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Sample records for mars-gram sensitivity studies

  1. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  2. Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Precision of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with TES observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  3. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  4. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  5. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars- GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars- GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  6. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars- GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars- GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  7. Mars-GRAM 2010: Additions and Resulting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Burns, K. Lee

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM has been utilized during previous aerobraking operations in the atmosphere of Mars. Mars-GRAM has also been used in the prediction and validation of Mars Pathfinder hypersonic aerodynamics, the aerothermodynamic and entry dynamics studies for Mars Polar Lander, the landing site selection process for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the Mars Aerocapture System Study (MASS) as well as the Aerocapture Technology Assessment Group (TAG). Most recently, Mars-GRAM 2010 was used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. The most recent release of Mars-GRAM 2010 contains several changes including an update to Fortran 90/95 and the addition of adjustment factors. Following the completion of a comparison analysis between Mars-GRAM, Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES), as well as Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) aerobraking density data, adjustment factors were added to Mars-GRAM 2010 that alter the input data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) and the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for the mapping year 0 user-controlled dust case. The addition of adjustment factors resolved the issue of previous versions of Mars-GRAM being less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for mapping year 0 and large optical depth values, such as tau equal to 3. Mars-GRAM was evaluated at locations and times of TES limb observations and adjustment factors were determined. For altitudes above 80 km and below 135 km, Mars-GRAM (MTGCM) densities were compared to aerobraking densities measured by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Odyssey (ODY), and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) to determine the adjustment

  8. The Next Generation of Mars-GRAM and Its Role in the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Ramey, Holly S.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM 2010 is currently being used to develop the onboard atmospheric density estimator that is part of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. In previous versions, Mars-GRAM was less than realistic when used for sensitivity studies for Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) MapYear=0 and large optical depth values, such as tau=3. A comparison analysis has been completed between Mars-GRAM, TES and data from the Planetary Data System (PDS) resulting in updated coefficients for the functions relating density, latitude, and longitude of the sun. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), Latitude (Lat) and areocentric solar longitude (Ls). The latest release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes these adjustment factors that alter the in-put data from MGCM and MTGCM for the Mapping Year 0 (user-controlled dust) case. The greatest adjustment occurs at large optical depths such as tau greater than 1. The addition of the adjustment factors has led to better correspondence to TES Limb data from 0-60 km as well as better agreement with MGS, ODY and MRO data at approximately 90-135 km. Improved simulations utilizing Mars-GRAM 2010 are vital to developing the onboard atmospheric density estimator for the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Plan. Mars-GRAM 2010 was not the only planetary GRAM utilized during phase 1 of this plan; Titan-GRAM and Venus-GRAM were used to generate density data sets for Aerobraking Design Reference Missions. These data sets included altitude profiles (both vertical and along a trajectory), GRAM perturbations (tides, gravity waves, etc.) and provided density and scale height values for analysis by other Autonomous Aero-braking team members.

  9. Validation of Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) and planned new features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2006-01-01

    For altitudes below 80 km, Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is based on output climatology from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). At COSPAR 2002, results were presented of validation tests of Mars-GRAM versus data from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Radio Science (RS) experiment. Further validation tests are presented comparing Mars-GRAM densities with those from the European Mars Climate Database (MCD), and comparing densities from both Mars-GRAM and MCD against TES observations. Throughout most of the height and latitude range of TES data (0-40 km and 70S to 70N), good agreement is found between atmospheric densities from Mars-GRAM and MCD. However, at the season and latitude zone for Mars Phoenix arrival and landing ( Ls = 65°-80° and latitude 65N to 75N), Mars-GRAM densities are about 30%-45% higher than MCD densities near 40 km altitude. Further evaluation is warranted concerning potential impact of these model differences on planning for Phoenix entry and descent. Three planned features for Mars-GRAM update are also discussed: (1) new MGCM and Thermospheric General Circulation Model data sets to be used as a revised basis for Mars-GRAM mean atmosphere, (2) a new feature to represent planetary-scale traveling waves for upper altitude density variations (such as found during Mars Odyssey aerobraking), and (3) a new model for effects of high resolution topographic slope on winds near the surface (0-4.5 km above Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter topography level). Mars-GRAM slope winds will be computed from a diagnostic (algebraic) relationship based on Ye et al. [Ye, Z.J., Segal, M., Pielke, R.A., A comparative study of daytime thermally induced upslope flow on Mars and Earth, J. Atmos. Sci. 47(5), 612-628, 1990]. This approach differs from mesoscale models (such as Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and Mars Mesoscale Model Version 5), which use prognostic, full-physics solutions of the

  10. Global Summary MGS TES Data and Mars-Gram Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C.; Johnson, D.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many Mars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM), while above 80 km it is based on University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topograph$ from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with a global summary data set of Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data. TES averages and standard deviations were assembled from binned TES data which covered surface to approx. 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of a Mars global dust storm). TES data were binned in 10-by-10 degree latitude-longitude bins (i.e. 36 longitude bins by 19 latitude bins), 12 seasonal bins (based on 30 degree increments of Ls angle). Bin averages and standard deviations were assembled at 23 data levels (temperature at 21 pressure levels, plus surface temperature and surface pressure). Two time-of day bins were used: local time near 2 or 14 hours local time). Two dust optical depth bins wereused: infrared optical depth either less than or greater than 0.25 (which corresponds to visible optical depth either less than or greater than about 0.5). For interests in aerocapture and precision entry and landing, comparisons focused on atmospheric density. TES densities versus height were computed from TES temperature versus pressure, using assumptions of perfect gas law and hydrostatics. Mars-GRAM validation studies used density ratio (TES/Mars-GRAM) evaluated at data bin center points in space and time. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (> 45 deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approx. 90 and 180deg

  11. Mars-GRAM Applications for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Site Selection Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary; Justus, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is presented of the Mars-Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) and its new features. One important new feature is the "auxiliary profile" option, whereby a simple input file is used to replace mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. An auxiliary profile can be generated from any source of data or alternate model output. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5) model) for three candidate Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing sites (Terby Crater, Melas Chasma, and Gale Crater). A global Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) database has also been generated for purposes of making 'Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components, averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude bins and 15 degree L(sub S) bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. Comparisons show reasonably good consistency between Mars-GRAM with low dust optical depth and both TES observed and mesoscale model simulated density at the three study sites. Mean winds differ by a more significant degree. Comparisons of mesoscale and TES standard deviations' with conventional Mars-GRAM values, show that Mars-GRAM density perturbations are somewhat conservative (larger than observed variability), while mesoscale-modeled wind variations are larger than Mars-GRAM model estimates. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  12. Utilizing Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) to Evaluate Entry Probe Mission Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. An overview is presented of Mars-GRAM 2005 and its new features. The "auxiliary profile" option is one new feature of Mars-GRAM 2005. This option uses an input file of temperature and density versus altitude to replace the mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. Any source of data or alternate model output can be used to generate an auxiliary profile. Auxiliary profiles for this study were produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5) model) and a global Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) database. The global TES database has been specifically generated for purposes of making Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components, averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude-longitude bins and 15 degree Ls bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sites are used as a sample of how Mars-GRAM' could be a valuable tool for planning of future Mars entry probe missions. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from the mesoscale model output and TES observed data for candidate MSL landing sites. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  13. Utilizing Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) to Evaluate Entry Probe Mission Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. An overview is presented of Mars-GRAM 2005 and its new features. The "auxiliary profile" option is one new feature of Mars-GRAM 2005. This option uses an input file of temperature and density versus altitude to replace the mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. Any source of data or alternate model output can be used to generate an auxiliary profile. Auxiliary profiles for this study were produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5) model) and a global Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) database. The global TES database has been specifically generated for purposes of making Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components, averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude-longitude bins and 15 degree Ls bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) sites are used as a sample of how Mars-GRAM' could be a valuable tool for planning of future Mars entry probe missions. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from the mesoscale model output and TES observed data for candidate MSL landing sites. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  14. Validation of Mars-GRAM and Planned New Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Keller, Vernon W.

    2004-01-01

    For altitudes below 80 km, Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is based on output climatology from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). At COSPAR 2002, results were presented of validation tests of Mars-GRAM versus data from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and Radio Science (RS) experiment. Further validation tests are presented comparing Mars- GRAM densities with those from the European Mars Climate Database (MCD), and comparing densities from both Mars-GRAM and MCD against TES observations. Throughout most of the height and latitude range of TES data (040 km and 70s to 70N), good agreement is found between atmospheric densities from Mars-GRAM and MCD. However, at the season and latitude zone for Mars Phoenix arrival and landing (Ls = 65 to 80 degrees and latitude 65 to 75N), Mars-GRAM densities are about 30 to 45 percent higher than MCD densities near 40 km altitude. Further evaluation is warranted concerning potential impact of these model differences on planning for Phoenix entry and descent. Three planned features for Mars-GRAM update are also discussed: (1) new MGCM and Thermospheric General Circulation Model data sets to be used as a revised basis for Mars-GRAM mean atmosphere, (2) a new feature to represent planetary-scale traveling waves for upper altitude density variations (such as found during Mars Odyssey aerobraking), and (3) a new model for effects of high resolution topographic slope on winds near the surface (0 to 4.5 km above MOLA topography level). Mars-GRAM slope winds will be computed from a diagnostic (algebraic) relationship based on Ye, Segal, and Pielke (1990). This approach differs from mesoscale models (such as MRAMS and Mars MM5), which use prognostic, full-physics solutions of the time- and space-dependent differential equations of motion. As such, slope winds in Mars-GRAM will be consistent with its "engineering-level" approach, and will be extremely fast and easy to evaluate

  15. Applications of Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) Supporting Mission Site Selection for Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) is an engineering level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. An overview is presented of Mars-GRAM 2005 and its new features. One new feature of Mars-GRAM 2005 is the 'auxiliary profile' option. In this option, an input file of temperature and density versus altitude is used to replace mean atmospheric values from Mars-GRAM's conventional (General Circulation Model) climatology. An auxiliary profile can be generated from any source of data or alternate model output. Auxiliary profiles for this study were produced from mesoscale model output (Southwest Research Institute's Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS) model and Oregon State University's Mars mesoscale model (MMM5)model) and a global Thermal Emission Spectrometer(TES) database. The global TES database has been specifically generated for purposes of making Mars-GRAM auxiliary profiles. This data base contains averages and standard deviations of temperature, density, and thermal wind components,averaged over 5-by-5 degree latitude-longitude bins and 15 degree L(s) bins, for each of three Mars years of TES nadir data. Results are presented using auxiliary profiles produced from the mesoscale model output and TES observed data for candidate Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) landing sites. Input parameters rpscale (for density perturbations) and rwscale (for wind perturbations) can be used to "recalibrate" Mars-GRAM perturbation magnitudes to better replicate observed or mesoscale model variability.

  16. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification has also been made which allows heights to go below local terrain height and return realistic pressure, density, and temperature (not the surface values) as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local valley areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch version of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  17. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (MARS-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification was also made which allows heights to go 'below' local terrain height and return 'realistic' pressure, density, and temperature, and not the surface values, as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local 'valley' areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch versions of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  18. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) and Database for Mission Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Duvall, Aleta; Johnson, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2001) is an engineering-level Mars atmosphere model widely used for many Mars mission applications. From 0-80 km, it is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model, while above 80 km it is based on Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model. Mars-GRAM 2001 and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter. Validation studies are described comparing Mars-GRAM with Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science and Thermal Emission Spectrometer data. RS data from 2480 profiles were used, covering latitudes 75 deg S to 72 deg N, surface to approximately 40 km, for seasons ranging from areocentric longitude of Sun (Ls) = 70-160 deg and 265-310 deg. RS data spanned a range of local times, mostly 0-9 hours and 18-24 hours. For interests in aerocapture and precision landing, comparisons concentrated on atmospheric density. At a fixed height of 20 km, RS density varied by about a factor of 2.5 over ranges of latitudes and Ls values observed. Evaluated at matching positions and times, these figures show average RSMars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-)0.05, except at heights above approximately 25 km and latitudes above approximately 50 deg N. Average standard deviation of RSMars-GRAM density ratio was 6%. TES data were used covering surface to approximately 40 km, over more than a full Mars year (February, 1999 - June, 2001, just before start of a Mars global dust storm). Depending on season, TES data covered latitudes 85 deg S to 85 deg N. Most TES data were concentrated near local times 2 hours and 14 hours. Observed average TES/Mars-GRAM density ratios were generally 1+/-0.05, except at high altitudes (15-30 km, depending on season) and high latitudes (greater than 45 deg N), or at most altitudes in the southern hemisphere at Ls approximately 90 and 180 deg. Compared to TES averages for a given latitude and season, TES data had average density standard deviation about the mean of

  19. Independent Verification of Mars-GRAM 2010 with Mars Climate Sounder Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Burns, Kerry L.

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission and engineering applications. Applications of Mars-GRAM include systems design, performance analysis, and operations planning for aerobraking, entry, descent and landing, and aerocapture. Atmospheric influences on landing site selection and long-term mission conceptualization and development can also be addressed utilizing Mars-GRAM. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte Carlo mode, to perform high-fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing. Mars-GRAM is an evolving software package resulting in improved accuracy and additional features. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Above 80 km, Mars-GRAM is based on the University of Michigan Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM). The most recent release of Mars-GRAM 2010 includes an update to Fortran 90/95 and the addition of adjustment factors. These adjustment factors are applied to the input data from the MGCM and the MTGCM for the mapping year 0 user-controlled dust case. The adjustment factors are expressed as a function of height (z), latitude and areocentric solar longitude (Ls).

  20. Utilizing Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) to Evaluate Entry Probe Mission Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL)1. Traditional Mars-GRAM options for representing the mean atmosphere along entry corridors include: a) TES Mapping Years 1 and 2, with Mars-GRAM data coming from MGCM model results driven by observed TES dust optical depth; and b) TES Mapping Year 0, with user-controlled dust optical depth and Mars-GRAM data interpolated from MGCM model results driven by selected values of globally-uniform dust optical depth. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Mars-GRAM and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), with altitudes referenced to the MOLA areoid, or constant potential surface. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated2 against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES)

  1. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) Version 3.8: Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, B. F.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) Version 3.8 is presented and its new features are discussed. Mars-GRAM uses new values of planetary reference ellipsoid radii, gravity term, and rotation rate (consistent with current JPL values) and includes centrifugal effects on gravity. The model now uses NASA Ames Global Circulation Model low resolution topography. Curvature corrections are applied to winds and limits based on speed of sound are applied. Altitude of the F1 ionization peak and density scale height, including effects of change of molecular weight with altitude are computed. A check is performed to disallow temperatures below CO2 sublimination. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAM source code and data files and running the program. Sample input and output are provided. An example of incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code is also given.

  2. Martian Atmospheric Modeling of Scale Factors for MarsGRAM 2005 and the MAVEN Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCullough, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For spacecraft missions to Mars, especially the navigation of Martian orbiters and landers, an extensive knowledge of the Martian atmosphere is extremely important. The generally-accepted NASA standard for modeling (MarsGRAM), which was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. MarsGRAM is useful for task such as aerobraking, performance analysis and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Unfortunately, the densities for the Martian atmosphere in MarsGRAM are based on table look-up and not on an analytical algorithm. Also, these values can vary drastically from the densities actually experienced by the spacecraft. This does not have much of an impact on simple integrations but drastically affects its usefulness in other applications, especially those in navigation. For example, the navigation team for the Mars Atmosphere Volatile Environment (MAVEN) Project uses MarsGRAM to target the desired atmospheric density for the orbiter's pariapse passage, its closet approach to the planet. After the satellite's passage through pariapsis the computed density is compared to the MarsGRAM model and a scale factor is assigned to the model to account for the difference. Therefore, large variations in the atmosphere from the model can cause unexpected deviations from the spacecraft's planned trajectory. In order to account for this, an analytic stochastic model of the scale factor's behavior is desired. The development of this model will allow for the MAVEN navigation team to determine the probability of various Martian atmospheric variations and their effects on the spacecraft.

  3. Martian Atmospheric Modeling of Scale Factors for MarsGRAM 2005 and the MAVEN Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCullough, Chris

    2011-01-01

    For spacecraft missions to Mars, especially the navigation of Martian orbiters and landers, an extensive knowledge of the Martian atmosphere is extremely important. The generally-accepted NASA standard for modeling (MarsGRAM), which was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. MarsGRAM is useful for task such as aerobraking, performance analysis and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture. Unfortunately, the densities for the Martian atmosphere in MarsGRAM are based on table look-up and not on an analytical algorithm. Also, these values can vary drastically from the densities actually experienced by the spacecraft. This does not have much of an impact on simple integrations but drastically affects its usefulness in other applications, especially those in navigation. For example, the navigation team for the Mars Atmosphere Volatile Environment (MAVEN) Project uses MarsGRAM to target the desired atmospheric density for the orbiter's pariapse passage, its closet approach to the planet. After the satellite's passage through pariapsis the computed density is compared to the MarsGRAM model and a scale factor is assigned to the model to account for the difference. Therefore, large variations in the atmosphere from the model can cause unexpected deviations from the spacecraft's planned trajectory. In order to account for this, an analytic stochastic model of the scale factor's behavior is desired. The development of this model will allow for the MAVEN navigation team to determine the probability of various Martian atmospheric variations and their effects on the spacecraft.

  4. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): Release No. 2 - Overview and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, B.; Johnson, D.; Tyree, L.

    1993-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM), a science and engineering model for empirically parameterizing the temperature, pressure, density, and wind structure of the Martian atmosphere, is described with particular attention to the model's newest version, Mars-GRAM, Release No. 2 and to the improvements incorporated into the Release No. 2 model as compared with the Release No. 1 version. These improvements include (1) an addition of a new capability to simulate local-scale Martian dust storms and the growth and decay of these storms; (2) an addition of the Zurek and Haberle (1988) wave perturbation model, for simulating tidal perturbation effects; and (3) a new modular version of Mars-GRAM, for incorporation as a subroutine into other codes.

  5. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2001 Version (Mars-GRAM 2001): Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    This document presents Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2001 Version (Mars-GRAM 2001) and its new features. As with the previous version (mars-2000), all parameterizations fro temperature, pressure, density, and winds versus height, latitude, longitude, time of day, and season (Ls) use input data tables from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) for the surface through 80-km altitude and the University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for 80 to 70 km. Mars-GRAM 2001 is based on topography from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) and includes new MGCM data at the topographic surface. A new auxiliary program allows Mars-GRAM output to be used to compute shortwave (solar) and longwave (thermal) radiation at the surface and top of atmosphere. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAN source code and data files and for running the program. It also provides sample input and output and an example for incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  6. Evaluating Mars Science Laboratory Landing Sites with the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL) [1]. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). Mars-GRAM and MGCM use surface topography from Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), with altitudes referenced to the MOLA areoid, or constant potential surface. Traditional Mars-GRAM options for representing the mean atmosphere along entry corridors include: (1) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) mapping years 1 and 2, with Mars-GRAM data coming from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) results driven by observed TES dust optical depth or (2) TES mapping year 0, with user-controlled dust optical depth and Mars-GRAM data interpolated from MGCM model results driven by selected values of globally-uniform dust optical depth. Mars-GRAM 2005 has been validated [2] against Radio Science data, and both nadir and limb data from TES [3]. There are several new features included in Mars-GRAM 2005. The first is the option to use input data sets from MGCM model runs that were designed to closely simulate conditions observed during the first two years of TES observations at Mars. The TES Year 1 option includes values from April 1999 through January 2001. The TES Year 2 option includes values from February 2001 through December 2002. The second new feature is the option to read and use any auxiliary profile of temperature and density versus altitude. In exercising the auxiliary profile Mars-GRAM option, values from the auxiliary profile replace data from the original MGCM databases. Some examples of auxiliary profiles include data from TES nadir or limb observations and Mars mesoscale model output at a particular

  7. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34): Programmer's Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie F.; Johnson, Dale L.

    1996-01-01

    This is a programmer's guide for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 3.34). Included are a brief history and review of the model since its origin in 1988 and a technical discussion of recent additions and modifications. Examples of how to run both the interactive and batch (subroutine) forms are presented. Instructions are provided on how to customize output of the model for various parameters of the Mars atmosphere. Detailed descriptions are given of the main driver programs, subroutines, and associated computational methods. Lists and descriptions include input, output, and local variables in the programs. These descriptions give a summary of program steps and 'map' of calling relationships among the subroutines. Definitions are provided for the variables passed between subroutines through common lists. Explanations are provided for all diagnostic and progress messages generated during execution of the program. A brief outline of future plans for Mars-GRAM is also presented.

  8. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2000 Version (Mars-GRAM 2000): Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, B. F.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model 2000 Version (Mars-GRAM 2000) and its new features. All parameterizations for temperature, pressure, density, and winds versus height, latitude, longitude, time of day, and L(sub s) have been replaced by input data tables from NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) for the surface through 80-km altitude and the University of Arizona Mars Thermospheric General Circulation Model (MTGCM) for 80 to 170 km. A modified Stewart thermospheric model is still used for higher altitudes and for dependence on solar activity. "Climate factors" to tune for agreement with GCM data are no longer needed. Adjustment of exospheric temperature is still an option. Consistent with observations from Mars Global Surveyor, a new longitude-dependent wave model is included with user input to specify waves having 1 to 3 wavelengths around the planet. A simplified perturbation model has been substituted for the earlier one. An input switch allows users to select either East or West longitude positive. This memorandum includes instructions on obtaining Mars-GRAM source code and data files and for running the program. It also provides sample input and output and an example for incorporating Mars-GRAM as an atmospheric subroutine in a trajectory code.

  9. A Revised Thermosphere for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM Version 3.4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Johnson, D. L.; James, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the newly-revised model thermosphere for the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM, Version 3.4). It also provides descriptions of other changes made to the program since publication of the programmer's guide for Mars-GRAM Version 3.34. The original Mars-GRAM model thermosphere was based on the global-mean model of Stewart. The revised thermosphere is based largely on parameterizations derived from output data from the three-dimensional Mars Thermospheric Global Circulation Model (MTGCM). The new thermospheric model includes revised dependence on the 10.7 cm solar flux for the global means of exospheric temperature, temperature of the base of the thermosphere, and scale height for the thermospheric temperature variations, as well as revised dependence on orbital position for global mean height of the base of the thermosphere. Other features of the new thermospheric model are: (1) realistic variations of temperature and density with latitude and time of day, (2) more realistic wind magnitudes, based on improved estimates of horizontal pressure gradients, and (3) allowance for user-input adjustments to the model values for mean exospheric temperature and for height and temperature at the base of the thermosphere. Other new features of Mars-GRAM 3.4 include: (1) allowance for user-input values of climatic adjustment factors for temperature profiles from the surface to 75 km, and (2) a revised method for computing the sub-solar longitude position in the 'ORBIT' subroutine.

  10. Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM 2005) Applications for Mars Science Laboratory Mission Site Selection Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.

    2007-01-01

    The new Mars-GRAM auxiliary profile capability, using data from TES observations, mesoscale model output, or other sources, allows a potentially higher fidelity representation of the atmosphere, and a more accurate way of estimating inherent uncertainty in atmospheric density and winds. Figure 3 indicates that, with nominal value rpscale=1, Mars-GRAM perturbations would tend to overestimate observed or mesoscale-modeled variability. To better represent TES and mesoscale model density perturbations, rpscale values as low as about 0.4 could be used. Some trajectory model implementations of Mars-GRAM allow the user to dynamically change rpscale and rwscale values with altitude. Figure 4 shows that an mscale value of about 1.2 would better replicate wind standard deviations from MRAMS or MMM5 simulations at the Gale, Terby, or Melas sites. By adjusting the rpscale and rwscale values in Mars-GRAM based on figures such as Figure 3 and 4, we can provide more accurate end-to-end simulations for EDL at the candidate MSL landing sites.

  11. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  12. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Michael S.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A.

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  13. Camera sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlueter, Jonathan; Murphey, Yi L.; Miller, John W. V.; Shridhar, Malayappan; Luo, Yun; Khairallah, Farid

    2004-12-01

    As the cost/performance Ratio of vision systems improves with time, new classes of applications become feasible. One such area, automotive applications, is currently being investigated. Applications include occupant detection, collision avoidance and lane tracking. Interest in occupant detection has been spurred by federal automotive safety rules in response to injuries and fatalities caused by deployment of occupant-side air bags. In principle, a vision system could control airbag deployment to prevent this type of mishap. Employing vision technology here, however, presents a variety of challenges, which include controlling costs, inability to control illumination, developing and training a reliable classification system and loss of performance due to production variations due to manufacturing tolerances and customer options. This paper describes the measures that have been developed to evaluate the sensitivity of an occupant detection system to these types of variations. Two procedures are described for evaluating how sensitive the classifier is to camera variations. The first procedure is based on classification accuracy while the second evaluates feature differences.

  14. Sensitivity studies of crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Sessler, A.M.

    1996-07-01

    The equations of motion are presented, appropriate to interacting charged particles of diverse charge and mass, subject to the external forces produced by various kinds of magnetic fields and rf electric fields in storage rings. These equations have been employed in the molecular dynamics simulations for sensitivity studies of crystalline beams. The two necessary conditions for the formation and maintenance of crystalline beams are summarized. Effects of lattice shear and AG focusing, magnetic field imperfection, and ion neutralization on crystalline beam heating is presented.

  15. Pathophysiological Study of Sensitive Skin.

    PubMed

    Buhé, Virginie; Vié, Katell; Guéré, Christelle; Natalizio, Audrey; Lhéritier, Céline; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Huet, Flavien; Talagas, Matthieu; Lebonvallet, Nicolas; Marcorelles, Pascale; Carré, Jean-Luc; Misery, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical syndrome characterized by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations, such as pruritus, burning or pain, in response to various factors, including skincare products, water, cold, heat, or other physical and/or chemical factors. Although these symptoms suggest inflammation and the activation of peripheral innervation, the pathophysiogeny of sensitive skin remains unknown. We systematically analysed cutaneous biopsies from 50 healthy women with non-sensitive or sensitive skin and demonstrated that the intraepidermal nerve fibre density, especially that of peptidergic C-fibres, was lower in the sensitive skin group. These fibres are involved in pain, itching and temperature perception, and their degeneration may promote allodynia and similar symptoms. These results suggest that the pathophysiology of skin sensitivity resembles that of neuropathic pruritus within the context of small fibre neuropathy, and that environmental factors may alter skin innervation.

  16. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  17. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  18. Icing Encounter Duration Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to investigate how aerodynamic performance degradation progresses with time throughout an exposure to icing conditions. It is one of the first documented studies of the effects of ice contamination on aerodynamic performance at various points in time throughout an icing encounter. Both a 1.5 and 6 ft chord, two-dimensional, NACA-23012 airfoils were subjected to icing conditions in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for varying lengths of time. At the end of each run, lift, drag, and pitching moment measurements were made. Measurements with the 1.5 ft chord model showed that maximum lift and pitching moment degraded more rapidly early in the exposure and degraded more slowly as time progressed. Drag for the 1.5 ft chord model degraded more linearly with time, although drag for very short exposure durations was slightly higher than expected. Only drag measurements were made with the 6 ft chord airfoil. Here, drag for the long exposures was higher than expected. Novel comparison of drag measurements versus an icing scaling parameter, accumulation parameter times collection efficiency was used to compare the data from the two different size model. The comparisons provided a means of assessing the level of fidelity needed for accurate icing simulation.

  19. Methods for Studying Sensitive Family Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelles, Richard J.

    This paper examines the major problems which confront researchers who wish to study sensitive topics in family relations. The major obstacles typically encountered are (1) locating subjects; (2) getting cooperation; and (3) obtaining valid and reliable data. A second section of the paper discusses methods of overcoming these obstacles. One…

  20. Adjoint sensitivity study on idealized explosive cyclogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Kekuan; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-01

    The adjoint sensitivity related to explosive cyclogenesis in a conditionally unstable atmosphere is investigated in this study. The PSU/NCAR limited-area, nonhydrostatic primitive equation numerical model MM5 and its adjoint system are employed for numerical simulation and adjoint computation, respectively. To ensure the explosive development of a baroclinic wave, the forecast model is initialized with an idealized condition including an idealized two-dimensional baroclinic jet with a balanced three-dimensional moderate-amplitude disturbance, derived from a potential vorticity inversion technique. Firstly, the validity period of the tangent linear model for this idealized baroclinic wave case is discussed, considering different initial moisture distributions and a dry condition. Secondly, the 48-h forecast surface pressure center and the vertical component of the relative vorticity of the cyclone are selected as the response functions for adjoint computation in a dry and moist environment, respectively. The preliminary results show that the validity of the tangent linear assumption for this idealized baroclinic wave case can extend to 48 h with intense moist convection, and the validity period can last even longer in the dry adjoint integration. Adjoint sensitivity analysis indicates that the rapid development of the idealized baroclinic wave is sensitive to the initial wind and temperature perturbations around the steering level in the upstream. Moreover, the moist adjoint sensitivity can capture a secondary high sensitivity center in the upper troposphere, which cannot be depicted in the dry adjoint run.

  1. Actinic Flux Calculations: A Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Flittner, D.; Ahmad, Z.; Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    calculate direct and diffuse surface irradiance and actinic flux (downwelling (2p) and total (4p)) for the reference model. Sensitivity analysis has shown that the accuracy of the radiative transfer flux calculations for a unit ETS (i.e. atmospheric transmittance) together with a numerical interpolation technique for the constituents' vertical profiles is better than 1% for SZA less than 70(sub o) and wavelengths longer than 310 nm. The differences increase for shorter wavelengths and larger SZA, due to the differences in pseudo-spherical correction techniques and vertical discretetization among the codes. Our sensitivity study includes variation of ozone cross-sections, ETS spectra and the effects of wavelength shifts between vacuum and air scales. We also investigate the effects of aerosols on the spectral flux components in the UV and visible spectral regions. The "aerosol correction factors" (ACFs) were calculated at discrete wavelengths and different SZAs for each flux component (direct, diffuse, reflected) and prescribed IPMMI aerosol parameters. Finally, the sensitivity study was extended to calculation of selected photolysis rates coefficients.

  2. Studies on sensitive Raman gas detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Duluo; Xu, Yongyue; Wang, Xinbing; Xiong, Youhui

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies on signal enhancement of spontaneous Raman scattering for developing of sensitive Raman gas detectors are reported. Raman scattering is a gas detecting method with high feasibility, but usually its signal is very low. To improve the level and the quality of the Raman signal, the effects of pumping laser source, sample cell, and optical arrangement are studied in detail. It is found that not only the wall of sample cell will give a wide Raman or fluorescence background which will decrease the sensitivity, but the dichroic beam splitter will also contribute considerable background if it is not aligned properly. The sample cell of hollow fiber is characterized by its high responsibility as well as its high background and low signal contrast. When the hollow fiber is replaced by a free-space sample cell consisted of metal-coated parabolic reflector, the wide background is largely suppressed. If there is no common optical elements between the pumping and collecting optical systems, the wide background will be cut down obviously, which is proved by the intracavity-enhanced Raman scattering in a He-Ne laser. These experimental results will be helpful for the research and developing of highly sensitive Raman gas detectors.

  3. Actinic Flux Calculations: A Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Flittner, D.; Ahmad, Z.; Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    calculate direct and diffuse surface irradiance and actinic flux (downwelling (2p) and total (4p)) for the reference model. Sensitivity analysis has shown that the accuracy of the radiative transfer flux calculations for a unit ETS (i.e. atmospheric transmittance) together with a numerical interpolation technique for the constituents' vertical profiles is better than 1% for SZA less than 70(sub o) and wavelengths longer than 310 nm. The differences increase for shorter wavelengths and larger SZA, due to the differences in pseudo-spherical correction techniques and vertical discretetization among the codes. Our sensitivity study includes variation of ozone cross-sections, ETS spectra and the effects of wavelength shifts between vacuum and air scales. We also investigate the effects of aerosols on the spectral flux components in the UV and visible spectral regions. The "aerosol correction factors" (ACFs) were calculated at discrete wavelengths and different SZAs for each flux component (direct, diffuse, reflected) and prescribed IPMMI aerosol parameters. Finally, the sensitivity study was extended to calculation of selected photolysis rates coefficients.

  4. Advanced protein crystal growth programmatic sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the costs of various APCG (Advanced Protein Crystal Growth) program options and to determine the parameters which, if changed, impact the costs and goals of the programs and to what extent. This was accomplished by developing and evaluating several alternate programmatic scenarios for the microgravity Advanced Protein Crystal Growth program transitioning from the present shuttle activity to the man tended Space Station to the permanently manned Space Station. These scenarios include selected variations in such sensitivity parameters as development and operational costs, schedules, technology issues, and crystal growth methods. This final report provides information that will aid in planning the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth Program.

  5. Pharmacology and toxicology of sensitizers: mechanism studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rauth, A.M.

    1984-08-01

    Nitroimidazoles are being studied extensively as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers. Besides their ability to selectively sensitize hypoxic cells to radiation, which depends on the parent compound, nitroimidazoles have a variety of other effects in vitro, in vivo and clinically which appear to require reductive metabolism. As a first step to suggesting possible mechanisms for these other biological effects, a summary has been made of the known oxidative and reductive products of the two most widely studied radiosensitizers, metronidazole and misonidazole. As a second step to suggesting possible mechanisms for these biological effects, it is important to view the problem in terms of the in vivo situation where distribution and sites of metabolism of the drug and its reduction products will be important factors. Combining basic information about the reduction chemistry of nitroimidazoles with knowledge about the pharmacology of drugs and their reduced products should allow a better assessment of mechanism of action as well as a better implementation of these drugs clinically.

  6. Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrick, Anne; LBNE Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will address the neutrino mass hierarchy, leptonic CP violation, and the value of the mixing angle Theta13 with unprecedented sensitivity. Protons from the Fermilab Main Injector will impinge on a target to create intense fluxes of charged pions and other mesons. The mesons will be guided down a 250 m length of pipe where they will decay creating a muon neutrino beam. The beam will pass through a near detector and travel on to massive detectors located in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Lab (DUSEL) in Western South Dakota. The near detector at Fermilab will measure the absolute flux of neutrinos before oscillation, and measure signal and background processes in the poorly understood GeV neutrino energy range. To quantify the potential sensitivity of this experiment and the specific needs of the near detector, simulation work has been undertaken. In particular, results of studies using a more sophisticated understanding of various background processes will be presented. Additionally, hardware work for a possible near detector design will be presented.

  7. Microphysical modeling of cirrus 2. Sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Toon, O.B.; Westphal, D.L.

    1994-05-20

    The one-dimensional cirrus model described in part 1 of this issue has been used to study the sensitivity of simulated cirrus microphysical and radiative properties to poorly known model parameters, poorly understood physical processes, and environmental conditions. Model parameters and physical processes investigated include nucleation rate, mode of nucleation (e.g., homogeneous freezing of aerosols and liquid droplets or heterogeneous deposition), ice crystal shape, and coagulation. These studies suggest that the leading sources of uncertainty in the model are the phase change (liquid-solid) energy barrier and the ice-water surface energy which dominate the homogeneous freezing nucleation rate and the coagulation sticking efficiency at low temperatures which controls the production of large ice crystals (radii greater than 100 {mu}m). Environmental conditions considered in sensitivity tests were CN size distribution, vertical wind speed, and cloud height. The authors found that variations in the total number of condensation nuclei (CN) have little effect on cirrus properties, since nucleation occurs only on the largest CN at the tail of the size distribution. The total number of ice crystals which nucleate depends primarily on the temperature and the cooling rate. Increasing the height of the clouds in the model leads to an increase in ice number density, a decrease in effective radius, and a decrease in ice water content. The most prominent effect of increasing cloud height was a rapid increase in the net cloud radiative forcing which can be attributed to the change in cloud temperature as well as change in cloud ice crystal size distributions. It has long been recognized that changes in cloud height or cloud area have the greatest potential for causing feedbacks on climate change. These results suggest that variations in vertical velocity or cloud microphysical changes associated with cloud height changes may also be important. 27 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Microphysical modeling of cirrus. 2: Sensitivity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Westphal, Douglas L.; Kinne, Stefan; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    The one-dimensional cirrus model described in part 1 of this issue has been used to study the sensitivity of simulated cirrus microphysical and radiative properties to poorly known model parameters, poorly understood physical processes, and environmental conditions. Model parameters and physical processes investigated include nucleation rate, mode of nucleation (e.g., homogeneous freezing of aerosols and liquid droplets or heterogeneous deposition), ice crystal shape, and coagulation. These studies suggest that the leading sources of uncertainty in the model are the phase change (liquid-solid) energy barrier and the ice-water surface energy which dominate the homogeneous freezing nucleation rate and the coagulation sticking efficiency at low temperatures which controls the production of large ice crystals (radii greater than 100 mcirons). Environmental conditions considered in sensitivity tests were CN size distribution, vertical wind speed, and cloud height. We found that (unlike stratus clouds) variations in the total number of condensation nuclei (NC) have little effect on cirrus microphysical and radiative properties, since nucleation occurs only on the largest CN at the tail of the size distribution. The total number of ice crystals which nucleate has little or no relationship to the number of CN present and depends primarily on the temperature and the cooling rate. Stronger updrafts (more rapid cooling) generate higher ice number densities, ice water content, cloud optical depth, and net radiative forcing. Increasing the height of the clouds in the model leads to an increase in ice number density, a decrease in effective radius, and a decrease in ice water content. The most prominent effect of increasing cloud height was a rapid increase in the net cloud radiative forcing which can be attributed to the change in cloud temperature as well as change in cloud ice size distributions. It has long been recognized that changes in cloud height or cloud area have the

  9. [New horizons of gluten sensitivity studies].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I

    2013-01-01

    Gluten sensitivity may be a cause of gluten-sensitivity celiac disease (GCD). Some gluten-sensitive subjects may have symptoms of GCD, but lack its characteristic changes in the small bowel mucosa (SBM) and a gluten-free diet results in the disappearance of clinical symptoms of GCD. If there is no gluten allergy, the concept "gluten intolerance (GI) unassociated with celiac disease" is applicable in these cases. There is an increase in the prevalence of GCD and GI, which is associated with the use of gluten in food industry to improve the taste and energy density of foods and with the damaging effect of viruses and bacteria on enterocyte membranes, thereby facilitating the penetration of gluten through SBM. The paper gives an update on progress in the diagnosis of GCD and GI and on prospects for designing gluten-free cereals.

  10. Low-Speed Pressure Sensitive Paint Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Brown; Mehta, Rabindra; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A series of low speed (M less than 0.2) experiments using University of Washington Fib-07 Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) have been conducted at NASA Ames on a NACA 0012 airfoil. Significant improvements in results have been shown: PSP calibration errors of the improved data (with pressure taps as a reference) now agree with theoretical error limits. Additional measurements on the 0012 airfoil using Temperature Sensitive Paint have been made. These TSP measurements now fully quantify the impact of temporal temperature changes on model surfaces on PSP measurements. Finally, simultaneous PSP - TSP measurements have been performed, allowing in-situ temperature correction of PSP data with good results.

  11. Animal models to study gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2012-07-01

    The initial development and maintenance of tolerance to dietary antigens is a complex process that, when prevented or interrupted, can lead to human disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which tolerance to specific dietary antigens is attained and maintained is crucial to our understanding of the pathogenesis of diseases related to intolerance of specific dietary antigens. Two diseases that are the result of intolerance to a dietary antigen are celiac disease (CD) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). Both of these diseases are dependent upon the ingestion of gluten (the protein fraction of wheat, rye, and barley) and manifest in the gastrointestinal tract and skin, respectively. These gluten-sensitive diseases are two examples of how devastating abnormal immune responses to a ubiquitous food can be. The well-recognized risk genotype for both is conferred by either of the HLA class II molecules DQ2 or DQ8. However, only a minority of individuals who carry these molecules will develop either disease. Also of interest is that the age at diagnosis can range from infancy to 70-80 years of age. This would indicate that intolerance to gluten may potentially be the result of two different phenomena. The first would be that, for various reasons, tolerance to gluten never developed in certain individuals, but that for other individuals, prior tolerance to gluten was lost at some point after childhood. Of recent interest is the concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which manifests as chronic digestive or neurologic symptoms due to gluten, but through mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. This review will address how animal models of gluten-sensitive disorders have substantially contributed to a better understanding of how gluten intolerance can arise and cause disease.

  12. Animal Models to Study Gluten Sensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Marietta, Eric V.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    The initial development and maintenance of tolerance to dietary antigens is a complex process that, when prevented or interrupted, can lead to human disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which tolerance to specific dietary antigens is attained and maintained is crucial to our understanding of the pathogenesis of diseases related to intolerance of specific dietary antigens. Two diseases that are the result of intolerance to a dietary antigen are celiac disease (CD) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). Both of these diseases are dependent upon the ingestion of gluten (the protein fraction of wheat, rye, and barley) and manifest in the gastrointestinal tract and skin, respectively. These gluten-sensitive diseases are two examples of how devastating abnormal immune responses to a ubiquitous food can be. The well-recognized risk genotype for both is conferred by either of the HLA class II molecules DQ2 or DQ8. However, only a minority of individuals who carry these molecules will develop either disease. Also of interest is that the age at diagnosis can range from infancy to 70–80 years of age. This would indicate that intolerance to gluten may potentially be the result of two different phenomena. The first would be that, for various reasons, tolerance to gluten never developed in certain individuals, but that for other individuals, prior tolerance to gluten was lost at some point after childhood. Of recent interest is the concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, which manifests as chronic digestive or neurologic symptoms due to gluten, but through mechanisms that remain to be elucidated. This review will address how animal models of gluten-sensitive disorders have substantially contributed to a better understanding of how gluten intolerance can arise and cause disease. PMID:22572887

  13. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  14. Sensitive scalp: does this condition exist? An epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent; Sibaud, Vincent; Ambronati, Marc; Macy, Guy; Boussetta, Sami; Taieb, Charles

    2008-04-01

    The concept of the 'sensitive scalp' is vague. However, the 'sensitive skin syndrome' is probably not limited to the face. To evaluate and analyse sensitive scalp conditions. 1011 individuals, representative of the French population, were investigated. 44.2 % declared suffering from a 'sensitive scalp' (47.4% of women versus 40.8% of men). Of these subjects, 11.5% reported having an associated scalp disease versus 1.1% of non-sensitive subjects. Hair loss was significantly associated with scalp sensitivity. The scalp was dry for 24%, normal for 58%, greasy for 16% and mixed for 1%. 13% complained of prickling, 25% of itching and 2% of burning or pain. These symptoms were more frequent among those with a 'sensitive scalp'. The main triggering factors were considered to be pollution, heat, emotions and shampoos. No other area of skin sensitivity was specifically associated with scalp sensitivity. 'Scalp sensitivity' exists and occurs frequently. Triggering factors are numerous. Symptoms appear different from those of facial skin sensitivity. Further studies to define and assess sensitive scalp conditions are needed.

  15. HCIT Broadband Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2012-01-01

    One of the important milestones of the TPF Coronagraph project is to demonstrate the ability to predict the performance sensitivities of the system at levels consistent with exo-planet detection requirement. We want to gain some general understanding about the potentials and the limitations of the current single-Deformable-Mirror (DM) High-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) system through modeling and simulations. Specifically, we want to understand the effects of some common errors on the EFC-based control of e-field over a half dark-hole region and broadband contrast. Investigated errors include: (1) Absorbing particles on a flat-mirror (2) Defects on the Occulter surface (3) Dead actuators on the DM. We also investigated the effects of control bandwidth on the broadband contrast. We used a MACOS-based simulation algorithm which (1) combines a ray trace, diffraction model, & a broadband wavefront control algorithm (2) is capable of performing full three-dimensional near-field diffraction analysis

  16. Sensitivity Study for Long Term Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates using Markov models to establish system and maintenance requirements for small electronic controllers where the goal is a high probability of continuous service for a long period of time. The system and maintenance items considered are quality of components, various degrees of simple redundancy, redundancy with reconfiguration, diagnostic levels, periodic maintenance, and preventive maintenance. Markov models permit a quantitative investigation with comparison and contrast. An element of special interest is the use of conditional probability to study the combination of imperfect diagnostics and periodic maintenance.

  17. Studies for Improved Gravitational Wave Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bender, Peter L.

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the possible accuracy of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) for studying gravitational waves at frequencies below the usually quoted frequency range of 100 microHz to 1 Hz. The extended frequency range of most interest is from 3 to 100 microHz. During this work, a new source of spurious accelerations of the test masses for LISA that had been overlooked previously was identified. It is one of the main noise contributors at 100 microHz, and rises as the inverse of the frequency to become probably the largest error source at 3 microHz. The new error source is fluctuations in the charge on the test mass due to cosmic ray charging interacting with the electric fields inside the housing that carries the capacitive electrodes for sensing relative motion of the test mass with respect to the housing. Even for zero charge on the test mass, there will be electrical fields acting on each face due to work function differences between the capacitive electrodes and the test mass.

  18. Grid Sensitivity Study for Slat Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system is being investigated through computational fluid dynamics simulations in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustics solver. Many previous simulations have been performed for the configuration, and the case was introduced as a new category for the Second AIAA workshop on Benchmark problems for Airframe Noise Configurations (BANC-II). However, the cost of the simulations has restricted the study of grid resolution effects to a baseline grid and coarser meshes. In the present study, two different approaches are being used to investigate the effect of finer resolution of near-field unsteady structures. First, a standard grid refinement by a factor of two is used, and the calculations are performed by using the same CFL3D solver employed in the majority of the previous simulations. Second, the OVERFLOW code is applied to the baseline grid, but with a 5th-order upwind spatial discretization as compared with the second-order discretization used in the CFL3D simulations. In general, the fine grid CFL3D simulation and OVERFLOW calculation are in very good agreement and exhibit the lowest levels of both surface pressure fluctuations and radiated noise. Although the smaller scales resolved by these simulations increase the velocity fluctuation levels, they appear to mitigate the influence of the larger scales on the surface pressure. These new simulations are used to investigate the influence of the grid on unsteady high-lift simulations and to gain a better understanding of the physics responsible for the noise generation and radiation.

  19. HCIT Broadband Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2012-01-01

    The High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory employs a broadband wavefront correction algorithm called Electric Field Conjugation (EFC) to obtain the required 10-10 contrast. This algorithm works with one deformable mirror (DM) to estimate the electric-field to be controlled, and with one or multiple DM's to create a "darkhole" in a predefined region of the image plane where terrestrial planets would be found. We have investigated the effects of absorbing dust particles on a flat optic, absorbing spots on the occulting mask, dead actuators on the DM, and the effects of control bandwidth on the efficiency of the EFC algorithm in a Lyot coronagraph configuration. The structural design of the optical system as well as the parameters of various optical elements used in the analysis is drawn from those of the HCIT system that have been implemented with one DM. The simulation takes into account the surface errors of various optical elements. Results of some of these studies have been verified by actual measurements.

  20. On power and sample size calculation in ethnic sensitivity studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Sethuraman, Venkat

    2011-01-01

    In ethnic sensitivity studies, it is of interest to know whether the same dose has the same effect over populations in different regions. Glasbrenner and Rosenkranz (2006) proposed a criterion for ethnic sensitivity studies in the context of different dose-exposure models. Their method is liberal in the sense that their sample size will not achieve the target power. We will show that the power function can be easily calculated by numeric integration, and the sample size can be determined by bisection.

  1. Cultural Sensitivity Among Clinical Nurses: A Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Medine; Toksoy, Serap; Direk, Zübeyde Denizci; Bezirgan, Selma; Boylu, Münevver

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the cultural sensitivity of nurses working in rural and urban hospitals in Turkey. The sampling of this descriptive and correlational study was composed of only 516 clinical nurses working in inpatient clinics. The data collection tools were the Socio-Demographic Questionnaire and the Intercultural Sensitivity Scale. A majority of the participating nurses experienced culture-related problems. Intercultural Sensitivity Scale results were partially high. The nurses had more problems in areas related to language barriers, patients' education level, and health perception about disease and religious beliefs when providing health care. Participants who were female, had an undergraduate or graduate education, had received in-service education on cultural care, or had taken transcultural nursing coursework obtained higher scores on the Intercultural Sensitivity Scale and its Interaction Engagement subscale. The cultural sensitivity level was 84.01 ± 9.1 (range = 43-107). The proportion of nurses who had received no in-service education was very high. They wanted to participate in an education program to gain better understanding of the culture of the society in which they lived. The results of the present study demonstrated that nurses should be prepared in cultural sensitivity and cultural competence. Continuing education and formal courses on cultural sensitivity for nursing professionals are essential for optimal health outcomes. Thus, inequalities in health could be prevented and the quality of health care could be improved. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Studies on Early Allergic Sensitization in the Lithuanian Birth Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dubakiene, Ruta; Rudzeviciene, Odilija; Butiene, Indre; Sezaite, Indre; Petronyte, Malvina; Vaicekauskaite, Dalia; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2012-01-01

    Cohort studies are of great importance in defining the mechanism responsible for the development of allergy-associated diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, allergic asthma, and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. Although these disorders share genetic and environmental risk factors, it is still under debate whether they are linked or develop sequentially along an atopic pathway. The current study was aimed to determine the pattern of allergy sensitization in the Lithuanian birth cohort “Alergemol” (n = 1558) established as a part of the multicenter European birth cohort “EuroPrevall”. Early sensitization to food allergens in the “Alergemol” birth cohort was analysed. The analysis revealed 1.3% and 2.8% of symptomatic-sensitized subjects at 6 and 12 months of age, respectively. The sensitization pattern in response to different allergens in the group of infants with food allergy symptoms was studied using allergological methods in vivo and in vitro. The impact of maternal and environmental risk factors on the early development of food allergy in at 6 and 12 months of age was evaluated. Our data showed that maternal diet, diseases, the use of antibiotics, and tobacco smoke during pregnancy had no significant impact on the early sensitization to food allergens. However, infants of atopic mothers were significantly more often sensitized to egg as compared to the infants of nonatopic mothers. PMID:22606067

  3. Intercultural Sensitivity through Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Melanie; Miranda, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    One of the foremost-cited rationales for study abroad during college is the development of a global perspective and intercultural sensitivity. Although this argument is mentioned frequently in promotional materials for study abroad, it has not yet been backed by research based on the outcomes of students' study abroad experiences. As more…

  4. Intercultural Sensitivity through Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Melanie; Miranda, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    One of the foremost-cited rationales for study abroad during college is the development of a global perspective and intercultural sensitivity. Although this argument is mentioned frequently in promotional materials for study abroad, it has not yet been backed by research based on the outcomes of students' study abroad experiences. As more…

  5. Ethical problems and moral sensitivity in physiotherapy: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Kulju, Kati; Suhonen, Riitta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2013-08-01

    This study identified and described ethical problems encountered by physiotherapists in their practice and physiotherapists' moral sensitivity in ethical situations. A questionnaire-based survey was constructed to identify ethical problems, and the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire Revised version was used to measure moral sensitivity. Physiotherapists (n = 116) working in public health services responded to the questionnaire. Based on the results, most of the physiotherapists encounter ethical problems weekly. They concern mainly financial considerations, equality and justice, professionalism, unethical conduct of physiotherapists or other professions and patients' self-determination. The dimension of moral strength was emphasised in physiotherapists' self-evaluations of their moral sensitivity. As a conclusion, ethical problems do occur not only at individual level but also at organisational and society level. Physiotherapists seem to have moral strength for speaking on behalf of the patient. Scarce resources make them feel insufficient but much could still be done to provide quality care in co-operation with other health-care professionals.

  6. Demographic Predictors of Pain Sensitivity: Results From the OPPERA Study.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Cara; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Dubner, Ronald; Fillingim, Roger B; Ohrbach, Richard; Slade, Gary D; Greenspan, Joel D

    2017-03-01

    The demographic factors of sex, age, and race/ethnicity are well recognized as relevant to pain sensitivity and clinical pain expression. Of these, sex differences have been the most frequently studied, and most of the literature describes greater pain sensitivity for women. The other 2 factors have been less frequently evaluated, and current literature is not definitive. Taking advantage of the large Orofacial Pain: Prospective Evaluation and Risk Assessment (OPPERA) study cohort, we evaluated the association of sex, age, and self-reported race with 34 measures of pressure, mechanical, and thermal pain sensitivity encompassing threshold and suprathreshold perception. Women were significantly more pain-sensitive than men for 29 of 34 measures. Age effects were small, and only significant for 7 of 34 measures, however, the age range was limited (18-44 years of age). Race/ethnicity differences varied across groups and pain assessment type. Non-Hispanic white individuals were less pain-sensitive than African-American (for 21 of 34 measures), Hispanic (19 of 34), and Asian (6 of 34) individuals. No pain threshold measure showed significant racial differences, whereas several suprathreshold pain measures did. This suggests that racial differences are not related to tissue characteristics or inherent nociceptor sensitivity. Rather, the differences observed for suprathreshold pain ratings or tolerance are more likely related to differences in central nociceptive processing, including modulation imposed by cognitive, psychological, and/or affective factors.

  7. Sensitivity studies of seismic risk models. Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra, M.K.; Banon, H.; Sues, R.H.; Thrasher, R.D.

    1984-06-01

    Recent PRA studies have used the Zion Method for estimating the seismic risks of nuclear power plants. During the course of these studies and in the subsequent regulatory and peer reviews, several questions were raised regarding the sensitivity of risk estimates. The present report has addressed these concerns with the objective of deriving generic conclusions. Sensitivity of seismically-induced severe core damage frequencies to different modeling assumptions was investigated using the Zion and Indian Point Unit 2 probabilistic safety studies as base cases. These included the effects of peak acceleration truncation, fragility modeling, dependence between component failures, and the significance of gross design and construction errors.

