LP101.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Masaki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Nabeshima, Ryusuke; Shima, Daisuke; Handa, Hiroshi; Aizawa, Shin

    2004-11-01

    We have previously reported that human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate into mature granulocytes when HL-60 co-cultivated with human bone marrow stromal LP101 cells. In the present study, we investigated which factors produced by LP101 cells induce HL-60 cells to differentiate into mature granulocytes. The expression of the cell surface antigen CD11b on HL-60 cells was increased after a 72-h culture with the conditioned medium (CM) obtained from LP101 cells. LP101 cells were observed to produce various cytokines, including TNF-alpha, GM-CSF and IL-6. The neutralizing antibodies against these cytokines partially suppressed the CM-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells. Recombinant TNF-alpha induced the differentiation of HL-60 cells, and GM-CSF and IL-6 additionally enhanced the effect of TNF-alpha. When the CM was divided into a low molecular weight (LMW) fraction and a high molecular weight (HMW) fraction by ultrafiltration, the LMW fraction synergistically enhanced the differentiation inducible activity of TNF-alpha. These results demonstrate that LP101 cells induce the differentiation of HL-60 cells by producing various cytokines including TNF-alpha, IL-6, and GM-CSF, and that unknown low molecular weight factors also participate.

  2. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Hongying; Cai Huiguo; Han Zhongchao; Yang Renchi; Zhao, Qinjun; Cao Ying; Li Jing; Zhou Cixiang; Liao Lianming; Jia Mingyue; Zhao Qian; Chen Guoqiang . E-mail: chengq@shsmu.edu.cn; Zhao, R.C. |. E-mail: chunhuaz@public.tpt.tj.cn

    2006-08-18

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O{sub 2}, bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G{sub 2}/S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O{sub 2} condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O{sub 2} condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation.

  3. Nanotopography Induced Human Bone Marrow Mesangiogenic Progenitor Cells (MPCs) to Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) Transition

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Sara; Montali, Marina; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Meucci, Sandro; Parchi, Paolo D.; Barachini, Serena; Panvini, Francesca M.; Pacini, Simone; Petrini, Iacopo; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Mesangiogenic progenitor cells (MPCs) are a very peculiar population of cells present in the human adult bone marrow, only recently discovered and characterized. Owing to their differentiation potential, MPCs can be considered progenitors for mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and for this reason they potentially represent a promising cell population to apply for skeletal tissue regeneration applications. Here, we evaluate the effects of surface nanotopography on MPCs, considering the possibility that this specific physical stimulus alone can trigger MPC differentiation toward the mesenchymal lineage. In particular, we exploit nanogratings to deliver a mechanical, directional stimulus by contact interaction to promote cell morphological polarization and stretching. Following this interaction, we study the MPC-MSC transition by i. analyzing the change in cell morphotype by immunostaining of the key cell-adhesion structures and confocal fluorescence microscopy, and ii. quantifying the expression of cell-phenotype characterizing markers by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that the MPC mesengenic differentiation can be induced by the solely interaction with the NGs, in absence of any other external, chemical stimulus. This aspect is of particular interest in the case of multipotent progenitors as MPCs that, retaining both mesengenic and angiogenic potential, possess a high clinical appeal. PMID:28066765

  4. Voltage-dependent calcium and chloride currents in S17 bone marrow stromal cell line.

    PubMed

    Silva, Henrique B; Medei, Emiliano; Rodrigues, Deivid C; Rondinelli, Edson; Almeida, Norma A S; Goldenberg, Regina C S; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Nascimento, José H M

    2010-04-01

    The bone marrow stromal cell line S17 has been used to study hematopoiesis in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of calcium and chloride currents in cultured S17 cells. Calcium currents were of low amplitude or barely detectable (50-100 pA). Hence to amplify the currents, we have used barium as a charge carrier. Barium currents were identified based on their distinct voltage-dependence, and sensitivity to dihydropyridines. S17 cells also exhibited a slowly activating outward current without inactivation, most commonly seen when the sodium of the extracellular solution was replaced either by TEA (TEA/Cs saline) or NMDG (NMDG saline), or by addition of amiloride to the extracellular solution. This current was abolished either by 500 microM SITS (4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2'-disulfonic acid) or 500 microM DPC (diphenylamine-2-carboxylic acid) a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel blocker, identifying it as a Cl(-) current. RT-PCR identified the presence of ENaC and CFTR transcripts. CFTR blockade reduced cell proliferation, suggesting that this channel plays a physiological role in regulation of S17 cell proliferation.

  5. Sulfated hyaluronan alters fibronectin matrix assembly and promotes osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Sarah; Arnoldini, Simon; Möller, Stephanie; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Hempel, Ute

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and structural integrity is one of many factors that influence cellular differentiation. Fibronectin (FN) which is in many tissues the most abundant ECM protein forms a unique fibrillary network. FN homes several binding sites for sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), such as heparin (Hep), which was previously shown to influence FN conformation and protein binding. Synthetically sulfated hyaluronan derivatives (sHA) can serve as model molecules with a well characterized sulfation pattern to study sGAG-FN interaction. Here is shown that the low-sulfated sHA (sHA1) interacts with FN and influences fibril assembly. The interaction of FN fibrils with sHA1 and Hep, but not with non-sulfated HA was visualized by immunofluorescent co-staining. FRET analysis of FN confirmed the presence of more extended fibrils in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC)-derived ECM in response to sHA1 and Hep. Although both sHA1 and Hep affected FN conformation, exclusively sHA1 increased FN protein level and led to thinner fibrils. Further, only sHA1 had a pro-osteogenic effect and enhanced the activity of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase. We hypothesize that the sHA1-triggered change in FN assembly influences the entire ECM network and could be the underlying mechanism for the pro-osteogenic effect of sHA1 on hBMSC.

  6. Bone marrow stromal cells inhibits HMGB1-mediated inflammation after stroke in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, J; Liu, B; Zhao, Q; Jin, P; Hua, F; Zhang, Z; Liu, Y; Zan, K; Cui, G; Ye, X

    2016-06-02

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a ligand of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), functions as a proinflammatory factor. It is mainly involved in inflammatory activation and contributes to the initiation and progression of stroke. By using a model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in type 2 diabetic rats, we investigated the changes of pro-inflammation mediators, blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage and functional outcome after stroke. Type 2 diabetic rats did not show an increased lesion volume, but exhibited significantly increased expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, BBB leakage, as well as decreased functional outcome after stroke compared with control rats. Injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into type 2 diabetic rats significantly reduced the expression of HMGB1 and RAGE, attenuated BBB leakage, and improved functional outcome after stroke. BMSCs-treated type 2 diabetic rats inhibited inflammation and improved functional outcome after stroke. Furthermore, in vitro data support the hypothesis that BMSCs-induced reduction of HMGB1 and RAGE in T2DM-MCAo rats contributed to attenuated inflammatory response in the ischemic brain, which may lead to the beneficial effects of BMSCs treatment. Further investigation of BMSCs treatment in type 2 diabetic stroke is warranted.

  7. Inhibition of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C prevents bone marrow stromal cell senescence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Wang, Nan; Huang, Jie; Xin, Jie; Peng, Fen; Ren, Yinshi; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying

    2009-10-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) can proliferate in vitro and can be transplanted for treating many kinds of diseases. However, BMSCs become senescent with long-term culture, which inhibits their application. To understand the mechanism underlying the senescence, we investigated the activity of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS with BMSC senescence. The activity of PC-PLC and levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS increased greatly during cell senescence. Selective inhibition of increased PC-PLC activity with D609 significantly decreased the number of senescence-associated beta galactosidase positive cells in BMSCs. Furthermore, D609 restored proliferation of BMSCs and their differentiation into adipocytes. Moreover, D609 suppressed the elevated levels of integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS. The data suggest that PC-PLC is involved in senescence of BMSCs, and its function is associated with integrin beta4, caveolin-1 and ROS.

  8. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues.

  9. Adult rat bone marrow stromal cells express genes associated with dopamine neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Brian C.; Woodbury, Dale . E-mail: WOODBURYDL@AOL.COM; Black, Ira B.

    2006-05-19

    An intensive search is underway to identify candidates to replace the cells that degenerate in Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, no suitable substitute has been found. We have recently found that adult rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to assume a neuronal phenotype in vitro. These findings may have particular relevance to the treatment of PD. We now report that adult MSCs express multiple dopaminergic genes, suggesting that they are potential candidates for cell therapy. Using RT-PCR, we have examined families of genes that are associated with the development and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons. MSCs transcribe a variety of dopaminergic genes including patched and smoothened (components of the Shh receptor), Gli-1 (downstream mediator of Shh), and Otx-1, a gene associated with formation of the mesencephalon during development. Furthermore, Shh treatment elicits a 1.5-fold increase in DNA synthesis in cultured MSCs, suggesting the presence of a functional Shh receptor complex. We have also found that MSCs transcribe and translate Nurr-1, a nuclear receptor essential for the development of dopamine neurons. In addition, MSCs express a variety of growth factor receptors including the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored ligand-binding subunit of the GDNF receptor, GFR{alpha}1, as well as fibroblast growth factor receptors one and four. The expression of genes that are associated with the development and survival of dopamine neurons suggests a potential role for these cells in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  10. The LIM protein LIMD1 influences osteoblast differentiation and function

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, Hilary F.; Bai Shuting; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2008-09-10

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation involves the coordinated activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Communication between these two cell types is essential for maintenance of normal bone homeostasis; however, the mechanisms regulating this cross talk are not completely understood. Many factors that mediate differentiation and function of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts have been identified. The LIM protein Limd1 has been implicated in the regulation of stress osteoclastogenesis through an interaction with the p62/sequestosome protein. Here we show that Limd1 also influences osteoblast progenitor numbers, differentiation, and function. Limd1{sup -/-} calvarial osteoblasts display increased mineralization and accelerated differentiation. While no significant differences in osteoblast number or function were detected in vivo, bone marrow stromal cells isolated from Limd1{sup -/-} mice contain significantly more osteoblast progenitors compared to wild type controls when cultured ex vivo. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in nuclear {beta}-catenin staining in differentiating Limd1{sup -/-} calvarial osteoblasts suggesting that Limd1 is a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling in osteoblasts. These results demonstrate that Limd1 influences not only stress osteoclastogenesis but also osteoblast function and osteoblast progenitor commitment. Together, these data identify Limd1 as a novel regulator of both bone osetoclast and bone osteoblast development and function.

  11. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  12. Changes in compartments of hemospoietic and stromal marrow progenitor cells after continuous low dose gamma-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domaratskaya, E.; Starostin, V.

    The low dose continuous gamma-irradiation chosen corresponded with that affected the organisms onboard a spacecraft (Mitrikas, Tsetlin, 2000). F1 (CBAxC57Bl/6) male and female mice were used at 3 4 months of age. Experimental mice were- irradiated during 10 days to a total dose of 15 mGy (Co60 gamma-sources, mean dose rate of 1.5-2.0 mGy/day). Another group of intact mice served as control. Younger and advanced hemopoietic progenitors measured at day 11 (i.e. CFU -S-11) and day 7 (i.e. CFU-S-7), respectively, after transplantation of test donor cells were assayed by the method of Till and McCulloch (1961). Stromal changes were evaluated by estimation of in vitro fibroblastic colony-forming units (CFU -F ) content and by the ability of ectopically grafted (under renal capsule) stroma to regenerate the new bone marrow organ. CFU-S-11 number increased of 40% as compared with control and almost 2-fold higher than that of CFU-S-7. The CFU-F content increased almost of 3-fold. Size of ectopic marrow transplants was estimated at day 70 following grafting by counting myelokariocyte and CFU -S number that repopulated the newly formed bone marrow organ. It was found more than 2-fold increase of myelokariocytes in transplants produced by marrow stroma of irradiated donors. CFU -S contents in transplants increased strikingly in comparison to control level. CFU-S-7 and CFU-S-11 increased of 7.5- and of 3.7-fold, respectively, i.e. the rate of advanced CFU - S predominated. It should be noted a good correlation between number of stromal progenitor cells (CFU-F) and ectopic transplant sizes evaluated as myelokaryocyte counts when irradiated donors used. In the same time, if sizes of transplants was measured as CFU-S-7 and CFU - S-11 numbers, their increases were more pronounced. Therefore, continuous low dose gamma- irradiation augments significantly both hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cell number in bone marrow. Additionally, the ratio of distinct CFU -S subpopulations

  13. Hematopoiesis on cellulose ester membranes. XI. Induction of new bone and a hematopoietic microenvironment by matrix factors secreted by marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Knospe, W H; Husseini, S G; Fried, W

    1989-07-01

    Cellulose ester membranes (CEM) were coated with stromal cells from bone marrow (BM) or bone and implanted intraperitoneally (IP) in CAF1 mice for intervals of 1 to 6 months. Previous studies indicated that matrix factors [glycoproteins (GPs), proteoglycans (PGs), and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)] were secreted by the regenerating stromal cells and adsorbed by the CEM. After 1 to 6 months, the CEMs were removed, scraped free of adherent cells, and irradiated in vitro with 40 Gy. The scraped and irradiated CEMs were then reimplanted IP or subcutaneously (SC) for periods of 1 to 6 months in secondary syngeneic murine hosts. They were then removed for histologic study. CEMs reimplanted in SC sites developed bone and hematopoiesis as early as 1 month after implantation. Maximum hematopoiesis and bone formation was observed after 3 months. CEMs coated during the initial implantation with bone-derived stromal cells contained more bone and hematopoietic cells than did CEMs coated with marrow-derived stromal cells after SC implementation. Neither the CEMs coated with bone stromal cells nor those coated with marrow stromal cells developed new bone or trilineal hematopoiesis after being implanted IP. A few CEMs contained small foci of granulopoiesis only. We conclude that noncellular matrix substances deposited on CEMs by bone, and to a lesser degree by marrow cells, can induce prestromal cells in the SC tissues to produce a microenvironment suitable for trilineal hematopoiesis.

  14. In vitro quantitation of lethal and physiologic effects of total body irradiation on stromal and hematopoietic stem cells in continuous bone marrow cultures from Rf mice

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, J.S.; Eckner, R.J.; Otten, J.A.; Tennant, R.W.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of in vivo total body irradiation (TBI) and interval from TBI to explant of marrow on: stromal cell proliferation in vitro; stromal cell support of hematopoiesis in continuous bone marrow culture; and generation of WEHI-3 growth factor (GF)-dependent lines of hematopoietic progenitor cells were evaluated. Explant of marrow at 2, 4, 5, or 6 months after single fraction TBI (300-800 rad) was associated with decreased longevity of hemopoiesis and a decrease in the proliferative capacity of fibroblastic adherent-stromal colony forming cells (CFUf) as measured by colony size at 14 days and number of colonies per 10/sup 6/ cells plated. In contrast, explant of marrow 8 to 24 months after TBI produced cultures with longevity that was indistinguishable from age-matched control cultures (19-24 weeks). Marrow from irradiated first and second generation recipients of serially transferred marrow demonstrated a similar 7-month in vivo recovery period; however, the plateau maximum duration of hemopoiesis did not return to control levels. Purified stromal cell cultures were prepared by corticosteroid-deprivation of explanted marrow for 28 days and were then engrafted in vitro with marrow from C57BL/6J or RfM/UN mice that had been irradiated 1 month previously. Hemopoiesis in these cultures was restored, and they produced GM-CFUc and granulocytes for 15-24 weeks. Thus, healthy stroma supported growth of recently irradiated hemopoietic cells in vitro. Indirect effects of x-irradiation on hemopoietic stem cells through damage and repair in the stromal cell compartment can be effectively studied with the present bone marrow culture system. (JMT)

  15. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of bone marrow stromal cell surface gene, BST2, that may be involved in pre-B-cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Tomizawa, Hitoshi

    1995-04-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells regulate B-cell growth and development through their surface molecules and cytokines. In this study, we generated a mAb, RS38, that recognized a novel human membrane protein, BST-2, expressed on bone marrow stromal cell lines and synovial cell lines. We cloned a cDNA encoding BST-2 from a rheumatoid arthritis-derived synovial cell line. BST-2 is a 30- to 36-kDa type II transmembrane protein, consisting of 180 amino acids. The BST-2 gene (HGMW-approved symbol BST2) is located on chromosome 19p13.2. BST-2 is expressed not only on certain bone marrow stromal cell lines but also on various normal tissues, although its expression pattern is different from that of another bone marrow stromal cell surface molecule, BST-1. BST-2 surface expression on fibroblast cell lines facilitated the stromal cell-dependent growth of a murine bone marrow-derived pre-B-cell line, DW34. The results suggest that BST-2 may be involved in pre-B-cell growth. 45 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Quantitative analysis of glycans, related genes, and proteins in two human bone marrow stromal cell lines using an integrated strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Dongliang; Pang, Xingchen; Yang, Ganglong; Deeg, H Joachim; Guan, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Altered expression of glycans is associated with cell-cell signal transduction and regulation of cell functions in the bone marrow micro-environment. Studies of this micro-environment often use two human bone marrow stromal cell lines, HS5 and HS27a, co-cultured with myeloid cells. We hypothesized that differential protein glycosylation between these two cell lines may contribute to functional differences in in vitro co-culture models. In this study, we applied an integrated strategy using genomic, proteomic, and functional glycomic techniques for global expression profiling of N-glycans and their related genes and enzymes in HS5 cells versus HS27a cells. HS5 cells had significantly enhanced levels of bisecting N-glycans (catalyzed by MGAT3 [β-1,4-mannosyl-glycoprotein 4-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase]), whereas HS27a cells had enhanced levels of Galβ1,4GlcNAc (catalyzed by β4GalT1 [β4-galactosyltransferase I]). This integrated strategy provides useful information regarding the functional roles of glycans and their related glycogenes and glycosyltransferases in the bone marrow microenvironment, and a basis for future studies of crosstalk among stromal cells and myeloma cells in co-culture.

  17. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Differentiate Into Corneal Tissue and Prevent Ocular Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Hernández-Galilea, Emiliano; Lorenzo, Rebeca; Herrero, Carmen; Velasco, Almudena; Carrancio, Soraya; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Rodríguez-Barbosa, José Ignacio; Parrilla, Marta; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesús; Aijón, José; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials have assessed the use of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) for the treatment of immune-related disorders such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the current study, we show that GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs generated from bone marrow migrate and differentiate into corneal tissue after subconjunctival injection in mice. Interestingly, these hBMSCs display morphological features of epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cells and appear at different layers and with different morphologies depending on their position within the epithelium. Furthermore, these cells display ultrastructural properties, such as bundles of intermediate filaments, interdigitations, and desmosomes with GFP(-) cells, which confirms their differentiation into corneal tissues. GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs were injected at different time points into the right eye of lethally irradiated mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation, which developed ocular GVHD (oGVHD). Remarkably, hBMSCs massively migrate to corneal tissues after subconjunctival injection. Both macroscopic and histopathological examination showed minimal or no evidence of GVHD in the right eye, while the left eye, where no hBMSCs were injected, displayed features of GVHD. Thus, in the current study, we confirm that hBMSCs may induce their therapeutic effect at least in part by differentiation and regeneration of damaged tissues in the host. Our results provide experimental evidence that hBMSCs represent a potential cellular therapy to attenuate oGVHD.

  18. Autologous bone marrow stromal cells are promising candidates for cell therapy approaches to treat bone degeneration in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Lebouvier, Angélique; Poignard, Alexandre; Coquelin-Salsac, Laura; Léotot, Julie; Homma, Yasuhiro; Jullien, Nicolas; Bierling, Philippe; Galactéros, Frédéric; Hernigou, Philippe; Chevallier, Nathalie; Rouard, Hélène

    2015-11-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a frequent complication in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To delay hip arthroplasty, core decompression combined with concentrated total bone marrow (BM) treatment is currently performed in the early stages of the osteonecrosis. Cell therapy efficacy depends on the quantity of implanted BM stromal cells. For this reason, expanded bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells) can be used to improve osteonecrosis treatment in SCD patients. In this study, we quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the function of BMSCs isolated from a large number of SCD patients with osteonecrosis (SCD-ON) compared with control groups (patients with osteonecrosis not related to SCD (ON) and normal donors (N)). BM total nuclear cells and colony-forming efficiency values (CFE) were significantly higher in SCD-ON patients than in age and sex-matched controls. The BMSCs from SCD-ON patients were similar to BMSCs from the control groups in terms of their phenotypic and functional properties. SCD-ON patients have a higher frequency of BMSCs that retain their bone regeneration potential. Our findings suggest that BMSCs isolated from SCD-ON patients can be used clinically in cell therapy approaches. This work provides important preclinical data that is necessary for the clinical application of expanded BMSCs in advanced therapies and medical products.

  19. Prostaglandin E2 impairs osteogenic and facilitates adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Noack, Carolin; Hempel, Ute; Preissler, Carolin; Dieter, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex) is a mandatory additive to induce osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) in vitro; however it is also known to promote the pathogenesis of osteoporotic bone disease in vivo. In this study human (h)BMSC were cultured in osteogenic medium containing β-glycerophosphate and ascorbate (OM) and in OM containing dex (OM/D). It was seen that dex induced in human (h)BMSC both, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Dex reveals its anti-inflammatory effect by reducing endogenous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) formation and by suppressing the inducible enzymes cyclooxygenase 2 and microsomal PGE2 synthase 1. It was further seen that dex enhanced the expression of prostaglandin receptors, mainly EP2 and EP4 receptor subtypes. We thus hypothesized that dex enforces the susceptibility of hBMSC to respond to exogenous PGE2. Permanent exposure of hBMSC which were cultured in OM/D to PGE2, decreased osteogenic and increased adipogenic differentiation markers. The effects of PGE2 were preferentially mediated by receptor subtypes EP2 and EP4; EP1 was partially involved in pro-adipogenic effects, and EP3 was partially involved in anti-osteogenic effects. These results suggest that dex suppresses the formation of endogenous PGE2 but also enables hBMSC to respond to PGE2 due to the induction of PGE2 receptors EP2 and EP4. PGE2 then shifts in hBMSC the balance from osteogenic to adipogenic differentiation.

  20. Endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in bone marrow are required to preserve muscle function in mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Ryo; Tamai, Katsuto; Aikawa, Eriko; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-03-01

    The physiological role of "endogenous" bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in tissue regeneration is poorly understood. Here, we show the significant contribution of unique endogenous BM-MSC populations to muscle regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mice (mdx). Transplantation of BM cells (BMCs) from 10-week-old mdx into 3-4-week-old mdx mice increased inflammation and fibrosis and reduced muscle function compared with mdx mice that received BMCs from 10-week-old wild-type mice, suggesting that the alteration of BMC populations in mdx mice affects the progression of muscle pathology. Two distinct MSC populations in BM, that is, hematopoietic lineage (Lin)(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) cells, were significantly reduced in 10-week-old mdx mice in disease progression. The results of a whole-transcriptome analysis indicated that these two MSC populations have distinct gene expression profiles, indicating that the Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) MSC populations are proliferative- and dormant-state populations in BM, respectively. BM-derived Lin(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs abundantly migrated to damaged muscles and highly expressed tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene/protein-6 (TSG-6), an anti-inflammatory protein, in damaged muscles. We also demonstrated that TSG-6 stimulated myoblast proliferation. The injection of Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs into the muscle of mdx mice successfully ameliorated muscle dysfunction by decreasing inflammation and enhancing muscle regeneration through TSG-6-mediated activities. Thus, we propose a novel function of the unique endogenous BM-MSC population, which countered muscle pathology progression in a DMD model.

  1. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Patients with Sickle Cell Disease Display Intact Functionality.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Elizabeth O; Chinnadurai, Raghavan; Yuan, Shala; Garcia, Marco; Arafat, Dalia; Gibson, Greg; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Galipeau, Jacques

    2017-01-26

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only cure for sickle cell disease (SCD), but engraftment remains challenging in patients lacking matched donors. Infusion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) at the time of HCT may promote hematopoiesis and ameliorate graft-versus-host disease. Experimental murine models suggest MSC major histocompatibility complex compatibility with recipient impacts their in vivo function, suggesting autologous MSCs could be superior to third-party MSCs for promoting HCT engraftment. Here we tested whether bone marrow (BM)-derived MSCs from SCD subjects have comparable functionality compared with MSCs from healthy volunteers. SCD MSC doubling time and surface marker phenotype did not differ significantly from non-SCD. Third-party and autologous (SCD) T cell proliferation was suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by all MSCs. SCD MSCs comparably expressed indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, which based on transwell and blocking experiments appeared to be the dominant immunomodulatory pathway. The expression of key genes involved in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-MSC interactions was minimally altered between SCD and non-SCD MSCs. Expression was, however, altered by IFN-γ stimulation, particularly CXCL14, CXCL26, CX3CL1, CKITL, and JAG1, indicating the potential to augment MSC expression by cytokine stimulation. These data demonstrate the feasibility of expanding BM-derived MSCs from SCD patients that phenotypically and functionally do not differ per International Society of Cell Therapy essential criteria from non-SCD MSCs, supporting initial evaluation (primarily for safety) of autologous MSCs to enhance haploidentical HSC engraftment in SCD.

  2. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation preserves gammaaminobutyric acid receptor function in the injured spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shunsuke; Kuroda, Satoshi; Shichinohe, Hideo; Seki, Toshitaka; Ohnishi, Takako; Tamagami, Hiroshi; Hida, Kazutoshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2006-11-01

    A surprising shortage of information surrounds the mechanisms by which bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) restore lost neurologic functions when transplanted into the damaged central nervous system. In the present study, we sought to elucidate whether BMSCs express the neuron-specific gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor when transplanted into injured spinal cord. To examine this, we harvested and cultured rat femoral BMSCs. We then subjected Sprague-Dawley rats to thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) with a pneumatic impact device. Fluorescence-labeled BMSCs (n = 7) were transplanted stereotactically or the vehicle in which these cells were cultured (n = 4) was introduced stereotactically into the rostral site of SCI at 7 days after injury. We evaluated GABA receptor function by measuring the binding potential for 125I-iomazenil (125I-IMZ) through in vitro autoradiography at 4 weeks after BMSC transplantation and simultaneously examined the fate of the transplanted BMSCs by immunocytochemistry. We found that the transplanted BMSC migrated toward the core of the injury and were densely distributed in the marginal region at 4 weeks after transplantation. BMSC transplantation significantly increased the binding potential for 125I-IMZ (p = 0.0376) and increased the number of GABA receptor-positive cells (p = 0.0077) in the marginal region of the injury site. Some of the transplanted BMSCs were positive for microtubule-associated protein-2 and the alpha1 subunit of GABA(A) receptor in the region of injury. These findings suggest that BMSCs have the potential to support the survival of neurons in the marginal region of SCI and can partly differentiate into neurons, regenerating spinal cord tissue at the site of injury.

  3. Heparin affects human bone marrow stromal cell fate: Promoting osteogenic and reducing adipogenic differentiation and conversion.

    PubMed

    Simann, Meike; Schneider, Verena; Le Blanc, Solange; Dotterweich, Julia; Zehe, Viola; Krug, Melanie; Jakob, Franz; Schilling, Tatjana; Schütze, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Heparins are broadly used for the prevention and treatment of thrombosis and embolism. Yet, osteoporosis is considered to be a severe side effect in up to one third of all patients on long-term treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying this clinical problem are only partially understood. To investigate if heparin affects differentiation of skeletal precursors, we examined the effects of heparin on the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage commitment and differentiation of primary human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). Due to the known inverse relationship between adipogenesis and osteogenesis and the capacity of pre-differentiated cells to convert into the respective other lineage, we also determined heparin effects on osteogenic conversion and adipogenic differentiation/conversion. Interestingly, heparin did not only significantly increase mRNA expression and enzyme activity of the osteogenic marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP), but it also promoted mineralization during osteogenic differentiation and conversion. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of the osteogenic marker bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4) was enhanced. In addition, heparin administration partly prevented adipogenic differentiation and conversion demonstrated by reduced lipid droplet formation along with a decreased expression of adipogenic markers. Moreover, luciferase reporter assays, inhibitor experiments and gene expression analyses revealed that heparin had putative permissive effects on osteogenic signaling via the BMP pathway and reduced the mRNA expression of the Wnt pathway inhibitors dickkopf 1 (DKK1) and sclerostin (SOST). Taken together, our data show a rather supportive than inhibitory effect of heparin on osteogenic hBMSC differentiation and conversion in vitro. Further studies will have to investigate the net effects of heparin administration on bone formation versus bone resorption in vivo to unravel the molecular mechanisms of heparin-associated osteoporosis and reconcile

  4. Mechanical stimulation orchestrates the osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells by regulating HDAC1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Wang, C D; Zhang, N; Tong, W X; Zhang, Y F; Shan, S Z; Zhang, X L; Li, Q F

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation and histone deacetylases (HDACs) have essential roles in regulating the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and bone formation. However, little is known regarding what regulates HDAC expression and therefore the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs during osteogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether mechanical loading regulates HDAC expression directly and examined the role of HDACs in mechanical loading-triggered osteogenic differentiation and bone formation. We first studied the microarrays of samples from patients with osteoporosis and found that the NOTCH pathway and skeletal development gene sets were downregulated in the BMSCs of patients with osteoporosis. Then we demonstrated that mechanical stimuli can regulate osteogenesis and bone formation both in vivo and in vitro. NOTCH signaling was upregulated during cyclic mechanical stretch (CMS)-induced osteogenic differentiation, whereas HDAC1 protein expression was downregulated. The perturbation of HDAC1 expression also had a significant effect on matrix mineralization and JAG1-mediated Notch signaling, suggesting that HDAC1 acts as an endogenous attenuator of Notch signaling in the mechanotransduction of BMSCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results suggest that HDAC1 modulates the CMS-induced histone H3 acetylation level at the JAG1 promoter. More importantly, we found an inhibitory role of Hdac1 in regulating bone formation in response to hindlimb unloading in mice, and pretreatment with an HDAC1 inhibitor partly rescued the osteoporosis caused by mechanical unloading. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that mechanical stimulation orchestrates genes expression involved in the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs via the direct regulation of HDAC1, and the therapeutic inhibition of HDAC1 may be an efficient strategy for enhancing bone formation under mechanical stimulation. PMID:27171263

  5. Effect of boron on osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xiaozhou; Cheng, Shaowen; Wang, Wei; Lin, Zhongqin; Chen, Qingyu; Zhang, Wei; Kou, Dongquan; Shen, Yue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Rompis, Ferdinand An; Peng, Lei; Zhu Lu, Chuan

    2011-12-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been well established as an ideal source of cell-based therapy for bone tissue engineering applications. Boron (B) is a notable trace element in humans; so far, the effects of boron on the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs have not been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of boron (0, 1, 10,100, and 1,000 ng/ml) on osteogenic differentiation of human BMSCs. In this study, BMSCs proliferation was analyzed by cell counting kit-8 (CCK8) assay, and cell osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, Von Kossa staining, and real-time PCR. The results indicated that the proliferation of BMSCs was no different from the control group when added with B at the concentration of 1, 10, and 100 ng/ml respectively (P > 0.05); in contrast, 1,000 ng/ml B inhibited the proliferation of BMSCs at days 4, 7, and 14 (P < 0.05). By ALP staining, we discovered that BMSCs treated with 10 and 100 ng/ml B presented a higher ALP activity compared with control (P < 0.05). By real-time PCR, we detected the messenger RNA expression of ALP, osteocalcin, collagen type I, and bone morphogenetic proteins 7 were also increased in 10 and 100 ng/ml B treatment groups (P < 0.05). The calcium depositions were increased in 1 and 10 ng/ml B treatment groups (P < 0.05). Taken all together, it was the first time to report that B could increase osteogenic effect by stimulating osteogenic differentiation-related marker gene synthesis during the proliferation and differentiation phase in human BMSCs and could be a promising approach for enhancing osteogenic capacity of cell-based construction in bone tissue engineering.

  6. Application of cell sheet technology to bone marrow stromal cell transplantation for rat brain infarct.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2017-02-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) transplantation enhances functional recovery after cerebral infarct, but the optimal delivery route is undetermined. This study was aimed to assess whether a novel cell-sheet technology non-invasively serves therapeutic benefits to ischemic stroke. First, the monolayered cell sheet was engineered by culturing rat BMSCs on a temperature-responsive dish. The cell sheet was analysed histologically and then transplanted onto the ipsilateral neocortex of rats subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion at 7 days after the insult. Their behaviours and histology were compared with those in the animals treated with direct injection of BMSCs or vehicle over 4 weeks post-transplantation. The cell sheet was 27.9 ± 8.0 μm thick and was composed of 9.8 ± 2.4 × 10(5) cells. Cell sheet transplantation significantly improved motor function when compared with the vehicle-injected animals. Histological analysis revealed that the BMSCs were densely distributed to the neocortex adjacent to the cerebral infarct and expressed neuronal phenotype in the cell sheet-transplanted animals. These findings were almost equal to those for the animals treated with direct BMSC injection. The attachment of the BMSC sheet to the brain surface did not induce reactive astrocytes in the adjacent neocortex, although direct injection of BMSCs profoundly induced reactive astrocytes around the injection site. These findings suggest that the BMSCs in cell sheets preserve their biological capacity of migration and neural differentiation. Cell-sheet technology may enhance functional recovery after ischaemic stroke, using a less invasive method. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yingbin; Cai, Shaoxi; Yang, Li; Yu, Shuhui; Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Haoxing; Liu, Lan; Liu, Qun; Du, Jun; Cai, Shaohui; Sung, K.L. Paul

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  8. Functional characterisation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, Helene; Zarcone, Maria C.; Taube, Christian; Stolk, Jan; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are evaluated for clinical use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but it is unclear whether COPD affects BM-MSCs. To investigate this, BM-MSCs from nine COPD patients and nine non-COPD age-matched controls were compared with regard to immunophenotype, growth and differentiation potential, and migration capacity. Other functional assays included the response to pro-inflammatory stimuli and inducers of the nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-like 2 antioxidant response element (Nrf2-ARE) pathway, and effects on NCI-H292 airway epithelial cells. No significant differences were observed in terms of morphology, proliferation and migration, except for increased adipocyte differentiation potential in the COPD group. Both groups were comparable regarding mRNA expression of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and in their potential to induce mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in NCI-H292 airway epithelial cells. MSCs from COPD patients secreted more interleukin-6 in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. Activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway resulted in a comparable induction of mRNA expression of four target genes, but the expression of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene NQO1 was lower in MSCs from COPD patients. The observation that MSCs from COPD patients are phenotypically and functionally comparable to those from non-COPD controls implies that autologous MSCs can be considered for use in the setting of clinical trials as a treatment for COPD. PMID:27730190

  9. EFFECTS OF PLATING DENSITY AND CULTURE TIME ON BONE MARROW STROMAL CELL CHARACTERISTICS

    PubMed Central

    Neuhuber, Birgit; Swanger, Sharon A.; Howard, Linda; Mackay, Alastair; Fischer, Itzhak

    2008-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent adult stem cells that have emerged as promising candidates for cell therapy in disorders including cardiac infarction, stroke and spinal cord injury. While harvesting methods used by different laboratories are relatively standard, MSC culturing protocols vary widely. This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of initial plating density and total time in culture on proliferation, cell morphology, and differentiation potential of heterogeneous MSC cultures and more homogeneous cloned subpopulations. Methods Rat MSC were plated at 20, 200 and 2000 cells/cm2 and grown to 50% confluency. The numbers of population doublings and doubling times were determined within and across multiple passages. Changes in cell morphology and differentiation potential to adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic lineages were evaluated and compared among early, intermediate and late passages, as well as between heterogeneous and cloned MSC populations. Results We found optimal cell growth at a plating density of 200 cells/cm2. Cultures derived from all plating densities developed increased proportions of flat cells over time. Assays for chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and adipogenesis showed that heterogeneous MSC plated at all densities sustained the potential for all three mesenchymal phenotypes through at least passage 5; the flat subpopulation lost adipogenic and chondrogenic potential. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the initial plating density is not critical for maintaining a well-defined, multipotent MSC population. Time in culture, however, affects cell characteristics, suggesting that cell expansion should be limited, especially until the specific characteristics of different MSC subpopulations are better understood. PMID:18495329

  10. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  11. Leptin-receptor-expressing mesenchymal stromal cells represent the main source of bone formed by adult bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo O; Yue, Rui; Murphy, Malea M; Peyer, James G; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-08-07

    Studies of the identity and physiological function of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been hampered by a lack of markers that permit both prospective identification and fate mapping in vivo. We found that Leptin Receptor (LepR) is a marker that highly enriches bone marrow MSCs. Approximately 0.3% of bone marrow cells were LepR(+), 10% of which were CFU-Fs, accounting for 94% of bone marrow CFU-Fs. LepR(+) cells formed bone, cartilage, and adipocytes in culture and upon transplantation in vivo. LepR(+) cells were Scf-GFP(+), Cxcl12-DsRed(high), and Nestin-GFP(low), markers which also highly enriched CFU-Fs, but negative for Nestin-CreER and NG2-CreER, markers which were unlikely to be found in CFU-Fs. Fate-mapping showed that LepR(+) cells arose postnatally and gave rise to most bone and adipocytes formed in adult bone marrow, including bone regenerated after irradiation or fracture. LepR(+) cells were quiescent, but they proliferated after injury. Therefore, LepR(+) cells are the major source of bone and adipocytes in adult bone marrow.

  12. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells are more beneficial cell sources for tooth regeneration compared with adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lanfeng; Chen, Lin; Feng, Fan; Cui, Junhui; Li, Kaide; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    Tooth loss is presently a global epidemic and tooth regeneration is thought to be a feasible and ideal treatment approach. Choice of cell source is a primary concern in tooth regeneration. In this study, the odontogenic differentiation potential of two non-dental-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs), were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. ADSCs and BMSCs were induced in vitro in the presence of tooth germ cell-conditioned medium (TGC-CM) prior to implantation into the omentum majus of rats, in combination with inactivated dentin matrix (IDM). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect the mRNA expression levels of odontogenic-related genes. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical assays were used to detect the protein levels of odontogenic-specific genes, such as DSP and DMP-1 both in vitro and in vivo. The results suggest that both ADSCs and BMSCs have odontogenic differentiation potential. However, the odontogenic potential of BMSCs was greater compared with ADSCs, showing that BMSCs are a more appropriate cell source for tooth regeneration.

  13. Deflazacort increases osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow culture and the ratio of RANKL/OPG mRNA expression in marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, H.; Kang, Y. S.; Hwang, C. S.; Moon, I. K.; Yim, C. H.; Choi, K. H.; Han, K. O.; Jang, H. C.; Yoon, H. K.; Han, I. K.

    2001-01-01

    Information on precise effects of deflazacort on bone cell function, especially osteoclasts, is quite limited. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to test effects of deflazacort on osteoclast-like cell formation in mouse bone marrow cultures and on the regulation of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and its ligand (RANKL) mRNA expressions by RT-PCR in the ST2 marrow stromal cells. TRAP-positive mononuclear cells increased after the treatment of deflazacort at 10(-9) to 10(-7) M alone for 6 days in a dose-dependent manner. Number of TRAP-positive multi-nucleated cells (MNCs) increased significantly with combined treatment of deflazacort at 10(-7) M and 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M compared to that of cultures treated with 1,25-(OH)2D3 alone (p<0.05). Exposure to deflazacort at 10(-7) M in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 at 10(-9) M in the last 3-day culture had greater stimulatory effect on osteoclast-like cell formation than that of the first 3-day culture did. Deflazacort at 10(-10) -10(-6) M downregulated OPG and upregulated RANKL in mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. These observations suggest that deflazacort stimulate osteoclast precursor in the absence of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and enhance differentiation of osteoclasts in the presence of 1,25-(OH)2D3. These effects are, in part, thought to be mediated by the regulation of the expression of OPG and RANKL mRNA in marrow stromal cells. PMID:11748360

  14. The HIV proteins Tat and Nef promote human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell senescence and alter osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Beaupere, Carine; Garcia, Marie; Larghero, Jerome; Fève, Bruno; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lagathu, Claire

    2015-08-01

    To maintain bone mass turnover and bone mineral density (BMD), bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are constantly recruited and subsequently differentiated into osteoblasts. HIV-infected patients present lower BMD than non-HIV infected individuals and a higher prevalence of osteopenia/osteoporosis. In antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naive patients, encoded HIV proteins represent pathogenic candidates. They are released by infected cells within BM and can impact on neighbouring cells. In this study, we tested whether HIV proteins Tat and/or Nef could induce senescence of human BM-MSCs and reduce their capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts. When compared to nontreated cells, MSCs chronically treated with Tat and/or Nef up to 30 days reduced their proliferative activity and underwent early senescence, associated with increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. The antioxidant molecule N-acetyl- cysteine had no or minimal effects on Tat- or Nef-induced senescence. Tat but not Nef induced an early increase in NF-κB activity and cytokine/chemokine secretion. Tat-induced effects were prevented by the NF-κB inhibitor parthenolide, indicating that Tat triggered senescence via NF-κB activation leading to oxidative stress. Otherwise, Nef- but not Tat-treated cells displayed early inhibition of autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, reversed Nef-induced senescence and oxidative stress. Moreover, Tat+Nef had cumulative effects. Finally, Tat and/or Nef decreased the MSC potential of osteoblastic differentiation. In conclusion, our in vitro data show that Tat and Nef could reduce the number of available precursors by inducing MSC senescence, through either enhanced inflammation or reduced autophagy. These results offer new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of decreased BMD in HIV-infected patients.

  15. The HIV proteins Tat and Nef promote human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell senescence and alter osteoblastic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Beaupere, Carine; Garcia, Marie; Larghero, Jerome; Fève, Bruno; Capeau, Jacqueline; Lagathu, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To maintain bone mass turnover and bone mineral density (BMD), bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are constantly recruited and subsequently differentiated into osteoblasts. HIV-infected patients present lower BMD than non-HIV infected individuals and a higher prevalence of osteopenia/osteoporosis. In antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naive patients, encoded HIV proteins represent pathogenic candidates. They are released by infected cells within BM and can impact on neighbouring cells. In this study, we tested whether HIV proteins Tat and/or Nef could induce senescence of human BM-MSCs and reduce their capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts. When compared to nontreated cells, MSCs chronically treated with Tat and/or Nef up to 30 days reduced their proliferative activity and underwent early senescence, associated with increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. The antioxidant molecule N-acetyl- cysteine had no or minimal effects on Tat- or Nef-induced senescence. Tat but not Nef induced an early increase in NF-κB activity and cytokine/chemokine secretion. Tat-induced effects were prevented by the NF-κB inhibitor parthenolide, indicating that Tat triggered senescence via NF-κB activation leading to oxidative stress. Otherwise, Nef- but not Tat-treated cells displayed early inhibition of autophagy. Rapamycin, an autophagy inducer, reversed Nef-induced senescence and oxidative stress. Moreover, Tat+Nef had cumulative effects. Finally, Tat and/or Nef decreased the MSC potential of osteoblastic differentiation. In conclusion, our in vitro data show that Tat and Nef could reduce the number of available precursors by inducing MSC senescence, through either enhanced inflammation or reduced autophagy. These results offer new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms of decreased BMD in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25847297

  16. Extracellular matrix protein mediated regulation of the osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Smitha; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Totey, Satish

    2012-09-01

    The biomimetic approach of tissue engineering exploits the favorable properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), to achieve better scaffold performance and tissue regeneration. ECM proteins regulate cell adhesion and differentiation through integrin mediated signal transduction. In the present study, we have examined the role of ECM proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin in regulating the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown on selected ECM protein treated tissue culture plates. The growth kinetics was assessed by calculating the doubling time of the cells on different ECM treated plates. The cells were directed to osteoblast lineage by growing them in osteogenic induction media for 21 day. Differentiation was evaluated at different time points by osteoblast differentiation associated gene expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, histochemical staining for mineralized matrix and calcium quantification. The doubling time of hMSCs cultured on collagen type I was significantly low, which was followed by laminin and fibronectin treated plates. However, doubling time of hMSCs cultured on vitronectin treated plate was not significantly different than that of the untreated control. High ALP gene (ALPL) expression and associated enhancement of mineralization were observed on collagen type I, fibronectin and vitronectin treated plates. Collagen type I showed early onset of mineralization with high ALP activity and up-regulation of osteopontin, ALPL, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin genes. Vitronectin also up-regulated these genes and showed the highest amount of calcium in the secreted mineral matrix. Therefore, we conclude that, ECM proteins indeed modified the growth patterns and induced the osteoblast differentiation of hMSCs. Our findings have significant implication for bone tissue engineering applications.