  8. Factors Affecting Contrast Sensitivity in Healthy Individuals: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Karatepe, Arzu Seyhan; Köse, Süheyla; Eğrilmez, Sait

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the demographic and ocular features affecting contrast sensitivity levels in healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: Seventy-four eyes of 37 subjects (7-65 years old) with refractive errors less than 1.0 diopter, no history of ocular surgery, and 20/20 visual acuity were included in the study. The participants were divided by age into three groups: group 1, 7-19 years, n=11; group 2, 20-49 years, n=15; and group 3, 50-65 years, n=11. All subjects underwent anterior and posterior segment evaluation, intraocular pressure measurements, refraction measurements, and clinical evaluation for strabismus. Contrast static test was performed using Metrovision MonPack 3 vision monitor system after measuring pupil diameter. Photopic and mesopic measurements were taken sequentially from right eyes, left eyes, and both eyes together. Results: Contrast sensitivity at intermediate and high spatial frequencies was lower with increasing age. Binocular measurements were better than monocular, and mesopic measurements were better than photopic measurements at all spatial frequencies. Contrast sensitivity at higher spatial frequency was lower with hyperopic refraction values. Conclusion: Increasing age, small pupil diameter, hyperopia, and photopic conditions were associated with lower contrast sensitivity in healthy individuals. Binocular contrast sensitivity measurements were better than monocular contrast sensitivity measurements in all conditions and spatial frequencies. PMID:28405481

  9. Factors Affecting Contrast Sensitivity in Healthy Individuals: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Karatepe, Arzu Seyhan; Köse, Süheyla; Eğrilmez, Sait

    2017-04-01

    To determine the demographic and ocular features affecting contrast sensitivity levels in healthy individuals. Seventy-four eyes of 37 subjects (7-65 years old) with refractive errors less than 1.0 diopter, no history of ocular surgery, and 20/20 visual acuity were included in the study. The participants were divided by age into three groups: group 1, 7-19 years, n=11; group 2, 20-49 years, n=15; and group 3, 50-65 years, n=11. All subjects underwent anterior and posterior segment evaluation, intraocular pressure measurements, refraction measurements, and clinical evaluation for strabismus. Contrast static test was performed using Metrovision MonPack 3 vision monitor system after measuring pupil diameter. Photopic and mesopic measurements were taken sequentially from right eyes, left eyes, and both eyes together. Contrast sensitivity at intermediate and high spatial frequencies was lower with increasing age. Binocular measurements were better than monocular, and mesopic measurements were better than photopic measurements at all spatial frequencies. Contrast sensitivity at higher spatial frequency was lower with hyperopic refraction values. Increasing age, small pupil diameter, hyperopia, and photopic conditions were associated with lower contrast sensitivity in healthy individuals. Binocular contrast sensitivity measurements were better than monocular contrast sensitivity measurements in all conditions and spatial frequencies.

  10. Aspartame sensitivity? A double blind randomised crossover study.

    PubMed

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Thatcher, Natalie J; Hammersley, Richard; Rigby, Alan S; Courts, Fraser L; Pechlivanis, Alexandros; Gooderham, Nigel J; Holmes, Elaine; le Roux, Carel W; Atkin, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    Aspartame is a commonly used intense artificial sweetener, being approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. There have been concerns over aspartame since approval in the 1980s including a large anecdotal database reporting severe symptoms. The objective of this study was to compare the acute symptom effects of aspartame to a control preparation. This was a double-blind randomized cross over study conducted in a clinical research unit in United Kingdom. Forty-eight individual who has self reported sensitivity to aspartame were compared to 48 age and gender matched aspartame non-sensitive individuals. They were given aspartame (100mg)-containing or control snack bars randomly at least 7 days apart. The main outcome measures were acute effects of aspartame measured using repeated ratings of 14 symptoms, biochemistry and metabonomics. Aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive participants differed psychologically at baseline in handling feelings and perceived stress. Sensitive participants had higher triglycerides (2.05 ± 1.44 vs. 1.26 ± 0.84mmol/L; p value 0.008) and lower HDL-C (1.16 ± 0.34 vs. 1.35 ± 0.54 mmol/L; p value 0.04), reflected in 1H NMR serum analysis that showed differences in the baseline lipid content between the two groups. Urine metabonomic studies showed no significant differences. None of the rated symptoms differed between aspartame and control bars, or between sensitive and control participants. However, aspartame sensitive participants rated more symptoms particularly in the first test session, whether this was placebo or control. Aspartame and control bars affected GLP-1, GIP, tyrosine and phenylalanine levels equally in both aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive subjects. Using a comprehensive battery of psychological tests, biochemistry and state of the art metabonomics there was no evidence of any acute adverse responses to aspartame. This independent study gives reassurance to both regulatory bodies and the public that acute ingestion of

  11. Aspartame Sensitivity? A Double Blind Randomised Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Thatcher, Natalie J.; Hammersley, Richard; Rigby, Alan S.; Pechlivanis, Alexandros; Gooderham, Nigel J.; Holmes, Elaine; le Roux, Carel W.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Courts, Fraser

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspartame is a commonly used intense artificial sweetener, being approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. There have been concerns over aspartame since approval in the 1980s including a large anecdotal database reporting severe symptoms. The objective of this study was to compare the acute symptom effects of aspartame to a control preparation. Methods This was a double-blind randomized cross over study conducted in a clinical research unit in United Kingdom. Forty-eight individual who has self reported sensitivity to aspartame were compared to 48 age and gender matched aspartame non-sensitive individuals. They were given aspartame (100mg)-containing or control snack bars randomly at least 7 days apart. The main outcome measures were acute effects of aspartame measured using repeated ratings of 14 symptoms, biochemistry and metabonomics. Results Aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive participants differed psychologically at baseline in handling feelings and perceived stress. Sensitive participants had higher triglycerides (2.05 ± 1.44 vs. 1.26 ± 0.84mmol/L; p value 0.008) and lower HDL-C (1.16 ± 0.34 vs. 1.35 ± 0.54 mmol/L; p value 0.04), reflected in 1H NMR serum analysis that showed differences in the baseline lipid content between the two groups. Urine metabonomic studies showed no significant differences. None of the rated symptoms differed between aspartame and control bars, or between sensitive and control participants. However, aspartame sensitive participants rated more symptoms particularly in the first test session, whether this was placebo or control. Aspartame and control bars affected GLP-1, GIP, tyrosine and phenylalanine levels equally in both aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive subjects. Conclusion Using a comprehensive battery of psychological tests, biochemistry and state of the art metabonomics there was no evidence of any acute adverse responses to aspartame. This independent study gives reassurance to both regulatory bodies

  12. [Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) and insulin sensitivity: experimental studies].

    PubMed

    Haluzík, M M; Haluzík, M

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which act as transcription factors. PPARs affect expression of many genes, which products are involved in lipid and carbohydrates metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation and numerous other processes. Three different subtypes (isoforms) of PPARs have been identified: PPAR-alpha, PPAR-gamma, PPAR-delta. PPAR-alpha receptors play an important role in the regulation of lipid metabolism: they decrease circulating fatty acids and triglyceride levels. Recently, the ability of PPAR-alpha receptors to improve insulin sensitivity in rodent model of insulin resistance have been documented and numerous studies have focused on this topic. One of the possible mechanisms of its action on the insulin sensitivity is lowering of ectopic lipids in liver and muscle tissues with subsequent heightening of insulin signalling cascade. Here we summarize the experimental studies focusing on the role of PPAR-alpha in the regulation of insulin sensitivity and discuss possible mechanisms involved.

  13. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API® strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. PMID:24151137

  14. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API(®) strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. © 2013 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pilot Study of Corneal Sensitivity and Its Association in Keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Mandathara, Preeji S; Stapleton, Fiona J; Kokkinakis, Jim; Willcox, Mark D P

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate corneal sensitivity and its association with other clinical parameters in keratoconus. Twenty-four subjects with keratoconus aged between 18 and 65 years were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Ocular symptoms, corneal topography, tear variables such as tear osmolarity, volume and lower tear meniscus height, ocular surface staining, central sensitivity threshold (CST), and corneal subepithelial nerve mapping were obtained. Association between central CST and other clinical variables was examined using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Partial correlation was performed to control for effects of confounding factors. Data from the most severe eye of each subject were included in analyses. Based on the maximum simulated keratometry (Kmax) reading, subjects were graded as having mild (N = 11; K max ≤ 52 D) or severe (N = 13; K max > 52 D) keratoconus. Central corneal sensitivity was lower (ie, increased CST) in the severe keratoconus group compared with that in the mild keratoconus group (median, interquartile range: 1.09; 0.60-19.66 vs. 0.51; 0.39-1.51 g/mm, P = 0.035). In bivariate correlations, reduced corneal sensitivity in keratoconus was associated with age (ρ = 0.42, P = 0.040), disease duration (ρ = 0.49, P = 0.015) and severity (ρ = 0.44; P = 0.032), lower central nerve fiber density (ρ = -0.68, P = 0.014), contact lens wear (ρ = 0.44; P = 0.025), and contact lens tolerance (ρ = 0.46; P = 0.033). After adjusting for contact lens wear, reduced corneal sensitivity was negatively associated with ocular symptoms (ρ = -0.426, P = 0.048) and pain sensitivity (ρ = -0.423, P = 0.045) and positively associated with corneal staining (ρ = 0.52, P = 0.011). Altered corneal sensitivity in keratoconus affected ocular symptoms and ocular surface health, which may have significant impact on the success of management options for keratoconus.

  16. Anxiety Sensitivity and Panic Attacks: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wen; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for panic genesis has obtained compelling support, but the clinical/practical importance of AS in panic genesis has been questioned. In addition, the association between panic experience and AS increase has not been clearly demonstrated. Through this 1-year longitudinal study among…

  17. Anxiety Sensitivity and Panic Attacks: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wen; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for panic genesis has obtained compelling support, but the clinical/practical importance of AS in panic genesis has been questioned. In addition, the association between panic experience and AS increase has not been clearly demonstrated. Through this 1-year longitudinal study among…

  18. Fluorescence microscopy studies on ALA-sensitized tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huettmann, Gereon; Achtelik, Wolfgang; Loening, Martin; Sommer, Konrad; Diddens, Heyke C.

    1996-12-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has the potential to study the spatial distribution of photosensitizers in tissue samples with cellular or subcellular resolution. A fluorescence microscope was developed to study the distribution of photosensitizer in tissue samples by acquiring fluorescence images in various spectral ranges and spatially resolved fluorescence spectra both from identical samples. Both methods provide complementary information, since the fluorescence images show the distribution of the sensitizers with a high spatial resolution whereas spatially resolved fluorescence spectra can identify the sensitizers and separate their fluorescence from background light emission by the spectral shape of the fluorescence. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) distribution induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was studied by fluorescence microscopy in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In an attempt to understand the varying success in treating BCC with topically applied ALA the PPIX distribution was studied in BCC samples of 10 patients. A strong fluorescence was observed in tumor cells as well as in epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicles. The depth of PPIX sensitization of the BCCs ranged from 0.4 to 3 mm and the ratio of tumor versus epidermal fluorescence of uninvolved skin was near one. In the BCCs an uneven sensitization with a lower fluorescence in the center of the tumor was often observed. Samples of the cervical mucosa also showed PPIX fluorescence in the endothelial layer, the malignant tissues and the glands. No increased fluorescence of the dysplastic lesions compared to the epithelium was observed.

  19. Study of Evolution of the ACS/SBC Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Roberto J.; ACS Team

    2013-06-01

    The Solar Blind Channel (SBC) on the Hubble Space Telescope has been in orbit for over 11 years and it is one of the older far ultraviolet imagers on the telescope. In anticipation of the UV campaign for cycle 21, we present the first study of the evolution of the sensitivity of the camera. A long baseline has been established by observing a calibration field (NGC6681) every year since launch in all six SBC filters (five long and one medium pass). From these observations we derive and report the sensitivity curves from launch to present.

  20. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramb, V. A.

    2005-04-01

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy.

  1. Linear Array Ultrasonic Transducers: Sensitivity and Resolution Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kramb, V.A.

    2005-04-09

    The University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) under contract by the US Air Force has designed and integrated a fully automated inspection system for the inspection of turbine engines that incorporates linear phased array ultrasonic transducers. Phased array transducers have been successfully implemented into weld and turbine blade root inspections where the defect types are well known and characterized. Embedded defects in aerospace turbine engine components are less well defined, however. In order to determine the applicability of linear arrays to aerospace inspections the sensitivity of array transducers to embedded defects in engine materials must be characterized. In addition, the implementation of array transducers into legacy inspection procedures must take into account any differences in sensitivity between the array transducer and that of the single element transducer currently used. This paper discusses preliminary results in a study that compares the sensitivity of linear array and conventional single element transducers to synthetic hard alpha defects in a titanium alloy.

  2. Bleaching induced tooth sensitivity: do the existing enamel craze lines increase sensitivity? A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mutlu; Abdin, Sam; Sipahi, Cumhur

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate whether or not an association exists between the presence of enamel craze lines and the prevalence of tooth sensitivity (TS) after in-office bleaching. Subjects that met the inclusion criteria (N = 23) were screened to detect the existence of enamel craze lines. In total, 460 teeth were subjected to bleaching where 49% of them presented enamel craze lines. After bleaching (15% hydrogen peroxide), the subjects were asked to rate the level of TS by answering a self-administered questionnaire. The majority of subjects (91%) experienced TS at the first day of bleaching. The TS prevalence decreased gradually to 22% at second day, to 17% at third day, and to 9% at fourth day. After the fourth day, no subject reported TS. While 15% of teeth with craze lines presented TS, 11% of teeth with no craze lines also showed TS. A positive but weak correlation (r = 0.214) was found between the existence of enamel craze lines and TS. In this clinical study, higher incidence of TS was found with the use of 15% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent compared to the previous studies. Patients who would undergo in-office bleaching should be informed that tooth sensitivity is a very often side effect but it may disappear within 1 week.

  3. Insulin sensitivity and carotid intima-media thickness: relationship between insulin sensitivity and cardiovascular risk study.

    PubMed

    Kozakova, Michaela; Natali, Andrea; Dekker, Jacqueline; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Laakso, Markku; Nilsson, Peter; Balkau, Beverley; Ferrannini, Ele

    2013-06-01

    Despite a wealth of experimental data in animal models, the independent association of insulin resistance with early carotid atherosclerosis in man has not been demonstrated. We studied a European cohort of 525 men and 655 women (mean age, 44 ± 8 years) free of conditions known to affect carotid wall (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). All subjects received an oral glucose tolerance test, a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (M/I as a measure of insulin sensitivity), and B-mode carotid ultrasound. In 833 participants (380 men), the carotid ultrasound was repeated after 3 years. In men, baseline intima-media thickness in the common carotid artery (CCA-IMT) was significantly higher (P<0.05) in the lowest M/I tertile, whereas in women CCA-IMT was higher (P<0.0005) in the highest fasting plasma glucose tertile (after adjustment for established risk factors). In multiple regression models, with CCA-IMT as the dependent variable and with risk factors and univariate metabolic correlates as independent variables, circulating free fatty acids and the leptin:adiponectin ratio replaced M/I as independent metabolic determinants of CCA-IMT in men. The strongest metabolic determinant of CCA-IMT in women was fasting plasma glucose. Three-year CCA-IMT changes were not associated with any cardio-metabolic risk factor. In young-to-middle aged apparently healthy people, the association of CCA-IMT with insulin sensitivity and its metabolic correlates differs between men and women. Lower insulin sensitivity is associated with higher IMT only in men; this association seems to be mediated by circulating free fatty acids and adipocytokines. In women, CCA-IMT is independently associated with fasting plasma glucose.

  4. X-ray luminescence computed tomography: a sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lun, Michael C.; Zhang, Wei; Li, Changqing

    2017-03-01

    X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT) is a hybrid molecular imaging modality that uses high energy x-ray photons to excite nanophosphors (e.g. Europium doped Gadolinium Oxysulfide - GOS: Eu3+) emitting optical photons to be measured by a sensitive detector for image reconstruction. XLCT has potentials to combine both the merits of x-ray imaging (high spatial resolution) and optical imaging (high sensitivity), which makes XLCT an attractive imaging modality to image nanophosphor targets deeply embedded in turbid media. In this study, we have evaluated the sensitivity of XLCT with phantom experiments by scanning targets of different phosphor concentrations at different depths. Cylindrical phantoms embedded with a cylindrical target with varying concentrations of GOS: Eu3+ (27.6 mM, 2.76 mM, 276 μM, and 27.6 μM) were scanned inside our lab made XLCT imaging system for varying scanning depths (6, 11, 16, and 21 mm). We found that XLCT is capable of imaging targets of very low concentrations (27.6 μM or 0.01 mg/mL) at significant depths, such as 21 mm. Our results demonstrate that there is also little variation in the reconstructed target size for different imaging depths for XLCT. We have for the first time, compared the sensitivity of XLCT with that of traditional computed tomography (CT) for phosphor targets. We found that XLCT's use of x-ray induced photons provides much higher measurement sensitivity and contrast compared to CT which provides image contrast solely based on x-ray attenuation.

  5. Shuttle filter study. Volume 2: Contaminant generation and sensitivity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Contaminant generation studies were conducted at the component level using two different methods, radioactive tracer technique and gravimetric analysis test procedure. Both of these were reduced to practice during this program. In the first of these methods, radioactively tagged components typical of those used in spacecraft were studied to determine their contaminant generation characteristics under simulated operating conditions. Because the purpose of the work was: (1) to determine the types and quantities of contaminants generated; and (2) to evaluate improved monitoring and detection schemes, no attempt was made to evaluate or qualify specific components. The components used in this test program were therefore not flight hardware items. Some of them had been used in previous tests; some were obsolete; one was an experimental device. In addition to the component tests, various materials of interest to contaminant and filtration studies were irradiated and evaluated for use as autotracer materials. These included test dusts, plastics, valve seat materials, and bearing cage materials.

  6. Bayesian failure probability model sensitivity study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-30

    The Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) has developed a system-level approach for estimating the effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the connectivity of telecommunications networks. This approach incorporates a Bayesian statistical model which estimates the HEMP-induced failure probabilities of telecommunications switches and transmission facilities. The purpose of this analysis is to address the sensitivity of the Bayesian model. This is done by systematically varying two model input parameters--the number of observations, and the equipment failure rates. Throughout the study, a non-informative prior distribution is used. The sensitivity of the Bayesian model to the noninformative prior distribution is investigated from a theoretical mathematical perspective.

  7. Pain Sensitivity and Opioid Analgesia: A Pharmacogenomic Twin Study

    PubMed Central

    Angst, Martin S.; Phillips, Nicholas G.; Drover, David R.; Tingle, Martha; Ray, Amrita; Swan, Gary E.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Clark, J. David

    2012-01-01

    Opioids are the cornerstone medication for the management of moderate to severe pain. Unfortunately, vast inter-individual differences in dose requirements complicate their effective and safe clinical use. Mechanisms underlying such differences are incompletely understood, are likely multifactorial, and include genetic and environmental contributions. While accumulating evidence suggests that variants of several genes account for some of the observed response variance, the relative contribution of these factors remains unknown. This study used a twin paradigm to provide a global estimate of the genetic and environmental contributions to inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid effects. Eighty one monozygotic and 31 dizygotic twin pairs successfully underwent a computer-controlled infusion with the muopioid agonist alfentanil in a single occasion, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study design. Pain sensitivity and analgesic effects were assessed with experimental heat and cold pressor pain models along with important covariates including demographic factors, depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Significant heritability was detected for cold pressor pain tolerance and opioid-mediated elevations in heat and cold pressor pain thresholds. Genetic effects accounted for 12–60% of the observed response variance. Significant familial effects accounting for 24–32% of observed variance were detected for heat and cold pressor pain thresholds and opioid-mediated elevation in cold pressor pain tolerance. Significant covariates included age, gender, race, education, and anxiety. Results provide a strong rationale for more detailed molecular genetic studies to elucidate mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid responses. Such studies will require careful consideration of the studied pain phenotype. PMID:22444188

  8. Sensitivity studies of Mars orbiters for Mars gravity recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosborough, George W.; Lemoine, Frank G.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the Mars orbiters with regard to their sensitivity to the Mars gravity field. The sensitivity is evaluated and quantified in terms of the magnitude and frequency of the orbiter position and velocity perturbations. The strengths and weaknesses of each orbiter, including Mariner 9, Viking 1 and 2, Mars Observer, Phobos, and Deimos, when used as a sensor of the Mars gravity field are assessed. It is shown that Mariner 9 and Viking data supply strong information on the low degree and order coefficients, with Mariner 9 contributing to the even-ordered terms out to about degrees 10 to 12. Phobos and Deimos are shown to be able to contribute to the lowest degrees of the gravity field, while the Mars Observer, in addition to the lower-degree and -order harmonics, will be responsive to coefficients as high as degree and order 50. Emphasis is placed on the spacecraft orbit plane orientation allowing the radial velocity perturbations to be measured by the Doppler data, thus enhancing the sensitivity to the gravitational signal.

  9. Reduced risk of atopic sensitization among farmers: the Humboldt study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Rennie, Donna; Cormier, Yvon; McDuffie, Helen; Pahwa, Punam; Dosman, James

    2007-01-01

    It needs to be clarified whether farming is associated with a reduced risk of atopy or allergic condition. There is a lack of consistent evidence for prevalences of atopy, respiratory allergy and asthma in adult farmers. A cross-sectional study of adults (n = 2,081) was conducted in the town of Humboldt, Sask. Allergy skin prick tests were conducted to determine atopic sensitization. Respiratory allergy and physician-diagnosed asthma were based on self-reporting. Logistic regression was used to assess the associations of atopy, respiratory allergy and asthma with farming practices, adjusting for other important variables. Of 2,081 participants, 27.8% were farmers. Reduced risks of atopic sensitization, respiratory allergy and asthma were observed among farmers compared to non-farmers. After adjustment for sex and age, which are major confounders, the odds ratio for atopic sensitization was 0.79 (95% confidence interval: 0.65, 0.97) for farmers versus non-farmers. Asthma showed a similar trend; however, there was no statistically significant difference in either respiratory allergy or asthma rates observed between farmers and non-farmers. The prevalence of atopy was lower in adult farmers than in non-farmers. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Sensitivity study of a dynamic thermodynamic sea ice model

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, D.M.; Mysak, L.A.; Manak, D.K. )

    1993-02-15

    A numerical simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean and the Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian seas is presented. The sea ice model is extracted from Oberhuber's (1990) coupled sea ice-mixed layer-isopycnal general circulation model and is written in spherical coordinates. The advantage of such a model over previous sea ice models is that it can be easily coupled to either global atmospheric or ocean general circulation models written in spherical coordinates. In this model, the thermodynamics are a modification of that of Parkinson and Washington, while the dynamics use the full Hibler viscous-plastic rheology. Monthly thermodynamic and dynamic forcing fields for the atmosphere and ocean are specified. The simulations of the seasonal cycle of ice thickness, compactness, and velocity, for a control set of parameters, compare favorably with the known seasonal characteristics of these fields. A sensitivity study of the control simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover is presented. The sensitivity runs are carried out under three different themes, namely, numerical conditions, parameter values, and physical processes. This last theme refers to experiments in which physical processes are either newly added or completely removed from the model. Approximately 80 sensitivity runs have been performed in which a change from the control run environment has been implemented. Comparisons have been made between the control run and a particular sensitivity run based on time series of the seasonal cycle of the domain-averaged ice thickness, compactness, areal coverage, and kinetic energy. In addition, spatially varying fields of ice thickness, compactness, velocity, and surface temperature for each season are presented for selected experiments. A brief description and discussion of the more interesting experiments are presented. The simulation of the seasonal cycle of Arctic sea ice cover is shown to be robust. 31 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Multiple chemical sensitivity: controlled scientific studies as proof of causation.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, L

    1993-08-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity is an environmental illness that demands exacting methods of diagnosis. Proposed associations between symptoms and specific substances, whether to one substance or to multiple chemicals, need to be critically examined through adequately designed scientific studies. Appropriate methods for controlled scientific study of adverse reactions to chemicals are discussed as well as the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) experience with aspartame as an example of the need for controlled scientific studies to refute or confirm anecdotal evidence. Since 1986 the FDA has received reports of 265 cases of epileptic seizures temporally associated with the ingestion of aspartame. Information obtained from the complainants' medical records as well as data on consumption patterns, temporal relationships, and challenge tests do not support the claim that the occurrences of the seizures are linked to consumption of aspartame. In addition, two double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover studies failed to demonstrate an association between epileptic seizures in children and adults and the ingestion of aspartame.

  12. Physics sensitivity studies of Fine-Grained Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xinchun; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Hongyue, Duyang

    2015-10-15

    The reference design of the near detector for the LBNE experiment is a high-resolution Fine-Grained Tracker (FGT). We performed sensitivity studies – critical to constraining the systematics in oscillation searches – of measurements of (1) the absolute neutrino flux, (2) neutrino-nucleon quasi-elastic (QE) and (3) resonance (Res) interactions. In QE and Res emphasis is laid in identifying in situ measurables that help constrain nuclear effects such as initial state pair wise correlations and final state interactions.

  13. [Sensitivity study of a revised leaf photochemical reflectance index (PRI)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao-yang; Niu, Zheng; Tang, Quan

    2008-09-01

    Photochemical reflectance index (PRI) defined as a normalized difference index using two narrow reflectance bands at 531 and 570 nm that are closely related to xanthophyll cycle pigment content has been successfully used to estimate leaf photosynthetic light use efficiency (LUE) across species which vary in water content and nitrogen concentration. Previous research demonstrated that a consistent relationship could be established between PRI and LUE calculated from gas exchange measurements at the leaf, small canopy, and full forest or crop canopy scales. However, a number of problems, such as the saturation of PRI when LUE exceeds 0.03 mol CO2 mol(-1) PPED (photosynthetic photon flux density) and disjunctive relationships of PRI and LUE in seasonal changes, still existed and need to be handled in order to evaluate LUE more accurately. A sensitivity study of a revised PRI with four leaf parameters was performed based on PROSPECT model in the present article to study the effects of different biochemical concentrations on leaf SR-PRI (simple ratio PRI). Sensitivity study proved that leaf SR-PRI is more sensitive to leaf mesophyll structure parameter (N) and chlorophyll a + b content (c(ab)) than parameters of dry matter content (c(m)) and equivalent water thickness (c(w)), indicating that leaf mesophyll structure parameter (N) and chlorophyll a + b content (c(ab)) should be especially considered when acquiring leaf SR-PRI. And changes in the two parameters would cause large variation in SR-PRI which would reduce the precision for estimating light use efficiency. Validation study of SR-PRI was carried out in the analysis and the results proved that SR-PRI can also be a feasible index of estimating LUE for four species of plants with correlation coefficients better than that of PRI and LUE. The advantage of SR-PRI compared to PRI is its much clearer physical meaning and its sensitivity to the changes in reflectance at 531 nm which serves as a core parameter to evaluate

  14. Computational studies of quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Grigory

    This thesis presents a computational study of quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells. First part deals with the non-equilibrium many-body theory or non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory. In this approach I study electron dynamics in the quantum-dot sensitized solar cell subjected to time-dependent fields. NEGF theory, because it does not impose any conditions on a perturbation, is the fundamental one to describe ultrafast processes in small, strongly correlated systems and/or in strong fields. In this research I do not only perform analytical derivation, but also design and implement spectral numerical solution for the resulting complex system of partial integrodifferential equations. This numerical solution yielded an order of magnitude speedup over the methods used previously in the field. The forth chapter of this thesis deals with calculation of optical properties and the ground state configuration of Zn2SnO4 (ZTO). ZTO is used by experimentalists in UW to grow nanorods which are then sensitized by QDs. ZTO is a challenging material for computational analysis because of its inverse spinel structure; thus it has an immense number of configurations matching the X-ray diffraction experiments. I've applied a cluster expansion method and have found the ground state configuration and phase diagram for ZTO. Calculations of optical properties of ground state bulk ZTO were done with a recently developed DFT functional. The optical band gap obtained in these calculations matched the experimental value. The last chapter describes development of the general simulator for interdigitated array electrodes. The application of this simulation together with the experiments may lead to understanding of reaction parameters and mechanisms important for development of electrochemical solar cells.

  15. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-10-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1% over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  16. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-06-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in Polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1 % over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  17. Developing a temperature sensitive tool for studying spin dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickey, Kurtis Jon

    Measuring the thermodynamic properties of nanoscale structures is becoming increasingly important as heterostructures and devices shrink in size. For example, recent discoveries of spin thermal effects such as spin Seebeck and spin Peltier show that thermal gradients can manipulate spin systems and vice versa. However, the relevant interactions occur within a spin diffusion length of a spin active interface, making study of these spin thermal effects challenging. In addition, recent ferromagnetic resonance studies of spatially confined nanomagnets have shown unique magnon modes in arrays and lines which may give rise to unique magnon-phonon interactions. In this case, the small volume of magnetic material presents a challenge to measurement and as a result the bulk of the work is done on arrays with measurements of the magnetization of individual particles possible through various microscopies but limited access to thermal properties. As a result, tools capable of measuring the thermal properties of nanoscale structures are required to fully explore this emerging science. One approach to addressing this challenge is the use of microscale suspended platforms that maximize their sensitivity to these spin thermal interactions through thermal isolation from their surroundings. Combining this thermal decoupling with sensitive thermometry allows for the measurement of nanojoule heat accumulations, such as those resulting from the small heat flows associated with spin transport and spin relaxation. As these heat flows may manifest themselves in a variety of spin-thermal effects, the development of measurement platforms that can be tailored to optimize their sensitivity to specific thermal measurements is essential. To address these needs, I have fabricated thermally isolated platforms using a unique focused ion beam (FIB) machining that allow for flexible geometries as well as a wide choice of material systems. The thermal characteristics of these platforms were

  18. Verification, validation and sensitivity studies in computational biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Andrew E; Ellis, Benjamin J; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2007-06-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation (V&V). The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of V&V principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques.

  19. Verification, Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Computational Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation. The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of verification and validation principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques. PMID:17558646

  20. A Sensitive Amphotericin B Immunoassay for Pharmacokinetic and Distribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Machard, Sophie; Theodoro, Frederic; Benech, Henri; Grognet, Jean-Marc; Ezan, Eric

    2000-01-01

    Since currently used assays of amphotericin B (AMB) lack sensitivity or are not easily adaptable in all laboratories, we have developed an enzyme immunoassay for AMB in biological fluids and tissues. Antibodies to AMB were raised in rabbits after administration of an AMB-bovine serum albumin conjugate. The enzymatic tracer was obtained by coupling AMB via its amino group to acetylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.7). These reagents were used for the development of a competitive immunoassay performed on microtitration plates. The limit of quantification was 100 pg/ml in plasma and 1 ng/g in tissues. The plasma assay was performed directly without extraction on a minimal volume of 0.1 ml. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were in the range of 5 to 17%, and the recoveries were 92 to 111% for AMB added to human plasma. The assay was applied to a pharmacokinetic study with mice given AMB intraperitoneally at the dose of 1 mg/kg. The drug distribution in selected compartments (plasma, liver, spleen, lung, and brain) was monitored until 72 h after administration. In conclusion, our assay is at least 100-fold more sensitive than previously described bioassays or chromatographic determinations of AMB and may be useful in studying the tissue pharmacokinetics of new AMB formulations and in drug monitoring in clinical situations. PMID:10681316

  1. Sensitivity model study of regional mercury dispersion in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencarelli, Christian N.; Bieser, Johannes; Carbone, Francesco; De Simone, Francesco; Hedgecock, Ian M.; Matthias, Volker; Travnikov, Oleg; Yang, Xin; Pirrone, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is the most important pathway by which Hg reaches marine ecosystems, where it can be methylated and enter the base of food chain. The deposition, transport and chemical interactions of atmospheric Hg have been simulated over Europe for the year 2013 in the framework of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS) project, performing 14 different model sensitivity tests using two high-resolution three-dimensional chemical transport models (CTMs), varying the anthropogenic emission datasets, atmospheric Br input fields, Hg oxidation schemes and modelling domain boundary condition input. Sensitivity simulation results were compared with observations from 28 monitoring sites in Europe to assess model performance and particularly to analyse the influence of anthropogenic emission speciation and the Hg0(g) atmospheric oxidation mechanism. The contribution of anthropogenic Hg emissions, their speciation and vertical distribution are crucial to the simulated concentration and deposition fields, as is also the choice of Hg0(g) oxidation pathway. The areas most sensitive to changes in Hg emission speciation and the emission vertical distribution are those near major sources, but also the Aegean and the Black seas, the English Channel, the Skagerrak Strait and the northern German coast. Considerable influence was found also evident over the Mediterranean, the North Sea and Baltic Sea and some influence is seen over continental Europe, while this difference is least over the north-western part of the modelling domain, which includes the Norwegian Sea and Iceland. The Br oxidation pathway produces more HgII(g) in the lower model levels, but overall wet deposition is lower in comparison to the simulations which employ an O3 / OH oxidation mechanism. The necessity to perform continuous measurements of speciated Hg and to investigate the local impacts of Hg emissions and deposition, as well as interactions dependent on land use and vegetation, forests, peat

  2. The Concept of the Sensitive Period in Developmental Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oyama, Susan

    1979-01-01

    Aims at clarifying the concept of the sensitive period. Differentiates imprinting and sensitivity and defines the latter as an interval of heightened responsiveness to certain kinds of stimuli. Argues that "sensitive period" is a descriptive, not an explanatory term which is consistent with an interactional approach to developmental…

  3. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, K.; Di Somma, A. A.

    1938-01-01

    With the view of making new types of chemicals accessible for investigations on drug hypersensitiveness, methods have been devised for sensitizing animals with diazomethane and mustard oil, two non-aromatic compounds. Guinea pigs have been sensitized to diazomethane, a substance of high reactivity and known to cause severe allergic effects in man. With the second substance, allylisothiocyanate, likewise capable of forming conjugates with substances in the animal body, sensitization effects have been obtained in man and in hogs. Sensitization in human beings was successful with one out of six individuals treated. The observations indicate species and individual differences as regards the ability to become sensitized to various chemical compounds. PMID:19870801

  4. Study on platinum thermal sensitive films deposited using magnetic sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Changlong; Liu, Weiguo; Zhou, Shun; Zhai, Yujia

    2012-10-01

    The infrared imaging detecting technology has broad application prospects in military and civilian fields. The bolometer is one of mainstream uncooled infrared detectors, because it has many advantages, for example, light weight, wide dynamic range, excellent response linearity, and without refrigeration and chopper which leads to low manufacturing cost. In many infrared detecting sensitive materials, Pt films have wider linear range, lower noise, and compatibility with silicon integrated process excellently. In this paper, Pt sensitive films were deposited by means of magnetron sputtering, the preparation process of Pt films for the infrared imaging detecting unit was studied, the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of Pt films can be improved by vacuum annealing to achieve 1.737 ‰/K. The micro-structure and micro-fabrication process of infrared imaging detecting unit based on Pt films were designed, and the heating character of infrared imaging detecting unit based on Pt films was measured using I-V character testing system. Testing results shown that, the properties of fabricated infrared thermal imaging detecting unit based on Pt films were better, Its TCR is about 1.64 ‰/K, and its thermal response is better.

  5. Head parameter sensitivity study of the intrinsic field reversal time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Peter K.; Jury, Jason C.; Judy, Jack

    1999-04-01

    Studies to establish the key head sensitivity parameters affecting the intrinsic field reversal time are reported. The effect of supply voltage, eddy current damping, head moment, and turns are investigated using the nonlinear, eddy current damped, thin-film write head model proposed by Klaassen and Hirko [IEEE Trans. Magn. 32, 3524 (1996)]. The model is realized using PSPICE circuit simulation. Eddy current time constant dependencies derived by Wood, Williams, and Hong [IEEE Trans. Magn. 26, 2954 (1990)] are used to explore materials with magnetizations ranging from 4πMS=10-20 kG, resistivities of 25 and 125 μΩ-cm and heads with 10-15 turns. Confirmation of the above writer sensitivities has been investigated using a short yoke 37 turn, high moment, low eddy current CoTaZr inductive head. From the experimentally determined model parameters, rise time results are computed for an improved 10 turn writer design. The results are shown to approach or exceed the limiting dynamics of the spin system.

  6. Sound Transmission Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Numerical Models.

    PubMed

    Oberrecht, Steve P; Krysl, Petr; Cranford, Ted W

    2016-01-01

    In 1974, Norris and Harvey published an experimental study of sound transmission into the head of the bottlenose dolphin. We used this rare source of data to validate our Vibroacoustic Toolkit, an array of numerical modeling simulation tools. Norris and Harvey provided measurements of received sound pressure in various locations within the dolphin's head from a sound source that was moved around the outside of the head. Our toolkit was used to predict the curves of pressure with the best-guess input data (material properties, transducer and hydrophone locations, and geometry of the animal's head). In addition, we performed a series of sensitivity analyses (SAs). SA is concerned with understanding how input changes to the model influence the outputs. SA can enhance understanding of a complex model by finding and analyzing unexpected model behavior, discriminating which inputs have a dominant effect on particular outputs, exploring how inputs combine to affect outputs, and gaining insight as to what additional information improves the model's ability to predict. Even when a computational model does not adequately reproduce the behavior of a physical system, its sensitivities may be useful for developing inferences about key features of the physical system. Our findings may become a valuable source of information for modeling the interactions between sound and anatomy.

  7. Animal models to study non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Amnuaycheewa, Plaimein; Murray, Joseph A; Marietta, Eric V

    2017-03-01

    Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS), sometimes known as non-celiac wheat sensitivity (NCWS), has recently received much attention, both scientific as well as from the alternative medical community. Over the past 5 years, there are over 200 publications on NCGS indexed on the PubMed database, the gluten-free market has been growing bigger, and it is clear that the number of consumers who are on a gluten-free diet (GFD) possibly because of a suspicion for NCGS appears to grow even faster. Nevertheless, despite these three rising events, many questions about NCGS remain unresolved. It is likely that NCGS represents a heterogeneous group of disorders linked by a common response to a GFD. It is still not fully understood how gluten, and likely other wheat proteins and components, could activate and drive the pathophysiology of NCGS. As a result, there are still no clear biomarkers, no robust clinical diagnostic criteria, nor a conclusive definition for NCGS. This heterogeneity can be approached by reducing the variables, in particular those of human behaviour and placebo effect, by studying animal models to address specific biological effects of wheat and/or gluten-related proteins. Herein we review the animal models and their potential to be used to advance our understanding of these disorders and potentially address their prevention and treatment.

  8. Integrating heterogeneous drug sensitivity data from cancer pharmacogenomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Pozdeyev, Nikita; Yoo, Minjae; Mackie, Ryan; Schweppe, Rebecca E.; Tan, Aik Choon; Haugen, Bryan R.

    2016-01-01

    The consistency of in vitro drug sensitivity data is of key importance for cancer pharmacogenomics. Previous attempts to correlate drug sensitivities from the large pharmacogenomics databases, such as the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and the Genomics of Drug Sensitivity in Cancer (GDSC), have produced discordant results. We developed a new drug sensitivity metric, the area under the dose response curve adjusted for the range of tested drug concentrations, which allows integration of heterogeneous drug sensitivity data from the CCLE, the GDSC, and the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal (CTRP). We show that there is moderate to good agreement of drug sensitivity data for many targeted therapies, particularly kinase inhibitors. The results of this largest cancer cell line drug sensitivity data analysis to date are accessible through the online portal, which serves as a platform for high power pharmacogenomics analysis. PMID:27322211

  9. A comparative study of corneal sensitivity in birds of prey.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Rodrigo P; Obón, Elena; Peña, Maria T; Costa, Daniel; Ríos, Jose; Leiva, Marta

    2014-05-01

    To determine and compare the corneal sensitivity in healthy wild diurnal and nocturnal birds of prey (BP) indigenous to Catalonia (Spain), and to establish if age is a determining factor in corneal sensitivity in those species. Ophthalmic examination was performed in 105 BP. Only birds with no ocular abnormalities were included in the study (n = 81): 21 diurnal BP (Falco tinnunculus: 16 fledglings, 5 adults) and 60 nocturnal BP (20 Athene noctua [9 fledglings, 11 adults], 20 Strix aluco [15 fledglings, 5 adults], and 20 Otus scops [6 fledglings and 14 adults]). Corneal touch threshold (CTT) was determined for each eye in five different corneal regions. Five attempts to cause a blink reflex were made in each region, and when three or more reflexes were positive, the pressure was deemed the CTT. Statistical analysis was performed using a Student's t-test for independent data or an anova model. The results between species and age groups were compared using the Generalized Estimated Equations model. There were no significant differences between any of the corneal regions (P = 0.25), or between the right (CTT = 4.9 ± 1.7 cm) and left (CTT = 4.8 ± 1.7 cm) eye in any of the species (P = 0.692). No difference was found between diurnal and nocturnal species (P = 0.913). Considering all the species, a significant difference was found between the mean CTT of fledglings (5.4 ± 1.2 cm) and adults (4.1 ± 2 cm), P < 0.001. A significant difference was found between fledglings and adults of A. noctua (P < 0.001) and S. aluco (P = 0.002). There is no significant difference in CTT between the different corneal regions in all the species studied. Corneal sensitivity is similar between diurnal and nocturnal birds of prey. Age is a determining factor in the CTT of A. noctua and S. aluco, with fledglings having a significantly higher CTT. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  10. Parameter Sensitivity Study of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.; Iyer, Venkit

    2001-01-01

    An off-line version of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) has been implemented for the "NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. The correction capability is currently restricted to corrections for solid wall interference in the model pitch plane for Mach numbers, less than 0.45 due to a limitation in tunnel calibration data. A study to assess output sensitivity to the aerodynamic parameters of Reynolds number and Mach number was conducted on this code to further ensure quality during the correction process. In addition, this paper includes all investigation into possible correction due to a semispan test technique using a non metric standoff and all improvement to the standard data rejection algorithm.

  11. Mass sensitivity studies for an inductively driven railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, J.J. ); Young, A.F. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary system constructs for an Electromagnetic Launcher (EML) System consists of a homopolar generator (HPG) driven by a hot hydrogen multi-stage turbine/nuclear reactor. The HPG is used to charge an inductive energy store. A key evaluation criterion for determining the viability of an EML is system mass. The objective of this paper is to identify those areas which result in substantial system mass reductions for an HPG driven EML. Sensitivity studies are performed by varying launch mass peak acceleration, launcher efficiency, inductance gradient (L{prime}), injection velocity, barrel mass per unit length, fuel tankage and pump estimates, and component energy and power densities. Two major contributors to the system mass are the allowed number of shots per barrel versus the number required for the mission, and the barrel length.

  12. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  13. Alignment Sensitivity Study of the St. ANA Beam Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervais, Michelle; Couder, Manoel; Jung, Hyo Soon; Setoodehnia, Kiana

    2014-09-01

    The St. ANA (STable Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) accelerator is being prepared for use with the St. George recoil mass separator. The accelerator is in working condition for use in direct kinematic experiments but the St. George separator works with inverse kinematics and requires a highly controlled beam restricted by severe position and divergence parameters that are not achieved at the present time. A systematic sensitivity study was conducted using a simulation of the beam line in order to assess the impact of a misalignment in each optical element or in the beam itself. Tests were done with the beam to analyze how the beam behaves at various points in the line and to compare this data with simulation results to determine possible causes of misalignment. The results of these tests and simulations are that the beam characteristics are now better understood and the possible causes of the limitations have been narrowed down. The St. ANA (STable Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics) accelerator is being prepared for use with the St. George recoil mass separator. The accelerator is in working condition for use in direct kinematic experiments but the St. George separator works with inverse kinematics and requires a highly controlled beam restricted by severe position and divergence parameters that are not achieved at the present time. A systematic sensitivity study was conducted using a simulation of the beam line in order to assess the impact of a misalignment in each optical element or in the beam itself. Tests were done with the beam to analyze how the beam behaves at various points in the line and to compare this data with simulation results to determine possible causes of misalignment. The results of these tests and simulations are that the beam characteristics are now better understood and the possible causes of the limitations have been narrowed down. Project advisor

  14. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, K.; Di Somma, A. A.

    1940-01-01

    Sensitization of guinea pigs to picric acid was obtained by application of oil solutions to the skin, preferably on inflamed sites or by treatment with a compound of picric acid with n-butyl-p-aminobenzoate. The lesions obtained in sensitive animals on superficial administration bore resemblance to human eczema. It seems probable that picric acid sensitization is an instance where a substance does not sensitize directly but after conversion into a more reactive compound, a principle which should be of wider application to instances where the original substance does not readily form conjugates. PMID:19871030

  15. Modeling surface trapped river plumes: A sensitivity study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyatt, Jason; Signell, Richard P.

    2000-01-01

    To better understand the requirements for realistic regional simulation of river plumes in the Gulf of Maine, we test the sensitivity of the Blumberg-Mellor hydrodynamic model to choice of advection scheme, grid resolution, and wind, using idealized geometry and forcing. The test case discharges 1500 m3/s of fresh water into a uniform 32 psu ocean along a straight shelf at 43?? north. The water depth is 15 m at the coast and increases linearly to 190 m at a distance 100 km offshore. Constant discharge runs are conducted in the presence of ambient alongshore current and with and without periodic alongshore wind forcing. Advection methods tested are CENTRAL, UPWIND, the standard Smolarkiewicz MPDATA and a recursive MPDATA scheme. For the no-wind runs, the UPWIND advection scheme performs poorly for grid resolutions typically used in regional simulations (grid spacing of 1-2 km, comparable to or slightly less than the internal Rossby radius, and vertical resolution of 10% of the water column), damping out much of the plume structure. The CENTRAL difference scheme also has problems when wind forcing is neglected, and generates too much structure, shedding eddies of numerical origin. When a weak 5 cm/s ambient current is present in the no-wind case, both the CENTRAL and standard MPDATA schemes produce a false fresh- and dense-water source just upstream of the river inflow due to a standing two-grid length oscillation in the salinity field. The recursive MPDATA scheme completely eliminates the false dense water source, and produces results closest to the grid-converged solution. The results are shown to be very sensitive to vertical grid resolution, and the presence of wind forcing dramatically changes the nature of the plume simulations. The implication of these idealized tests for realistic simulations is discussed, as well as ramifications on previous studies of idealized plume models.

  16. Deodorants: a clinical provocation study in fragrance-sensitive individuals.

    PubMed

    Johansen, J D; Rastogi, S C; Bruze, M; Andersen, K E; Frosch, P; Dreier, B; Lepoittevin, J P; White, I; Menné, T

    1998-10-01

    Deodorants are one of the most marketed types of cosmetics and are frequently reported as a cause of dermatitis, particularly among fragrance-sensitive persons. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of deodorants, which had previously caused axillary dermatitis in fragrance-mix-sensitive eczema patients, to provoke reactions on repeated open application tests on the upper arm and in the axillae, and to relate the findings to the content of fragrance-mix constituents in those deodorants. 14 eczema patients performed a 7-day use test with 1 or 2 deodorants that had caused a rash within the last 12 months. 2 applications per day were made in the axilla and simultaneously on a 25 cm2 area on the upper arm. A total of 20 deodorants were tested among the 14 patients. Afterwards, the deodorants were subjected to quantitative chemical analysis identifying constituents of the fragrance mix. 12/20 (60%) deodorants elicited eczema on use testing in the axilla. 8/12 deodorants were positive in the axilla on day (D) 7 and 4 both in the axilla and on the upper arm. 2 of the 4 developed a reaction in the axilla before it developed on the upper arm. Chemical analysis revealed that 18/19 deodorants contained between 1 and 6 of the fragrance-mix constituents, on average 3 being found. The mean concentration of fragrance-mix constituents was generally higher in the deodorants causing a positive use test, as compared with those giving a negative reaction, indicating that the differences between the deodorants in terms of elicitation potential were more related to quantitative aspects of allergen content than of a qualitative nature. It is recommended that deodorants are tested in the axilla in the case of a negative use test on the upper arm and a strong clinical suspicion.

  17. [Sensitive paranoia, concepts and a clinical case study].

    PubMed

    Rabin, Marie-Paule; Testard, Ingrid; Landazuri, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Sensitive paranoia, classified by Ernst Kretschmer, is a combination of a paranoid disorder with solitude and mental distress. Sensitive paranoiacs, often depressive and anxious, perceive themselves as being excluded from society while at the same time cultivating a resentment towards it. They also constantly put themselves down. Group therapy can help these patients to find appeasement in their social life.

  18. Implications of recent multimodel attribution studies for climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) is inferred from estimates of instrumental-period warming attributable solely to greenhouse gases (AW), as derived in two recent multi-model detection and attribution (D&A) studies that apply optimal fingerprint methods with high spatial resolution to 3D global climate model simulations. This approach minimises the key uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing without relying on low-dimensional models. The "observed" AW distributions from the D&A studies together with an observationally-based estimate of effective planetary heat capacity (EHC) are applied as observational constraints in (AW, EHC) space. By varying two key parameters—ECS and effective ocean diffusivity—in an energy balance model forced solely by greenhouse gases, an invertible map from the bivariate model parameter space to (AW, EHC) space is generated. Inversion of the constrained (AW, EHC) space through a transformation of variables allows unique recovery of the observationally-constrained joint distribution for the two model parameters, from which the marginal distribution of ECS can readily be derived. The method is extended to provide estimated distributions for transient climate response (TCR). The AW distributions from the two D&A studies produce almost identical results. Combining the two sets of results provides best estimates (5-95 % ranges) of 1.66 (0.7-3.2) K for ECS and 1.37 (0.65-2.2) K for TCR, in line with those from several recent studies based on observed warming from all causes but with tighter uncertainty ranges than for some of those studies. Almost identical results are obtained from application of an alternative profile likelihood statistical methodology.

  19. Study of Nonclassical Fields in Phase-Sensitive Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung Shik; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    1996-01-01

    We show that the reservoir influence can be modeled by an infinite array of beam splitters. The superposition of the input fields in the beam splitter is discussed with the convolution laws for their quasiprobabilities. We derive the Fokker-Planck equation for the cavity field coupled with a phase-sensitive reservoir using the convolution law. We also analyze the amplification in the phase-sensitive reservoir with use of the modified beam splitter model. We show the similarities and differences between the dissipation and amplification models. We show that a super-Poissonian input field cannot become sub-Poissonian by the phase-sensitive amplification.

  20. Sensitivity study of SMILES-2 for chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Baron, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Sensitivity studies of temperature and chemical species (Observed by ISS/JEM/SMILES: O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN, and Not observed by SMILES: Temperature, H2O, N2O, NO2, NO, CH3Cl, CO, H2CO, OH and O-atom) was carried out for the SMILES-2 proposal, a sub-mm and THz observation of limb emission from space over the spectral region from 400 GHz to 2.5 THz. Tentative but optimal candidate of frequency bands to cover these species was selected with 3 SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixers; SIS-1 (485-489 GHz + 523-527 GHz), SIS-2 (623-627 GHz + 648-652 GHz), SIS-3 (557 GHz + 576.3 GHz) and 2 HEB (Hot Electron Bolometer); HEB-1 (1.8 THz OH) and HEB-2 (2.06 THz O-atom). Temperature can be retrieved with 1 K precision and 1 km vertical resolution from 15 to 120 km. Other chemical species also showed very high single scan precision (random error) comparable to statistical standard error of previous satellite measurements.

  1. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect

    Aprahamian, A.; Mumpower, M.; Bentley, I.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The site of the rapid neutron capture process (r process) is one of the open challenges in all of physics today. The r process is thought to be responsible for the creation of more than half of all elements beyond iron. The scientific challenges to understanding the origin of the heavy elements beyond iron lie in both the uncertainties associated with astrophysical conditions that are needed to allow an r process to occur and a vast lack of knowledge about the properties of nuclei far from stability. One way is to disentangle the nuclear and astrophysical components of the question. On the nuclear physics side, there is great global competition to access and measure the most exotic nuclei that existing facilities can reach, while simultaneously building new, more powerful accelerators to make even more exotic nuclei. On the astrophysics side, various astrophysical scenarios for the production of the heaviest elements have been proposed but open questions remain. This paper reports on a sensitivity study of the r process to determine the most crucial nuclear masses to measure using an r-process simulation code, several mass models (FRDM, Duflo-Zuker, and HFB-21), and three potential astrophysical scenarios.

  2. Study of Sensitivity and Repeatability of Piezoelectric Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, C. E.; Greenaway, M. W.; Proud, W. G.

    2006-07-28

    The sensitivity and repeatability of stress and density measurements obtained using commercially available piezoelectric probes have been studied for high-velocity (> 450 m s-1) gas gun-driven spray experiments. The probes used are Dynasen Piezopins, in which the sensor element is a small ((0.4 {+-} 0.05) mm thick, (1.2 {+-} 0.1) mm diameter) PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) disk. The probe gives an output voltage V(t) proportional to the time derivative of the force normal to the poled axis of the PZT. The stress level is obtained using the time-integrated voltage. It is assumed that there is complete momentum transfer between the spray and the Piezopin, therefore the spray density can be found from the stress level. The spray is produced by accelerating aluminum powder (10 {mu}m grain size) in a gas gun. Spray density measurements are compared with values measured from x-ray images, and stress measurements are compared with extrapolated values from the spray densities obtained from the x-ray images.

  3. Markers of gluten sensitivity in acute mania: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Faith; Stallings, Cassie; Origoni, Andrea; Vaughan, Crystal; Khushalani, Sunil; Yolken, Robert

    2012-03-30

    Increased levels of antibodies to gliadin, which is derived from the wheat protein gluten, have been reported in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in cross-sectional studies. We examined longitudinally the levels of antibody reactivity to gliadin in acute mania. The sample included 60 individuals assessed during a hospital stay for acute mania, 39 at a 6-month follow-up, and a sample of 143 non-psychiatric controls. Antibodies to gliadin were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The relationship of the antibodies to the clinical course of mania was analyzed by the use of regression models. Individuals with mania had significantly increased levels of IgG antibodies to gliadin, but not other markers of celiac disease, at baseline compared with controls in multivariate analyses. However, these levels were not significantly different from those of controls at the six month follow-up. Among the individuals with mania, elevated levels at follow-up were significantly associated with re-hospitalization in the 6-month follow-up period. The monitoring and control of gluten sensitivity may have significant effects on the management of individuals hospitalized with acute mania.