  17. A novel synthetic peptide vector system for optimal gene delivery to bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Haitao, Pan; Qixin, Zheng; Xiaodong, Guo

    2007-03-01

    A 23-amino acid, bifunctional, integrin-targeted synthetic peptide was evaluated for ex vivo gene delivery to rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The peptide (K)(16)GRGDSPC consists of an amino terminal domain of 16 lysines for electrostatic binding of DNA, and a 7-amino acid integrin-binding domain at the carboxyl terminal. PcDNA3-EGFP plasmids were transfected into BMSCs by (K)(16)GRGDSPC and the positive cells gave out a bright green fluorescence. High levels of gene delivery of pcDNA3-TGF-beta1 plasmids were obtained with 2 to 4 microg/ml DNA concentration, with (K)(16)GRGDSPC at an optimal peptide: DNA w/w ratio of 3:1, with a required exposure time of more than 4 h but shorter than 24 h for BMSC exposure to the peptide/DNA complexes with completely absent serum in the initial stage; with 100 microM chloroquine and at least 8 h exposure for BMSC exposure to chloroquine; with a fusogenic peptide at an optimal (K)(16)GRGDSPC/DNA/fusogenic peptide w/w ratio of 3:1:5; and with Lipofectamine 2000 at an optimal (K)(16)GRGDSPC/DNA/Lipofectamine 2000 w/w ratio of 3:1:2 at a constant DNA concentration of 2 microg/ml. Chloroquine, the fusogenic peptide and Lipofectamine 2000 all significantly promoted gene delivery, but chloroquine was more effective than the fusogenic peptide and had obvious synergistic effects with Lipofectamine 2000. Under optimal conditions, TGF-beta1 gene was transfected into BMSCs without observable toxicity, and the stable expression was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The stable transgenic cells showed obvious bands. This novel synthetic peptide, providing a new way for the use of polylysine and RGD motif in DNA vector system, is potentially well suited to ex vivo gene delivery to BMSCs for experimental and clinical applications in the field of bone tissue engineering.

  18. Repair of goat tibial defects with bone marrow stromal cells and beta-tricalcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangpeng; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Wenjie; Cui, Lei; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin

    2008-06-01

    Tissue engineering techniques have been proven effective in bone regeneration and repairing load-bearing bone defects. Previous studies, however, have heretofore been limited to the use of slowdegradable or natural biomaterials as scaffolds. There are, however, no reports on using biodegradable, synthetic beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) as scaffolds to repair weight-bearing bone defects in large animals. In the present study, highly porous beta-TCP scaffolds prepared by the polymeric sponge method were used to repair goat tibial defects. Fifteen goats were randomly assigned to one of three groups, and a 26 mm-long defect at the middle part of the right tibia in each goat was created. In Group A (six goats), a porous beta-TCP ceramic cylinder that had been loaded with osteogenically induced autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was implanted in the defect of each animal. In Group B (six goats), the same beta-TCP ceramic cylinder without any cells loaded was placed in the defect. In Group C (three goats), the defect was left untreated. In Group A, bony union can be observed by gross view, X-ray and micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) detection, and histological observation at 32 weeks post-implantation. The implanted beta-TCP scaffolds were almost completely replaced by tissue-engineered bone. Bone mineral density in the repaired area of Group A was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of Group B, in which scant new bone was formed in each defect and the beta-TCP hadn't been completely resorbed at 32 weeks. Moreover, the tissue-engineered bone of Group A had similar biomechanical properties as that of the normal left tibia in terms of bending strength and Young's modulus (p > 0.05). In Group C, little or no new bone was formed, and non-union occurred, showing that the 26 mm segmental defect of the goat tibia was critical sized at 32 weeks. Thus, it can be concluded that the mechanical properties of the BMSCs/beta-TCP composites could be much

  19. Material Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation of Marrow Stromal Cells on Fiber-Reinforced Laminated Hydrogel Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weijie; Ma, Junyu; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2009-01-01

    The fibrils in the bone matrix are glued together by ECM proteins to form laminated structures (osteons) to provide elasticity and a supportive substrate for osteogenesis. The objective of this work was to investigate material properties and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal (BMS) cells seeded on osteon-mimetic fiber-reinforced hydrogel/apatite composites. Layers of electrospun poly(L-lactide) (L-PLA) fiber mesh coated with a poly(lactide-co-ethylene oxide fumarate) (PLEOF) hydrogel precursor solution were stacked and pressed together, and crosslinked to produce a laminated fiber-reinforced composite. Hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals were added to the precursor solution to produce an osteoconductive matrix for BMS cells. Acrylamide-terminated RGD peptide (Ac-GRGD) was conjugated to the PLEOF/HA hydrogel phase to promote focal point adhesion of BMS cells. Laminates were characterized with respect to Young’s modulus, degradation kinetics, and osteogenic differentiation of BMS cells. The moduli of the laminates under dry and wet conditions were significantly higher than those of the fiber mesh and PLEOF/HA hydrogel, and within the range of values reported for wet human cancellous bone. At days 14 and 21, ALPase activity of the laminates was significantly higher than those of the fiber mesh and hydrogel. Lamination significantly increased the extent of mineralization of BMS cells and laminates with HA and conjugated with RGD (Lam-RGD-HA) had 2.7-, 3.5-, and 2.8-fold higher calcium content (compared to laminates without HA or RGD) after 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively. The Lam-RGD-HA group had significantly higher expression of osteopontin (OP) and osteocalcin (OC) compared to the hydrogel or laminates without HA or RGD, consistent with the higher ALPase activity and calcium content of Lam-RGD-HA. Laminated osteon-mimetic structures have the potential to provide mechanical strength to the regenerating region as well as supporting the differentiation

  20. The effect of incorporating RGD adhesive peptide in polyethylene glycol diacrylate hydrogel on osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Williams, Christopher G; Wang, Dong-An; Lee, Hyukjin; Manson, Paul N; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2005-10-01

    Advances in tissue engineering require biofunctional scaffolds that can not only provide cells with structural support, but also interact with cells in a biological manner. To achieve this goal, a frequently used cell adhesion peptide Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) was covalently incorporated into poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEODA) hydrogel and its dosage effect (0.025, 1.25 and 2.5 mm) on osteogenesis of marrow stromal cells in a three-dimensional environment was examined. Expression of bone-related markers, osteocalcin (OCN) and Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), increased significantly as the RGD concentration increased. Compared with no RGD, 2.5 mm RGD group showed a 1344% increase in ALP production and a 277% increase in OCN accumulation in the medium. RGD helped MSCs maintain cbfa-1 expression when shifted from a two-dimensional environment to a three-dimensional environment. Soluble RGD was found to completely block the mineralization of marrow stromal cells, as manifested by quantitative calcium assay, phosphorus elemental analysis and Von Kossa staining. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that RGD-conjugated PEODA hydrogel promotes the osteogenesis of MSCs in a dosage-dependent manner, with 2.5 mm being optimal concentration.

  1. Formation and differentiation of three-dimensional rat marrow stromal cell culture on microcarriers in a rotating-wall vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Q.; Ducheyne, P.; Gao, H.; Ayyaswamy, P.

    1998-01-01

    Using a high aspect ratio vessel (HARV), this study investigated the formation of 3-D rat marrow stromal cell culture on microcarriers and the expression of bone-related biochemical markers under conditions of simulated microgravity. In addition, it calculated the shear stresses imparted on the surface of microcarriers of different densities by the medium fluid in an HARV. Secondary rat marrow stromal cells were cultured on two types of microcarriers, Cytodex-3 beads and modified bioactive glass particles. Examination of cellular morphology by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of three-dimensional multicellular aggregates consisting of multiple cell-covered Cytodex-3 microcarriers bridged together. Mineralization was observed in the aggregates. Spherical cell-bead aggregates were observed in an HARV, while cell-bead assemblies were mostly loosely packed in a chain-like or branched structure in a cell bag. The expressions of alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen type I, and osteopontin were shown via the use of histochemical staining, immunolabeling, and confocal scanning electron microscopy. Using a numerical approach, it was found that at a given rotational speed and for a given culture medium, a larger density difference between the microcarrier and the culture medium (e.g., a modified bioactive glass particle) imparted a higher maximum shear stress on the microcarrier.

  2. Modulation properties of factors released by bone marrow stromal cells on activated microglia: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Cizkova, Dasa; Devaux, Stéphanie; Le Marrec-Croq, Françoise; Franck, Julien; Slovinska, Lucia; Blasko, Juraj; Rosocha, Jan; Spakova, Timea; Lefebvre, Christophe; Fournier, Isabelle; Salzet, Michel

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we develop a new non-cell based (cell-free) therapeutic approach applied to BV2 microglial cells and spinal cord derived primary microglia (PM) using conditioned media from rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs-CM). First we collected conditioned media (CM) from either naive or injured rat spinal cord tissue (SCI-CM, inflammatory stimulation agent) and from rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs-CM, therapeutic immunomodulation agent). They were both subsequently checked for the presence of chemokines and growth, neurotrophic and neural migration factors using proteomics analysis. The data clearly showed that rat BMSCs-CM contain in vitro growth factors, neural migration factors, osteogenic factors, differentiating factors and immunomodulators, whereas SCI-CM contain chemokines, chemoattractant factors and neurotrophic factors. Afterwards we determined whether the BMSCs-CM affect chemotactic activity, NO production, morphological and pro-apoptotic changes of either BV2 or PM cells once activated with SCI-CM. Our results confirm the anti-migratory and NO-inhibitory effects of BMSCs-CM on SCI-CM-activated microglia with higher impact on primary microglia. The cytotoxic effect of BMSCs-CM occurred only on SCI-CM-stimulated BV2 cells and PM, not on naive BV2 cells, nor on PM. Taken together, the molecular cocktail found in BMSCs-CM is favorable for immunomodulatory properties. PMID:25524416

  3. The effects of thiazolidinediones on human bone marrow stromal cell differentiation in vitro and in thiazolidinedione-treated patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Beck, George R; Khazai, Natasha B; Bouloux, Gary F; Camalier, Corinne E; Lin, Yiming; Garneys, Laura M; Siqueira, Joselita; Peng, Limin; Pasquel, Francisco; Umpierrez, Denise; Smiley, Dawn; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2013-03-01

    Thiazolidinedione (TZD) therapy has been associated with an increased risk of bone fractures. Studies in rodents have led to a model in which decreased bone quality in response to TZDs is due to a competition of lineage commitment between osteoblasts (OBs) and adipocytes (ADs) for a common precursor cell, resulting in decreased OB numbers. Our goal was to investigate the effects of TZD exposure on OB-AD lineage determination from primary human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) both in vitro and in vivo from nondiabetic subjects and patients with type 2 diabetics. Our experimental design included 2 phases. Phase 1 was an in vitro study of TZD effects on the differentiation of hBMSCs into OBs and ADs in nondiabetic subjects. Phase 2 was a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effects of 6-month pioglitazone treatment in vivo on hBMSC differentiation using AD/OB colony forming unit assays in patients with type 2 diabetes. In vitro, TZDs (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone) enhanced the adipogenesis of hBMSCs, whereas neither altered OB differentiation or function as measured by alkaline phosphatase activity, gene expression, and mineralization. The ability of TZDs to enhance adipogenesis occurred at a specific time/stage of the differentiation process, and pretreating with TZDs did not further enhance adipogenesis. In vivo, 6-month TZD treatment decreased OB precursors, increased AD precursors, and increased total colony number in patients with type 2 diabetes. Our results indicate that TZD exposure in vitro potently stimulates adipogenesis but does not directly alter OB differentiation/mineralization or lineage commitment from hBMSCs. However, TZD treatment in type 2 diabetic patients results in decreased osteoblastogenesis from hBMSCs compared with placebo, indicating an indirect negative effect on OBs and suggesting an alternative model by which TZDs might negatively regulate bone quality.

  4. Bone morphogenetic protein 2 promotes osteogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells in type 2 diabetic rats via the Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao; Zhu, Chenyuan; Yu, Weiqiang; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Fuqiang; Sun, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus impairs osteogenesis in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) has been extensively applied for bone defect restoration and has been shown to activate the Wnt signaling pathway. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of BMP2 on the cell proliferation and osteogenesis of type 2 diabetic BMSCs in rats and explore whether BMP2 induced osteogenesis via the stimulation of Wnt signaling pathway. The cell experiments were divided into DM (diabetic BMSCs), BMP25 (induced with 25ng/ml BMP2), BMP100 (induced with 100ng/ml BMP2) and BMP25 +XAV groups. All cells with or without the different concentrations of BMP2 were cultured under the same experimental conditions. The in vitro results indicated that BMP2 enhanced cell proliferation by 130%-157% and osteogenic differentiation by approximately two-fold in type 2 diabetic BMSCs. The expression levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1, Runx2 and c-myc related to the Wnt signaling pathway were also upregulated from 180% to 212% in BMP2-induced type 2 diabetic rat BMSCs, while the level of GSK3β decreased to 43%. In BMP2-induced type 2 diabetic BMSCs with calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds for osteoblast study in vivo, the appearance of newly formed bone dramatically increased to 175% compared with type 2 diabetic BMSCs. These data demonstrated that BMP2 enhanced bone regeneration in diabetic BMSCs by stimulating the Wnt signaling pathway with the accumulation of β-catenin and the depressed expression of GSK3β. Diabetic BMSCs associated with BMP2 might be a potential tissue-engineered construct for bone defects in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Influence of different modifications of a calcium phosphate bone cement on adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Vater, Corina; Lode, Anja; Bernhardt, Anne; Reinstorf, Antje; Heinemann, Christiane; Gelinsky, Michael

    2010-03-15

    Collagen and noncollagenous proteins of the extracellular bone matrix are able to stimulate bone cell activities and bone healing. The modification of calcium phosphate bone cements used as temporary bone replacement materials with these proteins seems to be a promising approach to accelerate new bone formation. In this study, we investigated adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) on Biocement D/collagen composites which have been modified with osteocalcin and O-phospho-L-serine. Modification with osteocalcin was carried out by its addition to the cement precursor before setting as well as by functionalization of the cement samples after setting and sterilization. hBMSC were cultured on these samples for 28 days with and without osteogenic supplements. We found a positive impact especially of the phosphoserine-modifications but also of both osteocalcin-modifications on differentiation of hBMSC indicated by higher expression of the osteoblastic markers matrix metalloproteinase-13 and bone sialo protein II. For hBMSC cultured on phosphoserine-containing composites, an increased proliferation has been observed. However, in case of the osteocalcin-modified samples, only osteocalcin adsorbed after setting and sterilization of the cement samples was able to promote initial adhesion and proliferation of hBMSC. The addition of osteocalcin before setting results in a finer microstructure but the biological activity of osteocalcin might be impaired due to the sterilization process. Thus, our data indicate that the initial adhesion and proliferation of hBMSC is enhanced rather by the biological activity of osteocalcin than by the finer microstructure.

  6. The Role of Lipase and α-Amylase in the Degradation of Starch/Poly(ɛ-Caprolactone) Fiber Meshes and the Osteogenic Differentiation of Cultured Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana M.; Pham, Quynh P.; Malafaya, Patrícia B.; Sousa, Rui A.; Gomes, Manuela E.; Raphael, Robert M.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Reis, Rui L.

    2009-01-01

    The present work studies the influence of hydrolytic enzymes (α-amylase or lipase) on the degradation of fiber mesh scaffolds based on a blend of starch and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (SPCL) and the osteogenic differentiation of osteogenic medium–expanded rat bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) and subsequent formation of extracellular matrix on these scaffolds under static culture conditions. The biodegradation profile of SPCL fiber meshes was investigated using enzymes that are specifically responsible for the enzymatic hydrolysis of SPCL using concentrations similar to those found in human serum. These degradation studies were performed under static and dynamic conditions. After several degradation periods (3, 7, 14, 21, and 30 days), weight loss measurements and micro-computed tomography analysis (specifically porosity, interconnectivity, mean pore size, and fiber thickness) were performed. The SPCL scaffolds were seeded with rat MSCs and cultured for 8 and 16 days using complete osteogenic media with and without enzymes (α-amylase or lipase). Results indicate that culture medium supplemented with enzymes enhanced cell proliferation after 16 days of culture, whereas culture medium without enzymes did not. No calcium was detected in groups cultured with α-amylase or without enzymes after each time period, although groups cultured with lipase presented calcium deposition after the eighth day, showing a significant increase at the sixteenth day. Lipase appears to positively influence osteoblastic differentiation of rat MSCs and to enhance matrix mineralization. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy images showed that the enzymes did not have a deleterious effect on the three-dimensional structure of SPCL fiber meshes, meaning that the scaffolds did not lose their structural integrity after 16 days. Confocal micrographs have shown cells to be evenly distributed and infiltrated within the SPCL fiber meshes up to 410 μm from the surface. This study demonstrates

  7. Three-dimensional co-culture of mesenchymal stromal cells and differentiated osteoblasts on human bio-derived bone scaffolds supports active multi-lineage hematopoiesis in vitro: Functional implication of the biomimetic HSC niche

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaobing; Zhu, Biao; Wang, Xiaodong; Xiao, Rong; Wang, Chunsen

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) niche, consisting of two major crucial components, namely osteoblasts (OBs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), is responsible for the fate of HSPCs. Thus, closely mimicking the HSPC niche ex vivo may be an efficient strategy with which to develop new culture strategies to specifically regulate the balance between HSPC self-renewal and proliferation. The aim of this study was to establish a novel HSPC three-dimensional culture system by co-culturing bone marrow-derived MSCs and OBs differentiated from MSCs without any cytokines as feeder cells and applying bio-derived bone from human femoral metaphyseal portion as the scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the excellent biocompatibility of bio-derived bone with bone marrow-derived MSCs and OBs differentiated from MSCs. Western blot analysis revealed that many cytokines, which play key roles in HSPC regulation, were comprehensively secreted, while ELISA revealed that extracellular matrix molecules were also highly expressed. Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide fluorescence staining proved that our system could be used to supply a long-term culture of HSPCs. Flow cytometric analysis and qPCR of p21 expression demonstrated that our system significantly promoted the self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSPCs. Colony-forming unit (CFU) and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays confirmed that our system has the ability for both the expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HPCs) and the maintenance of a primitive cell subpopulation of HSCs. The severe-combined immunodeficient mouse repopulating cell assay revealed the promoting effects of our system on the expansion of long-term primitive transplantable HSCs. In conclusion, our system may be a more comprehensive and balanced system which not only promotes the self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSPCs, but also maintains primitive HPCs with superior phenotypic and

  8. Requirement of soluble factors produced by bone marrow stromal cells on the growth of novel established human myeloma cell line.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Shingo; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Megumi; Kaneita, Yoshitaka; Yasukawa, Kiyotaka; Sawada, Umihiko; Horie, Takashi; Tsuboi, Isao; Aizawa, Shin

    2003-03-01

    The growth of myeloma cells is believed to be mediated by functional interactions between tumor cells and the marrow environment involving the action of several cytokines. We report on the establishment and characterization of a new human myeloma cell line (TAB1) that can be long-term maintained in the presence of conditioned medium of bone marrow stromal cells (BMCM) and a BMCM independent variant, C2-2. Both cell lines have plasma cell morphology and express plasma cell antigens (CD38, PCA-1 and immunoglobulin kappa light chain). In the absence of BMCM, TAB1 cells undergoing apoptosis were observed. Among the adherent molecules tested, these cells expressed VLA-4, ICAM-1 and H-CAM, but not VLA-5, suggesting that these were mostly immature plasmacytes. Introduction with exogenous IL-6 and/or GM-CSF, which were detected in BMCM, partially supported the proliferation of TAB1 cells. Treatment with anti-IL-6 antibody partially inhibited the proliferation of TAB1 cells cultured with BMCM. These findings strongly suggest that TAB1 required at least two or more factors on their growth in vitro; IL-6 was one of the factors necessary for cell growth. Further studies are required to clarify the precise molecules which support TAB1 cell growth in combination with IL-6, however, TAB1 and its variant C2-2 cells may offer an attractive model to unravel novel molecular mechanisms involved in bone marrow stroma-dependent growth of myeloma cells.

  9. Bone Marrow Stress Decreases Osteogenic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Baht, Gurpreet S; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    Age-related bone loss may be a result of declining levels of stem cells in the bone marrow. Using the Col2.3Δtk (DTK) transgenic mouse, osteoblast depletion was used as a source of marrow stress in order to investigate the effects of aging on osteogenic progenitors which reside in the marrow space. Five-month-old DTK mice were treated with one or two cycles of ganciclovir to conditionally ablate differentiated osteoblasts, whereas controls were saline-treated. Treatment cycles were two weeks in length followed by four weeks of recovery. All animals were sacrificed at 8 months of age; bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested for cell culture and whole bones were excised for bone quality assessment. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were conducted to investigate the osteogenic potential of BMSC in vitro, and RNA was extracted to assess the expression of osteoblastic genes. Bone quality assessments included bone histomorphometry, TRAP staining, microcomputed tomography, and biomechanical testing. Osteoblast depletion decreased CFU-F (fibroblast), CFU-ALP (alkaline phosphatase), and CFU-VK (von Kossa) counts and BMSC osteogenic capacity in cell culture. Ex vivo, there were no differences in bone mineral density of vertebrae or femurs between treatment groups. Histology showed a decrease in bone volume and bone connectivity with repeated osteoblast depletion; however, this was accompanied by an increase in bone formation rate. There were no notable differences in osteoclast parameters or observed bone marrow adiposity. We have developed a model that uses bone marrow stress to mimic age-related decrease in osteogenic progenitors. Our data suggest that the number of healthy BMSCs and their osteogenic potential decline with repeated osteoblast depletion. However, activity of the remaining osteoblasts increases to compensate for this loss in progenitor osteogenic potential.

  10. Characterization and Immunomodulatory Effects of Canine Adipose Tissue- and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Keith A.; Chow, Natalie H. C.; Dukoff, David; Gibson, Thomas W. G.; LaMarre, Jonathan; Betts, Dean H.; Koch, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) hold promise for both cell replacement and immune modulation strategies owing to their progenitor and non-progenitor functions, respectively. Characterization of MSC from different sources is an important and necessary step before clinical use of these cells is widely adopted. Little is known about the biology and function of canine MSC compared to their mouse or human counterparts. This knowledge-gap impedes development of canine evidence-based MSC technologies. Hypothesis and Objectives We hypothesized that canine adipose tissue (AT) and bone marrow (BM) MSC (derived from the same dogs) will have similar differentiation and immune modulatory profiles. Our objectives were to evaluate progenitor and non-progenitor functions as well as other characteristics of AT- and BM-MSC including 1) proliferation rate, 2) cell surface marker expression, 3) DNA methylation levels, 4) potential for trilineage differentiation towards osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic cell fates, and 5) immunomodulatory potency in vitro. Results 1) AT-MSC proliferated at more than double the rate of BM-MSC (population doubling times in days) for passage (P) 2, AT: 1.69, BM: 3.81; P3, AT: 1.80, BM: 4.06; P4, AT: 2.37, BM: 5.34; P5, AT: 3.20, BM: 7.21). 2) Canine MSC, regardless of source, strongly expressed cell surface markers MHC I, CD29, CD44, and CD90, and were negative for MHC II and CD45. They also showed moderate expression of CD8 and CD73 and mild expression of CD14. Minor differences were found in expression of CD4 and CD34. 3) Global DNA methylation levels were significantly lower in BM-MSC compared to AT-MSC. 4) Little difference was found between AT- and BM-MSC in their potential for adipogenesis and osteogenesis. Chondrogenesis was poor to absent for both sources in spite of adding varying levels of bone-morphogenic protein to our standard transforming growth factor (TGF-β3)-based induction medium. 5) Immunomodulatory capacity was equal

  11. β-Catenin Directly Sequesters Adipocytic and Insulin Sensitizing Activities but Not Osteoblastic Activity of PPARγ2 in Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sima; Czernik, Piotr J.; Lu, Yalin; Lecka-Czernik, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Lineage allocation of the marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to osteoblasts and adipocytes is dependent on both Wnt signaling and PPARγ2 activity. Activation of PPARγ2, an essential regulator of energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity, stimulates adipocyte and suppresses osteoblast differentiation and bone formation, and correlates with decreased bone mass and increased fracture rate. In contrast, activation of Wnt signaling promotes osteoblast differentiation, augments bone accrual and reduces total body fat. This study examined the cross-talk between PPARγ2 and β-catenin, a key mediator of canonical Wnt signaling, on MSC lineage determination. Rosiglitazone-activated PPARγ2 induced rapid proteolytic degradation of β-catenin, which was prevented by either inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activity, or blocking pro-adipocytic activity of PPARγ2 using selective antagonist GW9662 or mutation within PPARγ2 protein. Stabilization of β-catenin suppressed PPARγ2 pro-adipocytic but not anti-osteoblastic activity. Moreover, β-catenin stabilization decreased PPARγ2-mediated insulin signaling as measured by insulin receptor and FoxO1 gene expression, and protein levels of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt). Cellular knockdown of β-catenin with siRNA increased expression of adipocyte but did not affect osteoblast gene markers. Interestingly, the expression of Wnt10b was suppressed by anti-osteoblastic, but not by pro-adipocytic activity of PPARγ2. Moreover, β-catenin stabilization in the presence of activated PPARγ2 did not restore Wnt10b expression indicating a dominant role of PPARγ2 in negative regulation of pro-osteoblastic activity of Wnt signaling. In conclusion, β-catenin and PPARγ2 are in cross-talk which results in sequestration of pro-adipocytic and insulin sensitizing activity. The anti-osteoblastic activity of PPARγ2 is independent of this interaction. PMID:23272157

  12. Prostaglandin-mediated inhibition of PTH-stimulated β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts by bone marrow macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Estus, Thomas L.; Choudhary, Shilpa; Pilbeam, Carol C.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow macrophages (BMMs), in the presence of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox2) produced PGE2, secrete an inhibitory factor in response to Rankl that blocks PTH-stimulated osteoblastic differentiation. This study was to determine if the inhibitory factor also blocks PTH-stimulated Wnt signaling. Primary calvarial osteoblasts (POBs) were co-cultured with conditioned medium (CM) from Rankl-treated wild type (WT) BMMs, which make the inhibitory factor, and Cox2 knockout (KO) BMMs, which do not. PTH induced cAMP production was blocked by WT CM but not by KO CM. In the presence of KO CM, PTH induced phosphorylation at β-catenin serine sites, ser552 and ser675, previously shown to be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA). Phosphorylation was blocked by WT CM and by H89, a PKA inhibitor. PTH did not increase total β-catenin. PTH-stimulated transcription factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor response element activity in POBs was blocked by WT CM and by serum amyloid A (SAA), the human recombinant analog of murine Saa3, which has recently been shown to be the inhibitory factor. In POBs cultured with Cox2 KO CM, PTH increased expression of multiple genes associated with the anabolic actions of PTH and decreased expression of Wnt antagonists. This differential regulation of gene expression was not seen in POBs cultured with WT CM. These data highlight the ability of PTH to phosphorylate β-catenin directly via PKA and demonstrate the ability of a Cox2-dependent inhibitory factor, secreted by Rankl-stimulated BMMs, to abrogate PTH stimulated β-catenin signaling. Our results suggest that PTH can stimulate a novel negative feedback of its anabolic actions by stimulating Rankl and Cox2 expression. PMID:26851123

  13. Osteogenic differentiation of cultured marrow stromal stem cells on surface of microporous hydroxyapatite based mica composite and macroporous synthetic hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E; Ohgushi, H; Yoshikawa, T; Yokobori, A T; Yokobori, T

    1999-01-01

    In order to investigate the significance of hydroxyapatite based microporous composite (HA/mica composite) surfaces and a macroporous synthetic hydroxyapatite, rat marrow cell culture, which shows osteogenic differentiation, was carried out on six different culture substrata (two control culture dishes, two identical HA/mica composites, and two identical macroporous synthetic hydroxyapatites). A culture period of two weeks in the presence of beta-glycerophosphate (BGP), ascorbic acid, and dexamethasone resulted in abundant mineralized nodule formations that were positive for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) stain. The stain on the macroporous synthetic hydroxyapatite and the HA/mica composites were intense, the enzyme activity being about double that of control culture dishes. These data indicate that the synthetic macroporous hydroxyapatite surface and the HA/mica composite surface promotes osteoblastic differentiation.

  14. Safety of treatment with DLA-identical or unrelated mesenchymal stromal cells in DLA-identical canine bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Santos, Erlinda B.; Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although in vitro and in vivo experiments have suggested that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) may have important immunomodulatory functions in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), results from clinical studies have been inconsistent. In the current study we investigate the safety of dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) identical or third party unrelated MSC in DLA-identical HCT. Results: There were no differences between treatment groups in depth of granulocyte or platelet nadirs, time to granulocyte or platelet engraftment, rate of acute GVHD or rejection. All dogs tolerated the MSC infusion well, although 2 dogs treated with unrelated MSC were euthanized on day 9 due to complications unrelated to the MSC infusion. While no formation of ectopic tissue was observed, GFP positive signals in bone marrow, spleen or liver were detected at time of necropsy in 75% and 50% of dogs treated with DLA-identical or unrelated MSC, respectively. Discussion: Treatment with DLA-identical or unrelated MSC in high dose DLA-identical HCT is safe, and provides a large animal HCT model in which to investigate immunological mechanisms and optimal treatment strategies for future human trials. Methods: Fourteen dogs were treated with 920 cGy total body irradiation (TBI) followed by transplantation of marrow from DLA-identical littermates and immunosuppression with cyclosporine. Prior to infusion of marrow, dogs received infusions of DLA-identical MSC from the marrow donor (n = 4), unrelated MSC (n = 4), or culture medium (n = 6), within 1 h of TBI. MSC obtained from relevant donors were ex-vivo expanded and transduced with GFP-retrovirus before infusion. PMID:23723082

  15. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  16. [Insights into auto-transplantation--the unexpected discovery of transdifferentiation systems in bone marrow stromal cells and its application].

    PubMed

    Dezawa, Mari

    2007-05-01

    Many kinds of cells, including embryonic stem cells and tissue stem cells, have been considered candidates for cell transplantation therapy for muscle-degenerative diseases. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) also have great potential as therapeutic agents since they are easily isolated and can be expanded from patients without serious ethical or technical problems. Recently, new methods for the highly efficient and specific induction of functional skeletal muscle cells have been found in MSCs. Induced cells differentiate into muscle fibers upon transplantation into degenerated muscles of rats and mdx-nude mice. Furthermore, the induced population contained Pax7-positive cells that contribute to subsequent regeneration of muscle upon repetitive damage without additional transplantation of cells. Here I describe the discovery of these induction systems and focus on the potential use of MSC-derived cells for "auto-cell transplantation therapy" in muscle-degenerative diseases.

  17. Potential of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Applications for Neuro-Degenerative, Neuro-Traumatic and Muscle Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dezawa, Mari; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Hoshino, Mikio; Itokazu, Yutaka; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2005-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative and muscle degenerative diseases. Many kinds of cells, including embryonic stem cells and tissue stem cells, have been considered as candidates for transplantation therapy. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) have great potential as therapeutic agents since they are easy to isolate and can be expanded from patients without serious ethical or technical problems. We discovered a new method for the highly efficient and specific induction of functional Schwann cells, neurons and skeletal muscle lineage cells from both rat and human MSCs. These induced cells were transplanted into animal models of neurotraumatic injuries, Parkinson’s disease, stroke and muscle dystrophies, resulting in the successful integration of transplanted cells and an improvement in behavior of the transplanted animals. Here we focus on the respective potentials of MSC-derived cells and discuss the possibility of clinical application in degenerative diseases. PMID:18369401

  18. Hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold-enhanced osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia; Hao, Wei; Li, Yuzhuo; Yao, Jinrong; Shao, Zhengzhong; Li, Hong; Yang, Jianjun; Chen, Shiyi

    2013-04-01

    A novel hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold was prepared and investigated for its potential to enhance both osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro. Approx. 12.4 ± 0.06 % (w/w) hydroxyapatite was deposited onto the scaffold, and cell viability and DNA content were significantly increased (18.5 ± 0.6 and 33 ± 1.2 %, respectively) compared with the hydroxyapatite scaffold after 14 days. Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase activity in the novel scaffold increased 41 ± 2.5 % after 14 days compared with the hydroxyapatite scaffold. The data indicate that this novel hydroxyapatite/regenerated silk fibroin scaffold has a positive effect on osteoinductivity and osteoconductivity, and may be useful for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Cx43 expressed on bone marrow stromal cells plays an essential role in multiple myeloma cell survival and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Connexin-43 (Cx43), a connexin constituent of gap junctions (GJs) is mainly expressed in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and played a important role on hematopoiesis. In this study, we explored the role of gap junctions (GJs) formed by Cx43 between BMSCs and multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Material and methods qPCR and western blot assays were employed to assay Cx43 expression in three MM cell lines (RPMI 8266, U266, and XG7), freshly isolated MM cells, and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Cx43 mRNA and proteins were detected in all three MM cell lines and six out of seven freshly isolated MM cells. Resuths The BMSCs from MM patients expressed Cx43 at higher levels than of normal donor (ND-BMSCs). Dye transfer assays demonstrated that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) occurring via Cx43 situated between MM and BMSCs is functional. Cytometry beads array (CBA) assays showed that cytokines production changed when the ND-BMSCs were co-cultured with MM cells, especially the levels of IL-6, SDF-1α and IL-10 were higher than those the cells cultured alone and decreased significantly in the presence of GJ inhibitor heptanol. Our results demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of BTZ to MM cells decreased significantly in the presence of BMSCs, an effect that was partially recovered in the presence of GJ inhibitor. Conclusions Our data suggest that GJIC between MM and BMSCs is a critical factor in tumor cell proliferation and drug sensitivity, and is implicated in MM pathogenesis. PMID:28144277

  20. Micro-/Nano- sized hydroxyapatite directs differentiation of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells towards an osteoblast lineage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan; Zhou, Gang; Zheng, Lisha; Liu, Haifeng; Niu, Xufeng; Fan, Yubo

    2012-03-01

    Regenerative medicine consisting of cells and materials provides a new way for the repair and regeneration of tissues and organs. Nano-biomaterials are highlighted due to their advantageous features compared with conventional micro-materials. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of micro-/nano- sized hydroxyapatite (μ/n-HA) on the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs). μ/n-HA were prepared by a microwave synthesizer and precipitation method, respectively. Different sizes of μ/n-HA were characterized by IR, XRD, SEM, TEM and co-cultured with rBMSCs. It was shown that rBMSCs expressed higher levels of osteoblast-related markers by n-HA than μ-HA stimulation. The size of HA is an important factor for affecting the osteogenic differentiation of rBMSCs. This provides a new avenue for mechanistic studies of stem cell differentiation and a new approach to obtain more committed differentiated cells.

  1. Osterix-cre labeled progenitor cells contribute to the formation and maintenance of the bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaling; Strecker, Sara; Wang, Liping; Kronenberg, Mark S; Wang, Wen; Rowe, David W; Maye, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out fate mapping studies using Osterix-EGFPCre and Osterix-CreERt animal models and found Cre reporter expression in many different cell types that make up the bone marrow stroma. Constitutive fate mapping resulted in the labeling of different cellular components located throughout the bone marrow, whereas temporal fate mapping at E14.5 resulted in the labeling of cells within a region of the bone marrow. The identity of cell types marked by constitutive and temporal fate mapping included osteoblasts, adipocytes, vascular smooth muscle, perineural, and stromal cells. Prolonged tracing of embryonic precursors labeled at E14.5dpc revealed the continued existence of their progeny up to 10 months of age, suggesting that fate mapped, labeled embryonic precursors gave rise to long lived bone marrow progenitor cells. To provide further evidence for the marking of bone marrow progenitors, bone marrow cultures derived from Osterix-EGFPCre/Ai9 mice showed that stromal cells retained Cre reporter expression and yielded a FACS sorted population that was able to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro and into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and perivascular stromal cells after transplantation. Collectively, our studies reveal the developmental process by which Osterix-Cre labeled embryonic progenitors give rise to adult bone marrow progenitors which establish and maintain the bone marrow stroma.

  2. Hydrogen gas treatment prolongs replicative lifespan of bone marrow multipotential stromal cells in vitro while preserving differentiation and paracrine potentials.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Guan, Jianjun; Tamama, Kenichi

    2010-07-02

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. Low frequency of MSCs in adult bone marrow necessitates ex vivo expansion of MSCs after harvest; however, such a manipulation causes cellular senescence with loss of differentiation, proliferative, and therapeutic potentials of MSCs. Hydrogen molecules have been shown to exert organ protective effects through selective reduction of hydroxyl radicals. As oxidative stress is one of the key insults promoting cell senescence in vivo as well as in vitro, we hypothesized that hydrogen molecules prevent senescent process during MSC expansion. Addition of 3% hydrogen gas enhanced preservation of colony forming early progenitor cells within MSC preparation and prolonged the in vitro replicative lifespan of MSCs without losing differentiation potentials and paracrine capabilities. Interestingly, 3% hydrogen gas treatment did not decrease hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting that scavenging hydroxyl radical might not be responsible for these effects of hydrogen gas in this study.

  3. Marrow-derived stromal cell delivery on fibrin microbeads can correct radiation-induced wound-healing deficits.

    PubMed

    Xie, Michael W; Gorodetsky, Raphael; Micewicz, Ewa D; Micevicz, Ewa D; Mackenzie, Natalia C; Gaberman, Elena; Levdansky, Lilia; McBride, William H

    2013-02-01

    Skin that is exposed to radiation has an impaired ability to heal wounds. This is especially true for whole-body irradiation, where even moderate nonlethal doses can result in wound-healing deficits. Our previous attempts to administer dermal cells locally to wounds to correct radiation-induced deficits were hampered by poor cell retention. Here we improve the outcome by using biodegradable fibrin microbeads (FMBs) to isolate a population of mesenchymal marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs) from murine bone marrow by their specific binding to the fibrin matrix, culture them to high density in vitro, and deliver them as MSCs on FMBs at the wound site. MSCs are retained locally, proliferate in site, and assist wounds in gaining tensile strength in whole-body irradiated mice with or without additional skin-only exposure. MSC-FMBs were effective in two different mouse strains but were ineffective across a major histocompatability barrier. Remarkably, irradiated mice whose wounds were treated with MSC-FMBs showed enhanced hair regrowth, suggesting indirect effect on the correction of radiation-induced follicular damage. Further studies showed that additional wound-healing benefit could be gained by administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and AMD3100. Collagen strips coated with haptides and MSCs were also highly effective in correcting radiation-induced wound-healing deficits.

  4. Direct reprogramming of human bone marrow stromal cells into functional renal cells using cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-04-14

    The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes-formation of "domes" and tubule-like structures-and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  5. Platelet lysate favours in vitro expansion of human bone marrow stromal cells for bone and cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    Zaky, S H; Ottonello, A; Strada, P; Cancedda, R; Mastrogiacomo, M

    2008-12-01

    The heterogeneous population of non-haematopoietic cells residing in the bone marrow (bone marrow stromal cells, BMSCs) and the different fractions and components obtained from platelet-rich plasma provide an invaluable source of autologous cells and growth factors for bone and other connective tissue reconstruction. In this study, we investigated the effect of an allogenic platelet lysate on human BMSCs proliferation and differentiation. Cell proliferation and number of performed cell doublings were enhanced in cultures supplemented with the platelet-derived growth factors (platelet lysate, PL), either with or without the concomitant addition of fetal bovine serum (FBS), compared to cultures performed in the presence of FBS and FGF2. Both in vitro and in vivo osteogenic differentiation were unaltered in cells maintained in medium supplemented with PL and not FBS (Only PL) and in cells maintained in medium containing FBS and FGF2. Interestingly, the in vitro cartilage formation was more effective in the pellet of BMSCs expanded in the Only PL medium. In particular, a chondrogenic differentiation was observed in pellets of some in vitro-expanded BMSCs in the Only PL medium, whereas pellets from parallel cell cultures in medium containing FBS did not respond to the chondrogenic induction. We conclude that the platelet lysate from human source is an effective and even more beneficial substitute for fetal bovine serum to support the in vitro expansion of human BMSCs for subsequent tissue-engineering applications.

  6. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  7. Hydrogen gas treatment prolongs replicative lifespan of bone marrow multipotential stromal cells in vitro while preserving differentiation and paracrine potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Guan, Jianjun; Tamama, Kenichi

    2010-07-02

    Cell therapy with bone marrow multipotential stromal cells/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represents a promising approach in the field of regenerative medicine. Low frequency of MSCs in adult bone marrow necessitates ex vivo expansion of MSCs after harvest; however, such a manipulation causes cellular senescence with loss of differentiation, proliferative, and therapeutic potentials of MSCs. Hydrogen molecules have been shown to exert organ protective effects through selective reduction of hydroxyl radicals. As oxidative stress is one of the key insults promoting cell senescence in vivo as well as in vitro, we hypothesized that hydrogen molecules prevent senescent process during MSC expansion. Addition of 3% hydrogen gas enhanced preservation of colony forming early progenitor cells within MSC preparation and prolonged the in vitro replicative lifespan of MSCs without losing differentiation potentials and paracrine capabilities. Interestingly, 3% hydrogen gas treatment did not decrease hydroxyl radical, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting that scavenging hydroxyl radical might not be responsible for these effects of hydrogen gas in this study.

  8. Evaluation of sericin as a fetal bovine serum-replacing cryoprotectant during freezing of human mesenchymal stromal cells and human osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Verdanova, Martina; Pytlik, Robert; Kalbacova, Marie Hubalek

    2014-04-01

    A reliable, cryoprotective, xeno-free medium suitable for different cell types is highly desirable in regenerative medicine. There is danger of infection or allergic reaction with the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS), making it problematic for medical applications. The aim of the present study was to develop an FBS-free cryoprotective medium for human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs; primary cells) and immortalized human osteoblasts (SAOS-2 cell line). Furthermore, we endeavored to eliminate or reduce the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the medium. Sericin, a sticky protein derived from the silkworm cocoon, was investigated as a substitute for FBS and DMSO in the freezing medium. Cell viability (24 hours after thawing, both hMSC and SAOS-2) and colony-forming ability (2 weeks after thawing, only for hMSCs) were both determined. The FBS-free medium with 1% sericin in 10% DMSO was found to be a suitable freezing medium for primary hMSCs, in contrast to immortalized human osteoblasts. Surprisingly, the storage of hMSCs in a cultivation medium with only 10% DMSO also provided satisfactory results. Any drop in DMSO concentration led to significantly worse survival of cells, with little improvement in hMSC survival in the presence of sericin. Thus, sericin may substitute for FBS in the freezing medium for primary hMSCs, but cannot substitute for DMSO.