  4. A study of radar aspect sensitivity in the lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Charlie Yann-Ting

    2001-09-01

    The goal of this thesis is related to atmospheric temperature measurements using in situ techniques in tandem with a direct numerical simulation to better understand the zenith angle dependence of VHF (30-300 MHz) radar backscatter from the atmosphere. We begin our study with a high-resolution balloon-borne in situ temperature measurement made over Wichita, KS, in 1995. Very steep vertical temperature gradients were found at the edges of vertical potential steps, regions of near zero vertical potential temperature gradient. We use wavelet analysis to isolate the organized components of the signal and, after subtraction from the original signal, the residual signal is found to have the characteristics of isotropic turbulence. This confirms our hypothesis that the measured temperature profile is a superposition of coherent structures and a background isotropic turbulence. From a radar perspective, we show that this wavelet analysis allows us to predict the radar backscatter as a function of zenith angle from a high- resolution one-dimensional temperature measurement. Unfortunately, radar measurements were not available at this point. We next explore the cause of aspect sensitivity directly via a multi-instrument investigation of the lower atmosphere over the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) near Lima, Peru. The joint analysis of radar backscatter and in situ measurements of the temperature structure shows that a combination of Fresnel scattering and turbulence is the most likely explanation for aspect sensitive echoes. Furthermore, the strong backscatter seems to originate from vertical potential temperature steps; such as those observed over Wichita, KS. Finally, we show that the measured potential temperature steps and the structures seen in a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are remarkably similar. Not only do we find good agreement between the observation and the simulation; the similarity is also seen in the wavelet

  5. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, K.; Chase, M. W.

    1939-01-01

    Experiments are described on the latency period in sensitization to poison ivy and on the time necessary for the agent to remain in contact with the skin. The chief matter of investigation concerned the manner in which the whole skin becomes sensitive following treatment at a particular site, and especially whether this is effected by way of the epidermis. Two methods were used to interrupt the continuity of the skin, one by cutting through both skin and the underlying thin muscular layer, the other by removing a strip of skin so as to spare the skin muscle. These procedures led to different results when poison ivy extract was applied to the areas thus isolated. In the first case, sensitization was mostly prevented, whereas with the second method generalized hypersensitiveness occurred almost uniformly. An explanation is to be found in the severance of the lymph vessels lying on the surface of the muscular layer, pointing to the necessity of a free lymph passage. On the other hand the experiments prove that general sensitization is not dependent upon maintaining the integrity of the skin around a treated area. An inhibition of sensitization by incisions extending through the panniculus carnosus was seen to some extent in anaphylactic sensitization with protein antigens, namely when sufficiently small amounts were employed. PMID:19870876

  6. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Merrill W.

    1947-01-01

    Evidence is presented to show that guinea pigs actively sensitized to simple chemical compounds form serum antibodies capable of sensitizing the skin of normal guinea pigs. Skin sites prepared as for the Prausnitz-Küstner test develop immediate-type ("evanescent") reactions with erythema and edema, upon subsequent injection of the corresponding simple compounds or protein conjugates thereof, and give effects resembling transferred reaginic reactions as seen in human beings. The antibodies were obtainable after sensitization by acyl chlorides, acid anhydrides, and also substances of lesser reactivity, picryl chloride and 2:4 dinitrochlorobenzene, which are human allergens. Observations are reported on the specificity of the antibodies and on various details of the reaction. Like effects result when antiprotein immune sera and their corresponding antigens are employed for the test, making it highly probable that the antibodies secured after sensitization to drugs result from immunization by conjugates formed in vivo. The sera obtained after sensitization with simple chemical compounds readily confer passive anaphylaxis, and their capacity for sensitizing the skin declines gradually with progressive heating. It was observed that following a reaction of substantial degree in guinea pig skin the area involved does not fully recover for some days its capacity to react, the effect being a manifestation, it would seem, of what has been termed "non-specific antianaphylaxis." PMID:19871693

  7. Study Abroad Experiences and Intercultural Sensitivity among Graduate Theological Students: A Preliminary and Exploratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Thomas L.

    2007-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the impact of study abroad experiences on graduate theological student intercultural sensitivity and the role that pedagogical approaches play in the development of intercultural sensitivity. It is widely held that study abroad contributes to student development of intercultural sensitivity (Jenkins &…

  8. Paleozoic ice sheet inception; a study of paleogeographic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, D. E.; Poulsen, C. J.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale continental glaciation is thought to have been episodic throughout the Paleozoic era. Evidence of short-lived glaciation in the Ordovician, a period of questionable glaciation in the Devonian, and extensive glaciation in the Permo-Carboniferous are variously supported by the geologic record. The climatic conditions that allowed Earth to descend into icehouse conditions during these periods are not well understood. Traditionally, Paleozoic glaciation was thought to be driven by the drift of continents over the austral pole, yet a myriad of other factors play a role in global mean temperatures and the ability of an icehouse climate to initiate. In this sensitivity study we utilize a coupled GCM-ice sheet-biome model in conjunction with updated paleogeographic reconstructions to examine ice sheet initiation at 30 million year time slices throughout the Paleozoic. Each time slice is subjected to an ice-favorable orbital alignment and a range of atmospheric pCO2 concentrations in an effort to determine the influence of continent distribution and greenhouse gas concentration on ice sheet initiation. Our modeling results demonstrate that both continental configuration and atmospheric pCO2 concentration play a significant role in ice sheet initiation, ice sheet areal extent, and ice sheet volume. Our results indicate that the geographic configurations most conducive to continental glaciation occurred from the mid-Devonian to the early Carboniferous, a result that is inconsistent with the geologic record and suggests that continental drift wasn't the sole driving force behind the occurrence of Paleozoic ice ages.

  9. A study of turbulent flow with sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwyer, H. A.; Peterson, T.

    1980-07-01

    In this paper a new type of analysis is introduced that can be used in numerical fluid mechanics. The method is known as sensitivity analysis and it has been widely used in the field of automatic control theory. Sensitivity analysis addresses in a systematic way to the question of 'how' the solution to an equation will change due to variations in the equation's parameters and boundary conditions. An important application is turbulent flow where there exists a large uncertainty in the models used for closure. In the present work the analysis is applied to the three-dimensional planetary boundary layer equations, and sensitivity equations are generated for various parameters in turbulence model. The solution of these equations with the proper techniques leads to considerable insight into the flow field and its dependence on turbulence parameters. Also, the analysis allows for unique decompositions of the parameter dependence and is efficient.

  10. Spermatogonial stem cell sensitivity to capsaicin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mizrak, Sefika C; Gadella, Bart M; Erdost, Hatice; Ozer, Aytekin; van Pelt, Ana MM; van Dissel-Emiliani, Federica MF

    2008-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports have been published on the sensitivity of spermatogenesis to capsaicin (CAP), the pungent ingredient of hot chili peppers. Here, the effect of CAP on germ cell survival was investigated by using two testis germ cell lines as a model. As CAP is a potent agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and no information was available of its expression in germ cells, we also studied the presence of TRPV1 in the cultured cells and in germ cells in situ. Methods The rat spermatogonial stem cell lines Gc-5spg and Gc-6spg were used to study the effects of different concentrations of CAP during 24 and 48 h. The response to CAP was first monitored by phase-contrast microscopy. As germ cells appear to undergo apoptosis in the presence of CAP, the activation of caspase 3 was studied using an anti activated caspase 3 antibody or by quantifying the amount of cells with DNA fragmentation using flow cytometry. Immunolocalization was done with an anti-TRPV1 antibody either with the use of confocal microscopy to follow live cell labeling (germ cells) or on Bouin fixed paraffin embedded testicular tissues. The expression of TRPV1 by the cell lines and germ cells was confirmed by Western blots. Results Initial morphological observations indicated that CAP at concentrations ranging from 150 uM to 250 uM and after 24 and 48 h of exposure, had deleterious apoptotic-like effects on both cell lines: A large population of the CAP treated cell cultures showed signs of DNA fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Quantification of the effect demonstrated a significant effect of CAP with doses of 150 uM in the Gc-5spg cell line and 200 uM in the Gc-6spg cell line, after 24 h of exposure. The effect was dose and time dependent in both cell lines. TRPV1, the receptor for CAP, was found to be expressed by the spermatogonial stem cells in vitro and also by premeiotic germ cells in situ. Conclusion CAP adversely affects spermatogonial survival

  11. Ice nucleation sensitivity studies using the detailed microphysical model MAID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina; Hildebrandt, Margit

    2010-05-01

    The influence of heterogeneous freezing on the ice crystal number of cirrus clouds have been evaluated by extensive model simulations using the detailed microphysical model MAID (Bunz et al., 2008). MAID includes heterogeneous as well as homogeneous freezing and, as a new feature, freezing thresholds for different types of ice nuclei (IN), derived from ice nucleation experiments at the cloud chamber AIDA. Cirrus formation scenarios are simulated in the temperature range 180 - 240 K in 10 K steps. For each temperature, six different vertical velocities were assumed, ranging from 1 - 1000 cm/s. Thus, one scenario contains 42 model runs. A variety of scenarios are simulated by variing the IN number between 0.001 and 0.2 cm-3 and using the freezing thresholds of coated soot and mineral dust. Further, the simulations are performed for constant vertical velocities uz as well as for uz superimposed with temperature pertubations of 1 and 3 K, respectively. Earlier studies (Gierens, 2003; Kärcher and Lohmann, 2003) concluded that homogeneous nucleation dominates in regions with updrafts stronger than 20-30 cms-1. Our simulations show that heterogeneous ice formation progressively influences the ice crystal concentrations up to uz = 100 cm/s, increasing with the IN number and with the temperature. Lowering the freezing threshold decreases the ice crystal number, while temperature pertubations increases the ice concentration, but both only for uz ≤ 10 cm/s. In addition to the ice nucleation sensitivity studies, we performed an intercomparison of MAID with a detailed microphysical model (DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, B. Kärcher) and a double moment bulk microphysics scheme (ETH Zürich, P. Spichtinger), resulting in a good agreement between the models. References: Bunz, H., Benz, S., Gensch, I., and Krämer, M. (2008): MAID: a model to simulate UT/LS aerosols and ice clouds, Envir. Res. Lett., 3, doi10.1088/1748-9326/3/3/035001. Gierens, K. (2003): On the transition between

  12. The simulated Indian monsoon: A GCM sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessy, M. J.; Kinter, J. L., III; Kirtman, B.; Marx, L.; Nigam, S.; Schneider, E.; Shukla, J.; Straus, D.; Vernekar, A.; Xue, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A series of sensitivity experiments are conducted in an attempt to understand and correct deficiencies in the simulation of the seasonal mean Indian monsoon with a global atmospheric general circulation model. The seasonal mean precipitation is less than half that observed. This poor simulation in seasonal integrations is independent of the choice of initial conditions and global sea surface temperature data used. Experiments are performed to test the sensitivity of the Indian monsoon simulation to changes in orography, vegetation, soil, wetness, and cloudiness. The authors find that the deficiency of the model precipitation simulation may be attributed to the use of an enhanced orography in the integrations. Replacement of this orography with a mean orography results in a much more realistic simulation of Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall. Experiments with a linear primitive equation model on the sphere suggest that this striking improvement is due to modulations of the orographically forced waves in the lower troposphere. This improvement in the monsoon simulation is due to the kinematic and dynamical effects of changing the topography, rather than the thermal effects, which were minimal. The magnitude of the impact on the Indian monsoon of the other sensitivity experiments varied considerably, but was consistently less than the impact of using the mean orography. However, results from the soil moisture sensitivity experiments suggest a possibly important role for soil moisture in simulating tropical precipitation, including that associated with the Indian monsoon.

  13. Detecting Damage Using Electric Field Measurements: A Computational Sensitivity Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-06

    on a range or in the Physical Scale Model ( PSM ) environment, the smallest area of damage that is detectable would depend upon measurement...sensitivities or errors along with the ability to physically create small pieces of bare metal on the PSM model. Figure 6-4. Comparison of calculated

  14. Further study on highly sensitive AMS measurement of 53Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kejun, Dong; Hao, Hu; Xianggao, Wang; Chaoli, Li; Ming, He; Zhenyu, Li; Shaoyong, Wu; Jiancheng, Liu; Guowen, Zheng; Heng, Li; Zhigang, Chen; Guangshan, Liu; Jian, Yuan; Shan, Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The AMS facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy has been equipped with a ΔE-Q3D detection system for the measurements of 53Mn. While the sample material of MnO2 and the extraction ions of MnO- were used previously in AMS measurement of 53Mn with fairly good results, a method has recently been developed with the extraction of MnF- from ion source using MnF2 and MnO2 + PbF2 as sample materials. As a result, a sensitivity of 10-14 (53Mn/Mn) has been achieved. Compared with the original MnO-/MnO2 approach, the method of MnF- extraction, combined with ΔE-Q3D detection technique, demonstrated an improved sensitivity for AMS measurement of 53Mn.

  15. Feasibility studies for separation processes using environmentally sensitive hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Sassi, A.P.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    Temperature- and pH-sensitive hydrogels can be used to separate or concentrate proteins from dilute solution. Two possible separation processes are discussed here. Experimental partitioning data are used to compare the efficiencies of neutral, weakly acidic, weakly basic, and polyampholytic poly-N-isopropylacrylamide copolymer gels for separating cytochrome c from ovalbumin. For each process, attention is given to the influence of the solute partition coefficient and swelling equilibria on process efficiency.

  16. Oxidation phenomena: MAAP4 sensitivity studies using CORA-13 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Luche, J.; Jacqmin, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    In France, both Electricite de France and Framatome are using the modular accident analysis program (MAAP) version 4 code for severe accident scenario analyses. Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, in collaboration with them, is investigating the code prediction capabilities on hydrogen production. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the fuel-clad oxidation model on the CORA-13 test results and to find the most sensitive parameters to this reaction, especially during reflooding.

  17. Reinforcement sensitivity of sex offenders and non-offenders: an experimental and psychometric study of reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    PubMed

    Leue, Anja; Brocke, Burkhard; Hoyer, Jürgen

    2008-08-01

    This study tested predictions of Gray's Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST) in subgroups of sex offenders and male non-offenders using an experimental choice task consisting of a reward and a non-reward phase. In addition, RST-related psychometric measures were used. Both experimental and psychometric data were of interest to determine whether sex offenders could be reliably differentiated from non-offenders. Paraphilic (N=50) and impulse control-disordered (N=48) sex offenders showed greater sensitivity to continuous reward than male non-offenders (N=51). Impulse control-disordered sex offenders showed less behavioural adaptation under non-reward than both paraphilic sex offenders and male non-offenders. In addition, reward sensitivity, rash-spontaneous impulsivity, and anxiety measures discriminated sex offenders from male non-offenders. The results suggest that reinforcement sensitivity is a promising personality trait for differentiating subgroups of sex offenders from non-offenders. The experimental and psychometric results illustrate that predictive accuracy in forensic settings could be improved by combining several types of data.

  18. Dentinal sensitivity: a natural mineral dietary supplement study.

    PubMed

    Rogo, E; Hodges, K; Herzog, A

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effect of drinking a natural mineral dietary supplement (NMDS) on gingival health and dentinal hypersensitivity. The NMDS product was from a geothermal source and contained 3.6 mg l(-1) of fluoride and other minerals. Sample selection included subjects with gingival inflammation and sensitivity as well as screening for exclusion factors. A double-blind randomized parallel approach was used. The investigation was a quasi-experimental pre/post-test design. The experimental group ingested and swished twice a day with the NMDS (1 l) and the control group followed the same regimen with a placebo containing de-ionized water (DIW). Clinical measurements of gingival inflammation and dentinal sensitivity were taken at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Gingival inflammation was measured using the Gingival Index. Dentinal hypersensitivity was measured using a tactile stimulus and an evaporative stimulus. After each stimulus was applied, the subjects rated the amount of discomfort on a visual analogue scale from 0 to 10. Each set of data was analysed using anova and a post hoc probing technique to determine within- and between-group differences (P = 0.05). The experimental and control groups (n = 70) experienced a statistically significant decrease in tactile and evaporative sensitivity scores over time; however, the between-group differences were not significant. The gingival inflammation data were not statistically significant with regard to the within- and between-group differences. Therefore the NMDS and DIW were equally effective in reducing dentinal hypersensitivity and neither product effectively reduced gingival inflammation.

  19. HCIT Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies: Simulation Versus Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Krist, John; Cady, Eric J.; Kern, Brian; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    Using NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we have experimentally investigated the sensitivity of dark hole contrast in a Lyot coronagraph for the following factors: 1) Lateral and longitudinal translation of an occulting mask; 2) An opaque spot on the occulting mask; 3) Sizes of the controlled dark hole area. Also, we compared the measured results with simulations obtained using both MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems) and PROPER optical analysis programs with full three-dimensional near-field diffraction analysis to model HCIT's optical train and coronagraph.

  20. Cascade sensitivity studies for KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Luigi Antonio

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the deep seas of the Mediterranean housing a large scale neutrino telescope. The first phase of construction of the telescope has started. Next step is an intermediate phase realising a detector volume of about one-third of the final detector volume. We report on calculations of the sensitivity of the KM3NeT detector to showering neutrino events, the strategy to optimise the detector to a cosmic neutrino flux analogous to the one reported by the IceCube Collaboration and the results of this strategy applied to the intermediate phase detector.

  1. An Initial Study of the Sensitivity of Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) Spacing Sensitivity to Weather and Configuration Input Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, Stephen E.; Hinton, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A study has been performed on a computer code modeling an aircraft wake vortex spacing system during final approach. This code represents an initial engineering model of a system to calculate reduced approach separation criteria needed to increase airport productivity. This report evaluates model sensitivity toward various weather conditions (crosswind, crosswind variance, turbulent kinetic energy, and thermal gradient), code configurations (approach corridor option, and wake demise definition), and post-processing techniques (rounding of provided spacing values, and controller time variance).

  2. The highly sensitive brain: an fMRI study of sensory processing sensitivity and response to others' emotions.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Bianca P; Aron, Elaine N; Aron, Arthur; Sangster, Matthew-Donald; Collins, Nancy; Brown, Lucy L

    2014-07-01

    Theory and research suggest that sensory processing sensitivity (SPS), found in roughly 20% of humans and over 100 other species, is a trait associated with greater sensitivity and responsiveness to the environment and to social stimuli. Self-report studies have shown that high-SPS individuals are strongly affected by others' moods, but no previous study has examined neural systems engaged in response to others' emotions. This study examined the neural correlates of SPS (measured by the standard short-form Highly Sensitive Person [HSP] scale) among 18 participants (10 females) while viewing photos of their romantic partners and of strangers displaying positive, negative, or neutral facial expressions. One year apart, 13 of the 18 participants were scanned twice. Across all conditions, HSP scores were associated with increased brain activation of regions involved in attention and action planning (in the cingulate and premotor area [PMA]). For happy and sad photo conditions, SPS was associated with activation of brain regions involved in awareness, integration of sensory information, empathy, and action planning (e.g., cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus [IFG], middle temporal gyrus [MTG], and PMA). As predicted, for partner images and for happy facial photos, HSP scores were associated with stronger activation of brain regions involved in awareness, empathy, and self-other processing. These results provide evidence that awareness and responsiveness are fundamental features of SPS, and show how the brain may mediate these traits.

  3. The highly sensitive brain: an fMRI study of sensory processing sensitivity and response to others' emotions

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Bianca P; Aron, Elaine N; Aron, Arthur; Sangster, Matthew-Donald; Collins, Nancy; Brown, Lucy L

    2014-01-01

    Background Theory and research suggest that sensory processing sensitivity (SPS), found in roughly 20% of humans and over 100 other species, is a trait associated with greater sensitivity and responsiveness to the environment and to social stimuli. Self-report studies have shown that high-SPS individuals are strongly affected by others' moods, but no previous study has examined neural systems engaged in response to others' emotions. Methods This study examined the neural correlates of SPS (measured by the standard short-form Highly Sensitive Person [HSP] scale) among 18 participants (10 females) while viewing photos of their romantic partners and of strangers displaying positive, negative, or neutral facial expressions. One year apart, 13 of the 18 participants were scanned twice. Results Across all conditions, HSP scores were associated with increased brain activation of regions involved in attention and action planning (in the cingulate and premotor area [PMA]). For happy and sad photo conditions, SPS was associated with activation of brain regions involved in awareness, integration of sensory information, empathy, and action planning (e.g., cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus [IFG], middle temporal gyrus [MTG], and PMA). Conclusions As predicted, for partner images and for happy facial photos, HSP scores were associated with stronger activation of brain regions involved in awareness, empathy, and self-other processing. These results provide evidence that awareness and responsiveness are fundamental features of SPS, and show how the brain may mediate these traits. PMID:25161824

  4. LAT Observation of GRBs: Simulations and Sensitivity Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Norris, Jay; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. It employs a pair conversion technique to record photons in the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT will follow the steps from its predecessor EGRET (1991-2000), and will explore the high-energy gamma-ray sky with unprecedented capabilities. The observation of Gamma-Ray Bursts is one of the main science goal of the LAT: in this contribution we compute an estimation of the LAT sensitivity to GRB, adopting a phenomenological description of GRBs, where the high-energy emission in GRB is obtained extrapolating the observed BATSE spectrum up to LAT energies. The effect of the cosmological attenuation is included. We use the BATSE current catalog to build up our statistics.

  5. A sensitivity study of a solar heated and cooled house

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanthapanichakoon, W.; Himmelblau, D. M.

    1980-04-01

    A sensitivity analysis was made of a typical solar heated and cooled house to determine which parameters in the model representing the house were significant and which could be ignored. Each component of the house was represented by algebraic and/or differential equations. A computer code was prepared that could simulate almost any flat-plate solar house configuration by simply specifying the type of house, individual components of the heating and cooling system, and the information flow diagram for material and energy flows. Seventeen parameters were examined for both winter and summer operation. A ranking of the influence of the parameters on the solar energy collected and the supplementary energy required to operate the system is provided.

  6. LAT observation of GRBs: Simulations and Sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Omodei, Nicola; Norris, Jay

    2007-07-12

    The GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. It employs a pair conversion technique to record photons in the energy range from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. The LAT will follow the steps from its predecessor EGRET (1991-2000), and will explore the high-energy gamma-ray sky with unprecedented capabilities. The observation of Gamma-Ray Bursts is one of the main science goal of the LAT: in this contribution we compute an estimation of the LAT sensitivity to GRB, adopting a phenomenological description of GRBs, where the high-energy emission in GRB is obtained extrapolating the observed BATSE spectrum up to LAT energies. The effect of the cosmological attenuation is included. We use the BATSE current catalog to build up our statistics.

  7. Sensitivity study of reliable, high-throughput resolution metricsfor photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2007-07-30

    The resolution of chemically amplified resists is becoming an increasing concern, especially for lithography in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) regime. Large-scale screening and performance-based down-selection is currently underway to identify resist platforms that can support shrinking feature sizes. Resist screening efforts, however, are hampered by the absence of reliable resolution metrics that can objectively quantify resist resolution in a high-throughput fashion. Here we examine two high-throughput metrics for resist resolution determination. After summarizing their details and justifying their utility, we characterize the sensitivity of both metrics to two of the main experimental uncertainties associated with lithographic exposure tools, namely: limited focus control and limited knowledge of optical aberrations. For an implementation at EUV wavelengths, we report aberration and focus limited error bars in extracted resolution of {approx} 1.25 nm RMS for both metrics making them attractive candidates for future screening and down-selection efforts.

  8. Sensitivity Studies of Air Ingress Acidents in Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J; Richards, Matt; Shepelev, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Postulated air ingress accidents, while of very low probability in a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), are of considerable interest to the plant designer, operator, and regulator because of the possibility that the core could sustain significant damage under some circumstances. Sensitivity analyses are described that cover a wide spectrum of conditions affecting outcomes of the postulated accident sequences, for both prismatic and pebble-bed core designs. The major factors affecting potential core damage are the size and location of primary system leaks, flow path resistances, the core temperature distribution, and the long-term availability of oxygen in the incoming gas from a confinement building. Typically, all the incoming oxygen entering the core area is consumed within the reactor vessel, so it is more a matter of where, not whether, oxidation occurs. An air ingress model with example scenarios and means for mitigating damage are described. Representative designs of modular HTGRs included here are a 400-MW(th) pebble-bed reactor (PBR), and a 600-MW(th) prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR) design such as the gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR).

  9. Design tradeoff studies and sensitivity analysis, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Further work was performed on the Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Fuel economy on the order of 2 to 3 times that of a conventional vehicle, with a comparable life cycle cost, is possible. The two most significant factors in keeping the life cycle cost down are the retail price increment and the ratio of battery replacement cost to battery life. Both factors can be reduced by reducing the power rating of the electric drive portion of the system relative to the system power requirements. The type of battery most suitable for the hybrid, from the point of view of minimizing life cycle cost, is nickel-iron. The hybrid is much less sensitive than a conventional vehicle is, in terms of the reduction in total fuel consumption and resultant decreases in operating expense, to reductions in vehicle weight, tire rolling resistance, etc., and to propulsion system and drivetrain improvements designed to improve the brake specific fuel consumption of the engine under low road load conditions. It is concluded that modifications to package the propulsion system and battery pack can be easily accommodated within the confines of a modified carryover body such as the Ford Ltd.

  10. Sensitivity study of neutron transport through standard and rebar concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bhuiyan, S.I.; Roussin, R.W.; Lucius, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is under way at ORNL to (1) develop a data base pertinent to the transport of neutrons through thick concrete shields, (2) use the data base in an energy group boundary selection and collapsing scheme, and (3) develop a simple methodology to access the data base to provide rapid solutions to practical shielding problems. This paper describes work carried out to fulfill objective (1), the work consisting of calculations of the transport of fission neutrons through 1- and 2-m-thick slabs of standard concrete and rebar (steel-reinforced) concrete, together with calculations of the sensitivities of the results to total, absorption, and elastic cross sections. The transport calculations were performed with the one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN in both forward and adjoint modes. The DLC-41C/VITAMIN-C cross-section library (171 neutron, 36 gamma groups) was employed, with a P/sub 3/ cross-section expansion and an S/sub 16/ angular quadrature. In all cases the fission source was assumed to be distributed within the first 1-cm thickness of the slab and the detector was assumed to occupy the last 1-cm thickness of the slab. For the rebar concrete the slab constituents were homogenized, with the horizontal and vertical No. 11 reinforcing steel rods comprising 7.6 vol. % of the slab. The quantity calculated was the absorbed dose rate, and care was taken in the mesh interval selection and source description to ensure agreement between the forward and adjoint results to within 0.02%.

  11. Assisted Sonication vs Conventional Transesterification Numerical Simulation and Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janajreh, Isam; Noorul Hussain, Mohammed; El Samad, Tala

    2015-10-01

    Transeterification is known as slow reaction that can take over several hours to complete as the two immiscible liquid reactants combine to form biodiesel and the less favorable glycerol. The quest of finding the perfect catalyst, optimal operational conditions, and reactor configuration to accelerate the reaction in mere few minutes that ensures high quality biodiesel, in economically viable way is coming along with sonication. This drastic reduction is a key enabler for the development of a continuous processing that otherwise is fairly costly and low throughput using conventional method. The reaction kinetics of sonication assisted as inferred by several authors is several time faster and this work implements these rates in a high fidelity numerical simulation model. This flow model is based on Navier-Stokes equations coupled with energy equation for non-isothermal flow and the transport equations of the multiple reactive species. The model is initially validated against experimental data from previous work of the authors using an annular reactor configuration. Following the validation, comparison of the reaction rate is shown to gain more insight to the distribution of the reaction and its attained rates. The two models (conventional and sonication) then compared on the basis of their sensitivity to the methane to oil molar ratio as the most pronounced process parameter. Both the exit reactor yield and the distribution of the species are evaluated with favorable yield under sonication process. These results pave the way to build a more robust process intensified reactor having an integrated selective heterogeneous catalyst to steer the reaction. This can avoid the downstream cleaning processes, cutting reaction time, and render economic benefit to the process.

  12. Regional Sensitivity to Neuroinflammation: In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Liraz-Zaltsman, S.; Biegon, A.; Liraz-Zaltsman, S.; Alexandrovich, A.G.; Trembovler, V.; Fishbein, I.; Yaka, R.; Shohami, E.; Biegon, A.

    2010-11-23

    Neuroinflammation is involved in several acute-onset neuropathologies such as meningitis, encephalitis, stroke, and traumatic brain injury as well as in neurodegenerative diseases. All of these patholologies are associated with cognitive deficits. Using a model of pure neuroinflammation (intracisternal injection of endotoxin in mice), we tested the hypothesis that brain regions involved in cognition are the most vulnerable to inflammatory insults, and this vulnerability is an inherent property of neocortical neurons. Mice (n = 10/group) injected with endotoxin (LPS) or saline in the cisterna magna underwent neurobehavioral and cognitive testing followed by quantitative autoradiographic assessment of regional neuroinflammation with [3H]PK11195, an established marker of microgliosis. In parallel, cocultures of cortical and striatal neurons taken from embryonic day 19 rat embryos or postnatal day 1 mice expressing green fluorescent protein were exposed for 24 h to the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha, glutamate, or a combination of the two agents. LPS-treated mice exhibited significant deficits in memory and significant increases in specific PK11195 binding in cortical and hippocampal regions, but not in striatum. Cultured neurons of cortical origin showed significantly lower survival rate relative to striatal neurons in response to TNFalpha, glutamate, or a combination of the two agents. Furthermore, TNFalpha exerted neuroprotective rather than neurotoxic effects in the striatal but not in the cortical neurons. These results suggest that the cortex is inherently more sensitive than the striatum to the deleterious effects of neuroinflammation, and may offer an explanation for the preponderance of cognitive deficits in neuropathologies with a neuroinflammatory component.

  13. Immunological studies in cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, M; Iyngkaran, N

    1981-01-01

    reliable measure of the local immune response. Levels of complement and immunoglobulin in serum or duodenal juice fail to provide help in the diagnosis of cows' milk protein-sensitive enteropathy. PMID:7193434

  14. Does a Culturally Sensitive Smoking Prevention Program Reduce Smoking Intentions among Aboriginal Children? A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKennitt, Daniel W.; Currie, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program would have short-term impacts on smoking intentions among Aboriginal children. Two schools with high Aboriginal enrollment were selected for the study. A grade 4 classroom in one school was randomly assigned to receive the culturally sensitive smoking…

  15. A Study of Young Children's Aesthetic Sensitivity to Drawing and Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golomb, Claire; Helmund, Judith

    This study examines the emergence of aesthetic sensitivity in the young child as a maker of art and as a critic of the work of peers. Two studies were designed to explore the child's own, mostly implicit, assumptions about child art, sensitivity to stylistic and drawing system differences, and to compositional patterns that characterize the work…

  16. [Results of studying taste sensitivity with basic or pure solutions].

    PubMed

    Marco Algarra, R

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we study the phenomenon of the gustatory fatigue using simple solutions in representation of the four basic-tastes. We have designed a map of the sensibility of the tongue to the four basic tastes according to our results. Finally we study the fatigue and adaptation in the gustatory system, concluding that are different concepts although they are very close related.

  17. The sensitivity of the KeratinoSens™ assay to evaluate plant extracts: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Andres, Eric; Sá-Rocha, Vanessa M; Barrichello, Carla; Haupt, Tina; Ellis, Graham; Natsch, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Several tests to assess skin sensitization hazard are in peer-review for pre-validation. These tests, as well as the animal tests they aim to replace, were developed (and validated) for the testing of pure substances. However, in the cosmetic field, active ingredients are often mixtures from natural sources. It is therefore important to understand which tests could be used to evaluate their safety. Here we describe a proof-of-concept study to test whether the KeratinoSens(™) assay is able to detect sensitizing constituents within botanical mixtures. Four extracts were spiked with different doses of the sensitizers citral, cinnamic aldehyde and isoeugenol. The tested extracts were negative in the test whereas they became positive in most cases when spiked with the sensitizers. Analysis of the results from the samples spiked with different doses allowed the determination of the minimal level of sensitizers being detectable. The contribution to sensitization potential of doses of 2% and above of the spiked sensitizers were reliably detected. There were limitations for an extract with high cytotoxicity, in which case detection of the artificially spiked sensitizers proved difficult. This study gives a proof of principle for testing of mixtures in the KeratinoSens(™) assay and indicates how sensitive the assay is to detect minor components with sensitizing potential. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Guidelines for fungal diagnoses and antifungal sensitivity studies].

    PubMed

    Gadea, Ignacio; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel

    2004-01-01

    The guidelines presented herein, which are based on the indications established by various studies and expert opinions, analyze several issues related to laboratory diagnosis of invasive fungal infections in immunosuppressed patients.

  19. Scotopic Sensitivity Syndrome in a Single Individual (A Case Study)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    investigates this form of visual dyslexia to determine its legitimacy and the possibility of developing an experimental methodology to quantify and...capable of altering visual and cognitive performance to a significant extent for both better and worse. The experimental methods developed by this...study can be used to quantify the performance of Irlen-type dyslexics and to study the impact of visual spectral energy on their vision system. (U

  20. Preliminary studies of combustor sensitivity to alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humenik, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    Combustion problems associated with using alternative fuels ground power and aeropropulsion applications were studied. Rectangular sections designed to simulate large annular combustor test conditions were examined. The effects of using alternative fuels with reduced hydrogen content, increased aromatic content, and a broad variation in fuel property characteristics were also studied. Data of special interest were collected which include: flame radiation characteristics in the various combustor zones; the correponding increase in liner temperature from increased radiant heat flux; the effect of fuel bound nitrogen on oxides of nitrogen (NO sub x) emissions; and the overall total effect of fuel variations on exhaust emissions.

  1. Host Language Proficiency, Intercultural Sensitivity, and Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The number of foreign language students who join study abroad programs continues to increase annually, especially those who take part in short-term sojourns lasting eight weeks or less. What can be accomplished in such a short stay in the host culture? Is it possible for sojourners to enhance their proficiency in the host language and…

  2. Compression-Ignition Sensitivity Studies of Liquid Propellants for Guns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    passing, we note that the problem of ullaqe in an explosive medium is not limited to the field of LP monopropellant gun systems. It can arias in LP...explode upon sudden preesurization. However, with one or more small bubbles in the liquid, a "hot spot" can be gernerated by the adiabatic compression of...Liqu d Monopropellant In order to conduct compreosion-ignition nen•itivity studies of a pro-comproused, multiple bubble liquid monoproptllant medium

  3. An avionics sensitivity study. Volume 1: Operational considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.; Mcconkey, E. D.

    1976-01-01

    Equipment and operational concepts affecting aircraft in the terminal area are reported. Curved approach applications and modified climb and descent procedures for minimum fuel consumption are considered. The curved approach study involves the application of MLS guidance to enable execution of the current visual approach to Washington National Airport under instrument flight conditions. The operational significance and the flight path control requirements involved in the application of curved approach paths to this situation are considered. Alternative flight path control regimes are considered to achieve minimum fuel consumption subject to constraints related to air traffic control requirements, flight crew and passenger reactions, and airframe and powerplant limitations.

  4. A parametric sensitivity study on the ascent of a SSTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirouzu, Masao; Matsushima, Koichi; Nomura, Shigeaki

    Simulation studies have been performed to optimize the parameters of a fully reusable SSTO vehicle to be used as a next generation space transportation system. The vehicle under consideration takes off horizontally from a runway. The SSTO uses an air-turboramjet at low Mach numbers, a supersonic-combustion ramjet at higher Mach numbers, and a conventional rocket in the final phase. Parameters considered include the gross take-off weight, vehicle configuration, aerodynamic coefficient values, number of engines, and change-over Mach number between the propulsion systems.

  5. Teaching Strategies and Practices that Promote a Culturally Sensitive Nursing Education: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teaching strategies that promote a culturally sensitive nursing education and culturally sensitive nursing. The diversity of Americans has increased. Thus, the nursing student population and patient population have both become more diverse. Nursing education programs, therefore, need to know the best…

  6. A Taxometric Study of the Latent Structure of Disgust Sensitivity: Converging Evidence for Dimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.

    2007-01-01

    Disgust sensitivity has recently been implicated as a specific vulnerability factor for several anxiety-related disorders. However, it is not clear whether disgust sensitivity is a dimensional or categorical phenomenon. The present study examined the latent structure of disgust by applying three taxometric procedures (maximum eigenvalue, mean…

  7. Observed Sensitivity during Family Interactions and Cumulative Risk: A Study of Multiple Dyads per Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dillon T.; Leckie, George; Prime, Heather; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the family, individual, and dyad-specific contributions to observed cognitive sensitivity during family interactions. Moreover, the influence of cumulative risk on sensitivity at the aforementioned levels of the family was examined. Mothers and 2 children per family were observed interacting in a round robin…

  8. A Taxometric Study of the Latent Structure of Disgust Sensitivity: Converging Evidence for Dimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.

    2007-01-01

    Disgust sensitivity has recently been implicated as a specific vulnerability factor for several anxiety-related disorders. However, it is not clear whether disgust sensitivity is a dimensional or categorical phenomenon. The present study examined the latent structure of disgust by applying three taxometric procedures (maximum eigenvalue, mean…

  9. Observed Sensitivity during Family Interactions and Cumulative Risk: A Study of Multiple Dyads per Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dillon T.; Leckie, George; Prime, Heather; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the family, individual, and dyad-specific contributions to observed cognitive sensitivity during family interactions. Moreover, the influence of cumulative risk on sensitivity at the aforementioned levels of the family was examined. Mothers and 2 children per family were observed interacting in a round robin…

  10. Evaluation of the Use of Team Teaching for Delivering Sensitive Content: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerridge, Joanna; Kyle, Gaye; Marks-Maran, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Many programmes in further and higher education contain sensitive areas of content, such as diversity, racism, power and privilege, breaking bad news, counselling, sex education and ethical decision making. Team teaching may be a useful method for delivering sensitive areas of course content. This article presents a pilot study that was undertaken…

  11. Teaching Strategies and Practices that Promote a Culturally Sensitive Nursing Education: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teaching strategies that promote a culturally sensitive nursing education and culturally sensitive nursing. The diversity of Americans has increased. Thus, the nursing student population and patient population have both become more diverse. Nursing education programs, therefore, need to know the best…

  12. A sensitivity study of storm cyclones with a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, K. S.; Tetzlaff, G.

    2003-04-01

    Extra tropical storms caused noticeable damages in the last decades. The evolution of strong cyclones is investigated by simulations with the nonhydrostatic limited area model 'Lokal Modell' (LM) of the German Weather Service (DWD). Which Conditions become important to distinguish an common cyclone from an storm-cyclone? Intense cyclones are mostly characterised by two typical large-scale features: high baroclinicity along the track of the low pressure system and a region of high equivalent potential temperature. For this purpose the observed values of the horizontal temperature gradient and the distribution of air moisture are varied and were used as forcing data, in such a way the development of storms was modified. The forcing data for the LM were generated by the global model of the DWD. Therefore data of real cyclones, such as the low Ginger, which occurred in 2000, were used. As the LM simulates only a limited area, the lateral bounds become problematic because of the manipulated forcing data. A procedure is tested, in order to prevent these problems. In this manner ensembles of storm scenarios were produced. The effects of various conditions were studied. Here in particular the changes in the surface velocity field were of interest. In the case of Ginger, an increase of the temperature gradient about 10 K causes an increasing of the maximum velocity about 3 m/s.

  13. Cruise Speed Sensitivity Study for Transonic Truss Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Douglas P.

    2017-01-01

    NASA's investment and research in aviation has led to new technologies and concepts that make aircraft more efficient and environmentally friendly. One aircraft design operational concept is the reduction of cruise speed to reduce fuel burned during a mission. Although this is not a new idea, it was used by all of the contractors involved in a 2008 NASA sponsored study that solicited concept and technology ideas to reduce environmental impacts for future subsonic passenger transports. NASA is currently improving and building new analysis capabilities to analyze advanced concepts. To test some of these new capabilities, a transonic truss braced wing configuration was used as a test case. This paper examines the effects due to changes in the design cruise speed and other tradeoffs in the design space. The analysis was baselined to the Boeing SUGAR High truss braced wing concept. An optimization was run at five different design cruise Mach numbers. These designs are compared to provide an initial assessment space and the parameters that should be considered when selecting a design cruise speed. A discussion of the design drivers is also included. The results show that the wing weight in the current analysis has more influence on the takeoff gross weight than expected. This effect caused lower than expected wing sweep angle values for higher cruise speed designs.

  14. Microbeam studies of the sensitivity of structures within living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Determining the biological effects of low doses of radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET) is complicated by the stochastic nature of charged-particle interactions. Populations of cells exposed to very low radiation doses contain a few cells which have been hit by a charged particle, while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage. At somewhat higher doses, a few cells receive two or more events. Because the effects of damage produced by separate events can interact in the cell, we have had to make assumptions about the nature of these interactions in order to interpret the results of the experiments. Many of those assumptions can be tested if we can be sure of the number of charged-particle events which occur in individual cells, and correlate this number with the biological effect. We have developed a special irradiation facility at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to control the actual number of charged particle tracks that pass through cell nuclei. The beam from a 2 MeV tandem accelerator is collimated to approximately 5 microns. Cells, grown in special dishes with 1.5 microns thick plastic bottoms, are positioned so that the desired portion of the cell aligns with the collimator. A shutter in the beam line is opened and closed after the desired number of particle tracks has been counted. This approach can be used to investigate the effects of the interaction between irradiated and unirradiated cells in an organized system, as well as to study the effects of spatial and temporal distribution of radiation damage within single cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  15. Microbeam studies of the sensitivity of structures within living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Determining the biological effects of low doses of radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET) is complicated by the stochastic nature of charged-particle interactions. Populations of cells exposed to very low radiation doses contain a few cells which have been hit by a charged particle, while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage. At somewhat higher doses, a few cells receive two or more events. Because the effects of damage produced by separate events can interact in the cell, we have had to make assumptions about the nature of these interactions in order to interpret the results of the experiments. Many of those assumptions can be tested if we can be sure of the number of charged-particle events which occur in individual cells, and correlate this number with the biological effect. We have developed a special irradiation facility at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to control the actual number of charged particle tracks that pass through cell nuclei. The beam from a 2 MeV tandem accelerator is collimated to approximately 5 microns. Cells, grown in special dishes with 1.5 microns thick plastic bottoms, are positioned so that the desired portion of the cell aligns with the collimator. A shutter in the beam line is opened and closed after the desired number of particle tracks has been counted. This approach can be used to investigate the effects of the interaction between irradiated and unirradiated cells in an organized system, as well as to study the effects of spatial and temporal distribution of radiation damage within single cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  16. Lidar studies on climate sensitivity characteristics of tropical cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motty, G. S.; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget due to their high frequency of occurrence, non-spherical ice crystal formations, and variability in the scattering/absorption characteristics. Mostly, the tropical cirrus clouds are considered as greenhouse modulators. Thus the parameterization of tropical cirrus clouds in terms of the micro- physical properties and the corresponding radiative effects are highly important for the climate studies. For characterizing the radiative properties of cirrus clouds, which depend on the size, shape and number of the ice crystals, the knowledge of extinction coefficient (σ) and optical depth (τ) are necessary. The σ provides information needed for understanding the influence of the scatterers on the radiative budget whereas the τ gives an indication on the composition and thickness of the cloud. Extensive research on the tropical cirrus clouds has been carried out by using a ground based and satellite based lidar systems. In this work, the characteristics of tropical cirrus cloud derived by using the data from the ground based lidar system over the tropical site Gadanki [13.5°N, 79.2°E], India during 2010 are presented. Some of the results are compared with those obtained by us from satellite based CALIOP lidar observations of the CALIPSO mission. It is observed that there is a strong dependence of the some of the physical properties such as occurrence height, cloud temperature and the geometrical thickness on the microphysical parameters in terms of extinction coefficient and optical depth. The correlation of both the σ and τ with temperature is also observed.

  17. Model sensitivity studies of the decrease in atmospheric carbon tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matthew; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; Salameh, Peter K.; Mühle, Jens; O'Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Simmonds, Peter G.; Krummel, Paul B.; Fraser, Paul J.; Steele, L. Paul; Happell, James D.; Rhew, Robert C.; Butler, James; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Hall, Bradley; Nance, David; Moore, Fred; Miller, Ben R.; Elkins, James W.; Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Chris D.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Mahieu, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. However, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74 % of total), but a reported 10 % uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9 % of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17 % of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). With an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year-1, the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year-1. Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases between observational

  18. Model Sensitivity Studies of the Decrease in Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matt; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. However, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74% of total), but a reported 10% uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9%of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17%of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). With an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year(exp -1), the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year(exp -1). Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases between

  19. Dentine sensitivity risk factors: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Mafla, Ana Cristina; Lopez-Moncayo, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the clinical and psychological risk factors associated with dentine hypersensitivity (DH) in order to provide an early diagnosis and preventive therapy. Materials and Methods: A nested case–control study was design between 2011 and 2012. A total of 61 DH cases and 122 controls participated in this investigation. Cases and controls were matched for sex, group of age and socioeconomic status in a ratio of 1:2. DH to different stimuli such as cold, heat, acid, and sweet was asked in patient interviews, and dental examinations were used to detect DH. Clinical and psychological risk factors such as dental hygiene, periodontal disease, acid diet, alcohol consumption, psychological stress, and psychopathological symptoms were inquired. Psychological stress was measured through the PSS-10 and psychopathological symptoms were evaluated by SCL-90-R in Spanish. Descriptive and univariate binary logistic regression analysis were performed to estimate the association between clinical and psychological risk factors and the presence of DH. Results: Toothpaste abrasivity (odds ratio [OR] 1.881, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.010–3.502, P = 0.045), gingival recession (OR 2.196, 95% CI 1.020–4.728, P = 0.041), and periodontal therapy (OR 5.357, 95% CI 2.051–13.993, P < 0.001) were associated with DH. Subjects with perceived stress (OR 1.211, 95%, CI 0.518–2.833, P = 0.658), obsessive-compulsive (OR 1.266, 95%, CI 0.494–3.240, P = 0.623) and hostility (OR 1.235, 95%, CI 0.507–3.007, P = 0.642) symptoms had a clinical greater odd of DH. Conclusion: Oral hygiene products and periodontal conditions are important risk factors for DH. Individuals with perceived stress, obsessive-compulsive, and hostility symptoms may increase a clinical risk for this entity. Targeting to dental counseling focused on oral hygiene products, periodontal therapy and a psychological evaluation may be promising in DH prevention. PMID:27011732

  20. LDEX Sensitivity Studies in Preparation for the LADEE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocker, A.; James, D.; Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Lunar Dust Experiment is an impact ionization dust detector scheduled for flight onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADE) mission in 2013. LDEX will map the spatial and size distributions of both the secondary ejecta particles - generated by interplanetary dust impacts, and the putative population of submicron grains - expected to be lofted by plasma effects near the terminators. The operational principal of LDEX is based on the measurement of impact generated electrons and ions, collected on its hemispherical target and ion sensor, respectively. The geometry of this instrument ensures that the collection efficiency of the ions does not depend on the location of the impact; however, the total charge does remain a function of the impact angle. This dependence was investigated during the calibration campaign at the dust accelerator facility of the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS). The resulting data have been compared with similar experiments performed for the calibration of the impact ionization instruments onboard the spacecraft Galileo and the Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard the Cassini space craft. These results show slight differences in the angular dependence of the ion generation for the various instruments, even though the function and the geometrical set ups as well as the target properties are similar. Furthermore, the investigated impact parameter ranges do not overlap completely. Thus, we perform a dedicated measurement with a suitable experimental set up at the dust accelerator facility in Boulder. The experiments exposed target materials, similar to LDEX, to dust particles in the velocity range from 1 to 70 km/s and mass range of 10-18 to 10-12kg, to show how the impact charge varies with impact angle. The simpler geometrical set up, especially the planar target, will allow to gain a deeper understanding of the underlying process by suppressing secondary processes, such as the ionization due

  1. Model sensitivity studies of the decrease in atmospheric carbon tetrachloride

    DOE PAGES

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matthew; ...

    2016-12-20

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. But, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74 % of total), but amore » reported 10 % uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9 % of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17 % of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). Furthermore, with an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year-1, the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year-1. Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases

  2. Model sensitivity studies of the decrease in atmospheric carbon tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matthew; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; Salameh, Peter K.; Mühle, Jens; O'Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Simmonds, Peter G.; Krummel, Paul B.; Fraser, Paul J.; Steele, L. Paul; Happell, James D.; Rhew, Robert C.; Butler, James; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Hall, Bradley; Nance, David; Moore, Fred; Miller, Ben R.; Elkins, James W.; Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Chris D.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Mahieu, Emmanuel

    2016-12-20

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. But, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74 % of total), but a reported 10 % uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9 % of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17 % of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). Furthermore, with an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year-1, the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to

  3. Model Sensitivity Studies of the Decrease in Atmospheric Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Liang, Qing; Rigby, Matt; Hossaini, Ryan; Montzka, Stephen A.; Dhomse, Sandip; Feng, Wuhu; Prinn, Ronald G.; Weiss, Ray F.; Harth, Christina M.; Salameh, Peter K.; Muehle, Jens; O’Doherty, Simon; Young, Dickon; Simmonds, Peter G.; Krummel, Paul B.; Fraser, Paul J.; Steele, L. Paul; Happell, James D.; Rhew, Robert C.; Butler, James; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Hall, Bradley; Nance, David; Moore, Fred; Miller, Ben R.; Elkins, James W.; Harrison, Jeremy J.; Boone, Chris D.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Mahieu, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an ozone-depleting substance, which is controlled by the Montreal Protocol and for which the atmospheric abundance is decreasing. However, the current observed rate of this decrease is known to be slower than expected based on reported CCl4 emissions and its estimated overall atmospheric lifetime. Here we use a three-dimensional (3-D) chemical transport model to investigate the impact on its predicted decay of uncertainties in the rates at which CCl4 is removed from the atmosphere by photolysis, by ocean uptake and by degradation in soils. The largest sink is atmospheric photolysis (74% of total), but a reported 10% uncertainty in its combined photolysis cross section and quantum yield has only a modest impact on the modelled rate of CCl4 decay. This is partly due to the limiting effect of the rate of transport of CCl4 from the main tropospheric reservoir to the stratosphere, where photolytic loss occurs. The model suggests large interannual variability in the magnitude of this stratospheric photolysis sink caused by variations in transport. The impact of uncertainty in the minor soil sink (9%of total) is also relatively small. In contrast, the model shows that uncertainty in ocean loss (17%of total) has the largest impact on modelled CCl4 decay due to its sizeable contribution to CCl4 loss and large lifetime uncertainty range (147 to 241 years). With an assumed CCl4 emission rate of 39 Gg year(exp -1), the reference simulation with the best estimate of loss processes still underestimates the observed CCl4 (overestimates the decay) over the past 2 decades but to a smaller extent than previous studies. Changes to the rate of CCl4 loss processes, in line with known uncertainties, could bring the model into agreement with in situ surface and remote-sensing measurements, as could an increase in emissions to around 47 Gg year(exp -1). Further progress in constraining the CCl4 budget is partly limited by systematic biases between

  4. Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

    2008-12-31

    The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD

  5. Multiple imputation in a longitudinal cohort study: a case study of sensitivity to imputation methods.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Helena; Patton, George C; Carlin, John B

    2014-11-01

    Multiple imputation has entered mainstream practice for the analysis of incomplete data. We have used it extensively in a large Australian longitudinal cohort study, the Victorian Adolescent Health Cohort Study (1992-2008). Although we have endeavored to follow best practices, there is little published advice on this, and we have not previously examined the extent to which variations in our approach might lead to different results. Here, we examined sensitivity of analytical results to imputation decisions, investigating choice of imputation method, inclusion of auxiliary variables, omission of cases with excessive missing data, and approaches for imputing highly skewed continuous distributions that are analyzed as dichotomous variables. Overall, we found that decisions made about imputation approach had a discernible but rarely dramatic impact for some types of estimates. For model-based estimates of association, the choice of imputation method and decisions made to build the imputation model had little effect on results, whereas estimates of overall prevalence and prevalence stratified by subgroup were more sensitive to imputation method and settings. Multiple imputation by chained equations gave more plausible results than multivariate normal imputation for prevalence estimates but appeared to be more susceptible to numerical instability related to a highly skewed variable. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Factors related to taste sensitivity in elderly: cross-sectional findings from SONIC study.

    PubMed

    Uota, M; Ogawa, T; Ikebe, K; Arai, Y; Kamide, K; Gondo, Y; Masui, Y; Ishizaki, T; Inomata, C; Takeshita, H; Mihara, Y; Maeda, Y

    2016-12-01

    The sense of taste is important, as it allows for assessment of nutritional value, as well as safety and quality of foods, with several factors suggested to be associated with taste sensitivity. However, comprehensive variables regarding taste and related factors have not been utilised in previous studies for assessments of sensitivity. In the present study, we performed cross-sectional analyses of taste sensitivity and related factors in geriatric individuals who participated in the SONIC Study. We analysed 2 groups divided by age, 69-71 years (young-old, n = 687) and 79-81 years (old-old, n = 621), and performed a general health assessment, an oral examination and determination of taste sensitivity. Contributing variables were selected by univariate analysis and then subjected to multivariate logistic regression analysis. In both groups, females showed significantly better sensitivity for bitter and sour tastes. Additionally, higher cognitive scores for subjects with a fine taste for salty were commonly seen in both groups, while smoking, drinking, hypertension, number of teeth, stimulated salivary flow salt intake and years of education were also shown to be associated with taste sensitivity. We found gender and cognitive status to be major factors affecting taste sensitivity in geriatric individuals.

  7. Pattern of sensitization to honeybee venom in beekeepers: a 5-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Makris, Michael; Gregoriou, Stamatis; Papaioannou, Dimitrios; Katoulis, Alexandros; Stavrianeas, Nicholaos G

    2006-01-01

    Beekeepers are at increased risk for honeybee (Hb) venom allergy and they represent a unique population for Hymenoptera venom studies. The aim of this was to prospectively examine the pattern of Hb venom sensitization over a 5-year period in new beekeepers and define possible predisposing factors. Thirty-five beekeepers were tested every 6 months for 5 years with in vivo and in vitro methods to detect the possible development of sensitization to Hb and common wasp (Cw) venom. Inclusion criteria included the lack of previous beekeeping activity and absence of sensitization or reported reaction to Hymenoptera stings. Subjects with both in vivo and in vitro tests that were definitely positive or with one definitely positive and the other doubtful were considered sensitized. Ten of 35 new beekeepers (28.6%) and 3 of 36 controls (8.3%) developed sensitivity to Hb venom during the 5-year period. The risk ratio in incidence studies was calculated at 3.43 (SE of log risk ratio = 0.61; 95% CI of risk ratio = 1.03-11.42). All sensitized beekeepers were detected within the first 18 months of occupational exposure; 8 of 10 (80%) beekeepers were detected during the initial 12 months and the 2 remaining beekeepers were detected between 12 and 18 months. One of 35 (2.9%) beekeepers and 1 of 36 controls (2.8%) were sensitized to Cw venom. The number of stings per year and atopy had no effect on sensitization rate. Although predisposing factors to sensitization or anaphylaxis could not be identified, beekeepers developed sensitization to bee venom in <18 months.