  9. Structurally-diverse, PPARγ-activating environmental toxicants induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Watt, James; Schlezinger, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental obesogens are a newly recognized category of endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been implicated in contributing to the rising rates of obesity in the United States. While obesity is typically regarded as an increase in visceral fat, adipocyte accumulation in the bone has been linked to increased fracture risk, lower bone density, and osteoporosis. Exposure to environmental toxicants that activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a critical regulator of the balance of differentiation between adipogenesis and osteogenesis, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis. However, induction of adipogenesis and suppression of osteogenesis are separable activities of PPARγ, and ligands may selectively alter these activities. It currently is unknown whether suppression of osteogenesis is a common toxic endpoint of environmental PPARγ ligands. Using a primary mouse bone marrow culture model, we tested the hypothesis that environmental toxicants acting as PPARγ agonists divert the differentiation pathway of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells towards adipogenesis and away from osteogenesis. The toxicants tested included the organotins tributyltin and triphenyltin, a ubiquitous phthalate metabolite (mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, MEHP), and two brominated flame retardants (tetrabromobisphenol-a, TBBPA, and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, METBP). All of the compounds activated PPARγ1 and 2. All compounds increased adipogenesis (lipid accumulation, Fabp4 expression) and suppressed osteogenesis (alkaline phosphatase activity, Osx expression) in mouse primary bone marrow cultures, but with different potencies and efficacies. Despite structural dissimilarities, there was a strong negative correlation between efficacies to induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis, with the organotins being distinct in their exceptional ability to suppress osteogenesis. As human exposure to a mixture of

  10. The transcription factors myeloid elf-1-like factor (MEF) and distal-less homeobox 5 (Dlx5) inversely regulate the differentiation of osteoblasts and adipocytes in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyunghwa; Baek, Jeong-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    In bone marrow, the differentiation of osteoblasts and adipocytes is reciprocally regulated. This inverse regulation occurs mainly through complex signaling crosstalk between transcriptional factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). This commentary addresses the role of myeloid elf-1 like factor (MEF) and distal-less homeobox 5 (Dlx5) in the lineage commitment of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into adipocytes and osteoblasts, respectively. MEF suppresses osteoblastogenesis by preventing Runx2 from binding to the promoters of target genes and enhancing adipogenesis via transactivation of PPARγ expression. Conversely, Dlx5 enhances osteoblastogenesis through upregulation of the expression of Runx2 and osteoblast marker genes while suppressing adipogenesis through the downregulation of PPARγ expression by sequestering the cAMP response element binding protein and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α. Studies designed to examine the effects of physiological and pathologic signals on the expression of MEF and Dlx5 will provide further insight to the function of these transcription factors in vivo.

  11. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YING-QIN; TANG, YING; FU, RAO; MENG, QIU-HUA; ZHOU, XUE; LING, ZE-MIN; CHENG, XIAO; TIAN, SU-WEI; WANG, GUO-JIE; LIU, XUE-GUO; ZHOU, LI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  12. Functionally and Phenotypically Distinct Subpopulations of Marrow Stromal Cells Are Fibroblast in Origin and Induce Different Fates in Peripheral Blood Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Mineo; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Delrow, Jeffrey J.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells constitute a heterogeneous population of cells, typically isolated after expansion in culture. In vivo, stromal cells often exist in close proximity or in direct contact with monocyte-derived macrophages, yet their interaction with monocytes is largely unexplored. In this report, isolated CD146+ and CD146− stromal cells, as well as immortalized cell lines representative of each (designated HS27a and HS5, respectively), were shown by global DNase I hypersensitive site mapping and principal coordinate analysis to have a lineage association with marrow fibroblasts. Gene expression profiles generated for the CD146+ and CD146− cell lines indicate significant differences in their respective transcriptomes, which translates into differences in secreted factors. Consequently, the conditioned media (CM) from these two populations induce different fates in peripheral blood monocytes. Monocytes incubated in CD146+ CM acquire a tissue macrophage phenotype, whereas monocytes incubated in CM from CD146− cells express markers associated with pre-dendritic cells. Importantly, when CD14+ monocytes are cultured in contact with the CD146+ cells, the combined cell populations, assayed as a unit, show increased levels of transcripts associated with organismal development and hematopoietic regulation. In contrast, the gene expression profile from cocultures of monocytes and CD146− cells does not differ from that obtained when monocytes are cultured with CD146− CM. These in vitro results show that the CD146+ marrow stromal cells together with monocytes increase the expression of genes relevant to hematopoietic regulation. In vivo relevance of these data is suggested by immunohistochemistry of marrow biopsies showing juxtaposed CD146+ cells and CD68+ cells associated with these upregulated proteins. PMID:24131213

  13. Comparative study of the chondrogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells, neonatal chondrocytes and adult chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Sushmita; Kirkham, Jennifer; Wood, David; Curran, Stephen; Yang, Xuebin

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} This study has characterised three different cell types under conditions similar to those used for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) for applications in cartilage repair/regeneration. {yields} Compared for the first time the chondrogenic potential of neonatal chondrocytes with human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs) and adult chondrocytes. {yields} Demonstrated that adult chondrocytes hold greatest potential for use in ACI based on their higher proliferation rates, lower alkaline phosphatise activity and enhanced expression of chondrogenic genes. {yields} Demonstrated the need for chondroinduction as a necessary pre-requisite to efficient chondrogenesis in vitro and, by extrapolation, for cell based therapy (e.g. ACI or cartilage tissue engineering). -- Abstract: Cartilage tissue engineering is still a major clinical challenge with optimisation of a suitable source of cells for cartilage repair/regeneration not yet fully addressed. The aims of this study were to compare and contrast the differences in chondrogenic behaviour between human bone marrow stromal cells (HBMSCs), human neonatal and adult chondrocytes to further our understanding of chondroinduction relative to cell maturity and to identify factors that promote chondrogenesis and maintain functional homoeostasis. Cells were cultured in monolayer in either chondrogenic or basal medium, recapitulating procedures used in existing clinical procedures for cell-based therapies. Cell doubling time, morphology and alkaline phosphatase specific activity (ALPSA) were determined at different time points. Expression of chondrogenic markers (SOX9, ACAN and COL2A1) was compared via real time polymerase chain reaction. Amongst the three cell types studied, HBMSCs had the highest ALPSA in basal culture and lowest ALPSA in chondrogenic media. Neonatal chondrocytes were the most proliferative and adult chondrocytes had the lowest ALPSA in basal media. Gene expression analysis revealed

  14. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cements

  15. In vitro differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into neurons and glial cells and differential protein expression in a two-compartment bone marrow stromal cell/neuron co-culture system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xu; Shao, Ming; Peng, Haisheng; Bi, Zhenggang; Su, Zhiqiang; Li, Hulun

    2010-07-01

    This study was performed to establish a bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/neuron two-compartment co-culture model in which differentiation of BMSCs into neurons could occur without direct contact between the two cell types, and to investigate protein expression changes during differentiation of this entirely BMSC-derived population. Cultured BMSCs isolated from Wistar rats were divided into three groups: BMSC culture, BMSC/neuron co-culture and BMSC/neuron two-compartment co-culture. Cells were examined for neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. The electrophysiological behavior of the BMSCs was examined using patch clamping. Proteins that had significantly different expression levels in BMSCs cultured alone and co-cultured with neurons were studied using a protein chip-mass spectroscopy technique. Expression of NSE and GFAP were significantly higher in co-culture cells than in two-compartment co-culture cells, and significantly higher in both co-culture groups than in BMSCs cultured alone. Five proteins showed significant changes in expression during differentiation: TIP39_RAT and CALC_RAT underwent increases, and INSL6_RAT, PNOC_RAT and PCSK1_RAT underwent decreases in expression. We conclude that BMSCs can differentiate into neurons during both contact co-culture with neurons and two-compartment co-culture with neurons. The rate at which BMSCs differentiated into neurons was higher in contact co-culture than in non-contact co-culture.

  16. System-wide survey of proteomic responses of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to in vitro cultivation.

    PubMed

    Mindaye, Samuel T; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R; Alterman, Michail A

    2015-11-01

    Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs, also loosely called bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are the subject of increasing numbers of clinical trials and laboratory research. Our group recently reported on the optimization of a workflow for a sensitive proteomic study of hBMSCs. Here, we couple this workflow with a label-free protein quantitation method to investigate the molecular responses of hBMSCs to long-term in vitro passaging. We explored the proteomic responses of hBMSCs by assessing the expression levels of proteins at early passage (passage 3, P3) and late passage (P7). We used multiple biological as well as technical replicates to ensure that the detected proteomic changes are repeatable between cultures and thus likely to be biologically relevant. Over 1700 proteins were quantified at three passages and a list of differentially expressed proteins was compiled. Bioinformatics-based network analysis and term enrichment revealed that metabolic pathways are largely altered, where many proteins in the glycolytic, pentose phosphate, and TCA pathways were shown to be largely upregulated in late passages. We also observed significant proteomic alterations in functional categories including apoptosis, and ER-based protein processing and sorting following in vitro cell aging. We posit that the comprehensive map outlined in this report of affected phenotypes as well as the underpinning molecular factors tremendously benefit the effort to uncovering targets that are not just used only to monitor cell fitness but can be employed to slowdown the in vitro aging process in hBMSCs and hence ensure manufacturing of cells with known quality, efficacy and stability.

  17. Collagen-containing scaffolds enhance attachment and proliferation of non-cultured bone marrow multipotential stromal cells.

    PubMed

    El-Jawhari, Jehan J; Sanjurjo-Rodríguez, Clara; Jones, Elena; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2016-04-01

    Large bone defects are ideally treated with autografts, which have many limitations. Therefore, osteoconductive scaffolds loaded with autologous bone marrow (BM) aspirate are increasingly used as alternatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the growth of multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) from unprocessed BM on a collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold (Orthoss(®) Collagen) with a non-collagen-containing bovine bone scaffold, Orthoss(®) . Another collagen-containing synthetic scaffold, Vitoss(®) was included in the comparison. Colonization of scaffolds by BM MSCs (n = 23 donors) was evaluated using microscopy, colony forming unit-fibroblast assay and flow-cytometry. The number of BM MSCs initially attached to Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) was similar but greater than Orthoss(®) (p = 0.001 and p = 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, the number of MSCs released from Orthoss(®) Collagen and Vitoss(®) after 2-week culture was also higher compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.010 and p = 0.023, respectively). Interestingly, collagen-containing scaffolds accommodated larger numbers of lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cells. Additionally, the proliferation of culture-expanded MSCs on Orthoss(®) collagen and Vitoss(®) was greater compared to Orthoss(®) (p = 0.047 and p = 0.004, respectively). Collectively, collagen-containing scaffolds were superior in supporting the attachment and proliferation of MSCs when they were loaded with unprocessed BM aspirates. This highlights the benefit of collagen incorporation into bone scaffolds for use with autologous bone marrow aspirates as autograft substitutes.

  18. Collagen‐containing scaffolds enhance attachment and proliferation of non‐cultured bone marrow multipotential stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    El‐Jawhari, Jehan J.; Sanjurjo‐Rodríguez, Clara; Jones, Elena

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Large bone defects are ideally treated with autografts, which have many limitations. Therefore, osteoconductive scaffolds loaded with autologous bone marrow (BM) aspirate are increasingly used as alternatives. The purpose of this study was to compare the growth of multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) from unprocessed BM on a collagen‐containing bovine bone scaffold (Orthoss® Collagen) with a non‐collagen‐containing bovine bone scaffold, Orthoss®. Another collagen‐containing synthetic scaffold, Vitoss® was included in the comparison. Colonization of scaffolds by BM MSCs (n = 23 donors) was evaluated using microscopy, colony forming unit‐fibroblast assay and flow‐cytometry. The number of BM MSCs initially attached to Orthoss® Collagen and Vitoss® was similar but greater than Orthoss® (p = 0.001 and p = 0.041, respectively). Furthermore, the number of MSCs released from Orthoss® Collagen and Vitoss® after 2‐week culture was also higher compared to Orthoss® (p = 0.010 and p = 0.023, respectively). Interestingly, collagen‐containing scaffolds accommodated larger numbers of lymphocytic and myelomonocytic cells. Additionally, the proliferation of culture‐expanded MSCs on Orthoss® collagen and Vitoss® was greater compared to Orthoss® (p = 0.047 and p = 0.004, respectively). Collectively, collagen‐containing scaffolds were superior in supporting the attachment and proliferation of MSCs when they were loaded with unprocessed BM aspirates. This highlights the benefit of collagen incorporation into bone scaffolds for use with autologous bone marrow aspirates as autograft substitutes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Orthopaedic Research Society. J Orthop Res 34:597–606, 2016. PMID:26466765

  19. Bone marrow stromal cells from multiple myeloma patients uniquely induce bortezomib resistant NF-κB activity in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Components of the microenvironment such as bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are well known to support multiple myeloma (MM) disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy including the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. However, functional distinctions between BMSCs in MM patients and those in disease-free marrow are not completely understood. We and other investigators have recently reported that NF-κB activity in primary MM cells is largely resistant to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, and that further enhancement of NF-κB by BMSCs is similarly resistant to bortezomib and may mediate resistance to this therapy. The mediating factor(s) of this bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity is induced by BMSCs is not currently understood. Results Here we report that BMSCs specifically derived from MM patients are capable of further activating bortezomib-resistant NF-κB activity in MM cells. This induced activity is mediated by soluble proteinaceous factors secreted by MM BMSCs. Among the multiple factors evaluated, interleukin-8 was secreted by BMSCs from MM patients at significantly higher levels compared to those from non-MM sources, and we found that IL-8 contributes to BMSC-induced NF-κB activity. Conclusions BMSCs from MM patients uniquely enhance constitutive NF-κB activity in MM cells via a proteinaceous secreted factor in part in conjunction with IL-8. Since NF-κB is known to potentiate MM cell survival and confer resistance to drugs including bortezomib, further identification of the NF-κB activating factors produced specifically by MM-derived BMSCs may provide a novel biomarker and/or drug target for the treatment of this commonly fatal disease. PMID:20604947

  20. Immunoregulatory effects on T lymphocytes by human mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, amniotic fluid, and placenta.

    PubMed

    Mareschi, Katia; Castiglia, Sara; Sanavio, Fiorella; Rustichelli, Deborah; Muraro, Michela; Defedele, Davide; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Fagioli, Franca

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising tool in cell therapies because of their multipotent, bystander, and immunomodulatory properties. Although bone marrow represents the main source of MSCs, there remains a need to identify a stem cell source that is safe and easily accessible and yields large numbers of cells without provoking debates over ethics. In this study, MSCs isolated from amniotic fluid and placenta were compared with bone marrow MSCs. Their immunomodulatory properties were studied in total activated T cells (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA-PBMCs). In particular, an in vitro co-culture system was established to study: (i) the effect on T-lymphocyte proliferation; (ii) the presence of T regulatory lymphocytes (Treg); (iii) the immunophenotype of various T subsets (Th1 and Th2 naïve, memory, effector lymphocytes); (iv) cytokine release and master gene expression to verify Th1, Th2, and Th17 polarization; and (v) IDO production. Under all co-culture conditions with PHA-PBMCs and MSCs (independently of tissue origin), data revealed: (i) T proliferation inhibition; (ii) increase in naïve T and decrease in memory T cells; (iii) increase in T regulatory lymphocytes; (iv) strong Th2 polarization associated with increased interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 levels, Th1 inhibition (significant decreases in interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interferon-γ, and interleukin-12) and Th17 induction (production of high concentrations of interleukins-6 and -17); (v) indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase mRNA induction in MSCs co-cultured with PHA-PBMCs. AF-MSCs had a more potent immunomodulatory effect on T cells than BM-MSCs, only slightly higher than that of placenta MSCs. This study indicates that MSCs isolated from fetal tissues may be considered a good alternative to BM-MSCs for clinical applications.

  1. The therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bayo, Juan; Marrodán, Mariano; Aquino, Jorge B; Silva, Marcelo; García, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are more often obtained from adult and extraembryonic tissues, with the latter sources being likely better from a therapeutic perspective. MSCs show tropism towards inflamed or tumourigenic sites. Mechanisms involved in MSC recruitment into tumours are comprehensively analysed, including chemoattractant signalling axes, endothelial adhesion and transmigration. In addition, signals derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumour microenvironment and their influence in MSC tropism and tumour recruitment are dissected, as well as the present controversy regarding their influence on tumour growth and/or metastasis. Finally, evidences available on the use of MSCs and other selected progenitor/stem cells as vehicles of antitumourigenic genes are discussed. A better knowledge of the mechanisms involved in progenitor/stem cell recruitment to HCC tumours is proposed in order to enhance their tumour targeting which may result in improvements in cell-based gene therapy strategies.

  2. Thyrostimulin Regulates Osteoblastic Bone Formation During Early Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    van der Spek, Anne; Logan, John G.; Gogakos, Apostolos; Bagchi-Chakraborty, Jayashree; Murphy, Elaine; van Zeijl, Clementine; Down, Jenny; Croucher, Peter I.; Boyde, Alan; Boelen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The ancestral glycoprotein hormone thyrostimulin is a heterodimer of unique glycoprotein hormone subunit alpha (GPA)2 and glycoprotein hormone subunit beta (GPB)5 subunits with high affinity for the TSH receptor. Transgenic overexpression of GPB5 in mice results in cranial abnormalities, but the role of thyrostimulin in bone remains unknown. We hypothesized that thyrostimulin exerts paracrine actions in bone and determined: 1) GPA2 and GPB5 expression in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, 2) the skeletal consequences of thyrostimulin deficiency in GPB5 knockout (KO) mice, and 3) osteoblast and osteoclast responses to thyrostimulin treatment. Gpa2 and Gpb5 expression was identified in the newborn skeleton but declined rapidly thereafter. GPA2 and GPB5 mRNAs were also expressed in primary osteoblasts and osteoclasts at varying concentrations. Juvenile thyrostimulin-deficient mice had increased bone volume and mineralization as a result of increased osteoblastic bone formation. However, thyrostimulin failed to induce a canonical cAMP response or activate the noncanonical Akt, ERK, or mitogen-activated protein kinase (P38) signaling pathways in primary calvarial or bone marrow stromal cell-derived osteoblasts. Furthermore, thyrostimulin did not directly inhibit osteoblast proliferation, differentiation or mineralization in vitro. These studies identify thyrostimulin as a negative but indirect regulator of osteoblastic bone formation during skeletal development. PMID:26018249

  3. Human blood and marrow side population stem cell and Stro-1 positive bone marrow stromal cell numbers decline with age, with an increase in quality of surviving stem cells: correlation with cytokines.

    PubMed

    Brusnahan, S K; McGuire, T R; Jackson, J D; Lane, J T; Garvin, K L; O'Kane, B J; Berger, A M; Tuljapurkar, S R; Kessinger, M A; Sharp, J G

    2010-01-01

    Hematological deficiencies increase with aging leading to anemias, reduced hematopoietic stress responses and myelodysplasias. This study tested the hypothesis that side population hematopoietic stem cells (SP-HSC) would decrease with aging, correlating with IGF-1 and IL-6 levels and increases in bone marrow fat. Marrow was obtained from the femoral head and trochanteric region of the femur at surgery for total hip replacement (N=100). Whole trabecular marrow samples were ground in a sterile mortar and pestle and cellularity and fat content determined. Marrow and blood mononuclear cells were stained with Hoechst dye and the SP-HSC profiles acquired. Marrow stromal cells (MSC) were enumerated flow cytometrically employing the Stro-1 antibody, and clonally in the colony forming unit fibroblast (CFU-F) assay. Plasma levels of IGF-1 (ng/ml) and IL-6 (pg/ml) were measured by ELISA. SP-HSC in blood and bone marrow decreased with age but the quality of the surviving stem cells increased. MSC decreased non-significantly. IGF-1 levels (mean=30.7, SEM=2) decreased and IL-6 levels (mean=4.4, SEM=1) increased with age as did marrow fat (mean=1.2mmfat/g, SEM=0.04). There were no significant correlations between cytokine levels or fat and SP-HSC numbers. Stem cells appear to be progressively lost with aging and only the highest quality stem cells survive.

  4. Three-dimensional co-culture of mesenchymal stromal cells and differentiated osteoblasts on human bio-derived bone scaffolds supports active multi-lineage hematopoiesis in vitro: Functional implication of the biomimetic HSC niche.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaobing; Zhu, Biao; Wang, Xiaodong; Xiao, Rong; Wang, Chunsen

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) niche, consisting of two major crucial components, namely osteoblasts (OBs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), is responsible for the fate of HSPCs. Thus, closely mimicking the HSPC niche ex vivo may be an efficient strategy with which to develop new culture strategies to specifically regulate the balance between HSPC self-renewal and proliferation. The aim of this study was to establish a novel HSPC three-dimensional culture system by co-culturing bone marrow-derived MSCs and OBs differentiated from MSCs without any cytokines as feeder cells and applying bio-derived bone from human femoral metaphyseal portion as the scaffold. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the excellent biocompatibility of bio-derived bone with bone marrow-derived MSCs and OBs differentiated from MSCs. Western blot analysis revealed that many cytokines, which play key roles in HSPC regulation, were comprehensively secreted, while ELISA revealed that extracellular matrix molecules were also highly expressed. Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide fluorescence staining proved that our system could be used to supply a long-term culture of HSPCs. Flow cytometric analysis and qPCR of p21 expression demonstrated that our system significantly promoted the self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSPCs. Colony-forming unit (CFU) and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays confirmed that our system has the ability for both the expansion of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HPCs) and the maintenance of a primitive cell subpopulation of HSCs. The severe-combined immunodeficient mouse repopulating cell assay revealed the promoting effects of our system on the expansion of long-term primitive transplantable HSCs. In conclusion, our system may be a more comprehensive and balanced system which not only promotes the self-renewal and ex vivo expansion of HSPCs, but also maintains primitive HPCs with superior

  5. Transplanted bone marrow stromal cells protect neurovascular units and ameliorate brain damage in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Taku; Maruichi, Katsuhiko; Kawabori, Masahito; Nakayama, Naoki; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to assess whether bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) could ameliorate brain damage when transplanted into the brain of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-SP). The BMSC or vehicle was stereotactically engrafted into the striatum of male SHR-SP at 8 weeks of age. Daily loading with 0.5% NaCl-containing water was started from 9 weeks. MRIs and histological analysis were performed at 11 and 12 weeks, respectively. Wistar-Kyoto rats were employed as the control. As a result, T2-weighted images demonstrated neither cerebral infarct nor intracerebral hemorrhage, but identified abnormal dilatation of the lateral ventricles in SHR-SP. HE staining demonstrated selective neuronal injury in their neocortices. Double fluorescence immunohistochemistry revealed that they had a decreased density of the collagen IV-positive microvessels and a decreased number of the microvessels with normal integrity between basement membrane and astrocyte end-feet. BMSC transplantation significantly ameliorated the ventricular dilatation and the breakdown of neurovascular integrity. These findings strongly suggest that long-lasting hypertension may primarily damage neurovascular integrity and neurons, leading to tissue atrophy and ventricular dilatation prior to the occurrence of cerebral stroke. The BMSC may ameliorate these damaging processes when directly transplanted into the brain, opening the possibility of prophylactic medicine to prevent microvascular and parenchymal-damaging processes in hypertensive patients at higher risk for cerebral stroke.

  6. An amphiphilic degradable polymer/hydroxyapatite composite with enhanced handling characteristics promotes osteogenic gene expression in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Kutikov, Artem B; Song, Jie

    2013-09-01

    Electrospun polymer/hydroxyapatite (HA) composites combining biodegradability with osteoconductivity are attractive for skeletal tissue engineering applications. However, most biodegradable polymers such as poly(lactic acid) (PLA) are hydrophobic and do not blend with adequate interfacial adhesion with HA, compromising the structural homogeneity, mechanical integrity and biological performance of the composite. To overcome this challenge, we combined a hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) block with poly(d,l-lactic acid) to improve the adhesion of the degradable polymer with HA. The amphiphilic triblock copolymer PLA-PEG-PLA (PELA) improved the stability of HA-PELA suspension at 25wt.% HA content, which was readily electrospun into HA-PELA composite scaffolds with uniform fiber dimensions. HA-PELA was highly extensible (failure strain>200% vs. <40% for HA-PLA), superhydrophilic (∼0° water contact angle vs. >100° for HA-PLA), and exhibited an 8-fold storage modulus increase (unlike deterioration for HA-PLA) upon hydration, owing to the favorable interaction between HA and PEG. HA-PELA also better promoted osteochondral lineage commitment of bone marrow stromal cells in unstimulated culture and supported far more potent osteogenic gene expression upon induction than HA-PLA. We demonstrate that the chemical incorporation of PEG is an effective strategy to improve the performance of degradable polymer/HA composites for bone tissue engineering applications.

  7. Characterization of the interface of the bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2-Vpu protein complex via computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinming; Zhang, Zhixin; Mi, Zeyun; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Quan; Li, Xiaoyu; Liang, Chen; Cen, Shan

    2012-02-14

    Bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST-2) inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from the cell surface. Various viral counter measures have been discovered, which allow viruses to escape BST-2 restriction. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) encodes viral protein U (Vpu) that interacts with BST-2 through their transmembrane domains and causes the downregulation of cell surface BST-2. In this study, we used a computer modeling method to establish a molecular model to investigate the binding interface of the transmembrane domains of BST-2 and Vpu. The model predicts that the interface is composed of Vpu residues I6, A10, A14, A18, V25, and W22 and BST-2 residues L23, I26, V30, I34, V35, L41, I42, and T45. Introduction of mutations that have been previously reported to disrupt the Vpu-BST-2 interaction led to a calculated higher binding free energy (MMGBSA), which supports our molecular model. A pharmacophore was also generated on the basis of this model. Our results provide a precise model that predicts the detailed interaction occurring between the transmembrane domains of Vpu and BST-2 and should facilitate the design of anti-HIV agents that are able to disrupt this interaction.

  8. Electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone nanofibrous membranes combined with a coculture of bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes for cartilage engineering.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaomin; Feng, Bei; Huang, Chuanpei; Wang, Hao; Ge, Yang; Hu, Renjie; Yin, Meng; Xu, Zhiwei; Wang, Wei; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Jinghao

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning has recently received considerable attention, showing notable potential as a novel method of scaffold fabrication for cartilage engineering. The aim of this study was to use a coculture strategy of chondrocytes combined with electrospun gelatin/polycaprolactone (GT/PCL) membranes, instead of pure chondrocytes, to evaluate the formation of cartilaginous tissue. We prepared the GT/PCL membranes, seeded bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC)/chondrocyte cocultures (75% BMSCs and 25% chondrocytes) in a sandwich model in vitro, and then implanted the constructs subcutaneously into nude mice for 12 weeks. Gross observation, histological and immunohistological evaluation, glycosaminoglycan analyses, Young's modulus measurement, and immunofluorescence staining were performed postimplantation. We found that the coculture group formed mature cartilage-like tissue, with no statistically significant difference from the chondrocyte group, and labeled BMSCs could differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells under the chondrogenic niche of chondrocytes. This entire strategy indicates that GT/PCL membranes are also a suitable scaffold for stem cell-based cartilage engineering and may provide a potentially clinically feasible approach for cartilage repairs.

  9. Establishment of a novel clonal murine bone marrow stromal cell line for assessment of p53 responses to genotoxic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbunov, Nikolai V.; Morris, James E.; Greenberger, J S.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2002-10-15

    The p53 protein is widely regarded as an important sensor of genotoxic damage in cells, and mutations in p53 are the most frequent observed in human cancers. Rapid assays for evaluating the potential of a chemical or physical agent to alter the transcriptional regulatory role of p53 may therefore serve as useful tools in toxicological research. In this study, the use of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a live cell reporter to assess the transactivation response of p53 to chemical and physical agents was evaluated. A stable murine bone marrow stromal cell line (D2XRIIGFP24) expressing EGFP under control of p53 response elements was established. D2XRIIGFP24 cells displayed low constitutive background fluorescence which was significantly enhanced in response to exposure to agents that induced of p53 protein levels. Increases in EGFP fluorescence in response to oxidative and nitrosative stress as well as UVC irradiation were dose-dependent, detectable within 3 hours of expo sure and correlated closely with the amount of p53 protein accumulated within the cell. The results demonstrate the potential for rapid and early detection of p53 transactivation using the EGFP reporter approach and indicate this approach is adaptable to a variety of fluorescent assay techniques and a useful cell model for molecular toxicology research.

  10. Bone marrow stromal cell-mediated tissue sparing enhances functional repair after spinal cord contusion in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ritfeld, Gaby J; Nandoe Tewarie, Rishi D S; Vajn, Katarina; Rahiem, Sahar T; Hurtado, Andres; Wendell, Dane F; Roos, Raymund A C; Oudega, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation has shown promise for repair of the spinal cord. We showed earlier that a BMSC transplant limits the loss of spinal nervous tissue after a contusive injury. Here, we addressed the premise that BMSC-mediated tissue sparing underlies functional recovery in adult rats after a contusion of the thoracic spinal cord. Our results reveal that after 2 months BMSCs had elicited a significant increase in spared tissue volumes and in blood vessel density in the contusion epicenter. A strong functional relationship existed between spared tissue volumes and blood vessel density. BMSC-transplanted rats exhibited significant improvements in motor, sensorimotor, and sensory functions, which were strongly correlated with spared tissue volumes. Retrograde tracing revealed that rats with BMSCs had twice as many descending brainstem neurons with an axon projecting beyond the contused spinal cord segment and these correlated strongly with the improved motor/sensorimotor functions but not sensory functions. Together, our data indicate that tissue sparing greatly contributes to BMSC-mediated functional repair after spinal cord contusion. The preservation/formation of blood vessels and sparing/regeneration of descending brainstem axons may be important mediators of the BMSC-mediated anatomical and functional improvements.

  11. Repair of osteochondral defects with in vitro engineered cartilage based on autologous bone marrow stromal cells in a swine model

    PubMed Central

    He, Aijuan; Liu, Lina; Luo, Xusong; Liu, Yu; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangjun; Wang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wenjie; Liu, Wei; Cao, Yilin; Zhou, Guangdong

    2017-01-01

    Functional reconstruction of large osteochondral defects is always a major challenge in articular surgery. Some studies have reported the feasibility of repairing articular osteochondral defects using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and biodegradable scaffolds. However, no significant breakthroughs have been achieved in clinical translation due to the instability of in vivo cartilage regeneration based on direct cell-scaffold construct implantation. To overcome the disadvantages of direct cell-scaffold construct implantation, the current study proposed an in vitro cartilage regeneration strategy, providing relatively mature cartilage-like tissue with superior mechanical properties. Our strategy involved in vitro cartilage engineering, repair of osteochondral defects, and evaluation of in vivo repair efficacy. The results demonstrated that BMSC engineered cartilage in vitro (BEC-vitro) presented a time-depended maturation process. The implantation of BEC-vitro alone could successfully realize tissue-specific repair of osteochondral defects with both cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, the maturity level of BEC-vitro had significant influence on the repaired results. These results indicated that in vitro cartilage regeneration using BMSCs is a promising strategy for functional reconstruction of osteochondral defect, thus promoting the clinical translation of cartilage regeneration techniques incorporating BMSCs. PMID:28084417

  12. Expansion induced microRNA changes in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells reveals interplay between immune regulation and cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kilpinen, Lotta; Parmar, Amarjit; Greco, Dario; Korhonen, Matti; Lehenkari, Petri; Saavalainen, Päivi; Laitinen, Saara

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are currently used in many cell based therapies. Prior to use in therapy, extensive expansion is required. We used microarray profiling to investigate expansion induced miRNA and mRNA expression changes of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) derived from old and young donors. The expression levels of 36 miRNAs were altered in cells derived from the old and respectively 39 miRNAs were altered in cells derived from young donors. Of these, only 12 were differentially expressed in both young and old donor BM-MSCs, and their predicted target mRNAs, were mainly linked to cell proliferation and senescence. Further qPCR verification showed that the expression of miR-1915-3p, miR-1207, miR-3665, and miR-762 correlated with the expansion time at passage 8. Previously described BM-MSC-specific miRNA fingerprints were also detected but these remained unchanged during expansion. Interestingly, members of well-studied miR-17/92 cluster, involved in cell cycle regulation, aging and also development of immune system, were down-regulated specifically in cells from old donors. The role of this cluster in MSC functionality is worth future studies since it links expansion, aging and immune system together. PMID:27852979

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and cell-to-cell communication in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sena, Kotaro; Angle, Siddhesh R; Kanaji, Arihiko; Aher, Chetan; Karwo, David G; Sumner, Dale R; Virdi, Amarjit S

    2011-07-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is an established therapy for fracture repair and has been used widely in the clinics, but its underlying mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the current research was to determine the effect of LIPUS on gap junctional cell-to-cell intercellular communication in rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) in vitro and to determine whether the ability of BMSCs to communicate by gap junctions would affect their response to LIPUS. Single or daily-multiple LIPUS treatment at 1.5MHz, 30mW/cm(2), for 20min was applied to BMSC. We demonstrated that BMSC form functional gap junctions and single LIPUS treatment significantly increased the intracellular dye transfer between BMSC. In addition, activated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 by LIPUS stimulation was diminished when cells were treated with a gap junction inhibitor 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β). We further demonstrated that 18β diminished the significant increase in alkaline phosphatase activity following LIPUS stimulation. These results suggest a potential role of gap junctional cell-to-cell intercellular communication on the effects of LIPUS in BMSC.

  14. Migration of bone marrow stromal cells in 3D: 4 color methodology reveals spatially and temporally coordinated events.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Marc M; Buschmann, Michael D

    2006-12-01

    The cytoskeleton plays a central role in many cell processes including directed cell migration. Since most previous work has investigated cell migration in two dimensions (2D), new methods are required to study movement in three dimensions (3D) while preserving 3D structure of the cytoskeleton. Most previous studies have labeled two cytoskeletal networks simultaneously, impeding an appreciation of their complex and dynamic interconnections. Here we report the development of a 4 color method to simultaneously image vimentin, actin, tubulin and the nucleus for high-resolution confocal microscopy of bone-marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) migrating through a porous membrane. Several methods were tested for structural preservation and labeling intensity resulting in identification of an optimized simultaneous fixation and permeabilization method using glutaraldehyde, paraformaldehyde and Triton X-100 followed by a quadruple fluorescent labeling method. This procedure was then applied at a sequence of time points to migrating cells, allowing temporal progression of migration to be assessed by visualizing all three networks plus the nucleus, providing new insights into 3D directed cell migration including processes such as leading edge structure, cytoskeletal distribution and nucleokinesis. Colocalization of actin and microtubules with distinct spatial arrangements at the cellular leading edge during migration, together with microtubule axial polarization supports recent reports indicating the pivotal role of microtubules in directed cell migration. This study also provides a foundation for 3D migration studies versus 2D studies, providing precise and robust methods to attain new insights into the cellular mechanisms of motility.

  15. Scaffold-free and scaffold-assisted 3D culture enhances differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2016-02-01

    3D cultures of stem cells can preserve differentiation potential or increase the efficiency of methods that induce differentiation. Mouse bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in 3D as scaffold-free spheroids or "mesoid bodies" (MBs) and as aggregates on poly(lactic) acid microspheres (MB/MS). 3D cultures demonstrated viable cells, interaction on multiple planes, altered cell morphology, and the formation of structures similar to epithelial cell bridges. Cell proliferation was limited in suspension cultures of MB and MB/MS; however, cells regained proliferative capacity when transferred to flat substrates of tissue culture plates (TCPs). Expanded as monolayer, cells retained expression of Sca-1 and CD44 stem cell markers. 3D cultures demonstrated enhanced potential for adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation showing higher triglyceride accumulation and robust mineralization in comparison with TCP cultures. Enhanced and efficient adipogenesis was also observed in 3D cultures generated in a rotating cell culture system. Preservation of multilineage potential of BMSC was demonstrated in 5-azacytidine treatment of 3D cultures and TCP by expression of cardiac markers GATA4 and ACTA1 although functioning cardiomyocytes were not derived.

  16. Molecular targeting regulation of proliferation and differentiation of the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bei-Yu; Wang, Xi; Chen, Liang-Wei; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2012-04-01

    The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), with pluripotent differentiation capacity, present an ideal source for cell transplantation or tissue engineering therapies, but exact understanding of regulating mechanism underling MSC proliferation and differentiation remains a critical issue in securing their safe and efficient clinical application. This review outlines current knowledge regarding MSC cell surface biomarkers and molecular mechanisms of MSC differentiation and proliferation with emphasis on Wnt/β-catenin signaling, Notch signaling pathway, bone morphogenesis proteins and various growth factors functioning in regulation of differentiation and proliferation of MSCs. Possible relation of oncogene and immunosuppressive activities of MSCs with tumorigenicity or tumor generation is also addressed for safe translational clinical application. Fast increase of MSC knowledge and techniques has led to some successful clinical trials and helped devising new tissue engineering therapies for bone and cartilage diseases that severely afflict human health. Production of adult MSC-derived functional neurons can further extend their therapeutic application in nerve injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is promising that MSCs shall overcome ethical and immunorejection problems appeared in human embryonic stem cells, and specific molecular targeting manipulation may result in practical MSC therapy for personalized treatment of various diseases in the regeneration medicine.

  17. In vivo bone formation by human marrow stromal cells in biodegradable scaffolds that release dexamethasone and ascorbate-2-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyongbum; Suh, Hwal; Jo, Sangmee Ahn; Kim, Hyun Woo; Lee, Jung Min; Kim, Eun Hae; Reinwald, Yvonne; Park, Sang-Hyug; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Jo, Inho

    2005-07-15

    An unsolved problem with stem cell-based engineering of bone tissue is how to provide a microenvironment that promotes the osteogenic differentiation of multipotent stem cells. Previously, we fabricated porous poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) scaffolds that released biologically active dexamethasone (Dex) and ascorbate-2-phosphate (AsP), and that acted as osteogenic scaffolds. To determine whether these osteogenic scaffolds can be used for bone formation in vivo, we seeded multipotent human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) onto the scaffolds and implanted them subcutaneously into athymic mice. Higher alkaline phosphatase expression was observed in hMSCs in the osteogenic scaffolds compared with that of hMSCs in control scaffolds. Furthermore, there was more calcium deposition and stronger von Kossa staining in the osteogenic scaffolds, which suggested that there was enhanced mineralized bone formation. We failed to detect cartilage in the osteogenic scaffolds (negative Safranin O staining), which implied that there was intramembranous ossification. This is the first study to demonstrate the successful formation of mineralized bone tissue in vivo by hMSCs in PLGA scaffolds that release Dex and AsP.

  18. Cotransplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells and chondrocytes as a novel therapy for reconstruction of condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jiewen; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2011-07-01

    Condylar cartilage is absolutely necessary for the normal function of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Unfortunately, condylar cartilage defect or missing is also one of the common clinical problems. Repair or reconstruction of cartilage is always a hot topic. Cell based cartilage regeneration is suggested as novel therapies in cartilage tissue engineering, and autologous chondrocytes were initially regarded as the ideal cell source. However, there are some disadvantages such as its limited augmentation capability for culture in vitro and may differentiate to other types of cells. On the other hand, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have gained special interest in tissue engineering. Because they can be obtained easily, cause relatively minor trauma and show the potential of long-run ex vivo expansion capacity. What most important is their capacity of multi-directional differentiation. They can differentiate into a variety of other types of cells when there are supplement exogenous factors or genes, but their clinical use is limited by safety concerns such as toxicity, insertional teratogenic, uncontrollable gene expression. Fortunately, the chondrocytes microenvironment has been demonstrated that could induce BMSCs to structure cartilage when culture in vitro or reimplanted in nude mice subcutaneously area. So in this article, we hypothesize that cotransplantation of autologous BMSCs and chondrocytes, which coculture with extracellular scaffolds, is a novel therapy for reconstruction of TMJ condylar cartilage. In our strategy, advantages of two types of cells are utilized and shortcomings are avoided, which strongly improve the feasibility and clinical safety, finally bring great hope to the patients with TMJ disease.

  19. Osteogenic Differentiation of Human and Ovine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in response to β-Glycerophosphate and Monosodium Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, Marta; Lovati, Arianna B; Lopa, Silvia; Moretti, Matteo

    2015-08-01

    Bone defects are severe burdens in clinics, and thus cell therapy offers an alternative strategy exploiting the features of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Sheep are a suitable orthopedic preclinical model for similarities with humans. This study compares the influence of two phosphate sources combined with bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) on the osteogenic potential of human and ovine BMSCs. β-Glycerophosphate (β-GlyP) and monosodium phosphate (NaH2PO4) were used as organic and inorganic phosphate sources. Osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs was assessed by calcified matrix, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene expression analysis. A higher calcified matrix deposition was detected in BMSCs cultured with NaH2PO4. Although no significant differences were detected among media for human BMSCs, β-GlyP with or without BMP-2 determined a positive trend in ALP levels compared to NaH2PO4. In contrast, NaH2PO4 had a positive effect on ALP levels in ovine BMSCs. β-GlyP better supported the expression of COL1A1 in human BMSCs, whereas all media enhanced RUNX2 and SPARC expression. Ovine BMSCs responded poorly to any media for RUNX2, COL1A1, and SPARC expression. NaH2PO4 improved calcified matrix deposition without upregulating the transcriptional expression of osteogenic markers. A further optimization of differentiation protocols needs to be performed to translate the procedures from preclinical to clinical models.

  20. Assessing the potential of colony morphology for dissecting the CFU-F population from human bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Gothard, D; Dawson, J I; Oreffo, R O C

    2013-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an ideal cell source for bone tissue engineering strategies. However, bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) populations that contain MSCs are highly heterogeneous expressing a wide variety of proliferative and differentiation potentials. Current MSC isolation methods employing magnetic-activated and fluorescent-activated cell sorting can be expensive and time consuming and, in the absence of specific MSC markers, fail to generate homogeneous populations. We have investigated the potential of various colony morphology descriptors to provide correlations with cell growth potential. Density-independent colony forming unit-fibroblastic (CFU-F) capacity is a MSC prerequisite and resultant colonies display an array of shapes and sizes that might be representative of cell function. Parent colonies were initially categorised according to their diameter and cell density and grouped before passage for the subsequent assessment of progeny colonies. Whereas significant morphological differences between distinct parent populations indicated a correlation with immunophenotype, enhanced CFU-F capacity was not observed when individual colonies were isolated according to these morphological parameters. Colony circularity, an alternative morphological measure, displayed a strong correlation with subsequent cell growth potential. The current study indicates the potential of morphological descriptors for predicting cell growth rate and suggests new directions for research into dissection of human BMSC CFU-F populations.