  8. Delayed Mismatch Field Latencies in Autism Spectrum Disorder with Abnormal Auditory Sensitivity: A Magnetoencephalographic Study.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Sugata, Hisato; Hanaie, Ryuzo; Nagatani, Fumiyo; Yamamoto, Tomoka; Tachibana, Masaya; Tominaga, Koji; Hirata, Masayuki; Mohri, Ikuko; Taniike, Masako

    2017-01-01

    Although abnormal auditory sensitivity is the most common sensory impairment associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), the neurophysiological mechanisms remain unknown. In previous studies, we reported that this abnormal sensitivity in patients with ASD is associated with delayed and prolonged responses in the auditory cortex. In the present study, we investigated alterations in residual M100 and MMFs in children with ASD who experience abnormal auditory sensitivity. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure MMF elicited by an auditory oddball paradigm (standard tones: 300 Hz, deviant tones: 700 Hz) in 20 boys with ASD (11 with abnormal auditory sensitivity: mean age, 9.62 ± 1.82 years, 9 without: mean age, 9.07 ± 1.31 years) and 13 typically developing boys (mean age, 9.45 ± 1.51 years). We found that temporal and frontal residual M100/MMF latencies were significantly longer only in children with ASD who have abnormal auditory sensitivity. In addition, prolonged residual M100/MMF latencies were correlated with the severity of abnormal auditory sensitivity in temporal and frontal areas of both hemispheres. Therefore, our findings suggest that children with ASD and abnormal auditory sensitivity may have atypical neural networks in the primary auditory area, as well as in brain areas associated with attention switching and inhibitory control processing. This is the first report of an MEG study demonstrating altered MMFs to an auditory oddball paradigm in patients with ASD and abnormal auditory sensitivity. These findings contribute to knowledge of the mechanisms for abnormal auditory sensitivity in ASD, and may therefore facilitate development of novel clinical interventions.

  9. Sensitivity Study of Ice Crystal Optical Properties in the 874 GHz Submillimeter Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Guanglin; Yang, Ping; Wu, Dong L.

    2015-01-01

    Testing of an 874 GHz submillimeter radiometer on meteorological satellites is being planned to improve ice water content retrievals. In this paper we study the optical properties of ice cloud particles in the 874 GHz band. The results show that the bulk scattering and absorption coefficients of an ensemble of ice cloud particles are sensitive to the particle shape and effective diameter, whereas the latter is also sensitive to temperature. The co-polar back scattering cross-section is not sensitive to particle shape, temperature, and the effective diameter in the range of 50200 m.

  10. [Skin sensitization to aeroallergens in the child: cross-sectional study of 200 cases].

    PubMed

    Malouche, Sonia; Boussetta, Khadija; Ben Hassine, Lamia; Malouche, Kais; Siala, Maha; Nessib, Fairouz; Mongalgi, Mohamed A; Ben Hassen, Aouatf; Rejeb, Sana; Boussnina, Souad

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of the allergic diseases increased considerably during the last decades. The clinical expression of allergy depends on the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of sensitizing to aeroallergens in the child and to determine the risk factors of sensitizing. We carried out a cross-sectional study relating to 200 pediatric patients of the Mahmoud El Matri hospital, aged from 3 to14 years. We performed skin prick test to 12 current aeroallergens. The prevalence of sensitizing to aeroallergens was 14%. Acarina (DP and/or DF) represented the allergens accused in the majority of the cases (96,4% of the cases). The statistical analysis of the various risk factors of sensitizing showed that these factors were: the presence of a family atopy (p= 0,0034) particularly a maternal asthma (p< 0,001), the personal atopy specially an asthma, an allergic rhinitis or eczema atopic (p< 10-5), the short breast-feeding (p= 0,033) and the home humidity (p=0,0072). Several risk factors reported in the literature did not seem to intervene in our study (the passive smoking, the urban dweling, the age of food diversification, infections at the low age). The prevalence of sensitizing to aeroallergens is relatively high in our series. Many factors could explain the increase of the allergic diseases. Our study stresses the importance of the genetic, nutritional and environmental factors in the appearance of aeroallergens sensitization.

  11. The sensitization pattern differs according to rhinitis and asthma multimorbidity in adults: the EGEA study.

    PubMed

    Burte, E; Bousquet, J; Siroux, V; Just, J; Jacquemin, B; Nadif, R

    2017-04-01

    Mono- and polysensitization are different IgE-mediated allergic phenotypes in children. Allergic sensitization is associated with both allergic asthma and allergic rhinitis, however, associations between the sensitization pattern and particularly polysensitization with asthma and rhinitis remains poorly studied in adults. The aim of this study was to assess how the allergic sensitization pattern associates with asthma, rhinitis and their multimorbidity. 1199 adults from the EGEA study, with extensive phenotypic characterization and all data available on skin prick tests to 10 allergens, total IgE and blood eosinophils were included. Using questionnaires only, participants were classified into 6 groups: asymptomatic (no asthma, no rhinitis), non-allergic rhinitis alone, allergic rhinitis alone, asthma alone, asthma+non-allergic rhinitis and asthma+allergic rhinitis. Mono- and polysensitization were defined by a positive skin prick test to one or more than one allergen respectively. Asymptomatic participants and those with non-allergic rhinitis alone were mostly non-sensitized (around 72%) while around 12% were polysensitized. Between 32% and 43% of participants with allergic rhinitis alone, asthma alone and asthma+non-allergic rhinitis were non-sensitized and between 37% and 46% of them were polysensitized. 65% of the participants with asthma+allergic rhinitis were polysensitized. The level of total IgE followed a similar trend to that of allergic sensitization. Eosinophils were increased in asthma, especially when associated with rhinitis. Nasal symptoms were more severe and eczema more common in participants with both asthma and allergic rhinitis than in the other groups. Allergic sensitization and particularly polysensitization rates widely differ according to asthma and rhinitis status. This study emphasized the importance of taking into account multimorbidity between asthma and rhinitis and showed that allergic sensitization is not a dichotomic variable.

  12. Non-allergic cutaneous reactions in airborne chemical sensitivity--a population based study.

    PubMed

    Berg, Nikolaj Drimer; Linneberg, Allan; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Dirksen, Asger; Elberling, Jesper

    2011-06-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) is characterised by adverse effects due to exposure to low levels of chemical substances. The aetiology is unknown, but chemical related respiratory symptoms have been found associated with positive patch test. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cutaneous reactions from patch testing and self-reported severity of chemical sensitivity to common airborne chemicals. A total of 3460 individuals participating in a general health examination, Health 2006, were patch tested with allergens from the European standard series and screened for chemical sensitivity with a standardised questionnaire dividing the participants into four severity groups of chemical sensitivity. Both allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions--defined as irritative, follicular, or doubtful allergic reactions--were analysed in relationship with severity of chemical sensitivity. Associations were controlled for the possible confounding effects of sex, age, asthma, eczema, atopic dermatitis, psychological and social factors, and smoking habits. In unadjusted analyses we found associations between allergic and non-allergic cutaneous reactions on patch testing and the two most severe groups of self-reported sensitivity to airborne chemicals. When adjusting for confounding, associations were weakened, and only non-allergic cutaneous reactions were significantly associated with individuals most severely affected by inhalation of airborne chemicals (odds ratio = 2.5, p = 0.006). Our results suggest that individuals with self-reported chemical sensitivity show increased non-allergic cutaneous reactions based on day 2 readings of patch tests.

  13. Study of positive and negative feedback sensitivity in psychosis using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test.

    PubMed

    Farreny, Aida; Del Rey-Mejías, Ángel; Escartin, Gemma; Usall, Judith; Tous, Núria; Haro, Josep Maria; Ochoa, Susana

    2016-07-01

    Schizophrenia involves marked motivational and learning deficits that may reflect abnormalities in reward processing. The purpose of this study was to examine positive and negative feedback sensitivity in schizophrenia using computational modeling derived from the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). We also aimed to explore feedback sensitivity in a sample with bipolar disorder. Eighty-three individuals with schizophrenia and 27 with bipolar disorder were included. Demographic, clinical and cognitive outcomes, together with the WCST, were considered in both samples. Computational modeling was performed using the R syntax to calculate 3 parameters based on trial-by-trial execution on the WCST: reward sensitivity (R), punishment sensitivity (P), and choice consistency (D). The associations between outcome variables and the parameters were investigated. Positive and negative sensitivity showed deficits, but P parameter was clearly diminished in schizophrenia. Cognitive variables, age, and symptoms were associated with R, P, and D parameters in schizophrenia. The sample with bipolar disorder would show cognitive deficits and feedback abnormalities to a lesser extent than individuals with schizophrenia. Negative feedback sensitivity demonstrated greater deficit in both samples. Idiosyncratic cognitive requirements in the WCST might introduce confusion when supposing model-free reinforcement learning. Negative symptoms of schizophrenia were related to lower feedback sensitivity and less goal-directed patterns of choice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvement of insulin sensitivity by a novel drug candidate, BGP-15, in different animal studies.

    PubMed

    Literáti-Nagy, Botond; Tory, Kálmán; Peitl, Barna; Bajza, Ágnes; Korányi, László; Literáti-Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Hooper, Philip L; Vígh, László; Szilvássy, Zoltán

    2014-03-01

    Insulin resistance has been recognized as the most significant predictor of further development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Here we investigated the effect of a heat shock protein (HSP) co-inducer, BGP-15, on insulin sensitivity in different insulin-resistant animal models and compared its effect with insulin secretagogues and insulin sensitizers. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp technique in normal and cholesterol-fed rabbits and in healthy Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats in dose-ranging studies. We also examined the effect of BGP-15 on streptozotocin-induced changes in the vasorelaxation of the aorta in Sprague-Dawley rats. BGP-15 doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg increased insulin sensitivity by 50% and 70%, respectively, in cholesterol-fed but not in normal rabbits. After 5 days of treatment with BGP-15, the glucose infusion rate was increased in a dose-dependent manner in genetically insulin-resistant GK rats. The most effective dose was 20 mg/kg, which showed a 71% increase in insulin sensitivity compared to control group. Administration of BGP-15 protected against streptozotocin-induced changes in vasorelaxation, which was similar to the effect of rosiglitazone. Our results indicate that the insulin-sensitizing effect of BGP-15 is comparable to conventional insulin sensitizers. This might be of clinical utility in the treatment of T2DM.

  15. Estimating sensitivity and specificity for technology assessment based on observer studies.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Robert M; Pesce, Lorenzo L

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy and precision of using scores from a receiver operating characteristic rating scale to estimate sensitivity and specificity. We used data collected in a previous study that measured the improvements in radiologists' ability to classify mammographic microcalcification clusters as benign or malignant with and without the use of a computer-aided diagnosis scheme. Sensitivity and specificity were estimated from the rating data from a question that directly asked the radiologists their biopsy recommendations, which was used as the "truth," because it is the actual recall decision, thus it is their subjective truth. By thresholding the rating data, sensitivity and specificity were estimated for different threshold values. Because of interreader and intrareader variability, estimated sensitivity and specificity values for individual readers could be as much as 100% in error when using rating data compared to using the biopsy recommendation data. When pooled together, the estimates using thresholding the rating data were in good agreement with sensitivity and specificity estimated from the recommendation data. However, the statistical power of the rating data estimates was lower. By simply asking the observer his or her explicit recommendation (eg, biopsy or no biopsy), sensitivity and specificity can be measured directly, giving a more accurate description of empirical variability and the power of the study can be maximized. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural correlates of anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Radaelli, Daniele; Cucchi, Michele; Ricci, Liana; Vai, Benedetta; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    Panic disorder has been associated with dysfunctional neuropsychological dimensions, including anxiety sensitivity. Brain-imaging studies of the neural correlates of emotional processing have identified a network of structures that constitute the neural circuitry for emotions. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and insula, which are part of this network, are also involved in the processing of threat-related stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate if neural activity in response to emotional stimuli in the cortico-limbic network is associated to anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder. In a sample of 18 outpatients with panic disorder, we studied neural correlates of implicit emotional processing of facial affect expressions with a face-matching paradigm; correlational analyses were performed between brain activations and anxiety sensitivity. The correlational analyses performed showed a positive correlation between anxiety sensitivity and brain activity during emotional processing in regions encompassing the PFC, ACC and insula. Our data seem to confirm that anxiety sensitivity is an important component of panic disorder. Accordingly, the neural underpinnings of anxiety sensitivity could be an interesting focus for treatment and further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A new u-statistic with superior design sensitivity in matched observational studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Paul R

    2011-09-01

    In an observational or nonrandomized study of treatment effects, a sensitivity analysis indicates the magnitude of bias from unmeasured covariates that would need to be present to alter the conclusions of a naïve analysis that presumes adjustments for observed covariates suffice to remove all bias. The power of sensitivity analysis is the probability that it will reject a false hypothesis about treatment effects allowing for a departure from random assignment of a specified magnitude; in particular, if this specified magnitude is "no departure" then this is the same as the power of a randomization test in a randomized experiment. A new family of u-statistics is proposed that includes Wilcoxon's signed rank statistic but also includes other statistics with substantially higher power when a sensitivity analysis is performed in an observational study. Wilcoxon's statistic has high power to detect small effects in large randomized experiments-that is, it often has good Pitman efficiency-but small effects are invariably sensitive to small unobserved biases. Members of this family of u-statistics that emphasize medium to large effects can have substantially higher power in a sensitivity analysis. For example, in one situation with 250 pair differences that are Normal with expectation 1/2 and variance 1, the power of a sensitivity analysis that uses Wilcoxon's statistic is 0.08 while the power of another member of the family of u-statistics is 0.66. The topic is examined by performing a sensitivity analysis in three observational studies, using an asymptotic measure called the design sensitivity, and by simulating power in finite samples. The three examples are drawn from epidemiology, clinical medicine, and genetic toxicology.

  18. Study of the Sensitization on the Grain Boundary in Austenitic Stainless Steel Aisi 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsisová, Edina; Dománková, Mária; Slatkovský, Ivan; Sahul, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC) is one of the major problems in austenitic stainless steels. This type of corrosion is caused by precipitation of secondary phases on grain boundaries (GB). Precipitation of the secondary phases can lead to formation of chromium depleted zones in the vicinity of grain boundaries. Mount of the sensitization of material is characterized by the degree of sensitization (DOS). Austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 as experimental material had been chosen. The samples for the study of sensitization were solution annealed on 1100 °C for 60 min followed by water quenching and then sensitization by isothermal annealing on 700 °C and 650 °C with holding time from 15 to 600 min. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used for identification of secondary phases. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) was applied for characterization of grain boundary structure as one of the factors which influences on DOS.

  19. Experimental study of high sensitivity infrared spectrometer with waveguide-based up-conversion detector(1).

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijun; Slattery, Oliver; Tang, Xiao

    2009-08-03

    We have developed an up-conversion spectrometer for signals at single photon levels near the infrared region based on a tunable up-conversion detector that uses a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide as the conversion medium. We also experimentally studied its characteristics including sensitivity, dark count rate, spectral scan speed, signal transfer function of the waveguide, and polarization sensitivity. The overall single photon detection efficiency of the up-conversion spectrometer is about 32%. With its ultra high sensitivity the spectrometer can measure spectra for signals at a level as low as -126 dBm. We have demonstrated the spectrometers high sensitivity by measuring the spectrum of a greatly attenuated multimode emission from a laser diode at the 1310 nm band.

  20. Numerical study on an application of subwavelength dielectric gratings for high-sensitivity plasmonic detection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woo Kyung; Kim, Nak-Hyeon; Byun, Kyung Min

    2012-07-10

    Although subwavelength dielectric gratings can be employed to achieve a high sensitivity of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor, the plasmonic interpretation verifying the resulting sensitivity improvement remains unclear. The aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of the grating's geometric parameters on the amplification of SPR responses and to understand the physical mechanisms associated with the enhancement. Our numerical results show that the proposed SPR substrate with a dielectric grating can provide a better sensitivity due to the combined effects of surface reaction area and field distribution at the binding region. An influence of adhesion layer on the sensor performance is also discussed. The obtained results will be promising in high-sensitivity plasmonic biosensing applications.

  1. Sensitivity analysis in health economic and pharmacoeconomic studies. An appraisal of the literature.

    PubMed

    Agro, K E; Bradley, C A; Mittmann, N; Iskedjian, M; Ilersich, A L; Einarson, T R

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the extent of reporting of sensitivity analyses in the health economics, medical and pharmacy literature between journal types and over time. 90 articles were chosen from each of the bodies of literature on health economics, medicine and pharmacy. MEDLINE, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts were searched for English-language economic studies published between 1989 and 1993. The studies chosen for inclusion had to be original articles published in one of the selected journals between January 1989 and December 1993, involving a comparison between drugs, treatments or services, and evaluating both costs and outcomes. 123 articles initially met these criteria; however, 16 were inappropriate, 17 were randomised out, leaving 90 studies (73%) that were used (30 from each literature group). Data were extracted independently by 5 raters using a validated checklist. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by calculating kappa. 53 of the 90 articles (59%) conducted sensitivity analyses. 39 (74%) stated explicitly that a sensitivity analysis was being performed; this was noted in the Methods section of 35 papers (67%). 80% of health economics journals, 70% of medical journals and 20% of pharmacy journals conducted sensitivity analyses. Despite the fact that all published pharmacoeconomic guidelines suggest the use of sensitivity analysis, only 59% of studies between 1989 and 1993 did so. Improvement is required, especially in the pharmacy literature. No time trends in the conduct of sensitivity analyses were detected. However, the sample may not have been sufficient to detect such trends. Pharmacoeconomic guidelines should provide more details on preferred methods of sensitivity analysis and on desired parameters.

  2. Increased spinal pain sensitization in major depressive disorder: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tikàsz, Andràs; Tourjman, Valérie; Chalaye, Philippe; Marchand, Serge; Potvin, Stéphane

    2016-12-30

    Although patients suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD) often complain from painful symptoms, the relationship between experimental pain processes and depression has yet to be clearly characterized. Only recently have studies employing temporal summation (TS) paradigms offered preliminary insight into the co-occurrence of pain and depression. This study sets out to evaluate the contribution of spinal and supraspinal processes in pain sensitization in MDD using a TS paradigm. Thirteen volunteers with no psychiatric disorders (controls) and fourteen MDD subjects were included in the analysis. Low-(0.14Hz) and high-(1Hz) frequency intermittent stimulations of the sural nerve were used to induce TS. Spinal pain sensitization was quantified by measuring the change in the amplitude of the nociceptive-specific flexion reflex (NFR) response, and supraspinal pain sensitization was obtained by measuring change in subjective pain rating, from the low- to high-frequency stimulation condition. We found an increased sensitization in the NFR response (p<0.05) in MDD subjects in the high-frequency condition, which did not translate into an increase of their subjective responses. However, we found a positive association between spinal sensitization and painful somatic symptoms in MDD subjects. Together, these results suggest increased spinal pain sensitization in MDD, which might explain the high prevalence of painful somatic symptoms in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Two-step sensitivity testing of parametrized and regionalized life cycle assessments: methodology and case study.

    PubMed

    Mutel, Christopher L; de Baan, Laura; Hellweg, Stefanie

    2013-06-04

    Comprehensive sensitivity analysis is a significant tool to interpret and improve life cycle assessment (LCA) models, but is rarely performed. Sensitivity analysis will increase in importance as inventory databases become regionalized, increasing the number of system parameters, and parametrized, adding complexity through variables and nonlinear formulas. We propose and implement a new two-step approach to sensitivity analysis. First, we identify parameters with high global sensitivities for further examination and analysis with a screening step, the method of elementary effects. Second, the more computationally intensive contribution to variance test is used to quantify the relative importance of these parameters. The two-step sensitivity test is illustrated on a regionalized, nonlinear case study of the biodiversity impacts from land use of cocoa production, including a worldwide cocoa products trade model. Our simplified trade model can be used for transformable commodities where one is assessing market shares that vary over time. In the case study, the highly uncertain characterization factors for the Ivory Coast and Ghana contributed more than 50% of variance for almost all countries and years examined. The two-step sensitivity test allows for the interpretation, understanding, and improvement of large, complex, and nonlinear LCA systems.

  4. Perinatal undernutrition facilitates morphine sensitization and cross-sensitization to cocaine in adult rats: a behavioral and neurochemical study.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, E E; Valdomero, A; Orsingher, O A; Cuadra, G R

    2010-01-20

    The development of sensitization to the locomotor effects of morphine and cross-sensitization between morphine and cocaine were evaluated in adult rats submitted to a protein malnutrition schedule from the 14th day of gestation up to 30 days of age (D-rats), and compared with well-nourished animals (C-rats). Dose-response curves to morphine-induced locomotor activity (5, 7.5, 10 or 15 mg/kg, i.p., every other day for 5 days) revealed a shift to the left in D-rats compared to C-rats. This implies that D-rats showed behavioral sensitization to the lower dose of morphine used (5 mg/kg), which was ineffective in C-rats. Furthermore, when a cocaine challenge (10 mg/kg, i.p) was given 48 h after the last morphine administration, only D-rats exhibited cross-sensitization in morphine-pretreated animals (7.5 and 10 mg/kg). In order to correlate the differential response observed with the functioning of the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were measured in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell) and the dorsal caudate-putamen. A challenge with cocaine in morphine pre-exposed animals produced an increase in DA release, but only in the nucleus accumbens "core" of D-rats. Similar DA levels were found in the nucleus accumbens "shell" and in the dorsal caudate-putamen of both groups. Finally, these results demonstrate that D-rats had a lower threshold for developing both a progressive behavioral sensitization to morphine and a cross-sensitization to cocaine. In accordance with these behavioral findings, a higher responsiveness of the nucleus accumbens core, expressed by increased DA levels, both basal and after cocaine challenge, was observed in D-rats.

  5. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a quickly growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of water footprint estimates to changes in important input variables and quantifies the size of uncertainty in water footprint estimates. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat in the Yellow River Basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River Basin in the period considered. The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis focused on the effects on water footprint estimates at basin level (in m3 t-1) of four key input variables: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), and crop calendar. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the water footprint of crops to fractional changes of individual input variables. Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by crop calendar and PR. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0 was dominant compared to that of precipitation. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input uncertainties were on average ±26% (at 95% confidence level). The sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types, with highest sensitivities

  6. The STOPPA Twin Study Explains the Exhaled Nitric Oxide and Asthma Link by Genetics and Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Nordlund, Björn; Lundholm, Cecilia; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; van Hage, Marianne; Örtqvist, Anne K; Almqvist, Catarina

    2017-08-01

    The link between asthma and exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to estimate the association between FENO and asthma, taking genetics, sensitization, and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) into account. A total of 681 twins (53% monozygotic [MZ] and 47% dizygotic [DZ]) from the population-based STOPPA study (mean age 12.6 years) were recruited and information on FENO (parts per billion), parental report of current asthma, sensitization to airborne allergens (Phadiatop; IgE ≥0.35 kUA/l), and ICS-treatment was collected. We estimated the association between FENO and asthma, sensitization, and ICS in all twins and within pairs (DZ and MZ) to address shared genetic and environmental factors. Linear regression of log-transformed FENO was used and results presented as exponentiated regression coefficients (exp[β]), with 95% confidence interval (CI). We found an association between asthma and FENO in all twins, exp(β) 1.31 [1.11, 1.54]. In within-pairs analysis, the association was stronger within DZ pairs discordant for FENO, exp(β) 1.50 [1.19, 1.89], compared to MZ pairs, exp(β) 1.07 [0.84, 1.37], p = .049. There was no difference in FENO in non-sensitized children with asthma, compared to children with neither asthma nor sensitization, exp(β) 0.89 [0.77, 1.03]. However, increased FENO was associated with sensitization, exp(β) 1.48 [1.30, 1.69], and with sensitization together with asthma, exp(β) 1.98 [1.57, 2.51], in all twins and within DZ pairs discordant for FENO, but not in MZ pairs. The FENO asthma association remained in DZ pairs without regular ICS-treatment. The association between FENO and asthma is explained by genetics and sensitization.

  7. High-sensitivity Cardiac Troponin Elevation after Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Prospective, Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Duma, Andreas; Pal, Swatilika; Johnston, Joshua; Helwani, Mohammad A; Bhat, Adithya; Gill, Bali; Rosenkvist, Jessica; Cartmill, Christopher; Brown, Frank; Miller, J Philip; Scott, Mitchell G; Sanchez-Conde, Francisco; Jarvis, Michael; Farber, Nuri B; Zorumski, Charles F; Conway, Charles; Nagele, Peter

    2017-04-01

    While electroconvulsive therapy is widely regarded as a lifesaving and safe procedure, evidence regarding its effects on myocardial cell injury is sparse. The objective of this investigation was to determine the incidence and magnitude of new cardiac troponin elevation after electroconvulsive therapy using a novel high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay. This was a prospective cohort study in adult patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy in a single academic center (up to three electroconvulsive therapy treatments per patient). The primary outcome was new high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I elevation after electroconvulsive therapy, defined as an increase of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I greater than 100% after electroconvulsive therapy compared to baseline with at least one value above the limit of quantification (10 ng/l). Twelve-lead electrocardiogram and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I values were obtained before and 15 to 30 min after electroconvulsive therapy; in a subset of patients, an additional 2-h high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I value was obtained. The final study population was 100 patients and a total of 245 electroconvulsive therapy treatment sessions. Eight patients (8 of 100; 8%) experienced new high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I elevation after electroconvulsive therapy with a cumulative incidence of 3.7% (9 of 245 treatments; one patient had two high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I elevations), two of whom had a non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (incidence 2 of 245; 0.8%). Median high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I concentrations did not increase significantly after electroconvulsive therapy. Tachycardia and/or elevated systolic blood pressure developed after approximately two thirds of electroconvulsive therapy treatments. Electroconvulsive therapy appears safe from a cardiac standpoint in a large majority of patients. A small subset of patients with preexisting cardiovascular risk factors, however, may develop new

  8. Definition of Sensitive Skin: An Expert Position Paper from the Special Interest Group on Sensitive Skin of the International Forum for the Study of Itch.

    PubMed

    Misery, Laurent; Ständer, Sonja; Szepietowski, Jacek C; Reich, Adam; Wallengren, Joanna; Evers, Andrea W M; Takamori, Kenji; Brenaut, Emilie; Le Gall-Ianotto, Christelle; Fluhr, Joachim; Berardesca, Enzo; Weisshaar, Elke

    2017-01-04

    Sensitive skin is a frequent complaint in the general population, in patients, and among subjects suffering from itch. The International Forum for the Study of Itch (IFSI) decided to initiate a special interest group (SIG) on sensitive skin. Using the Delphi method, sensitive skin was defined as "A syndrome defined by the occurrence of unpleasant sensations (stinging, burning, pain, pruritus, and tingling sensations) in response to stimuli that normally should not provoke such sensations. These unpleasant sensations cannot be explained by lesions attributable to any skin disease. The skin can appear normal or be accompanied by erythema. Sensitive skin can affect all body locations, especially the face". This paper summarizes the background, unresolved aspects of sensitive skin and the process of developing this definition.

  9. The Guinea Pig Sensitized by House Dust Mite: A Model of Experimental Cough Studies.

    PubMed

    Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Mokry, J; Medvedova, I; Kavalcikova-Bogdanova, N; Plevkova, J

    2016-01-01

    The guinea pig sensitized by ovalbumin is the most widely used model to study cough experimentally, as the neurophysiology of the vagus nerve in the guinea pig is closest to humans. Nonetheless, the choice of the antigen remains questionable, which influences the translation of results into clinical medicine. The present study seeks to develop an alternative model of cough study using house dust mite sensitization (HDM). Thirty guinea pigs were divided into the HDM group, ovalbumin (OVA) group, and control group based on their cough response to 0.4 M citric acid. In the HDM group animals were sensitized by 0.25 %HDM aerosol, which they inhaled for 5 min over 5 days, followed by inhalation of 0.5 %HDM in the same protocol. Sensitization was confirmed by a skin test. Symptoms of allergic rhinitis were induced by intranasal application of 15 μl 0.5 %HDM and cough challenges with citric acid were performed. Airway resistance was measured in vivo by Pennock's method. We found that both HDM and OVA-sensitized groups showed a significantly enhanced nasal reactivity and cough response compared with controls. The airway resistance data did not show significant differences. We conclude that the HDM cough model replicates functional aspects of the OVA model, which may make it an alternative to the latter. However, the superiority of the HDM model for experimental cough studies remains to be further explored.

  10. Clinical presentation and microorganisms sensitivity profile for diabetic foot ulcers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nur Hilda Hanina, A W; Intan, N S; Syafinaz, A N; Zalinah, A; Lailatul Akmar, M N; Devnani, A S

    2015-06-01

    Patients suffering from diabetes mellitus (DM) frequently present with infected diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). This study was done to record the anatomical site and the grade of ulcers according to Wagner's classification and to culture the microorganisms from the ulcers and determine their antibiotic sensitivity. Prospective study was conducted on 77 diabetic patients who were admitted with DFU from June until December 2011. Patients with end stage renal failure, those who had previous vascular surgery on the involved limb, or hyperbaric oxygen or maggot therapy for the ulcers, or had unrelated skin diseases around the involved foot were excluded from the study. Specimens for culture were obtained by a sterile swab stick or tissue sample was taken from the wound with sterile surgical instruments. Wagner's grade III and IV ulcers were most common. Majority of the ulcers involved toes (48%). Gram negative microorganisms were predominantly isolated (71.1%). Gram positive microorganisms were less frequently cultured (27.7%). Fungus was cultured from one sample (1.2%). Gram negative microorganisms were sensitive to aminoglycosides, cephalosporins or β-lactamase inhibitors. More than 40% were resistant to ampicillin. Gram positive microorganisms were sensitive to cloxacillin. MRSA were sensitive to vancomycin. Empirical use of antibiotics should be curtailed to prevent development of drug resistant strains of microorganisms and MRSA. We suggest use of antiseptic solutions to clean the ulcers until antibiotic sensitivity report is available. Results of our altered treatment regimen we plan to publish in a later study.

  11. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: phantom studies.

    PubMed

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for breast simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive imaging.

  12. Determining the Anxiety Sensitivity Bases of Anxiety: A Study with Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erozkan, Atilgan

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the relationships between subdimensions of anxiety sensitivity and anxiety. The participants in the study were 841 undergraduate students (411 females; 430 males) randomly selected from three different faculties--Faculties of Technical Education, Education, and Sport Sciences--at Mugla Sitki Kocman University. Data…

  13. Does Sensitivity to Orthographic Regularities Influence Reading and Spelling Acquisition? A 1-Year Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothe, Josefine; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Ise, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the influence of orthographic processing on reading and spelling performance. It was found that orthographic processing is an independent predictor of reading and spelling performance in different languages and children of different ages. This study investigated sensitivity to orthographic regularities in German-speaking…

  14. Does Sensitivity to Orthographic Regularities Influence Reading and Spelling Acquisition? A 1-Year Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothe, Josefine; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Ise, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the influence of orthographic processing on reading and spelling performance. It was found that orthographic processing is an independent predictor of reading and spelling performance in different languages and children of different ages. This study investigated sensitivity to orthographic regularities in German-speaking…

  15. Hippocampal volume and sensitivity to maternal aggressive behavior: a prospective study of adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Sarah; Yap, Marie B H; Sheeber, Lisa; Dudgeon, Paul; Yücel, Murat; Pantelis, Christos; Simmons, Julian G; Allen, Nicholas B

    2011-02-01

    It has been suggested that biological factors confer increased sensitivity to environmental influences on depressive symptoms during adolescence, a crucial time for the onset of depressive disorders. Given the critical role of the hippocampus in sensitivity to stress and processing of contextual aspects of the environment, investigation of its role in determining sensitivity to environmental context seems warranted. This study prospectively examined hippocampal volume as a measure of sensitivity to the influence of aggressive maternal behavior on change in depressive symptoms from early to midadolescence. The interaction between aggressive maternal behavior and hippocampal volume was found to predict change in depressive symptoms. Significant sex differences also emerged, whereby only for girls were larger bilateral hippocampal volumes more sensitive to the effects of maternal aggressive behavior, particularly with respect to experiencing the protective effects of low levels of maternal aggressiveness. These findings help elucidate the complex relationships between brain structure, environmental factors such as maternal parenting style, and sensitivity to (i.e., risk for, and protection from) the emergence of depression during this life stage. Given that family context risk factors are modifiable, our findings suggest the potential utility of targeted parenting interventions for the prevention and treatment of adolescent depressive disorder.

  16. Impact of multiple matched controls on design sensitivity in observational studies.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Paul R

    2013-03-01

    In an observational study, one treated subject may be matched for observed covariates to either one or several untreated controls. The common motivation for using several controls rather than one is to increase the power of a test of no effect under the doubtful assumption that matching for observed covariates suffices to remove bias from nonrandom treatment assignment. Does the choice between one or several matched controls affect the sensitivity of conclusions to violations of this doubtful assumption? With continuous responses, it is known that reducing the heterogeneity of matched pair differences reduces sensitivity to unmeasured biases, but increasing the sample size has a highly circumscribed effect on sensitivity to bias. Is the use of several controls rather than one analogous to a reduction in heterogeneity or to an increase in sample size? The issue is examined for Huber's m-statistics, including the t-test, the examination having three components: an example, asymptotic calculations using design sensitivity, and a simulation. Use of multiple controls with continuous responses yields a nontrivial reduction in sensitivity to unmeasured biases. An example looks at lead and cadmium in the blood of smokers from the 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A by-product of the discussion is a new result giving the design sensitivity for the permutation distribution of m-statistics.

  17. Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Giriyanna; Shivalingaiah, Anwith Huluvadi; Vijayeendra, Anagha Manakari; Sarkar, Nivedita; Nagaraj, Chitra; Masthi, Nugehally Raju Ramesh

    2016-04-01

    Sericulture plays an eminent role in development of rural economy in India. Silk filature is a unit where silk is unwound from the cocoons and the strands are collected into skeins. During the process workers are exposed to the high molecular weight proteins like Sericin and Fibroin which are potent allergens leading to sensitization over a period of time and subsequently occupational related health disorders. To identify and compare the magnitude of silk allergen sensitization in workers of silk filatures. A community based comparative descriptive study was conducted for a period of 1 year at Ramanagara in south India. One hundred twenty subjects working in the silk filatures formed the study group. For comparison, 2 types of controls were selected viz.120 subjects who were not working in the silk filatures but resided in the same geographical area (control A) and 360 subjects who were not working in silk filatures as well not residing in the same geographical area (control B). Skin prick test was used to identify the silk allergen sensitization. Mean age was 34.14 ± 2.84 years in the study group. Mean age was 40.59 ± 14.40 years and 38.54 ± 12.20 years in control A and control B, respectively. There were 35 males (29.16%) and 85 females (70.84%) in the study group. There were 58 (48.34%) males and 62 (51.66%) females and 152 (42.2%) males and 208 females (57.8%) in control A and control B, respectively. Sensitization to silk allergen was 35.83% in the study group and 20.83% in the control group A and 11.11% in control group B. There was difference in the allergen sensitivity between the study group and control groups and it was statistically significant (chi-square = 38.08; p < 0.001). There is high burden of silk allergen sensitization among silk filature workers.

  18. Behavioral Control and Reward Sensitivity in Adolescents’ Risk Taking Behavior: A Longitudinal TRAILS Study

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, Margot; Oldehinkel, Tineke; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2017-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental theories of risk behavior hypothesize that low behavioral control in combination with high reward sensitivity explains adolescents’ risk behavior. However, empirical studies examining this hypothesis while including actual risk taking behavior in adolescence are lacking. In this study we tested whether the imbalance between behavioral control and reward sensitivity underlies risk taking behavior in adolescence, using a nationally representative longitudinal sample of 715 adolescents, of which 66% revealed an increased risk for mental health problems. To assess behavioral control at age 11 we used both self-report (effortful control) as well as behavioral measures of cognitive control (i.e., working memory and response inhibition). Reward sensitivity was assessed with the Bangor Gambling Task. The main finding of this study was that effortful control at age 11 was the best predictor of risk taking behavior (alcohol and cannabis use) at age 16, particularly among adolescents who were more reward sensitive. Risk taking behavior in adolescents might be explained by relatively weak behavioral control functioning combined with high sensitivity for reward. PMID:28261148

  19. Behavioral Control and Reward Sensitivity in Adolescents' Risk Taking Behavior: A Longitudinal TRAILS Study.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Margot; Oldehinkel, Tineke; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2017-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental theories of risk behavior hypothesize that low behavioral control in combination with high reward sensitivity explains adolescents' risk behavior. However, empirical studies examining this hypothesis while including actual risk taking behavior in adolescence are lacking. In this study we tested whether the imbalance between behavioral control and reward sensitivity underlies risk taking behavior in adolescence, using a nationally representative longitudinal sample of 715 adolescents, of which 66% revealed an increased risk for mental health problems. To assess behavioral control at age 11 we used both self-report (effortful control) as well as behavioral measures of cognitive control (i.e., working memory and response inhibition). Reward sensitivity was assessed with the Bangor Gambling Task. The main finding of this study was that effortful control at age 11 was the best predictor of risk taking behavior (alcohol and cannabis use) at age 16, particularly among adolescents who were more reward sensitive. Risk taking behavior in adolescents might be explained by relatively weak behavioral control functioning combined with high sensitivity for reward.

  20. The Effect of Hypothyroidism on Color Contrast Sensitivity: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Mehtap; Turgut Ozturk, Banu; Turan, Elif; Gonulalan, Gulsum; Polat, Ilker; Gunduz, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormone has been shown to control retinal cone opsin expression, the protein of color vision, in adult rodents. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of hypothyroidism on color contrast sensitivity in adult overt hypothyroid patients. Methods Thirty-eight overt hypothyroid (31 females, 7 males) subjects and 20 euthyroid (16 females, 4 males) controls were studied prospectively. Color vision examination was performed by Chromatest, a software program analyzing the tritan (blue-yellow) color contrast threshold (tritan CCT) and protan (red-green) color contrast threshold (protan CCT). Color contrast sensitivity analyses of hypothyroid subjects were performed on admission and after L-thyroxine treatment when biochemical euthyroidism was achieved. Results After a median period of 90 (90-210) days, 24 (19 females, 5 males) patients were euthyroid and eligible for a second color vision examination. Baseline tritan CCT and protan CCT values were significantly higher in the hypothyroid group compared to euthyroid controls, which clinically translates into impaired color contrast sensitivity (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). There was a significant decrease in tritan CCT (p = 0.002) and protan CCT (p < 0.001) values in the hypothyroid group after euthyroidism was achieved, which denotes improvement in color contrast sensitivity. Conclusions It is a novel finding of the current study that color contrast sensitivity is impaired in hypothyroidism and significantly improves after euthyroidism is achieved. PMID:25960961

  1. Risk of sensitization and allergy in Ragweed workers – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to its high allergenic potential Ambrosia artemisiifolia has become a health threat in many European countries during the last few decades. Hence, several cities and communities initiated ragweed eradication campaigns. In Berlin, Germany, so-called Ambrosia scouts are being assigned the task of finding and eliminating this weed. We sought to evaluate the potential risk of sensitization and allergy in these individuals. Findings In order to assess the risk of sensitization and allergy, we followed-up 20 Ambrosia scouts by skin-prick test with inhalant allergens, immunoserological and pulmonary function tests. Additionally, medical conditions were evaluated by a questionnaire especially designed for this study. Despite close contact to ragweed over a median duration of 13.8 months, none of the participants became sensitized or allergic to ragweed. One individual developed a clinical non-relevant sensitization towards the taxiconomically-related plant mugwort. A decline in relative FEV1 was most probably due to heavy smoking. Conclusions Our surprising findings suggest that intensive contact and exposure to high ragweed pollen concentrations do not necessarily result in sensitization and/or allergy, meaning that the allergenic potential of this weed might be lower than hitherto expected. However, it is also conceivable that continuous exposure to high allergen levels induced tolerance in the ragweed workers. Due to the relatively small number of subjects studied, our results might be biased and therefore investigations on larger study groups are needed. PMID:25147570

  2. Citation searches are more sensitive than keyword searches to identify studies using specific measurement instruments

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Suzanne K.; Kamath, Geetanjali R.; Pratt, Gregory F.; Saraykar, Smita S.; Volk, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of two search methods in identifying studies that used the Control Preferences Scale (CPS), a healthcare decision-making instrument commonly used in clinical settings. Study Design & Setting We searched the literature using two methods: 1) keyword searching using variations of “control preferences scale” and 2) cited reference searching using two seminal CPS publications. We searched three bibliographic databases [PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science (WOS)] and one full-text database (Google Scholar). We report precision and sensitivity as measures of effectiveness. Results Keyword searches in bibliographic databases yielded high average precision (90%), but low average sensitivity (16%). PubMed was the most precise, followed closely by Scopus and WOS. The Google Scholar keyword search had low precision (54%) but provided the highest sensitivity (70%). Cited reference searches in all databases yielded moderate sensitivity (45–54%), but precision ranged from 35–75% with Scopus being the most precise. Conclusion Cited reference searches were more sensitive than keyword searches, making it a more comprehensive strategy to identify all studies that use a particular instrument. Keyword searches provide a quick way of finding some but not all relevant articles. Goals, time and resources should dictate the combination of which methods and databases are used. PMID:25554521

  3. Age-related differential sensitivity to cadmium in Hyalella curvispina (Amphipoda) and implications in ecotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    García, M E; Rodrígues Capítulo, A; Ferrari, L

    2010-07-01

    The standardization of toxicity tests requires the selection of the most suitable test species and their developmental stages, as well as the selection of the appropriate assay matrix and the evaluation of the sensitivity of the test species to the reference toxicants. International protocols recommend the use of the amphipod Hyalella azteca from the Northern Hemisphere for sediment toxicity tests. We selected the widely distributed amphipod Hyalella curvispina, representative of pleustonic, epiphitic and zoobenthic assemblages in austral South America, as test species to be used in regional studies. Our goals were to evaluate the sensitivity of three developmental stages of H. curvispina to cadmium as a reference toxicant and to select the most suitable age and exposure time for aquatic ecotoxicity assessment. The three ages were highly susceptible to cadmium, with sensitivities: neonates > adults > juveniles. Our results validate the use of the native H. curvispina as a standard species for ecotoxicological assessment studies.

  4. Citation searches are more sensitive than keyword searches to identify studies using specific measurement instruments.

    PubMed

    Linder, Suzanne K; Kamath, Geetanjali R; Pratt, Gregory F; Saraykar, Smita S; Volk, Robert J

    2015-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two search methods in identifying studies that used the Control Preferences Scale (CPS), a health care decision-making instrument commonly used in clinical settings. We searched the literature using two methods: (1) keyword searching using variations of "Control Preferences Scale" and (2) cited reference searching using two seminal CPS publications. We searched three bibliographic databases [PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science (WOS)] and one full-text database (Google Scholar). We report precision and sensitivity as measures of effectiveness. Keyword searches in bibliographic databases yielded high average precision (90%) but low average sensitivity (16%). PubMed was the most precise, followed closely by Scopus and WOS. The Google Scholar keyword search had low precision (54%) but provided the highest sensitivity (70%). Cited reference searches in all databases yielded moderate sensitivity (45-54%), but precision ranged from 35% to 75% with Scopus being the most precise. Cited reference searches were more sensitive than keyword searches, making it a more comprehensive strategy to identify all studies that use a particular instrument. Keyword searches provide a quick way of finding some but not all relevant articles. Goals, time, and resources should dictate the combination of which methods and databases are used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Study of gemcitabine-sensitive/resistant cancer cells by cell cloning and synchrotron FTIR microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Abigail V; Siddique, Muhammad R; Filik, Jacob; Sandt, Christophe; Dumas, Paul; Cinque, Gianfelice; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Yang, Ying; Sulé-Suso, Josep

    2014-08-01

    Over the last few years, significant scientific insight on the effects of chemotherapy drugs at cellular level using synchrotron-based FTIR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy has been obtained. The work carried out so far has identified spectral differences in cancer cells before and after the addition of drugs. However, this had to account for the following issues. First, chemotherapy agents cause both chemical and morphological changes in cells, the latter being responsible for changes in the spectral profile not correlated with biochemical characteristics. Second, as the work has been carried out in mixed populations of cells (resistant and sensitive), it is important to distinguish the spectral differences which are due to sensitivity/resistance to those due to cell morphology and/or cell mixture. Here, we successfully cloned resistant and sensitive lung cancer cells to a chemotherapy drug. This allowed us to study a more uniform population and, more important, allowed us to study sensitive and resistant cells prior to the addition of the drug with S-FTIR microscopy. Principal component analysis (PCA) did not detect major differences in resistant cells prior to and after adding the drug. However, PCA separated sensitive cells prior to and after the addition of the drug. This would indicate that the spectral differences between cells prior to and after adding a drug might reside on those more or less sensitive cells that have been able to remain alive when they were collected to be studied with S-FTIR microspectroscopy. This is a proof of concept and a feasibility study showing a methodology that opens a new way to identify the effects of drugs on more homogeneous cell populations using vibrational spectroscopy.

  6. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004-2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  7. Patterns of Inhalant Allergen Sensitization and Geographical Variation in Korean Adults: A Multicenter Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Gyu; Kim, Mi Yeong; Song, Woo Jung; Kim, Sujeong; Jo, Eun Jung; Lee, Seung Eun; Kwon, Jae Woo; Lee, Sang Min; Park, Chan Sun; Park, Hye Kyung; Park, Heung Woo; Chang, Yoon Seok; Lee, Jaechun; Lee, Young Min; Jee, Young Koo; Lee, Jong Myung; Choi, Inseon S; Cho, Sang Heon

    2017-11-01

    Inhalant allergen sensitization is one of the major factors involved in the pathogenesis of allergic respiratory diseases. However, the sensitization is determined by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Thus, testing panels of inhalant allergens may differ among geographical areas. Here we aimed to determine 10 common inhalant allergens in Korean adult patients with suspected respiratory allergies and to examine the variation between different geographical locations. A total of 28,954 patient records were retrieved for retrospective analysis, from 12 referral allergy clinics located in 9 different areas. Inclusion criteria were Korean adults (≥18 years old) who underwent the inhalant allergen skin prick test for suspected history of respiratory allergy. The primary outcome was inhalant allergen skin prick response. Demographic and clinical information were also collected. Positive skin prick responses to allergens were defined as allergen-to-histamine wheal ratio ≥1. Based on skin test results, the most prevalent aeroallergens were determined. The overall prevalence of allergic sensitization was 45.3%. Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus were the most commonly sensitized allergens. Other common inhalant allergens were cat epithelium (8.1%), birch (7.7%), mugwort (6.9%), alder (6.7%), hazel (6.7%), beech (6.7%), oak (6.6%), and Tyrophagus putres (6.2%), in decreasing order frequency. These 10 inhalant allergens explained 90% of inhalant allergen sensitization in the study participants. However, distinct patterns of the 10 inhalant sensitization were observed in patients living in Chungnam and Jeju. American cockroach, Gernam cockroach, and Trichophyton metagrophytes were unique in Chungnam. Orchard, Japanese cedar, and Velvet were unique in Jeju. The present analysis suggests a panel of 10 most common inhalant allergens in Korean adult patients with suspected respiratory allergies, which explained 90% of inhalant

  8. Study of the Intergranular Corrosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Stainless Steel in Transpassive Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed Behbahani, Khashayar; Najafisayar, Pooria; Pakshir, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    In this study, intergranular corrosion behavior of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel was investigated using conventional potentiodynamic polarization, double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique carried out at different potentials in the transpassive region. Different types of heat treatments were used to obtain samples with different degrees of sensitization. The results of the DLEPR tests showed that the solution-annealed sample and that was sensitized for half an hour would be considered as nonsensitized ones. Moreover, the sample that was sensitized for 24 h exhibits the highest value of the degree of sensitization. Polarization test results showed a typical active-passive behavior from which the transpassive potential range was determined and used as the range of the applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. Three different AC responses (including capacitive and inductive responses) were observed depending on the value of applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. In addition, it was observed that the presence of the second inductive loop at high applied DC bias is due to the adsorption of nonsoluble corrosion products on the surface of the samples. Moreover, the fitted values to the charge transfer and polarization resistances ( R ct and R P) decreased as the sensitization time increased from 30 min to 24 h. Such observations were in good accordance with the metallographic examination of the corroded surfaces, carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques, revealing discontinuous grain boundary attack in nonsensitized samples and a continuous network of grain boundary attack in the case of sensitized ones. Moreover, as the applied DC bias increases the ferrite phase attack also occurs in the sensitized samples. In addition, approximately no pitting corrosion was observed on the surface of the corroded samples which is in accordance with their respective cyclic

  9. Predicting Changes in Cultural Sensitivity among Students of Spanish during Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsen, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Short-term study abroad programs of less than a semester are becoming increasingly popular among undergraduate students in the United States. However, little research has examined the changes in students' cultural sensitivity through their participation in such programs or what factors may predict growth and improvement in such areas. This study…

  10. Maternal Sensitivity and Child Secure Base Use in Early Childhood: Studies in Different Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada, German; Trumbell, Jill; Noblega, Magaly; Plata, Sandra; Peña, Paola; Carbonell, Olga A.; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal sensitivity and child security are related during early childhood and whether such an association is found in different cultural and social contexts. Mother-child dyads (N = 237) from four different countries (Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States) were observed in naturalistic settings when children were…

  11. Aggressive Behavior between Siblings and the Development of Externalizing Problems: Evidence from a Genetically Sensitive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective links between sibling aggression and the development of externalizing problems using a multilevel modeling approach with a genetically sensitive design. The sample consisted of 780 adolescents (390 sibling pairs) who participated in 2 waves of the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development project.…

  12. Maternal Sensitivity and Child Secure Base Use in Early Childhood: Studies in Different Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada, German; Trumbell, Jill; Noblega, Magaly; Plata, Sandra; Peña, Paola; Carbonell, Olga A.; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal sensitivity and child security are related during early childhood and whether such an association is found in different cultural and social contexts. Mother-child dyads (N = 237) from four different countries (Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States) were observed in naturalistic settings when children were…

  13. Predicting Changes in Cultural Sensitivity among Students of Spanish during Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsen, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Short-term study abroad programs of less than a semester are becoming increasingly popular among undergraduate students in the United States. However, little research has examined the changes in students' cultural sensitivity through their participation in such programs or what factors may predict growth and improvement in such areas. This study…

  14. A Cross-Sectional Study of Prosodic Sensitivity and Reading Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliman, Andrew J.; Wood, Clare; Sheehy, Kieron

    2012-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we explore the relationship between prosodic sensitivity (suprasegmental phonology) and phonological awareness (segmental phonology) and investigate whether a group of poor readers display significant suprasegmental phonological deficits in comparison to chronological age-matched controls and younger, reading…

  15. The Effect of Nature Documentaries on Students' Environmental Sensitivity: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbas, Tasos A.; Paraskevopoulos, Stefanos; Stamou, Anastasia G.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the potential educational value of nature documentaries, the contribution of such films to environmental education is largely unknown. In the present study, we attempt to delineate the role of nature documentaries to the environmental sensitivity of students when the films are simply introduced to the class. More specifically, the present…

  16. The Effect of Nature Documentaries on Students' Environmental Sensitivity: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbas, Tasos A.; Paraskevopoulos, Stefanos; Stamou, Anastasia G.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the potential educational value of nature documentaries, the contribution of such films to environmental education is largely unknown. In the present study, we attempt to delineate the role of nature documentaries to the environmental sensitivity of students when the films are simply introduced to the class. More specifically, the present…

  17. Aggressive Behavior between Siblings and the Development of Externalizing Problems: Evidence from a Genetically Sensitive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective links between sibling aggression and the development of externalizing problems using a multilevel modeling approach with a genetically sensitive design. The sample consisted of 780 adolescents (390 sibling pairs) who participated in 2 waves of the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development project.…

  18. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  19. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Welsch, Carsten P.; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio

    2010-10-15

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed.

  20. Maternal sensitivity, infant limbic structure volume and functional connectivity: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin-Graboi, A; Kong, L; Sim, L W; Sanmugam, S; Broekman, B F P; Chen, H; Wong, E; Kwek, K; Saw, S-M; Chong, Y-S; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Pederson, D; Meaney, M J; Qiu, A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the profound parental effects on cognitive, emotional and social development in humans remain poorly understood. Studies with nonhuman models suggest variations in parental care affect the limbic system, influential to learning, autobiography and emotional regulation. In some research, nonoptimal care relates to decreases in neurogenesis, although other work suggests early-postnatal social adversity accelerates the maturation of limbic structures associated with emotional learning. We explored whether maternal sensitivity predicts human limbic system development and functional connectivity patterns in a small sample of human infants. When infants were 6 months of age, 20 mother–infant dyads attended a laboratory-based observational session and the infants underwent neuroimaging at the same age. After considering age at imaging, household income and postnatal maternal anxiety, regression analyses demonstrated significant indirect associations between maternal sensitivity and bilateral hippocampal volume at six months, with the majority of associations between sensitivity and the amygdala demonstrating similar indirect, but not significant results. Moreover, functional analyses revealed direct associations between maternal sensitivity and connectivity between the hippocampus and areas important for emotional regulation and socio-emotional functioning. Sensitivity additionally predicted indirect associations between limbic structures and regions related to autobiographical memory. Our volumetric results are consistent with research indicating accelerated limbic development in response to early social adversity, and in combination with our functional results, if replicated in a larger sample, may suggest that subtle, but important, variations in maternal care influence neuroanatomical trajectories important to future cognitive and emotional functioning. PMID:26506054

  1. Study of node and mass sensitivity of resonant mode based cantilevers with concentrated mass loading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kewei Chai, Yuesheng; Fu, Jiahui

    2015-12-15

    Resonant-mode based cantilevers are an important type of acoustic wave based mass-sensing devices. In this work, the governing vibration equation of a bi-layer resonant-mode based cantilever attached with concentrated mass is established by using a modal analysis method. The effects of resonance modes and mass loading conditions on nodes and mass sensitivity of the cantilever were theoretically studied. The results suggested that the node did not shift when concentrated mass was loaded on a specific position. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever was linearly proportional to the square of the point displacement at the mass loading position for all the resonance modes. For the first resonance mode, when mass loading position x{sub c} satisfied 0 < x{sub c} < ∼ 0.3l (l is the cantilever beam length and 0 represents the rigid end), mass sensitivity decreased as the mass increasing while the opposite trend was obtained when mass loading satisfied ∼0.3l ≤ x{sub c} ≤ l. Mass sensitivity did not change when concentrated mass was loaded at the rigid end. This work can provide scientific guidance to optimize the mass sensitivity of a resonant-mode based cantilever.