  1. Carbon nanotubes functionalized with fibroblast growth factor accelerate proliferation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells and bone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Eri; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Venturelli, Enrica; Takita, Hiroko; Watari, Fumio; Bianco, Alberto; Yokoyama, Atsuro

    2013-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were functionalized with fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and the advantages of their use as scaffolds for bone augmentation were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The activity of FGF was assessed by measuring the effect on the proliferation of rat bone marrow stromal cells (RBMSCs). The presence of FGF enhanced the proliferation of RBMSCs and the FGF covalently conjugated to the nanotubes (FGF-CNT) showed the same effect as FGF alone. In addition, FGF-CNT coated sponges were implanted between the parietal bone and the periosteum of rats and the formation of new bone was investigated. At day 14 after implantation, a larger amount of newly formed bone was clearly observed in most pores of FGF-CNT coated sponges. These findings indicated that MWCNTs accelerated new bone formation in response to FGF, as well as the integration of particles into new bone during its formation. Scaffolds coated with FGF-CNT could be considered as promising novel substituting materials for bone regeneration in future tissue engineering applications.

  2. Tungsten Promotes Sex-Specific Adipogenesis in the Bone by Altering Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Grant, Michael P; Wu, Ting Hua; Flores Molina, Manuel; Plourde, Dany; Kelly, Alexander D R; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Lemaire, Maryse; Schlezinger, Jennifer J; Mwale, Fackson; Mann, Koren K

    2016-04-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring metal that increasingly is being incorporated into industrial goods and medical devices, and is recognized as an emerging contaminant. Tungsten preferentially and rapidly accumulates in murine bone in a concentration-dependent manner; however the effect of tungsten deposition on bone biology is unknown. Other metals alter bone homeostasis by targeting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation, thus, we investigated the effects of tungsten on MSCsin vitroandin vivoIn vitro, tungsten shifted the balance of MSC differentiation by enhancing rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis, which correlated with an increase in adipocyte content in the bone of tungsten-exposed, young, male mice. Conversely, tungsten inhibited osteogenesis of MSCsin vitro; however, we found no evidence that tungsten inhibited osteogenesisin vivo Interestingly, two factors known to influence adipogenesis are sex and age of mice. Both female and older mice have enhanced adipogenesis. We extended our study and exposed young female and adult (9-month) male and female mice to tungsten for 4 weeks. Although tungsten accumulated to a similar extent in young female mice, it did not promote adipogenesis. Interestingly, tungsten did not accumulate in the bone of older mice; it was undetectable in adult male mice, and just above the limit of detect in adult female mice. Surprisingly, tungsten enhanced adipogenesis in adult female mice. In summary, we found that tungsten alters bone homeostasis by altering differentiation of MSCs, which could have significant implications for bone quality, but is highly dependent upon sex and age.

  3. Transplantation of NGF-gene-modified bone marrow stromal cells into a rat model of Alzheimer' disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Yan; Li, Jin-Tao; Wu, Qing-Ying; Li, Jin; Feng, Zhong-Tang; Liu, Su; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2008-02-01

    It is well known that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) grafted into the hippocampus of the rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) could survive and differentiate into cholinergic neurons as well as contribute towards functional restoration. The present study evaluated the effects of BMSC as a seed cell modified by nerve growth factor (NGF) gene into the hippocampus of AD rats. The beta-amyloid protein was injected bilaterally into the rat hippocampus to reproduce the AD model. After the human total RNA was extracted, the NGF gene was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, then cloned into the pcDNA3. BMSC derived from a green fluorescence protein transgenic mouse were isolated, cultured, identified, and transfected by the NGF recombinant. The NGF-gene-modified BMSC were then transplanted into the hippocampus of AD rats. The results showed that implanted BMSC survived, migrated and expressed NGF as well as differentiated into ChAT-positive neurons. A significant improvement in learning and memory in AD rats was also seen in NGF-gene-modified BMSC group, when compared with the BMSC group. The present findings suggested that BMSC provided an effective carrier for delivery of NGF into AD rats, and the administration of NGF-gene-modified BMSC may be considered as a potential strategy for the development of effective therapies for the treatment of AD.

  4. The temporal expression of estrogen receptor alpha-36 and runx2 in human bone marrow derived stromal cells during osteogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, W.R.; Owens, S.E.; Wilde, C.; Pallister, I.; Kanamarlapudi, V.; Zou, W.; Xia, Z.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ERα36 is the predominant ERα isoform involved in bone regulation in human BMSC. • ERα36 mRNA is significantly upregulated during the process of osteogenesis. • The pattern of ERα36 and runx2 mRNA expression is similar during osteogenesis. • ERα36 appears to be co-localised with runx2 during osteogenesis. - Abstract: During bone maintenance in vivo, estrogen signals through estrogen receptor (ER)-α. The objectives of this study were to investigate the temporal expression of ERα36 and ascertain its functional relevance during osteogenesis in human bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSC). This was assessed in relation to runt-related transcription factor-2 (runx2), a main modulatory protein involved in bone formation. ERα36 and runx2 subcellular localisation was assessed using immunocytochemistry, and their mRNA expression levels by real time PCR throughout the process of osteogenesis. The osteogenically induced BMSCs demonstrated a rise in ERα36 mRNA during proliferation followed by a decline in expression at day 10, which represents a change in dynamics within the culture between the proliferative stage and the differentiative stage. The mRNA expression profile of runx2 mirrored that of ERα36 and showed a degree subcellular co-localisation with ERα36. This study suggests that ERα36 is involved in the process of osteogenesis in BMSCs, which has implications in estrogen deficient environments.

  5. Limited Functional Effects of Subacute Syngeneic Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation After Rat Spinal Cord Contusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Sandner, Beatrice; Ciatipis, Mareva; Motsch, Melanie; Soljanik, Irina; Weidner, Norbert; Blesch, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Cell transplantation might be one means to improve motor, sensory, or autonomic recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Among the different cell types evaluated to date, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have received considerable interest due to their potential neuroprotective properties. However, uncertainty exists whether the efficacy of BMSCs after intraspinal transplantation justifies an invasive procedure. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of syngeneic BMSC transplantation following a moderate to severe rat spinal cord injury. Adult Fischer 344 rats underwent a T9 contusion injury (200 kDy) followed by grafting of GFP-expressing BMSCs 3 days postinjury. Animals receiving a contusion injury without cellular grafts or an injury followed by grafts of syngeneic GFP-expressing fibroblasts served as control. Eight weeks posttransplantation, BMSC-grafted animals showed only a minor effect in one measure of sensorimotor recovery, no significant differences in tissue sparing, and no changes in the recovery of bladder function compared to both control groups in urodynamic measurements. Both cell types survived in the lesion site with fibroblasts displaying a larger graft volume. Thus, contrary to some reports using allogeneic or xenogeneic transplants, subacute intraparenchymal grafting of syngeneic BMSCs has only a minor effect on functional recovery.

  6. Comparison of Morphology, Orientation, and Migration of Tendon Derived Fibroblasts and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells on Electrochemically Aligned Collagen Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Cheng, Xingguo; Kishore, Vipuil; Uquillas, Jorge Alfredo; Akkus, Ozan

    2010-01-01

    There are approximately 33 million injuries involving musculoskeletal tissues (including tendons and ligaments) every year in the United States. In certain cases the tendons and ligaments are damaged irreversibly and require replacements that possess the natural functional properties of these tissues. As a biomaterial, collagen has been a key ingredient in tissue engineering scaffolds. The application range of collagen in tissue engineering would be greatly broadened if the assembly process could be better controlled to facilitate the synthesis of dense, oriented tissue-like constructs. An electrochemical method has recently been developed in our laboratory to form highly oriented and densely packed collagen bundles with mechanical strength approaching that of tendons. However, there is limited information whether this electrochemically aligned collagen bundle (ELAC) presents advantages over randomly oriented bundles in terms of cell response. Therefore, the current study aimed to assess the biocompatibility of the collagen bundles in vitro, and compare tendon derived fibroblasts (TDFs) and bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) in terms of their ability to populate and migrate on the single and braided ELAC bundles. The results indicated that the ELAC was not cytotoxic; both cell types were able to populate and migrate on the ELAC bundles more efficiently than that observed for random collagen bundles. The braided ELAC constructs were efficiently populated by both TDFs and MSCs in vitro. Therefore, both TDFs and MSCs can be used with the ELAC bundles for tissue engineering purposes. PMID:20694974

  7. Mag-seeding of rat bone marrow stromal cells into porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2007-09-01

    Bone tissue engineering has been investigated as an alternative strategy for autograft transplantation. In the process of tissue engineering, cell seeding into three-dimensional (3-D) scaffolds is the first step for constructing 3-D tissues. We have proposed a methodology of cell seeding into 3-D porous scaffolds using magnetic force and magnetite nanoparticles, which we term Mag-seeding. In this study, we applied this Mag-seeding technique to bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and 3-D hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds. BMSCs were magnetically labeled with our original magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs) having a positive surface charge to improve adsorption to cell surface. Magnetically labeled BMSCs were seeded onto a scaffold, and a 1-T magnet was placed under the scaffold. By using Mag-seeding, the cells were successfully seeded into the internal space of scaffolds with a high cell density. The cell seeding efficiency into HA scaffolds by Mag-seeding was approximately threefold larger than that by static-seeding (conventional method, without a magnet). After a 14-d cultivation period using the osteogenic induction medium by Mag-seeding, the level of two representative osteogenic markers (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin) were significantly higher than those by static-seeding. These results indicated that Mag-seeding of BMSCs into HA scaffolds is an effective approach to bone tissue engineering.

  8. The crucial role of vitamin C and its transporter (SVCT2) in bone marrow stromal cell autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Pathania, Rajneesh; Ahmad, Saif; Kutiyanawalla, Ammar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.; Chutkan, Norman; Hunter, Monte; Hill, William D.; Hamrick, Mark; Isales, Carlos; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin C is an antioxidant that plays a vital role in various biological processes including bone formation. Previously, we reported that vitamin C is transported into bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) through the sodium dependent Vitamin C Transporter 2 (SVCT2) and this transporter plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, this transporter is regulated by oxidative stress. To date, however, the exact role of vitamin C and its transporter (SVCT2) in ROS regulated autophagy and apoptosis in BMSCs is poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that oxidative stress decreased survival of BMSCs in a dose-dependent manner and induced growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These effects were accompanied by the induction of autophagy, confirmed by P62 and LC3B protein level and punctate GFP–LC3B distribution. The supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress by regulating autophagy. Knockdown of the SVCT2 transporter in BMSCs synergistically decreased cell survival even under low oxidative stress conditions. Also, supplementing vitamin C failed to rescue cells from stress. Our results reveal that the SVCT2 transporter plays a vital role in the mechanism of BMSC survival under stress conditions. Altogether, this study has given new insight into the role of the SVCT2 transporter in oxidative stress related autophagy and apoptosis in BMSCs. PMID:26210298

  9. [Effect of continuous gamma-radiation at low doses on clonogenic hemopoietic (CFU-S) and stromal (CFU-F) bone marrow cells ].

    PubMed

    Domaratskaia, E I; Starostin, V I; Tsetlin, V V; Butorina, N N; Bueverova, E I; Bragina, E V; Khrushchov, N G

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects of low doses of continuous gamma-irradiation (Co60, 10 days, mean daily dose power 1.5-2.0 mGy, total dose 15 mGy) on hemopoietic and stromal progenitor cells of murine bone marrow. The content of hemopoietic clonogenic cells representing a "younger" (CFU-S-11) and more "mature" (CFU-S-7) categories in the compartment of stem cells was determined in the bone marrow. The state of bone marrow stroma was estimated by the method of in vitro cloning according to the number of progenitor cells that form colonies of fibroblasts (CFU-F) and by the method of ectopic transplantation according to the capacity of stroma of organizing and building new hemopoietic territories. Continuous gamma-irradiation at low doses, that were by one order of magnitude lower than those inducing hermesis, exerted a stimulating effect on both hemopoietic (CFU-S) and stromal (CFU-F) progenitor cells. The number of CFU-S in the compartment of stem cells of the bone marrow markedly increased and they formed larger hemopoietic territories but these cells appeared to create a qualitatively different microenvironment, which stimulated the proliferation of CFU-S.

  10. Effect of kidney-reinforcing and marrow-beneficial traditional Chinese medicine-intervened serum on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DA-AN; DENG, YUE-NING; LIU, LEI; LI, JIAN-JUN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of kidney-reinforcing and marrow-beneficial traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)-intervened (KRMBTI)-serum on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in rats. Rat BMSCs were isolated and cultured in vitro with various concentrations of serum obtained from rats at different time-points following treatment with low, medium and high doses of KRMBT. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and proliferation of the BMCSs was assessed to determine the optimal serum sampling time-point and serum concentration. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 expression of the BMSCs was detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and hepcidin mRNA expression in the rat livers was detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The proliferation of BMCSs treated with serum obtained l h after dosing was observed to be significantly higher than that for BMCSs treated with serum obtained at the four other time-points (P<0.05). Furthermore, the proliferation following treatment with 25% KRMBTI-serum was significantly higher than that for the other KRMBTI-serum concentrations (P<0.01). For a 25% concentration of the serum collected at l h, the proliferation in the high- and low-dose KRMBTI-serum groups was significantly higher than that of the medium-dose and control groups (P<0.01) and no statistical significance was observed between the high- and low-dose groups. In the osteogenic differentiation process of the high-dose group, the ALP activity at every time-point was significantly higher than that of the low-dose group and the peak value of the former was achieved at concentrations between 20 and 30%. KRMBTI-serum was shown to promote the expression of TGF-β1. Furthermore, hepcidin was observed to be expressed at significantly higher levels in the high-dose group than in the control group, and hepcidin expression was significantly higher after 10 weeks compared with

  11. Id4, a New Candidate Gene for Senile Osteoporosis, Acts as a Molecular Switch Promoting Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yzumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nikaido, Itoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Ninomiya, Yuichi; Kanesaki-Yatsuka, Yukiko; Akita, Masumi; Motegi, Hiromi; Wakana, Shigeharu; Noda, Tetsuo; Sablitzky, Fred; Arai, Shigeki; Kurokawa, Riki; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu; Schönbach, Christian; Suda, Tatsuo; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of bone marrow adipocytes observed in senile osteoporosis or age-related osteopenia is caused by the unbalanced differentiation of MSCs into bone marrow adipocytes or osteoblasts. Several transcription factors are known to regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the balance between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation in the bone marrow have yet to be elucidated. To identify candidate genes associated with senile osteoporosis, we performed genome-wide expression analyses of differentiating osteoblasts and adipocytes. Among transcription factors that were enriched in the early phase of differentiation, Id4 was identified as a key molecule affecting the differentiation of both cell types. Experiments using bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2 and Id4-deficient mice showed that lack of Id4 drastically reduces osteoblast differentiation and drives differentiation toward adipocytes. On the other hand knockdown of Id4 in adipogenic-induced ST2 cells increased the expression of Pparγ2, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation. Similar results were observed in bone marrow cells of femur and tibia of Id4-deficient mice. However the effect of Id4 on Pparγ2 and adipocyte differentiation is unlikely to be of direct nature. The mechanism of Id4 promoting osteoblast differentiation is associated with the Id4-mediated release of Hes1 from Hes1-Hey2 complexes. Hes1 increases the stability and transcriptional activity of Runx2, a key molecule of osteoblast differentiation, which results in an enhanced osteoblast-specific gene expression. The new role of Id4 in promoting osteoblast differentiation renders it a target for preventing the onset of senile osteoporosis. PMID:20628571

  12. Sol-gel derived aluminosilicate coatings on alumina as substrate for osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Leivo, Jarkko; Meretoja, Ville; Vippola, Minnamari; Levänen, Erkki; Vallittu, Pekka; Mäntylä, Tapio A

    2006-11-01

    Rat bone marrow stromal cell differentiation on aluminosilicate 3Al(2)O(3)-2SiO(2) coatings was investigated. Thin ceramic coatings were prepared on alpha-alumina substrates by the sol-gel process and calcined in order to establish an amorphous aluminosilicate ceramic phase with and without nanosized transitional mullite crystals. In addition, coatings of thermally sprayed aluminosilicate and diphasic gamma-alumina-silica nanosized colloids were prepared. Cell culture testing by rat osteoblasts showed good biocompatibility for aluminosilicates with sustained normal osteoblast functions. Despite mutual disparities in physical and chemical nanostructures, the culture findings suggested fairly similar osteoblast response to all tested coatings. The results suggest that topographical frequency parameters and chemical uniformity are important parameters in determining the best conditions for osteoblasts on sol-gel derived aluminosilicate materials.

  13. Origin of osteoclasts: Mature monocytes and macrophages are capable of differentiating into osteoclasts under a suitable microenvironment prepared by bone marrow-derived stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Akatsu, Takuhiko; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takahisa; Suda, Tatsuo ); Nishihara, Tatsuji; Koga, Toshihiko ); Martin, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors previously reported that osteoclast-like cells were formed in cocultures of a mouse marrow-derived stromal cell line (ST2) with mouse spleen cells in the presence of 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. In this study, they developed a new coculture system to determine the origin of osteoclasts. When relatively small numbers of mononuclear cells obtained from mouse bone marrow, spleen, thymus, or peripheral blood were cultured for 12 days on the ST2 cell layers, they formed colonies with a linear relationship between the number of colonies formed and the number of hemopoietic cells inoculated. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAPase)-positive monoculear and multinucleated cells appeared in the colonies (TRAPase-positive colonies) in response to 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} and dexamethasone. When hemopoietic cells suspended in a collagen-gel solution were cultured on the ST2 cell layers to prevent their movement, TRAPase-positive colonies were similarly formed, indicating that each colony originated from a single cell. Salmon {sup 125}I-labeled calcitonin specifically bound to the TRAPase-positive cells. Resorption lacunae were formed on dentine slices on which cocultures were performed. These results indicate that osteoclasts are also derived from the mature monocytes and macrophages when a suitable microenvironment is provided by bone marrow-derived stromal cells.

  14. Effects of voluntary exercise on the viability, proliferation and BDNF levels of bone marrow stromal cells in rat pups born from morphine- dependent mothers during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Haydari, Sakineh; Safari, Manouchehr; Zarbakhsh, Sam; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein

    2016-11-10

    This study was designed to investigate whether free access to a running wheel during pregnancy in morphine-dependent mothers would influence the viability, proliferation and BDNF levels of bone marrow stromal cells in rat pups. Pregnant rats were made dependent by chronic administration of morphine in drinking water simultaneously with free access to a running wheel. Male pups are weaned at 21days of birth and their bones marrows were aspirated from the femurs and tibias and also the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured. MTT assay was used to determine cell viability and proliferation rate. The level of BDNF was measured in the supernant of BMSCs culture by ELISA. The sedentary morphine-dependent mothers' pups showed a significant increase in the percentage cell viability and proliferation rate and also a significant decrease in the BDNF protein levels in BMSCs. The rat pups borne from exercising the control and morphine-dependent mothers exhibited an increase in the percentage viability, proliferation rate and BDNF levels of the BMSCs. This study showed that maternal exercise during pregnancy in morphine-dependent and non-dependent mothers, with increasing of BDNF levels increased the proliferation and viability of BMSCs in the rat pups. Also, chronic administration of morphine during pregnancy was able to increase the proliferation and viability of BMSCs in the rat pups.

  15. Magnesium modification of a calcium phosphate cement alters bone marrow stromal cell behavior via an integrin-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiaoyu; Lin, Dan; Shi, Hengsong; Yuan, Yuan; Tang, Wei; Zhou, Huanjun; Guo, Han; Qian, Jiangchao; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-06-01

    The chemical composition, structure and surface characteristics of biomaterials/scaffold can affect the adsorption of proteins, and this in turn influences the subsequent cellular response and tissue regeneration. With magnesium/calcium phosphate cements (MCPC) as model, the effects of magnesium (Mg) on the initial adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) as well as the underlying mechanism were investigated. A series of MCPCs with different magnesium phosphate cement (MPC) content (0∼20%) in calcium phosphate cement (CPC) were synthesized. MCPCs with moderate proportion of MPC (5% and 10%, referred to as 5MCPC and 10MCPC) were found to effectively modulate the orientation of the adsorbed fibronectin (Fn) to exhibit enhanced receptor binding affinity, and to up-regulate integrin α5β1 expression of BMSCs, especially for 5MCPC. As a result, the attachment, morphology, focal adhesion formation, actin filaments assembly and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on 5MCPC were strongly enhanced. Further in vivo experiments confirmed that 5MCPC induced promoted osteogenesis in comparison to ot her CPC/MCPCs. Our results also suggested that the Mg on the underlying substrates but not the dissolved Mg ions was the main contributor to the above positive effects. Based on these results, it can be inferred that the specific interaction of Fn and integrin α5β1 had predominant effect on the MCPC-induced enhanced cellular response of BMSCs. These results provide a new strategy to regulate BMSCs adhesion and osteogenic differentiation by adjusting the Mg/Ca content and distribution in CPC, guiding the development of osteoinductive scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

  16. Novel markers of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells identified using a quantitative proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Granéli, Cecilia; Thorfve, Anna; Ruetschi, Ulla; Brisby, Helena; Thomsen, Peter; Lindahl, Anders; Karlsson, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Today, the tool that is most commonly used to evaluate the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro is the demonstration of the expression of multiple relevant markers, such as ALP, RUNX2 and OCN. However, as yet, there is no single surface marker or panel of markers which clearly defines human BMSCs (hBMSCs) differentiating towards the osteogenic lineage. The aim of this study was therefore to examine this issue. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics was utilized to investigate differently expressed surface markers in osteogenically differentiated and undifferentiated hBMSCs. Labeled membrane proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) and 52 proteins with an expression ratio above 2, between osteogenically differentiated and undifferentiated cells, were identified. Subsequent validation, by flow cytometry and ELISA, of the SILAC expression ratios for a number of these proteins and investigations of the lineage specificity of three candidate markers were performed. The surface markers, CD10 and CD92, demonstrated significantly increased expression in hBMSCs differentiated towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. In addition, there was a slight increase in CD10 expression during chondrogenic differentiation. Furthermore, the expression of the intracellular protein, crystalline-αB (CRYaB), was only significantly increased in osteogenically differentiated hBMSCs and not affected during differentiation towards the chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. It has been concluded from the present results that CD10 and CD92 are potential markers of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation and that CRYaB is a potential novel osteogenic marker specifically expressed during the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  17. Further observations on the behavioral and neural effects of bone marrow stromal cells in rodent pain models

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Chu, Yu-Xia; Imai, Satoshi; Yang, Jia-Le; Zou, Shiping; Mohammad, Zaid; Wei, Feng; Dubner, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown potential to treat chronic pain, although much still needs to be learned about their efficacy and mechanisms of action under different pain conditions. Here, we provide further convergent evidence on the effects of BMSCs in rodent pain models. Results In an orofacial pain model involving injury of a tendon of the masseter muscle, BMSCs attenuated behavioral pain conditions assessed by von Frey filaments and a conditioned place avoidance test in female Sprague-Dawley rats. The antihyperalgesia of BMSCs in females lasted for <8 weeks, which is shorter than that seen in males. To relate preclinical findings to human clinical conditions, we used human BMSCs. Human BMSCs (1.5 M cells, i.v.) attenuated mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by spinal nerve ligation and suppressed spinal nerve ligation-induced aversive behavior, and the effect persisted through the 8-week observation period. In a trigeminal slice preparation, BMSC-treated and nerve-injured C57B/L mice showed reduced amplitude and frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents, as well as excitatory synaptic currents evoked by electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve root, suggesting inhibition of trigeminal neuronal hyperexcitability and primary afferent input by BMSCs. Finally, we observed that GluN2A (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2A) tyrosine phosphorylation and protein kinase Cgamma (PKCγ) immunoreactivity in rostral ventromedial medulla was suppressed at 8 weeks after BMSC in tendon-injured rats. Conclusions Collectively, the present work adds convergent evidence supporting the use of BMSCs in pain control. As PKCγ activity related to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation is critical in opioid tolerance, these results help to understand the mechanisms of BMSC-produced long-term antihyperalgesia, which requires opioid receptors in rostral ventromedial medulla and apparently lacks the development of tolerance

  18. Targeting PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ signalling disrupts human AML survival and bone marrow stromal cell mediated protection.

    PubMed

    Pillinger, Genevra; Loughran, Niamh V; Piddock, Rachel E; Shafat, Manar S; Zaitseva, Lyubov; Abdul-Aziz, Amina; Lawes, Matthew J; Bowles, Kristian M; Rushworth, Stuart A

    2016-06-28

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) is an enzyme group, known to regulate key survival pathways in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). It generates phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate, which provides a membrane docking site for protein kinaseB activation. PI3K catalytic p110 subunits are divided into 4 isoforms; α,β,δ and γ. The PI3Kδ isoform is always expressed in AML cells, whereas the frequency of PI3Kγ expression is highly variable. The functions of these individual catalytic enzymes have not been fully resolved in AML, therefore using the PI3K p110δ and p110γ-targeted inhibitor IPI-145 (duvelisib) and specific p110δ and p110γ shRNA, we analysed the role of these two p110 subunits in human AML blast survival. The results show that PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ inhibition with IPI-145 has anti-proliferative activity in primary AML cells by inhibiting the activity of AKT and MAPK. Pre-treatment of AML cells with IPI-145 inhibits both adhesion and migration of AML blasts to bone marrow stromal cells. Using shRNA targeted to the individual isoforms we demonstrated that p110δ-knockdown had a more significant anti-proliferative effect on AML cells, whereas targeting p110γ-knockdown significantly inhibited AML migration. The results demonstrate that targeting both PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ to inhibit AML-BMSC interactions provides a biologic rationale for the pre-clinical evaluation of IPI-145 in AML.

  19. Cross-Talk Between Human Tenocytes and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Potentiates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, Emmanuel C.; Shah, Jay V.; Mohiuddin, Mahir; Ghebes, Corina A.; Crispim, João F.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Fernandes, Hugo A.M.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) pathologies account for a significant portion of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising solution in the regeneration of both tissues. Specifically, the use of multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has shown great promise to serve as both a suitable cell source for tenogenic regeneration and a source of trophic factors to induce tenogenesis. Using four donor sets, we investigated the bidirectional paracrine tenogenic response between human hamstring tenocytes (hHT) and bone marrow-derived hMSC. Cell metabolic assays showed that only one hHT donor experienced sustained notable increases in cell metabolic activity during co-culture. Histological staining confirmed that co-culture induced elevated collagen protein levels in both cell types at varying time-points in two of four donor sets assessed. Gene expression analysis using qPCR showed the varied up-regulation of anabolic and catabolic markers involved in extracellular matrix maintenance for hMSC and hHT. Furthermore, analysis of hMSC/hHT co-culture secretome using a reporter cell line for TGF-β, a potent inducer of tenogenesis, revealed a trend of higher TGF-β bioactivity in hMSC secretome compared to hHT. Finally, hHT cytoskeletal immunostaining confirmed that both cell types released soluble factors capable of inducing favorable tenogenic morphology, comparable to control levels of soluble TGF-β1. These results suggest a potential for TGF-β-mediated signaling mechanism that is involved during the paracrine interplay between the two cell types that is reminiscent of T/L matrix remodeling/ turnover. These findings have significant implications in the clinical use of hMSC for common T/L pathologies. PMID:26308651

  20. Influence of biomechanical and biochemical stimulation on the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells seeded on polyurethane scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    TENG, SONGSONG; LIU, CHAOXU; GUENTHER, DANIEL; OMAR, MOHAMED; NEUNABER, CLAUDIA; KRETTEK, CHRISTIAN; JAGODZINSKI, MICHAEL

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to compare the effects of cyclic compression, perfusion, dexamethasone (DEX) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) on the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in polyurethane scaffolds in a perfusion bioreactor. Polyurethane scaffolds seeded with hBMSCs were cultured under six different conditions, as follows: 10% Cyclic compression at 0.5 and 5 Hz; 10 ml/min perfusion; 100 nM DEX; 100 ng/ml BMP-7; and 1 ml/min perfusion without mechanical and biochemical stimulation (control). On days 7 and 14, samples were tested for the following data: Cell proliferation; mRNA expression of Runx2, COL1A1 and osteocalcin; osteocalcin content; calcium deposition; and the equilibrium modulus of the tissue specimen. The results indicated that BMP-7 and 10 ml/min perfusion promoted cell proliferation, which was inhibited by 5 Hz cyclic compression and DEX. On day 7, the 5 Hz cyclic compression inhibited Runx2 expression, whereas the 0.5 Hz cyclic compression and BMP-7 upregulated the COL1A1 mRNA levels on day 7 and enhanced the osteocalcin expression on day 14. The DEX-treated hBMSCs exhibited downregulated osteocalcin expression. After 14 days, the BMP-7 group exhibited the highest calcium deposition, followed by the 0.5 Hz cyclic compression and the DEX groups. The equilibrium modulus of the engineered constructs significantly increased in the BMP-7, 0.5 Hz cyclic compression and DEX groups. In conclusion, the present results suggest that BMP-7 and perfusion enhance cell proliferation, whereas high frequency cyclic compression inhibits the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs. Low frequency cyclic compression is more effective than DEX, but less effective compared with BMP-7 on the osteogenic differentiation of hBMSCs seeded on polyurethane scaffolds. PMID:27284290

  1. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Pandya, Chirayu D; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Chutkan, Norman; Markand, Shanu; Hill, William D; Hamrick, Mark; Isales, Carlos; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2014-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38) and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  2. Adenoviral Mediated Expression of BMP2 by Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Cultured in 3D Copolymer Scaffolds Enhances Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunita; Sapkota, Dipak; Xue, Ying; Sun, Yang; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Bruland, Ove; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Selection of appropriate osteoinductive growth factors, suitable delivery method and proper supportive scaffold are critical for a successful outcome in bone tissue engineering using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC). This study examined the molecular and functional effect of a combination of adenoviral mediated expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) in BMSC and recently developed and characterized, biodegradable Poly(L-lactide-co-є-caprolactone){poly(LLA-co-CL)}scaffolds in osteogenic molecular changes and ectopic bone formation by using in vitro and in vivo approaches. Pathway-focused custom PCR array, validation using TaqMan based quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and ALP staining showed significant up-regulation of several osteogenic and angiogenic molecules, including ALPL and RUNX2 in ad-BMP2 BMSC group grown in poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds both at 3 and 14 days. Micro CT and histological analyses of the subcutaneously implanted scaffolds in NOD/SCID mice revealed significantly increased radiopaque areas, percentage bone volume and formation of vital bone in ad-BMP2 scaffolds as compared to the control groups both at 2 and 8 weeks. The increased bone formation in the ad-BMP2 group in vivo was paralleled at the molecular level with concomitant over-expression of a number of osteogenic and angiogenic genes including ALPL, RUNX2, SPP1, ANGPT1. The increased bone formation in ad-BMP2 explants was not found to be associated with enhanced endochondral activity as evidenced by qRT-PCR (SOX9 and FGF2) and Safranin O staining. Taken together, combination of adenoviral mediated BMP-2 expression in BMSC grown in the newly developed poly(LLA-co-CL) scaffolds induced expression of osteogenic markers and enhanced bone formation in vivo. PMID:26808122

  3. Identification of Pathways Mediating Growth Differentiation Factor5-Induced Tenogenic Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sik-Loo; Ahmad, Tunku Sara; Ng, Wuey-Min; Azlina, Amir Abbas; Azhar, Mahmood Merican; Selvaratnam, Lakshmi; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    To date, the molecular signalling mechanisms which regulate growth factors-induced MSCs tenogenic differentiation remain largely unknown. Therefore, a study to determine the global gene expression profile of tenogenic differentiation in human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) using growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) was conducted. Microarray analyses were conducted on hMSCs cultures supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GDF5 and compared to undifferentiated hMSCs and adult tenocytes. Results of QuantiGene® Plex assay support the use and interpretation of the inferred gene expression profiles and pathways information. From the 27,216 genes assessed, 873 genes (3.21% of the overall human transcriptome) were significantly altered during the tenogenic differentiation process (corrected p<0.05). The genes identified as potentially associated with tenogenic differentiation were ARHGAP29, CCL2, integrin alpha 8 and neurofilament medium polypeptides. These genes, were mainly associated with cytoskeleton reorganization (stress fibers formation) signaling. Pathway analysis demonstrated the potential molecular pathways involved in tenogenic differentiation were: cytoskeleton reorganization related i.e. keratin filament signaling and activin A signaling; cell adhesion related i.e. chemokine and adhesion signaling; and extracellular matrix related i.e. arachidonic acid production signaling. Further investigation using atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated apparent cytoskeleton reorganization in GDF5-induced hMSCs suggesting that cytoskeleton reorganization signaling is an important event involved in tenogenic differentiation. Besides, a reduced nucleostemin expression observed suggested a lower cell proliferation rate in hMSCs undergoing tenogenic differentiation. Understanding and elucidating the tenogenic differentiation signalling pathways are important for future optimization of tenogenic hMSCs for functional tendon cell-based therapy and

  4. Canonical FGFs Prevent Osteogenic Lineage Commitment and Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Via ERK1/2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Simann, Meike; Le Blanc, Solange; Schneider, Verena; Zehe, Viola; Lüdemann, Martin; Schütze, Norbert; Jakob, Franz; Schilling, Tatjana

    2017-02-01

    Controlling the adipo-osteogenic lineage decision of trabecular human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) in favor of osteogenesis represents a promising approach for osteoporosis therapy and prevention. Previously, Fibroblast Growth Factor 1 (FGF1) and its subfamily member FGF2 were scored as leading candidates to exercise control over skeletal precursor commitment and lineage decision albeit literature results are highly inconsistent. We show here that FGF1 and 2 strongly prevent the osteogenic commitment and differentiation of hBMSCs. Mineralization of extracellular matrix (ECM) and mRNA expression of osteogenic marker genes Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP), Collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), and Integrin-Binding Sialoprotein (IBSP) were significantly reduced. Furthermore, master regulators of osteogenic commitment like Runt-Related Transcription Factor 2 (RUNX2) and Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP4) were downregulated. When administered under adipogenic culture conditions, canonical FGFs did not support osteogenic marker expression. Moreover despite the presence of osteogenic differentiation factors, FGFs even disabled the pro-osteogenic lineage decision of pre-differentiated adipocytic cells. In contrast to FGF Receptor 2 (FGFR2), FGFR1 was stably expressed throughout osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation and FGF addition. Moreover, FGFR1 and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) were found to be responsible for underlying signal transduction using respective inhibitors. Taken together, we present new findings indicating that canonical FGFR-ERK1/2 signaling entrapped hBMSCs in a pre-committed state and arrested further maturation of committed precursors. Our results might aid in unraveling and controlling check points relevant for ageing-associated aberrant adipogenesis with consequences for the treatment of degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis and for skeletal tissue engineering strategies. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 263-275, 2017. © 2016 Wiley

  5. Tungsten Promotes Sex-Specific Adipogenesis in the Bone by Altering Differentiation of Bone Marrow-Resident Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Grant, Michael P.; Wu, Ting Hua; Flores Molina, Manuel; Plourde, Dany; Kelly, Alexander D. R.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Lemaire, Maryse; Schlezinger, Jennifer J.; Mwale, Fackson; Mann, Koren K.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten is a naturally occurring metal that increasingly is being incorporated into industrial goods and medical devices, and is recognized as an emerging contaminant. Tungsten preferentially and rapidly accumulates in murine bone in a concentration-dependent manner; however the effect of tungsten deposition on bone biology is unknown. Other metals alter bone homeostasis by targeting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) differentiation, thus, we investigated the effects of tungsten on MSCs in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, tungsten shifted the balance of MSC differentiation by enhancing rosiglitazone-induced adipogenesis, which correlated with an increase in adipocyte content in the bone of tungsten-exposed, young, male mice. Conversely, tungsten inhibited osteogenesis of MSCs in vitro; however, we found no evidence that tungsten inhibited osteogenesis in vivo. Interestingly, two factors known to influence adipogenesis are sex and age of mice. Both female and older mice have enhanced adipogenesis. We extended our study and exposed young female and adult (9-month) male and female mice to tungsten for 4 weeks. Although tungsten accumulated to a similar extent in young female mice, it did not promote adipogenesis. Interestingly, tungsten did not accumulate in the bone of older mice; it was undetectable in adult male mice, and just above the limit of detect in adult female mice. Surprisingly, tungsten enhanced adipogenesis in adult female mice. In summary, we found that tungsten alters bone homeostasis by altering differentiation of MSCs, which could have significant implications for bone quality, but is highly dependent upon sex and age. PMID:26865663

  6. Therapeutic effect of transplanting magnetically labeled bone marrow stromal stem cells in a liver injury rat model with 70%-hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Wu; Zhu, Da-Jian; Ju, Yong-Le; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background There are only few reports about the use of bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) for the treatment of traumatic liver injury. This study aimed to study the therapeutic effect of fluorescence-labeled BMSCs administered to rats subject to traumatic liver injury. Material/Methods Male SD rats with a 70% resection of the liver were injected with feridex-labeled BMSCs which could be induced to functional hepatocytes in vitro. Liver function was assayed and the liver scanned by 1.5-T MRI at 12 hrs and on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 post-operation. The pathological changes of liver sections were monitored. Results The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, direct bilirubin, and total bilirubin in the transplantation group were significantly lower than the control group. The MRI showed rats of the transplantation group had an oval low signal area at 12 hr after operation; the low signal range gradually expanded and the signal intensity gradually decreased over 14 days after operation. The low signal range in the control group disappeared 12 hr after the operation. After Prussian blue staining, rats of the transplantation group contained blue granules with no significant hypertrophy or edema in hepatocytes, while the control group showed no blue granules with significant hypertrophy and edema. Conclusions The BMSCs transplanted into the injured rat liver gradually migrate to the surrounding liver tissue and partially repair the liver surgical injury in rats. BMSCs may represent an effective therapeutic approach for acute liver injury. PMID:23018343

  7. Matrix-mediated retention of osteogenic differentiation potential by human adult bone marrow stromal cells during ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Mauney, Joshua R; Kaplan, David L; Volloch, Vladimir

    2004-07-01

    During prolonged cultivation ex vivo, adult bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) undergo two probably interdependent processes, replicative aging and a decline in differentiation potential. Recently, our results with primary human fibroblasts indicated that growth on denatured collagen (DC) matrix results in the reduction of the rate of cellular aging. The present study has been undertaken to test whether the growth of human BMSCs under the same conditions would translate into preservation of cellular aging-attenuated functions, such as the ability to express HSP70 in response to stress as well as of osteogenic differentiation potential. We report here that growth of BMSCs on a DC matrix versus tissue culture polystyrene significantly reduced one of the main manifestations of cellular aging, the attenuation of the ability to express a major protective stress response component, HSP70, increased the proliferation capacity of ex vivo expanded BMSCs, reduced the rate of morphological changes, and resulted in a dramatic increase in the retention of the potential to express osteogenic-specific functions and markers upon treatment with osteogenic stimulants. BMSCs are a promising and increasingly important cell source for tissue engineering as well as cell and gene therapeutic strategies. For use of BMSCs in these applications, ex vivo expansion is necessary to obtain a sufficient, therapeutically useful, number of cells; however, this results in the loss of differentiation potential. This problem is especially acute in older patients where more extensive in vitro expansion of smaller number of stem/progenitor cells is needed. The finding that growth on certain biomaterials preserves aging-attenuated functions, enhances proliferation capacity, and maintains differentiation potential of BMSCs indicates a promising approach to address this problem.

  8. Can notochordal cells promote bone marrow stromal cell potential for nucleus pulposus enrichment? A simplified in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Potier, Esther; Ito, Keita

    2014-12-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown promising potential to stop intervertebral disc degeneration in several animal models. In order to restore a healthy state, though, this potential should be further stimulated. Notochordal cells (NCs), influential in disc development, have been shown to stimulate BMSC differentiation, but it is unclear how this effect will translate in an environment where resident disc cells (nucleus pulposus cells [NPCs]) could also influence BMSCs. The goal of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the effects of NCs on BMSCs when cocultured with NPCs, in a simplified 3D in vitro system. Bovine BMSCs and NPCs were mixed (Mix) and seeded into alginate beads. Using culture inserts, the Mix was then cocultured with porcine NCs (alginate beads) and compared to coculture with empty beads or porcine skin fibroblasts (SFs, alginate beads). NPCs alone were also cocultured with NCs, and BMSCs alone cultured under chondrogenic conditions. The effects of coculture conditions on cell viability, matrix production (proteoglycan and collagen), and gene expression of disc markers (aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX9) were assessed after 4 weeks of culture. The NC phenotype and gene expression profile were also analyzed. Coculture with NCs did not significantly influence cell viability, proteoglycan production, or disc marker gene expression of the Mix. When compared to NPCs, the Mix produced the same amount of proteoglycan and displayed a higher expression of disc marker, indicating a stimulation of the BMSCs (and/or NPCs) in the Mix. Additionally, during the 4 weeks of culture, the NC phenotype changed drastically (morphology, gene expression profile). These results show that NCs might not be as stimulatory for BMSCs in an NPC-rich environment, as believed from individual cultures. This absence of effects could be explained by a mild stimulation provided by (de)differentiating NCs and the costimulation of BMSCs and NPCs by each other.

  9. Molecular examination of bone marrow stromal cells and chondroitinase ABC-assisted acellular nerve allograft for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Jia, Hua; Li, Wen-Yuan; Guan, Li-Xin; Deng, Lingxiao; Liu, Yan-Cui; Liu, Gui-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying combinatorial bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation and chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC) therapy in a model of acellular nerve allograft (ANA) repair of the sciatic nerve gap in rats. Sprague Dawley rats (n=24) were used as nerve donors and Wistar rats (n=48) were randomly divided into the following groups: Group I, Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) control group (ANA treated with DMEM only); Group II, Ch-ABC group (ANA treated with Ch-ABC only); Group III, BMSC group (ANA seeded with BMSCs only); Group IV, Ch-ABC + BMSCs group (Ch-ABC treated ANA then seeded with BMSCs). After 8 weeks, the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the regenerated tissues were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Axonal regeneration, motor neuron protection and functional recovery were examined by immunohistochemistry, horseradish peroxidase retrograde neural tracing and electrophysiological and tibialis anterior muscle recovery analyses. It was observed that combination therapy enhances the growth response of the donor nerve locally as well as distally, at the level of the spinal cord motoneuron and the target muscle organ. This phenomenon is likely due to the propagation of retrograde and anterograde transport of growth signals sourced from the graft site. Collectively, growth improvement on the donor nerve, target muscle and motoneuron ultimately contribute to efficacious axonal regeneration and functional recovery. Thorough investigation of molecular peripheral nerve injury combinatorial strategies are required for the optimization of efficacious therapy and full functional recovery following ANA. PMID:27698684

  10. A Modified Approach to Inducing Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Differentiate into Cells with Mature Schwann Cell Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yutian; Chen, Jianghai; Liu, Wei; Lu, Xiaocheng; Liu, Zhenyu; Zhao, Xiaobo; Li, Gongchi; Chen, Zhenbing

    2016-02-15

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) can be induced to differentiate into Schwann-like cells under classical induction conditions. However, cells derived from this method are unstable, exhibiting a low neurotrophin expression level after the induction conditions are removed. In Schwann cell (SC) culture, progesterone (PROG) enhances neurotrophic synthesis and myelination, specifically regulating the expression of the myelin protein zero (P0)- and peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22)-encoding genes by acting in concert or in synergy with insulin and glucocorticoids (GLUCs). In the present study, we investigated whether combined PROG, GLUC, and insulin therapy induced MSCs to differentiate into modified SC-like cells with phenotypes similar to those of mature SCs. After being cultured for 2 weeks in modified differentiation medium, the modified SC-like cells showed increased expression of P0 and PMP22. In addition, morphological and phenotypic characterizations were conducted over a period of over 2 weeks, and functional characteristics persisted for more than 3 weeks after the induction reagents were withdrawn. The transplantation of green fluorescent protein-labeled, modified SC-like cells into transected sciatic nerves with a 10-mm gap significantly increased the proliferation of the original SCs and improved axon regeneration and myelination compared with original BM-SCs. Immunostaining for P0 revealed that more of the transplanted modified SC-like cells retained the phenotypic characteristics of SCs. Taken together, these results reveal that the combined application of PROG, GLUC, and insulin induces MSCs to differentiate into cells with phenotypic, molecular, and functional properties of mature SCs.

  11. Site-Specific Characteristics of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Modify the Effect of Aging on the Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing; Zou, Xuan; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Xia; E, Lingling; Feng, Lin; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Guilan; Xing, Helin; Liu, Hongchen

    2016-03-15

    Bone is a self-renewing tissue. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) are located in the adult skeleton and are believed to be involved in the maintenance of skeletal homeostasis throughout life. With increasing age, the ability of the skeleton to repair itself decreases, possibly due to the reduced functional capacity of BMSCs. Recent evidence has suggested the existence of at least two populations of BMSCs with different embryonic origins that cannot be interchanged during stem cell recruitment: craniofacial BMSCs (neural crest origin) and appendicular BMSCs (mesoderm origin). Questions arise as to whether the site-specific characteristics alter the effect of aging on the skeleton. In this study, the effects of biological aging on human BMSCs were compared with BMSCs derived from the craniofacial bone versus those derived from the appendicular skeleton. The phenotype, proliferation, and functional characteristics (osteogenic differentiation, cytokine secretion, and bone formation in vivo) of the BMSCs were investigated. The results demonstrated that the proliferative capacity and osteogenic differentiation of the BMSCs decrease significantly with age both in vitro and in vivo. For age-matched groups, the osteogenic differentiation capacity of alveolar BMSCs was higher than that of femoral BMSCs in the middle-aged and old groups, while there was no significant difference for the young groups. Compared with old alveolar BMSCs, old femoral BMSCs had a significantly longer population doubling time, a smaller colony-forming population, and less bone formation in vivo, while there was no significant difference for the young and middle-aged groups. Distinct differences in the expression of cytokine factors were also found. In conclusion, human BMSCs display an age-related decrease in functional capacity, and embryonic origins may play a critical role in mediating the aging rate of BMSCs. These data provide novel insights into the skeletal site

  12. Identification of Pathways Mediating Growth Differentiation Factor5-Induced Tenogenic Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sik-Loo; Ahmad, Tunku Sara; Ng, Wuey-Min; Azlina, Amir Abbas; Azhar, Mahmood Merican; Selvaratnam, Lakshmi; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    To date, the molecular signalling mechanisms which regulate growth factors-induced MSCs tenogenic differentiation remain largely unknown. Therefore, a study to determine the global gene expression profile of tenogenic differentiation in human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) using growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) was conducted. Microarray analyses were conducted on hMSCs cultures supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GDF5 and compared to undifferentiated hMSCs and adult tenocytes. Results of QuantiGene® Plex assay support the use and interpretation of the inferred gene expression profiles and pathways information. From the 27,216 genes assessed, 873 genes (3.21% of the overall human transcriptome) were significantly altered during the tenogenic differentiation process (corrected p<0.05). The genes identified as potentially associated with tenogenic differentiation were ARHGAP29, CCL2, integrin alpha 8 and neurofilament medium polypeptides. These genes, were mainly associated with cytoskeleton reorganization (stress fibers formation) signaling. Pathway analysis demonstrated the potential molecular pathways involved in tenogenic differentiation were: cytoskeleton reorganization related i.e. keratin filament signaling and activin A signaling; cell adhesion related i.e. chemokine and adhesion signaling; and extracellular matrix related i.e. arachidonic acid production signaling. Further investigation using atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated apparent cytoskeleton reorganization in GDF5-induced hMSCs suggesting that cytoskeleton reorganization signaling is an important event involved in tenogenic differentiation. Besides, a reduced nucleostemin expression observed suggested a lower cell proliferation rate in hMSCs undergoing tenogenic differentiation. Understanding and elucidating the tenogenic differentiation signalling pathways are important for future optimization of tenogenic hMSCs for functional tendon cell-based therapy and

  13. Differences of cell surface marker expression between bone marrow- and kidney-derived murine mesenchymal stromal cells and fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Cakiroglu, F; Osbahr, J W; Kramer, J; Rohwedel, J

    2016-10-31

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are undifferentiated, multipotent adult cells with regenerative properties. They are particularly relevant for therapeutic approaches due to the simplicity of their isolation and cultivation. Since MSC show an expression pattern of cell surface marker, which is almost identical to fibroblasts, many attempts have been made to address the similarities and differences between MSC and fibroblasts. In this study we aimed to isolate murine MSC from bone marrow (BM) and kidney to characterize them in comparison to fibroblasts. Cells were isolated from murine kidney, BM and abdominal skin by plastic adherence and subsequently characterized by analysing their capability to build colony-forming unit-fibroblasts (CFU-F), their morphology, their proliferation, expression of telomerase activity and cell surface antigens as well as their differentiation capacity. Plastic adherent cells from the 3 mouse tissues showed similar morphology, proliferation profiles and CFU-F building capacities. However, while MSC from BM and kidney differentiated into the adipogenic, chondrogenic and osteogenic direction, fibroblasts were not able to do so efficiently. In addition, a tendency for lower expression of telomerase was found in the fibroblast population. Proliferating cells from kidney and BM expressed the MSC-specific cell surface markers CD105 and Sca-1 on a significantly higher and CD117 on a significantly lower level compared to fibroblasts and were thereby distinguishable from fibroblasts. Furthermore, we found that certain CD markers were specifically expressed on a higher level, either in BM-derived cells or fibroblasts. This study demonstrates that murine MSC isolated from different organs express certain specific markers, which enable their discrimination.

  14. Matrix formation is enhanced in co-cultures of human meniscus cells with bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Matthies, Norah-Faye; Mulet-Sierra, Aillette; Jomha, Nadr M; Adesida, Adetola B

    2013-12-01

    The ultimate aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) to supplement meniscus cells for meniscus tissue engineering and regeneration. Human menisci were harvested from three patients undergoing total knee replacements. Meniscus cells were released from the menisci after collagenase treatment. BMSCs were harvested from the iliac crest of three patients and were expanded in culture until passage 2. Primary meniscus cells and BMSCs were co-cultured in vitro in three-dimensional (3D) pellet culture at three different cell-cell ratios for 3 weeks under normal (21% O2 ) or low (3% O2 ) oxygen tension in the presence of serum-free chondrogenic medium. Pure BMSCs and pure meniscus cell pellets served as control groups. The tissue generated was assessed biochemically, histochemically and by quantitative RT-PCR. Co-cultures of primary meniscus cells and BMSCs resulted in tissue with increased (1.3-1.7-fold) deposition of proteoglycan (GAG) extracellular matrix (ECM) relative to tissues derived from BMSCs or meniscus cells alone under 21% O2 . GAG matrix formation was also enhanced (1.3-1.6-fold) under 3% O2 culture conditions. Alcian blue staining of generated tissue confirmed increased deposition of GAG-rich matrix. mRNA expression of type I collagen (COL1A2), type II collagen (COL2A1) and aggrecan were upregulated in co-cultured pellets. However, SOX9 and HIF-1α mRNA expression were not significantly modulated by co-culture. Co-culture of primary meniscus cells with BMSCs resulted in increased ECM formation. Co-delivery of meniscus cells and BMSCs can, in principle, be used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies to repair meniscus defects.

  15. Isolation, expansion and characterization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in serum-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Gottipamula, Sanjay; Ashwin, K M; Muttigi, Manjunatha S; Kannan, Suresh; Kolkundkar, Udaykumar; Seetharam, Raviraja N

    2014-04-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) heralded a new beginning for regenerative medicine and generated tremendous interest as the most promising source for therapeutic application. Most cell therapies require stringent regulatory compliance and prefer the use of serum-free media (SFM) or xeno-free media (XFM) for the MSC production process, starting from the isolation onwards. Here, we report on serum-free isolation and expansion of MSCs and compare them with cells grown in conventional fetal bovine serum (FBS)-containing media as a control. The isolation, proliferation and morphology analysis demonstrated significant differences between MSCs cultured in various SFM/XFM in addition to their difference with FBS controls. BD Mosaic™ Mesenchymal Stem Cell Serum-Free media (BD-SFM) and Mesencult-XF (MSX) supported the isolation, sequential passaging, tri-lineage differentiation potential and acceptable surface marker expression profile of BM-MSCs. Further, MSCs cultured in SFM showed higher immune suppression and hypo-immunogenicity properties, making them an ideal candidate for allogeneic cell therapy. Although cells cultured in control media have a significantly higher proliferation rate, BM-MSCs cultured in BD-SFM or MSX media are the preferred choice to meet regulatory requirements as they do not contain bovine serum. While BM-MSCs cultured in BD-SFM and MSX media adhered to all MSC characteristics, in the case of few parameters, the performance of cells cultured in BD-SFM was superior to that of MSX media. Pre-clinical safety and efficiency studies are required before qualifying SFM or XFM media-derived MSCs for therapeutic applications.

  16. Large-scale expansion of pre-isolated bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in serum-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Gottipamula, Sanjay; Muttigi, Manjunatha S; Chaansa, S; Ashwin, K M; Priya, Nancy; Kolkundkar, Udaykumar; SundarRaj, Swathi; Majumdar, Anish Sen; Seetharam, Raviraja N

    2016-02-01

    The regenerative potential of mesenchymal stromal or stem cells (MSCs) has generated tremendous interest for treating various degenerative diseases. Regulatory preference is to use a culture medium that is devoid of bovine components for stem cell expansion intended for therapeutic applications. However, a clear choice an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) has not yet emerged. We have screened five different commercially available serum-free media (SFM) for their ability to support the growth and expansion of pre-isolated undifferentiated bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) and compared the results with cells grown in standard FBS-containing medium as control. In addition, based on initial screening results, BD Mosaic™ Mesenchymal Stem Cell Serum-free (BD-SFM) medium was evaluated in large-scale cultures for the performance and culture characteristics of BM-MSCs. Of the five different serum-free media, BD-SFM enhanced BM-MSCs growth and expansion in Cell STACK (CS), but the cell yield per CS-10 was less when compared to the control medium. The characteristics of MSCs were measured in terms of population doubling time (PDT), cell yield and expression of MSC-specific markers. Significant differences were observed between BD-SFM and control medium in terms of population doublings (PDs), cell yield, CFU-F and morphological features, whereas surface phenotype and differentiation potentials were comparable. The BD-SFM-cultured MSCs were also found to retain the differentiation potential, immune-privileged status and immunosuppressive properties inherent to MSCs. Our results suggest that BD-SFM supports large-scale expansion of BM-MSCs for therapeutic use.

  17. In vivo osteogenic activity of bone marrow stromal stem cells transfected with Ad-GFP-hBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, G X; Hu, L; Hu, H X; Zhang, Z; Liu, D P

    2014-06-16

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) and the in vivo and in vitro osteogenic activity of BMSCs transfected with the adenovirus plasmid, Ad-GFP-hBMP-2. The Ad-GFP-hBMP-2 plasmid was packaged and transfected into rabbit BMSCs to determine the transfection rate. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities of Ad-GFP-hBMP-2-transfected BMSCs (experimental group) and untransfected BMSCs (control group) were detected. In situ hybridization of type I collagen and Western blot were used to determine the BMP-2 gene and protein expressions. The transfected and untransfected BMSCs were respectively inoculated into nude mice to observe in vivo osteogenesis. The decalcified bovine cancellous bone scaffold was respectively combined with transfected and untransfected BMSCs and implanted into ulnar defects in rabbits to repair the bone. The adenovirus titer was 1.2x10(10) pfu/mL. Green fluorescent protein expression appeared 48 h after transfection with the adenovirus plasmid, and the transfection rate was 71.1%. The ALP activity was higher in the experimental group than the control group at each time point after transfection. The gene and protein expressions of BMP-2 were higher in the experimental group than the control group. The positive rates of in vivo osteogenesis in the experimental and control groups were 90% and 40%, respectively. The bone defect repair effects differed markedly between the two groups. The BMP-2 gene can be highly expressed in BMSCs to successfully induce osteogenic differentiation. BMSCs can be used as seed cells for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Conditioned media from differentiating craniofacial bone marrow stromal cells influence mineralization and proliferation in periodontal ligament stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhenyu; Feng, Yuan; Liu, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    Previous reports have mainly focused on the behavioral responses of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) in interaction with tibia bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). However, there is little study on the biologic features of hPDLSCs under the induction of maxilla BMSCs (M-BMSCs) at different phases of osteogenic differentiation. We hypothesized that M-BMSCs undergoing osteogenic differentiation acted on the proliferation, differentiation, and bone-forming capacity of hPDLSCs. In this paper, primary hPDLSCs and human M-BMSCs (hM-BMSCs) were expanded in vitro. After screening of surface markers for characterization, hPDLSCs were cocultured with different phases of differentiating hM-BMSCs. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were examined, and mineralization-associated markers such as osteocalcin and runt-related transcription factor 2 of hPDLSCs in coculture with uninduced/osteoinduced hM-BMSCs were evaluated. hPDLSCs in hM-BMSCs-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM) group showed a reduction in proliferation compared with untreated hPDLSCs, while osteoinduced hM-BMSCs for 10 day-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM-10ds) and osteoinduced hM-BMSCs for 15 day-conditioned medium (hM-BMSCs-CM-15ds) enhance the proliferation of hPDLSCs. hM-BMSCs of separate differentiation stages temporarily inhibited osteogenesis of hPDLSCs in the early days. Upon extending time periods, uninduced/osteoinduced hM-BMSCs markedly enhanced osteogenesis of hPDLSCs to different degrees. The transplantation results showed hM-BMSCs-CM-15ds treatment promoted tissue regeneration to generate cementum/periodontal ligament-like structure characterized by hard-tissue formation. This research supported the notion that hM-BMSCs triggered osteogenesis of hPDLSCs suggesting important implications for periodontal engineering.

  19. Increased NF-κB Activity and Decreased Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Mediate Reduced Osteoblast Differentiation and Function in ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Le Henaff, Carole; Mansouri, Rafik; Modrowski, Dominique; Zarka, Mylène; Geoffroy, Valérie; Marty, Caroline; Tarantino, Nadine; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Marie, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent human ΔF508 mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is associated with reduced bone formation and bone loss in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which the ΔF508-CFTR mutation causes alterations in bone formation are poorly known. In this study, we analyzed the osteoblast phenotype in ΔF508-CFTR mice and characterized the signaling mechanisms underlying this phenotype. Ex vivo studies showed that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation negatively impacted the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into osteoblasts and the activity of osteoblasts, demonstrating that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation alters both osteoblast differentiation and function. Treatment with a CFTR corrector rescued the abnormal collagen gene expression in ΔF508-CFTR osteoblasts. Mechanistic analysis revealed that NF-κB signaling and transcriptional activity were increased in mutant osteoblasts. Functional studies showed that the activation of NF-κB transcriptional activity in mutant osteoblasts resulted in increased β-catenin phosphorylation, reduced osteoblast β-catenin expression, and altered expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity or activation of canonical Wnt signaling rescued Wnt target gene expression and corrected osteoblast differentiation and function in bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts from ΔF508-CFTR mice. Overall, the results show that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation impairs osteoblast differentiation and function as a result of overactive NF-κB and reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, the data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB or activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can rescue the abnormal osteoblast differentiation and function induced by the prevalent ΔF508-CFTR mutation, suggesting novel therapeutic strategies to correct the osteoblast dysfunctions in cystic fibrosis. PMID:26060255

  20. Increased NF-κB Activity and Decreased Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Mediate Reduced Osteoblast Differentiation and Function in ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Henaff, Carole; Mansouri, Rafik; Modrowski, Dominique; Zarka, Mylène; Geoffroy, Valérie; Marty, Caroline; Tarantino, Nadine; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Marie, Pierre J

    2015-07-17

    The prevalent human ΔF508 mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is associated with reduced bone formation and bone loss in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which the ΔF508-CFTR mutation causes alterations in bone formation are poorly known. In this study, we analyzed the osteoblast phenotype in ΔF508-CFTR mice and characterized the signaling mechanisms underlying this phenotype. Ex vivo studies showed that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation negatively impacted the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into osteoblasts and the activity of osteoblasts, demonstrating that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation alters both osteoblast differentiation and function. Treatment with a CFTR corrector rescued the abnormal collagen gene expression in ΔF508-CFTR osteoblasts. Mechanistic analysis revealed that NF-κB signaling and transcriptional activity were increased in mutant osteoblasts. Functional studies showed that the activation of NF-κB transcriptional activity in mutant osteoblasts resulted in increased β-catenin phosphorylation, reduced osteoblast β-catenin expression, and altered expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity or activation of canonical Wnt signaling rescued Wnt target gene expression and corrected osteoblast differentiation and function in bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts from ΔF508-CFTR mice. Overall, the results show that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation impairs osteoblast differentiation and function as a result of overactive NF-κB and reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, the data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB or activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can rescue the abnormal osteoblast differentiation and function induced by the prevalent ΔF508-CFTR mutation, suggesting novel therapeutic strategies to correct the osteoblast dysfunctions in cystic fibrosis.

  1. Effect of surface modification of nanofibres with glutamic acid peptide on calcium phosphate nucleation and osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Ozan; Kumar, Ankur; Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; He, Xuezhong; Cui, Tong; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2016-02-01

    Biomineralization is mediated by extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins with amino acid sequences rich in glutamic acid. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of calcium phosphate deposition on aligned nanofibres surface-modified with a glutamic acid peptide on osteogenic differentiation of rat marrow stromal cells. Blend of EEGGC peptide (GLU) conjugated low molecular weight polylactide (PLA) and high molecular weight poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was electrospun to form aligned nanofibres (GLU-NF). The GLU-NF microsheets were incubated in a modified simulated body fluid for nucleation of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibre surface. To achieve a high calcium phosphate to fibre ratio, a layer-by-layer approach was used to improve diffusion of calcium and phosphate ions inside the microsheets. Based on dissipative particle dynamics simulation of PLGA/PLA-GLU fibres, > 80% of GLU peptide was localized to the fibre surface. Calcium phosphate to fibre ratios as high as 200%, between those of cancellous (160%) and cortical (310%) bone, was obtained with the layer-by-layer approach. The extent of osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of marrow stromal cells seeded on GLU-NF microsheets was directly related to the amount of calcium phosphate deposition on the fibres prior to cell seeding. Expression of osteogenic markers osteopontin, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and type 1 collagen increased gradually with calcium phosphate deposition on GLU-NF microsheets. Results demonstrate that surface modification of aligned synthetic nanofibres with EEGGC peptide dramatically affects nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate crystals on the fibres leading to increased osteogenic differentiation of marrow stromal cells and mineralization.

  2. ADAR1 ablation decreases bone mass by impairing osteoblast function in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shibing; Sharma, Rohit; Nie, Daibang; Jiao, Hongli; Im, Hee-Jeong; Lai, Yumei; Zhao, Zhongfang; Zhu, Ke; Fan, Jie; Chen, Di; Wang, Qingde; Xiao, Guozhi

    2013-01-15

    Bone mass is controlled through a delicate balance between osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We show here that RNA editing enzyme adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) is critical for proper control of bone mass. Postnatal conditional knockout of Adar1 (the gene encoding ADAR1) resulted in a severe osteopenic phenotype. Ablation of the Adar1 gene significantly suppressed osteoblast differentiation without affecting osteoclast differentiation in bone. In vitro deletion of the Adar1 gene decreased expression of osteoblast-specific osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein genes, alkaline phosphatase activity, and mineralization, suggesting a direct intrinsic role of ADAR1 in osteoblasts. ADAR1 regulates osteoblast differentiation by, at least in part, modulation of osterix expression, which is essential for bone formation. Further, ablation of the Adar1 gene decreased the proliferation and survival of bone marrow stromal cells and inhibited the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells towards osteoblast lineage. Finally, shRNA knockdown of the Adar1 gene in MC-4 pre-osteoblasts reduced cyclin D1 and cyclin A1 expression and cell growth. Our results identify ADAR1 as a new key regulator of bone mass and suggest that ADAR1 functions in this process mainly through modulation of the intrinsic properties of osteoblasts (i.e., proliferation, survival and differentiation).

  3. Pesticide induced alterations in marrow physiology and depletion of stem and stromal progenitor population: an experimental model to study the toxic effects of pesticide.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sumanta; Basak, Pratima; Chaklader, Malay; Das, Prosun; Pereira, Jacintha Archana; Chaudhuri, Samaresh; Law, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Long-term exposure of agriculturally used organochloride and organophosphate pesticides have been shown to cause long-lasting hematotoxicity and increased incidence of aplastic anemia in humans. The mechanisms involved in pesticide induced hematotoxicity and the features of toxicity that may play a major role in bone marrow suppression are not known. The aim of the present study was to investigate the hematological consequences of pesticide exposure in swiss albino mice exposed to aqueous mixture of common agriculturally used pesticides for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 13 weeks. After the end of last exposure, without a recovery period, the strong hematotoxic effect of pesticide was assessed in mice with long-term bone marrow explant culture (LTBMC-Ex) system and cell colony forming assays. Bone marrow explant culture from the pesticide exposed group of mice failed to generate a supportive stromal matrix and did not produce adequate number of hematopoietic cells and found to contain largely the adipogenic precursors. The decreased cell colony numbers in the pesticide exposed group indicated defective maturational and functional status of different marrow cell lineages. As a whole, exposure of mice to the mixture of pesticides reduced the total number of bone marrow cells (granulocytes are the major targets of pesticide toxicity), hematopoietic, and non-hematopoietic progenitor cells and most of the hematological parameters. Replication of primitive stem/progenitor cells in the marrow was decreased following pesticide exposure with G0/G1-phase arrest of most of the cells. The progenitor cells showed decreased percentage of cells in S/G2/M-phase. The increased apoptosis profile of the marrow progenitors (Increased CD95 expression) and primitive stem cells (High Annexin-V positivity on Sca1+ cells) with an elevated intracellular cleaved caspase-3 level on the Sca1+ bone marrow cells provided the base necessary for explaining the deranged bone marrow microenvironmental

  4. Prospective Review of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiation into Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Garg, Priyanka; Mazur, Matthew M; Buck, Amy C; Wandtke, Meghan E; Liu, Jiayong; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2017-02-01

    Stem cell research has been a popular topic in the past few decades. This review aims to discuss factors that help regulate, induce, and enhance mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation into osteoblasts for bone regeneration. The factors analyzed include bone morphogenic protein (BMP), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1), histone demethylase JMJD3, cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), fucoidan, Runx2 transcription factor, and TAZ transcriptional coactivator. Methods promoting bone healing are also evaluated in this review that have shown promise in previous studies. Methods tested using animal models include low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) with MSC, micro motion, AMD3100 injections, BMP delivery, MSC transplantation, tissue engineering utilizing scaffolds, anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody, low dose photodynamic therapy, and bone marrow stromal cell transplants. Human clinical trial methods analyzed include osteoblast injections, bone marrow grafts, bone marrow and platelet rich plasma transplantation, tissue engineering using scaffolds, and recombinant human BMP-2. These methods have been shown to promote and accelerate new bone formation. These various methods for enhanced bone regeneration have the potential to be used, following further research, in clinical practice.

  5. The role of children's bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in the ex vivo expansion of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pelagiadis, Iordanis; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Choulaki, Christianna; Kalmanti, Maria; Dimitriou, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The recognition of the role of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) in hematopoiesis, as part of the bone marrow microenvironment, renewed the interest for cord blood (CB) ex vivo expansion as a source of HSC for transplantation. MSC from children are recognized to have different biological properties compared to the ones from adults. The current study focuses on the evaluation of the effects of children's bone marrow MSC on the ex vivo expansion capacity of both allogeneic cord blood and autologous bone marrow (BM) CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) when used as a cell feeder layer with or without recombinant cytokines. Our results showed that children's bone marrow-derived MSC expand more primitive populations in co culture with CD34 and that the expansion is further enhanced when the culture is supplemented with growth factors. No additive effect was seen either with the early- or late-acting growth factors' cocktails used. Biological features of CB hematopoietic progenitors seem to make them more suitable than their BM counterparts for ex vivo expansion. Clinical implementation will be facilitated by methodological standardization and guidelines' establishment.

  6. Model acupuncture point: Bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells are moved by a weak electromagnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Emelyanov, Artem N; Borisova, Marina V; Kiryanova, Vera V

    2016-01-01

    AIM To show the existence of a structural formative role of magnetic fields (MFs) with respect to biological objects by using our proposed model of an acupoint. METHODS We introduced a magnetised 10-100 μT metal rod (needle) into culture dishes with a negatively charged working surface and observed during 24 h how cells were arranged by MFs and by electrical fields (EFs) when attached. Rat and human bone marrow-derived stromal stem cells (rBMSCs and hBMSCs), human nonadherent mononuclear blood cells, NCTCs and A172 cells, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) were evaluated. The dish containing BMSCs was defined as the model of an acupoint. rBMSCs proliferative activity affected by the needle was investigated. For investigating electromagnetic field structures, we used the gas discharge visualisation (GDV) method. RESULTS During 24 h of incubation in 50-mm culture dishes, BMSCs or the nonadherent cells accumulated into a central heap in each dish. BMSCs formed a torus (central ring) with an inner diameter of approximately 10 mm only upon the introduction of the needle in the centre of the dish. The cells did not show these effects in 35- or 90-mm culture dishes or hydrophobic dishes or rectangular cuvettes. NCTCs and A172 cells showed unstable the effects and only up to two weeks after thawing. Moreover, we observed that the appearance of these effects depended on the season. In winter, BMSCs showed no the effects. GDV experiments revealed that the resonant annular illumination gradually formed from 10 to 18-20 s in polar solutions with and without cell suspension of BMSCs, NCTCs and E. coli when using circular 50-mm dishes, stimulation at 115 V and switching of the electrode poles at 1 kHz. All these data demonstrate the resonant nature of the central ring. Significant influence of MFs on the rBMSC proliferation rate was not observed. CONCLUSION BMSCs can be moved by MFs when in the presence of a constant EF and MF, when the cells are in the responsive functional state

  7. Potency Biomarker Signature Genes from Multiparametric Osteogenesis Assays: Will cGMP Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Make Bone?

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Alba; Veronesi, Elena; Candini, Olivia; Caselli, Anna; D’souza, Naomi; Rasini, Valeria; Giorgini, Andrea; Catani, Fabio; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    In skeletal regeneration approaches using human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSC), functional evaluation before implantation has traditionally used biomarkers identified using fetal bovine serum-based osteogenic induction media and time courses of at least two weeks. However, emerging pre-clinical evidence indicates donor-dependent discrepancies between these ex vivo measurements and the ability to form bone, calling for improved tests. Therefore, we adopted a multiparametric approach aiming to generate an osteogenic potency assay with improved correlation. hBM-MSC populations from six donors, each expanded under clinical-grade (cGMP) conditions, showed heterogeneity for ex vivo growth response, mineralization and bone-forming ability in a murine xenograft assay. A subset of literature-based biomarker genes was reproducibly upregulated to a significant extent across all populations as cells responded to two different osteogenic induction media. These 12 biomarkers were also measurable in a one-week assay, befitting clinical cell expansion time frames and cGMP growth conditions. They were selected for further challenge using a combinatorial approach aimed at determining ex vivo and in vivo consistency. We identified five globally relevant osteogenic signature genes, notably TGF-ß1 pathway interactors; ALPL, COL1A2, DCN, ELN and RUNX2. Used in agglomerative cluster analysis, they correctly grouped the bone-forming cell populations as distinct. Although donor #6 cells were correlation slope outliers, they contrastingly formed bone without showing ex vivo mineralization. Mathematical expression level normalization of the most discrepantly upregulated signature gene COL1A2, sufficed to cluster donor #6 with the bone-forming classification. Moreover, attenuating factors causing genuine COL1A2 gene down-regulation, restored ex vivo mineralization. This suggested that the signature gene had an osteogenically influential role; nonetheless no single

  8. Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Adipocytes, and Osteoblasts in a 3D Tri-Culture Model of Hyperglycemic Conditions in the Bone Marrow Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Rinker, Torri E.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Kemp, Melissa L.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found that uncontrolled diabetes and consequential hyperglycemic conditions can lead to increased incidence of osteoporosis. Osteoblasts, adipocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all components of the bone marrow microenvironment and thus may have an effect on diabetes-related osteoporosis. However, few studies have investigated the influence of these three cell types on each other, especially in the context of hyperglycemia. Thus, we developed a hydrogel-based 3D culture platform engineered to allow live-cell retrieval in order to investigate the interactions between MSCs, osteoblasts, and adipocytes in mono-, co-, and tri-culture configurations under hyperglycemic conditions for 7 days of culture. Gene expression, histochemical analysis of differentiation markers, and cell viability were measured for all cell types, and MSC-laden hydrogels were degraded to retrieve cells to assess colony-forming capacity. Multivariate models of gene expression data indicated that primary discrimination was dependent on neighboring cell type, validating the need for co-culture configurations to study conditions modeling this disease state. MSC viability and clonogenicity were reduced when mono- and co-cultured with osteoblasts in high glucose levels. In contrast, MSCs had no reduction of viability or clonogenicity when cultured with adipocytes in high glucose conditions and adipogenic gene expression indicated that cross-talk between MSCs and adipocytes may occur. Thus, our unique culture platform combined with post-culture multivariate analysis provided novel insight into cellular interactions within the MSC microenvironment and highlights the necessity of multi-cellular culture systems for further investigation of complex pathologies such as diabetes and osteoporosis. PMID:24463781

  9. Suppression of mTOR signaling pathway promotes bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into osteoblast in degenerative scoliosis: in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Yi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Chun-De

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the role of mTOR signaling pathway in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) differentiation into osteoblast in degenerative scoliosis (DS). The rat model of DS was established. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were selected and divided into the normal control group, the positive control group (normal rats injected with rapamycin), the negative control group (DS rats injected with PBS) and the experiment group (DS rats injected with rapamycin). H&E staining was performed to observe the osteogenesis of scoliosis. The BMSCs were obtained and assigned into seven groups: the normal control group, the positive control group, the negative control group and 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups. Flow cytometry was conducted to testify cell cycle. The mRNA and protein expressions of mTOR and osteoblastic differentiation markers were measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting. In vivo, compared with the negative control group, bone trabecular area and the number of differentiated bone cells were significantly increased in the experiment groups. In vitro, at 24 and 48 h after rapamycin treatment, compared with the negative control group, BMSCs at G0/G1 stage increased, but BMSCs at S stage decreased in the 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups; the expressions of mTOR and p70-S6K1 proteins were reduced in the 1.0/10.0/100.0/1000.0 nmol/L experiment groups, while ALP activity, OC levels, calcium deposition, Co1-I protein expression and the mRNA expressions of OC and Co1-I were significantly increased. Suppression of mTOR signaling pathway by rapamycin could promote BMSCs differentiation into osteoblast in DS.

  10. Evaluation of transport conditions for autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for therapeutic application in horses.

    PubMed

    Espina, Miguel; Jülke, Henriette; Brehm, Walter; Ribitsch, Iris; Winter, Karsten; Delling, Uta

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used for clinical applications in equine patients. For MSC isolation and expansion, a laboratory step is mandatory, after which the cells are sent back to the attending veterinarian. Preserving the biological properties of MSCs during this transport is paramount. The goal of the study was to compare transport-related parameters (transport container, media, temperature, time, cell concentration) that potentially influence characteristics of culture expanded equine MSCs. Methods. The study was arranged in three parts comparing (I) five different transport containers (cryotube, two types of plastic syringes, glass syringe, CellSeal), (II) seven different transport media, four temperatures (4 °C vs. room temperature; -20 °C vs. -80 °C), four time frames (24 h vs. 48 h; 48 h vs. 72 h), and (III) three MSC concentrations (5 × 10(6), 10 × 10(6), 20 × 10(6) MSC/ml). Cell viability (Trypan Blue exclusion; percent and total number viable cell), proliferation and trilineage differentiation capacity were assessed for each test condition. Further, the recovered volume of the suspension was determined in part I. Each condition was evaluated using samples of six horses (n = 6) and differentiation protocols were performed in duplicates. Results. In part I of the study, no significant differences in any of the parameters were found when comparing transport containers at room temperature. The glass syringe was selected for all subsequent evaluations (highest recoverable volume of cell suspension and cell viability). In part II, media, temperatures, or time frames had also no significant influence on cell viability, likely due to the large number of comparisons and small sample size. Highest cell viability was observed using autologous bone marrow supernatant as transport medium, and "transport" at 4 °C for 24 h (70.6% vs. control group 75.3%); this was not significant. Contrary, viability was unacceptably low (<40

  11. Evaluation of transport conditions for autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for therapeutic application in horses

    PubMed Central

    Espina, Miguel; Jülke, Henriette; Brehm, Walter; Ribitsch, Iris; Winter, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly used for clinical applications in equine patients. For MSC isolation and expansion, a laboratory step is mandatory, after which the cells are sent back to the attending veterinarian. Preserving the biological properties of MSCs during this transport is paramount. The goal of the study was to compare transport-related parameters (transport container, media, temperature, time, cell concentration) that potentially influence characteristics of culture expanded equine MSCs. Methods. The study was arranged in three parts comparing (I) five different transport containers (cryotube, two types of plastic syringes, glass syringe, CellSeal), (II) seven different transport media, four temperatures (4 °C vs. room temperature; −20 °C vs. −80 °C), four time frames (24 h vs. 48 h; 48 h vs. 72 h), and (III) three MSC concentrations (5 × 106, 10 × 106, 20 × 106 MSC/ml). Cell viability (Trypan Blue exclusion; percent and total number viable cell), proliferation and trilineage differentiation capacity were assessed for each test condition. Further, the recovered volume of the suspension was determined in part I. Each condition was evaluated using samples of six horses (n = 6) and differentiation protocols were performed in duplicates. Results. In part I of the study, no significant differences in any of the parameters were found when comparing transport containers at room temperature. The glass syringe was selected for all subsequent evaluations (highest recoverable volume of cell suspension and cell viability). In part II, media, temperatures, or time frames had also no significant influence on cell viability, likely due to the large number of comparisons and small sample size. Highest cell viability was observed using autologous bone marrow supernatant as transport medium, and “transport” at 4 °C for 24 h (70.6% vs. control group 75.3%); this was not significant. Contrary, viability was unacceptably low

  12. Functional recovery of neuronal activity in rat whisker-barrel cortex sensory pathway from freezing injury after transplantation of adult bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Iwata, Junko; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Nakao, Yasuaki; Maeda, Minoru

    2005-07-01

    The effect of transplantation of adult bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) into the freeze-lesioned left barrel field cortex in the rat was investigated by measurement of local cerebral glucose utilization (lCMR(glc)) in the anatomic structures of the whisker-to-barrel cortex sensory pathway. Bone marrow stromal cells or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were injected intracerebrally into the boundary zone 1 h after induction of the freezing cortical lesion. Three weeks after surgery, the 2-[(14)C]deoxyglucose method was used to measure lCMR(glc) during right whisker stimulation. The volume of the primary necrotic freezing lesion was significantly reduced (P<0.05), and secondary retrograde degeneration in the left ventral posteromedial (VPM) thalamic nucleus was diminished in the MSC-treated group. Local cerebral glucose utilization measurements showed that the freezing cortical lesion did not alter the metabolic responses to stimulation in the brain stem trigeminal nuclei, but eliminated the responses in the left VPM nucleus and periphery of the barrel cortex in the PBS-treated group. The left/right (stimulated/unstimulated) lCMR(glc) ratios were significantly improved in both the VPM nucleus and periphery of the barrel cortex in the MSC-treated group compared with the PBS-treated group (P<0.05). These results indicate that MSC transplantation in adults may stimulate metabolic and functional recovery in injured neuronal pathways.

  13. Incorporation of Fucoidan in β-Tricalcium phosphate-Chitosan scaffold prompts the differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells into osteogenic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Puvaneswary, Subramaniam; Raghavendran, Hanumantharao Balaji; Talebian, Sepehr; Murali, Malliga Raman; A Mahmod, Suhaeb; Singh, Simmrat; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, we reported the fabrication and characterization of a novel tricalcium phosphate-fucoidan-chitosan (TCP-Fu-Ch) biocomposite scaffold. However, the previous report did not show whether the biocomposite scaffold can exhibit osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells in osteogenic media and normal media supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB). On day 15, the release of osteocalcin, was significant in the TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold, when compared with that in the TCP-Ch scaffold, and the level of release was approximately 8 and 6 ng/ml in osteogenic and normal media supplemented with PDGF-BB, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy of the TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold demonstrated mineralization and apatite layer formation on day 14, while the addition of PDGF-BB also improved the osteogenic differentiation of the scaffold. An array of gene expression analysis demonstrated that TCP-Fu-Ch scaffold cultured in osteogenic and normal media supplemented with PDGF-BB showed significant improvement in the expression of collagen 1, Runt-related transcription factor 2, osteonectin, bone gamma-carboxyglutamate protein, alkaline phosphatase, and PPA2, but a decline in the expression of integrin. Altogether, the present study demonstrated that fucoidan-incorporated TCP-Ch scaffold could be used in the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and can be a potential candidate for the treatment of bone-related ailments through tissue engineering technology. PMID:27068453

  14. NFI-C regulates osteoblast differentiation via control of osterix expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Seol; Choung, Han-Wool; Kim, Heung-Joong; Gronostajski, Richard M; Yang, Young-Il; Ryoo, Hyun-Mo; Lee, Zang Hee; Kim, Hong-Hee; Cho, Eui-Sic; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2014-09-01

    In bone marrow, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Age-related osteoporosis is associated with a reciprocal decrease of osteogenesis and an increase of adipogenesis in bone marrow. In this study, we demonstrate that disruption of nuclear factor I-C (NFI-C) impairs osteoblast differentiation and bone formation, and increases bone marrow adipocytes. Interestingly, NFI-C controls postnatal bone formation but does not influence prenatal bone development. We also found decreased NFI-C expression in osteogenic cells from human osteoporotic patients. Notably, transplantation of Nfic-overexpressing BMSCs stimulates osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation, but inhibits adipocyte differentiation by suppressing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression in Nfic(-/-) mice showing an age-related osteoporosis-like phenotype. Finally, NFI-C directly regulates Osterix expression but acts downstream of the bone morphogenetic protein-2-Runx2 pathway. These results suggest that NFI-C acts as a transcriptional switch in cell fate determination between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in BMSCs. Therefore, regulation of NFI-C expression in BMSCs could be a novel therapeutic approach for treating age-related osteoporosis.

  15. Neuropeptide y and neuropeptide y y5 receptor interaction restores impaired growth potential of aging bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Igura, Koichi; Haider, Husnain Kh; Ahmed, Rafeeq P H; Sheriff, Sulaiman; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2011-08-01

    Abstract improved growth characteristics of the aging bone marrow cells subsequent to neuropeptide Y (NPY)/neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor (NPY Y5R) ligand-receptor interaction. Bone marrow cells were isolated from neonatal (2-3 weeks), young (8-12 weeks), and old (24-28 months) rats on the basis of their preferential adherence to plastic surface. After culturing the cells at initial seeding density of 1×10(4) cells/cm(2), we found that the proliferation potential of bone marrow cells declined with age. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting showed that bone marrow cells in different age groups constitutively expressed NPY and NPY receptor subtypes (Y1R, Y2R, and Y5R). However, NPY and Y5R expression increased by more than 130-fold and decreased by 28-fold, respectively, in old bone marrow cells as compared to young bone marrow cells. NPY (10 nM) stimulated the proliferation of all bone marrow cells age groups, and their proliferation was blocked by Y5R antagonist. However, the pro-proliferative effect of NPY on old bone marrow cells was weaker than other cell groups due to lower Y5R expression. Y5R gene transfection of old bone marrow cells with subsequent NPY(3-36) (10 nM) treatment significantly increased proliferation of old bone marrow cells (>56%) as compared to green fluorescence protein-transfected control old bone marrow cells. Stimulation of old bone marrow cells by NPY treatment rejuvenated the growth characteristics of aging bone marrow cells as a result of Y5R overexpression.

  16. Transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cell-derived Schwann cells reduces cystic cavity and promotes functional recovery after contusion injury of adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Takahito; Koda, Masao; Dezawa, Mari; Anahara, Reiko; Toyama, Yoshiro; Yoshinaga, Katsunori; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Koshizuka, Shuhei; Nishio, Yutaka; Mannoji, Chikato; Okawa, Akihiko; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cell-derived Schwann cells (hBMSC-SC) promotes functional recovery after contusive spinal cord injury of adult rats. Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSC) were cultured from bone marrow of adult human patients and induced into Schwann cells (hBMSC-SC) in vitro. Schwann cell phenotype was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Growth factors secreted from hBMSC-SC were detected using cytokine antibody array. Immunosuppressed rats were laminectomized and their spinal cords were contused using NYU impactor (10 g, 25 mm). Nine days after injury, a mixture of Matrigel and hBMSC-SC (hBMSC-SC group) was injected into the lesioned site. Five weeks after transplantation, cresyl-violet staining revealed that the area of cystic cavity was smaller in the hBMSC-SC group than that in the control group. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of anti-growth-associated protein-43-positive nerve fibers was significantly larger in the hBMSC-SC group than that in the control group. At the same time, the number of tyrosine hydroxylase- or serotonin-positive fibers was significantly larger at the lesion epicenter and caudal level in the hBMSC-SC group than that in the control group. In electron microscopy, formation of peripheral-type myelin was recognized near the lesion epicenter in the hBMSC-SC group. Hind limb function recovered significantly in the hBMSC-SC group compared with the control group. In conclusion, the functions of hBMSC-SC are comparable to original Schwann cells in rat spinal cord injury models, and are thus potentially useful treatments for patients with spinal cord injury.