  2. Increased sensitivity of patch testing by standardized tape stripping beforehand: a multicentre diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Dickel, Heinrich; Kreft, Burkhard; Kuss, Oliver; Worm, Margitta; Soost, Stephanie; Brasch, Jochen; Pfützner, Wolfgang; Grabbe, Jürgen; Angelova-Fischer, Irena; Elsner, Peter; Fluhr, Joachim; Altmeyer, Peter; Geier, Johannes

    2010-05-01

    As a modification of patch testing, the strip patch test was established to obtain more sensitive and reliable test results. Comparative data on diagnostic accuracy for both tests are missing. To compare the diagnostic accuracy of strip patch tests and patch tests in detecting sensitizations in patients with suspected allergic contact dermatitis by using patient history as the reference standard. In a multicentre, prospective, investigator-blinded study 790 patients were enrolled. The defined reference standard was established prior to patch testing. Patch tests were performed with nickel sulfate, potassium dichromate, and lanolin alcohol. Duplicate tests were simultaneously performed on both sides of the back, of which one randomly chosen side was tape stripped beforehand, according to a standardized procedure. Primary outcome was the difference in sensitivity between strip patch test and patch test. Seven hundred and eighty-seven patients were included in the analysis. Strip patch tests detected considerably more sensitization to nickel sulfate and potassium dichromate than patch tests: differences of sensitivities were 16.4% (95% CI, 8.7-24.1%) for nickel sulfate and 25.0% (95% CI, 8.9-41.0%) for potassium dichromate, both favouring the strip patch test. The standardized strip patch test proved to be accurate and clinically safe and is promising to improve diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis beyond the patch test.

  3. Further studies on the control of ACh sensitivity by muscle activity in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lomo, T; Westgaard, R H

    1975-01-01

    1. Denervated rat soleus muscles were stimulated directly through chronically implanted electrodes and the influence of different amounts and patterns of stimuli on the acetylcholine (ACh) sensitivity of the muscle was studied. The number of stimuli was varied by giving similar trains of stimuli (10 Hz for 10 sec) at different intervals (0 to 12 hr). The pattern of stimulation was varied by giving different trains of stimuli (100 Hz for 1 sec, 10 Hz for 10 sec and 1 Hz continuously) as the same average frequency of stimulation (1 Hz). 2. Stimulation usually started 5 days after the denervation when ACh hypersensitivity was fully developed. Most stimulation procedures reduced extrajunctional ACh sensitivity to normal or below normal values within 5-21 days, and these levels were maintained on prolonged stimulation. 3. The rate at which ACh hypersensitivity disappeared increased with increasing amount and frequency of stimulation. However, as few as 100 stimuli given every 5-5 hr for 3 weeks caused a tenfold reduction of sensitivity. 4. The stimulation had little or no effect on the ACh sensitivity at the end plate. Along the rest of the fibre the sensitivity was reduced at approximately the same rate except near the tendons where it appeared to fall more slowly in some fibres. 5. The stimulation restored the resting membrane potential of the denervated fibres to normal. PMID:1206569

  4. Menstrual cycle effects on insulin sensitivity in women with type 1 diabetes: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Trout, Kimberly K; Rickels, Michael R; Schutta, Mark H; Petrova, Maja; Freeman, Ellen W; Tkacs, Nancy C; Teff, Karen L

    2007-04-01

    Many women complain of difficulty maintaining euglycemia during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. This pilot study's objective was to evaluate possible differences in insulin sensitivity between follicular and luteal phases in women with type 1 diabetes. Women using insulin infusion pumps (n = 5, mean age 29.2 +/- 10.9 years, mean body mass index 24 +/- 1.8 kg/m(2)) underwent frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests during each cycle phase. Insulin sensitivity and glucose effectiveness were determined by Minimal Model analysis. Non-insulin-mediated glucose disposal increased during the luteal phase (0.009 +/- 0.004 min(1)) versus the follicular phase (0.005 +/- 0.003 min(1)) (P < 0.05). Although no significant differences were found in mean insulin sensitivity between follicular (0.76 +/- 0.27 x 10(4)/min(1) /microU/mL) and luteal phase (0.58 +/- 0.26 x 10(4)/min(1) /microU/ mL), three of the five subjects had a decline in insulin sensitivity. Elevated blood glucose during the luteal phase may increase insulin-independent glucose disposal. Some individuals appear more responsive to menstrual cycle effects on insulin sensitivity. Women should be encouraged to use available self-monitoring technology to identify possible cyclical variations in blood glucose that might require clinician review and insulin dosage adjustments.

  5. a Comprehensive Study of the Milan Urban Plume: Gas Phase, Aerosols and ROG/NOx-SENSITIVITY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommen, J.; Bärtsch-Ritter, N.; Andreani-Aksoyoglu, S.; Keller, J.; Prevot, A. S. H.

    2003-04-01

    Three-dimensional photochemical models were used to investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of the photooxidant and aerosol production in the highly polluted Milan area (Italy). A simulation of the 13 May, 1998 event is presented, when peak ozone levels of 190 ppb were measured in the urban plume. The model base case is able to reproduce the ozone concentration in the center of the plume but more peroxide is formed than in the adjacent areas in contradiction to observation. This can be interpreted as a tendency of the model towards a stronger NOx sensitivity compared to observation. The emission inventory was modified based on experimental evidence. Ozone levels did not differ much between the base case simulation and those with a modified emission inventory, while peroxide formation and NOx concentrations in the urban plume did. That lead to a better agreement with measurements. Based on this measurement-model comparison we studied the ROG/NOx sensitivity of the ozone production in this area. We also investigated the effects of various meteorological conditions and the resolution of the emission inventory on the ozone mixing ratio and the ROG/NOx sensitivity. It was found, that the net ozone formation in northern Italy depends stronger on temperature than humidity, while the humidity is more important for the ROG/NOx sensitivity of the ozone production. NOx sensitive areas increase only if much coarser emission inventories were used. Higher wind speeds increased ROG sensitive areas. The influence of strong point emission source was also investigated. The study was then extended to the calculation of secondary aerosol species such as particulate nitrate, ammonium, sulfate, and SOC (secondary organic carbon) for the particle sizes below 2.5 µm. The comparison between model results and observations will be presented and discussed.

  6. Tobacco smoke exposure and multiplexed immunoglobulin E sensitization in children: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Yao, T-C; Chang, S-W; Hua, M-C; Liao, S-L; Tsai, M-H; Lai, S-H; Tseng, Y-L; Yeh, K-W; Tsai, H-J; Huang, J-L

    2016-01-01

    Although there is evidence that exposure to tobacco smoke is harmful to children's respiratory health, the effects of tobacco smoke exposure on the regulation of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated immune responses to specific allergens remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between objectively assessed tobacco smoke exposure and specific IgE profiles for a broad spectrum of allergens in a population setting. Children aged 5-18 years (N = 1315) were assessed using serum cotinine measurement and microarray-based multiplexed detection of specific IgE against 40 allergens. Serum cotinine levels were positively associated with sensitization to foods (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.95; 95% CI: 1.59-15.34), cockroaches (AOR = 3.77; 95% CI: 1.49-9.51), and pollen (AOR = 2.84; 95% CI: 1.20-6.73) while the association was borderline significant for animals (AOR = 2.53; 95% CI: 0.92-6.93). No associations were found for sensitization against mites, mold, and latex. When considering the degree of allergic sensitization, serum cotinine levels were positively correlated to the number of sensitization to cockroaches (P = 0.004), pollen (P = 0.006), and foods (P < 0.001), with statistically significant positive dose-response relationships (all P < 0.01). Similar results were observed when summing up specific IgE concentrations for the aforementioned allergen categories. The association between tobacco smoke exposure and IgE sensitization to environmental allergens varies for different allergens among children. This study demonstrates that elevated serum cotinine levels are significantly associated with IgE sensitization to cockroaches, grass pollen, and certain foods, with potential dose-dependent relationships. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Mesoscale ensemble sensitivity analysis for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    Ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) is emerging as a viable alternative to adjoint sensitivity. Several open issues face ESA for forecasts dominated by mesoscale phenomena, including (1) sampling error arising from finite-sized ensembles causing over-estimated sensitivities, and (2) violation of linearity assumptions for strongly nonlinear flows. In an effort to use ESA for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain, we present results from experiments designed to address these open issues. Sampling error in ESA arises in two places. First, when hypothetical observations are introduced to test the sensitivity estimates for linearity. Here the same localization that was used in the filter itself can be simply applied. Second and more critical, localization should be considered within the sensitivity calculations. Sensitivity to hypothetical observations, estimated without re-running the ensemble, includes regression of a sample of a final-time (forecast) metric onto a sample of initial states. Derivation to include localization results in two localization coefficients (or factors) applied in separate regression steps. Because the forecast metric is usually a sum, and can also include a sum over a spatial region and multiple physical variables, a spatial localization function is difficult to specify. We present results from experiments to empirically estimate localization factors for ESA to test hypothetical observations for mesoscale data assimilation in complex terrain. Localization factors are first derived for an ensemble filter following the empirical localization methodology. Sensitivities for a fog event over Salt Lake City, and a Colorado downslope wind event, are tested for linearity by approximating assimilation of perfect observations at points of maximum sensitivity, both with and without localization. Observation sensitivity is then estimated, with and without localization, and tested for linearity. The validity of the

  8. Ensemble calibration and sensitivity study of a surface CO2 flux scheme using an optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lulin; Pan, Zaitao

    2008-05-01

    Carbon exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem is a key component affecting climate changes. Because the in situ measurements are not dense enough to resolve CO2 exchange spatial variation on various scales, the variation has been mainly simulated by numerical ecosystem models. These models contain large uncertainties in estimating CO2 exchange owing to incorporating a number of empirical parameters on different scales. This study applied a global optimization algorithm and ensemble approach to a surface CO2 flux scheme to (1) identify sensitive photosynthetic and respirational parameters, and (2) optimize the sensitive parameters in the modeling sense and improve the model skills. The photosynthetic and respirational parameters of corn (C4 species) and soybean (C3 species) in NCAR land surface model (LSM) are calibrated against observations from AmeriFlux site at Bondville, IL during 1999 and 2000 growing seasons. Results showed that the most sensitive parameters are maximum carboxylation rate at 25°C and its temperature sensitivity parameter (Vcmax25 and avc), quantum efficiency at 25°C (Qe25), temperature sensitivity parameter for maintenance respiration (arm), and temperature sensitivity parameter for microbial respiration (amr). After adopting calibrated parameter values, simulated seasonal averaged CO2 fluxes were improved for both the C4 and the C3 crops (relative bias reduced from 0.09 to -0.02 for the C4 case and from 0.28 to -0.01 for the C3 case). An updated scheme incorporating new parameters and a revised flux-integration treatment is also proposed.

  9. Young Females' Attention towards Road Safety Images: An ERP Study of the Revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Sherrie-Anne; White, Melanie J; Lewis, Ioni

    2017-08-24

    This study examined whether reward and punishment sensitivities, as conceptualised by Gray and McNaughton's revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), influenced young female drivers' attention towards a series of positive and negative anti-speeding advertisement images. Young females' increasing crash risk is associated with their engagement in risky behaviours which, in turn, has been associated with a stronger Behavioural Approach System (BAS; sensitive to rewards). It was predicted that individuals with a stronger BAS would elicit larger N100 and N200 mean amplitudes (reflecting greater attention) towards the positive images. Similar associations were predicted in relation to the Fight-Flight-Freeze System (FFFS; sensitive to punishments) for negative images. Twenty-four female drivers (17-25 years; final N = 16) completed Corr-Cooper's (2013) RST-Personality Questionnaire, prior to undergoing an Event-Related Potential computerised visual task (i.e., oddball paradigm) which comprised positive, negative, and neutral images as targets against checkerboard image distractors. Contrary to expectations, individuals with a stronger BAS (Reward Reactivity and Impulsivity) demonstrated significantly larger N200 mean amplitudes on presentation of the negative images than those with weaker a BAS, at the Cz electrode site. No other significant RST effects were found. These findings provide some preliminary objective support for the use of negative emotion-based road safety advertisements for young females. Further, this study provides support for using psychophysiological measures to enhance understanding of traffic injury persuasion.

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 10 loci influencing allergic sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A; Warrington, Nicole M; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H; Tiesler, Carla M T; Duffy, David L; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy L; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Husemoen, Lise L; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE (allergic sensitization) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the top SNP from 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association to allergic sensitization from three to 10, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2 and HLA-B. All the top-SNPs were associated with allergic symptoms in an independent study. Risk variants at these 10 loci were estimated to account for at least 25% of allergic sensitization and allergic rhinitis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations may provide novel insight into the etiology of allergic disease. PMID:23817571

  11. Darwinian fitness and the intensity of natural selection: studies in sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Matthias Gundlach, Volker; Ziehe, Martin

    2007-12-21

    Darwinian fitness, the capacity of a variant type to establish itself in competition with the resident population, is determined by evolutionary entropy, a measure of the uncertainty in age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn. This article shows that the intensity of natural selection, as measured by the sensitivity of entropy with respect to changes in the age-specific fecundity and mortality variables, is a convex function of age, decreasing at early and increasing at later ages. We exploit this result to provide quantitative evolutionary explanations of the large variation in survivorship curves observed in natural populations. Previous studies to explain variation in survivorship curves have been based on the proposition that Darwinian fitness is determined by the Malthusian parameter. Hence the intensity of natural selection will be determined by the sensitivity of the Malthusian parameter with respect to changes in the age-specific fecundity and mortality variables. This measure of the selection gradient is known to be a decreasing function of age, with implications which are inconsistent with empirical observations of survivorship curves in human and animal populations. The analysis described in this paper point to the mitigated import of sensitivity studies based on the Malthusian parameter. Our analysis provides theoretical and empirical support for the ecological and evolutionary significance of sensitivity analysis based on entropy, which is the appropriate measure of Darwinian fitness.

  12. Cosmetic Contact Sensitivity in Patients with Melasma: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Neel; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Some of the patients with melasma perhaps have pigmented cosmetic dermatitis. However, cosmetic contact sensitivity in melasma remains poorly studied particularly in the Indian context. Objectives. To study cosmetic contact sensitivity in patients with melasma. Materials and Methods. 67 (F : M = 55 : 12) consecutive patients with melasma between 19 and 49 years of age were patch tested sequentially during January–December, 2012, with Indian Cosmetic and Fragrance Series, Indian Sunscreen Series, p-phenylenediamine, and patient's own cosmetic products. Results. 52 (78%) patients were in the age group of 20–40 years. The duration of melasma varied from 1 month to 20 years. Centrofacial, malar, and mandibular patterns were observed in 48 (72%), 18 (27%), and 1 (1%) patients, respectively. Indian Cosmetics and Fragrance Series elicited positive reactions in 29 (43.3%) patients. Cetrimide was the most common contact sensitizers eliciting positivity in 15 (52%) patients, followed by gallate mix in 9 (31%) patients and thiomersal in 7 (24%) patients. Only 2 of the 42 patients showed positive reaction from their own cosmetics while the other 5 patients had irritant reaction. Indian Sunscreen Series did not elicit any positive reaction. Conclusion. Cosmetics contact sensitivity appears as an important cause of melasma not associated with pregnancy, lactation, or hormone therapy. PMID:25132846

  13. Does a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program reduce smoking intentions among Aboriginal children? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    McKennitt, Daniel W; Currie, Cheryl L

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program would have short-term impacts on smoking intentions among Aboriginal children. Two schools with high Aboriginal enrollment were selected for the study. A grade 4 classroom in one school was randomly assigned to receive the culturally sensitive smoking prevention program. A grade 4 classroom in the second school received a standard smoking prevention program delivered in this jurisdiction. Children in each classroom were tested pre- and post-intervention to measure attitude changes about smoking. There was a significant reduction in intentions to smoke among Aboriginal children who received the culturally sensitive smoking prevention program. The small overall sample size precluded a direct comparison of the efficacy of the culturally sensitive and standard programs. The present findings suggest a smoking prevention program that has been culturally adapted for Aboriginal children may reduce future smoking intentions among Aboriginal grade 4 students. Further research is needed to determine the extent to which school smoking prevention programs adapted to respect the long-standing use of tobacco in Aboriginal cultural traditions may be more effective than standard programs in reaching Aboriginal youth.

  14. Dermal safety study with imidacloprid/moxidectin topical solution in the ivermectin-sensitive collie.

    PubMed

    Paul, A J; Hutchens, D E; Firkins, L D; Borgstrom, M

    2004-05-26

    A study was conducted to determine the safety of the dermal application of 10% imidacloprid/2.5% moxidectin topical solution in ivermectin-sensitive collies. Each milliliter of this solution contains 100mg of imidacloprid and 25mg of moxidectin. A total of 21 collies were prescreened for ivermectin-sensitivity and heartworm negative status prior to selection for the study. Animals were assigned based on the maximum ivermectin-sensitivity score demonstrated during the prestudy screening. Treatment groups included a 3x and 5x test article group, and a 3x and 5x mineral oil control group. The 3x and 5x doses were administered at three and five times, respectively, the 1x dose based on the animal's body weight. On day 0, 3 of the 21 dogs were treated with dermal applications of a preliminary dose of 3x test article to screen for unexpected signs of toxicity with the remaining 18 dogs being treated with 3x mineral oil to blind for the volume of liquid applied. After no signs of toxicity were observed, these same three dogs were treated with 3x of test article and 2x mineral oil on days 28 and 56. The remaining 18 animals were equally allocated to either a 5x test article group or a 5x control group and were each treated on days 28, 56, and 84. Personnel performing observations were blinded to treatment. Observations were made for clinical signs of ivermectin sensitivity twice daily during non-dosing days. On treatment days, dogs were observed hourly for the first 4h post-treatment and at 6, 8, 12, 18 and 24h. Signs of toxicosis were not observed in any of the dogs throughout the observation period. This study demonstrated the safety of imidacloprid/moxidectin, when administered to collies testing positive for ivermectin sensitivity at dosages up to five times the maximum recommended dose.

  15. Monitoring gender equity in health using gender-sensitive indicators: a cross-national study.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Granados, Natalia; Pitzul, Kristen Blythe; Dorado, Linda M; Wang, Feng; McDermott, Sarah; Rondon, Marta B; Posada-Villa, Jose; Saavedra, Javier; Torres, Yolanda; Des Meules, Marie; Stewart, Donna E

    2011-01-01

    As gender is known to be a major determinant of health, monitoring gender equity in health systems remains a vital public health priority. Focusing on a low-income (Peru), middle-income (Colombia), and high-income (Canada) country in the Americas, this study aimed to (1) identify and select gender-sensitive health indicators and (2) assess the feasibility of measuring and comparing gender-sensitive health indicators among countries. Gender-sensitive health indicators were selected by a multidisciplinary group of experts from each country. The most recent gender-sensitive health measures corresponding to selected indicators were identified through electronic databases (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, LIPECS, Latindex, and BIREME) and expert consultation. Data from population-based studies were analyzed when indicator information was unavailable from reports. Twelve of the 17 selected gender-sensitive health indicators were feasible to measure in at least two countries, and 9 of these were comparable among all countries. Indicators that were available were not stratified or adjusted by age, education, marital status, or wealth. The largest between-country difference was maternal mortality, and the largest gender inequity was mortality from homicides. This study shows that gender inequities in health exist in all countries, regardless of income level. Economic development seemed to confer advantages in the availability of such indicators; however, this finding was not consistent and needs to be further explored. Future initiatives should include identifying health system factors and risk factors associated with disparities as well as assessing the cost-effectiveness of including the routine monitoring of gender inequities in health.

  16. Density functional theory study on dye-sensitized solar cells using oxadiazole-based dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, Umer; Hussein, Ibnelwaleed A.; Harrabi, Khalil; Reddy, Belum V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT(TD-DFT) modeling techniques are used to conduct a computational study of the geometry and electronic structure of oxadiazole-based organic sensitizers. A DFT study on the thermodynamic aspects of the charge transport processes associated with dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) suggests that the system with 1,2,4-oxadiazole has a balance among the different crucial factors and may result in the highest incident photon to charge carrier efficiency. The dye/) anatase clusters were also simulated to illustrate the electron injection efficiency at the interface. This study provides basic understanding of the impact of molecular design on the performance of oxadiazole dyes in DSSCs.

  17. Estimation of age-specific sensitivity and sojourn time in breast cancer screening studies.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiuyu J; Shen, Yu; Miller, Anthony B

    2005-10-30

    This study investigates statistical approaches to quantitatively describing the age effect on screening sensitivity and sojourn time distribution in breast cancer screening studies. Such an investigation is directly motivated by the need to understand the inherent relationships between age and these important quantities. We incorporate the age effect through generalized linear models under a progressive disease modelling framework and obtain the corresponding parameter estimators using the maximum likelihood method. Among a set of potential models, we use Akeike's information criterion and likelihood ratio test in model selection and inferences. Extensive simulation studies show that the estimators have reasonable accuracy and the model selection criterion works well. The proposed methods are illustrated using data from two large breast cancer screening trials. The results show that the screening sensitivity increases with age at screening examinations based on these two trials. 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. A study on the sensitivity and simultaneous adjustment of a hoop-column antenna surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong Been; Juang, Jer-Nan; Maghami, Peiman

    1989-01-01

    The results of a recent surface adjustment of the 15-meter diameter hoop-column antenna are presented. A least-squares differential algorithm is used to adjust the surface shape as close as possible to a perfect parabola. Since the desired perfect parabola is not uniquely known a priori, parameters of the perfect parabola are included in the design vector along with the cable length changes. As an extension to an earlier study, lateral sensitivity is included in the least-squares adjustment procedure. In addition, the effect of cable length uncertainties on the surface RMS error is considered and an error bound is derived. The results in this study indicate an improvement over earlier studies. The sensitivity analysis provided a quantitative measure of the needed accuracy of the cable adjustments in the laboratory. Recommendations are included to further enhance shape adjustment.

  19. Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Giriyanna; Vijayeendra, Anagha Manakari; Sarkar, Nivedita; Nagaraj, Chitra; Masthi, Nugehally Raju Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Sericulture plays an eminent role in development of rural economy in India. Silk filature is a unit where silk is unwound from the cocoons and the strands are collected into skeins. During the process workers are exposed to the high molecular weight proteins like Sericin and Fibroin which are potent allergens leading to sensitization over a period of time and subsequently occupational related health disorders. Objective To identify and compare the magnitude of silk allergen sensitization in workers of silk filatures. Methods A community based comparative descriptive study was conducted for a period of 1 year at Ramanagara in south India. One hundred twenty subjects working in the silk filatures formed the study group. For comparison, 2 types of controls were selected viz.120 subjects who were not working in the silk filatures but resided in the same geographical area (control A) and 360 subjects who were not working in silk filatures as well not residing in the same geographical area (control B). Skin prick test was used to identify the silk allergen sensitization. Results Mean age was 34.14 ± 2.84 years in the study group. Mean age was 40.59 ± 14.40 years and 38.54 ± 12.20 years in control A and control B, respectively. There were 35 males (29.16%) and 85 females (70.84%) in the study group. There were 58 (48.34%) males and 62 (51.66%) females and 152 (42.2%) males and 208 females (57.8%) in control A and control B, respectively. Sensitization to silk allergen was 35.83% in the study group and 20.83% in the control group A and 11.11% in control group B. There was difference in the allergen sensitivity between the study group and control groups and it was statistically significant (chi-square = 38.08; p < 0.001). Conclusion There is high burden of silk allergen sensitization among silk filature workers. PMID:27141481

  20. Wheat sensitization and work-related symptoms in the baking industry are preventable. An epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Houba, R; Heederik, D; Doekes, G

    1998-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 393 workers from 21 bakeries to study the relationship between wheat allergen exposure and wheat sensitization and work-related allergic symptoms. Exposure to wheat allergens was characterized by a recently developed and validated immunoassay. Specific IgE antibodies against wheat flour and common allergens were measured by immunoassays, and work-related allergic symptoms were registered by questionnaire. A strong and positive association was found between wheat flour allergen exposure and wheat flour sensitization. This relationship was steepest and strongest in atopics. Prevalence ratios for high and medium wheat allergen exposure were 5.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-16.2), and 2.7 (0.5-14.5) for atopic workers, and 2.5 (0.8-7.5) and 1.4 (0. 3-6.4) for nonatopics, compared with workers with low wheat allergen exposure. In sensitized bakers those with an elevated allergen exposure had more often work-related symptoms, with prevalence ratios for high and medium wheat allergen exposure of 3.5 (CI 1.6-7. 5) and 2.6 (CI 0.9-7.8), respectively, compared with workers with low wheat allergen exposure. The existence of exposure-sensitization gradients suggests that work-related sensitization risk will be negligible when exposure levels will be reduced to average exposure concentration of 0.2 microgram/m3 wheat allergen or approximately 0.5 mg/m3 inhalable dust during a work shift.

  1. A study of the enhanced sensitizing capacity of a contact allergen in lipid vesicle formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsson, Carl; Madsen, Jakob Torp; Graneli, Annette; Andersen, Klaus E.; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Jonsson, Charlotte A.; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-05-01

    The growing focus on nanotechnology and the increased use of nano-sized structures, e.g. vesicles, in topical formulations has led to safety concerns. We have investigated the sensitizing capacity and penetration properties of a fluorescent model compound, rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC), when administered in micro- and nano-scale vesicle formulations. The sensitizing capacity of RBITC was studied using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the skin penetration properties were compared using diffusion cells in combination with two-photon microscopy (TPM). The lymph node cell proliferation, an indicator of a compounds sensitizing capacity, increased when RBITC was applied in lipid vesicles as compared to an ethanol:water (Et:W) solution. Micro-scale vesicles showed a slightly higher cell proliferative response compared to nano-scale vesicles. TPM imaging revealed that the vesicle formulations improved the skin penetration of RBITC compared to the Et:W solution. A strong fluorescent region in the stratum corneum and upper epidermis implies elevated association of RBITC to these skin layers when formulated in lipid vesicles. In conclusion, the results indicate that there could be an elevated risk of sensitization when haptens are delivered in vehicles containing lipid vesicles. Although the size of the vesicles seems to be of minor importance, further studies are needed before a more generalized conclusion can be drawn. It is likely that the enhanced sensitizing capacity is a consequence of the improved penetration and increased formation of hapten-protein complexes in epidermis when RBITC is delivered in ethosomal formulations. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  2. Dermal and ocular irritation and skin sensitization studies of fullerene C60 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Matsuda, Akitaka; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Naya, Masato; Nakanishi, Junko

    2013-06-01

    Widespread production and use of nanomaterials have caused the release of increasing amounts of nanomaterials into the environment. The introduction of novel materials into industry requires safety evaluations as well as an understanding of the impact of the nanomaterials on human health, because the unique properties and size of nanomaterials may also result in unique health risks. Skin and eyes have the highest risk of exposure to nanomaterials, because deposition to the superficial organs has the potential to be a major route of exposure during the manufacturing, use, and disposal of nanomaterials. However, information on the dermal and eye irritation and sensitization of fullerene C(60) nanoparticles is still lacking. This study was performed to examine the potential irritating and sensitizing effects of fullerenes on the skin and eyes. The dermal and eye irritation study was performed using rabbits according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guidelines 404 and 405, respectively. The skin sensitization study was carried out in accordance to the OECD Guideline 406 using guinea pigs. The concentrations of the fullerenes in the test substances were the maximum allowable for administration. Fullerenes were applied at 50 mg in dermal irritation, 40 mg in skin sensitization, and 100 mg in eye irritation studies. No dermal responses, including erythema/eschar or edema, were found in rabbits treated with fullerenes. No rabbits exhibited corneal opacity, abnormality of the iris, or chemosis eye at any time point after the application of fullerenes. Fullerenes caused conjunctival redness and blood vessel hyperemia at 1 h, but not at 24 h. No erythema or edema was observed after the challenge with fullerenes in the fullerene-treated guinea pigs. Reversible minimal potential for acute irritation of the eyes was induced by fullerenes, but neither irritation nor sensitization was caused on the skin. Although the present study provided

  3. Enhancing native defect sensitivity for EUV actinic blank inspection: optimized pupil engineering and photon noise study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yow-Gwo; Neureuther, Andrew; Naulleau, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss the impact of optimized pupil engineering and photon noise on native defect sensitivity in EUV actinic blank inspection. Native defects include phase-dominated defects, absorber defects, and defects with a combination of phase and absorption behavior. First, we extend the idea of the Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) method and study the impact of optimum phase shift in the pupil plane on native defect sensitivity, showing a 23% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) enhancement compare to bright field (BF) for a phase defect with 20% absorption. We also describe the possibility to increase target defect SNR on target defect sizes at the price of losing the sensitivity on smaller (non-critical) defects. Moreover, we show the advantage of the optimized phase contrast (OZPC) method over BF EUV actinic blank inspection. A single focus scan from OZPC has better inspection efficiency over BF. Second, we make a detailed comparison between the phase contrast with apodization (AZPC) method and dark field (DF) method based on defect sensitivity in the presence of both photon shot noise and camera noise. Performance is compared for a variety of photon levels, mask roughness conditions, and combinations of defect phase and absorption.

  4. A case-control study of wood dust exposure, mutagen sensitivity, and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wu, X; Delclos, G L; Annegers, J F; Bondy, M L; Honn, S E; Henry, B; Hsu, T C; Spitz, M R

    1995-09-01

    The associations between lung cancer risk, mutagen sensitivity (a marker of cancer susceptibility), and a putative lung carcinogen, wood dust, were assessed in a hospital-based case-control study. There were 113 African -American and 67 Mexican-American cases with newly diagnosed, previously untreated lung cancer and 270 controls, frequency-matched on age, ethnicity, and sex. Mutagen sensitivity ( 1 chromatid break/cell after short-term bleomycin treatment) was associated with statistically significant elevated risk for lung cancer [odds ration (OR) = 4.3; 95% confidence intervals (CI) = 2.3-7.9]. Wood dust exposure was also a significant predictor of risk (overall OR = 3.5; CI = 1.4-8.6) after controlling for smoking and mutagen sensitivity. When stratified by ethnicity, wood dust exposure was s significant risk factor for African-Americans (OR = 5.5; CI = 1.6-18.9) but not for Mexican-Americans (OR = 2.0; CI = 0.5-8.1). The ORs were 3.8 and 4.8 for non-small cell lung cancer in Mexican-Americans (CI = 1.2-18.5). Stratified analysis suggested evidence of strong interactions between wood dust exposure and both mutagen sensitivity and smoking in lung cancer risk.

  5. 'Blue' voltage-sensitive dyes for studying spatiotemporal dynamics in the brain: visualizing cortical waves.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xinling; Wu, Jian-Young

    2017-07-01

    Among many distinct contributions made by Amiram Grinvald's group, the "Blue dyes" is a special gift for visualizing cortical population neuronal activity. The excitation wavelength of blue dyes has minimal overlap with the absorption of hemoglobin, and hence has minimal pulsation artifacts. This advantage leads to high signal-to-noise ratio optical recordings of cortical activity, with sensitivity as good as that of local field potential recordings. High sensitivity imaging allows for recording of spontaneous and evoked activity in single trials without spatial or temporal averaging, and has benefitted many scientists in their research projects. Single trial recording is particularly important for studying the cortex, because spontaneous and ongoing activities interact with sensory evoked events, creating rich dynamics in the wave patterns. Signal averaging in space and time would diminish the dynamic components in the patterns. Here, we discuss how the blue dyes help to achieve high-sensitivity voltage-sensitive dye imaging of spontaneous and evoked cortical activities. Spontaneous cortical activity has a constantly changing spatial pattern and temporal frequency, making it impossible to average in space and time. Amiran Grinvald's invention of blue dyes made it possible to examine the spatiotemporal patterns of cortical dynamics, about 15 years before the first useful genetically coded voltage proteins became available.

  6. Study of the cortical representation of whisker frequency selectivity using voltage-sensitive dye optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Pumbo, Elena; Tang, Qinggong; Chen, Chao-Wei; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The facial whiskers of rodents act as a high-resolution tactile apparatus that allow the animal to detect the finest details of its environment. Previously it was shown that whisker-sensitive neurons in the somatosensory cortex show frequency selectivity to small amplitude stimuli, An intravital voltage-sensitive dye optical imaging (VSDi) method in combination with the different frequency whisker stimulation was used in order to visualize neural activity in the mice somatosensory cortex in response to the stimulation of a single whisker by different frequencies. Using the intravital voltage-sensitive dye optical imaging (VSDi) method in combination with the different frequency whisker stimulation we visualized neural activity in the mice somatosensory cortex in response to the stimulation of a single whisker by different frequencies. We found that whisker stimuli with different frequencies led to different optical signals in the barrel field. Our results provide evidence that different neurons of the barrel cortex have different frequency preferences. This supports prior research that whisker deflections cause responses in cortical neurons within the barrel field according to the frequency of the stimulation. Many studies of the whisker frequency selectivity were performed using unit recording but to map spatial organization, imaging methods are essential. In the work described in the present paper, we take a serious step toward detailed functional mapping of the somatosensory cortex using VSDi. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of whisker frequency sensitivity and selectivity of barrel cortex neurons with optical imaging methods. PMID:28243518

  7. Theoretical Study of Monolayer and Double-Layer Waveguide Love Wave Sensors for Achieving High Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Fan, Chunhai; Su, Yan

    2017-03-22

    Love wave sensors have been widely used for sensing applications. In this work, we introduce the theoretical analysis of the monolayer and double-layer waveguide Love wave sensors. The velocity, particle displacement and energy distribution of Love waves were analyzed. Using the variations of the energy repartition, the sensitivity coefficients of Love wave sensors were calculated. To achieve a higher sensitivity coefficient, a thin gold layer was added as the second waveguide on top of the silicon dioxide (SiO₂) waveguide-based, 36 degree-rotated, Y-cut, X-propagating lithium tantalate (36° YX LiTaO₃) Love wave sensor. The Love wave velocity was significantly reduced by the added gold layer, and the flow of wave energy into the waveguide layer from the substrate was enhanced. By using the double-layer structure, almost a 72-fold enhancement in the sensitivity coefficient was achieved compared to the monolayer structure. Additionally, the thickness of the SiO₂ layer was also reduced with the application of the gold layer, resulting in easier device fabrication. This study allows for the possibility of designing and realizing robust Love wave sensors with high sensitivity and a low limit of detection.

  8. Theoretical Study of Monolayer and Double-Layer Waveguide Love Wave Sensors for Achieving High Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Fan, Chunhai; Su, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Love wave sensors have been widely used for sensing applications. In this work, we introduce the theoretical analysis of the monolayer and double-layer waveguide Love wave sensors. The velocity, particle displacement and energy distribution of Love waves were analyzed. Using the variations of the energy repartition, the sensitivity coefficients of Love wave sensors were calculated. To achieve a higher sensitivity coefficient, a thin gold layer was added as the second waveguide on top of the silicon dioxide (SiO2) waveguide–based, 36 degree–rotated, Y-cut, X-propagating lithium tantalate (36° YX LiTaO3) Love wave sensor. The Love wave velocity was significantly reduced by the added gold layer, and the flow of wave energy into the waveguide layer from the substrate was enhanced. By using the double-layer structure, almost a 72-fold enhancement in the sensitivity coefficient was achieved compared to the monolayer structure. Additionally, the thickness of the SiO2 layer was also reduced with the application of the gold layer, resulting in easier device fabrication. This study allows for the possibility of designing and realizing robust Love wave sensors with high sensitivity and a low limit of detection. PMID:28327504

  9. National study of newborn hearing screening: programme sensitivity and characteristics of undetected children.

    PubMed

    Korver, A M H; Konings, S; Meuwese-Jongejeugd, A; van Straaten, H L M; Uilenburg, N; Dekker, F W; Wever, C C; Frijns, J H M; Oudesluys-Murphy, A M

    2013-01-01

    The success of universal newborn hearing screening (UNHS) programmes is usually evaluated by determining the effect of the early detection of hearing loss on developmental outcome. However, in practice, these programmes do not detect all children with permanent childhood hearing impairment. In this study we determine the sensitivity of the current UNHS programme and analyse the characteristics of the children not detected by UNHS. We performed a nationwide, population-based, retrospective follow-up study in The Netherlands. All children born in 2003-05 and screened in a hearing screening programme (well babies and neonatal intensive care (NICU) graduates) were included for study. The main outcome measure was the sensitivity of the UNHS programme (based on the proportion of children known to have a permanent childhood hearing impairment in 2008 who were identified by UNHS). We also evaluated age at diagnosis, severity, and aetiology of hearing impairment in the children not detected by UNHS. We found that the sensitivity of the current UNHS programme was 0.83 (0.79 for well babies and 0.96 for NICU graduates). Permanent childhood hearing impairment was confirmed before 36 months of age in 96% of the study cohort. Of the children unidentified by the UNHS, > 50% had moderate hearing loss. No predominant cause of hearing impairment was found in these children. Our current UNHS programme identified the majority of children with a permanent hearing impairment of congenital cause.

  10. A study of the sensitivity of stratospheric ozone to hypersonic aircraft emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.; Johnston, H.S.

    1988-09-01

    There recently has been new interest in the development of faster and more efficient aircraft for intercontinental passenger flights. Such aircraft would likely spend a high fraction of their flight time in the stratosphere. As a natural progression from studies that were done during the CIAP Program in the mid 1970s, this study investigates the sensitivity of stratospheric ozone to NO/sub x/ and HO/sub x/ emissions in conjunction with current understanding of atmospheric chemical and physical processes. The LLNL one-dimensional and two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport models of the troposphere and stratosphere are used in this investigation. Because of the significant uncertainties in possible future emissions, it is necessary that we examine the models sensitivity to a wide range in magnitude, altitude, and latitude of assumed emissions. As well as examining different NO/sub x/ and HO/sub x/ emission levels, attempts are also made to examine the sensitivity of ozone to emissions under different background amounts of stratospheric chlorine (CIX). These studies lay the groundwork for future studies aimed at analyses of more realistic aircraft emission scenarios.

  11. Sensitivity studies of developing convection in a cloud-resolving model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petch, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Cloud-resolving models (CRMs) remain an important tool for providing detailed process information about convection. In this short paper I focus on the development of deep convection and consider what can be considered a minimum expense benchmark simulation for comparison with a numerical weather-prediction model. To decide this a range of sensitivity studies are presented to aspects of the experimental set-up which strongly impact the computational expense. Many of the sensitivities shown in these CRM experiments are quite different to those seen in previous papers which have tended to focus more on deep active convection. Here it is shown that for the case-study presented a minimum expense benchmark simulation must be a 3D simulation. A 200 m horizontal grid length and a domain of 25 km are also required to capture the most important processes.

  12. Alignment and Polarization Sensitivity Study on the Cassini: CIRS FIR Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooke, Julie; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument flying on the Cassini spacecraft to Saturn is a cryogenic spectrometer with far-infrared (FIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) channels. The CIRS FIR channel is a polarizing interferometer that contains three polarizing grid components. These components are an input polarizer, a polarizing beamsplitter, and an output polarizer/analyzer. They consist of a 1.5 micron thick mylar substrate with 2 microns wide copper wires, with 2 microns spacing (4 microns pitch) photolithographically deposited on the substrate. This paper details the alignment sensitivity studies performed on the polarizing beamsplitter, and the polarization sensitivity studies performed on all three polarizing components in the FIR interferometer.

  13. Sensitive and rapid laser diagnostic for shock tube kinetics studies using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-04-21

    We report the first application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a coherent light source for sensitive and rapid gaseous species time-history measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 83 with a measurement time resolution of 20 µs was demonstrated for C2H2 detection using a near-infrared transition near 1537 nm, corresponding to a noise-equivalent detection limit of 20 ppm at 296 K and 76 ppm at 906 K at 50 kHz. This substantial gain in signal, relative to conventional single-pass absorption, will enable ultra-sensitive species detection in shock tube kinetics studies, particularly useful for measurements of minor species and for studies of dilute reactive systems.

  14. Nanomechanical Study of Model Pressure Sensitive Adhesives by Scanning Probe Microscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-20

    September 1, 2000. 5.) Mark D. Foster, ""Studying Pressure Sensitive Adhesives by Scanning Probe Microscopy," Avery Dennison , Painesville, OH, May 12, 2000... Adhesives and Coatings dept. Dr. Hubertus von Voithenberg, Vice President, Research and Development tesa Dr. Yuan Yuan Zhang, Avery Dennison Dr...academics, or industry to whom at least one annual report was sent and/or this year’s report will be sent: Dr. Ken Chuang, Research Associate, Avery Dennison

  15. Spherical Nanoparticle Supported Lipid Bilayers for the Structural Study of Membrane Geometry-Sensitive Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward Y.; Briley, Nicole E.; Tyndall, Erin R.; Xu, Jie; Li, Conggang; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.; Flanagan, John M.; Tian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Many essential cellular processes including endocytosis and vesicle trafficking require alteration of membrane geometry. These changes are usually mediated by proteins that can sense and/or induce membrane curvature. Using spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (SSLBs), we characterize how SpoVM, a bacterial development factor, interacts with differently curved membranes by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR. Our results demonstrate that SSLBs are an effective system for structural and topological studies of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules. PMID:26488086

  16. A clinical study comparing the efficacy and sensitivity of home vs combined whitening.

    PubMed

    Dawson, P F L; Sharif, M O; Smith, A B; Brunton, P A

    2011-01-01

    This randomized clinical study assessed efficacy in terms of color change and production of sensitivity after home whitening alone and home whitening supplemented with in-office bleaching. Thirty-six subjects (aged 19 to 58 years) were randomly assigned to one of three different treatment groups: (A) home whitening for two weeks, with 16% carbamide peroxide in custom-made trays; (B) home whitening for two weeks, with 16% carbamide peroxide in custom-made trays supplemented with in-office bleaching with 9% hydrogen peroxide (in the same trays); or (C) home whitening for two weeks, with 16% carbamide peroxide in custom-made trays supplemented with in-office bleaching with 27% hydrogen peroxide (in the same trays). The efficacy of tooth whitening was assessed by determining the color change associated with the six upper anterior teeth using a value-ordered shade guide. Sensitivity was self-assessed with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS). Tooth shade and sensitivity were assessed at the following points: pretreatment; immediately after the home whitening phase; immediately after the in-office phase (groups B and C); and one week post active treatment. At the one week follow-up visit, subjects in group A had a mean (SD) color change of 5.9 (1.83) (teeth were lighter) immediately after cessation of treatment (p<0.01). Subjects in groups B and C experienced a greater change in mean (SD) shade immediately following their respective in-office treatments of 5.1 (1.53) and 5.4 (1.55). However, within one week, the shade of these teeth regressed to a similar degree to that achieved by subjects treated in group A. Overall, no significant difference in shade change or sensitivity was produced between the three groups. Investigators concluded that the in-office element of combined whitening produced no significant difference in tooth color or sensitivity when compared with home whitening alone.

  17. Measuring the face-sensitive N170 with a gaming EEG system: A validation study.

    PubMed

    de Lissa, Peter; Sörensen, Sidsel; Badcock, Nicholas; Thie, Johnson; McArthur, Genevieve

    2015-09-30

    The N170 is a "face-sensitive" event-related potential (ERP) that occurs at around 170ms over occipito-temporal brain regions. The N170's potential to provide insight into the neural processing of faces in certain populations (e.g., children and adults with cognitive impairments) is limited by its measurement in scientific laboratories that can appear threatening to some people. The advent of cheap, easy-to-use portable gaming EEG systems provides an opportunity to record EEG in new contexts and populations. This study tested the validity of the face-sensitive N170 ERP measured with an adapted commercial EEG system (the Emotiv EPOC) that is used at home by gamers. The N170 recorded through both the gaming EEG system and the research EEG system exhibited face-sensitivity, with larger mean amplitudes in response to the face stimuli than the non-face stimuli, and a delayed N170 peak in response to face inversion. The EPOC system produced very similar N170 ERPs to a research-grade Neuroscan system, and was capable of recording face-sensitivity in the N170, validating its use as research tool in this arena. This opens new possibilities for measuring the face-sensitive N170 ERP in people who cannot travel to a traditional ERP laboratory (e.g., elderly people in care), who cannot tolerate laboratory conditions (e.g., people with autism), or who need to be tested in situ for practical or experimental reasons (e.g., children in schools). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. STUDIES ON THE ANTIBODIES IN RABBIT ANTISERA RESPONSIBLE FOR SENSITIZATION OF HUMAN SKIN

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, John H.; Kabat, Elvin A.

    1953-01-01

    The capacity of rabbit anti-egg albumin sera to sensitize human skin has been studied. It has been shown that passive transfer by these sera is completely unrelated to the egg albumin-anti-egg albumin system, as demonstrated by a failure of passive transfer by some antisera containing ample anti-egg albumin and persistence of passive transfer in other antisera from which all anti-egg albumin had been removed by precipitation with homologous antigen. Three preparations of non-precipitating anti-egg albumin have been shown to have sensitizing capacities which bear no relation to their non-precipitating anti-egg albumin contents. From a portion of one of these the non-precipitating anti-egg albumin was removed without impairing its sensitizing ability, while in another portion obliteration of the sensitizing capacity was accomplished without reducing the anti-egg albumin. Evidence is presented to show that there are at least two possible antibodies in anti-egg albumin sera which are capable of inducing skin sensitivity and that they are antibodies against egg white impurities in crystalline egg albumin other than anti-conalbumin, anti-ovomucoid, and anti-lysozyme. The usefulness of a suitable quantitative precipitin technic for the analysis for antibodies against antigen impurities and for their selective absorption from sera is illustrated. The principle governing the procedure is described. The technic allows for the determination of a given trace antibody by working with such small concentrations of its purified specific antigen that whatever other antigen-antibody compounds are formed simultaneously with that to be determined will be below their solubility levels and consequently will not contribute appreciably to the precipitate. PMID:13069639

  19. Study on an auto-correlation-function-based damage index: Sensitivity analysis and structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2015-12-01

    The damage index based on the auto correlation function to detect the damage of the structure under white noise excitation is studied in detail in this paper. The maximum values of the auto correlation function of the vibration response signals (displacement, velocity and acceleration) from different measurement points of the structure are collected and formulated as a vector called Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV), which is expressed as a weighted combination of the Hadamard product of two mode shapes. AMV is normalized by its root mean square value so that the influence of the excitation can be eliminated. Sensitivity analysis for the different parts of the normalized AMV shows that the sensitivity of the normalized AMV to the local stiffness is dependent most on the sensitivity of the Hadamard product of the two lower order mode shapes to the local stiffness, which has a sudden change of the value around the local stiffness change position. The sensitivity of the normalized AMV has the similar shape and same trend that shows it is a very good damage indicator even for the very small damage. The relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage occurs in the structure is adopted as the damage index to show the damage location. Several examples of the stiffness reduction detection of a 12-story shear frame structure are utilized to validate the results in sensitivity analysis, illustrate the effectiveness and anti-noise ability of the AMV-based damage detection method and compare the effect of the response type on the detectability of the normalized AMV.

  20. A case study for evaluating potential soil sensitivity in aridland systems.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Wendy L; Ferschweiler, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Globally, ecosystems are subjected to prolonged droughts and extreme heat events, leading to forest die-offs and dominance shifts in vegetation. Some scientists and managers view soil as the main resource to be considered in monitoring ecosystem responses to aridification. As the medium through which precipitation is received, stored, and redistributed for plant use, soil is an important factor in the sensitivity of ecosystems to a drying climate. This study presents a novel approach to evaluating where on a landscape soils may be most sensitive to drying, making them less resilient to disturbance, and where potential future vegetation changes could lead to such disturbance. The drying and devegetation of arid lands can increase wind erosion, contributing to aerosol and dust emissions. This has implications for air quality, human health, and water resources. This approach combines soil data with vegetation simulations, projecting future vegetation change, to create maps of potential areas of concern for soil sensitivity and dust production in a drying climate. Consistent with recent observations, the projections show shifts from grasslands and woodlands to shrublands in much of the southwestern region. An increase in forested area occurs, but shifts in the dominant types and spatial distribution of the forests also are seen. A net increase in desert ecosystems in the region and some changes in alpine and tundra ecosystems are seen. Approximately 124,000 km(2) of soils flagged as "sensitive" are projected to have vegetation change between 2041 and 2050, and 82,927 km(2) of soils may become sensitive because of future vegetation changes. These maps give managers a way to visualize and identify where soils and vegetation should be investigated and monitored for degradation in a drying climate, so restoration and mitigation strategies can be focused in these areas.

  1. A Pilot Study on Developing a Standardized and Sensitive School Violence Risk Assessment with Manual Annotation.

    PubMed

    Barzman, Drew H; Ni, Yizhao; Griffey, Marcus; Patel, Bianca; Warren, Ashaki; Latessa, Edward; Sorter, Michael

    2017-09-01

    School violence has increased over the past decade and innovative, sensitive, and standardized approaches to assess school violence risk are needed. In our current feasibility study, we initialized a standardized, sensitive, and rapid school violence risk approach with manual annotation. Manual annotation is the process of analyzing a student's transcribed interview to extract relevant information (e.g., key words) to school violence risk levels that are associated with students' behaviors, attitudes, feelings, use of technology (social media and video games), and other activities. In this feasibility study, we first implemented school violence risk assessments to evaluate risk levels by interviewing the student and parent separately at the school or the hospital to complete our novel school safety scales. We completed 25 risk assessments, resulting in 25 transcribed interviews of 12-18 year olds from 15 schools in Ohio and Kentucky. We then analyzed structured professional judgments, language, and patterns associated with school violence risk levels by using manual annotation and statistical methodology. To analyze the student interviews, we initiated the development of an annotation guideline to extract key information that is associated with students' behaviors, attitudes, feelings, use of technology and other activities. Statistical analysis was applied to associate the significant categories with students' risk levels to identify key factors which will help with developing action steps to reduce risk. In a future study, we plan to recruit more subjects in order to fully develop the manual annotation which will result in a more standardized and sensitive approach to school violence assessments.

  2. First principles DFT study of dye-sensitized CdS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kalpna; Singh, Kh. S.; Kishor, Shyam; Josefesson, Ida; Odelius, Michael; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    Dye-sensitized quantum dots (QDs) are considered promising candidates for dye-sensitized solar cells. In order to maximize their efficiency, detailed theoretical studies are important. Here, we report a first principles density functional theory (DFT) investigation of experimentally realized dye - sensitized QD / ligand systems, viz., Cd{sub 16}S{sub 16}, capped with acetate molecules and a coumarin dye. The hybrid B3LYP functional and a 6−311+G(d,p)/LANL2dz basis set are used to study the geometric, energetic and electronic properties of these clusters. There is significant structural rearrangement in all the clusters studied - on the surface for the bare QD, and in the positions of the acetate / dye ligands for the ligated QDs. The density of states (DOS) of the bare QD shows states in the band gap, which disappear on surface passivation with the acetate molecules. Interestingly, in the dye-sensitised QD, the HOMO is found to be localized mainly on the dye molecule, while the LUMO is on the QD, as required for photo-induced electron injection from the dye to the QD.

  3. The correlation between mental health and multiple chemical sensitivity: a survey study in Japanese workers.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyi; Lu, Xi; Hisada, Aya; Fujiwara, Yuki; Katoh, Takahiko

    2015-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the correlation between mental health and multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS). The present study was conducted at two companies in 2011; both in Kyushu, Japan. The "subjective symptoms" subscale of the "Self-diagnosis Checklist for Assessment of Workers' Accumulated Fatigue" was used as a mental health subscale. To determine if multiple chemical exposure has an impact on mental health, we composed an original path model using structural equation analysis. Our final path model can be regarded as good: CMIN/DF = 1.832, CFI = 0.996, and RMSEA = 0.038, AIC = 71.158. As expected, chemical sensitivity and other chemical sensitivity scores predicted the health effects of multiple chemical exposure (β = 0.19, 0.64). Mental health was predicted by symptom severity and life impact (β = 0.56 and 0.12), which were both affected by multiple chemical exposure (β = 0.38 and 0.89, respectively). As far as we are aware, this is the first study using path analysis to explore whether MCS can indicate mental health in worker populations worldwide, and we found a significant causal relationship between them. This could indicate that more focus should be placed on the impact of MCS on mental health in future investigations.

  4. N Reactor core heatup sensitivity study for the 32-inch unit cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Zimmerman, B.; Heard, F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of N Reactor core heatup studies have been performed using the TRUMP-BD computer code. These studies were performed to address questions concerning the dependency of results on potential variations in the material properties and/or modeling assumptions. This report described and documents a series of 31 TRUMP-BD runs that were performed to determine the sensitivity of calculated inner-fuel temperatures to a variety of TRUMP input parameters and also to a change in the node density in a high-temperature-gradient region. The results of this study are based on the 32-in. model. 18 refs., 17 figs., 2 tab.

  5. Pilot study of contact sensitization to rubber allergens and bisphenol A amongst dental students.

    PubMed

    Lyapina, Maya Grigorievna; Krasteva, Assya; Dencheva, Maria; Tzekova, Mariana; Nikolov, Georgy; Yaneva-Deliverska, Mariela; Kisselova-Yaneva, Angelina

    2017-05-08

    The aim of this study has been to evaluate the rate of contact sensitization to some rubber allergens and to bisphenol A (BPA) amongst students of dental medicine and dental patients. A total of 50 participants were included in the study: 40 students of dental medicine exposed to the studied rubber allergens and BPA-based dental materials during the course of their education; 10 dental patients without occupational exposure to the latter substances served as a control group. All of them were patch-tested with the studied rubber allergens and bisphenol A. Highest was the sensitizing action of carba mix, followed by benzoyl peroxide and mercapto mix. The sensitization rate for carba mix was significantly higher for dental students as well as for the whole studied population, if compared to the one for thiuram mix (Chi2 = 12.9, p < 0.001; Chi2 = 13.9, p < 0.001), bisphenol A (Chi2 = 8.9, p < 0.001; Chi2 = 11.9, p < 0.001), toluenesulfonamide formaldehyde resin (Chi2 = 10.7, p < 0.001; Chi2 = 13.9, p < 0.001) and benzoyl peroxide (Chi2 = 4.7, p = 0.03; Chi2 = 5.8, p = 0.016), and for dental patients, if compared to the one for mercapto mix (Chi2 = 7.07, p = 0.008). Concomitant positive skin patch-test reactions to carba mix and to benzoyl peroxide, and to all the studied allergens were established. Carba mix could be outlined as a sensitizer of paramount importance for dental students as well as for dental patients. Benzoyl peroxide was the second ranked sensitizer for dental students. Positive skin patch-test reactions to bisphenol A and toluenesulfonamide formaldehyde resin were established only among the group of dental students. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(3):397-405.