  17. Prostate cancer derived prostatic acid phosphatase promotes an osteoblastic response in the bone microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Sandy R.; Chin, Jessica; Zhang, Xiaotun; Brown, Lisha G.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Lakely, Bryce; Tenniswood, Martin; Corey, Eva; Nelson, Peter S.; Vessella, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90 % of patients who die of prostate cancer (PCa) have bone metastases, often promoting osteoblastic lesions. We observed that 88 % of castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) bone metastases express prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), a soluble secreted protein expressed by prostate epithelial cells in predominately osteoblastic (n = 18) or osteolytic (n = 15) lesions. Additionally, conditioned media (CM) of an osteoblastic PCa xenograft LuCaP 23.1 contained significant levels of PAP and promoted mineralization in mouse and human calvaria-derived cells (MC3T3-E1 and HCO). To demonstrate that PAP promotes mineralization, we stimulated MC3T3-E1 cells with PAP and observed increased mineralization, which could be blocked with the specific PAP inhibitor, phosphonic acid. Furthermore, the mineralization promoted by LuCaP 23.1 CM was also blocked by phosphonic acid, suggesting PAP is responsible for the mineralization promoting activity of LuCaP 23.1. In addition, gene expression arrays comparing osteoblastic to osteolytic CRPC (n = 14) identified betacellulin (BTC) as a gene upregulated during the osteoblastic response in osteoblasts during new bone formation. Moreover, BTC levels were increased in bone marrow stromal cells in response to LuCaP 23.1 CM in vitro. Because new bone formation does occur in osteoblastic and can occur in osteolytic CRPC bone metastases, we confirmed by immunohistochemistry (n = 36) that BTC was highly expressed in osteoblasts involved in new bone formation occurring in both osteoblastic and osteolytic sites. These studies suggest a role for PAP in promoting the osteoblastic reaction in CRPC bone metastases and identify BTC as a novel downstream protein expressed in osteoblasts during new bone formation. PMID:24242705

  18. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jonas; Tvedesøe, Claus; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Lysdahl, Helle; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Chen, Muwan; Baas, Jorgen; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Bünger, Cody Eric

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. Methods: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone marrow and the molar teeth of each pig, respectively. BMSCs and DPSCs were cultured in monolayer and on a three-dimensional (3D) polycaprolactone (PCL) – hyaluronic acid – tricalcium phosphate (HT-PCL) scaffold. Population doubling (PD), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and calcium deposition were measured in monolayer. In the 3D culture ALP activity, DNA content, and calcium deposition were evaluated. Six non-penetrating critical-size defects were made in each calvarium of 14 pigs. Three paired sub-studies were conducted: (1) empty defects vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; (2) PCL scaffolds vs. HT-PCL scaffolds; and (3) autologous BMSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds vs. autologous DPSCs on HT-PCL scaffolds. The observation time was five weeks. Bone volume fractions (BV/TV) were assessed with micro-computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. Results and discussion: The results from the in vitro study revealed a higher ALP activity and calcium deposition of the DPSC cultures compared with BMSC cultures. Significantly more bone was present in the HT-PCL group than in both the pure PCL scaffold group and the empty defect group in vivo. DPSCs generated more bone than BMSCs when seeded on HT-PCL. In conclusion, DPSCs exhibited a higher osteogenic potential compared with BMSCs both in vitro and in vivo, making it a potential cell source for future bone tissue engineering. PMID:27163105

  19. Arsenic induces cell apoptosis in cultured osteoblasts through endoplasmic reticulum stress

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, C.-H.; Chiu, Y.-C.; Huang, C.-F.; Chen, Y.-W.; Chen, P.-C.

    2009-12-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass resulting from an imbalance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts. Therefore, decreased bone formation by osteoblasts may lead to the development of osteoporosis, and rate of apoptosis is responsible for the regulation of bone formation. Arsenic (As) exists ubiquitously in our environment and increases the risk of neurotoxicity, liver injury, peripheral vascular disease and cancer. However, the effect of As on apoptosis of osteoblasts is mostly unknown. Here, we found that As induced cell apoptosis in osteoblastic cell lines (including hFOB, MC3T3-E1 and MG-63) and mouse bone marrow stromal cells (M2-10B4). As also induced upregulation of Bax and Bak, downregulation of Bcl-2 and dysfunction of mitochondria in osteoblasts. As also triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as indicated by changes in cytosolic-calcium levels. We found that As increased the expression and activities of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and calpain. Transfection of cells with GRP78 or calpain siRNA reduced As-mediated cell apoptosis in osteoblasts. Therefore, our results suggest that As increased cell apoptosis in cultured osteoblasts and increased the risk of osteoporosis.

  20. Therapeutic effect of co-transplantation of neuregulin-1-transfected Schwann cells and bone marrow stromal cells on spinal cord hemisection syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji Fei; Zhao, Fu Sheng; Wu, Geng; Kong, Qing Fei; Sun, Bo; Cao, Jingyan; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Jing Hua; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Xu Dong; Li, Hu Lun

    2011-06-22

    The aim of this present study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of co-transplantation of neuregulin-1-transfected Schwann cells (SCs) and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on a rat model of spinal cord hemi-section injuries (Brown-Séquard syndrome), which is relevant to human clinical spinal cord injury. Both in vivo and in vitro data we received demonstrated that co-transplantation BMSCs with NRG1-transfected SCs reduced the size of cystic cavities, promoted axonal regeneration and hind limb functional recovery in comparison with SCs or BMSCs transplantation alone or together, and this treatment could provide important insights into potential therapies of spinal cord hemi-section injuries.

  1. Enhancing in vivo vascularized bone formation by cobalt chloride-treated bone marrow stromal cells in a tissue engineered periosteum model.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wei; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2010-05-01

    The periosteum plays an indispensable role in both bone formation and bone defect healing. In this study we constructed an artificial in vitro periosteum by incorporating osteogenic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and cobalt chloride (CoCl(2))-treated BMSCs. The engineered periostea were implanted both subcutaneously and into skull bone defects in SCID mice to investigate ectopic and orthotopic osteogenesis and vascularization. After two weeks in subcutaneous and four weeks in bone defect areas, the implanted constructs were assessed for ectopic and orthotopic osteogenesis and vascularization by micro-CT, histomorphometrical and immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that CoCl(2) pre-treated BMSCs induced higher degree of vascularization and enhanced osteogenesis within the implants in both ectopic and orthotopic areas. This study provided a novel approach using BMSCs sourced from the same patient for both osteogenic and pro-angiogenic purposes in constructing tissue engineered periosteum to enhance vascularized osteogenesis.

  2. Percutaneous Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Implantation Is Safe for Reconstruction of Human Lower Limb Long Bone Atrophic Nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Emadedin, Mohsen; Labibzadeh, Narges; Fazeli, Roghayeh; Mohseni, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Seyedeh Esmat; Moghadasali, Reza; Mardpour, Soura; Azimian, Vajiheh; Goodarzi, Alireza; Ghorbani Liastani, Maede; Mirazimi Bafghi, Ali; Baghaban Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza; Aghdami, Nasser

    2017-01-01

    Objective Nonunion is defined as a minimum of a 9-month period of time since an injury with no visibly progressive signs of healing for 3 months. Recent studies show that application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the laboratory setting is effective for bone regeneration. Animal studies have shown that MSCs can be used to treat nonunions. For the first time in an Iranian population, the present study investigated the safety of MSC implantation to treat human lower limb long bone nonunion. Materials and Methods It is a prospective clinical trial for evaluating the safety of using autologus bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells for treating nonunion. Orthopedic surgeons evaluated 12 patients with lower limb long bone nonunion for participation in this study. From these, 5 complied with the eligibility criteria and received MSCs. Under fluoroscopic guidance, patients received a one-time implantation of 20-50×106 MSCs into the nonunion site. All patients were followed by anterior-posterior and lateral X-rays from the affected limb, in addition to hematological, biochemical, and serological laboratory tests obtained before and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the implantation. Possible adverse effects that included local or systemic, serious or non-serious, and related or unrelated effects were recorded during this time period. Results From a safety perspective, all patients tolerated the MSCs implantation during the 12 months of the trial. Three patients had evidence of bony union based on the after implantation Xrays. Conclusion The results have suggested that implantation of bone marrow-derived MSCs is a safe treatment for nonunion. A double-blind, controlled clinical trial is required to assess the efficacy of this treatment (Registration Number: NCT01206179). PMID:28367426

  3. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor BB Enhances Osteogenesis of Adipose-Derived But Not Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ben P; Hutton, Daphne L; Kozielski, Kristen L; Bishop, Corey J; Naved, Bilal; Green, Jordan J; Caplan, Arnold I; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Dorafshar, Amir H; Grayson, Warren L

    2015-09-01

    Tissue engineering using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) holds great promise for regenerating critically sized bone defects. While the bone marrow-derived MSC is the most widely studied stromal/stem cell type for this application, its rarity within bone marrow and painful isolation procedure have motivated investigation of alternative cell sources. Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) are more abundant and more easily procured; furthermore, they also possess robust osteogenic potency. While these two cell types are widely considered very similar, there is a growing appreciation of possible innate differences in their biology and response to growth factors. In particular, reports indicate that their osteogenic response to platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) is markedly different: MSCs responded negatively or not at all to PDGF-BB while ASCs exhibited enhanced mineralization in response to physiological concentrations of PDGF-BB. In this study, we directly tested whether a fundamental difference existed between the osteogenic responses of MSCs and ASCs to PDGF-BB. MSCs and ASCs cultured under identical osteogenic conditions responded disparately to 20 ng/ml of PDGF-BB: MSCs exhibited no difference in mineralization while ASCs produced more calcium per cell. siRNA-mediated knockdown of PDGFRβ within ASCs abolished their ability to respond to PDGF-BB. Gene expression was also different; MSCs generally downregulated and ASCs generally upregulated osteogenic genes in response to PDGF-BB. ASCs transduced to produce PDGF-BB resulted in more regenerated bone within a critically sized murine calvarial defect compared to control ASCs, indicating PDGF-BB used specifically in conjunction with ASCs might enhance tissue engineering approaches for bone regeneration.

  4. Encapsulation of rat bone marrow stromal cells using a poly-ion complex gel of chitosan and succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly).

    PubMed

    Kusumastuti, Yuni; Shibasaki, Yoshiaki; Hirohara, Shiho; Kobayashi, Mime; Terada, Kayo; Ando, Tsuyoshi; Tanihara, Masao

    2015-01-28

    Encapsulation of stem cells into a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold is necessary to achieve tissue regeneration. Prefabricated 3D scaffolds, such as fibres or porous sponges, have limitations regarding homogeneous cell distribution. Hydrogels that can encapsulate cells such as animal-derived collagen gels need adjustment of the pH and/or temperature upon cell mixing. In this report, we fabricated a poly-ion complex (PIC) hydrogel of chitosan and succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly) and assessed its effect on cell viability after encapsulation of rat bone marrow stromal cells. PIC hydrogels were obtained successfully with a concentration of each precursor as low as 3.0-3.8 mg/ml. The maximum gelation and swelling ratios were achieved with an equal molar ratio (1:1) of anionic and cationic groups. Using chitosan acetate as a cationic precursor produced a PIC hydrogel with both a significantly greater gelation ratio and a better swelling ratio than chitosan chloride. Ammonium succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly) as an anionic precursor gave similar gelation and swelling ratios to those of sodium succinylated poly(Pro-Hyp-Gly). Cell encapsulation was also achieved successfully by mixing rat bone marrow stromal cells with the PIC hydrogel simultaneously during its formation. The PIC hydrogel was maintained in the culture medium for 7 days at 37°C and the encapsulated cells survived and proliferated in it. Although it is necessary to improve its functionality, this PIC hydrogel has the potential to act as a 3D scaffold for cell encapsulation and tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Granulocyte-Colony-Stimulating Factor Stimulation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promotes CD34+ Cell Migration Via a Matrix Metalloproteinase-2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Adriana López; Ribeiro-Fleury, Tatiana; Chabot, Valérie; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Langonné, Alain; Hérault, Olivier; Charbord, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) can be mobilized into the circulation using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), for graft collection in view of hematopoietic transplantation. This process has been related to bone marrow (BM) release of serine proteases and of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Yet, the role of these mediators in HSC egress from their niches remains questionable, because they are produced by nonstromal cells (mainly neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages) that are not a part of the niche. We show here that the G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) is expressed by human BM mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs), and that G-CSF prestimulation of MSCs enhances the in vitro trans-stromal migration of CD34+ cells. Zymography analysis indicates that pro-MMP-2 (but not pro-MMP-9) is expressed in MSCs, and that G-CSF treatment increases its expression and induces its activation at the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that G-CSF-stimulated migration depends on G-CSFR expression and is mediated by a mechanism that involves MMPs. These results suggest a molecular model whereby G-CSF infusion may drive, by the direct action on MSCs, HSPC egress from BM niches via synthesis and activation of MMPs. In this model, MMP-2 instead of MMP-9 is implicated, which constitutes a major difference with mouse mobilization models. PMID:22651889

  6. Roles of bone marrow cells in skeletal metastases: no longer bystanders.

    PubMed

    Park, Serk In; Soki, Fabiana N; McCauley, Laurie K

    2011-12-01

    Bone serves one of the most congenial metastatic microenvironments for multiple types of solid tumors, but its role in this process remains under-explored. Among many cell populations constituting the bone and bone marrow microenvironment, osteoblasts (originated from mesenchymal stem cells) and osteoclasts (originated from hematopoietic stem cells) have been the main research focus for pro-tumorigenic roles. Recently, increasing evidence further elucidates that hematopoietic lineage cells as well as stromal cells in the bone marrow mediate distinct but critical functions in tumor growth, metastasis, angiogenesis and apoptosis in the bone microenvironment. This review article summarizes the key evidence describing differential roles of bone marrow cells, including hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), megakaryocytes, macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the development of metastatic bone lesions. HSCs promote tumor growth by switching on angiogenesis, but at the same time compete with metastatic tumor cells for occupancy of osteoblastic niche. Megakaryocytes negatively regulate the extravasating tumor cells by inducing apoptosis and suppressing proliferation. Macrophages and myeloid cells have pro-tumorigenic roles in general, suggesting a similar effect in the bone marrow. Hematopoietic and stromal cell populations in the bone marrow, previously considered as simple by-standers in the context of tumor metastasis, have distinct and active roles in promoting or suppressing tumor growth and metastasis in bone. Further investigation on the extended roles of bone marrow cells will help formulate better approaches to treatment through improved understanding of the metastatic bone microenvironment.

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cells from pooled mononuclear cells of multiple bone marrow donors as rescue therapy in pediatric severe steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease: a multicenter survey

    PubMed Central

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Bönig, Halvard; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Bunos, Milica; Jauch, Anna; Janssen, Johannes W.G.; Škifić, Marijana; Michel, Kristina; Eising, Ben; Lucchini, Giovanna; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter; Basu, Oliver; von Luettichau, Irene; Schulz, Ansgar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2016-01-01

    To circumvent donor-to-donor heterogeneity which may lead to inconsistent results after treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with mesenchymal stromal cells generated from single donors we developed a novel approach by generating these cells from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of 8 healthy “3rd-party” donors. Generated cells were frozen in 209 vials and designated as mesenchymal stromal cell bank. These vials served as a source for generation of clinical grade mesenchymal stromal cell end-products, which exhibited typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, trilineage differentiation potential and at later passages expressed replicative senescence-related markers (p21 and p16). Genetic analysis demonstrated their genomic stability (normal karyotype and a diploid pattern). Importantly, clinical end-products exerted a significantly higher allosuppressive potential than the mean allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from the same donors individually. Administration of 81 mesenchymal stromal cell end-products to 26 patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease in 7 stem cell transplant centers who were refractory to many lines of treatment, induced a 77% overall response at the primary end point (day 28). Remarkably, although the cohort of patients was highly challenging (96% grade III/IV and only 4% grade II graft-versus-host disease), after treatment with mesenchymal stromal cell end-products the overall survival rate at two years follow up was 71±11% for the entire patient cohort, compared to 51.4±9.0% in graft-versus-host disease clinical studies, in which mesenchymal stromal cells were derived from single donors. Mesenchymal stromal cell end-products may, therefore, provide a novel therapeutic tool for the effective treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27175026

  8. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on acute lymphocytic leukemia cells via p21 down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiran; Hu, Kaimin; Hu, Yongxian; Liu, Lizhen; Wang, Binsheng; Huang, He

    2014-09-01

    The effect of bone marrow microenvironment on the cell cycle of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and the underlying mechanism has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that in normal condition, bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) had no significant effect on the cell cycle and apoptosis of ALL; in the condition when the cell cycle of ALL was blocked by genotoxic agents, BM-MSCs could increase the S-phase cell ratio and decrease the G2/M phase ratio of ALL. Besides, BM-MSCs could protect ALL cells from drug-induced apoptosis. Then, we proved that BM-MSCs affect the cell cycle arrest effect of genotoxic agents on ALL cells via p21 down-regulation. Moreover, our results indicated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin and Erk pathways might be involved in the BM-MSC-induced down-regulation of p21 in ALL cells. Targeting microenvironment-related signaling pathway may therefore be a potential novel approach for ALL therapy.

  9. Adipose Stem Cells Display Higher Regenerative Capacities and More Adaptable Electro-Kinetic Properties Compared to Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; Amer, Marwa; Abdelbaset, Reda; Sherif, Sameh N.; Abo-Elela, Marwan; Ghallab, Yehya H.; Abdelhamid, Hamdy; Ismail, Yehea; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) have recently emerged as a more viable source for clinical applications, compared to bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) because of their abundance and easy access. In this study we evaluated the regenerative potency of ASCs compared to BM-MSCs. Furthermore, we compared the dielectric and electro-kinetic properties of both types of cells using a novel Dielectrophoresis (DEP) microfluidic platform based on a printed circuit board (PCB) technology. Our data show that ASCs were more effective than BM-MSCs in promoting neovascularization in an animal model of hind-limb ischemia. When compared to BM-MSCs, ASCs displayed higher resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and to oxidative stress-induced senescence, and showed more potent proangiogenic activity. mRNA expression analysis showed that ASCs had a higher expression of Oct4 and VEGF than BM-MSCs. Furthermore, ASCs showed a remarkably higher telomerase activity. Analysis of the electro-kinetic properties showed that ASCs displayed different traveling wave velocity and rotational speed compared to BM-MSCs. Interestingly, ASCs seem to develop an adaptive response when exposed to repeated electric field stimulation. These data provide new insights into the physiology of ASCs, and evidence to their potential superior potency compared to marrow MSCs as a source of stem cells. PMID:27883074

  10. Comparison of Immunomodulation Properties of Porcine Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells Derived from the Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue, and Dermal Skin Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ock, Sun-A; Baregundi Subbarao, Raghavendra; Lee, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Jeong-Hyeon; Jeon, Ryoung-Hoon; Lee, Sung-Lim; Park, Ji Kwon; Hwang, Sun-Chul; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) demonstrate immunomodulation capacity that has been implicated in the reduction of graft-versus-host disease. Accordingly, we herein investigated the capacity of MSCs derived from several tissue sources to modulate both proinflammatory (interferon [IFN] γ and tumor necrosis factor [TNF] α) and immunosuppressive cytokines (transforming growth factor [TGF] β and interleukin [IL] 10) employing xenogeneic human MSC-mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) test. Bone marrow-derived MSCs showed higher self-renewal capacity with relatively slow proliferation rate in contrast to adipose-derived MSCs which displayed higher proliferation rate. Except for the lipoprotein gene, there were no marked changes in osteogenesis- and adipogenesis-related genes following in vitro differentiation; however, the histological marker analysis revealed that adipose MSCs could be differentiated into both adipose and bone tissue. TGFβ and IL10 were detected in adipose MSCs and bone marrow MSCs, respectively. However, skin-derived MSCs expressed both IFNγ and IL10, which may render them sensitive to immunomodulation. The xenogeneic human MLR test revealed that MSCs had a partial immunomodulation capacity, as proliferation of activated and resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not affected, but this did not differ among MSC sources. MSCs were not tumorigenic when introduced into immunodeficient mice. We concluded that the characteristics of MSCs are tissue source-dependent and their in vivo application requires more in-depth investigation regarding their precise immunomodulation capacities. PMID:26798368

  11. A 3D Culture System Enhances the Ability of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells to Support the Growth of Limbal Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Sheyla; Mei, Hua; Nakatsu, Martin N.; Baclagon, Elfren R.; Deng, Sophie X.

    2016-01-01

    The standard method of cultivating limbal epithelial progenitor/stem cells (LSCs) on a monolayer of mouse 3T3 feeder cells possesses the risk of cross-contamination in clinical applications. Human feeder cells have been used to eliminate this risk; however, efficiency from xenobiotic-free cultures on a monolayer appears to be lower than in the standard method using 3T3 cells. We investigated whether bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, could serve as feeder cells for the expansion of LSCs in the 3-dimensional (3D) system. Primary single human LSCs on a monolayer of 3T3s served as the control. Very poor growth was observed when single LSCs were cultured on BMSCs. When LSC clusters were cultured on a BMSC monolayer (CC-BM), 3D culture system (3D CC-BM) and fibrin 3D system (fibrin 3D CC-BM), the 3D CC-BM method supported a greater LSC expansion. The 3D CC-BM system produced a 2.5-fold higher cell growth rate than the control (p<0.05). The proportion of K14+ and p63αbright cells were comparable to those in the control (p>0.05), whereas the proportion of K12+ cells was lower (p<0.05). These results indicate that BMSCs can efficiently support the expansion of the LSC population in the 3D culture. PMID:26896856

  12. Human umbilical cord perivascular cells exhibited enhanced migration capacity towards hepatocellular carcinoma in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells: a role for autocrine motility factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Bayo, Juan; Fiore, Esteban; Aquino, Jorge B; Malvicini, Mariana; Rizzo, Manglio; Peixoto, Estanislao; Alaniz, Laura; Piccioni, Flavia; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC.

  13. Human Umbilical Cord Perivascular Cells Exhibited Enhanced Migration Capacity towards Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Comparison with Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: A Role for Autocrine Motility Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Jorge B.; Malvicini, Mariana; Bolontrade, Marcela; Podhajcer, Osvaldo; Garcia, Mariana G.; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Unfortunately, the incidence and mortality associated with HCC are increasing. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies are urgently needed and the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as carrier of therapeutic genes is emerging as a promising option. Different sources of MSCs are being studied for cell therapy and bone marrow-derived cells are the most extensively explored; however, birth associated-tissues represent a very promising source. The aim of this work was to compare the in vitro and in vivo migration capacity between bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs) towards HCC. We observed that HUCPVCs presented higher in vitro and in vivo migration towards factors released by HCC. The expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) receptor, genes related with the availability of the receptor on the cell surface (caveolin-1 and -2) and metalloproteinase 3, induced by the receptor activation and important for cell migration, was increased in HUCPVCs. The chemotactic response towards recombinant AMF was increased in HUCPVCs compared to BM-MSCs, and its inhibition in the conditioned medium from HCC induced higher decrease in HUCPVC migration than in BM-MSC. Our results indicate that HUCPVCs could be a useful cellular source to deliver therapeutic genes to HCC. PMID:25147818

  14. How does the supernatant of Lactobacillus acidophilus affect the proliferation and differentiation activities of rat bone marrow-derived stromal cells?

    PubMed

    Samadikuchaksaraei, A; Gholipourmalekabadi, M; Saberian, M; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, M; Shahidi Delshad, E

    2016-08-31

    Low proliferation rate and unwanted differentiation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (rBMSCs) during the frequent passages have limited the use of such cells in clinical cell therapy. Recently, the researchers have focused on the effects of the components produced by some bacteria on proliferation of the stem cells. In this study, we discussed the possible effects of the Lactobacillus acidophilus supernatant on proliferation and differentiation of the rBMSCs. For this aim, the cells were isolated from rat bone marrow, characterized by culturing on tissue specific differentiation media and stained. The cells (passage two) were treated with different concentrations of the L. acidophilus supernatant (0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, 3, 9 and 30 &mgr;l/ml) for 14 days. The proliferation and differentiation capacity of the cells were then determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT assay) and tissue specific staining. The results showed a positive effect of the supernatant on the cell proliferation in 3 and 9 &mgr;l/ml concentrations, while did not affect the differentiation capacity of the rBMSCs. The current study strongly suggests the L. acidophilus supernatant as an alternative material that could be added to the media with aim of improvement in the proliferation rate of the rBMSCs without affecting their differentiation capacity.

  15. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 receptor CXCR4-overexpressing bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells accelerate wound healing by migrating into skin injury areas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dazhi; Sun, Shijin; Wang, Zhengguo; Zhu, Peifang; Yang, Zailiang; Zhang, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its membrane receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) are involved in the homing and migration of multiple stem cell types, neovascularization, and cell proliferation. This study investigated the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) accelerate skin wound healing in the mouse model by overexpression of CXCR4 in BMSCs. We compared SDF-1 expression and skin wound healing times of BALB/c mice, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, and immune system-deficient nude mice after (60)Co radiation-induced injury of their bone marrow. The occurrence of transplanted adenovirus-transfected CXCR4-overexpressing male BMSCs in the wound area was compared with the occurrence of untransfected male BALB/c BMSCs in (60)Co-irradiated female mice skin wound healing areas by Y chromosome marker analyses. The wound healing time of BALB/c mice was 14.00±1.41 days, whereas for the nude and SCID mice it was 17.16±1.17 days and 19.83±0.76 days, respectively. Male BMSCs could be detected in the surrounding areas of (60)Co-irradiated female BALB/c mice wounds, and CXCR4-overexpressing BMSCs accelerated the wound healing time. CXCR4-overexpressing BMSCs migrate in an enhanced manner to skin wounds in a SDF-1-expression-dependent manner, thereby reducing the skin wound healing time.

  16. Bioimaging assessment and effect of skin wound healing using bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with the artificial dermis in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hirokazu; Murakami, Takashi; Ajiki, Takashi; Hara, Mayumi; Hoshino, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the fate and healing effect of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in a rat diabetic skin wound model. Rats are treated with streptozotocin to induce diabetic conditions. A full-thickness skin defect is surgically made on the head of diabetic rats, and covered with an artificial dermis impregnated with either bone marrow cells (BMCs) or bone-marrow-derived MSCs from firefly luciferase (luc) transgenic (Tg) rats. Wound healing is evaluated using planimetry and immunohistochemistry, and the fate of transplanted MSCs is determined using in-vivo luminescent imaging. The diabetic wound treated with MSCs-impregnated artificial dermis is significantly smaller than that treated with artificial dermis alone at 1 week postoperation. Photons of luc+ MSCs are detected at the transplanted site during healing (3 weeks), whereas those of luc+ MSCs are depleted only after 1 week postimplantation. Immunohistochemistry at the healing site treated with MSCs demonstrates that CD31+ vessels increase with expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, suggesting that MSCs accelerate angiogenesis. These findings suggest that transplanted MSCs could be retained at wound sites during the healing process in a diabetic rat model, and subsequently promote wound healing through angiogenesis.

  17. Notch2 Signaling Regulates the Proliferation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells via c-Myc Expression

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Kenichi; Araki, Daisuke; Niibe, Kunimichi; Houlihan, Diarmaid D.; Morikawa, Satoru; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Akazawa, Chihiro; Hori, Shingo; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) reside in the bone marrow and maintain their stemness under hypoxic conditions. However, the mechanism underlying the effects of hypoxia on MSCs remains to be elucidated. This study attempted to uncover the signaling pathway of MSC proliferation. Under low-oxygen culture conditions, MSCs maintained their proliferation and differentiation abilities for a long term. The Notch2 receptor was up-regulated in MSCs under hypoxic conditions. Notch2-knockdown (Notch2-KD) MSCs lost their cellular proliferation ability and showed reduced gene expression of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α, HIF-2α, and c-Myc. Overexpression of the c-Myc gene in Notch2-KD MSCs allowed the cells to regain their proliferation capacity. These results suggested that Notch2 signaling is linked to c-Myc expression and plays a key role in the regulation of MSC proliferation. Our findings provide important knowledge for elucidating the self-replication competence of MSCs in the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27855169

  18. Assessment of the Role of Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Juice for Inducing Osteoblast Differentiation in Isolated Rat Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sharmila; Tamizhselvi, Ramasamy; George, Leema; Manickam, Venkatraman

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Morinda citrifolia (Noni), an important traditional medicinal plant still used in patients with bone fractures or dislocation to promote connective tissue repair and to reduce inflammation. However, the effects of Noni on bone metabolism and whether it influences the osteogenic differentiation is yet to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the effect of Morinda citrifolia (Noni) juice on the proliferation rate of rat bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) and the osteoblastic differentiation as shown by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osteocalcin (OCN) mRNA expression in vitro. Methods and Results Treatment with 200 μg/ml Noni juice enhanced the proliferation rate of the BMSC and also upregulated the osteogenic differentiation marker genes ALP and OCN, and Runx2 measured by RTPCR. Consistent with these results collagen scaffolds implanted in vivo, which were loaded with BMSC pre-exposed to Noni, showed increased bone density measured by computed tomography and histological analysis revealed neo-angiogenesis for bone formation. Conclusions These results suggest that Noni stimulates osteoblastogenesis and can be used as adjuvant natural medicine for bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27572713

  19. A reproducible method for the isolation and expansion of ovine mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow for use in regenerative medicine preclinical studies.

    PubMed

    Caminal, Marta; Vélez, Roberto; Rabanal, Rosa Maria; Vivas, Daniel; Batlle-Morera, Laura; Aguirre, Màrius; Barquinero, Jordi; García, Joan; Vives, Joaquim

    2016-11-18

    The use of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as candidate medicines for treating a variety of pathologies is based on their qualities as either progenitors for the regeneration of damaged tissue or producers of a number of molecules with pharmacological properties. Preclinical product development programmes include the use of well characterized cell populations for proof of efficacy and safety studies before testing in humans. In the field of orthopaedics, an increasing number of translational studies use sheep as an in vivo test system because of the similarities with humans in size and musculoskeletal architecture. However, robust and reproducible methods for the isolation, expansion, manipulation and characterization of ovine MSCs have not yet been standardised. The present study describes a method for isolation and expansion of fibroblastic-like, adherent ovine MSCs that express CD44, CD90, CD140a, CD105 and CD166, and display trilineage differentiation potential. The 3-week bioprocess proposed here typically yielded cell densities of 1.4 × 10(4) MSCs/cm(2) at passage 2, with an expansion factor of 37.8 and approximately eight cumulative population doublings. The osteogenic potential of MSCs derived following this methodology was further evaluated in vivo in a translational model of osteonecrosis of the femoral head, in which the persistence of grafted cells in the host tissue and their lineage commitment into osteoblasts and osteocytes was demonstrated by tracking enhanced green fluorescent protein-labelled cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Induction of a program gene expression during osteoblast differentiation with strontium ranelate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Lingling; Zaidi, Samir; Peng Yuanzhen; Zhou Hang; Moonga, Baljit S.; Blesius, Alexia; Dupin-Roger, Isabelle; Zaidi, Mone . E-mail: mone.zaidi@mssm.edu; Sun Li

    2007-04-06

    Strontium ranelate, a new agent for the treatment of osteoporosis, has been shown stimulate bone formation in various experimental models. This study examines the effect of strontium ranelate on gene expression in osteoblasts, as well as the formation of mineralized (von Kossa-positive) colony-forming unit-osteoblasts (CFU-obs). Bone marrow-derived stromal cells cultured for 21 days under differentiating conditions, when exposed to strontium ranelate, displayed a significant time- and concentration-dependent increase in the expression of the master gene, Runx2, as well as bone sialoprotein (BSP), but interestingly without effects on osteocalcin. This was associated with a significant increase in the formation of CFU-obs at day 21 of culture. In U-33 pre-osteoblastic cells, strontium ranelate significantly enhanced the expression of Runx2 and osteocalcin, but not BSP. Late, more mature osteoblastic OB-6 cells showed significant elevations in BSP and osteocalcin, but with only minimal effects on Runx2. In conclusion, strontium ranelate stimulates osteoblast differentiation, but the induction of the program of gene expression appears to be cell type-specific. The increased osteoblastic differentiation is the likely basis underlying the therapeutic bone-forming actions of strontium ranelate.

  1. Hydrocortisone differentially affects the ability of murine stromal cells and human marrow-derived adherent cells to promote the differentiation of CD34++/CD38- long-term culture-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Croisille, L; Auffray, I; Katz, A; Izac, B; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1994-12-15

    Very primitive human hematopoietic progenitor cells are identified indirectly by their ability to give rise to clonogenic progenitors in the presence of either human or murine stromal cells. These long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) assays are usually performed in the presence of hydrocortisone based on the initial observation that hydrocortisone was required for prolonged hematopoiesis in standard long-term bone marrow cultures. In this report, we investigated the role of hydrocortisone in LTC-IC assays initiated with CD34++/CD38- cells seeded onto either human bone marrow LTC-derived adherent cells or a murine marrow-derived stromal cell line, MS-5. It was found that weekly addition of hydrocortisone to the cultures reduced the frequency of LTC-IC (from 1/5 to 1/20) calculated from limiting dilution experiments and also reduced fivefold to 10-fold the number of their progeny clonogenic cells detected after 4 to 5 weeks. In contrast, the frequency and differentiative potential of CD34++/CD38- grown in the presence of human marrow feeders was unaltered by the addition of glucocorticoids. Data are consistent with the hypothesis that hydrocortisone inhibited LTC-IC differentiation by downregulating the expression of a synergistic factor produced by MS-5 cells. (1) In the absence of hydrocortisone, the number of clonogenic progenitors generated by LTC-IC was much higher in cultures seeded on MS-5 than in cultures seeded on human marrow adherent cells, which was also true when cytokines were added to the cocultures. However, based on the phenotype of the colonies, progenitors produced in MS-5 cocultures were more mature than those generated on human marrow adherent cells. (2) Hydrocortisone counteracted the stimulatory effect of recombinant human cytokines (interleukin-3, interleukin-6, and steel factor) in assays performed on MS-5 but not on human marrow feeders. (3) Hydrocortisone led to a 50% decrease in the numbers of colony-forming units

  2. Direct Comparison of Wharton's Jelly and Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Enhance Engraftment of Cord Blood CD34+ Transplants

    PubMed Central

    van der Garde, Mark; van Pel, Melissa; Millán Rivero, Jose Eduardo; de Graaf-Dijkstra, Alice; Slot, Manon C.; Kleinveld, Yoshiko; Watt, Suzanne M.; Roelofs, Helene

    2015-01-01

    Cotransplantation of CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhances HSPC engraftment. For these applications, MSCs are mostly obtained from bone marrow (BM). However, MSCs can also be isolated from the Wharton's jelly (WJ) of the human umbilical cord. This source, regarded to be a waste product, enables a relatively low-cost MSC acquisition without any burden to the donor. In this study, we evaluated the ability of WJ MSCs to enhance HSPC engraftment. First, we compared cultured human WJ MSCs with human BM-derived MSCs (BM MSCs) for in vitro marker expression, immunomodulatory capacity, and differentiation into three mesenchymal lineages. Although we confirmed that WJ MSCs have a more restricted differentiation capacity, both WJ MSCs and BM MSCs expressed similar levels of surface markers and exhibited similar immune inhibitory capacities. Most importantly, cotransplantation of either WJ MSCs or BM MSCs with CB CD34+ cells into NOD SCID mice showed similar enhanced recovery of human platelets and CD45+ cells in the peripheral blood and a 3-fold higher engraftment in the BM, blood, and spleen 6 weeks after transplantation when compared to transplantation of CD34+ cells alone. Upon coincubation, both MSC sources increased the expression of adhesion molecules on CD34+ cells, although stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)-induced migration of CD34+ cells remained unaltered. Interestingly, there was an increase in CFU-GEMM when CB CD34+ cells were cultured on monolayers of WJ MSCs in the presence of exogenous thrombopoietin, and an increase in BFU-E when BM MSCs replaced WJ MSCs in such cultures. Our results suggest that WJ MSC is likely to be a practical alternative for BM MSC to enhance CB CD34+ cell engraftment. PMID:26414086

  3. Diverse marrow stromal cells protect CLL cells from spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis: development of a reliable and reproducible system to assess stromal cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurtova, Antonina V; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Chen, Rong; Ding, Wei; Schnabl, Susanne; Quiroga, Maite P; Sivina, Mariela; Wierda, William G; Estrov, Zeev; Keating, Michael J; Shehata, Medhat; Jäger, Ulrich; Gandhi, Varsha; Kay, Neil E; Plunkett, William; Burger, Jan A

    2009-11-12

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) provide important survival and drug resistance signals to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, but current models to analyze CLL-MSC interactions are heterogeneous. Therefore, we tested different human and murine MSC lines and primary human MSCs for their ability to protect CLL cells from spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis. Our results show that both human and murine MSCs are equally effective in protecting CLL cells from fludarabine-induced apoptosis. This protective effect was sustained over a wide range of CLL-MSC ratios (5:1 to 100:1), and the levels of protection were reproducible in 4 different laboratories. Human and murine MSCs also protected CLL cells from dexamethasone- and cyclophosphamide-induced apoptosis. This protection required cell-cell contact and was virtually absent when CLL cells were separated from the MSCs by micropore filters. Furthermore, MSCs maintained Mcl-1 and protected CLL cells from spontaneous and fludarabine-induced Mcl-1 and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these studies define common denominators for CLL cocultures with MSCs. They also provide a reliable, validated tool for future investigations into the mechanism of MSC-CLL cross talk and for drug testing in a more relevant fashion than the commonly used suspension cultures.

  4. Diverse marrow stromal cells protect CLL cells from spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis: development of a reliable and reproducible system to assess stromal cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kurtova, Antonina V.; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Chen, Rong; Ding, Wei; Schnabl, Susanne; Quiroga, Maite P.; Sivina, Mariela; Wierda, William G.; Estrov, Zeev; Keating, Michael J.; Shehata, Medhat; Jäger, Ulrich; Gandhi, Varsha; Kay, Neil E.; Plunkett, William

    2009-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) provide important survival and drug resistance signals to chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, but current models to analyze CLL–MSC interactions are heterogeneous. Therefore, we tested different human and murine MSC lines and primary human MSCs for their ability to protect CLL cells from spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis. Our results show that both human and murine MSCs are equally effective in protecting CLL cells from fludarabine-induced apoptosis. This protective effect was sustained over a wide range of CLL–MSC ratios (5:1 to 100:1), and the levels of protection were reproducible in 4 different laboratories. Human and murine MSCs also protected CLL cells from dexamethasone- and cyclophosphamide-induced apoptosis. This protection required cell–cell contact and was virtually absent when CLL cells were separated from the MSCs by micropore filters. Furthermore, MSCs maintained Mcl-1 and protected CLL cells from spontaneous and fludarabine-induced Mcl-1 and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these studies define common denominators for CLL cocultures with MSCs. They also provide a reliable, validated tool for future investigations into the mechanism of MSC–CLL cross talk and for drug testing in a more relevant fashion than the commonly used suspension cultures. PMID:19762485

  5. Increased survival after irradiation followed by regeneration of bone marrow stromal cells with a novel thiol-based radioprotector

    PubMed Central

    Okić-Djordjević, Ivana; Trivanović, Drenka; Jovanović, Miloš; Ignjatović, Marija; Šećerov, Bojana; Mojović, Miloš; Bugarski, Diana; Bačić, Goran; Andjus, Pavle R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the survival of laboratory rats after irradiation and to study the cellularity of their bone marrow and the multipotential mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in groups treated with or without a new thiol-based radioprotector (GM2011) Methods Animals were irradiated by a Cobalt gamma source at 6.7 Gy. Treated animals were given i.p. GM2011 30 minutes before and 3 and 7 hours after irradiation. Controls consisted of sham irradiated animals without treatment and animals treated without irradiation. After 30 days post-irradiation, animals were sacrificed and bone marrow cells were prepared from isolated femurs. A colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) assay was performed to obtain the number of BM-MSCs. Results In the treated group, 87% of animals survived, compared to only 30% in the non-treated irradiated group. Irradiation induced significant changes in the bone marrow of the treated rats (total bone marrow cellularity was reduced by ~ 60% – from 63 to 28 cells ×106/femur and the frequency of the CFU-F per femur by ~ 70% – from 357 to 97), however GL2011 almost completely prevented the suppressive effect observed on day 30 post-irradiation (71 cells ×106/femur and 230 CFU-F/femur). Conclusion Although the irradiation dosage was relatively high, GL2011 acted as a very effective new radioprotector. The recovery of the BN-MSCs and their counts support the effectiveness of the studied radioprotector. PMID:24577826

  6. Human platelet lysate allows expansion and clinical grade production of mesenchymal stromal cells from small samples of bone marrow aspirates or marrow filter washouts.

    PubMed

    Capelli, C; Domenghini, M; Borleri, G; Bellavita, P; Poma, R; Carobbio, A; Micò, C; Rambaldi, A; Golay, J; Introna, M

    2007-10-01

    We compared two protocols for the expansion of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) starting from diagnostic samples of BM aspirates (2-5 ml) or using the remnants in the bag and filter at the end of the BM infusions. The protocols differed in the presence of either 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or 5% platelet lysate (PL). We obtained a significantly (P=0.02) better expansion with PL, obtaining a median 1010-fold compared to 198-fold with a selected batch of FBS and in fewer days (29.8 in PL versus 41.4 in FBS). Overall, we recovered a variable number from 54.8 x 10(6) to 365 x 10(6) hMSCs in PL versus a variable number from 2.7 x 10(6) to 31 x 10(6) in FBS. No difference could be found in terms of gross morphology, differentiation potential, surface markers and immunological properties (inhibition of allogeneic PHA response and mixed lymphocyte reaction) of cells expanded with PL or FBS. The preparations were found within the range of acceptability for all the quality control criteria. Due to the clinical grade nature of the PL and the reproducibility of separate preparations, we propose this method to obtain hMSCs even from minute amounts of BM cells.

  7. VEGF treatment promotes bone marrow-derived CXCR4+ mesenchymal stromal stem cell differentiation into vessel endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiming; Xia, Shudong; Fang, Hanyun; Pan, Jiansheng; Jia, Yinfeng; Deng, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cells serve an important role in the process of blood vessel repair. However, the mechanism of vascular repair mediated by C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4-positive (CXCR4+) bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) following myocardial infarction remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on vessel endothelial differentiation from BMSCs. CXCR4+ BMSCs were isolated from the femoral bone marrow of 2-month-old mice and the cells were treated with VEGF. Expression of endothelial cell markers and the functional properties were assessed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry and vascular formation analyses. The results indicated that the CXCR4+ BMSCs from femoral bone marrow cells expressed putative cell surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells. Treatment with VEGF induced platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) expression at the transcriptional and translational levels, compared with untreated controls. Moreover, VEGF treatment induced CXCR4+ BMSCs to form hollow tube-like structures on Matrigel, suggesting that the differentiated endothelial cells had the functional properties of blood vessels. The results demonstrate that the CXCR4+ BMSCs were able to differentiate into vessel endothelial cells following VEGF treatment. For cell transplantation in vascular disease, it may be concluded that CXCR4+ BMSCs are a novel source of endothelial progenitor cells with high potential for application in vascular repair. PMID:28352314

  8. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), but not high glucose, inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of mouse stromal ST2 cells through the suppression of osterix expression, and inhibit cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Kyoko; Yamaguchi, Toru; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Ogawa, Noriko; Yano, Shozo; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2012-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is known to be associated with osteoporotic fractures through a decrease in osteoblastic bone formation rather than an increase in osteoclastic bone resorption. However, its precise mechanism is unknown, and we examined whether or not high glucose or advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play key roles in the pathogenesis and complications of diabetes, would affect the osteoblastic differentiation, growth, and apoptosis of mouse stromal ST2 cells. Ten to 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 alone dose-dependently inhibited the mineralization. AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly inhibited alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities as well as the mineralization of the cells (p < 0.01). In contrast, 22 mM glucose alone or in combination with 200 μg/mL AGE2 or AGE3 did not affect these cellular phenotypes. Real-time PCR showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly decreased mRNA expressions of osteocalcin as well as osterix on day 14 (p < 0.01). Western blot analysis showed that AGE2 or AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) also decreased the levels of Runx2 and osterix protein expressions on days 7 and 14. AGE2 or AGE3 significantly suppressed cell growth and increased apoptotic cell death in time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.01). Moreover, AGE3 alone (200 μg/mL) significantly increased mRNA expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) on days 2 and 3 (p < 0.01). These results suggest that AGE2 and AGE3, but not high glucose, may inhibit the osteoblastic differentiation of stromal cells by decreasing osterix expression and partly by increasing RAGE expression, as well as inhibiting cell growth and increasing cell apoptosis.