  6. Numerical modeling of stress in stenotic arteries with microcalcifications: a parameter sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F

    2011-01-01

    As a follow-up to the work presented in Wenk et al. (2010, "Numerical Modeling of Stress in Stenotic Arteries With Microcalcifications: A Micromechanical Approximation," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 091011), a formal sensitivity study was conducted in which several model parameters were varied. The previous work only simulated a few combinations of the parameters. In the present study, the fibrous cap thickness, longitudinal position of the region of microcalcifications, and volume fraction of microcalcifications were varied over a broader range of values. The goal of the present work is to investigate the effects of localized regions of microcalcifications on the stress field of atherosclerotic plaque caps in a section of carotid artery. More specifically, the variations in the magnitude and location of the maximum circumferential stress were assessed for a range of parameters using a global sensitivity analysis method known as Sobol' indices. The stress was calculated by performing finite element simulations of three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, while the sensitivity indices were computed using a Monte Carlo scheme. The results indicate that cap thickness plays a significant role in the variation in the magnitude of the maximum circumferential stress, with the sensitivity to volume fraction increasing when the region of microcalcification is located at the shoulder. However, the volume fraction played a larger role in the variation in the location of the maximum circumferential stress. This matches the finding of the previous study (Wenk et al., 2010, "Numerical Modeling of Stress in Stenotic Arteries With Microcalcifications: A Micromechanical Approximation," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 091011), which indicates that the maximum circumferential stress always shifts to the region of microcalcification.

  7. [On the Way to Culture-Sensitive Patient Information Materials: Results of a Focus Group Study].

    PubMed

    Ries, Zivile; Frank, Fabian; Bermejo, Isaac; Kalaitsidou, Chariklia; Zill, Jördis; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Bengel, Jürgen; Hölzel, Lars

    2017-09-28

    Aim This study was part of a double-blind randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the effects of culture-sensitive patient information materials (PIM) compared with standard translated material. The study aimed to obtain the data for the development of culture sensitive PIM about unipolar depression for the 4 largest migrant groups in Germany (Turkish, Polish, Russian and Italian migration background). Method A qualitative study using 4 manual-based focus groups (FG), one for each migrant group, with 29 participants (9 with a Turkish (TüG), 8 with a Polish (PoG), 5 with a Russian (RuG) and 7 with an Italian (ItG) migration background) was conducted. The discussions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results 7 categories were identified. For the (1.) development of a good culture-sensitive PIM an easy language, a clear structure, an assessable extent of information and the avoidance of stereotypes were highlighted cross-culturally in all four FG. RuG and PoG had the largest (2.) lack of information about the German health care system. Concerning the (3.) illness perception RuG named problems with recognizing and understanding depression. PoG, RuG and TüG thematized (4.) feared consequences of the illness and of professional helpseeking. ItG, PoG, RuG had fears concerning (5.) psychotropic drugs as a result from insufficient knowledge about medication. For (6.) doctor-patient relationship cultural specifics were identified in RuG and TüG and for (7.) migration or culture specific reasons for depression in RuG, ItG and TüG. Conclusion Although the identified categories were relevant for all or for the majority of migrant groups, for most categories specific cultural aspects were discovered. These findings show the importance of a culture sensitive adaptation of PIM. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Iris color, skin sun sensitivity, and age-related maculopathy. The Blue Mountains Eye Study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, P; Smith, W; Wang, J J

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess relationships between age-related maculopathy (ARM) and iris color, skin sun sensitivity, and other sunlight-related factors. Cross-sectional population-based study. The Blue Mountains Eye Study performed a detailed eye examination of 3654 residents living in the Blue Mountains area, west of Sydney, Australia. Subjects with late age-related macular degeneration (late AMD), early ARM, and large drusen (> or = 125 microns diameter) were identified using masked grading of retinal photographs. Iris color was graded using standard photographs, and interviewers collected questionnaire data on sunlight-related factors. Logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, AMD family history, and current smoking, was used to assess associations. Blue iris color was significantly associated with an increased risk of both late AMD (odds ratio [OR], 1.69) and early ARM (OR, 1.45). An increased risk of late AMD, but not early ARM, was associated with both high (OR, 2.54) and low (OR, 2.18) skin sun sensitivity, as assessed using the Fitzpatrick sun-sensitivity scale. These associations remained after adjusting for the presence of sun-related skin damage. Neither history (or treatment) of skin cancer lesions, signs of sun-induced skin damage, or number of severe sunburns was associated with either late AMD or early ARM. Blue iris color was associated with an increased risk of both late AMD and early ARM in this population. Abnormal skin sensitivity to sunlight was also associated with an increased risk of late AMD.

  9. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-06-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t-1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River basin in the period considered. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the crop water footprint to fractional changes of seven individual input variables and parameters: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), crop calendar (planting date with constant growing degree days), soil water content at field capacity (Smax), yield response factor (Ky) and maximum yield (Ym). Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates related to uncertainties in four key input variables: PR, ET0, Kc, and crop calendar were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types. In general, the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by the crop calendar. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint is, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0was dominant compared to that of PR. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input

  10. A hierarchical Bayesian approach to adaptive vision testing: A case study with the contrast sensitivity function

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hairong; Kim, Woojae; Hou, Fang; Lesmes, Luis Andres; Pitt, Mark A.; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Myung, Jay I.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement efficiency is of concern when a large number of observations are required to obtain reliable estimates for parametric models of vision. The standard entropy-based Bayesian adaptive testing procedures addressed the issue by selecting the most informative stimulus in sequential experimental trials. Noninformative, diffuse priors were commonly used in those tests. Hierarchical adaptive design optimization (HADO; Kim, Pitt, Lu, Steyvers, & Myung, 2014) further improves the efficiency of the standard Bayesian adaptive testing procedures by constructing an informative prior using data from observers who have already participated in the experiment. The present study represents an empirical validation of HADO in estimating the human contrast sensitivity function. The results show that HADO significantly improves the accuracy and precision of parameter estimates, and therefore requires many fewer observations to obtain reliable inference about contrast sensitivity, compared to the method of quick contrast sensitivity function (Lesmes, Lu, Baek, & Albright, 2010), which uses the standard Bayesian procedure. The improvement with HADO was maintained even when the prior was constructed from heterogeneous populations or a relatively small number of observers. These results of this case study support the conclusion that HADO can be used in Bayesian adaptive testing by replacing noninformative, diffuse priors with statistically justified informative priors without introducing unwanted bias. PMID:27105061

  11. Contributions to Future Stratospheric Climate Change: An Idealized Chemistry-Climate Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of an idealized model sensitivity study, three of the main contributors to future stratospheric climate change are evaluated: increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, ozone recovery, and changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). These three contributors are explored in combination and separately, to test the interactions between ozone and climate; the linearity of their contributions to stratospheric climate change is also assessed. In a simplified chemistry-climate model, stratospheric global mean temperature is most sensitive to CO2 doubling, followed by ozone depletion, then by increased SSTs. At polar latitudes, the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratosphere is more sensitive to changes in CO2, SSTs and O3 than is the Southern Hemisphere (SH); the opposing responses to ozone depletion under low or high background CO2 concentrations, as seen with present-day SSTs, are much weaker and are not statistically significant under enhanced SSTs. Consistent with previous studies, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is found to increase in an idealized future climate; SSTs contribute most to this increase in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region, while CO2 and ozone changes contribute most in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  12. Hydrograph sensitivity to estimates of map impervious cover: a WinHSPF BASINS case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endreny, Theodore A.; Somerlot, Christopher; Hassett, James M.

    2003-04-01

    The BASINS geographic information system hydrologic toolkit was designed to compute total maximum daily loads, which are often derived by combining water quantity estimates with pollutant concentration estimates. In this paper the BASINS toolkit PLOAD and WinHSPF sub-models are briefly described, and then a 0·45 km2 headwater watershed in the New York Croton River area is used for a case study illustrating a full WinHSPF implementation. The goal of the Croton study was to determine the sensitivity of WinHSPF hydrographs to changes in land cover map inputs. This scenario occurs when scaling the WinHSPF model from the smaller 0·45 km2 watershed to the larger 1000 km2 management basin of the entire Croton area. Methods used to test model sensitivity include first calibrating the WinHSPF hydrograph using research-monitored precipitation and discharge data together with high spatial resolution and accuracy land cover data of impervious and pervious areas, and then swapping three separate land cover files, known as GIRAS, MRLC, and DOQQ data, into the calibrated model. Research results indicated that the WinHSPF land cover swapping had peak flow sensitivity in December 2001 hydrographs between 35% underestimation and 20% overestimation, and that errors in land-cover-derived runoff ratios for storm totals and peak flows tracked with the land cover data estimates of impervious area.

  13. Association of oxidative status and insulin sensitivity in periparturient dairy cattle: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, A; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L; Castillo, C

    2016-04-01

    Post-parturient insulin resistance (IR) is a common feature in all mammalian animals. However, in dairy cows, it can be exacerbated because of high milk yield, leading to excessive negative energy balance, which is related with increased disease incidence, reduced milk production and worsened reproductive performance. IR has been extensively investigated in humans suffering from diabetes mellitus. In these subjects, it is known that oxidative stress (OS) plays a causative role in the onset of IR. Although OS occurs in transitional dairy cattle, there are yet no studies that investigated the association between IR and OS in dairy cattle. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between OS and IR in dairy cattle. Serum samples were taken repeatedly from 22 dairy cows from 2 months prior to the expected calving date to 2 months after calving and were analysed for markers of metabolic and redox balance. Surrogate indices of insulin sensitivity were also calculated. Generalised linear mixed models revealed an effect of the oxidative status on peripheral insulin concentration and on indices of insulin sensitivity. Hence, field trials should investigate the effectiveness of antioxidant therapy on insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues during the transition period of dairy cattle.

  14. Insulin sensitivity, food intake, and cravings with premenstrual syndrome: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Trout, Kimberly K; Basel-Brown, Lisa; Rickels, Michael R; Schutta, Mark H; Petrova, Maja; Freeman, Ellen W; Tkacs, Nancy C; Teff, Karen L

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate possible differences in insulin sensitivity, food intake, and cravings between the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle in women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Subjects were screened for PMS using the Penn Daily Symptom Rating (DSR) scale. Each subject had two overnight admissions (once in each cycle phase) to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. They performed 3-day diet histories prior to each hospitalization. After admission, subjects received dinner and a snack, then were fasted until morning, when they underwent a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGT). Insulin sensitivity was determined by Minimal Model analysis. Blinded analysis of diet histories and inpatient food intake was performed by a registered dietitian. There was no difference found in insulin sensitivity between cycle phases (n = 7). There were also no differences in proportions of macronutrients or total kilocalories by cycle phase, despite a marked difference in food cravings between cycle phase, with increased food cravings noted in the luteal phase (p = 0.002). Total DSR symptom scores decreased from a mean of 186 (+/-29.0) in the luteal phase to 16.6 (+/-14.2) in the follicular phase. Women in this study consumed relatively high proportions of carbohydrates (55%-64%) in both cycle phases measured. These findings reinforce the suggestion that although the symptom complaints of PMS are primarily confined to the luteal phase, the neuroendocrine background for this disorder may be consistent across menstrual cycle phases.

  15. National pholcodine consumption and prevalence of IgE-sensitization: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, S G O; Florvaag, E; Oman, H; Poulsen, L K; Mertes, P M; Harper, N J N; Garvey, L H; Gerth van Wijk, R; Metso, T; Irgens, A; Dybendal, T; Halsey, J; Seneviratne, S L; Guttormsen, A B

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to test, on a multinational level, the pholcodine (PHO) hypothesis, i.e. that the consumption of PHO-containing cough mixtures could cause higher prevalence of IgE antibodies to PHO, morphine (MOR) and suxamethonium (SUX). As a consequence the risk of anaphylaxis to neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) will be increased. National PHO consumptions were derived from the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) database. IgE and IgE antibodies to PHO, MOR, SUX and P-aminophenyl-phosphoryl choline (PAPPC) were measured in sera from atopic individuals, defined by a positive Phadiatop test (>0.35 kU(A)/l), collected in nine countries representing high and low PHO-consuming nations. There was a significant positive association between PHO consumption and prevalences of IgE-sensitization to PHO and MOR, but not to SUX and PAPPC, as calculated both by exposure group comparisons and linear regression analysis. The Netherlands and the USA, did not have PHO-containing drugs on the markets, although the former had a considerable PHO consumption. Both countries had high figures of IgE-sensitization. This international prevalence study lends additional support to the PHO hypothesis and, consequently, that continued use of drugs containing this substance should be seriously questioned. The results also indicate that other, yet unknown, substances may lead to IgE-sensitization towards NMBAs.

  16. Preliminary Thermal-Mechanical Sizing of Metallic TPS: Process Development and Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Abu-Khajeel, Hasan; Hsu, Su-Yuen

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to perform sensitivity studies and develop a process to perform thermal and structural analysis and sizing of the latest Metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) developed at NASA LaRC (Langley Research Center). Metallic TPS is a key technology for reducing the cost of reusable launch vehicles (RLV), offering the combination of increased durability and competitive weights when compared to other systems. Accurate sizing of metallic TPS requires combined thermal and structural analysis. Initial sensitivity studies were conducted using transient one-dimensional finite element thermal analysis to determine the influence of various TPS and analysis parameters on TPS weight. The thermal analysis model was then used in combination with static deflection and failure mode analysis of the sandwich panel outer surface of the TPS to obtain minimum weight TPS configurations at three vehicle stations on the windward centerline of a representative RLV. The coupled nature of the analysis requires an iterative analysis process, which will be described herein. Findings from the sensitivity analysis are reported, along with TPS designs at the three RLV vehicle stations considered.

  17. Thermal performance sensitivity studies in support of material modeling for extended storage of used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-15

    The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. • degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds • changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components • changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

  18. Study of the sensitivity of gas sensing by use of index-guiding photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Guang; Liu, Si-Ying; Song, Zhao-Yuan; Han, Yin; Cheng, Tong-Lei; Zhou, Gui-Yao; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate an absorption transmission spectrum of CH(4) in a 16.9 cm long index-guiding photonic crystal fiber (PCF) fabricated in our laboratory. One of the main factors to improve the sensitivity is to increase the fraction of power in PCF cladding air holes. We study the fraction of power in PCF cladding air holes as a function of the index-guiding PCF parameters. We found that a PCF with small spacing and a large air-filling ratio has a higher fraction of power in its cladding air holes. At the same time the mode area in this PCF is small and would generate strong nonlinear effects in the fiber. If we use a PCF in which the core is formed by missing seven air holes, it is immediately obvious that the PCF used as a sensor has higher sensitivity and a larger mode area.

  19. Cheap color evaluation of dye-based pressure sensitive films for plantar studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeong, W. K.; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2005-04-01

    Dye-based pressure sensitive films are advantageous in plantar pressure studies due to their of ease of use, costeffectiveness, and ability to produce measurements within the shoe. To circumvent the use of proprietary equipment and software to relate the dye stained film to load, an alternative approach of using a conventional flatbed scanner and generic image processing software is attempted here instead. The technique revealed high linear increasing and decreasing trends for the respective red and blue normalized intensities (correlation coefficient > 0.95) and low standard deviation in all readings (< 0.06) overall. By subtracting the blue from the red normalized intensity, it was discovered that the measurement sensitivity could be doubled. The results here confirm the viability of using a conventional flatbed scanner and generic image processing software to relate the dye stained pressure films to load. The adoption of this approach promises substantial cost savings.

  20. Study of upscaling possibilities for antimony sulfide solid state sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakopoulou, Archontoula; Raptis, Dimitrios; Dracopoulos, Vasilios; Sygellou, Lamprini; Andrikopoulos, Konstantinos S.; Lianos, Panagiotis

    2015-03-01

    Solid state solar cells of inverted structure were constructed by successive deposition of nanoparticulate titania, antimony sulfide sensitizer and P3HT on FTO electrodes with PEDOT:PSS:Ag as counter electrode. Sensitized photoanode electrodes were characterized by XRD, Raman, XPS, FESEM and UV-vis. Small laboratory scale cells were first constructed and optimized. Functional cells were obtained by annealing the antimony sulfide film either in air or in inert atmosphere. High short-circuit currents were recorded in both cases with air-annealed sample producing more current but lower voltage. Small unit cells were combined to form cell modules. Connection of unit cells in parallel increased current but not proportionally to that of the unit cell. Connection in series preserved current and generated voltage multiplication. Cells were constructed and studied under ambient conditions, without encapsulation. The results encourage upscaling of antimony sulfide solar cells.

  1. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Tong, Charles; Sun, Yunwei; Chu, Wei; Ye, Aizhong; Miao, Chiyuan; Di, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin near Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more efficient

  2. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    DOE PAGES

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; ...

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin nearmore » Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more

  3. A Sensitivity Study of Aerosol Effects on an Idealized Supercell Storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, A.; Storelvmo, T.

    2013-12-01

    One of the largest uncertainties in future climate projections lies in the climatic effects of aerosols. It has been shown that the cooling effect of aerosols could partially offset the current global warming induced by increased greenhouse gas concentration. Among the effects of aerosols, the interaction between aerosols and deep convective clouds is especially difficult to quantify, due to the complex interaction and limited measurements available. Although the radiative effect of deep convective clouds on climate is small, they could affect the local, regional, and global climate by altering precipitation and the large-scale circulations. Thus, it is of importance to understand how deep convection changes its development and evolution with aerosol loading. This study aims to understand the effects of varying aerosol number concentrations on deep convective clouds, using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. A quarter-circular shear supercell is simulated with three different microphysics schemes in an idealized setting, while mimicking the changes in aerosol concentration by changing either cloud droplet concentration or activated cloud condensation nuclei concentration. We find that the simulated amount of precipitation has quite different sensitivities to aerosol concentration, depending on the microphysics scheme used; one of the simulations shows a drastic decrease in precipitation with increased aerosol loading, whereas simulations with the other two schemes show relatively low sensitivities to aerosol concentration. This fact highlights uncertainties in the complex microphysical interactions in convective clouds. In addition, changes in ice nuclei concentration are mimicked by changing the ice nucleation rate in each scheme. Sensitivity to this variation is also dependent on the microphysics scheme used. Furthermore, radiation is added in the simulations so that both radiative and microphysical effects of aerosol on the supercell storm are

  4. Momentum- and Heat-Flux Parametrization at Dome C, Antarctica: A Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignon, Etienne; Genthon, Christophe; Barral, Hélène; Amory, Charles; Picard, Ghislain; Gallée, Hubert; Casasanta, Giampietro; Argentini, Stefania

    2017-02-01

    An extensive meteorological observational dataset at Dome C, East Antarctic Plateau, enabled estimation of the sensitivity of surface momentum and sensible heat fluxes to aerodynamic roughness length and atmospheric stability in this region. Our study reveals that (1) because of the preferential orientation of snow micro-reliefs (sastrugi), the aerodynamic roughness length z0 varies by more than two orders of magnitude depending on the wind direction; consequently, estimating the turbulent fluxes with a realistic but constant z0 of 1 mm leads to a mean friction velocity bias of 24 % in near-neutral conditions; (2) the dependence of the ratio of the roughness length for heat z_{0t} to z0 on the roughness Reynolds number is shown to be in reasonable agreement with previous models; (3) the wide range of atmospheric stability at Dome C makes the flux very sensitive to the choice of the stability functions; stability function models presumed to be suitable for stable conditions were evaluated and shown to generally underestimate the dimensionless vertical temperature gradient; as these models differ increasingly with increases in the stability parameter z / L, heat flux and friction velocity relative differences reached 100 % when z/L > 1; (4) the shallowness of the stable boundary layer is responsible for significant sensitivity to the height of the observed temperature and wind data used to estimate the fluxes. Consistent flux results were obtained with atmospheric measurements at heights up to 2 m. Our sensitivity study revealed the need to include a dynamical parametrization of roughness length over Antarctica in climate models and to develop new parametrizations of the surface fluxes in very stable conditions, accounting, for instance, for the divergence in both radiative and turbulent fluxes in the first few metres of the boundary layer.

  5. Dental anxiety in relation to neuroticism and pain sensitivity. A twin study.

    PubMed

    Vassend, Olav; Røysamb, Espen; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2011-03-01

    Predisposing personality traits as well as heightened pain sensitivity and fear of pain have been hypothesized as central factors in the development of dental anxiety. The aim of the study was to estimate the heritability of dental anxiety, and to investigate the genetic and environmental sources of covariance between dental anxiety on one hand, and pain sensitivity and the neuroticism trait on the other. A sample comprising 188 twins, aged 23-35 years (53 monozygotic and 39 dizygotic twin pairs, and 4 single twins whose co-twin did not participate), was included in the study. Measures of dental anxiety and personality were obtained using Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale and the NEO Personality Inventory Revised, respectively. Heat pain and cold pressor pain sensitivity were assessed using standard pain testing procedures. Bivariate Cholesky models were employed to decompose the correlations between phenotypes into genetic and environmental factors. Using models with common additive genetic (A) and individual-specific environmental (E) factors, moderate heritability (i.e., .41) for dental anxiety was demonstrated. Virtually all of the phenotypic correlation between neuroticism and dental anxiety could be accounted for by A. Furthermore, a substantial part of the variance in dental anxiety was due to specific genetic and individual environmental influences unrelated to neuroticism. The phenotypic correlations between dental anxiety and the pain sensitivity indices were close to zero. Thus, while neuroticism and dental anxiety share a sizeable proportion of genetic (but not environmental) risk factors, the results also suggest that these two attributes are distinct entities with overlapping, but not identical, etiologies.

  6. Prenatal latex sensitization in patients with spina bifida: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, Michael; Goettler, Susanne; Eschenburg, Georg; Kracht, Thorben; Kunkel, Philip; Von der Wense, Axel; Reinshagen, Konrad

    2014-03-01

    Patients with spina bifida are particularly vulnerable to developing immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated latex sensitization. Even though many risk factors leading to latex allergy in these patients have been described, it is still unclear whether the increased prevalence of latex sensitization is disease associated or due to the procedures used to treat spina bifida. The aim of this study was to assess prenatal latex sensitization in patients with spina bifida by examining IgE levels in umbilical cord blood. Patients with spina bifida and matched healthy infants were recruited from the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf and Children's Hospital Altona. Latex-specific and total IgE were assessed in umbilical cord blood using ImmunoCAP testing to evaluate the degree of prenatal latex sensitization. Twenty-two subjects, 10 with spina bifida and 12 healthy individuals, were included. Subjects were selected after matching for sex, gestational age, weight, parental allergy profile, number of prenatal examinations, and utilization of latex tools during pregnancy (propensity score estimates, p = 0.36). In patients with spina bifida, latex-specific and total IgE levels were significantly higher than those in healthy individuals (p = 0.001). After normalization to total IgE, latex-specific IgE levels were higher, yet not significantly increased (p = 0.085). Perinatally, there is a significant augmentation of total and latex-specific IgE in patients with spina bifida. After correcting for total IgE, latex-specific IgE was increased, yet not significantly higher than in matched, healthy controls. This pilot study gives novel insights in the immunological reactions related to spina bifida. The increased latex-specific IgE levels could possibly be associated with the occurrence of a latex allergy in the future.

  7. Handheld computers for self-administered sensitive data collection: A comparative study in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Curioso, Walter H; Gonzales, Marco A; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Castagnetto, Jesus M; Carcamo, Cesar P; Hughes, James P; Garcia, Patricia J; Garnett, Geoffrey P; Holmes, King K

    2008-01-01

    Background Low-cost handheld computers (PDA) potentially represent an efficient tool for collecting sensitive data in surveys. The goal of this study is to evaluate the quality of sexual behavior data collected with handheld computers in comparison with paper-based questionnaires. Methods A PDA-based program for data collection was developed using Open-Source tools. In two cross-sectional studies, we compared data concerning sexual behavior collected with paper forms to data collected with PDA-based forms in Ancon (Lima). Results The first study enrolled 200 participants (18–29 years). General agreement between data collected with paper format and handheld computers was 86%. Categorical variables agreement was between 70.5% and 98.5% (Kappa: 0.43–0.86) while numeric variables agreement was between 57.1% and 79.8% (Spearman: 0.76–0.95). Agreement and correlation were higher in those who had completed at least high school than those with less education. The second study enrolled 198 participants. Rates of responses to sensitive questions were similar between both kinds of questionnaires. However, the number of inconsistencies (p = 0.0001) and missing values (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in paper questionnaires. Conclusion This study showed the value of the use of handheld computers for collecting sensitive data, since a high level of agreement between paper and PDA responses was reached. In addition, a lower number of inconsistencies and missing values were found with the PDA-based system. This study has demonstrated that it is feasible to develop a low-cost application for handheld computers, and that PDAs are feasible alternatives for collecting field data in a developing country. PMID:18366687

  8. A parametric study of the nonlinear dynamics and sensitivity of a beam-rigid body microgyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajimi, S. A. M.; Heppler, G. R.; Abdel-Rahman, E. M.

    2017-09-01

    The nonlinear dynamical features of a gyroscopic system manifesting in a rotation rate sensor are presented. A computational shooting method and Floquet multipliers are used to characterize the response. Response characteristics are demonstrated and studied by generating various frequency-response plots, force-response curves, time-history plots, and phase-portraits. The effects of varying the DC bias voltages, the AC drive-voltage and drive-frequency, and the quality factors on the system response are studied in detail. The advantages of operating in the nonlinear regime are shown to appear in larger bandwidth and higher sensitivity.

  9. Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-01-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

  10. A sensitivity study for pneumatic vortex control on a chined forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boalbey, R. E.; Ely, W. L.; Robinson, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the sensitivity of yaw control on a chined forebody to the longitudinal location of a blowing slot at the chine edge. In addition, the effects of port blowing were also studied. NASA Langley's thin-layer Navier-Stokes code CFL3D was used to compare flow field characteristics and total yawing moment coefficients for the blowing configurations. Based upon equivalent blowing momentum coefficients, a significant increase in yaw control effectiveness was attained from the forward slot, relative to the aft slot, and port blowing was less effective than either slot blowing configuration.

  11. Breathability studies of electron beam curable polyurethane pressure sensitive adhesive for bio-medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Mehra, Dayal Singh; Niyogi, Utpal Kumar; Sabharwal, Sunil; Singh, Gurdeep

    2014-10-01

    Polyurethane (PU) based pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) commonly used in surgical dressing has been made by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. In contact with biological substrate like skin, PSAs generally lose their adhesive strength due to very low moisture vapor transmission rate (MVTR). In the present study, effects of varying e-beam dose and different crosslinkers on the MVTR of the PU-PSA have been investigated. A comparative study of effects of different crosslinkers showed that PU-PSA with IPDI has the least while that with TAC has the highest gel content and crystallinity and a reverse trend was observed for the MVTR.

  12. A sensitivity study for pneumatic vortex control on a chined forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boalbey, R. E.; Ely, W. L.; Robinson, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the sensitivity of yaw control on a chined forebody to the longitudinal location of a blowing slot at the chine edge. In addition, the effects of port blowing were also studied. NASA Langley's thin-layer Navier-Stokes code CFL3D was used to compare flow field characteristics and total yawing moment coefficients for the blowing configurations. Based upon equivalent blowing momentum coefficients, a significant increase in yaw control effectiveness was attained from the forward slot, relative to the aft slot, and port blowing was less effective than either slot blowing configuration.

  13. Ozone Response to Aircraft Emissions: Sensitivity Studies with Two-dimensional Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Jackman, Charles H.; Douglass, Anne R.; Bureske, K.; Weubbles, Donald J.; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Brasseur, G.; Pyle, J.; Jones, Anna

    1992-01-01

    Our first intercomparison/assessment of the effects of a proposed high-speed civil transport (HSCT) fleet on the stratosphere is presented. These model calculations should be considered more as sensitivity studies, primarily designed to serve the following purposes: (1) to allow for intercomparison of model predictions; (2) to focus on the range of fleet operations and engine specifications giving minimal environmental impact; and (3) to provide the basis for future assessment studies. The basic scenarios were chosen to be as realistic as possible, using the information available on anticipated developments in technology. They are not to be interpreted as a commitment or goal for environmental acceptability.

  14. Genetic diversity and drug sensitivity studies on Eimeria tenella field isolates from Hubei Province of China.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Li, Yalin; Yang, Xin; Ke, Qiyun; Lei, Weiqiang; Mughal, Mudassar Niaz; Fang, Rui; Zhou, Yanqin; Shen, Bang; Zhao, Junlong

    2017-03-09

    Avian coccidiosis is an intracellular intestinal parasitic disease, caused by intracellular intestinal parasites from the genus Eimeria, among which Eimeria tenella is one of the most pathogenic species and causes great economic losses. Frequent applications of anticoccidial drugs have resulted in the development of drug-resistance in E. tenella. In the present study, we sought to determine the genetic diversity of E. tenella isolates prevalent in chicken farms in Hubei Province of China and examine their sensitivity to three anticoccidial drugs. The results provide useful information for the prevention and control of coccidiosis in this region. Eimeria tenella oocysts were isolated from faecal samples collected from different commercial broiler production farms in Hubei Province, China. After oocyst sporulation and animal inoculation for expansion of the field isolates, DNA and RNA were extracted from excysted sporozoites for molecular characterization. Species identification of field isolates were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of ribosomal DNA. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used for population genetic analysis. Subsequently, sequences of the major sporozoite surface antigen (SAG), micronemal protein 2 (MIC-2) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes from genomic DNA, and the Eimeria tenella cation-transport ATPase (EtCat ATPase) gene from cDNA were obtained for genotyping using multi-sequence alignments. Finally, sensitivity of the field isolates to three commonly used anticoccidial drugs (diclazuril, decoquinate and maduramycin) were tested to assess the prevalence of drug resistance in E. tenella in Hubei Province of China. Analysis of the ITS1 sequences indicated that all the isolates were E. tenella. RAPD analysis and multi-sequence alignments of the SAG, MIC-2, EtCat ATPase and cytb showed genetic diversity among these isolates. Finally, drug sensitivity tests demonstrated

  15. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, M.A. |

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  16. Assessment of sensitivity to change of the European Scleroderma Study Group activity index.

    PubMed

    Melsens, Karin; De Keyser, Filip; Decuman, Saskia; Brusselle, Guy; De Pauw, Michel; Deschepper, Ellen; De Wilde, Katelijne; Elewaut, Dirk; Piette, Yves; Vandecasteele, Els; Smith, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The European Scleroderma Study Group (EScSG) activity index meets nearly all the OMERACT-standards of truth, discrimination and feasibility. The sensitivity to change remains to be attested. This study assesses sensitivity to change of the EScSG activity index in patients with early and severe diffuse cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis (dcSSc) treated with rituximab. 12-month follow-up (open-label study) of 14 consecutive patients with early dcSSc. Patients received an infusion of two times 1000 mg rituximab at month 0 and 6, together with 100 mg methylprednisolone. Clinical read outs (modified Rodnan skin score [mRSS], lung function and echocardiography) and EScSG activity index were performed at month 0, 3, 6 and 12. Mixed models analyses (MMA) were used to evaluate changes in parameters over time. There was a clinically significant change in skin score with a mean (SD) mRSS of 24.8 (4.44) at baseline and 10.4 (3.12) at month 12 (MMA p<0.001). Also the EScSG activity index decreased significantly, with a mean (SD) of 4.3 (1.79) at baseline and 0.7 (0.83) at month 12 (MMA p<0.001). The estimated mean change of the EScSG activity index was -3.6 (95%CI -4.9; -2.4) over 12 months. Indices of internal organ involvement remained stable throughout the study. A significant improvement of the EScSG activity index was observed, in line with the significant improvement of the mRSS and the stabilisation of internal organ involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first study to attest sensitivity to change of the EScSG activity index in the subset of 'early' dcSSc. ClinicalTrials.gov Registration, http://clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT00379431.

  17. Familial aggregation of food allergy and sensitization to food allergens: a family-based study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, H-J; Kumar, R; Pongracic, J; Liu, X; Story, R; Yu, Y; Caruso, D; Costello, J; Schroeder, A; Fang, Y; Demirtas, H; Meyer, K E; O'Gorman, M R G; Wang, X

    2009-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of food allergy (FA) is a growing clinical and public health problem. The contribution of genetic factors to FA remains largely unknown. This study examined the pattern of familial aggregation and the degree to which genetic factors contribute to FA and sensitization to food allergens. This study included 581 nuclear families (2,004 subjects) as part of an ongoing FA study in Chicago, IL, USA. FA was defined by a set of criteria including timing, clinical symptoms obtained via standardized questionnaire interview and corroborative specific IgE cut-offs for > or =95% positive predictive value (PPV) for food allergens measured by Phadia ImmunoCAP. Familial aggregation of FA as well as sensitization to food allergens was examined using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models, with adjustment for important covariates including age, gender, ethnicity and birth order. Heritability was estimated for food-specific IgE measurements. FA in the index child was a significant and independent predictor of FA in other siblings (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.2-5.6, P=0.01). There were significant and positive associations among family members (father-offspring, mother-offspring, index-other siblings) for total IgE and specific IgE to all the nine major food allergens tested in this sample (sesame, peanut, wheat, milk, egg white, soy, walnut, shrimp and cod fish). The estimated heritability of food-specific IgE ranged from 0.15 to 0.35 and was statistically significant for all the nine tested food allergens. This family-based study demonstrates strong familial aggregation of FA and sensitization to food allergens, especially, among siblings. The heritability estimates indicate that food-specific IgE is likely influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Together, this study provides strong evidence that both host genetic susceptibility and environmental factors determine the complex trait of IgE-mediated FA.

  18. Sensitivity study and optimization of a 3D electric impedance tomography prostate probe

    PubMed Central

    Borsic, A; Halter, R; Wan, Y; Hartov, A; Paulsen, K D

    2010-01-01

    In current clinical practice, the primary diagnostic method for testing for prostate cancer is ultrasound-guided biopsy. In this paper, we consider using a sonolucent array of electrodes, printed on a thin Kapton layer and positioned on the imaging window of a transrectal ultrasound probe, as a method for providing coregistered electrical and ultrasound imaging of the prostate. As the electrical properties of malignant tissues have been shown to differ significantly from benign tissues, the estimation of the electrical properties is expected to be helpful in distinguishing certain beginning pathologies from cancer and in improving the detection rate that current biopsy methods provide. One of the main difficulties in estimating electrical properties of tissues with this electrode configuration is the rapid decay of the sensitivity with distance from the sensing array. In order to partially overcome this difficulty, we propose to use prior information from the ultrasound (US). Specifically we intend to delineate the boundaries of the prostate from the US, to subdivide the organ into a small number of voxels and to estimate the conductivity as constant on each of these subvolumes. We use a 3D forward model based on the finite element method for studying the sensitivity of a simulated segmented prostate for three different electrode array designs. The three designs present different electrode areas and inter-electrode gaps. Larger electrodes are desirable as they present a better contact, but we show that as they result in smaller inter-electrode gaps, shunting currents can be significant and the sensitivity is reduced. Because our clinical measurement system employs a single current source, we consider tetrapolar measurement patterns for evaluating these electrode configurations. Optimal measurement patterns are well defined for adaptive systems, where multiple currents are injected at the same time. For the electrode array designs we consider, which are three

  19. a Study of the Shock Sensitivity of PBX 9501 Damaged by Compressive Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, D. G.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Hooks, D. E.; Peterson, P. D.; DeLuca, R.; Stahl, D. B.; Hagelberg, S. I.; Alcon, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the effects of damage caused by compressive loading on the shock sensitivity of the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. PBX 9501 consists of 95 wt. % HMX and 5 wt. % nitroplasticized Estane binder. The binder is a mixture of 49 wt. % Estane® 5703 (BF Goodrich), 49 wt. % Nitroplasticizer (a eutectic mixture of bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)formal and bis(2,2 dinitropropyl)acetal), and 2 wt. % Irganox® 1010 stabilizer. PBX 9501 cubes, 25.4 mm on a side, were compressed to various uniaxial loads in an Instron machine. After loading, 10×10 mm cross-sections, 3.5 mm thick, were taken from the center of each cube. These slices were then subjected to nearly identical 35 kbar shocks. Transmitted shock wave profiles were measured using interface velocimetry (VISAR). Comparison of shock wave growth is a measure of shock sensitivity. Results on four samples indicate little change in sensitivity caused by compressive loading.

  20. Endogenous Opioid-Masked Latent Pain Sensitization: Studies from Mouse to Human

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jørgen B.; Werner, Marianne; Taylor, Bradley K.; Werner, Mads U.

    2015-01-01

    Following the resolution of a severe inflammatory injury in rodents, administration of mu-opioid receptor inverse agonists leads to reinstatement of pain hypersensitivity. The mechanisms underlying this form of latent pain sensitization (LS) likely contribute to the development of chronic pain, but LS has not yet been demonstrated in humans. Using a C57BL/6 mouse model of cutaneous mild heat injury (MHI) we demonstrated a dose-dependent reinstatement of pain sensitization, assessed as primary (P < 0.001) and secondary hyperalgesia (P < 0.001) by naloxone (0.3–10 mg/kg), 168 hrs after the induction of MHI. Forward-translating the dose data to a human MHI model (n = 12) we could show that LS does indeed occur after naloxone 2 mg/kg, 168 hrs after a MHI. Our previous unsuccessful efforts to demonstrate unmasking of LS in humans are thus likely explained by an insufficient naloxone dose (0.021 mg/kg). However, while LS was consistently demonstrated in 21/24 mice, LS was only seen in 4/12 subjects. This difference is likely due to selection bias since the C57BL/6 mouse strain exhibits markedly enhanced pain sensitivity in assays of acute thermal nociception. Future exploratory studies in humans should prioritize inclusion of “high-sensitizers” prone to develop LS and use post-surgical models to elucidate markers of vulnerability to chronic postsurgical pain. Trial Registration EudraCT 2012-005663-27 PMID:26305798

  1. Application and sensitivity studies of the orographic cloud model MCCP (Mountain Cloud Chemistry Program) PLUVIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, E.G.; Luecken, D.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1987-07-01

    A special MCCP version of the PLUVIUS MOD 5.0 reactive storm model (MCCP PLUVIUS) was applied to conditions representative of Mt. Mitchell, North Carolina. Tests were also conducted to determine the sensitivity of the model to various meteorological and chemical parameters. Results of the modeling investigation indicate that aqueous concentrations and deposition fluxes of pollutants are location dependent. The greatest concentrations occur at the edges of the cloud, where the liquid water content is low, and the greatest deposition flux occurs on the windward side of the mountain. For conditions considered representative of summertime conditions at Mt. Mitchell, predicted ion concentrations in deposited cloud water at a point corresponding to the MCCP field station are within the ranges actually observed. Sensitivity studies indicate that in-cloud oxidation of SO/sub 2/ makes a limited contribution to total sulfate deposition for typical concentrations of SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. However, sulfate deposition predicted by MCCP PLUVIUS is extremely sensitive to the value selected for aerosol sulfate existing in the modeled air mass prior to cloud formation. Hydrogen ion deposition predicted by the model is strongly influenced by input values for gas-phase nitric acid and ammonia. 11 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Sensitivity of lumbar spine response to follower load and flexion moment: finite element study.

    PubMed

    Naserkhaki, Sadegh; El-Rich, Marwan

    2017-04-01

    The follower load (FL) combined with moments is commonly used to approximate flexed/extended posture of the lumbar spine in absence of muscles in biomechanical studies. There is a lack of consensus as to what magnitudes simulate better the physiological conditions. Considering the in-vivo measured values of the intradiscal pressure (IDP), intervertebral rotations (IVRs) and the disc loads, sensitivity of these spinal responses to different FL and flexion moment magnitudes was investigated using a 3D nonlinear finite element (FE) model of ligamentous lumbosacral spine. Optimal magnitudes of FL and moment that minimize deviation of the model predictions from in-vivo data were determined. Results revealed that the spinal parameters i.e. the IVRs, disc moment, and the increase in disc force and moment from neutral to flexed posture were more sensitive to moment magnitude than FL magnitude in case of flexion. The disc force and IDP were more sensitive to the FL magnitude than moment magnitude. The optimal ranges of FL and flexion moment magnitudes were 900-1100 N and 9.9-11.2 Nm, respectively. The FL magnitude had reverse effect on the IDP and disc force. Thus, magnitude for FL or flexion that minimizes the deviation of all the spinal parameters together from the in-vivo data can vary. To obtain reasonable compromise between the IDP and disc force, our findings recommend that FL of low magnitude must be combined with flexion moment of high intensity and vice versa.

  3. New diagnostic criteria for infective endocarditis. A study of sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, E; Parrini, I; Chinaglia, A; Pomari, F; Brusasco, G; Bobbio, M; Trinchero, R; Brusca, A

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of new criteria proposed by Duke University for case definition of infective endocarditis as compared to the previously accepted Von Reyn criteria. A total of 143 consecutive suspected cases of infective endocarditis in 137 febrile patients were included. Of these, 69 had infective endocarditis, pathologically proven in 28, but with only a clinical diagnosis in 41. In the remaining 74 cases, the diagnosis of infective endocarditis was rejected after a follow-up of at least 3 months. The sensitivity of Duke's criteria was significantly higher, both when patients with possible infective endocarditis were considered as true-positive (definition 1; 100% vs 69%, P < 0.001) and when possible cases were considered as rejected (definition 2; 76% vs 51%, P < 0.01). Specificity was very high with both criteria: 92% Von Reyn vs 88% Duke (ns) with definition 1 and 99% Von Reyn vs 97% Duke (ns) with definition 2. The overall accuracy of the Duke criteria in the entire population was significantly higher with both definitions (0.94 vs 0.81 definition 1, P < 0.001; 0.87 vs 0.75, P = 0.015 definition 2). Duke's criteria for defining infective endocarditis has been shown to be more sensitive than previously adopted criteria, while maintaining a high degree of specificity. Therefore, they must be accepted as a substitute for previous criteria.

  4. Luminophore Application Study of Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Tatsunori; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    A polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) is a fast responding and sprayable PSP which has been applied for capturing global unsteady flows. The luminophore application process is studied to enhance the characterization of the PC-PSP. A dipping deposition method is used to apply a luminophore on a polymer-ceramic coating. The method selects a solvent by its polarity index. The characterization includes the signal level, pressure sensitivity, temperature dependency, and response time. It is found that the luminophore application process affects the steady-state characterizations, such as the signal level, pressure sensitivity, and temperature dependency. A range of change for each characterization, which is based on the minimum quantity, is a factor of 4.7, 9, and 3.8, respectively. A response time on the order of ten microseconds is shown. The application process is not a dominant factor for changing the response time, which is within the uncertainty of the thickness variation. Comparisons of the effects on the luminophore application process and the polymer content are made to discuss the PC-PSP characterization results. PMID:23760088

  5. Injustice at work and leukocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity: findings from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Herr, Raphael M; Loerbroks, Adrian; van Vianen, Annelies E M; Hoffmann, Kristina; Fischer, Joachim E; Bosch, Jos A

    2015-06-01

    Organizational justice refers to perceived fairness at the workplace. Low organizational justice has been identified as a major source of distress and a predictor of poor health. Impaired regulation of immunological and inflammatory pathways may, in part, underlie these health effects. The present study investigated the association of organizational justice with leukocyte glucocorticoid sensitivity in vivo. Organizational justice was assessed among 541 male factory workers (mean [standard deviation] age = 46 [9] years) by questionnaire. Cortisol release was measured at three time points before blood collection and summed as the area under the curve. Blood was used to assess leukocyte (white blood cell [WBC] count) subsets (neutrophils [%WBC], lymphocytes [%WBC], and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio). Glucocorticoid sensitivity was operationalized as the correlation between cortisol release and these hematologic parameters. Associations were adjusted for demographics, work characteristics, and life-style variables. A dose-response relationship between organizational justice and glucocorticoid sensitivity was found. Cortisol and hematologic parameters showed the expected significant association among individuals reporting high (all β values ≥ |.26|; all p values ≤.001) or medium organizational justice (all β values ≥ |.15|; all p values ≤.050), but not among those reporting low organizational justice (all β values ≤ |.04|; all p values > .10). These regression slopes differed significantly between organizational justice groups (p values for interaction < .050). Low justice at work is associated with an impaired ability of endogenous cortisol to regulate leukocyte distribution in vivo. These findings identify a novel biological pathway by which organizational justice may affect health.

  6. Sunburn, sun exposure, and sun sensitivity in the Study of Nevi in Children.

    PubMed

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Oliveria, Susan A; Arora, Arshi; Marchetti, Michael A; Orlow, Irene; Dusza, Stephen W; Weinstock, Martin A; Scope, Alon; Geller, Alan C; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-11-01

    To examine the joint effect of sun exposure and sunburn on nevus counts (on the natural logarithm scale; log nevi) and the role of sun sensitivity. We describe an analysis of cross-sectional data from 443 children enrolled in the prospective Study of Nevi in Children. To evaluate the joint effect, we partitioned the sum of squares because of interaction between sunburn and sun exposure into orthogonal components representing (1) monotonic increase in log nevi with increasing sun exposure (rate of increase of log nevi depends on sunburn), and (2) nonmonotonic pattern. In unadjusted analyses, there was a marginally significant monotonic pattern of interaction (P = .08). In adjusted analyses, sun exposure was associated with higher log nevi among those without sunburn (P < .001), but not among those with sunburn (P = .14). Sunburn was independently associated with log nevi (P = .02), even though sun sensitivity explained 29% (95% confidence interval: 2%-56%, P = .04) of its effect. Children with high sun sensitivity and sunburn had more nevi, regardless of sun exposure. A program of increasing sun protection in early childhood as a strategy for reducing nevi, when applied to the general population, may not equally benefit everyone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative study on sensitivity of higher plants and fish to heavy fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskiene, N; Svecevicius, G; Vosyliene, M Z; Marciulioniene, D; Montvydiene, D

    2004-08-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on higher plants [garden cress (Lepidium sativum), great duckweed (Spirodela polyrrhiza), and Tradescantia clone BNL 02] and fish [rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at all stages of development: eggs, larvae and adults] to estimate their sensitivity to heavy fuel oil (HFO). A number of biological indices (survival, growth, and physiological and morphological parameters) as well as the genotoxic impact (Tradescantia) of HFO was evaluated by acute and chronic toxicity tests. Fish were found to be more sensitive to the toxic effect of HFO than were higher plants. EC(50) values obtained for higher plants ranged from 8.7 g/L (L. sativum) to 19.8 g/L (Tradescantia), and maximum-acceptable-toxicant concentration (MATC) values ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 g/L of total HFO for L. sativum and Tradescantia, respectively. The 96-h LC(50) values ranged from 0.33 g/L, for larvae, to 2.97 g/L, for adult fish, and the MATC value for fish was found to be equal to 0.0042 g/L of total HFO. To evaluate and predict the ecological risk of the overall effects of oil spills, studies should be performed using a set of acute and chronic bioassays that include test species of different phylogenetic levels with the most sensitive morphological, physiological, and genotoxic indices. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Developmental effects of decision-making on sensitivity to reward: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Jarcho, Johanna M; Benson, Brenda E; Plate, Rista C; Guyer, Amanda E; Detloff, Allison M; Pine, Daniel S; Leibenluft, Ellen; Ernst, Monique

    2012-10-01

    Studies comparing neural correlates of reward processing across development yield inconsistent findings. This challenges theories characterizing adolescents as globally hypo- or hypersensitive to rewards. Developmental differences in reward sensitivity may fluctuate based on reward magnitude, and on whether rewards require decision-making. We examined whether these factors modulate developmental differences in neural response during reward anticipation and/or receipt in 26 adolescents (14.05±2.37 yrs) and 26 adults (31.25±8.23 yrs). Brain activity was assessed with fMRI during reward anticipation, when subjects made responses with-vs.-without decision-making, to obtain large-vs.-small rewards, and during reward receipt. When reward-receipt required decision-making, neural activity did not differ by age. However, when reward receipt did not require decision-making, neural activity varied by development, reward magnitude, and stage of the reward task. During anticipation, adolescents, but not adults, exhibited greater activity in the insula, extending into putamen, and cingulate gyrus for large-vs.-small incentives. During feedback, adults, but not adolescents, exhibited greater activity in the precuneus for large-vs.-small incentives. These data indicate that age-related differences in reward sensitivity cannot be characterized by global hypo- or hyper-responsivity. Instead, neural responding in striatum, prefrontal cortex and precuneus is influenced by both situational demands and developmental factors. This suggests nuanced maturational effects in adolescent reward sensitivity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Inter- and intraspecies chemical sensitivity: a case study using 2,4-dinitroanisole.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan J; Laird, Jennifer G; Lounds, Chris; Gong, Ping; Barker, Natalie D; Brasfield, Sandra M; Russell, Amber L; Johnson, Mark S

    2015-02-01

    Insensitive munitions offer increased safety because of their "insensitivity" to unintended detonation relative to historically used formulations such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Dinitroanisole (DNAN) is an insensitive munition constituent, and its solubility and stability warrant investigations of potential toxicological hazard related to manufacturing discharges and training ranges. Although ecotoxicology data are available for other insensitive munition constituents, few data are available for DNAN. In the present study, acute and chronic exposures of a fish (Pimephales promelas) and 2 cladocerans (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia pulex) were conducted. The 50% lethal concentration (LC50) values of DNAN ranged from 14.2 mg/L to 42.0 mg/L, depending on species. In chronic exposures, fish survival (LC50 = 10.0 mg/L) was more sensitive than cladoceran survival (LC50 = 13.7 to >24.2 mg/L). However, cladoceran reproduction was equally or more sensitive to DNAN (50% inhibition values 2.7-10.6 mg/L, depending on species) than fish endpoints. Daphnia pulex was the most sensitive species, with only slight differences between the 3 populations tested. Although the aquatic toxicity of DNAN was lower than previously reported in the literature for TNT, future research is needed to determine the potential synergistic toxicity of all the constituents in insensitive munition mixtures and the implications of photo-oxidation. © 2014 SETAC.

  10. [Sensitivity of the anal canal: study techniques and results in normal subjects].

    PubMed

    Solana Bueno, A; Roig Vila, J V; Villoslada Prieto, C; Segarra Gomar, D; Ramirez Muñoz, D; Hinojosa del Val, J; Lledó Matoses, S

    1995-04-01

    To describe a technique for the study of the anal canal sensitivity to electric and thermal stimulation, and to investigate it prospectively in normal subjects. Mucosal electrosensitivity and thermal sensation of the anal canal is correlated with motor parameters: perineometry, manometry and electrophysiology. 41 control subjects (20M & 21F) with normal anorectal anatomophysiology. In the middle anal canal minimum electrosensibility thresholds were present, and they were similar to the thermal profile. A significant impairment in electrosensitivity was observed as a function of age, but no differences between the sexes were found. Lower thresholds were obtained than cold temperatures (p < 0.001). Both tests of sensitivity correlated with pudendal motor parameters. The maximal thermal difference in the anal canal was 0.28 degree C, while the minimal detectable temperature change was 0.46 +/- 0.1 degrees C. The sensitivity of the anal canal is greatest in the zone of the anal valves and better in response to hot than cold stimulus. As the minimum detectable temperature change has been greater than the difference of temperature between the low and high anal canal, we suggest that discrimination is not possible on the basis of thermal differences.

  11. SUNBURN, SUN EXPOSURE, AND SUN SENSITIVITY IN THE STUDY OF NEVI IN CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Oliveria, Susan A; Arora, Arshi; Marchetti, Michael A; Orlow, Irene; Dusza, Stephen W; Weinstock, Martin A; Scope, Alon; Geller, Alan C; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Halpern, Allan C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the joint effect of sun exposure and sunburn on nevus counts (on the natural logarithm scale; log nevi) and the role of sun sensitivity. Methods We describe an analysis of cross-sectional data from 443 children enrolled in the prospective study of nevi in children. To evaluate the joint effect, we partitioned the sum of squares due to interaction between sunburn and sun exposure into orthogonal components representing: (i) monotonic increase in log nevi with increasing sun exposure (rate of increase of log nevi depends upon sunburn), and (ii) non-monotonic pattern. Results In unadjusted analyses, there was a marginally significant monotonic pattern of interaction (p-value = 0.08). In adjusted analyses, sun exposure was associated with higher log nevi among those without sunburn (p < 0.001), but not among those with sunburn (p = 0.14). Sunburn was independently associated with log nevi (p = 0.02), even though sun sensitivity explained 29% (95% CI: 2%-56%, p = 0.04) of its effect. Children with high sun sensitivity and sunburn had more nevi, regardless of sun exposure. Conclusions A program of increasing sun protection in early childhood as a strategy for reducing nevi, when applied to the general population, may not equally benefit everyone. PMID:26096189

  12. A magnetotelluric study of the sensitivity of an area to seismoelectric signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balasis, G.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2005-01-01

    During recent years, efforts at better understanding the physical properties of precursory ultra-low frequency pre-seismic electric signals (SES) have been intensified. Experiments show that SES cannot be observed at all points of the Earth's surface but only at certain so-called sensitive sites. Moreover, a sensitive site is capable of collecting SES from only a restricted number of seismic areas (selectivity effect). Tberefore the installation of a permanent station appropriate for SES collection should necessarily be preceded by a pilot study over a broad area and for a long duration. In short, a number of temporary stations are installed and, after the occurrence of several significant earthquakes (EQs) from a given seismic area, the most appropriate (if any) of these temporary stations, in the sense that they happen to collect SES, can be selected as permanent. Such a long experiment constitutes a serious disadvantage in identifying a site as SES sensitive. However, the SES sensitivity of a site should be related to the geoelectric structure of the area that hosts the site as well as the regional geoelectric structure between the station and the seismic focal area. Thus, knowledge of the local and regional geoelectric structure can dramatically reduce the time involved in identifying SES sites. hi this paper the magnetotelluric method is used to investigate the conductivity structure of an area where a permanent SES station is in operation. Although general conclusions cannot be drawn, the area surrounding an SES site near Ioannina, Greece is characterized by: (1) major faults in the vicinity; (2) highly resistive structure flanked by abrupt conductivity contrasts associated with large-scale geologic contacts, and (3) local inhomogeneities in conductivity structure. The above results are consistent with the fact that electric field amplitudes from remotely-generated signals should be appreciably stronger at such sites when compared to neighboring sites

  13. Eczema and sensitization to common allergens in the United States: a multiethnic, population-based study.

    PubMed

    Fu, Teresa; Keiser, Elizabeth; Linos, Eleni; Rotatori, Robert M; Sainani, Kristin; Lingala, Bharathi; Lane, Alfred T; Schneider, Lynda; Tang, Jean Y

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between food and environmental allergens in contributing to eczema risk is unclear on a multiethnic population level. Our purpose was to determine whether sensitization to specific dietary and environmental allergens as measured according to higher specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels is associated with eczema risk in children. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants ages 1 to 17 years were asked whether they had ever received a diagnosis of eczema from a physician (n = 538). Total and specific serum IgE levels for four dietary allergens (egg, cow's milk, peanut, and shrimp) and five environmental allergens (dust mite, cat, dog, Aspergillus, and Alternaria) were measured. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between eczema and IgE levels. In the United States, 10.4 million children (15.6%) have a history of eczema. Eczema was more common in black children (p < 0.001) and in children from families with higher income and education (p = 0.01). The median total IgE levels were higher in children with a history of eczema than in those without (66.4 vs 50.6 kU/L, p = 0.004). In multivariate analysis adjusted for age, race, sex, family income, household education, and physician-diagnosed asthma, eczema was significantly associated with sensitization to cat dander (odds ratio [OR] = 1.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 1.4, p = 0.009) and dog dander (OR = 1.5, 95% CI, 1.2, 1.7, p < 0.001). After correction for multiple comparisons, only sensitization to dog dander remained significant. U.S. children with eczema are most likely to be sensitized to dog dander. Future prospective studies should further explore this relationship.