  9. Inhibition of adhesive interaction between multiple myeloma and bone marrow stromal cells by PPARgamma cross talk with NF-kappaB and C/EBP.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Hua; Yang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Xiaohu; Farrar, William L

    2007-12-15

    Binding of multiple myeloma (MM) cells to bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) triggers expression of adhesive molecules and secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), promoting MM cell growth, survival, drug resistance, and migration, which highlights the possibility of developing and validating novel anti-MM therapeutic strategies targeting MM cells-host BMSC interactions and their sequelae. Recently, we have found that expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) and its ligands can potently inhibit IL-6-regulated MM cell growth. Here we demonstrate that PPARgamma agonists 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone significantly suppress cell-cell adhesive events, including expression of adhesion molecules and IL-6 secretion from BMSCs triggered by adhesion of MM cells, as well as overcome drug resistance by a PPARgamma-dependent mechanism. The synthetic and natural PPARgamma agonists have diverging and overlapping mechanisms blocking transactivation of transcription factors NF-kappaB and 5'-CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta). Both 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone blocked C/EBPbeta transcriptional activity by forming PPARgamma complexes with C/EBPbeta. 15-d-PGJ2 and troglitazone also blocked NF-kappaB activation by recruiting the coactivator PGC-1 from p65/p50 complexes. In addition, 15-d-PGJ2 had a non-PPARgamma-dependent effect by inactivation of phosphorylation of IKK and IkappaB. These studies provide the framework for PPARgamma-based pharmacological strategies targeting adhesive interactions of MM cells with the bone marrow microenvironment.

  10. Bone marrow stromal cell sheets may promote axonal regeneration and functional recovery with suppression of glial scar formation after spinal cord transection injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Akinori; Horii-Hayashi, Noriko; Sasagawa, Takayo; Shimizu, Takamasa; Shigematsu, Hideki; Iwata, Eiichiro; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Koizumi, Munehisa; Akahane, Manabu; Nishi, Mayumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) is a theoretical potential as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although a scaffold is sometimes used for retaining transplanted cells in damaged tissue, it is also known to induce redundant immunoreactions during the degradation processes. In this study, the authors prepared cell sheets made of BMSCs, which are transplantable without a scaffold, and investigated their effects on axonal regeneration, glial scar formation, and functional recovery in a completely transected SCI model in rats. METHODS BMSC sheets were prepared from the bone marrow of female Fischer 344 rats using ascorbic acid and were cryopreserved until the day of transplantation. A gelatin sponge (GS), as a control, or BMSC sheet was transplanted into a 2-mm-sized defect of the spinal cord at the T-8 level. Axonal regeneration and glial scar formation were assessed 2 and 8 weeks after transplantation by immunohistochemical analyses using anti-Tuj1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibodies, respectively. Locomotor function was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale. RESULTS The BMSC sheets promoted axonal regeneration at 2 weeks after transplantation, but there was no significant difference in the number of Tuj1-positive axons between the sheet- and GS-transplanted groups. At 8 weeks after transplantation, Tuj1-positive axons elongated across the sheet, and their numbers were significantly greater in the sheet group than in the GS group. The areas of GFAP-positive glial scars in the sheet group were significantly reduced compared with those of the GS group at both time points. Finally, hindlimb locomotor function was ameliorated in the sheet group at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS The results of the present study indicate that an ascorbic acid-induced BMSC sheet is effective in the treatment of SCI and enables autologous transplantation without requiring a

  11. A robust and reproducible animal serum-free culture method for clinical-grade bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Anita; Oja, Sofia; Kilpinen, Lotta; Kaartinen, Tanja; Möller, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Korhonen, Matti; Nystedt, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Efficient xenofree expansion methods to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based culture methods are strongly encouraged by the regulators and are needed to facilitate the adoption of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. In the current study we established a clinically-compliant and reproducible animal serum-free culture protocol for bone marrow-(BM-) MSCs based on an optimized platelet-derived supplement. Our study compared two different platelet-derived supplements, platelet lysate PL1 versus PL2, produced by two different methods and lysed with different amounts of freeze-thaw cycles. Our study also explored the effect of a low oxygen concentration on BM-MSCs. FBS-supplemented BM-MSC culture served as control. Growth kinetics, differentiation and immunomodulatory potential, morphology, karyotype and immunophenotype was analysed. Growth kinetics in long-term culture was also studied. Based on the initial results, we chose to further process develop the PL1-supplemented culture protocol at 20 % oxygen. The results from 11 individual BM-MSC batches expanded in the chosen condition were consistent, yielding 6.60 × 10(9) ± 4.74 × 10(9) cells from only 20 ml of bone marrow. The cells suppressed T-cell proliferation, displayed normal karyotype and typical MSC differentiation potential and phenotype. The BM-MSCs were, however, consistently HLA-DR positive when cultured in platelet lysate (7.5-66.1 %). We additionally show that culture media antibiotics and sterile filtration of the platelet lysate can be successfully omitted. We present a robust and reproducible clinically-compliant culture method for BM-MSCs based on platelet lysate, which enables high quantities of HLA-DR positive MSCs at a low passage number (p2) and suitable for clinical use.

  12. Biological, Functional and Genetic Characterization of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Pediatric Patients Affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Antonella; Biagini, Simone; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Sirleto, Pietro; Angioni, Adriano; Starc, Nadia; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Moretta, Francesca; Proia, Alessandra; Contoli, Benedetta; Genovese, Silvia; Ciardi, Claudia; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Rosti, Vittorio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs) at diagnosis (day+0) and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78), the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs). ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001) and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04) as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.). ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present), nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment. PMID:24244271

  13. Cytoskeletal proteins and stem cell markers gene expression in human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after different periods of simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershovich, P. M.; Gershovich, J. G.; Zhambalova, A. P.; Romanov, Yu. A.; Buravkova, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) are present in a variety of tissues during prenatal and postnatal human development. In adult organism, they are prevalent in bone marrow and supposed to be involved in space-flight induced osteopenia. We studied expression of various genes in human bone marrow MSCs after different terms of simulated microgravity (SMG) provided by Random Positioning Machine. Simulated microgravity induced transient changes in expression level of genes associated with actin cytoskeleton, especially after 48 h of SMG. However, after 120 h exposure in SMG partial restoration of gene expression levels (relative to the control) was found. Similar results were obtained with bmMSCs subjected to 24 h readaptation in static state after 24 h in SMG. Analysis of 84 genes related to identification, growth and differentiation of stem cells revealed that expression of nine genes was changed slightly after 48 h in SMG. More pronounced changes in gene expression of "stem cells markers" were observed after 120 h of simulated microgravity. Among 84 investigated genes, 30 were up-regulated and 24 were down-regulated. Finally, MSCs osteogenesis induced by long-term (10-20 days) simulation of microgravity was accompanied by down-regulation of gene expression of the main osteogenic differentiation markers ( ALPL, OMD) and master transcription osteogenic factor of MSCs ( Runx2). Thus, our study demonstrated that changes in expression level of some genes associated with actin cytoskeleton and stem cell markers are supposed to be one of the mechanisms, which contribute to precursor's cellular adaptation to the microgravity conditions. These results can clarify genomic mechanisms through which SMG reduces osteogenic differentiation of bmMSCs.

  14. Effects of Arsenic on Osteoblast Differentiation in Vitro and on Bone Mineral Density and Microstructure in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Tien; Lu, Tung-Ying; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Yang, Rong-Sen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Arsenic is a ubiquitous toxic element and is known to contaminate drinking water in many countries. Several epidemiological studies have shown that arsenic exposure augments the risk of bone disorders. However, the detailed effect and mechanism of inorganic arsenic on osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and bone loss still remain unclear. Objectives: We investigated the effects and mechanism of arsenic on osteoblast differentiation in vitro and evaluated bone mineral density (BMD) and bone microstructure in rats at doses relevant to human exposure from drinking water. Methods: We used a cell model of rat primary bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and a rat model of long-term exposure with arsenic-contaminated drinking water, and determined bone microstructure and BMD in rats by microcomputed tomography (μCT). Results: We observed significant attenuation of osteoblast differentiation after exposure of BMSCs to arsenic trioxide (0.5 or 1 μM). After arsenic treatment during differentiation, expression of runt-related transcription factor-2 (Runx2), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and osteocalcin in BMSCs was inhibited and phosphorylation of enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was increased. These altered differentiation-related molecules could be reversed by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Exposure of rats to arsenic trioxide (0.05 or 0.5 ppm) in drinking water for 12 weeks altered BMD and microstructure, decreased Runx2 expression, and increased ERK phosphorylation in bones. In BMSCs isolated from arsenic-treated rats, osteoblast differentiation was inhibited. Conclusions: Our results suggest that arsenic is capable of inhibiting osteoblast differentiation of BMSCs via an ERK-dependent signaling pathway and thus increasing bone loss. Citation: Wu CT, Lu TY, Chan DC, Tsai KS, Yang RS, Liu SH. 2014. Effects of arsenic on osteoblast differentiation in vitro and on bone mineral density and microstructure in rats. Environ

  15. Predicting the Remaining Lifespan and Cultivation-Related Loss of Osteogenic Capacity of Bone Marrow Multipotential Stromal Cells Applicable across a Broad Donor Age Range

    PubMed Central

    Churchman, Sarah M.; Boxall, Sally A.; McGonagle, Dennis

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Culture expanded multipotential stromal cells (MSCs) have considerable potential for bone regeneration therapy but their wider use is constrained by the lack of simple and predictive assays of functional potency. Extended passaging leads to loss of multipotency but speed of decline depends on MSC donor age. The aim of this study was to develop an assay predictive of MSC culture longevity applicable to a broad donor age range. Materials and Methods. Bone marrow (BM, n = 7) was obtained from a diverse range (2–72 years) of healthy donors. MSCs were culture expanded to senescence and their osteoprogenitor content, gene expression profiles, epigenetic signature, and telomere behaviour were measured throughout. Output data was combined for modelling purposes. Results. Regardless of donor age, cultures' osteoprogenitor content correlated better with remaining lifespan (population doublings before senescence, PD-BS) than proliferative history (accrued PDs). Individual gene's expression or telomere length did not predict PD-BS but methylation of individual CpG islands did, PRAMEF2 in particular (r = 0.775). Coupling the steep relationship of relative SPARC expression with PD-BS (r = −0.753) the formula SPARC × 1/PREMEF2 gave an improved correlation (r = −0.893). Conclusion. A formula based on SPARC mRNA and PRAMEF2 methylation may be used to predict remaining BM-MSC longevity and related loss of multipotentiality independent of donor age. PMID:28298930

  16. Effects of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on the Proliferation, Osteogenic Differentiation and Adipogenic Differentiation of Primary Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun; Ge, Kun; Ren, Huihui; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhang, Jinchao

    2015-09-01

    The effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) on the proliferation, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of primary mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were studied by employing 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-dipheny tetrazolium bromide (MTT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, collagen production, alizarin red-S (ARS) and oil red o stain assays. The results indicated that nanoceria increased the viability of BMSCs at all tested concentrations with evident dose dependence for 24 and 72 h. On day 14, nanoceria inhibited the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs at all tested concentrations. On day 19 and 24, nanoceria inhibited the formation of mineralized matrix nodules of BMSCs at all tested concentrations. On day 17, nanoceria inhibited the adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs at all tested concentrations. This suggests that the effects of nanoceria on the proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs are very complicated. Both the concentration and culture time have significant influence on the proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and adipogenic differentiation of BMSCs. These results will be helpful for rational applications of nanoceria in the future.

  17. Presentation of a novel model of chitosan- polyethylene oxide-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers together with bone marrow stromal cells to repair and improve minor bone defects

    PubMed Central

    Emamgholi, Asgar; Rahimi, Mohsen; Kaka, Gholamreza; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Najafi, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Various methods for repairing bone defects are presented. Cell therapy is one of these methods. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seem to be suitable for this purpose. On the other hand, lots of biomaterials are used to improve and repair the defect in the body, so in this study we tried to produce a similar structure to the bone by the chitosan and hydroxyapatite. Materials and Methods: In this study, the solution of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite-polyethylene oxide (PEO) Nanofibers was produced by electrospinning method, and then the BMSCs were cultured on this solution. A piece of chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite Nanofibers with BMSCs was placed in a hole with the diameter of 1 mm at the distal epiphysis of the rat femur. Then the biomechanical and radiographic studies were performed. Results: Biomechanical testing results showed that bone strength was significantly higher in the Nanofiber/BMSCs group in comparison with control group. Also the bone strength in nanofiber/BMSCs group was significant, but in nanofiber group was nearly significant. Radiographic studies also showed that the average amount of callus formation (radio opacity) in nanofiber and control group was not significantly different. The callus formation in nanofiber/BMSCs group was increased compared to the control group, and it was not significant in the nanofiber group. Conclusion: Since chitosan-nanohydroxyapatite nanofibers with BMSCs increases the rate of bone repair, the obtained cell-nanoscaffold shell can be used in tissue engineering and cell therapy, especially for bone defects. PMID:26523221

  18. The Interferon-Inducible Host Factor Bone Marrow Stromal Antigen 2/Tetherin Restricts Virion Release, but Is It Actually a Viral Restriction Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Viruses face a variety of obstacles when infecting a new host. The past few years have brought exciting new insights into the function of restriction factors, which form part of the host's innate immune system. One of the most recently identified restriction factors is bone marrow stromal antigen 2 (BST-2)/tetherin. BST-2 is an interferon-inducible gene whose expression dramatically reduces the release of viruses from infected cells. This effect of BST-2 is not specific to human immunodeficiency virus but affects a broad range of enveloped viruses. Since the identification of BST-2 as a restriction factor in 2008, much progress has been made in understanding the molecular properties and functional characteristics of this host factor. The goal of this review was to provide an update on our current understanding of the role of BST-2 in regulating virus release and to discuss its role in controlling virus spread during productive infection with special emphasis on human immunodeficiency virus-1. PMID:21166593

  19. Enhanced Ex Vivo Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Progenitors on Native and Spin Coated Acellular Matrices Prepared from Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wasnik, Samiksha; Kantipudi, Suma; Kirkland, Mark A.; Pande, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular microenvironment in bone marrow (BM) is known to regulate the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We have developed cell-free matrices from a BM stromal cell line (HS-5), which can be used as substrates either in native form or as tissue engineered coatings, for the enhanced ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (UCB) derived HSPC. The physicochemical properties (surface roughness, thickness, and uniformity) of native and spin coated acellular matrices (ACM) were studied using scanning and atomic force microscopy (SEM and AFM). Lineage-specific expansion of HSPC, grown on these substrates, was evaluated by immunophenotypic (flow cytometry) and functional (colony forming) assays. Our results show that the most efficient expansion of lineage-specific HSPC occurred on spin coated ACM. Our method provides an improved protocol for ex vivo HSPC expansion and it offers a system to study the in vivo roles of specific molecules in the hematopoietic niche that influence HSPC expansion. PMID:26981135

  20. The Morphofunctional Effect of the Transplantation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Predegenerated Peripheral Nerve in Chronic Paraplegic Rat Model via Spinal Cord Transection

    PubMed Central

    Buzoianu-Anguiano, Vinnitsa; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra; García-Vences, Elisa; Caballero-Chacón, Sara; Guizar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Chavez-Sanchez, Luis; Grijalva, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Functional recovery following spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by poor axonal and cellular regeneration as well as the failure to replace damaged myelin. Employed separately, both the transplantation of the predegenerated peripheral nerve (PPN) and the transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been shown to promote the regrowth and remyelination of the damaged central axons in SCI models of hemisection, transection, and contusion injury. With the aim to test the effects of the combined transplantation of PPN and BMSC on regrowth, remyelination, and locomotor function in an adult rat model of spinal cord (SC) transection, 39 Fischer 344 rats underwent SC transection at T9 level. Four weeks later they were randomly assigned to traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) without treatment, TSCI + Fibrin Glue (FG), TSCI + FG + PPN, and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs. Eight weeks after, transplantation was carried out on immunofluorescence and electron microscope studies. The results showed greater axonal regrowth and remyelination in experimental groups TSCI + FG + PPN and TSCI + FG + PPN + BMSCs analyzed with GAP-43, neuritin, and myelin basic protein. It is concluded that the combined treatment of PPN and BMSCs is a favorable strategy for axonal regrowth and remyelination in a chronic SC transection model. PMID:26634157

  1. Distribution and Viability of Fetal and Adult Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Biaxial Rotating Vessel Bioreactor after Seeding on Polymeric 3D Additive Manufactured Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Leferink, Anne M.; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering-based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs) seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation. PMID:26557644

  2. Transplantation of marrow stromal cells restores cerebral blood flow and reduces cerebral atrophy in rats with traumatic brain injury: in vivo MRI study.

    PubMed

    Li, Lian; Jiang, Quan; Qu, Chang Sheng; Ding, Guang Liang; Li, Qing Jiang; Wang, Shi Yang; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lu, Mei; Mahmood, Asim; Chopp, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Cell therapy promotes brain remodeling and improves functional recovery after various central nervous system disorders, including traumatic brain injury (TBI). We tested the hypothesis that treatment of TBI with intravenous administration of human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) provides therapeutic benefit in modifying hemodynamic and structural abnormalities, which are detectable by in vivo MRI. hMSCs were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. Male Wistar rats (300-350 g, n=18) subjected to controlled cortical impact TBI were intravenously injected with 1 mL of saline (n=9) or hMSCs in suspension (n=9, approximately 3 × 10(6) SPIO-labeled hMSCs) 5 days post-TBI. In vivo MRI measurements consisting of cerebral blood flow (CBF), T2-weighted imaging, and 3D gradient echo imaging were performed for all animals 2 days post-TBI and weekly for 6 weeks. Functional outcome was evaluated with modified neurological severity score and Morris water maze test. Cell engraftment was detected in vivo by 3D MRI and confirmed by double staining. Ventricle and lesion volumetric alterations were measured using T2 maps, and hemodynamic abnormality was tracked by MRI CBF measurements. Our data demonstrate that treatment with hMSCs following TBI diminishes hemodynamic abnormalities by early restoration and preservation of CBF in the brain regions adjacent to and remote from the impact site, and reduces generalized cerebral atrophy, all of which may contribute to the observed improvement of functional outcome.

  3. Prostaglandin E2 plays a key role in the immunosuppressive properties of adipose and bone marrow tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yanez, Rosa Oviedo, Alberto Aldea, Montserrat Bueren, Juan A. Lamana, Maria L.

    2010-11-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have important immunosuppressive properties, but the mechanisms and soluble factors involved in these effects remain unclear. We have studied prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) as a possible candidate implied in adipose tissue-derived MSCs (Ad-MSCs) immunosuppressive properties over dendritic cells and T lymphocytes, compared to bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). We found that both MSCs inhibited the maturation of myeloid-DCs and plasmocytoid-DCs. High levels of PGE2 were detected in DCs/MSCs co-cultures. Its blockade with indomethacin (IDM) allowed plasmocytoid-DCs but not myeloid-DCs maturation. Additionally, high levels of PGE2 were found in co-cultures in which Ad-MSCs or BM-MSCs inhibited activated T cells proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokines production. PGE2 blockade by IDM preserved T lymphocytes proliferation but did not restore the pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion. However, an increased expression of transcription factors and cytokines genes involved in the Th1/Th2 differentiation pathway was detected in the T cells co-cultured with Ad-MSCs, but not with BM-MSCs. In conclusion, we propose that PGE2 is a soluble factor mediating most of the immunosuppressive effects of Ad-MSCs and BM-MSCs over p-DCs maturation and activated T lymphocytes proliferation and cytokine secretion.

  4. 3D cell culture and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells plated onto jet-sprayed or electrospun micro-fiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Meadhbh Á; Renaud, Audrey; Gamblin, Anne-Laure; D'Arros, Cyril; Nedellec, Steven; Trichet, Valerie; Layrolle, Pierre

    2015-08-04

    A major limitation of the 2D culture systems is that they fail to recapitulate the in vivo 3D cellular microenvironment whereby cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions occur. In this paper, a biomaterial scaffold that mimics the structure of collagen fibers was produced by jet-spraying. This micro-fiber polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold was evaluated for 3D culture of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in comparison with a commercially available electrospun scaffold. The jet-sprayed scaffolds had larger pore diameters, greater porosity, smaller diameter fibers, and more heterogeneous fiber diameter size distribution compared to the electrospun scaffolds. Cells on jet-sprayed constructs exhibited spread morphology with abundant cytoskeleton staining, whereas MSCs on electrospun scaffolds appeared less extended with fewer actin filaments. MSC proliferation and cell infiltration occurred at a faster rate on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. Osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and ECM production as measured by ALP, collagen and calcium deposition was superior on jet-sprayed compared to electrospun scaffolds. The jet-sprayed scaffold which mimics the native ECM and permits homogeneous cell infiltration is important for 3D in vitro applications such as bone cellular interaction studies or drug testing, as well as bone tissue engineering strategies.

  5. The PI3-kinase delta inhibitor idelalisib (GS-1101) targets integrin-mediated adhesion of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell to endothelial and marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Brown, Wells S; McIntyre, Bradley W; Estrov, Zeev; Maffei, Rossana; O'Brien, Susan; Sivina, Mariela; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Wierda, William G; Keating, Michael J; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E; Lannutti, Brian J; Marasca, Roberto; Burger, Jan A

    2013-01-01

    CLL cell trafficking between blood and tissue compartments is an integral part of the disease process. Idelalisib, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor causes rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with an increase in lymphocytosis, prior to inducing objective responses in CLL patients. This characteristic activity presumably is due to CLL cell redistribution from tissues into the blood, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We therefore analyzed idelalisib effects on CLL cell adhesion to endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells (EC, BMSC). We found that idelalisib inhibited CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC under static and shear flow conditions. TNFα-induced VCAM-1 (CD106) expression in supporting layers increased CLL cell adhesion and accentuated the inhibitory effect of idelalisib. Co-culture with EC and BMSC also protected CLL from undergoing apoptosis, and this EC- and BMSC-mediated protection was antagonized by idelalisib. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLL cell adhesion to EC and VLA-4 (CD49d) resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt, which was sensitive to inhibition by idelalisib. These findings demonstrate that idelalisib interferes with integrin-mediated CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC, providing a novel mechanism to explain idelalisib-induced redistribution of CLL cells from tissues into the blood.

  6. The PI3-Kinase Delta Inhibitor Idelalisib (GS-1101) Targets Integrin-Mediated Adhesion of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Cell to Endothelial and Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorcari, Stefania; Brown, Wells S.; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Estrov, Zeev; Maffei, Rossana; O’Brien, Susan; Sivina, Mariela; Hoellenriegel, Julia; Wierda, William G.; Keating, Michael J.; Ding, Wei; Kay, Neil E.; Lannutti, Brian J.; Marasca, Roberto; Burger, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    CLL cell trafficking between blood and tissue compartments is an integral part of the disease process. Idelalisib, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor causes rapid lymph node shrinkage, along with an increase in lymphocytosis, prior to inducing objective responses in CLL patients. This characteristic activity presumably is due to CLL cell redistribution from tissues into the blood, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We therefore analyzed idelalisib effects on CLL cell adhesion to endothelial and bone marrow stromal cells (EC, BMSC). We found that idelalisib inhibited CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC under static and shear flow conditions. TNFα-induced VCAM-1 (CD106) expression in supporting layers increased CLL cell adhesion and accentuated the inhibitory effect of idelalisib. Co-culture with EC and BMSC also protected CLL from undergoing apoptosis, and this EC- and BMSC-mediated protection was antagonized by idelalisib. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLL cell adhesion to EC and VLA-4 (CD49d) resulted in the phosphorylation of Akt, which was sensitive to inhibition by idelalisib. These findings demonstrate that idelalisib interferes with integrin-mediated CLL cell adhesion to EC and BMSC, providing a novel mechanism to explain idelalisib-induced redistribution of CLL cells from tissues into the blood. PMID:24376763

  7. The Influence of Tetracycline Inducible Targeting Rat PPARγ Gene Silencing on the Osteogenic and Adipogenic Differentiation of Bone Marrow Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaobo; Liu, Xianzhe; Cai, Xianyi; Lin, Tao; Xu, Weihua; Yang, Cao; Liu, Yongwei; Yang, Shuhua; Fu, Dehao

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) has been considered as the master regulator for adipogenesis of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). However, there are few reports regarding the effect of PPARγ gene silencing on osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation in rat BMSCs, and no reports about tissue targeting and conditional knockdown of PPARγ gene. In this study, we construct rat PPARγ gene shRNA Tet-on lentiviral vector, the lentiviral vector facilitated tetracycline (which has the characteristics of bone targeting)-inducible knockdown specific to PPARγ gene, and transfect it into BMSCs, the silencing effects induced by tetracycline is significant. The expression of the adipogenic factors adipocyte determination and differentiation-dependent factor 1 (ADD1) and recombinant CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) were decreased as measured by RT-PCR and Western blot assay following PPARγ silencing. In contrast, expression of the osteogenic genes encoding collagen I and Cbfa1/Runx2 were increased. In adipogenic medium, PPARγ-shRNA transfection reduced the lipid droplet count as measured by Oil red O staining when compared to the control groups. In osteogenic medium, PPARγ-shRNA increased the activity of alkaline phosphatase and the amount of calcium deposition as measured by Alizarin red S staining. These results suggest that the rat PPARγ gene shRNA Teton lentiviral vector decreases adipogenic differentiation and promotes osteogenic differentiation in BMSCs induced by tetracycline.

  8. The Bone Regeneration Using Bone Marrow Stromal Cells with Moderate Concentration Platelet-Rich Plasma in Femoral Segmental Defect of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Junichi; Hashimoto, Junichi; Takano, Mitsuo; Takagi, Michiaki

    2017-01-01

    Background: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can provide an assortment of growth factors, but how PRP effects bone regeneration is still unknown. The aim of the study was to explore an optimal method of using PRP and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods: An in vitro experiment was first conducted to determine an appropriate quantity of PRP. BMSCs were cultured with PRP of different concentrations to assess cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Following the in vitro study, a rat femoral segmental defect model was used. Five collagen mixtures consisting of different concentrations of PRP and BMSCs were prepared as follows, i) BMSCs and PRP (platelet 20 x 104/µl), ii) BMSCs and PRP (platelet 100 x 104/µl), iii) BMSCs and PRP (platelet 500 x 104/µl), iv) BMSCs, and v) PRP group (platelet 100 x 104/µl), were used to fill defect. New bone formation was evaluated by soft X-ray and histologic analyses were performed at 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks postoperatively. Results: The cell proliferation increased PRP concentration-dependently. Cellular alkaline phosphatase activity was higher in moderate concentration than high or low concentration group’s in vitro study. In vivo study, the bone fill percentage of newly formed bone in BMSCs and PRP (platelet 100 x 104/µl) was 46.9% at 8 weeks and increased significantly compared with other groups. Conclusion: BMSCs with moderate level of PRP significantly enhanced bone formation in comparison with BMSCs or PRP transplant in a rat femoral defect model. PMID:28217215

  9. Feasibility and Efficiency of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Culture with Allogeneic Platelet Lysate-Supplementation for Cell Therapy against Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chengbo; Wang, Zifeng; Hamauchi, Shuji; Abumiya, Takeo; Kazumata, Ken; Ito, Tsuneo; Kudo, Kohsuke; Takamoto, Shigeru; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is increasing interest in human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) as regeneration therapy against cerebral stroke. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility and validity of hBMSC cultures with allogeneic platelet lysates (PLs). Platelet concentrates (PC) were harvested from healthy volunteers and made into single donor-derived PL (sPL). The PL mixtures (mPL) were made from three different sPL. Some growth factors and platelet cell surface antigens were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The hBMSCs cultured with 10% PL were analyzed for their proliferative potential, surface markers, and karyotypes. The cells were incubated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) agents and injected into a pig brain. MRI and histological analysis were performed. Consequently, nine lots of sPL and three mPL were prepared. ELISA analysis showed that PL contained adequate growth factors and a particle of platelet surface antigens. Cell proliferation capacity of PLs was equivalent to or higher than that of fetal calf serum (FCS). No contradiction in cell surface markers and no chromosomal aberrations were found. The MRI detected the distribution of SPIO-labeled hBMSCs in the pig brain. In summary, the hBMSCs cultured with allogeneic PL are suitable for cell therapy against stroke. PMID:27840648

  10. Static and dynamic cultivation of bone marrow stromal cells on biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds derived from an indirect rapid prototyping technique.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, M; Uhl, F; Detsch, R; Deisinger, U; Ziegler, G

    2010-11-01

    The adequate regeneration of large bone defects is still a major problem in orthopaedic surgery. Synthetic bone substitute materials have to be biocompatible, biodegradable, osteoconductive and processable into macroporous scaffolds tailored to the patient specific defect. Hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) as well as mixtures of both phases, biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP), meet all these requirements and are considered to be optimal synthetic bone substitute materials. Rapid prototyping (RP) can be applied to manufacture scaffolds, meeting the criteria required to ensure bone ingrowth such as high porosity and defined pore characteristics. Such scaffolds can be used for bone tissue engineering (BTE), a concept based on the cultivation of osteogenic cells on osteoconductive scaffolds. In this study, scaffolds with interconnecting macroporosity were manufactured from HA, TCP and BCP (60 wt% HA) using an indirect rapid prototyping technique involving wax ink-jet printing. ST-2 bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were seeded onto the scaffolds and cultivated for 17 days under either static or dynamic culture conditions and osteogenic stimulation. While cell number within the scaffold pore system decreased in case of static conditions, dynamic cultivation allowed homogeneous cell growth even within deep pores of large (1,440 mm(3)) scaffolds. Osteogenic cell differentiation was most advanced on BCP scaffolds in both culture systems, while cells cultured under perfusion conditions were generally more differentiated after 17 days. Therefore, scaffolds manufactured from BCP ceramic and seeded with BMSCs using a dynamic culture system are the method of choice for bone tissue engineering.

  11. Delayed minimally invasive injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell sheets regenerates large bone defects in an ovine preclinical animal model.

    PubMed

    Berner, Arne; Henkel, Jan; Woodruff, Maria A; Steck, Roland; Nerlich, Michael; Schuetz, Michael A; Hutmacher, Dietmar W

    2015-05-01

    Cell-based tissue engineering approaches are promising strategies in the field of regenerative medicine. However, the mode of cell delivery is still a concern and needs to be significantly improved. Scaffolds and/or matrices loaded with cells are often transplanted into a bone defect immediately after the defect has been created. At this point, the nutrient and oxygen supply is low and the inflammatory cascade is incited, thus creating a highly unfavorable microenvironment for transplanted cells to survive and participate in the regeneration process. We therefore developed a unique treatment concept using the delayed injection of allogenic bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) sheets to regenerate a critical-sized tibial defect in sheep to study the effect of the cells' regeneration potential when introduced at a postinflammatory stage. Minimally invasive percutaneous injection of allogenic BMSCs into biodegradable composite scaffolds 4 weeks after the defect surgery led to significantly improved bone regeneration compared with preseeded scaffold/cell constructs and scaffold-only groups. Biomechanical testing and microcomputed tomography showed comparable results to the clinical reference standard (i.e., an autologous bone graft). To our knowledge, we are the first to show in a validated preclinical large animal model that delayed allogenic cell transplantation can provide applicable clinical treatment alternatives for challenging bone defects in the future.

  12. Distribution and Viability of Fetal and Adult Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Biaxial Rotating Vessel Bioreactor after Seeding on Polymeric 3D Additive Manufactured Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Leferink, Anne M; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering-based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs) seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation.

  13. Interleukin-1β pre-treated bone marrow stromal cells alleviate neuropathic pain through CCL7-mediated inhibition of microglial activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Deng, Guoying; Wang, Haowei; Yang, Mei; Yang, Rui; Li, Xiangnan; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yuan, Hongbin

    2017-01-01

    Although neuropathic pain is one of the most intractable diseases, recent studies indicate that systemic or local injection of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) decreases pro-inflammatory cytokines release and alleviates neuropathic pain. However, it is still not clear whether pre-treated BMSCs have a strong anti-inflammatory and/or analgesia effect. Using the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain, IL-1β pre-treated BMSCs (IL-1β-BMSCs) were injected into rats followed by SNL in order to determine possible effects. Results indicated that IL-1β-BMSCs were more efficacious in both amelioration of neuropathic pain and inhibition of microglia activation. Specifically, microglia inhibition was found to be mediated by chemokine C-C motif ligand 7 (CCL7) but not CCL2. Results also showed that IL-1β-BMSCs had a stronger inhibitory effect on astrocyte activation as well as CCL7 release, which was found to be mediated by IL-10 not transforming growth factor-β1. In addition, we also found directional migration of IL-1β-BMSCs was mediated by inceased C-X-C motif chemokine ligand (CXCL) 13 expression following SNL. In conclusion, our results indicated IL-1β-BMSCs could inhibit microglia activation and neuropathic pain by decreasing CCL7 level in spinal cord. PMID:28195183

  14. [Actin cytoskeleton organization and spreading of bone marrow stromal cells and cartilage cells during their combined and independent cultivation on different extracellular matrix proteins].

    PubMed

    Sakhenberg, E I; Nikolaenko, N S; Pinaev, G P

    2014-01-01

    To clarify the mutual influence of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and cartilage cells we studied the organization of their actin cytoskeleton and cell spreading on different extracellular matrix proteins--laminin 2/4, collagen type I or fibronectin. It has been shown that the most pronounced difference in morphological characteristics of the cells such as their form, size and actin cytoskeleton organization occur in the case of interaction with fibronectin. So, after separate brief incubation of both cell types on fibronectin, the average area of BMSCs spreading was about 4 times greater than the area of the cartilage cell spreading. However, in the co-culture of these cells in a ratio of 1:1, the average jointed spreading area on fibronctin was nearly 1.5 times less than the theoretically calculated. To determine the nature of exposure of the cells to each other we have studied spreading of these cells in the media conditioned by another cell type. We have found that the area of BMSC's spreading in the medium conditioned by cartilage cells is markedly smaller than the area of spreading of the same cells in the control medium. These data suggest that the cartilage cells secrete factors that reduce BMSC's spreading.

  15. Effects of glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, RU486, on the proliferative and differentiation capabilities of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Na; Yu, Yang; Schmidt, Thomas; Stanford, Clark; Hong, Liu

    2013-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) potentially regulate the proliferation, differentiation, and premature senescence of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). In the present study we investigated the effects mediated by endogenous GCs and the effects of an antagonist of the glucocorticoid receptor, RU486, on the proliferative and differentiation capabilities of MSCs using an ovariectomized (OVX) animal model. Following ovariectomy and a decrease in systemic estradiol levels, the serum concentration of corticosterone is significantly increased in OVX rats. Compared to sham-operated controls, the total superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum of OVX rats and the proliferation of their MSCs are significantly reduced. Furthermore, the osteogenic differentiation capabilities of OVX rat MSCs are significantly decreased, while adipogenic capabilities tend to increase. Subcutaneous administration of RU486 effectively increases the population and proliferative capacity of the MSCs in OVX rats. RU486 treatment also improves osteogenic capabilities and down-regulates adipogenic capabilities of MSCs. These results strongly indicate that the elevated levels of endogenous GCs induced by estrogen depletion might accelerate the premature senescence of MSCs and reduce their proliferative and osteogenic differentiation capabilities, while the blockage of the effects of endogenous GCs may restore their capabilities. These responses could potentially be developed to protect the capabilities of MSCs from oxidative stress-induced premature senescence and extend their lifespan in patients with advancing age and estrogen depletion.

  16. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses. PMID:26060498

  17. Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentially Inhibit Cytokine Production by Peripheral Blood Monocytes Subpopulations and Myeloid Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Paula; Gomes, Joana; Pedreiro, Susana; Pedrosa, Monia; Martinho, Antonio; Antunes, Brigida; Ribeiro, Tania; Santos, Francisco; Domingues, Rosario; Abecasis, Manuel; Trindade, Helder; Paiva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    The immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) rendered them an attractive therapeutic approach for immune disorders and an increasing body of evidence demonstrated their clinical value. However, the influence of MSC on the function of specific immune cell populations, namely, monocyte subpopulations, is not well elucidated. Here, we investigated the influence of human bone marrow MSC on the cytokine and chemokine expression by peripheral blood classical, intermediate and nonclassical monocytes, and myeloid dendritic cells (mDC), stimulated with lipopolysaccharide plus interferon (IFN)γ. We found that MSC effectively inhibit tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α and macrophage inflammatory protein- (MIP-) 1β protein expression in monocytes and mDC, without suppressing CCR7 and CD83 protein expression. Interestingly, mDC exhibited the highest degree of inhibition, for both TNF-α and MIP-1β, whereas the reduction of TNF-α expression was less marked for nonclassical monocytes. Similarly, MSC decreased mRNA levels of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and IL-6 in classical monocytes, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 in classical and nonclassical monocytes, and IL-1β and CXCL10 in mDC. MSC do not impair the expression of maturation markers in monocytes and mDC under our experimental conditions; nevertheless, they hamper the proinflammatory function of monocytes and mDC, which may impede the development of inflammatory immune responses.

  18. Detection of the quantity of kinesin and microgravity-sensitive kinesin genes in rat bone marrow stromal cells grown in a simulated microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Chengzhi; Wang, Chunyan; Li, Yuan; Li, Yinghui; Dai, Zhongquan; Zhao, Dongming; Sun, Hongyi; Wu, Bin

    2011-06-01

    Kinesin and kinesin-like proteins (KLPs) constitute a superfamily of microtubule motor proteins found in all eukaryotic organisms. Members of the kinesin superfamily are known to play important roles in many fundamental cellular and developmental processes. To date, few published studies have reported on the effects of microgravity on kinesin expression. In this paper, we describe the expression pattern and microgravity-sensitive genes of kinesin in rat bone marrow stromal cells cultured in a ground-based rotating bioreactor. The quantity of kinesin under the clinorotation condition was examined by immunoblot analysis with anti-kinesin. Furthermore, the distribution of kinesin at various times during clinorotation was determined by dual immunostaining, using anti-kinesin monoclonal antibody or anti-β-tubulin monoclonal antibody. In terms of kinesin quantity, we found that the ratios of the amounts of clinorotated/stationary KLPs decreased from clinorotation day 5 to day 10, although it increased on days 2 and 3. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that kinesin in the nucleus was the first to be affected by simulated microgravity, following the kinesin at the periphery that was affected at various times during clinorotation. Real-time RT-PCR analysis of kinesin mRNA expression was performed and led to the identification of 3 microgravity-sensitive kinesin genes: KIF9, KIFC1, and KIF21A. Our results suggest that kinesin has a distinct expression pattern, and the identification of microgravity-sensitive kinesin genes offers insight into fundamental cell biology.

  19. In vitro generation of whole osteochondral constructs using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells, employing a two-chambered co-culture well design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelei; Ng, Kian Siang; Ravi, Sujata; Goh, James C H; Toh, Siew Lok

    2016-04-01

    The regeneration of whole osteochondral constructs with a physiological structure has been a significant issue, both clinically and academically. In this study, we present a method using rabbit bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) cultured on a silk-RADA peptide scaffold in a specially designed two-chambered co-culture well for the generation of multilayered osteochondral constructs in vitro. This specially designed two-chambered well can simultaneously provide osteogenic and chondrogenic stimulation to cells located in different regions of the scaffold. We demonstrated that this co-culture approach could successfully provide specific chemical stimulation to BMSCs located on different layers within a single scaffold, resulting in the formation of multilayered osteochondral constructs containing cartilage-like and subchondral bone-like tissue, as well as the intermediate osteochondral interface. The cells in the intermediate region were found to be hypertrophic chondrocytes, embedded in a calcified extracellular matrix containing glycosaminoglycans and collagen types I, II and X. In conclusion, this study provides a single-step approach that highlights the feasibility of rabbit BMSCs as a single-cell source for multilayered osteochondral construct generation in vitro.

  20. Human platelet lysate is an alternative to fetal bovine serum for large-scale expansion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Gottipamula, Sanjay; Sharma, Archana; Krishnamurthy, Sagar; Majumdar, Anish Sen; Seetharam, Raviraja N

    2012-07-01

    Human platelet lysate (HPL) was evaluated as an alternative to fetal bovine serum (FBS) in large-scale culturing of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) for therapeutic applications. Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM)of low glucose (LG) and Knock Out (KO) were used with human platelet lysate (HPL) as LG-HPL and KO-HPL, and with FBS as LG-FBS and KO-FBS to culture the BM-MSCs. HPL at 10 % (v/v) supported BM-MSCs growth and subsequent isolation efficiency generated >90 × 10(6) MSCs in LG-HPL. Population doublings (PDs) and population doubling times of LG-HPL and KO-HPL (PDT) were not significantly different but LG-HPL showed a significant clonogenic potential and HPL cultures had an average PDT of 36.5 ± 6.5 h and an average PDs of 5 ± 0.7/passage. BM-MSCs cultured with LG-HPL had significantly higher immunosuppression compared to LG-FBS, but KO-HPL and KO-FBS-grown cultures were not significantly different. HPL is therefore alternative to FBS for large-scale production of BM-MSCs for therapeutic applications.

  1. NOTCH-Mediated Maintenance and Expansion of Human Bone Marrow Stromal/Stem Cells: A Technology Designed for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yufeng; Long, Teng; Wang, Cuicui; Mirando, Anthony J; Chen, Jianquan; O'Keefe, Regis J; Hilton, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Human bone marrow-derived stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) have great therapeutic potential for treating skeletal disease and facilitating skeletal repair, although maintaining their multipotency and expanding these cells ex vivo have proven difficult. Because most stem cell-based applications to skeletal regeneration and repair in the clinic would require large numbers of functional BMSCs, recent research has focused on methods for the appropriate selection, expansion, and maintenance of BMSC populations during long-term culture. We describe here a novel biological method that entails selection of human BMSCs based on NOTCH2 expression and activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway in cultured BMSCs via a tissue culture plate coated with recombinant human JAGGED1 (JAG1) ligand. We demonstrate that transient JAG1-mediated NOTCH signaling promotes human BMSC maintenance and expansion while increasing their skeletogenic differentiation capacity, both ex vivo and in vivo. This study is the first of its kind to describe a NOTCH-mediated methodology for the maintenance and expansion of human BMSCs and will serve as a platform for future clinical or translational studies aimed at skeletal regeneration and repair.