  14. Pushing boundaries-culture-sensitive care in oncology and palliative care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Schrank, Beate; Rumpold, Tamara; Amering, Michaela; Masel, Eva Katharina; Watzke, Herbert; Schur, Sophie

    2017-06-01

    In increasingly globalized societies, patient-centered cancer care requires culture-sensitive approaches in order to ensure patients well-being. While migrant patients' needs are frequently reported in the literature, staff members' perception of work with migrant patients, associated challenges, or individual work approaches are largely unknown. This study addresses this research gap through qualitative exploration of experiences of multicultural health care professionals in supportive oncology and palliative care, working with patients from different cultural backgrounds. This study aims to understand staff experience of the impact of culture on cancer care. This study was conducted at the Medical University of Vienna, including staff from different settings of oncology and palliative care, in different professional positions, and with a range of individual migration backgrounds. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 21 staff members working with patients from different cultural backgrounds. Interviews explored views on the impact of culture on care were audio-taped, transcribed, and analyzed using a rigorous method of thematic analysis, enhanced with grounded theory techniques. Interviews revealed 4 key topics: culture-specific differences, assumed reasons for differences, consequences of multicultural care, and tools for culture-sensitive care. Strategies to better deal with migrant patients and their families were suggested to improve work satisfaction amongst staff. This study identifies relevant staff challenges in work with migrant patients. Concrete suggestions for improvement include measures on an organizational level, team level, and personal tools. The suggested measures are applicable to improve work satisfaction and culture-sensitive care not only in cancer care but also in other areas of medicine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. 20th century precipitation changes in the Sahel region: sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Baumgartner, D.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    The 20th century has seen an enormous growth in population and industrialization. These changes are accompanied, among others, by a substantial increase in aerosol emission. To learn more about associated consequences for the climate system we have carried out a comparatively large set of transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM, using aerosol emission data from NIES (National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan) and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center. The sensitivity studies cover the period from 1870 to 2005 and comprise ensembles of simulations (up to 13 members per ensemble), which allow to address the role of different aerosol species, greenhouse gases, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. We present a preliminary analysis of these global simulation data for the Sahel region (land within 20W / 35E / 10N / 20N). The annual cycle as well as the overall temporal evolution of precipitation in the Sahel according to CRU (Climate Research Unit, UK) is captured well by the model simulations: two comparatively wet phases in the 1930s and 1950s, a more or less continuous decline thereafter, and a renewed increase in precipitation since the 1980s. This decline / renewed incline since the 1950s is, however, about twice as strong in the CRU data than in the model data. The sensitivity studies reveal SSTs as a prominent factor for the time evolution of precipitation, while the atmosphere only effect of aerosols plays a minor role for the modeled precipitation. The observation based prescribed SSTs may, however, encapsulate and aerosol effect already.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Study of the Modified Stumvoll Insulin Sensitivity Index Identifies BCL2 and FAM19A2 as Novel Insulin Sensitivity Loci.

    PubMed

    Walford, Geoffrey A; Gustafsson, Stefan; Rybin, Denis; Stančáková, Alena; Chen, Han; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hong, Jaeyoung; Jensen, Richard A; Rice, Ken; Morris, Andrew P; Mägi, Reedik; Tönjes, Anke; Prokopenko, Inga; Kleber, Marcus E; Delgado, Graciela; Silbernagel, Günther; Jackson, Anne U; Appel, Emil V; Grarup, Niels; Lewis, Joshua P; Montasser, May E; Landenvall, Claes; Staiger, Harald; Luan, Jian'an; Frayling, Timothy M; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Morcillo, Sonsoles; Martínez-Larrad, María Teresa; Biggs, Mary L; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Corbaton-Anchuelo, Arturo; Færch, Kristine; Gómez-Zumaquero, Juan Miguel; Goodarzi, Mark O; Kizer, Jorge R; Koistinen, Heikki A; Leong, Aaron; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Machicao, Fausto; Manning, Alisa K; Martín-Núñez, Gracia María; Rojo-Martínez, Gemma; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David S; Zmuda, Joseph M; Zhang, Zhongyang; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Smith, Ulf; Soriguer, Federico; Hansen, Torben; Jørgensen, Torben J; Linnenberg, Allan; Pedersen, Oluf; Walker, Mark; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert A; Wareham, Nicholas J; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Stefan, Norbert; Groop, Leif; O'Connell, Jeff R; Boehnke, Michael; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Mohlke, Karen L; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; März, Winfried; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Psaty, Bruce M; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée; Ingelsson, Erik; Florez, Jose C

    2016-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found few common variants that influence fasting measures of insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a GWAS of an integrated assessment of fasting and dynamic measures of insulin sensitivity would detect novel common variants. We performed a GWAS of the modified Stumvoll Insulin Sensitivity Index (ISI) within the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-Related Traits Consortium. Discovery for genetic association was performed in 16,753 individuals, and replication was attempted for the 23 most significant novel loci in 13,354 independent individuals. Association with ISI was tested in models adjusted for age, sex, and BMI and in a model analyzing the combined influence of the genotype effect adjusted for BMI and the interaction effect between the genotype and BMI on ISI (model 3). In model 3, three variants reached genome-wide significance: rs13422522 (NYAP2; P = 8.87 × 10(-11)), rs12454712 (BCL2; P = 2.7 × 10(-8)), and rs10506418 (FAM19A2; P = 1.9 × 10(-8)). The association at NYAP2 was eliminated by conditioning on the known IRS1 insulin sensitivity locus; the BCL2 and FAM19A2 associations were independent of known cardiometabolic loci. In conclusion, we identified two novel loci and replicated known variants associated with insulin sensitivity. Further studies are needed to clarify the causal variant and function at the BCL2 and FAM19A2 loci. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. Decreased pain sensitivity among people with schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of experimental pain induction studies.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, Brendon; Thompson, Trevor; Acaster, Sarah; Vancampfort, Davy; Gaughran, Fiona; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-11-01

    Patients with schizophrenia report reduced pain sensitivity in clinical studies, but experimental studies are required to establish pain sensitivity as a potential endophenotype. We conducted a systematic review of electronic databases from database inception until April 15, 2015, including experimental studies investigating pain among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder vs healthy controls. A random-effect meta-analysis yielding Hedges' g ±95% confidence intervals (CIs) as the effect size (ES) measure was conducted. Primary outcome was a pooled composite of pain threshold and pain tolerance; secondary outcomes included these parameters individually, plus sensory threshold, physiological pain response, and pain intensity or unpleasantness. Across 17 studies, patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder (n = 387; age, 30.7 ± 6.9 years; females, 31.9%; illness duration, 7.0 ± 5.7 years) were compared with controls (n = 483; age, 29.5 ± 7.4 years; females, 31.0%). Patients had elevated pain threshold/pain tolerance vs controls (ES = 0.583; 95% CI, 0.212-0.954; P = 0.002; studies = 15). Results were similar in antipsychotic-free individuals (ES = 0.599; 95% CI, 0.291-0.907; P < 0.0001; studies = 8), with trend-level significance in antipsychotic-treated individuals (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, -0.007 to 1.125; P = 0.047; studies = 9). Likewise, patients with schizophrenia had increased pain tolerance (ES = 0.566; 95% CI, 0.235-0.897; P = 0.0001; studies = 6), sensory threshold (ES = 1.16; 95% CI, 0.505-1.727; P < 0.0001; studies = 5), and pain threshold (ES = 0.696; 95% CI, 0.407-0.986; P < 0.001; studies = 9), as well as reduced physiological response to noxious stimuli (ES = 0.456; 95% CI, 0.131-0.783; P = 0.006) and pain intensity/unpleasantness ratings (ES = 0.547; 95% CI, 0.146-0.949; P = 0.008). Findings were similarly significant in antipsychotic-free patients with schizophrenia (analysable parameters = 4) and antipsychotic-treated individuals (analysable

  18. Developing an injectable formula containing an oxygen-sensitive drug: a case study of danofloxacin injectable.

    PubMed

    Kasraian, K; Kuzniar, A A; Wilson, G G; Wood, J A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of impurities in formulation components, antioxidants, formulation pH, and processing/packaging on the extent of color change associated with oxidation of danofloxacin injectable. The methods used in this study include reversed-phase HPLC, UV-VIS spectrophotometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, visual observation, and iodimetric titration for quantification of the antioxidant. The results from this study revealed that trace impurities from two different excipients significantly contributed to color change associated with oxidation. Polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) introduced trace levels of peroxides into the solution. A second excipient also had a significant impact on stability because it introduced trace metal impurities into the product. The minimization of oxygen levels alone in the solution and headspace was not sufficient to completely eliminate the product instability. The addition of an antioxidant, monothioglycerol (MTG), resulted in a formulation less sensitive to processing variables. The impact of pH on the performance of MTG was also studied. At pH 7.5, MTG resulted in significant improvement in stability; however, at pH 6.0 it was not effective as an antioxidant. Process modifications alone may not be sufficient to prevent oxidation. Chemical approaches, such as pH control, addition of an antioxidant, and control of components should be considered first as means of enhancing stability of oxygen-sensitive solutions.

  19. Parametric Sensitivity Study of Operating and Design Variables in Wellbore Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, G.; Shook, G.M.; Mines, G.L.; Bloomfield, K.K.

    2004-05-01

    This report documents the results of an extensive sensitivity study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This study investigated the effects of various operating and design parameters on wellbore heat exchanger performance to determine conditions for optimal thermal energy extraction and evaluate the potential for using a wellbore heat exchanger model for power generation. Variables studied included operational parameters such as circulation rates, wellbore geometries and working fluid properties, and regional properties including basal heat flux and formation rock type. Energy extraction is strongly affected by fluid residence time, heat transfer contact area, and formation thermal properties. Water appears to be the most appropriate working fluid. Aside from minimal tubing insulation, tubing properties are second order effects. On the basis of the sensitivity study, a best case model was simulated and the results compared against existing low-temperature power generation plants. Even assuming ideal work conversion to electric power, a wellbore heat exchange model cannot generate 200 kW (682.4e+3 BTU/h) at the onset of pseudosteady state. Using realistic conversion efficiency, the method is unlikely to generate 50 kW (170.6e+3 BTU/h).

  20. Local and Nonlocal Impacts of Soil Moisture Initialization on AGCM Seasonal Forecasts: A Model Sensitivity Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Frederiksen, C. S.

    2003-07-01

    Using a version of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (BMRC) atmospheric general circulation model, this study investigates the model's sensitivity to different soil moisture initial conditions in its dynamically extended seasonal forecasts of June-August 1998 climate anomalies, with focus on the south and northeast China regions where severe floods occurred. The authors' primary aim is to understand the model's responses to different soil moisture initial conditions in terms of the physical and dynamical processes involved. Due to a lack of observed global soil moisture data, the efficacy of using soil moisture anomalies derived from the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis is assessed. Results show that by imposing soil moisture percentile anomalies derived from the reanalysis data into the BMRC model initial condition, the regional features of the model's simulation of seasonal precipitation and temperature anomalies are modulated. Further analyses reveal that the impacts of soil moisture conditions on the model's surface temperature forecasts are mainly from localized interactions between land surface and the overlying atmosphere. In contrast, the model's sensitivity in its forecasts of rainfall anomalies is mainly due to the nonlocal impacts of the soil moisture conditions. Over the monsoon-dominated east Asian region, the contribution from local water recycling, through surface evaporation, to the model simulation of precipitation is limited. Rather, it is the horizontal moisture transport by the regional atmospheric circulation that is the dominant factor in controlling the model rainfall. The influence of different soil moisture conditions on the model forecasts of rainfall anomalies is the result of the response of regional circulation to the anomalous soil moisture condition imposed. Results from the BMRC model sensitivity study support similar findings from other model studies that have appeared in recent years and emphasize the importance of improving

  1. [Sensitivity to change of questionnaires measuring subjective health--results of a prospective comparative study].

    PubMed

    Igl, W; Zwingmann, C; Faller, H

    2006-08-01

    Questionnaires measuring patients' subjective health or health-related quality of life are indispensable tools for the evaluation of effects revealed by intervention studies in the field of medical rehabilitation. These patient-reported outcomes should appropriately reflect change over time. Unfortunately, "sensitivity to change" has so far not been adequately examined for German health-related quality of life questionnaires, especially not in a comparative way. Therefore, indices of sensitivity to change for three widespread generic assessment tools have been determined: IRES-3, SF-36, scales of the SCL-90-R. A prospective comparative study was conducted in n = 1145 inpatients with orthopaedic/rheumatologic and cardiac diseases from 16 rehabilitation clinics. All patients received usual care. Their subjective health-status was assessed at two to four weeks before admission (t0), admission (t1), discharge (t2), and three months after discharge (t3). At each time point, they completed the IRES-3, SF-36, and relevant scales of the SCL-90-R. For the time interval t1-t2, Guyatt's responsiveness index (GRI) was calculated and compared across scales and instruments. Virtually all GRI coefficients for scales and aggregated scores, respectively, reached statistical significance. With respect to the GRI distributions of the diagnostic groups, most coefficients were located in a middle to upper range. While the results for the scales do not clearly indicate which assessment instrument should be preferred, GRI coefficients for higher aggregated scores suggest the IRES-3 to be most sensitive to change. These results can be helpful in selecting a health-related quality of life instrument or certain subscales for evaluation studies in the field of medical rehabilitation.

  2. Primary care patient willingness for genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The current research into single nucleotide polymorphisms has extended the role of genetic testing to the identification of increased risk for common medical conditions. Advances in genetic research may soon necessitate preparation for the role of genetic testing in primary care medicine. This study attempts to determine what proportion of patients would be willing to undergo genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension in a primary care setting, and what factors are related to this willingness. Methods A cross-sectional study using a self-report questionnaire was conducted among outpatients in primary care clinics and hospitals in Japan. The main characteristics measured were education level, family medical history, personal medical history, concern about hypertension, salt preference, reducing salt intake, and willingness to undergo genetic testing for salt-sensitive hypertension. Results Of 1,932 potential participants, 1,457 (75%) responded to the survey. Of the respondents, 726 (50%) indicated a willingness to undergo genetic testing. Factors related to this willingness were being over 50 years old (adjusted odds ratio [ad-OR] = 1.42, 95% Confidence interval = 1.09 – 1.85), having a high level of education (ad-OR: 1.83, 1.38 – 2.42), having a family history of hypertension (ad-OR: 1.36, 1.09 – 1.71), and worrying about hypertension (ad-OR: 2.06, 1.59 – 2.68). Conclusions Half of the primary care outpatients surveyed in this study wanted to know their genetic risk for salt-sensitive hypertension. Those who were worried about hypertension or had a family history of hypertension were more likely to be interested in getting tested. These findings suggest that primary care physicians should provide patients with advice on genetic testing, as well as address their anxieties and concerns related to developing hypertension. PMID:24103405

  3. Study of the sensitivity of neonates to digoxin: contribution of erythrocyte /sup 86/Rb uptake test

    SciTech Connect

    Zannad, F.; Marchal, F.; Royer, R.J.; Vert, P.; Robert, J.

    1981-01-01

    In general, there is little agreement how digoxin should be used in newborn, and the results of studies in this field seem contradictory. This study attempts a quantitative assessment of the number and the sensitivity of cellular receptors for digoxin in the organism, by the in vitro measurement of erythrocyte /sup 86/Rb neonates compared with adults and old people. Red blood cells are first incubated with differing concentrations of digoxin, and then incubated with /sup 86/Rb. The initial level of /sup 86/Rb uptake (Rbi) is that observed in the absence of digoxin. The 50% index of captation (IC50) is the digoxin concentration in nanograms per ml at which /sup 86/Rb uptake is half Rbi. Three grups of patients were studied: Group I: 12 neonates, less that 5 days old; Group II: 11 adults (26 to 57 years old); Group III: 9 elderly people (71 to 82 years old). Rbi was significantly lower in neonates (Mean +/- SD: 25.8% +/- 3.5, P less than 0.001) and in the elderly (29.9% +/- 3.1) than in adults (36.8% +/- 4.6). IC50 was significantly lower in the elderly (12.1 mg/ml +/- 2.4) than in the adult patients (20.5 ng/ml +/- 5.5, P less than 0.001). In the newborns, values of IC50 were widely scattered (16.2 ng/ml +/- 7.2). The authors suggest that since Rbi reflects Na+, K+-ATPase activity, this activity is diminished in newborn and old people, and indicates that they have fewer cellular recaptors for digoxin than adults. In the elderly, the low IC50 would imply increased sensitivity to digoxin. In neonates, the wide range of values for IC50 suggests considerable individual variation in sensitivity to digoxin. The results aer consistent with the recently recomnended lower dosages of digoxin i neonates.

  4. Electrochemical detection of high-sensitivity CRP inside a microfluidic device by numerical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyudo; Park, Insu; Kwon, Kiwoon; Kwon, Taeyun; Seo, Jongbum; Chang, Woo-Jin; Nam, Hakhyun; Cha, Geun Sig; Choi, Moon Hee; Yoon, Dae Sung; Lee, Sang Woo

    2012-04-01

    The concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), a classic acute phase plasma protein, increases rapidly in response to tissue infection or inflammation, especially in cases of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Thus, highly sensitive monitoring of the CRP concentration plays a pivotal role in detecting these diseases. Many researchers have studied methods for the detection of CRP concentrations such as optical, mechanical, and electrochemical techniques inside microfluidic devices. While significant progress has been made towards improving the resolution and sensitivity of detection, only a few studies have systematically analyzed the CRP concentration using both numerical and experimental approaches. Specifically, systematic analyses of the electrochemical detection of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) inside a microfluidic device have never been conducted. In this paper, we systematically analyzed the electrochemical detection of CRP modified through the attachment of an alkaline phosphatase (ALP-labeled CRP) using ELISA inside a chip. For this analysis, we developed a model based on antigen-antibody binding kinetics theory for the numerical quantification of the CRP concentration. We also experimentally measured the current value corresponding to the ALP-labeled CRP concentration inside the microfluidic chip. The measured value closely matched the calculated value obtained by numerical simulation using the developed model. Through this comparison, we validated the numerical simulation methods, and the calculated and measured values. Lastly, we examined the effects of various microfluidic parameters on electrochemical detection of the ALP-labeled CRP concentration using numerical simulations. The results of these simulations provide insight into the microfluidic electrochemical reactions used for protein detection. Furthermore, the results described in this study should be useful for the design and optimization of

  5. Oxidation of Hg1-xCdxTe studied with surface sensitive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgen, P.; Silberman, J. A.; Lindau, I.; Spicer, W. E.; Wilson, J. A.

    1982-07-01

    We report the use of surface sensitive electron spectroscopies to monitor the initial steps of formation of a native oxide on atomically clean cleaved Hgl-xCdxTe single crystal surfaces in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Here the oxide is formed by oxygen excited by the presence of an operating ion gauge. During the reaction, the composition of the surface region of the substrate was found to change, with a net loss of Hg from the surface. Parallel studies of the compositions of thick anodic oxides using sputter profiling techniques showed only small amounts of Hg in the anodic oxides.

  6. Sensitive Method for Detection of Human Herpesviruses 6 and 7 in Saliva Collected in Field Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zerr, Danielle M.; Huang, Meei-Li; Corey, Lawrence; Erickson, Matthew; Parker, Heather L.; Frenkel, Lisa M.

    2000-01-01

    To facilitate studies of the epidemiology and natural history of human herpesviruses 6 and 7 in infants, a practical method for collecting and quantifying the DNA of these viruses was developed. Saliva was collected using small strips of filter paper, and virus was detected using a real-time quantitative fluorescent-probe PCR assay. The sensitivity and specificity of this method even after prolonged drying of the specimens compared favorably to those of our traditional method of collecting and assaying saliva. PMID:10790134

  7. URSULA2 computer program. Volume 2. Applications (sensitivity studies and demonstration calculations). Final report. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, L.W.; Marchland, E.O.; Singhal, A.K.; Spalding, D.B.

    1980-01-01

    The URSULA2 computer program has been developed for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of steam generators for PWR nuclear power plants. It computes three-dimensional distributions of velocity, pressure, enthalpy, etc., in the shell of the generator, and the distributions of primary-fluid temperature within the tubes. The code is applicable to both steady and unsteady flows and is equiped with three physical models: the equal velocity homogeneous model, a slip (or two-fluid) model, and an algebraic slip model. Applications, sensitivity studies, and demonstration calculations are presented.

  8. Performance Sensitivity Studies on the PIAA Implementation of the High-Contrast Imaging Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Lou, John; Shaklan, Stuart; Levine, Marie

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the sensitivity studies on the Phase-Induced Amplitude Apodization (PIAA), or pupil mapping using the High-Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). PIAA is a promising technique in high-dynamic range stellar coronagraph. This presentation reports on the investigation of the effects of the phase and rigid-body errors of various optics on the narrowband contrast performance of the PIAA/HCIT hybrid system. The results have shown that the 2-step wavefront control method utilizing 2-DMs is quite effective in compensating the effects of realistic phase and rigid-body errors of various optics

  9. Sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics, diabetics and normoglycemic controls: a comparative cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing prevalence of pre-diabetes is an emerging public health problem. Decrease in sweet taste sensitivity which can lead to an increase in sugar intake might be a factor driving them to overt diabetes. The aim of the present study was to assess the sweet taste sensitivity in pre-diabetics in comparison with diabetics and with normoglycemic controls. Methods Forty pre-diabetics, 40 diabetics and 34 normoglycemic controls were studied. The three groups were matched for age, sex and BMI. The division into groups was based on their glycated hemoglobin levels. The detection and recognition thresholds were determined by the multiple forced-choice method using sucrose solutions prepared in ¼ log dilutions. The intensities of perceived sensations for a series of suprathreshold concentrations of sucrose solutions prepared in ½ log dilution were determined by rating on a visual analogue scale. Statistical analyses were performed by SPSS version 21. Results The mean (SD) detection thresholds of diabetic, pre-diabetic and normoglycemic groups were 0.025 (0.01), 0.018 (0.01) and 0.015 (0.01) respectively with a significant increase in diabetic group compared to normoglycemic group (p = 0.03). The mean recognition thresholds were not different among the three groups. When the intensity ratings for suprathreshold concentrations of sucrose were compared between the three groups, for all suprathreshold concentrations tested, significant differences were observed across the four concentrations (p < 0.001) and between groups in suprathreshold ratings (p < 0.05). Further analysis showed that the diabetic group had significantly lower suprathreshold ratings than the normoglycemic group (p < 0.001). Although all mean suprathreshold intensity ratings of the pre-diabetic group were between the normoglycemic and diabetic groups, the differences were not significant. Conclusions This is the first study to demonstrate the sweet taste sensitivity in pre

  10. Mortar Interior Ballistics: Sensitivity Studies Using IBHVG2 and Progress Toward a Multidimensional Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    coefficient and exponent, covolume , and projectile weight) on the peak chamber pressure and projectile exit velocity. A sensitivity study on these...the percent change in the peak pressure of the main chamber as a function of a change in the propellant covolume for the 120-mm mortar (zones 0, 2...taken up by the gas molecules in the gas. The covolume becomes important at high (gun) pressures . 5 ’ fF R T , (1) where F is the force, R’ is

  11. Turbulence Model Sensitivity and Scour Gap Effect of Unsteady Flow around Pipe: A CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abbod; Sharma, R. K.; Ganesan, P.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed. PMID:25136666

  12. Tensiomyographic Markers Are Not Sensitive for Monitoring Muscle Fatigue in Elite Youth Athletes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Wiewelhove, Thimo; Raeder, Christian; de Paula Simola, Rauno Alvaro; Schneider, Christoph; Döweling, Alexander; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Tensiomyography (TMG) is an indirect measure of a muscle's contractile properties and has the potential as a technique for detecting exercise-induced skeletal muscle fatigue. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of tensiomyographic markers to identify reduced muscular performance in elite youth athletes. Methods: Fourteen male junior tennis players (age: 14.9 ± 1.2 years) with an international (International Tennis Federation) ranking position participated in this pre-post single group trial. They completed a 4-day high-intensity interval training (HIT) microcycle, which was composed of seven training sessions. TMG markers; countermovement jump (CMJ) performance (criterion measure of fatigue); delayed onset muscle soreness; and perceived recovery and stress were measured 24 h before and after the training program. The TMG measures included maximal radial deformation of the rectus femoris muscle belly (Dm), contraction time between 10 and 90% Dm (Tc) and the rate of deformation until 10% (V10) and 90% Dm (V90), respectively. Diagnostic characteristics were assessed with a receiver-operating curve (ROC) analysis and a contingency table, in which the area under the curve (AUC), Youden's index, sensitivity, specificity, and the diagnostic effectiveness (DE) of TMG measures were reported. A minimum AUC of 0.70 and a lower confidence interval (CI) >0.50 classified “good” diagnostic markers to assess performance changes. Results: Twenty-four hours after the microcycle, CMJ performance was observed to be significantly (p < 0.001) reduced (Effect Size [ES] = −0.68), and DOMS (ES = 3.62) as well as perceived stress were significantly (p < 0.001) increased. In contrast, Dm (ES = −0.35), Tc (ES = 0.04), V10 (ES = −0.32), and V90 (ES = −0.33) remained unchanged (p > 0.05) throughout the study. ROC analysis and the data derived from the contingency table revealed that none of the tensiomyographic markers were effective diagnostic

  13. Turbulence model sensitivity and scour gap effect of unsteady flow around pipe: a CFD study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abbod; Sharma, R K; Ganesan, P; Akib, Shatirah

    2014-01-01

    A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed.

  14. Sensitivity studies of 4D descent strategies in an advanced metering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izumi, K. H.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of utilizing various 4D airplane descent strategies in an advanced time-based metering environment was conducted. The three strategies considered were clean-idle Mach/CAS, constant flight path angle (CFPA) Mach/CAS, and fuel-optimal. Traffic inputs consisted of all combinatory pairs of three types of commercial turbojets (B737-300, B747-200, and B767-200) and two weight classes for each airplane type. Sensitivities of traffic throughput and fleet fuel to descent strategies, both among themselves and in combination, for different assigned meter fix times and traffic pairings were studied under controlled initial conditions.

  15. Building Cultural Sensitivity and Interprofessional Collaboration Through a Study Abroad Experience.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Irene; Attridge, Russell T; Attridge, Rebecca L; Maize, David F; McNeill, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Study abroad (SA) experiences for health professions students may be used to heighten cultural sensitivity to future patients and incorporate interprofessional education (IPE). Two groups of nursing and pharmacy students participated in an SA elective over a 2-year period, traveling to China and India. Both groups improved significantly in knowledge, awareness, and skills following the travel experiences. Student reflections indicate that the SA experience was transformative, changing their views of travel, other cultures, personal environment, collaboration with other health professionals, and themselves. Use of SA programs is a novel method to encourage IPE, with a focus on enhancing the acquisition of cultural competency skills. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Influence of personal characteristics of individual women on sensitivity and specificity of mammography in the Million Women Study: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Emily; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie; Bull, Diana; Crossley, Barbara; Simmonds, Moya; Hilton, Elizabeth; Bailey, Stephen; Barrett, Nigel; Briers, Peter; English, Ruth; Jackson, Alan; Kutt, Elizabeth; Lavelle, Janet; Rockall, Linda; Wallis, Matthew G; Wilson, Mary; Patnick, Julietta

    2004-01-01

    Objectives To examine how lifestyle, hormonal, and other factors influence the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Methods Women recruited into the Million Women Study completed a questionnaire about various personal factors before routine mammographic screening. A sample of 122 355 women aged 50-64 years were followed for outcome of screening and incident breast cancer in the next 12 months. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using standard definitions, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Results Breast cancer was diagnosed in 726 (0.6%) women, 629 in screen positive and 97 in screen negative women; 3885 (3.2%) were screen positive but had no subsequent diagnosis of breast cancer. Overall sensitivity was 86.6% and specificity was 96.8%. Three factors had an adverse effect on both measures: use of hormone replacement therapy (sensitivity: 83.0% (95% confidence interval 77.4% to 87.6%), 84.7% (73.9% to 91.6%), and 92.1% (87.6% to 95.0%); specificity: 96.8% (96.6% to 97.0%), 97.8% (97.5% to 98.0%), and 98.1% (98.0% to 98.2%), respectively, for current, past, and never use); previous breast surgery v no previous breast surgery (sensitivity: 83.5% (75.7% to 89.1%) v 89.4% (86.5% to 91.8%); specificity: 96.2% (95.8% to 96.5%) v 97.4% (97.3% to 97.5%), respectively); and body mass index < 25 v ≥ 25 (sensitivity: 85.7% (81.2% to 89.3%) v 91.0% (87.5% to 93.6%); specificity: 97.2% (97.0% to 97.3%) v 97.4% (97.3% to 97.6%), respectively). Neither sensitivity nor specificity varied significantly according to age, family history of breast cancer, parity, past oral contraceptive use, tubal ligation, physical activity, smoking, or alcohol consumption. Conclusions The efficiency, and possibly the effectiveness, of mammographic screening is lower in users of hormone replacement therapy, in women with previous breast surgery, and in thin women compared with other women. PMID:15331472

  17. Influence of personal characteristics of individual women on sensitivity and specificity of mammography in the Million Women Study: cohort study.

    PubMed

    Banks, Emily; Reeves, Gillian; Beral, Valerie; Bull, Diana; Crossley, Barbara; Simmonds, Moya; Hilton, Elizabeth; Bailey, Stephen; Barrett, Nigel; Briers, Peter; English, Ruth; Jackson, Alan; Kutt, Elizabeth; Lavelle, Janet; Rockall, Linda; Wallis, Matthew G; Wilson, Mary; Patnick, Julietta

    2004-08-28

    To examine how lifestyle, hormonal, and other factors influence the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Women recruited into the Million Women Study completed a questionnaire about various personal factors before routine mammographic screening. A sample of 122,355 women aged 50-64 years were followed for outcome of screening and incident breast cancer in the next 12 months. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by using standard definitions, with adjustment for potential confounding factors. Breast cancer was diagnosed in 726 (0.6%) women, 629 in screen positive and 97 in screen negative women; 3885 (3.2%) were screen positive but had no subsequent diagnosis of breast cancer. Overall sensitivity was 86.6% and specificity was 96.8%. Three factors had an adverse effect on both measures: use of hormone replacement therapy (sensitivity: 83.0% (95% confidence interval 77.4% to 87.6%), 84.7% (73.9% to 91.6%), and 92.1% (87.6% to 95.0%); specificity: 96.8% (96.6% to 97.0%), 97.8% (97.5% to 98.0%), and 98.1% (98.0% to 98.2%), respectively, for current, past, and never use); previous breast surgery v no previous breast surgery (sensitivity: 83.5% (75.7% to 89.1%) v 89.4% (86.5% to 91.8%); specificity: 96.2% (95.8% to 96.5%) v 97.4% (97.3% to 97.5%), respectively); and body mass index < 25 v > or = 25 (sensitivity: 85.7% (81.2% to 89.3%) v 91.0% (87.5% to 93.6%); specificity: 97.2% (97.0% to 97.3%) v 97.4% (97.3% to 97.6%), respectively). Neither sensitivity nor specificity varied significantly according to age, family history of breast cancer, parity, past oral contraceptive use, tubal ligation, physical activity, smoking, or alcohol consumption. The efficiency, and possibly the effectiveness, of mammographic screening is lower in users of hormone replacement therapy, in women with previous breast surgery, and in thin women compared with other women.

  18. Conditionally activating optical contrast agent with enhanced sensitivity via gold nanoparticle plasmon energy transfer: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Aih; Wang, Jianting

    2014-12-07

    Molecular sensing/imaging utilizing fluorophores has been one of the most frequently used techniques in biomedical research. As for any molecular imaging techniques, fluorescence mediated sensing always seeks for greater specificity and sensitivity. Since fluorophores emit fluorescence while their electron energy state changes, manipulating the local electromagnetic field around the fluorophores may be a way to enhance the specificity and sensitivity. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are known to form a very strong electromagnetic field on their surface [i.e., surface plasmon field (SPF)], upon receiving photonic energy. The level of fluorescence change by GNP-SPF may range from complete quenching to extensive enhancement, depending upon the SPF strength, excitation and emission wavelengths, and quantum yield of the fluorophore. Here, we report a novel design that utilizes BOTH fluorescence quenching and enhancement abilities of the GNP in one single nano-entity, providing high specificity and sensitivity. The construct utilizes a specially designed molecular dual-spacer that places the fluorphore at the location with an appropriate GNP-SFP strength before and after exposed to the biomarker. A model system to test the concept was an optical signal mediator activated by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA; breast cancer secreting enzyme). The resulting contrast agent shows less than 10% of the natural fluorescence but, in the presence of uPA, its fluorescence emission is triggered and emits its fluorescence approximately twice of the natural form. This study demonstrated that our novel design of an optical contrast agent can be conditionally activated with enhanced sensitivity, using both quenching and enhancement phenomena of fluorophores in the electromagnetic field of the appropriate strengths (in this case, locally generated by the GNP-SPF). This entity is similar to molecular beacon in terms of specificity but with greater sensitivity. In addition, it is not

  19. Sensitivity of left ventricular mechanics to myofiber architecture: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Nikou, Amir; Gorman, Robert C; Wenk, Jonathan F

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of computational models of the heart to their incorporated myofiber architecture during diastole. This architecture plays a critical role in the mechanical and electrical function of the heart and changes after myocardial tissue remodeling, which is associated with some of the most common heart diseases. In this study, a left ventricular finite element model of the porcine heart was created using magnetic resonance imaging, which represents the in vivo geometry. Various myofiber architectures were assigned to the finite element mesh, in the form of fiber and sheet angles. A structural-based material law was used to model the behavior of passive myocardium and its parameters were estimated using measured in vivo strains and cavity volume from magnetic resonance imaging. The final results showed noticeable sensitivity of the stress distribution to both the fiber and sheet angle distributions. This implies that a structural-based material law that takes into account the effect of both fiber and sheet angle distributions should be used. The results also show that although the simulation results improve using available data from histological studies of myocardial structure, the need for individualized myofiber architecture data is crucial.

  20. Comparative study of human neuronal and glial cell sensitivity for in vitro neurogenotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Laffon, Blanca; Fernández-Bertólez, Natalia; Costa, Carla; Pásaro, Eduardo; Valdiglesias, Vanessa

    2017-04-01

    Cell cultures from neuronal and glial origin have proven to be powerful tools for elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms of nervous system development and physiology, and as neurotoxicity models to evaluate in vitro the possible effects of chemicals. But cellular heterogeneity of nervous system is considerable and these cells have been shown to respond diversely to neurotoxic insults, leading to disparate results from different studies. To shed more light on suitability of cellular models of nervous origin for neurotoxicity screening, the objective of this study was to compare the sensitivity to genetic damage induction of two nervous cell lines. To this aim, neurons (SH-SY5Y) and glial (A172) cells were treated with differently-acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin, actinomycin-D, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, and griseofulvin). After discarding cytotoxicity, genotoxicity was evaluated by a battery of assays encompassing detection of different genetic lesions. Results obtained showed that glial cells are generally more resistant to genotoxic damage induced by clastogenic agents, but more sensitive to aneugenic effects. These results highlight the need of proper design of in vitro neurotoxicology studies, especially for neurogenotoxicity screening, emphasizing the importance of employing more than one nervous cell type for testing the potential toxicity of a particular exposure.

  1. Studies on sensitivity to tension and gating pathway of MscL by molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jun-Yu; Ding, Guang-Hong

    2013-04-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels play an important role in various physiological processes. Although the determination of the structure of mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) makes the simulation study possible, it has not so far been possible to directly simulate the gating mechanism of MscL in atomic detail. In this article, MscL has been studied via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to gain a detailed description of the sensitivity to lateral tension and the gating pathway. MscL undergoes conformational rearrangement in sustaining lateral tension, and the open state is obtained when 2.0MPa lateral tension is directly applied on the pure protein. During the opening process, Loop region responds to tension first, and the mechanical sensitivity is followed by S1 domain. Transmembrane (TM) bundle is the key position for channel opening, and the motion of TM1 helices finally realizes the significant expansion of the constricted gating pore. C-terminus domain presents expansion later during the TM opening. In our study, return of the whole protein to the initial closed state is achieved only in the early opening stage. During the relaxation from the open state, the TM helices are the most mobile domain, which is different from the opening process.

  2. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin.

  3. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  4. Five-factor personality traits and pain sensitivity: a twin study.

    PubMed

    Vassend, Olav; Røysamb, Espen; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2013-05-01

    Factors underlying individual differences in pain responding are incompletely understood, but are likely to include genetic influences on basal pain sensitivity in addition to demographic characteristics such as age, sex, and ethnicity, and psychological factors including personality. This study sought to explore the relationship between personality traits and experimental pain sensitivity, and to determine to what extent the covariances between these phenotypes are mediated by common genetic and environmental factors. A sample composed of 188 twins, aged 23 to 35years, was included in the study. Heat pain intensity (HPI) and cold-pressor pain intensity (CPI) ratings were obtained using standardized pain testing procedures, and personality traits were assessed with the NEO Personality Inventory, Revised. Associations between personality and the pain sensitivity indices were examined using zero-order correlations and generalized estimating equations. Bivariate Cholesky models were used in the biometric analyses. The most robust finding was a significant phenotypic association between CPI and the personality facets Impulsiveness (a facet of Neuroticism) and Excitement-Seeking (a facet of Extraversion), and estimates of the genetic correlation were .37 (P<.05) and .43 (P<.05), respectively. In contrast, associations between HPI and personality seemed weak and unstable, but a significant effect of Angry Hostility (a facet of Neuroticism) emerged in generalized estimating equations analysis. Although the genetic correlation between these phenotypes was essentially zero, a weak but significant individual-specific environmental correlation emerged (re=.21, P<.05). Taken together, these findings suggest that CPI is more consistently related to personality dispositions than HPI, both phenotypically and genetically.

  5. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of {sigma} = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with {sigma} = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  6. Contrast sensitivity evaluation with filter contact lenses in patients with retinitis pigmentosa: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Carracedo, Gonzalo; Carballo, Jesús; Loma, Elena; Felipe, Gema; Cacho, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this pilot study was to test whether retinitis pigmentosa patients would benefit from filter contact lenses as an effective optical aid against glare and photophobia. Methods Fifteen subjects with retinitis pigmentosa were enrolled in this study. All of them were evaluated with filter soft contact lenses (MaxSight), filter glasses (CPF 527) and without filters (control). All patients were assessed for the three aid conditions by means of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), contrast sensitivity (without glare and with central and peripheral glare)(CSV-1000) and a specific subjective questionnaire about quality of vision. Results BCVA was slightly better with filters than without filter but the differences were not statistically significant. Contrast sensitivity without glare improved significantly with the contact lenses (p < 0.05). The central glare had significant differences for the frequencies of 3 cpd and 18 cpd between the contact lens filter and the control group (p = 0.021 and p = 0.044, respectively). For the peripheral glare contrast sensitivity improved with contact lens versus control group for highest frequencies, 12 and 18 cpd (p < 0.001 and p = 0.045, respectively). According to the questionnaire the contact lens filter gave them more visual comfort than the glasses filter under the scenarios of indoors glare, outdoors activities and indoors comfort. Conclusion The filter contact lenses seem to be a good option to improve the quality of vision of patients with retinitis pigmentosa.

  7. Photo- and biophysical studies of lectin-conjugated fluorescent nanoparticles: reduced sensitivity in high density assays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaqi; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Basu, Amit; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2010-11-18

    Lectin-conjugated, fluorescent silica nanoparticles (fNP) have been developed for carbohydrate-based histopathology evaluations of epithelial tissue biopsies. The fNP platform was selected for its enhanced emissive brightness compared to direct dye labeling. Carbohydrate microarray studies were performed to compare the carbohydrate selectivity of the mannose-recognizing lectin Concanavalin A (ConA) before and after conjugation to fluorescent silica nanoparticles (ConA-fNP). These studies revealed surprisingly low emission intensities upon staining with ConA-fNP compared to those with biotin-ConA/Cy3-streptavidin staining. A series of photophysical and biophysical characterizations of the fNP and ConA-fNP conjugates were performed to probe the low sensitivity from fNP in the microarray assays. Up to 1200 fluorescein (FL) and 80 tetramethylrhodamine (TR) dye molecules were incorporated into 46 nm diameter fNP, yielding emissive brightness values 400 and 35 times larger than the individual dye molecules, respectively. ConA lectin conjugated to carboxylic acid surface-modified nanoparticles covers 15-30% of the fNP surface. The CD spectra and mannose substrate selectivity of ConA conjugated to the fNP differed slightly compared to that of soluble ConA. Although, the high emissive brightness of fNP enhances detection sensitivity for samples with low analyte densities, large fNP diameters limit fNP recruitment and binding to samples with high analyte densities. The high analyte density and nearly two-dimensional target format of carbohydrate microarrays make probe size a critical parameter. In this application, fNP labels afford minimal sensitivity advantage compared to direct dye labeling.

  8. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  9. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  10. From web search to healthcare utilization: privacy-sensitive studies from mobile data

    PubMed Central

    Horvitz, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Objective We explore relationships between health information seeking activities and engagement with healthcare professionals via a privacy-sensitive analysis of geo-tagged data from mobile devices. Materials and methods We analyze logs of mobile interaction data stripped of individually identifiable information and location data. The data analyzed consist of time-stamped search queries and distances to medical care centers. We examine search activity that precedes the observation of salient evidence of healthcare utilization (EHU) (ie, data suggesting that the searcher is using healthcare resources), in our case taken as queries occurring at or near medical facilities. Results We show that the time between symptom searches and observation of salient evidence of seeking healthcare utilization depends on the acuity of symptoms. We construct statistical models that make predictions of forthcoming EHU based on observations about the current search session, prior medical search activities, and prior EHU. The predictive accuracy of the models varies (65%–90%) depending on the features used and the timeframe of the analysis, which we explore via a sensitivity analysis. Discussion We provide a privacy-sensitive analysis that can be used to generate insights about the pursuit of health information and healthcare. The findings demonstrate how large-scale studies of mobile devices can provide insights on how concerns about symptomatology lead to the pursuit of professional care. Conclusion We present new methods for the analysis of mobile logs and describe a study that provides evidence about how people transition from mobile searches on symptoms and diseases to the pursuit of healthcare in the world. PMID:22661560

  11. A study of application sensitivity to variation in message passing latency and bandwidth

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.H.; Mackay, D.R.; Robinson, A.C.; Barragy, E.J.

    1996-06-01

    This study measures the effects of changes in message latency and bandwidth for production-level codes on a current generation tightly coupled MPP, the Intel Paragon. Messages are sent multiple times to study the application sensitivity to variations in band - width and latency. This method preserves the effects of contention on the interconnection network. Two applications are studied, PCTH, a shock physics code developed at Sandia National Laboratories, and PSTSWM, a spectral shallow water code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory. These codes are significant in that PCTH is a {open_quote}full physics{close_quotes} application code in production use, while PSTSWM serves as a parallel algorithm test bed and benchmark for production codes used in atmospheric modeling. They are also significant in that the message-passing behavior differs significantly between the two codes, each representing an important class of scientific message-passing applications.

  12. From maternal sensitivity in infancy to adult attachment representations: a longitudinal adoption study with secure base scripts.

    PubMed

    Schoenmaker, Christie; Juffer, Femmie; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Linting, Mariëlle; van der Voort, Anja; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether differences in adult attachment representations could be predicted from early and later maternal sensitivity, controlling for early and later assessments of attachment. In this longitudinal study on 190 adoptees, attachment at 23 years was measured with the Attachment Script Assessment. Maternal sensitivity was observed in infancy and at seven and 14 years. Attachment was also measured in infancy and at 14 years. Higher maternal sensitivity in infancy predicted more secure attachment in infancy and more secure attachment representations in young adulthood. Higher maternal sensitivity in middle childhood also predicted more secure attachment representations in young adulthood. There was no continuity of attachment from infancy to young adulthood, but attachment in adolescence and young adulthood were significantly related. Even in genetically unrelated families, maternal sensitivity in early and middle childhood predicts attachment representations in young adults, confirming the importance of sensitive parenting for human development.

  13. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  14. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  15. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  16. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  17. Mesoscale Assimilation of TMI Rainfall Data with 4DVAR: Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2003-01-01

    Sensitivity studies are performed on the assimilation of TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission) Microwave Imager (TMI) derived rainfall data into a mesoscale model using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) technique. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the impact of TMI rainfall data on the numerical simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998). The results indicate that rainfall data assimilation is sensitive to the error characteristics of the data and the inclusion of physics in the adjoint and forward models. In addition, assimilating the rainfall data alone is helpful for producing a more realistic eye and rain bands in the hurricane but does not ensure improvements in hurricane intensity forecasts. Further study indicated that it is necessary to incorporate TMI rainfall data together with other types of data such as wind data into the model, in which case the inclusion of the rainfall data further improves the intensity forecast of the hurricane. This implies that proper constraints may be needed for rainfall assimilation.

  18. Development of a sensitive mid-infrared spectrometer for the study of cooled molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael W.

    The study of molecular ions is relevant to many areas of scientific interest. Mid-infrared laser spectroscopy functions as a useful tool for understanding the role of molecular ions in these areas. To this end, a broadly tunable mid-infrared difference frequency generation noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) system has been developed and characterized through rovibrational spectroscopy of methane. In addition, an attempt was made to use this spectrometer to probe molecular ions focused into an ion beam. Challenges inherent to laboratory molecular ion spectroscopy, such as quantum dilution at high internal temperatures and low ion number density, have been addressed through the development of an instrument that produces rotationally cooled molecular ions coupled to the highly sensitive spectroscopic technique NICE-OHMS. The instrument was first explored as an extension of an ion beam spectrometer by the integration of a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source for the production of the cooled molecular ions. Issues with the implementation led to the re- design of the instrument for spectroscopically probing a supersonic expansion discharge directly with NICE-OHMS. After implementing discharge modulation of the supersonic expansion source, spectra of rotationally cooled H(3/+) and HN(+/2) were acquired. This instrumental development and preliminary spectroscopy has paved the way for a new method for the sensitive spectroscopic study of cooled molecular ions that will aid further insight into these chemical species in many fields.

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of subgingival bacteria in predicting preterm birth- a pilot cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Khalid S; El Tantawi, Maha M.; Alagl, Adel S; Alnimr, Amani M; Haseeb, Yasmeen A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preterm birth (PTB) increases the risk of adverse outcomes for new born infants. Subgingival bacteria are implicated in causing PTB. The aim of the present study was to assess the accuracy of some subgingival gram positive and gram negative bacteria detected by routine lab procedures in predicting PTB. Methodology Pregnant Saudi women (n= 170) visiting King Fahad hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia, were included in a pilot cohort study. Plaque was collected in the 2nd trimester and screened for subgingival anaerobes using Vitek2. Pregnancy outcome (preterm/full term birth) was assessed at delivery. Sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative likelihood ratios were calculated for the identified bacteria to predict PTB. Results Data about time of delivery was available for 94 subjects and 22 (23.4%) had PTB. Three gram negative and 4 gram positive subgingival bacteria had sensitivity ≥ 95% with two of each having negative likelihood ratios ≤0.10. Three gram positive bacteria had specificity > 95% with only one having positive likelihood ratio >2. Conclusion Subgingival bacteria identified using readily available lab techniques in the plaque of pregnant Saudi women in their 2nd trimester have useful potential to rule out PTB. PMID:27833518

  20. Model-based POD study of manual ultrasound inspection and sensitivity analysis using metamodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribay, Guillemette; Artusi, Xavier; Jenson, Frédéric; Reece, Christopher; Lhuillier, Pierre-Emile

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of NDE can be quantified by using the Probability of Detection (POD) approach. Former studies have shown the potential of the model-assisted POD (MAPOD) approach to replace expensive experimental determination of POD curves. In this paper, we make use of CIVA software to determine POD curves for a manual ultrasonic inspection of a heavy component, for which a whole experimental POD campaign was not available. The influential parameters were determined by expert analysis. The semi-analytical models used in CIVA for wave propagation and beam-defect interaction have been validated in the range of variation of the influential parameters by comparison with finite element modelling (Athena). The POD curves are computed for « hit/miss » and « â versus a » analysis. The verification of Berens hypothesis is evaluated by statistical tools. A sensitivity study is performed to measure the relative influence of parameters on the defect response amplitude variance, using the Sobol sensitivity index. A meta-model is also built to reduce computing cost and enhance the precision of estimated index.

  1. Effects of footwear on plantar foot sensitivity: a study with Formula 1 shoes.

    PubMed

    Schlee, Günther; Sterzing, Thorsten; Milani, Thomas L

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Formula 1 footwear on the ability of the plantar foot to detect vibration stimuli. Twenty-five male subjects participated in the study. Five foot/shoe conditions were analysed (barefoot and four shoe conditions). Vibration thresholds were measured at three anatomical locations of the plantar foot (heel, first metatarsal head and hallux) at two frequencies (30 and 200 Hz). The results show a frequency-dependent influence of footwear on foot sensitivity. The comparison between barefoot and shod conditions showed lower thresholds (P < 0.01) for the barefoot condition at 30 Hz, whereas lower thresholds (P < 0.01) were found for all shoe conditions at 200 Hz compared to barefoot. Lower thresholds (P < 0.01) were measured at 200 Hz in comparison to 30 Hz in all experimental conditions. The shoe outsole material seems to facilitate the transmission of high-frequent vibration stimuli to the skin, resulting in better vibration sensitivity at 200 Hz when wearing Formula 1 shoes compared to barefoot.

  2. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ)-(γ, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  3. Tackling EEG signal classification with least squares support vector machines: a sensitivity analysis study.

    PubMed

    Lima, Clodoaldo A M; Coelho, André L V; Eisencraft, Marcio

    2010-08-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) signal captures the electrical activity of the brain and is an important source of information for studying neurological disorders. The proper analysis of this biological signal plays an important role in the domain of brain-computer interface, which aims at the construction of communication channels between human brain and computers. In this paper, we investigate the application of least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) to the task of epilepsy diagnosis through automatic EEG signal classification. More specifically, we present a sensitivity analysis study by means of which the performance levels exhibited by standard and least squares SVM classifiers are contrasted, taking into account the setting of the kernel function and of its parameter value. Results of experiments conducted over different types of features extracted from a benchmark EEG signal dataset evidence that the sensitivity profiles of the kernel machines are qualitatively similar, both showing notable performance in terms of accuracy and generalization. In addition, the performance accomplished by optimally configured LS-SVM models is also quantitatively contrasted with that obtained by related approaches for the same dataset. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Study of influence of the fiber optic coatings parameters on optical acoustic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrov, V. S.; Kulikov, A. V.; Plotnikov, M. U.; Efimov, M. E.; Varzhel, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents the optical fiber acoustic sensitivity dependence on the coating parameters and the thickness of coating layer. A comparison of data obtained from the theoretical research and experimental estimates of real samples sensitivity in air and water.