  2. Induction of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase in Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Preliminary Observations

    PubMed Central

    He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Zong, Lin; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Several investigators have reported increased levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme which plays an important role in the repair of damaged DNA, in cells exposed to extremely low dose ionizing radiation which does not cause measurable DNA damage. Objective. To examine whether exposure of the cells to nonionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) is capable of increasing messenger RNA of PARP-1 and its protein levels in mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods. BMSCs were exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 μW/cm2 power intensity for 3 hours/day for 5 days. PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels were examined at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 hours after exposure using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Sham-exposed (SH) cells and those exposed to ionizing radiation were used as unexposed and positive control cells. Results. BMSCs exposed to RF showed significantly increased expression of PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels after exposure to RF while such changes were not observed in SH-exposed cells. Conclusion. Nonionizing RF exposure is capable of inducing PARP-1. PMID:27190989

  3. The effect of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel on bone marrow stromal cell transplant survival and spinal cord repair.

    PubMed

    Ritfeld, Gaby J; Rauck, Britta M; Novosat, Tabitha L; Park, Daewon; Patel, Pavan; Roos, Raymund A C; Wang, Yadong; Oudega, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Cell therapy for nervous tissue repair is limited by low transplant survival. We investigated the effects of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(serinol hexamethylene urethane) (ESHU) on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplant survival and repair using a rat model of spinal cord contusion. Transplantation of BMSCs in ESHU at three days post-contusion resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in BMSC survival at one week post-injury and a 66% increase in spared nervous tissue volume at four weeks post-injury. These improvements were accompanied by enhanced hindlimb motor and sensorimotor recovery. In vitro, we found that ESHU protected BMSCs from hydrogen peroxide-mediated death, resulting in a four-fold increase in BMSC survival with two-fold fewer BMSCs expressing the apoptosis marker, caspase 3 and the DNA oxidation marker, 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. We argue that ESHU protected BMSCs transplanted is a spinal cord contusion from death thereby augmenting their effects on neuroprotection leading to improved behavioral restoration. The data show that the repair effects of intraneural BMSC transplants depend on the degree of their survival and may have a widespread impact on cell-based regenerative medicine.

  4. Different performances of CXCR4, integrin-1β and CCR-2 in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) migration by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weixiong; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Zhimin; Li, Lei; Chen, Wenchuan

    2017-02-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is an established therapy for fracture healing where bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) migration is crucial to bone regeneration. This work focused on different performances of C-X-C-receptor 4 (CXCR4), integrin-1β and chemokine-chemokine receptor2 (CCR-2) in BMSCs migration by LIPUS stimulation. Single 20-min LIPUS treatment was applied to BMSCs during wound healing assay with or without the inhibitor AMD3100. The migration rate of BMSCs with LIPUS stimulation exhibited a higher closure rate than that of BMSCs without LIPUS stimulation, which was 1.89 μm/h and 1.38 μm/h, respectively. After LIPUS stimulation, significant elevation of the expression of CXCR4, integrin-1β and CCR-2 was observed. When AMD3100 was added, the migration rate of the BMSCs was obviously declined with or without LIPUS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of CXCR4 was significantly down-regulated by AMD3100, while integrin-1β and CCR-2 were less affected. It suggested that the enhancement of the migration of the BMSCs by LIPUS was inhibited by AMD3100. The results confirmed that LIPUS stimulation was able to activate and improve migration of BMSCs. Nevertheless, CXCR4 and both integrin-1β and CCR-2 had different roles in BMSCs migration after LIPUS treatment.

  5. Cholinergic neuron-like cells derived from bone marrow stromal cells induced by tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate promote functional recovery and neural protection after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunhui; Shao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Bi, Jianzhong; Yang, Shaonan; Zhang, Shangli; Gao, Jiangang; Miao, Junying

    2013-01-01

    The rate of neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vivo is very low; therefore, it is necessary to elevate the number of BMSC-derived neurons to cure neurodegenerative diseases. We previously reported that tricyclodecane-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609), an inhibitor of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC), induced BMSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells in vitro. However, the neuronal type is not clear, and it is still unknown whether these neuron-like cells possess physiological properties of functional neurons and whether they can contribute to the recovery of neuron dysfunction. To answer these questions, we investigated their characteristics by detecting neuronal function-related neurotransmitters and calcium image. The results showed that these cells exhibited functional cholinergic neurons in vitro. Transplantation of these cholinergic neuron-like cells promoted the recovery of spinal cord-injured mice, and they were more effective than BMSCs. The number of cholinergic neurons was increased after injection with BMSC-derived cholinergic neuron-like cells, indicating their high differentiation rate in vivo. Moreover, the proportion of cholinergic neurons in host cells and secretion of acetylcholine were increased, and preservation of neurofilament was also observed in the lesion of mice implanted with BMSC-derived neurons, suggesting the neuronal protection of BMSC-derived neurons. Our findings provide both a simple method to induce the differentiation of BMSCs into cholinergic neuron-like cells and a putative strategy for the therapy of spinal cord injuries.

  6. Remote ischemic postconditioning enhances cell retention in the myocardium after intravenous administration of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qin; Song, Peng; Wang, Enshi; Li, Jun; Hu, Shengshou; Zhang, Hao

    2013-03-01

    Efficacy of intravenous administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for myocardial infarction (MI) is limited by low cell retention in the damaged myocardium. Previous studies indicated that remote ischemic conditioning could protect against ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury by release of various cytokines including stromal cell derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1α). However, whether remote ischemic postconditioning (RIPostC) can also enhance the retention of infused cells in the myocardium by activating MSC homing is unclear. In this study, RIPostC was induced with 4cycles of 5min occlusion and reperfusion of the abdominal aorta in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats which underwent ligation of the coronary artery 1week previously. Cytokine levels in serum and myocardium were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 1, 6, 24 and 48h after RIPostC. Then, a total of 4×10(6) male MSCs were infused intravenously at 24h after RIPostC. The number of survived cells in the myocardium was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis for Y chromosome and the heart function was evaluated by echocardiography at 1month after cell infusion. Furthermore, 10μg/kg rabbit anti-rat CXCR4 polyclonal antibody was injected intraperitoneally to prove the role of SDF-1α for RIPostC. RIPostC induced an increase in SDF-1α in serum at 1h and enhanced SDF-1α transcription and protein synthesis in the myocardium at 24h after the procedure. 1month after cell transplantation, RIPostC significantly increased MSC myocardial retention by 79.1±12.3% and thereby contributed to enhanced cardiac function in comparison with cell transplantation without RIPostC. Furthermore, blockade with a CXCR4-specific antibody after RIPostC markedly attenuated the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy. We conclude that RIPostC activated SDF-1α expression and enhanced retention of the infused MSCs in the injured myocardium. Priming of the heart with RIPostC might be a novel

  7. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  8. Gremlin 1 Identifies a Skeletal Stem Cell with Bone, Cartilage, and Reticular Stromal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Worthley, Daniel L.; Churchill, Michael; Compton, Jocelyn T.; Tailor, Yagnesh; Rao, Meenakshi; Si, Yiling; Levin, Daniel; Schwartz, Matthew G.; Uygur, Aysu; Hayakawa, Yoku; Gross, Stefanie; Renz, Bernhard W.; Setlik, Wanda; Martinez, Ashley N.; Chen, Xiaowei; Nizami, Saqib; Lee, Heon Goo; Kang, H. Paco; Caldwell, Jon-Michael; Asfaha, Samuel; Westphalen, C. Benedikt; Graham, Trevor; Jin, Guangchun; Nagar, Karan; Wang, Hongshan; Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Kolhe, Alka; Carpenter, Jared; Glaire, Mark; Nair, Abhinav; Renders, Simon; Manieri, Nicholas; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Fox, James G.; Reichert, Maximilian; Giraud, Andrew S.; Schwabe, Robert F.; Pradere, Jean-Phillipe; Walton, Katherine; Prakash, Ajay; Gumucio, Deborah; Rustgi, Anil K.; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Friedman, Richard A.; Gershon, Michael D.; Sims, Peter; Grikscheit, Tracy; Lee, Francis Y.; Karsenty, Gerard; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Wang, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    The stem cells that maintain and repair the postnatal skeleton remain undefined. One model suggests that perisinusoidal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) give rise to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, marrow stromal cells, and adipocytes, although the existence of these cells has not been proven through fate-mapping experiments. We demonstrate here that expression of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist gremlin 1 defines a population of osteochondroreticular (OCR) stem cells in the bone marrow. OCR stem cells self-renew and generate osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and reticular marrow stromal cells, but not adipocytes. OCR stem cells are concentrated within the metaphysis of long bones not in the perisinusoidal space and are needed for bone development, bone remodeling, and fracture repair. Grem1 expression also identifies intestinal reticular stem cells (iRSCs) that are cells of origin for the periepithelial intestinal mesenchymal sheath. Grem1 expression identifies distinct connective tissue stem cells in both the bone (OCR stem cells) and the intestine (iRSCs). PMID:25594183

  9. Differential effects and glucocorticoid potentiation of bone morphogenetic protein action during rat osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boden, S D; McCuaig, K; Hair, G; Racine, M; Titus, L; Wozney, J M; Nanes, M S

    1996-08-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce cartilage and bone differentiation in vivo and promote osteoblast differentiation from calvarial and marrow stromal cell preparations. Functional differences between BMP-2, -4, and -6 are not well understood. Recent investigations find that these three closely related osteoinductive proteins may exert different effects in primary rat calvarial cell cultures, suggesting the possibility of unique functions in vivo. In this study, we use a fetal rat secondary calvarial cell culture system to examine the differential effects of BMP-2, -4, and -6 on early osteoblast differentiation. These cells do not spontaneously differentiate into osteoblasts, as do cells in primary calvarial cultures, but rather require exposure to a differentiation initiator such as glucocorticoid or BMP. We determined that BMP-6 is a 2- to 2.5-fold more potent inducer of osteoblast differentiation than BMP-2 or -4. BMP-6 induced the formation of more and larger bone nodules as well as increased osteocalcin secretion. The effects of all three of these BMPs were potentiated up to 10-fold by cotreatment or pretreatment with the glucocorticoid triamcinolone (Trm). The Trm effects were synergistic with those of BMP-2 or -4, suggesting that this glucocorticoid may increase the cell responsiveness to these BMPs. Finally, BMP-6 did not require either cotreatment or pretreatment with Trm to achieve greater amounts of osteoblast differentiation than seen with BMP-2 or BMP-4 treatment, suggesting that BMP-6 may act at an earlier stage of cell differentiation.

  10. Expansion and Characterization of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Osteoblast-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arpornmaeklong, Premjit; Wang, Zhuo; Pressler, Michael J.; Brown, Shelley E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the potential to serve as a repository of cells for the replacement of damaged or diseased tissues and organs. However, to use hESCs in clinically relevant scenarios, a large number of cells are likely to be required. The aim of this study was to demonstrate an alternative cell culture method to increase the quantity of osteoblast-like cells directly derived from hESCs (hESCs-OS). Undifferentiated hESCs were directly cultivated and serially passaged in osteogenic medium (hESC-OS), and exhibited similar expression patterns of osteoblast-related genes to osteoblast-like cells derived from mesenchymal stem cells derived from hESCs (hESCs-MSCs-OS) and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs-OS). In comparison to hESCs-MSCs-OS, the hESCs-OS required a shorter expansion time to generate a homogenous population of osteoblast-like cells that did not contain contaminating undifferentiated hESCs. Identification of human specific nuclear antigen (HuNu) in the newly formed bone in calvarial defects verified the role of the transplanted hESCs-OS as active bone forming cells in vivo. Taken together, this study suggests that osteoblast-like cells directly derived from hESCs have the potential to serve as an alternative source of osteoprogenitors for bone tissue engineering strategies. PMID:20698777

  11. Endovenous administration of bone-marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells prevents renal failure in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Ezquer, Fernando; Ezquer, Marcelo; Simon, Valeska; Pardo, Fabian; Yañez, Alejandro; Carpio, Daniel; Conget, Paulette

    2009-11-01

    Twenty-five to 40% of diabetic patients develop diabetic nephropathy, a clinical syndrome that comprises renal failure and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. It represents the major cause of chronic kidney disease and is associated with premature morbimortality of diabetic patients. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) contribute to the regeneration of several organs, including acutely injured kidney. We sought to evaluate if MSC protect kidney function and structure when endovenously administered to mice with severe diabetes. A month after nonimmunologic diabetes induction by streptozotocin injection, C57BL/6 mice presented hyperglycemia, glycosuria, hypoinsulinemia, massive beta-pancreatic islet destruction, low albuminuria, but not renal histopathologic changes (DM mice). At this stage, one group of animals received the vehicle (untreated) and other group received 2 doses of 0.5 x 10(6) MSC/each (MSC-treated). Untreated DM mice gradually increased urinary albumin excretion and 4 months after diabetes onset, they reached values 15 times higher than normal animals. In contrast, MSC-treated DM mice maintained basal levels of albuminuria. Untreated DM mice had marked glomerular and tubular histopathologic changes (sclerosis, mesangial expansion, tubular dilatation, proteins cylinders, podocytes lost). However, MSC-treated mice showed only slight tubular dilatation. Observed renoprotection was not associated with an improvement in endocrine pancreas function in this animal model, because MSC-treated DM mice remained hyperglycemic and hypoinsulinemic, and maintained few remnant beta-pancreatic islets throughout the study period. To study MSC biodistribution, cells were isolated from isogenic mice that constitutively express GFP (MSC(GFP)) and endovenously administered to DM mice. Although at very low levels, donor cells were found in kidney of DM mice 3 month after transplantation. Presented preclinical results support MSC administration as a cell

  12. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Anna; Anginot, Adrienne; Mancini, Stéphane J C; Schiff, Claudine; Carle, Georges F; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine

    2011-07-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  13. Reduced trabecular bone mass and strength in mice overexpressing Gα11 protein in cells of the osteoblast lineage.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, Ariana; Mattocks, Michael; Sugamori, Kim S; Grynpas, Marc D; Mitchell, Jane

    2014-02-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) require G proteins for intracellular signaling to regulate a variety of growth and maintenance processes, including osteogenesis and bone turnover. Bone maintenance events may be altered by changes in the activity or level of G proteins, which then modify signaling in bone cells such as osteoblasts. We have previously reported increased levels of Gα11 protein and signaling to phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathways in response to dexamethasone in osteoblastic UMR 106-01 cells. Here we generated pOBCol3.6-GNA11 transgenic mice that overexpress Gα11 protein in cells of the osteoblast lineage (G11-Tg mice). G11-Tg mice exhibit an osteopenic phenotype characterized by significant reductions in trabecular bone mineral density, thickness, number and strength. The numbers of osteoblasts and osteocytes were unchanged in G11-Tg bone, but early markers of osteoblast differentiation, Alp and Bsp, were increased while the late stage differentiation marker Ocn was not changed suggesting reduced osteoblast maturation in G11-Tg trabecular bone which was accompanied by a decreased bone formation rate. Furthermore, in vitro cultures of G11-Tg primary osteoblasts show delayed osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Histological analyses also revealed increased osteoclast parameters, accompanied by elevated mRNA expression of Trap and Ctsk. mRNA levels of Rankl and M-csf were elevated in vitro in bone marrow stromal cells undergoing osteogenesis and in trabecular bone in vivo. Together, these findings demonstrate that increasing Gα11 protein expression in osteoblasts can alter gene expression and result in a dual mechanism of trabecular bone loss.

  14. Chondrocytic Atf4 regulates osteoblast differentiation and function via Ihh

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguang; Lian, Na; Ma, Yun; Li, Lingzhen; Gallant, Richard C.; Elefteriou, Florent; Yang, Xiangli

    2012-01-01

    Atf4 is a leucine zipper-containing transcription factor that activates osteocalcin (Ocn) in osteoblasts and indian hedgehog (Ihh) in chondrocytes. The relative contribution of Atf4 in chondrocytes and osteoblasts to the regulation of skeletal development and bone formation is poorly understood. Investigations of the Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4 mouse model, in which Atf4 is selectively overexpressed in chondrocytes in an Atf4-null background, demonstrate that chondrocyte-derived Atf4 regulates osteogenesis during development and bone remodeling postnatally. Atf4 overexpression in chondrocytes of the Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4 double mutants corrects the reduction in stature and limb in Atf4–/– embryos and rectifies the decrease in Ihh expression, Hh signaling, proliferation and accelerated hypertrophy that characterize the Atf4–/– developing growth plate cartilages. Unexpectedly, this genetic manipulation also restores the expression of osteoblastic marker genes, namely Ocn and bone sialoprotein, in Atf4–/– developing bones. In Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4 adult mice, all the defective bone parameters found in Atf4–/– mice, including bone volume, trabecular number and thickness, and bone formation rate, are rescued. In addition, the conditioned media of ex vivo cultures from wild-type or Atf4–/–;Col2a1-Atf4, but not Atf4–/– cartilage, corrects the differentiation defects of Atf4–/– bone marrow stromal cells and Ihh-blocking antibody eliminates this effect. Together, these data indicate that Atf4 in chondrocytes is required for normal Ihh expression and for its paracrine effect on osteoblast differentiation. Therefore, the cell-autonomous role of Atf4 in chondrocytes dominates the role of Atf4 in osteoblasts during development for the control of early osteogenesis and skeletal growth. PMID:22190639

  15. Platelet-rich concentrate in serum free medium enhances osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Thamil Selvee; Karunanithi, Puvanan; Naveen, Sangeetha Vasudevaraj; Murali, Malliga Raman; Abbas, Azlina A.; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that platelet concentrates used in conjunction with appropriate growth media enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). However, their potential in inducing osteogenesis of hMSCs when cultured in serum free medium has not been explored. Furthermore, the resulting osteogenic molecular signatures of the hMSCs have not been compared to standard osteogenic medium. We studied the effect of infrequent supplementation (8-day interval) of 15% non-activated platelet-rich concentrate (PRC) in serum free medium on hMSCs proliferation and differentiation throughout a course of 24 days, and compared the effect with those cultured in a standard osteogenic medium (OM). Cell proliferation was analyzed by alamar blue assay. Gene expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, Collagen1, Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone morphogenetic protein 2, Osteopontin, Osteocalcin, Osteonectin) were analyzed using Q-PCR. Immunocytochemical staining for osteocalcin, osteopontin and transcription factor Runx2 were done at 8, 16 and 24 days. Biochemical assays for the expression of ALP and osteocalcin were also performed at these time-points. Osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed qualitatively by Alizarin Red S staining that was quantified using cetylpyridinium chloride. Results showed that PRC supplemented in serum free medium enhanced hMSC proliferation, which peaked at day 16. The temporal pattern of gene expression of hMSCs under the influence of PRC was comparable to that of the osteogenic media, but at a greater extent at specific time points. Immunocytochemical staining revealed stronger staining for Runx2 in the PRC-treated group compared to OM, while the staining for Osteocalcin and Osteopontin were comparable in both groups. ALP activity and Osteocalcin/DNA level were higher in the PRC group. Cells in the PRC group had similar level of bone mineralization as those cultured in OM, as reflected by the intensity of Alizarin red

  16. Immunosuppressive effects of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on graft-versus-host disease in rats following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevruz, Oral; Avcu, Ferit; Ural, A Uğur; Pekel, Aysel; Dirican, Bahar; Safalı, Mükerrem; Akdağ, Elvin; Beyzadeoğlu, Murat; Ide, Tayfun; Sengül, Ali

    2013-09-01

    Amaç: Graft versus host hastalığı (GVHH) , başarılı bir kemik iliği nakli için önemli bir engel oluşturmaktadır. Multipotent mezenşimal stromal hücrelerin (MSH) immünsupresif etkileri, in vivo ve in vitro olarak gösterilmiş olmakla birlikte, GVHH’ nı önleme yönünde klinik uygulamalarda bulunmaktadır . Gereç ve Yöntemler: Bu çalışmanın amacı ratlarda kemik iliği nakli sonrası oluşturulan GVHH’nı önleme ve tedavi etmede MSH nin etkinliğinin incelenmesidir. Bu amaçla 49 Sprague Dawley cinsi rat rastegele 4 çalışma, 3 kontrol grubuna ayrılmış ve gruplara MSH de içeren farklı GVHH önleyici tedaviler uygulanmıştır. Kemik iliği nakli sonrası GVHH skorlaması ve yaşama süreleri incelenmiştir. Bulgular: Tüm ışınlanmış ve önleyici tedavi verilmemiş ratlar ölmüştür. MSH nin önleyici uygulamaları, standart GVHD önleyici tedavileri kadar etkin bulunmuştur. MSH uygulamaları, GVHH nın gözlemsel ve histolojik bulgularını ve CD4+/CD8+ oranını azaltmaktadır.Ayrıca MSH uygulanan gruplarda CD25+ T hücrelerinin in vivo oranıda daha yüksek olup, Allojeneik kemik iliği nakli sonrası standart GVHH tedavisi uygulananlara göre plazma İnterlökin-2 seviyesinin daha yüksek olarak saptanmıştır. Sonuç: Bulgularımız MSH uygulamasının, GVHH nın hem önlenme hem de tedavi edilmesinde etkin olduğunu göstermiştir. Ancak bu bulguların geniş ölçekli çalışmalarla desteklenmesi gerekmektedir.

  17. Identification of stable reference genes for gene expression analysis of three-dimensional cultivated human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Juliane; Jacobi, Angela; Stiehler, Maik

    2015-02-01

    The principles of tissue engineering (TE) are widely used for bone regeneration concepts. Three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of autologous human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) on porous scaffolds is the basic prerequisite to generate newly formed bone tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a specific and sensitive analytical tool for the measurement of mRNA-levels in cells or tissues. For an accurate quantification of gene expression levels, stably expressed reference genes (RGs) are essential to obtain reliable results. Since the 3D environment can affect a cell's morphology, proliferation, and gene expression profile compared with two-dimensional (2D) cultivation, there is a need to identify robust RGs for the quantification of gene expression. So far, this issue has not been adequately investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the most stably expressed RGs for gene expression analysis of 3D-cultivated human bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). For this, we analyzed the gene expression levels of n=31 RGs in 3D-cultivated human BM-MSCs from six different donors compared with conventional 2D cultivation using qRT-PCR. MSCs isolated from bone marrow aspirates were cultivated on human cancellous bone cube scaffolds for 14 days. Osteogenic differentiation was assessed by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and expression of osteogenic marker genes. Expression levels of potential reference and target genes were quantified using commercially available TaqMan(®) assays. mRNA expression stability of RGs was determined by calculating the coefficient of variation (CV) and using the algorithms of geNorm and NormFinder. Using both algorithms, we identified TATA box binding protein (TBP), transferrin receptor (p90, CD71) (TFRC), and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase 1 (HPRT1) as the most stably expressed RGs in 3D-cultivated BM-MSCs. Notably, genes that are routinely used as RGs, for example, beta actin

  18. The role of vascular actors in two dimensional dialogue of human bone marrow stromal cell and endothelial cell for inducing self-assembled network.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Daculsi, Richard; Grellier, Maritie; Bareille, Reine; Bourget, Chantal; Remy, Murielle; Amedee, Joëlle

    2011-02-03

    Angiogenesis is very important for vascularized tissue engineering. In this study, we found that a two-dimensional co-culture of human bone marrow stromal cell (HBMSC) and human umbical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) is able to stimulate the migration of co-cultured HUVEC and induce self-assembled network formation. During this process, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF₁₆₅) was upregulated in co-cultured HBMSC. Meanwhile, VEGF₁₆₅-receptor2 (KDR) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were upregulated in co-cultured HUVEC. Functional studies show that neutralization of VEGF₁₆₅ blocked the migration and the rearrangement of the cells and downregulated the expression of uPA and its receptor. Blocking of vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cad) did not affect the migration of co-cultured HUVEC but suppressed the self-assembled network formation. In conclusion, co-cultures upregulated the expression of VEGF₁₆₅ in co-cultured HBMSC; VEGF₁₆₅ then activated uPA in co-cultured HUVEC, which might be responsible for initiating the migration and the self-assembled network formation with the participation of VE-cad. All of these results indicated that only the direct contact of HBMSC and HUVEC and their respective dialogue are sufficient to stimulate secretion of soluble factors and to activate molecules that are critical for self-assembled network formation which show a great application potential for vascularization in tissue engineering.

  19. Discovery of novel hematopoietic cell adhesion molecules from human bone marrow stromal cell membrane protein extracts by a new cell-blotting technique.

    PubMed

    Seshi, B

    1994-05-01

    In an attempt to define the role of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) within the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment in normal hematopoiesis and in leukemia development, a novel cell-blotting technique that involved cell adhesion to protein bands after separation by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE) and blotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane has been developed. Human BM stromal cell membrane fractions have been prepared from Dexter-type cultures after cell lysis by sonification and differential centrifugations of the sonification contents. The 20,000 g pellets representing membrane fractions have been solubilized by 2% Triton X-100, 0.575% LDS, and 8 mol/L urea in sequential order. The protein extracts are fractionated by LDS-PAGE and screened for CAMs by the new cell-blotting technique. This led to identification of nine protein bands in lanes containing LDS extracts showing adhesion of KG1a (CD34+ progenitor myeloid) cells. Evidence that the BM proteins exhibiting KG1a cell adhesion are novel CAMs is based on the observations that these proteins, in comparison with known CAMs, specifically VCAM-1, CD54, and CD44, show (1) contrasting detergent-solubility properties, (2) different temperature requirement for mediating cell adhesion function, and (3) markedly distinct electrophoretic mobilities. The various cell types tested, notably KG1a, NALM-6, WIL-2, Ramos, HS-Sultan, K562, JY B lymphoblastoid cells, and T lymphoblasts, showed distinctive patterns of binding to different subsets of BM CAMs. These results demonstrate a new approach to studies of molecular mechanisms that may determine specificity of hematopoietic cellular localization within BM microenvironment and may play an important role in controlling hematopoiesis.

  20. Beneficial reciprocal effects of bone marrow stromal cells and Schwann cells from adult rats in a dynamic co‑culture system in vitro without intercellular contact.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Na; Cui, Xiao-Jun; Su, Kai-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Jin-Hua

    2015-10-01

    In order to examine how implanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) encourage peripheral nerve regeneration, the present study investigated the interaction of BMSCs and Schwann cells (SCs) using an indirect in vitro co‑culture model. SCs and BMSCs were obtained from adult Sprague‑Dawley rats. The passaged BMSCs were CD29‑ and CD44‑positive but CD45‑negative and were co‑cultured with the primary SCs using a Millicell system, which allows BMSCs and SCs to grow in the same culture medium but without direct contact. Expression of the typical SC markers S‑100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) of the treated BMSCs as well as the proliferation capacity of the co‑cultured SCs was evaluated by immunocytochemical staining on the 3rd and 5th day of co‑culture. Immunocytochemical staining showed that >75% of the BMSCs in the indirect co‑culture model were GFAP‑ and S‑100‑positive on the 3rd and 5th day after co‑culture, as opposed to <5% of the BMSCs in the control group. On the 3rd day after co‑culture, only a few co‑cultured BMSCs showed the typical SC‑like morphology, while most BMSCs still kept their native appearance. By contrast, on the 5th day after co‑culture, almost all of the co‑cultured BMSCs appeared with the typical SC‑like morphology. Furthermore, 70.71% of the SCs in the indirect co‑culture model were S‑100‑positive on the 5th day of co‑culture, as opposed to >30.43% of the SCs in the control group. These results indicated that BMSCs may interact synergistically with SCs with regard to promoting peripheral nerve regeneration.

  1. Impaired proliferative potential of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes is associated with abnormal WNT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pavlaki, Konstantia; Pontikoglou, Charalampos G; Demetriadou, Anthi; Batsali, Aristea K; Damianaki, Athina; Simantirakis, Emmanouil; Kontakis, Michail; Galanopoulos, Athanasios; Kotsianidis, Ioannis; Kastrinaki, Maria-Christina; Papadaki, Helen A

    2014-07-15

    It has been shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) display defective proliferative potential. We have probed the impaired replicative capacity of culture-expanded MSCs in MDS patients (n=30) compared with healthy subjects (n=32) by studying senescence characteristics and gene expression associated with WNT/transforming growth factor-β1 (TGFB1) signaling pathways. We have also explored the consequences of the impaired patient MSC proliferative potential by investigating their differentiation potential and the capacity to support normal CD34(+) cell growth under coculture conditions. Patient MSCs displayed decreased gene expression of the senescence-associated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN1A, CDKN2A, and CDKN2B, along with PARG1, whereas the mean telomere length was upregulated in patient MSCs. MDS-derived MSCs exhibited impaired capacity to support normal CD34(+) myeloid and erythroid colony formation. No significant changes were observed between patients and controls in gene expression related to TGFB1 pathway. Patient MSCs displayed upregulated non-canonical WNT expression, combined with downregulated canonical WNT expression and upregulated canonical WNT inhibitors. MDS-derived MSCs displayed defective osteogenic and adipogenic lineage priming under non-differentiating culture conditions. Pharmacological activation of canonical WNT signaling in patient MDSs led to an increase in cell proliferation and upregulation in the expression of early osteogenesis-related genes. This study indicates abnormal WNT signaling in MSCs of MDS patients and supports the concept of a primary MSC defect that might have a contributory effect in MDS natural history.

  2. Autocrine and Paracrine Interactions between Multiple Myeloma Cells and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells by Growth Arrest-specific Gene 6 Cross-talk with Interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Miki; Ohkawara, Hiroshi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ueda, Koki; Shichishima-Nakamura, Akiko; Ito, Emi; Imai, Jun-Ichi; Yanagisawa, Yuka; Honma, Reiko; Watanabe, Shinya; Waguri, Satoshi; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2017-03-10

    The pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) has not yet been fully elucidated. Our microarray analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed significant up-regulation of growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a vitamin K-dependent protein with a structural homology with protein S, in bone marrow (BM) cells of MM patients. ELISA showed that the serum levels of soluble Gas6 were significantly increased in the MM patients when compared with healthy controls. Gas6 was overexpressed in the human CD138-positive MM cell line RPMI-8226. Exogenous Gas6 suppressed apoptosis induced by serum deprivation and enhanced cell proliferation of the MM cells. The conditional medium from the human BM stromal cell line HS-5 induced cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis of the MM cells with extracellular signal-regulated kinase, Akt, and nuclear factor-κB phosphorylation, which were reversed by the neutralizing antibody to Gas6 or IL-6. The TAM family receptor Mer, which has been identified as a Gas6 receptor, was overexpressed in BM cells of MM patients. The knockdown of Mer by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and up-regulation of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in MM cells stimulated by an HS-5 cell-conditioned medium. Furthermore, the Gas6-neutralizing antibody reduced the up-regulation of IL-6 and ICAM-1 induced by a HS-5 cell-conditioned medium in MM cells. The present study provides new evidence that autocrine and paracrine stimulation of Gas6 in concert with IL-6 contributes to the pathogenesis of MM, suggesting that Gas6-Mer-related signaling pathways may be a promising novel target for treating MM.

  3. Cell density-dependent changes in intracellular Ca2+ mobilization via the P2Y2 receptor in rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Jun; Gemba, Hisae

    2009-05-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are an interesting subject of research because they have characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. We investigated intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in rat BMSCs. Agonists for purinergic receptors increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)](i)). The order of potency followed ATP = UTP > ADP = UDP. ATP-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i) was suppressed by U73122 and suramin, but not by pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), suggesting the functional expression of G protein-coupled P2Y(2) receptors. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical studies also showed the expression of P2Y(2) receptors. [Ca(2+)](i) response to UTP changed with cell density. The UTP-induced rise in [Ca(2+)](i) was greatest at high density. V(max) (maximum Ca(2+) response) and EC(50) (agonist concentration that evokes 50% of V(max)) suggest that the amount and property of P2Y(2) receptors were changed by cell density. Note that UTP induced Ca(2+) oscillation at only medium cell density. Pharmacological studies indicated that UTP-induced Ca(2+) oscillation required Ca(2+) influx by store-operated Ca(2+) entry. Carbenoxolone, a gap junction blocker, enhanced Ca(2+) oscillation. Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR studies revealed that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells declined but the mRNA expression level of the P2Y(2) receptor increased as cell density increased. Co-application of fetal calf serum with UTP induced Ca(2+) oscillation at high cell density. These results suggest that the different patterns observed for [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization with respect to cell density may be associated with cell cycle progression.

  4. Bone-Forming Capacity and Biodistribution of Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells Directly Loaded Into Scaffolds: A Novel and Easy Approach for Clinical Application of Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Léotot, Julie; Lebouvier, Angélique; Hernigou, Philippe; Bierling, Philippe; Rouard, Hélène; Chevallier, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    In the context of clinical applications of bone regeneration, cell seeding into scaffolds needs to be safe and easy. Moreover, cell density also plays a crucial role in the development of efficient bone tissue engineering constructs. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a simple and rapid cell seeding procedure on hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/βTCP), as well as define optimal cell density and control the biodistribution of grafted cells. To this end, human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) were seeded on HA/βTCP scaffolds, and we have compared bone formation using an ectopic model. Our results demonstrated a significantly higher bone-forming capacity of hBMSCs directly loaded on HA/βTCP during surgery compared to hBMSCs preseeded for 7 days in vitro on HA/βTCP before ectopic implantation. The extent of new bone formation increases with increasing hBMSC densities quantitatively, qualitatively, and in frequency. Also, this study showed that grafted hBMSCs remained confined to the implantation site and did not spread toward other tissues, such as liver, spleen, lungs, heart, and kidneys. In conclusion, direct cell loading into a scaffold during surgery is more efficient for bone regeneration, as well as quick and safe. Therefore direct cell loading is suitable for clinical requirements and cell production control, making it a promising approach for orthopedic applications. Moreover, our results have provided evidence that the formation of a mature bone organ containing hematopoietic islets needs a sufficiently high local density of grafted hBMSCs, which should guide the optimal dose of cells for clinical use.

  5. Toll-Like Receptor 3 and Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling Proteins Regulate CXCR4 and CXCR7 Expression in Bone Marrow-Derived Human Multipotent Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Coffelt, Seth B.; Betancourt, Aline M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of bone marrow-derived human multipotent stromal cells (hMSC) in cell-based therapies has dramatically increased in recent years, as researchers have exploited the ability of these cells to migrate to sites of tissue injury, inflammation, and tumors. Our group established that hMSC respond to “danger” signals – by-products of damaged, infected or inflamed tissues – via activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). However, little is known regarding downstream signaling mediated by TLRs in hMSC. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate that TLR3 stimulation activates a Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 pathway, and increases expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 and SOCS3 in hMSC. Our studies suggest that each of these SOCS plays a distinct role in negatively regulating TLR3 and JAK/STAT signaling. TLR3-mediated interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) expression was inhibited by SOCS3 overexpression in hMSC while SOCS1 overexpression reduced STAT1 activation. Furthermore, our study is the first to demonstrate that when TLR3 is activated in hMSC, expression of CXCR4 and CXCR7 is downregulated. SOCS3 overexpression inhibited internalization of both CXCR4 and CXCR7 following TLR3 stimulation. In contrast, SOCS1 overexpression only inhibited CXCR7 internalization. Conclusion/Significance These results demonstrate that SOCS1 and SOCS3 each play a functionally distinct role in modulating TLR3, JAK/STAT, and CXCR4/CXCR7 signaling in hMSC and shed further light on the way hMSC respond to danger signals. PMID:22745793

  6. The Roles of Matrix Polymer Crystallinity and Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles in Modulating Material Properties of Photo-crosslinked Composites and Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanfeng; Kempen, Diederik H. R.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Lu, Lichun

    2010-01-01

    Two poly(ε-caprolactone fumarate)s (PCLFs) with distinct physical properties have been employed to prepare nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles via photo-crosslinking. The two PCLFs are PCLF530 and PCLF2000, named after their precursor PCL diol molecular weight of 530 and 2000 g.mol-1, respectively. Crosslinked PCLF530 is amorphous while crosslinked PCLF2000 is semi-crystalline with a melting temperature (Tm) of ∼40 °C and a crystallinity of 40%. Consequently, the rheological and mechanical properties of crosslinked PCLF2000 are significantly greater than those of crosslinked PCLF530. Structural characterizations and physical properties of both series of crosslinked PCLF/HA nanocomposites with HA compositions of 0%, 5%, 10%, 20%, and 30% have been investigated. By adding HA nanoparticles, crosslinked PCLF530/HA nanocomposites demonstrate enhanced rheological and mechanical properties while the enhancement in compressive modulus is less prominent in crosslinked PCLF2000/HA nanocomposites. In vitro cell attachment and proliferation have been performed using rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and correlated with the material properties. Cell attachment and proliferation on crosslinked PCLF530/HA nanocomposite disks have been enhanced strongly with increasing the HA composition. However, surface morphology and surface chemistry such as composition, hydrophilicity, and the capability of adsorbing protein cannot be used to interpret the cell responses on different samples. Instead, the role of surface stiffness in regulating cell responses can be supported by the correlation between the change in compressive modulus and BMSC proliferation on these two series of crosslinked PCLFs and PCLF/HA nanocomposites. PMID:19339048

  7. Europium-doped Gd2O3 nanotubes cause the necrosis of primary mouse bone marrow stromal cells through lysosome and mitochondrion damage.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yi; Chen, Shizhu; Duan, Jianlei; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2015-05-01

    With the wide applications of europium-doped Gd2O3 nanoparticles (Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs) in biomedical fields, it will inevitably increase the chance of human exposure. It was reported that Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs could accumulate in bone. However, there have been few reports about the potential effect of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) NPs on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). In this study, the Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes were prepared and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) excitation and emission spectra, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cytotoxicity of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes on BMSCs and the associated mechanisms were further studied. The results indicated that they could be uptaken into BMSCs by an energy-dependent and macropinocytosis-mediated endocytosis process, and primarily localized in lysosome. Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes effectively inhibited the viability of BMSCs in concentration and time-dependent manners. A significant increase in the percentage of late apoptotic/necrotic cells, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage and the number of PI-stained cells was found after BMSCs were treated by 10, 20, and 40μg/mL of Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes for 12h. No obvious DNA ladders were detected, but a dispersed band was observed. The above results revealed that Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotubes could trigger cell death by necrosis instead of apoptosis. Two mechanisms were involved in Gd2O3:Eu(3+) nanotube-induced BMSCs necrosis: lysosomal rupture and release of cathepsins B; and the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) injury to the mitochondria and DNA. The study provides novel evidence to elucidate the toxicity mechanisms and may be beneficial to more rational applications of these nanomaterials in the future.

  8. Stromal cell-derived factor-1-directed bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell migration in response to inflammatory and/or hypoxic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wu, Rui-Xin; Gao, Li-Na; Xia, Yu; Tang, Hao-Ning; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Directing cell trafficking toward a target site of interest is critical for advancing stem cell therapy in clinical theranostic applications. In this study, we investigated the effects of inflammatory and/or hypoxic stimuli on the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) during in vitro culture and after in vivo implantation. Using tablet scratch experiments and observations from a transwell system, we found that both inflammatory and hypoxic stimuli significantly enhanced cell migration. However, the combination of inflammatory and hypoxic stimuli did not result in a synergistic effect. The presence of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) significantly enhanced cell migration irrespective of the incubation conditions, and these positive effects could be blocked by treatment with AMD3100. Based on a time course experiment, we found that preconditioning cells with either inflammatory or hypoxic stimuli for 24 h or with both stimuli for 12 h led to high levels of chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression. In vivo studies further demonstrated that pretreatment of BMMSCs with inflammatory and/or hypoxic stimuli resulted in an increased number of systemically injected cells migrating toward skin injuries, and local SDF-1 administration significantly increased cell migration. These findings suggest that in vitro control of either inflammatory or hypoxic stimuli has significant potential to enhance SDF-1-directed BMMSC migration via the upregulation of CXCR4 expression. Although combining the stimuli did not necessarily lead to a synergistic effect, the potential to reduce the dose and time required for cell preconditioning indicates that combinations of various strategies warrant further exploration. PMID:26745021

  9. Naringin promotes osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells by up-regulating Foxc2 expression via the IHH signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fei-xiang; Du, Shi-xin; Liu, De-zhong; Hu, Qin-xiao; Yu, Guo-yong; Wu, Chu-cheng; Zheng, Gui-zhou; Xie, Da; Li, Xue-dong; Chang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Naringin is an active compound extracted from Rhizoma Drynariae, and studies have revealed that naringin can promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). In this study, we explored whether naringin could promote osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs by upregulating Foxc2 expression via the Indian hedgehog (IHH) signaling pathway. BMSCs were cultured in basal medium, basal medium with naringin, osteogenic induction medium, osteogenic induction medium with naringin and osteogenic induction medium with naringin in the presence of the IHH inhibitor cyclopamine (CPE). We examined cell proliferation by using a WST-8 assay, and differentiation by Alizarin Red S staining (for mineralization) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In addition, we detected core-binding factor α1 (Cbfα1), osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) and Foxc2 expression by using RT-PCR. We also determined Foxc2 and IHH protein levels by western blotting. Naringin increased the mineralization of BMSCs, as shown by Alizarin red S assays, and induced ALP activity. In addition, naringin significantly increased the mRNA levels of Foxc2, Cbfα1, OCN, and BSP, while decreasing PPARγ2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, the IHH inhibitor CPE inhibited the osteogenesis-potentiating effects of naringin. Naringin increased Foxc2 and stimulated the activation of IHH, as evidenced by increased expression of proteins that were inhibited by CPE. Our findings indicate that naringin promotes osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs by up-regulating Foxc2 expression via the IHH signaling pathway. PMID:27904711

  10. Experimental bladder regeneration using a poly-l-lactide/silk fibroin scaffold seeded with nanoparticle-labeled allogenic bone marrow stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Yudintceva, Natalia M; Nashchekina, Yulia A; Blinova, Miralda I; Orlova, Nadezhda V; Muraviov, Alexandr N; Vinogradova, Tatiana I; Sheykhov, Magomed G; Shapkova, Elena Y; Emeljannikov, Dmitriy V; Yablonskii, Petr K; Samusenko, Igor A; Mikhrina, Anastasiya L; Pakhomov, Artem V; Shevtsov, Maxim A

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a poly-l-lactide/silk fibroin (PL-SF) bilayer scaffold seeded with allogenic bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) was investigated as a potential approach for bladder tissue engineering in a model of partial bladder wall cystectomy in rabbits. The inner porous layer of the scaffold produced from silk fibroin was designed to promote cell proliferation and the outer layer produced from poly-l-lactic acid to serve as a waterproof barrier. To compare the feasibility and efficacy of BMSC application in the reconstruction of bladder defects, 12 adult male rabbits were divided into experimental and control groups (six animals each) that received a scaffold seeded with BMSCs or an acellular one, respectively. For BMSC tracking in the graft in in vivo studies using magnetic resonance imaging, cells were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. In vitro studies demonstrated high intracellular incorporation of nanoparticles and the absence of a toxic influence on BMSC viability and proliferation. Following implantation of the graft with BMSCs into the bladder, we observed integration of the scaffold with surrounding bladder tissues (as detected by magnetic resonance imaging). During the follow-up period of 12 weeks, labeled BMSCs resided in the implanted scaffold. The functional activity of the reconstructed bladder was confirmed by electromyography. Subsequent histological assay demonstrated enhanced biointegrative properties of the PL-SF scaffold with cells in comparison to the control graft, as related to complete regeneration of the smooth muscle and urothelium tissues in the implant. Confocal microscopy studies confirmed the presence of the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled BMSCs in newly formed bladder layers, thus indicating the role of stem cells in