  5. Red meat, dairy, and insulin sensitivity: a randomized crossover intervention study.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kirsty M; Keogh, Jennifer B; Clifton, Peter M

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked high consumption of red and processed meat with risk of developing type 2 diabetes, whereas high dairy consumption has been associated with decreased risk, but interventions have been limited. We compared the effects on insulin sensitivity of consuming a diet high in lean red meat with minimal dairy, a diet high in primarily low-fat dairy (from milk, yogurt, or custard) with no red meat, and a control diet that contained neither red meat nor dairy. A randomized crossover study was undertaken with 47 overweight and obese men and women divided into 2 groups as follows: those with normal glucose tolerance and those with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Participants followed the 3 weight-stable dietary interventions for 4 wk with glucose, insulin, and C-peptide measured by using oral-glucose-tolerance tests at the end of each diet. Fasting insulin was significantly higher after the dairy diet than after the red meat diet (P < 0.01) with no change in fasting glucose resulting in a decrease in insulin sensitivity after the high-dairy diet (P < 0.05) as assessed by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A significant interaction between diet and sex was observed such that, in women alone, HOMA-IR was significantly lower after the red meat diet than after the dairy diet (1.33 ± 0.8 compared with 1.71 ± 0.8, respectively; P < 0.01). Insulin sensitivity calculated by using the Matsuda method was 14.7% lower in women after the dairy diet than after the red meat diet (P < 0.01) with no difference between diets in men. C-peptide was not different between diets. In contrast to some epidemiologic findings, these results suggest that high consumption of dairy reduces insulin sensitivity compared with a diet high in lean red meat in overweight and obese subjects, some of whom had glucose intolerance. This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry as ACTRN

  6. Is Hiding Foot and Mouth Disease Sensitive Behavior for Farmers? A Survey Study in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Gunarathne, Anoma; Kubota, Satoko; Kumarawadu, Pradeep; Karunagoda, Kamal; Kon, Hiroichi

    2016-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has a long history in Sri Lanka and was found to be endemic in various parts of the country and constitutes a constant threat to farmers. In Sri Lanka, currently there is no regular, nationwide vaccination programme devised to control FMD. Therefore, improving farmers’ knowledge regarding distinguishing FMD from other diseases and ensuring prompt reporting of any suspicion of FMD as well as restricting movement of animals are critical activities for an effective FMD response effort. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between farmers’ knowledge levels and their behaviors to establish a strategy to control FMD. In our study, item count technique was applied to estimate the number of farmers that under-report and sell FMD-infected animals, although to do so is prohibited by law. The following findings were observed: about 63% of farmers have very poor knowledge of routes of FMD transmission; ‘under-reporting’ was found to be a sensitive behavior and nearly 23% of the farmers were reluctant to report FMD-infected animals; and ‘selling FMD-infected animals’ is a sensitive behavior among high-level knowledge group while it is a non-sensitive behavior among the low-level knowledge group. If farmers would understand the importance of prompt reporting, they may report any suspected cases of FMD to veterinary officials. However, even if farmers report honestly, they do not want to cull FMD-infected animals. Thus, education programs should be conducted not only on FMD introduction and transmission, but also its impact. Furthermore, consumers may criticize the farmers for culling their infected animals. Hence, not only farmers, but also consumers need to be educated on the economic impact of FMD and the importance of controlling an outbreak. If farmers have a high knowledge of FMD transmission, they consider selling FMD-infected animals as a sensitive behavior. Therefore, severe punishment should

  7. Liquid PEG Polymers Containing Antioxidants: A Versatile Platform for Studying Oxygen-Sensitive Photochemical Processes.

    PubMed

    Mongin, Cédric; Golden, Jessica H; Castellano, Felix N

    2016-09-14

    This article proposes the exploitation of widely available, inexpensive, innocuous "green" liquid polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers containing the oxygen scavenger oleic acid (OA) as promising media for studying oxygen-sensitive photochemical processes. Here we report the successful application of this media to detailed investigations of triplet-sensitized photochemical upconversion, previously established as being readily poisoned by dissolved oxygen. Three different PEG materials were investigated with increasing molecular weight from 200 to 600 g/mol, coded as PEG-200, PEG-400, and PEG-600. These fluidic polymers facilitate an oxygen-depleted environment in comparison to commonly employed organic solvents while providing high solubility and diffusion for the dissolved chromophores. Moreover, the low oxygen permeation afforded by these PEG solvents allows them to remain deoxygenated in open containers under ambient conditions for extended time periods. OA, 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA), and 2,5-dimethylfuran (DMF) are shown to efficiently and quantitatively consume dissolved oxygen in the PEG environment in the presence of the photoactivated triplet sensitizer platinum(II) tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin (PtTPBP). Oxygen consumption was directly correlated with systematically increasing sensitizer excited-state lifetimes that eventually reach the same plateau as achieved through extensive N2 sparging. Diffusion-controlled bimolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer quenching between PtTPBP and the acceptor/annihilator 9,10-bisphenylethynylanthracene (BPEA) was observed in all three PEG formulations investigated. Subsequent triplet-triplet annihilation, between triplet excited BPEA acceptors, achieves bright and stable upconverted singlet fluorescence from BPEA with no decrease in intensity over 20 h under ambient conditions. In the champion composition (PEG 200), the upconversion quantum efficiency reached 31% under conditions where triplet-triplet annihilation

  8. Radar sensitivity and antenna scan pattern study for a satellite-based Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling global atmospheric circulations and forecasting the weather would improve greatly if worldwide information on winds aloft were available. Recognition of this led to the inclusion of the LAser Wind Sounder (LAWS) system to measure Doppler shifts from aerosols in the planned for Earth Observation System (EOS). However, gaps will exist in LAWS coverage where heavy clouds are present. The RAdar Wind Sensor (RAWS) is an instrument that could fill these gaps by measuring Doppler shifts from clouds and rain. Previous studies conducted at the University of Kansas show RAWS as a feasible instrument. This thesis pertains to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sensitivity, transmit waveform, and limitations to the antenna scan pattern of the RAWS system. A dop-size distribution model is selected and applied to the radar range equation for the sensitivity analysis. Six frequencies are used in computing the SNR for several cloud types to determine the optimal transmit frequency. the results show the use of two frequencies, one higher (94 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) for better penetration in rain, provide ample SNR. The waveform design supports covariance estimation processing. This estimator eliminates the Doppler ambiguities compounded by the selection of such high transmit frequencies, while providing an estimate of the mean frequency. the unambiguous range and velocity computation shows them to be within acceptable limits. The design goal for the RAWS system is to limit the wind-speed error to less than 1 ms(exp -1). Due to linear dependence between vectors for a three-vector scan pattern, a reasonable wind-speed error is unattainable. Only the two-vector scan pattern falls within the wind-error limits for azimuth angles between 16 deg to 70 deg. However, this scan only allows two components of the wind to be determined. As a result, a technique is

  9. First-principles study of Carbz-PAHTDDT dye sensitizer and two Carbz-derived dyes for dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Narges; Wang, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Two new carbazole-based organic dye sensitizers are designed and investigated in silico. These dyes are designed through chemical modifications of the π-conjugated bridge of a reference organic sensitizer known as Carbz-PAHTDDT (S9) dye. The aim of designing these dyes was to reduce the energy gap between their highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and to red-shift their absorption response compared to those of the reference S9 dye sensitizer. This reference dye has a reported promising efficiency when coupled with ferrocene-based electrolyte composition. To investigate geometric and electronic structure, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations were conducted on the new dyes as well as the reference dye. The present study indicated that the long-range correction to the theoretical model in the TD-DFT simulation is important to produce accurate absorption wavelengths. The theoretical studies have shown a reduced HOMO-LUMO gap and red-shifted absorption spectra for both of the new candidate dyes. In particular, the new S9-D1 dye is found to have significant reduced HOMO-LUMO energy gap, greater push-pull character and higher wavelengths of absorption when compared to the reference dye. Such findings suggest that the new dyes are promising and suitable for optoelectronic applications.

  10. Sensitivity to Morphosyntactic Information in 3-Year-Old Children with Typical Language Development: A Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deevy, Patricia; Leonard, Laurence B.; Marchman, Virginia A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested the feasibility of a method designed to assess children's sensitivity to tense/agreement information in fronted auxiliaries during online comprehension of questions (e.g., "Are the nice little dogs running?"). We expected that a group of children who were proficient in auxiliary use would show this sensitivity,…

  11. Shyness-Sensitivity and Social, School, and Psychological Adjustment in Urban Chinese Children: A Four-Wave Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal contributions between shyness-sensitivity and social, school, and psychological adjustment in urban Chinese children. Longitudinal data were collected once a year from Grade 3 to Grade 6 (ages 9-12 years) for 1,171 children from multiple sources. Shyness-sensitivity positively contributed to social, school, and…

  12. Shyness-Sensitivity and Social, School, and Psychological Adjustment in Urban Chinese Children: A Four-Wave Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal contributions between shyness-sensitivity and social, school, and psychological adjustment in urban Chinese children. Longitudinal data were collected once a year from Grade 3 to Grade 6 (ages 9-12 years) for 1,171 children from multiple sources. Shyness-sensitivity positively contributed to social, school, and…

  13. Study of factors which influence the shock-initiation sensitivity of hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, A. C.

    1981-03-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study factors which influence the shock initiation sensitivity of hexanitrostilbene (HNS). The six factors evaluated were: (1) powder morphology, (2) sample density, (3) test temperature, (4) sample length, (5) diameter of the impacting flyer, and (6) duration of the input stimulus. In addition, the effect of pressure duration, tau, was assessed on the initiation sensitivity of an extrudable explosive (LX-13) and of hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB) for comparison with that of superfine hexanitrostilbene (HNS-SF). The impact stimulus was provided by a polyimide flyer 1.57 mm in diameter propelled by an electrically excited bursting foil. Flyer velocity determined impact pressure, P (3 to 20 GPa), and flyer thickness the shock duration, tau (0.010 to 0.150 ..mu..s), the pulse shape being rectangular. Powder morphology was the most significant factor to influence the initiation sensitivity of HNS; with 0.035-..mu..s pulses the smallest particle-sized HNS had a threshold pressure for initiation which was 50% of that required for the coarser HNS-II. Other factors which lowered the threshold pressure were: lower sample density, elevated test temperature, and larger diameter flyers. HNS-SF showed a shorter growth-to-detonation distance (GTDD) than HNS-I; the GTDD was 0.56 mm at an impact pressure of 7.3 GPa. Pulse duration affected the threshold pressure with each explosive behaving in its own characteristic manner; a P-tau characterization is essential, therefore, for all explosives of interest and should include values of tau which are equivalent to pulse durations expected in service.

  14. Reduced sensitizing capacity of epoxy resin systems: a structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Ida B; Broo, Kerstin; Jonsson, Charlotte; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2009-11-01

    Epoxy resins can be prepared from numerous chemical compositions. Until recently, alternatives to epoxy resins based on diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A (DGEBA) or bisphenol F (DGEBF) monomers have not received commercial interest, but are presently doing so, as epoxy resins with various properties are desired. Epoxy resin systems are known to cause allergic contact dermatitis because of contents of uncured monomers, reactive diluents, and hardeners. Reactive diluents, for example, glycidyl ethers, which also contain epoxide moieties, are added to reduce viscosity and improve polymerization. We have investigated the contact allergenic properties of a series of six analogues to phenyl glycidyl ether (PGE), all with similar basic structures but with varying carbon chain lengths and degrees of saturation. The chemical reactivity of the compounds in the test series toward the hexapeptide H-Pro-His-Cys-Lys-Arg-Met-OH was investigated. All epoxides were shown to bind covalently to both cysteine and proline residues. The percent depletion of nonreacted peptide was also studied resulting in 88% depletion when using PGE and 46% when using butyl glycidyl ether (5) at the same time point, thus revealing a large difference between the fastest and the slowest reacting epoxide. The skin sensitization potencies of the epoxides using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) were evaluated in relation to the observed physicochemical and reactivity properties. To enable determination of statistical significance between structurally closely related compounds, a nonpooled LLNA was performed. It was found that the compounds investigated ranged from strong to weak sensitizers, congruent with the reactivity data, indicating that even small changes in chemical structure result in significant differences in sensitizing capacity.

  15. A qualitative study on non-verbal sensitivity in nursing students.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2013-07-01

    To explore nursing students' perception of the meanings and roles of non-verbal communication and sensitivity. It also attempts to understand how different factors influence their non-verbal communication style. The importance of non-verbal communication in the health arena lies in the need for good communication for efficient healthcare delivery. Understanding nursing students' non-verbal communication with patients and the influential factors is essential to prepare them for field work in the future. Qualitative approach based on 16 in-depth interviews. Sixteen nursing students from the Master of Nursing and the Year 3 Bachelor of Nursing program were interviewed. Major points in the recorded interviews were marked down for content analysis. Three main themes were developed: (1) understanding students' non-verbal communication, which shows how nursing students value and experience non-verbal communication in the nursing context; (2) factors that influence the expression of non-verbal cues, which reveals the effect of patients' demographic background (gender, age, social status and educational level) and participants' characteristics (character, age, voice and appearance); and (3) metaphors of non-verbal communication, which is further divided into four subthemes: providing assistance, individualisation, dropping hints and promoting interaction. Learning about students' non-verbal communication experiences in the clinical setting allowed us to understand their use of non-verbal communication and sensitivity, as well as to understand areas that may need further improvement. The experiences and perceptions revealed by the nursing students could provoke nurses to reconsider the effects of the different factors suggested in this study. The results might also help students and nurses to learn and ponder their missing gap, leading them to rethink, train and pay more attention to their non-verbal communication style and sensitivity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Sensitization to dust mite defines different phenotypes of asthma: A multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Silvia; Drago, Gaspare; Longo, Valeria; Colombo, Paolo; Balzan, Martin; Bilocca, David; Zammit, Christopher; Montefort, Stephen; Scaccianoce, Gianluca; Cuttitta, Giuseppina; Viegi, Giovanni; Cibella, Fabio

    2017-08-07

    Indoor allergens are risk factors for asthma: Thus, the characterization of indoor air quality is important for studying environment-health relationships in children. In particular, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus is the dominant allergen for asthma. We cross-sectionally investigated the relationships among respiratory symptoms and function, airway inflammation, allergen sensitization, and indoor allergen concentration. One hundred and thirty-two children aging 10-14 years and living in a Southern Mediterranean area were evaluated by parental questionnaires. Spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), skin prick tests, total, and specific serum IgE analyses were performed along with the evaluation of home dust samples for the content in Der p 1 allergen. Three clusters were created on the basis of the presence/absence of wheeze in the last 12 months (Wh12m) and Der p 1-specific IgE level. Cluster 1 (Wh12m+/high Der p 1 IgE) presented higher FeNO and poorer pulmonary function (lower FEV1 and FEF25%-75% ), while its symptom score was not different from Cluster 2 (Wh12m+/low Der p 1 IgE). Cluster 3 (Wh12m-/low IgE) showed the lowest FeNO values and pulmonary function similar to Cluster 2. Within Cluster 1, both Der p 1-specific IgE and FeNO were positively correlated with dust Der p 1. Similar asthma phenotypes may occur in children despite differences in their atopic state. In atopic children, sensitizing allergens in the indoor environment may increase airway inflammation worsening pulmonary function. Moreover, environmental exposures may contribute to the development of asthma-like symptoms also in the absence of atopic sensitization, thus contributing to asthma overdiagnosis. © 2017 EAACI and John Wiley and Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

  17. Mothers' and Fathers' Sensitivity with Their Two Children: A Longitudinal Study from Infancy to Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T.; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; van Berkel, Sheila R.; Endendijk, Joyce J.; van der Pol, Lotte D.; Linting, Mariëlle; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Mesman, Judi

    2017-01-01

    To examine the effects of child age and birth order on sensitive parenting, 364 families with 2 children were visited when the second-born children were 12, 24, and 36 months old, and their older siblings were on average 2 years older. Mothers showed higher levels of sensitivity than fathers at all assessments. Parental sensitivity increased from…

  18. Aerodynamic parameter studies and sensitivity analysis for rotor blades in axial flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. Danny; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The analytical capability is offered for aerodynamic parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of rotary wings in axial flight by using a 3-D undistorted wake model in curved lifting line theory. The governing equations are solved by both the Multhopp Interpolation technique and the Vortex Lattice method. The singularity from the bound vortices is eliminated through the Hadamard's finite part concept. Good numerical agreement between both analytical methods and finite differences methods are found. Parametric studies were made to assess the effects of several shape variables on aerodynamic loads. It is found, e.g., that a rotor blade with out-of-plane and inplane curvature can theoretically increase lift in the inboard and outboard regions respectively without introducing an additional induced drag.

  19. Sensitivity /comparison study between the Jacchia 1970, 1971, and 1977 upper atmospheric density models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The neutral upper atmospheric models for the Earth's thermosphere currently used in NASA-MSFC programs are the Jacchia 1970 (J70), 1971 (J71), and 1977 (J77). The Jacchia 1970 model (modified) is used in all MSFC orbital mechanics analyses. Since total density and its variations are the main environmental parameters of interest in orbital lifetime and attitude control studies, the total neutral density was selected for this analysis. This report presents the results of a parametric study of the total density (at 400 km altitude) as computed with three MSFC/Jacchia models. The sensitivity of each of the density models at the summer solstice to varying solar conditions (flux) and geomagnetic (index) values is discussed.

  20. Physician cultural sensitivity in African American advance care planning: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Mervin P; Weiner, Joseph S; Pekmezaris, Renee; Almendral, Alicia; Cosiquien, Reginald; Auerbach, Charles; Wolf-Klein, Gisele

    2007-06-01

    Physician cultural sensitivity is particularly important for end-of-life care. This study correlates physicians' own racial background, clinical experience, and cultural sensitivity training with their attitudes, perceptions, and knowledge of advance care planning issues for African American patients. A cross-sectional self-report questionnaire was distributed to 236 physicians at three major teaching hospitals. Seventy-eight percent of all surveys were returned (183/236). The respondent racial characteristics were 53% white, 28% Asian, and 17% black. While 72% of physicians agreed that different ethnic groups have distinct attitudes towards advance directives, 58% acknowledged lack of familiarity with end-of-life preferences of African American patients. Black physicians (African American and non-U.S.-born) rated the cultural sensitivity training they received on a 0-10 Likert-type scale as 5.43 (n=28) versus a 3.74 rating by white physicians (n=91; p=0.022). Black physicians (African American and non-U.S.-born, n=27) rated their familiarity with advance care planning preferences of African Americans as 5.89 and white physicians (n=90) rated theirs as 4.14 on a 10-point Likert-type scale (p=0.002). Finally, 88% of U.S.-born black physicians (7/8) versus 35% of white physicians (32/91) perceived that the Tuskegee experiment has impacted African American medical decision-making (p=0.014). Similarly, a greater proportion of African American physicians perceived that the Tuskegee experiment has impacted African American medical decision making, compared to non-U.S.-born black physicians (88% (7/8) versus 26% (5/19), p=0.008). The majority of the physicians surveyed routinely provide end-of-life care and believe they are aware of racial differences in advance care planning. Yet, most were unfamiliar with specific end-of-life preferences of African American patients. We advocate for further research and cultural sensitivity training to improve end-of-life care for

  1. Parametric study of EEG sensitivity to phase noise during face processing.

    PubMed

    Rousselet, Guillaume A; Pernet, Cyril R; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2008-10-03

    The present paper examines the visual processing speed of complex objects, here faces, by mapping the relationship between object physical properties and single-trial brain responses. Measuring visual processing speed is challenging because uncontrolled physical differences that co-vary with object categories might affect brain measurements, thus biasing our speed estimates. Recently, we demonstrated that early event-related potential (ERP) differences between faces and objects are preserved even when images differ only in phase information, and amplitude spectra are equated across image categories. Here, we use a parametric design to study how early ERP to faces are shaped by phase information. Subjects performed a two-alternative force choice discrimination between two faces (Experiment 1) or textures (two control experiments). All stimuli had the same amplitude spectrum and were presented at 11 phase noise levels, varying from 0% to 100% in 10% increments, using a linear phase interpolation technique. Single-trial ERP data from each subject were analysed using a multiple linear regression model. Our results show that sensitivity to phase noise in faces emerges progressively in a short time window between the P1 and the N170 ERP visual components. The sensitivity to phase noise starts at about 120-130 ms after stimulus onset and continues for another 25-40 ms. This result was robust both within and across subjects. A control experiment using pink noise textures, which had the same second-order statistics as the faces used in Experiment 1, demonstrated that the sensitivity to phase noise observed for faces cannot be explained by the presence of global image structure alone. A second control experiment used wavelet textures that were matched to the face stimuli in terms of second- and higher-order image statistics. Results from this experiment suggest that higher-order statistics of faces are necessary but not sufficient to obtain the sensitivity to phase noise

  2. Parametric study of EEG sensitivity to phase noise during face processing

    PubMed Central

    Rousselet, Guillaume A; Pernet, Cyril R; Bennett, Patrick J; Sekuler, Allison B

    2008-01-01

    Background The present paper examines the visual processing speed of complex objects, here faces, by mapping the relationship between object physical properties and single-trial brain responses. Measuring visual processing speed is challenging because uncontrolled physical differences that co-vary with object categories might affect brain measurements, thus biasing our speed estimates. Recently, we demonstrated that early event-related potential (ERP) differences between faces and objects are preserved even when images differ only in phase information, and amplitude spectra are equated across image categories. Here, we use a parametric design to study how early ERP to faces are shaped by phase information. Subjects performed a two-alternative force choice discrimination between two faces (Experiment 1) or textures (two control experiments). All stimuli had the same amplitude spectrum and were presented at 11 phase noise levels, varying from 0% to 100% in 10% increments, using a linear phase interpolation technique. Single-trial ERP data from each subject were analysed using a multiple linear regression model. Results Our results show that sensitivity to phase noise in faces emerges progressively in a short time window between the P1 and the N170 ERP visual components. The sensitivity to phase noise starts at about 120–130 ms after stimulus onset and continues for another 25–40 ms. This result was robust both within and across subjects. A control experiment using pink noise textures, which had the same second-order statistics as the faces used in Experiment 1, demonstrated that the sensitivity to phase noise observed for faces cannot be explained by the presence of global image structure alone. A second control experiment used wavelet textures that were matched to the face stimuli in terms of second- and higher-order image statistics. Results from this experiment suggest that higher-order statistics of faces are necessary but not sufficient to obtain the

  3. Encoding of yaw in the presence of distractor motion: studies in a fly motion sensitive neuron.

    PubMed

    Roy, Suva; Sinha, Shiva R; de Ruyter van Steveninck, Rob

    2015-04-22

    Motion estimation is crucial for aerial animals such as the fly, which perform fast and complex maneuvers while flying through a 3-D environment. Motion-sensitive neurons in the lobula plate, a part of the visual brain, of the fly have been studied extensively for their specialized role in motion encoding. However, the visual stimuli used in such studies are typically highly simplified, often move in restricted ways, and do not represent the complexities of optic flow generated during actual flight. Here, we use combined rotations about different axes to study how H1, a wide-field motion-sensitive neuron, encodes preferred yaw motion in the presence of stimuli not aligned with its preferred direction. Our approach is an extension of "white noise" methods, providing a framework that is readily adaptable to quantitative studies into the coding of mixed dynamic stimuli in other systems. We find that the presence of a roll or pitch ("distractor") stimulus reduces information transmitted by H1 about yaw, with the amount of this reduction depending on the variance of the distractor. Spike generation is influenced by features of both yaw and the distractor, where the degree of influence is determined by their relative strengths. Certain distractor features may induce bidirectional responses, which are indicative of an imbalance between global excitation and inhibition resulting from complex optic flow. Further, the response is shaped by the dynamics of the combined stimulus. Our results provide intuition for plausible strategies involved in efficient coding of preferred motion from complex stimuli having multiple motion components. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356481-14$15.00/0.

  4. Recent changes in surface solar radiation and precipitation in India: sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Frischknecht, M.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    Population growth and industrialization is progressing at an unprecedented rate on a global scale. One region undergoing a particularly fast transition is India. These changes are accompanied, among others, by a substantial increase in aerosol emission. To learn more about associated consequences for the climate system we have carried out a comparatively large set of transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM, using aerosol emission data from NIES (National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan) and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center. The sensitivity studies cover the period from 1870 to 2005 and comprise ensembles of simulations (up to 13 members per ensemble), which allow to address the role of different aerosol species, greenhouse gases, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. We present and analysis of these simulation data with particular focus on surface solar radiation (SSR) and precipitation in India, and discuss potential physical mechanisms involved. Modeled annual mean SSR is found to decrease over the Indian subcontinent (land between 67E / 90E / 10N / 25N) at a rate of about -3 to -4 W/m2 per decade. This dimming is roughly in line with observation based estimates. The decrease is comparable under all sky conditions. Regional and seasonal differences are substantial, with the Ganges plane showing the strongest dimming. Aerosols are transported far out over the Indian ocean, leading to a substantial decrease in SSR also there. Modeled precipitation captures well the annual monsoon cycle. The observed, recent decrease in precipitation is, however, overestimated by the model. More precisely, the model captures the observed precipitation reduction in northern India in July / August, but not the observed increase in precipitation in May / June. Our sensitivity studies suggest that the atmosphere only response to increasing aerosol emissions is a reduction of

  5. A Study of the Shock Sensitivity of PBX 9501 Damaged by Compressive Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Darla; Gustavsen, Richard; Hooks, Daniel; Peterson, Paul; Deluca, Racci; Stahl, David; Hagelberg, Stephanie; Alcon, Robert

    2007-06-01

    We have studied the effects of damage caused by compressive loading on the shock sensitivity of the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9501. PBX 9501 consists of 95 wt. % HMX (C4H8N8O8) and 5 wt. % Nitroplasticized Estane binder. The binder is a mixture of 49 wt. % Estane^5703 (BF Goodrich), 49 wt. % Nitroplasticizer (a 50/50 eutectic mixture of bis(2,2-dinitropropyl)formal and bis(2,2 dinitropropyl)acetal), and 2 wt. % Irganox^ 1010 stabilizer. PBX 9501 cubes, 25.4 mm on a side, were subjected to various uniaxial compressive loads in an Instron machine. After loading, 3.5 mm thick slices were taken from the center of each cube. These slices were then subjected to nearly identical 35 kbar shocks. Transmitted shock wave profiles were measured using interface velocimetry (VISAR). Comparison of shock wave growth is a measure of shock sensitivity. Results on four specimens are being analyzed relative to previous baseline data on PBX 9501 at various pressed densities, to determine if the response of damaged material is due to factors other than simple density changes. (LA-UR 07-1206)

  6. Secondary aerosols in Switzerland and northern Italy: Modeling and sensitivity studies for summer 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani-Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; Keller, Johannes; PréVôT, Andre S. H.; Baltensperger, Urs; Flemming, Johannes

    2008-03-01

    The formation and transport of secondary aerosols during a 4-day period in summer 2003 were studied using the 3-dimensional air quality model CAMx (Comprehensive Air quality Model with eXtensions) over an area covering regions north and south of the Swiss Alps with different air pollution characteristics. The modeled components were particulate sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, primary (POA) and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and elemental carbon (EC) with a particle diameter smaller than 2.5 μm. Highest concentrations were predicted in northern Italy. The modeled sum of particle mass concentrations was in general lower than PM2.5 measurements most probably due to an underestimation of organic aerosols. Differences between the regions in the north and the south of the Alps are discussed with respect to the aerosol concentrations and to the sensitivity of aerosol formation. Sensitivity tests using reduced NH3 and NOx emissions suggest that in northern Switzerland secondary aerosol formation is unlikely to be limited by NH3 but rather by HNO3. On the other hand, aerosol formation around Milan seems to be similarly dependent on HNO3 and NH3 most of the time. However, there are times when limitation by NH3 is stronger. The contribution of biogenic sources to SOA was predicted to be rather high, about 80% in the north, matching the measurements whereas it was lower in southern Switzerland (40%).

  7. Derivation of soil thresholds for lead applying species sensitivity distribution: A case study for root vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changfeng; Ma, Yibing; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2016-02-13

    The combination of food quality standard and soil-plant transfer models can be used to derive critical limits of heavy metals for agricultural soils. In this paper, a robust methodology is presented, taking the variations of plant species and cultivars and soil properties into account to derive soil thresholds for lead (Pb) applying species sensitivity distribution (SSD). Three species of root vegetables (four cultivars each for radish, carrot, and potato) were selected to investigate their sensitivity differences for accumulating Pb through greenhouse experiment. Empirical soil-plant transfer model was developed from carrot New Kuroda grown in twenty-one soils covering a wide variation in physicochemical properties and was used to normalize the bioaccumulation data of non-model cultivars. The relationship was then validated to be reliable and would not cause over-protection using data from field experimental sites and published independent studies. The added hazardous concentration for protecting 95% of the cultivars not exceeding the food quality standard (HC5add) were then calculated from the Burr Type III function fitted SSD curves. The derived soil Pb thresholds based on the added risk approach (total soil concentration subtracting the natural background part) were presented as continuous or scenario criteria depending on the combination of soil pH and CEC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Sensitivity Studies for Space-Based Global Measurements of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jian-Ping; Kawa, S. Randolph; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is well known as the primary forcing agent of global warming. Although the climate forcing due to CO2 is well known, the sources and sinks of CO2 are not well understood. Currently the lack of global atmospheric CO2 observations limits our ability to diagnose the global carbon budget (e.g., finding the so-called "missing sink") and thus limits our ability to understand past climate change and predict future climate response. Space-based techniques are being developed to make high-resolution and high-precision global column CO2 measurements. One of the proposed techniques utilizes the passive remote sensing of Earth's reflected solar radiation at the weaker vibration-rotation band of CO2 in the near infrared (approx. 1.57 micron). We use a line-by-line radiative transfer model to explore the potential of this method. Results of sensitivity studies for CO2 concentration variation and geophysical conditions (i.e., atmospheric temperature, surface reflectivity, solar zenith angle, aerosol, and cirrus cloud) will be presented. We will also present sensitivity results for an O2 A-band (approx. 0.76 micron) sensor that will be needed along with CO2 to make surface pressure and cloud height measurements.

  9. Sensitivity Studies for Space-Based Global Measurements of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jian-Ping; Kawa, S. Randolph; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is well known as the primary forcing agent of global warming. Although the climate forcing due to CO2 is well known, the sources and sinks of CO2 are not well understood. Currently the lack of global atmospheric CO2 observations limits our ability to diagnose the global carbon budget (e.g., finding the so-called "missing sink") and thus limits our ability to understand past climate change and predict future climate response. Space-based techniques are being developed to make high-resolution and high-precision global column CO2 measurements. One of the proposed techniques utilizes the passive remote sensing of Earth's reflected solar radiation at the weaker vibration-rotation band of CO2 in the near infrared (approx. 1.57 micron). We use a line-by-line radiative transfer model to explore the potential of this method. Results of sensitivity studies for CO2 concentration variation and geophysical conditions (i.e., atmospheric temperature, surface reflectivity, solar zenith angle, aerosol, and cirrus cloud) will be presented. We will also present sensitivity results for an O2 A-band (approx. 0.76 micron) sensor that will be needed along with CO2 to make surface pressure and cloud height measurements.

  10. Insulin sensitivity and brain reward activation in overweight Hispanic girls: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Tanja C.; Tsao, Sinchai; Page, Kathleen A.; Hu, Houchun; Hasson, Rebecca E.; Goran, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance is a link between obesity and the associated disease risk. In addition to its role as an energy regulatory signal to the hypothalamus, insulin also modulates food reward. Objective To examine the relationship of insulin sensitivity (SI) and fasting insulin with cerebral activation in response to food and non-food cues in children. Methods Twelve overweight Hispanic girls (age: 8–11) participated in two study visits, a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test and a functional neuroimaging (fMRI) session (GE HDxt 3.0Tesla)) with visual stimulation tasks. Blocks of images (high calorie (HC), low calorie (LC) and non-food (NF)) were presented in randomized order. Results Comparing HC with NF, SI was inversely associated with activation in the anterior cingulate (r2 = 0.65; p < 0.05), the insula (r2 = 0.69; p < 0.05), the orbitofrontal cortex (r2 = 0.74; p < 0.05), and the frontal and rolandic operculum (r2 = 0.76; p < 0.001). Associations remained significant after adjustment for BMI. Association of fasting insulin and cerebral activation dissapeared after adjustment for waist circumference. Conclusion In addition to weight loss insulin sensitivity may pose an important target to regulate neural responses to food cues in the prevention of excessive weight gain. PMID:24357646

  11. A Prospective Study of Stress Autonomy versus Stress Sensitization in Adolescents at Varied Risk for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Matthew C.; Ciesla, Jeffrey A.; Garber, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the stress autonomy, stress sensitization, and depression vulnerability hypotheses in adolescents across six years (i.e., grades 6 through 12). Participants were 240 children (Time 1 mean age = 11.86, SD = 0.57) who varied in risk for depression based on their mother’s history of mood disorders. All analyses were conducted as multilevel models to account for nesting in the data. Results were consistent with the stress sensitization hypothesis. The within-subject relation of stress levels to depressive symptoms strengthened with increasing numbers of prior depressive episodes. In addition, evidence consistent with the vulnerability hypothesis was found. The relation of stress levels to depressive symptoms was stronger for adolescents who were at risk for depression based on maternal depression history and for those who had experienced more depressive episodes through grade 12. These findings suggest that onsets of depression in adolescents may be predicted by both relatively stable and dynamic transactions between stressful life events and vulnerabilities such as maternal depression and youths’ own history of depressive episodes. PMID:20455607

  12. Transport studies of quantum dots sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Maloney, Francis Scott; Rimal, Gaurab; Poudyal, Uma; Tang, Jinke; Wang, Wenyong

    We present opto-electrical transport properties of Mn-CdSe quantum dots (QDs) sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FET). The ZnO NWs with 2 atomic % of Mn doping are grown by chemical vapor deposition. The NWs are ferromagnetic at low temperature. The as grown nanowires are transferred to clean SiO2/Si substrate and single nanowire field effect transistors (FET) are fabricated by standard e-beam lithography. Mobility and carrier concentration of Mn-ZnO NWs are estimated from FET device measurement which shows NWs are n-type semiconductors. Pulse laser deposition of Mn-CdSe QDs on the single NW FET significantly increases carrier concentration of the QD-NW system in dark where the QD monolayer conduction is negligibly small. The photoconductivity study of QD sensitized NW FET enlightens the conduction spectrum of QD-NW system and QD to NW carrier transfer mechanism. This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-10ER46728.

  13. Sensitivity of the human mirror neuron system for abstract traces of actions: An EEG-study.

    PubMed

    Hoenen, Matthias; Lübke, Katrin T; Pause, Bettina M

    2017-03-01

    Theories of neuroaesthetics assume, that looking at traces of actions used in creating artwork (e.g. brush marks) is associated with a simulation of these actions in the observer's sensorimotor-cortex. The aim of the current study is to dissociate the activation of the sensorimotor-cortex by the observation of action traces from associated visual processes. Twenty-eight participants observed handmade graphics (acrylic paint on paper) of different complexity (line, triangle, shape of a house) and computer-generated counterparts. Central mu-activity, as an index of sensorimotor-cortex activity, and occipital alpha-activity, as an index of visual cortex activity were recorded in the 8-13Hz EEG-band. In line with the hypothesis, mu-activity at electrode C4 is sensitive for the complexity of handmade (p=0.001), but not computer-generated graphics (p>0.500). In contrast, occipital alpha-activity is sensitive for the complexity of both handmade and computer-generated graphics (p<0.001). Furthermore, the more empathic the participants rated themselves, the stronger mu-suppression was induced by handmade graphics compared to computer-generated graphics (electrode C4; r=-0.612, p=0.001). These results support the involvement of the sensorimotor-cortex in the recognition of action traces and strengthen evidence that individuals scoring high in emotional empathy feature a particularly responsive mirror neuron system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensitization to beer ingredients in Chinese individuals with beer allergy: a clinical study of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiqiang; Chen, Wenchieh; Huang, Xiuying; Zhou, Xiaofang; Luo, Jie; Wang, Huan; Darsow, Ulf; Becker, Thomas; Qian, Fei; Hao, Fei; Ring, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Rare case reports of allergic reactions to beer have been published, but the nature of the eliciting substances in beer ingredients is often unknown. It was the aim of this study to identify sensitization patterns against various beer ingredients in Chinese individuals with beer allergy. Twenty-seven Chinese individuals with a clear-cut history of beer allergy were prescreened to answer a specific questionnaire related to the history and symptoms of beer allergy. Twenty individuals underwent allergy diagnostics with different food allergens and extracts of beer ingredients using the skin prick test (SPT) and the open oral provocation test (OPT) with beer. Fifteen patients (75%) showed positive reactions to one or more beer ingredients. Of these, 9 individuals, reactive to sorghum and/or sorghum malt also showed positive reactions to other ingredients. Seventeen individuals showed variable symptoms after the OPT. Cutaneous erythema and urticaria were the most common symptoms and usually persisted for over 2 h. There were no significant differences in SPT reactivity to beer ingredients between male and female individuals. Single patients reacted to barley, hops or yeast. Sensitization to sorghum and/or sorghum malt was the most common finding in Chinese individuals with beer allergy.

  15. Validity of Quinpirole Sensitization Rat Model of OCD: Linking Evidence from Animal and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stuchlik, Ales; Radostová, Dominika; Hatalova, Hana; Vales, Karel; Nekovarova, Tereza; Koprivova, Jana; Svoboda, Jan; Horacek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with 1–3% prevalence. OCD is characterized by recurrent thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions). The pathophysiology of OCD remains unclear, stressing the importance of pre-clinical studies. The aim of this article is to critically review a proposed animal model of OCD that is characterized by the induction of compulsive checking and behavioral sensitization to the D2/D3 dopamine agonist quinpirole. Changes in this model have been reported at the level of brain structures, neurotransmitter systems and other neurophysiological aspects. In this review, we consider these alterations in relation to the clinical manifestations in OCD, with the aim to discuss and evaluate axes of validity of this model. Our analysis shows that some axes of validity of quinpirole sensitization model (QSM) are strongly supported by clinical findings, such as behavioral phenomenology or roles of brain structures. Evidence on predictive validity is contradictory and ambiguous. It is concluded that this model is useful in the context of searching for the underlying pathophysiological basis of the disorder because of the relatively strong biological similarities with OCD. PMID:27833539

  16. The respiratory local lymph node assay as a tool to study respiratory sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Arts, Josje H E; de Jong, Wim H; van Triel, Jos J; Schijf, Marcel A; de Klerk, Arja; van Loveren, Henk; Kuper, C Frieke

    2008-12-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is used to test the potential of low molecular weight (LMW) compounds to induce sensitization via the skin. In the present study, a respiratory LLNA was developed. Male BALB/c mice were exposed head/nose-only during three consecutive days for 45, 90, 180, or 360 min/day to various LMW allergens. Ear application (skin LLNA) was used as a positive control. Negative controls were exposed to the vehicle. Three days after the last exposure, proliferation was determined in the draining mandibular lymph nodes, and the respiratory tract was examined microscopically. Upon inhalation, the allergens trimellitic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, hexamethylene diisocyanate, toluene diisocyanate, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), dinitrochlorobenzene, and oxazolone were positive and showed stimulation indices (SIs) up to 11, whereas trimeric IPDI, formaldehyde, and methyl salicylate were negative (viz. SI < 3). All compounds, except trimeric IPDI, induced histopathological lesions predominantly in the upper respiratory tract. Exposure by inhalation is a realistic approach to test respiratory allergens. However, based on the local toxicity, the dose that can be applied is (generally) much lower than can be achieved by skin application. It is concluded that strong LMW allergens, regardless their immunological nature, besides the skin can also sensitize the body via the respiratory tract. In addition, the contact allergens were as potent as the respiratory allergens, although the potency ranking differed from that in a skin LLNA.

  17. Validity of Quinpirole Sensitization Rat Model of OCD: Linking Evidence from Animal and Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Stuchlik, Ales; Radostová, Dominika; Hatalova, Hana; Vales, Karel; Nekovarova, Tereza; Koprivova, Jana; Svoboda, Jan; Horacek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder with 1-3% prevalence. OCD is characterized by recurrent thoughts (obsessions) and repetitive behaviors (compulsions). The pathophysiology of OCD remains unclear, stressing the importance of pre-clinical studies. The aim of this article is to critically review a proposed animal model of OCD that is characterized by the induction of compulsive checking and behavioral sensitization to the D2/D3 dopamine agonist quinpirole. Changes in this model have been reported at the level of brain structures, neurotransmitter systems and other neurophysiological aspects. In this review, we consider these alterations in relation to the clinical manifestations in OCD, with the aim to discuss and evaluate axes of validity of this model. Our analysis shows that some axes of validity of quinpirole sensitization model (QSM) are strongly supported by clinical findings, such as behavioral phenomenology or roles of brain structures. Evidence on predictive validity is contradictory and ambiguous. It is concluded that this model is useful in the context of searching for the underlying pathophysiological basis of the disorder because of the relatively strong biological similarities with OCD.

  18. Techno-economic sensitivity study of heliostat field parameters for micro-gas turbine CSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Willem A.; Gauché, Paul; Dinter, Frank; Myburgh, J. T.

    2017-06-01

    Concentrating solar power systems based on micro-gas turbines potentially offer numerous benefits should they become commercially viable. Heliostat fields for such systems have unique requirements in that the number of heliostats and the focal ratios are typically much lower than conventional central receiver systems. This paper presents a techno-economic sensitivity study of heliostat field parameters for a micro-gas turbine central receiver system. A 100 kWe minitower system is considered for the base case and a one-at-a-time strategy is used to investigate parameter sensitivities. Increasing heliostat focal ratios are found to have significant optical performance benefits due to both a reduction in astigmatic aberrations and a reduction in the number of facet focal lengths required; confirming the hypothesis that smaller heliostats offer a techno-economic advantage. Fixed Horizontal Axis tracking mechanism is shown to outperform the conventional Azimuth Zenith tracking mechanism in high density heliostat fields. Although several improvements to heliostat field performance are discussed, the capex fraction of the heliostat field for such system is shown to be almost half that of a conventional central receiver system and optimum utilization of the higher capex components, namely; the receiver and turbine subsystems, are more rewarding than that of the heliostat field.

  19. Host cell reactivation studies with epidermal cells of mice sensitive and resistant to carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.E.; Strickland, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Primary epidermal cells from AKR, BALB/c, CD-1, and SENCAR mice, listed in order of least to most sensitive to epidermal carcinogenesis by initiation and promotion protocols, were found to be equally competent to ''reactivate'' herpes simplex virus type 1 irradiated by germicidal ultraviolet radiation. Nontumorigenic BALB/c epidermal cell lines selected in vitro for resistance to terminal differentiation after in vivo or in vitro treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens showed virus survival curves similar to those of primary cells. Similarly, primary cultures which were allowed to grow to confluency following a single treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (100 ng/ml) retained normal host cell reactivation. Host cell reactivation studies with mouse dermal fibroblasts could not be done because of the failure of the herpes simplex virus to infect these cells and produce plaques. These results demonstrate that survival of ultraviolet light-damaged virus in primary epidermal cells in culture is unrelated to whether the cells are derived from mice sensitive or resistant to epidermal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, virus survival is not changed by tumor promoter treatment or by treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens which results in differentiation-resistant cells.

  20. DFT and TD-DFT study on geometries, electronic structures and electronic absorption of some metal free dye sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mohr, T; Aroulmoji, V; Ravindran, R Samson; Müller, M; Ranjitha, S; Rajarajan, G; Anbarasan, P M

    2015-01-25

    The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of 2-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione (henna1), 3-(5-((1E)-2-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-dioxonaphthalen-3-yloxy) vinyl) thiophen-2-yl)-2-isocyanoacrylic acid (henna2) and anthocyanin dye sensitizers were studied based on density functional theory (DFT) using the hybrid functional B3LYP. The Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectrum was investigated by using a hybrid method which combines the properties and dynamics of many-body in the presence of time-dependent (TD) potentials, i.e. TDSCF-DFT (B3LYP). Features of the electronic absorption spectrum in the visible and near-UV regions were plotted and assigned based on TD-DFT calculations. Due to the absorption, bands of the metal-organic compound are n→π(*) present. The calculated results suggest that the three lowest energy excited states of the investigated dye sensitizers are due to photoinduced electron transfer processes. The interfacial electron transfer between semiconductor TiO2 electrode and dye sensitizer is owing to an electron injection process from excited dye to the semiconductor's conduction band. The role of linking the henna1 dye with a carboxylic acid via a thiophene bridge was analyzed. The results are that using a stronger π-conjugate bridge as well as a strong donator and acceptor group enhances the efficiency.

  1. Acute pulmonary embolism: sensitivity and specificity of ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy in PIOPED II study.

    PubMed

    Sostman, H Dirk; Stein, Paul D; Gottschalk, Alexander; Matta, Fadi; Hull, Russell; Goodman, Larry

    2008-03-01

    To use Prospective Investigation of Pulmonary Embolism Diagnosis (PIOPED) II data to retrospectively determine sensitivity and specificity of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigraphic studies categorized as pulmonary embolism (PE) present or PE absent and the proportion of patients for whom these categories applied. The PIOPED II study had institutional review board approval at all participating centers. Patient informed consent was obtained; the study was HIPAA compliant. Approval and consent included those for future retrospective research. Patients in the PIOPED II database of clinical and imaging results were included if they had diagnosis at computed tomographic (CT) angiography, Wells score, and diagnosis at V/Q scanning. V/Q scan central readings were recategorized as PE present (PIOPED II reading = high probability of PE), PE absent (PIOPED II reading = very low probability of PE or normal), or nondiagnostic (PIOPED II reading = low or intermediate probability of PE). A composite reference standard was used: the PIOPED II digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) result, or if there was no definitive DSA result, CT angiographic results that were concordant with the Wells score (ie, positive CT angiographic result and Wells score > 2 or negative CT angiographic result and Wells score < 6). Sensitivity and specificity of recategorized central readings were computed. With the exclusion of patients with intermediate or low probability, the sensitivity of a high probability (PE present) scan finding was 77.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 69.7%, 85.0%), while the specificity of very low probability or normal (PE absent) scan finding was 97.7% (95% CI: 96.4%, 98.9%). The percentage of patients with a PE present or PE absent scan finding was 73.5% (95% CI: 70.7%, 76.4%). In a population similar to that in PIOPED II, results of V/Q scintigraphy can be diagnostically definitive in a majority of patients; thus, it can be considered an appropriate pulmonary imaging

  2. Effect of memantine on cough reflex sensitivity: translational studies in guinea pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Canning, Brendan J; Garner, Rachel; Paterson, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Cough is the most common complaint for which outpatients in the United States seek medical attention, and yet available therapeutic options for cough lack proven efficacy and are further limited by safety and abuse liabilities. Thus, safe and effective cough suppressants are needed. Recent preclinical studies described the antitussive effects of memantine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blocker used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The goals of the present study were to compare the antitussive effects of memantine, dextromethorphan, and codeine in guinea pigs; to relate the dose-dependent actions of memantine in these studies to peak plasma concentrations achieved following oral administration; and to provide the first ever evaluation of the antitussive effect of memantine in humans. In guinea pigs, memantine and codeine were comparable in efficacy and potency but both were superior to dextromethorphan in the citric acid cough challenge model. The pharmacokinetic analyses suggest that memantine was active in guinea pigs at micromolar plasma concentrations. Subsequently, 14 healthy volunteers as well as 14 otherwise healthy adults with acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) underwent capsaicin cough challenges 6 hours after ingestion of 20 mg memantine and matched placebo in a randomized, double-blind, crossover fashion. In healthy volunteers, memantine significantly inhibited cough reflex sensitivity (P = 0.034). In subjects with URI, responsiveness to capsaicin was markedly increased, and in these patients, the inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity by memantine relative to placebo did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.088). These data support further research to investigate the potential of memantine as a clinically useful antitussive. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. A psychoneuroendocrine study of brain dopaminergic sensitivity in locally limited or metastatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Messina, G; Vaghi, M; Bartolacelli, E; Massarenti, L L; Trabattoni, P; Meregalli, P; Meregalli, M; Gavazzeni, C; Rovelli, F; Tancini, G; Gardani, G S

    2003-01-01

    In addition to the occurrence of pain, the evidence of a diminished capacity to feel pleasure is one of the most common cancer-related symptoms. Recent advances in psychoneuroendocrinological knowledge has shown that the perception of pleasure is mainly mediated by the dopaminergic pathways in the brain. Moreover, it has also been demonstrated that the brain dopaminergic sensitivity may be clinically explored by evaluating the endocrine response to the administration of dopaminergic agents, such as apomorphine, which consists of a decline in PRL concentrations and an increase in GH and cortisol levels. The present study was performed to evaluate dopaminergic sensitivity by the administration of apomorphine in cancer patients in an attempt to document possible cancer-related neuroendocrine anomalies, which could explain the psychological status of the patients. The study included 24 cancer patients (breast cancer: 12; colorectal cancer: 7; non-small cell lung cancer: 5), 12 of whom showed distant organ metastases. Apomorphine was given orally at 0.01 mg/kg b.w., by collecting venous blood samples before and after 20 and 60 minutes. A normal decline in PRL levels was seen in both non-metastatic and metastatic cancer patients. No cortisol increase in response to apomorphine was achieved and the lack of cortisol response was particularly evident in metastatic patients. No GH rise occurred in either metastatic or non-metastatic cancer patients. Finally, no significant difference in the endocrine response to apomorphine was seen in relation to the histotype of tumor. The results of this study show that the neoplastic disease is characterized by neurochemical alterations involving pleasure-related dopaminergic pathways, which are more evident in the metastatic disease, without particular differences in relation to tumor histotype. Therefore, the psychological condition of cancer patients would not depend only on psychological factors, but it could be due at least in part

  4. Angiotensin II (de)sensitization: Fluid intake studies with implications for cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and hypertension is the most common risk factor for death. Although many anti-hypertensive pharmacotherapies are approved for use in the United States, rates of hypertension have increased over the past decade. This review article summarizes a presentation given at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. The presentation described work performed in our laboratory that uses angiotensin II-induced drinking as a model system to study behavioral and cardiovascular effects of the renin-angiotensin system, a key component of blood pressure regulation, and a common target of anti-hypertensives. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a potent dipsogen, but the drinking response shows a rapid desensitization after repeated injections of AngII. This desensitization appears to be dependent upon the timing of the injections, requires activation of the AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor, requires activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members, and involves the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region as a critical site of action. Moreover, the response does not appear to be the result of a more general suppression of behavior, a sensitized pressor response to AngII, or an aversive state generated by the treatment. More recent studies suggest that the treatment regimen used to produce desensitization in our laboratory also prevents the sensitization that occurs after daily bolus injections of AngII. Our hope is that these findings can be used to support future basic research on the topic that could lead to new developments in treatments for hypertension.

  5. Masticatory loadings and cranial deformation in Macaca fascicularis: a finite element analysis sensitivity study

    PubMed Central

    Fitton, L C; Shi, J F; Fagan, M J; O’Higgins, P

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical analyses are commonly conducted to investigate how craniofacial form relates to function, particularly in relation to dietary adaptations. However, in the absence of corresponding muscle activation patterns, incomplete muscle data recorded experimentally for different individuals during different feeding tasks are frequently substituted. This study uses finite element analysis (FEA) to examine the sensitivity of the mechanical response of a Macaca fascicularis cranium to varying muscle activation patterns predicted via multibody dynamic analysis. Relative to the effects of varying bite location, the consequences of simulated variations in muscle activation patterns and of the inclusion/exclusion of whole muscle groups were investigated. The resulting cranial deformations were compared using two approaches; strain maps and geometric morphometric analyses. The results indicate that, with bite force magnitude controlled, the variations among the mechanical responses of the cranium to bite location far outweigh those observed as a consequence of varying muscle activations. However, zygomatic deformation was an exception, with the activation levels of superficial masseter being most influential in this regard. The anterior portion of temporalis deforms the cranial vault, but the remaining muscles have less profound effects. This study for the first time systematically quantifies the sensitivity of an FEA model of a primate skull to widely varying masticatory muscle activations and finds that, with the exception of the zygomatic arch, reasonable variants of muscle loading for a second molar bite have considerably less effect on cranial deformation and the resulting strain map than does varying molar bite point. The implication is that FEA models of biting crania will generally produce acceptable estimates of deformation under load as long as muscle activations and forces are reasonably approximated. In any one FEA study, the biological significance of the

  6. The role of noise sensitivity in the noise-response relation: A comparison of three international airport studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kamp, Irene; Job, R. F. Soames; Hatfield, Julie; Haines, Mary; Stellato, Rebecca K.; Stansfeld, Stephen A.

    2004-12-01

    In order to examine the role of noise sensitivity in response to environmental noise, this paper presents detailed comparisons of socio-acoustic studies conducted around international airports in Amsterdam, Sydney, and London. Earlier findings that noise sensitivity moderates the effect of noise on annoyance were examined to see if they could be replicated in each of the datasets, independent of the technique of measuring noise sensitivity. The relation between exposure to aircraft noise and noise annoyance was studied separately for groups of individuals with low, medium, and high noise sensitivity, with statistical adjustment for relevant confounders. Results support the previous findings that noise sensitivity is an independent predictor of annoyance and adds to the prediction of noise annoyance afforded by noise exposure level by up to 26% of explained variance. There is no evidence of a moderating effect, whereby the covariation between noise exposure level and annoyance is weak for people who score at the extreme high or low end of the sensitivity scale, and strong for people who score in the middle of the sensitivity scale. Generally, noise sensitivity appears to increase annoyance independently of the level of noise exposure after adjustment for relevant confounders. These findings were consistent across the three datasets. .

  7. Application of TAM III to study sensitivity of soil organic matter degradation to temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikegard, Peter; Barros, Nieves; Piñeiro, Verónica

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, studies of soil biodegradation are based on CO2 dissipation rates. CO2 is a product of aerobic degradation of labile organic substrates like carbohydrates. That limits the biodegradation concept to just one of the soil organic matter fractions. This feature is responsible for some problems to settle the concept of soil organic matter (SOM) recalcitrance and for controversial results defining sensitivity of SOM to temperature. SOM consists of highly complex macromolecules constituted by fractions with different chemical nature and redox state affecting the chemical nature of biodegradation processes. Biodegradation of fractions more reduced than carbohydrates take place through metabolic pathways that dissipate less CO2 than carbohydrate respiration, that may not dissipate CO2, or that even may uptake CO2. These compounds can be considered more recalcitrant and with lower turnover times than labile SOM just because they are degraded at lower CO2 rates that may be just a consequence of the metabolic path. Nevertheless, decomposition of every kind of organic substrate always releases heat. For this reason, the measurement of the heat rate by calorimetry yields a more realistic measurement of the biodegradation of the SOM continuum. TAM III is one of the most recent calorimeters designed for directly measuring in real time the heat rate associated with any degradation process. It is designed as a multichannel system allowing the concomitant measurement of to up 24 samples at isothermal conditions or through a temperature scanning mode from 18 to 100ºC, allowing the continous measure of any sample at controlled non-isothermal conditions. The temperature scanning mode was tested in several soil samples collected at different depths to study their sensitivity to temperature changes from 18 to 35 ºC calculating the Q10 and the activation energy (EA) by the Arrhenius equation. It was attempted to associate the obtained EA values with the soil thermal

  8. Alluvial fan sensitivity to glacial-interglacial climate change: case studies from Death Valley.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, Alexander; D'Arcy, Mitch; Roda-Boluda, Duna; Brooke, Sam

    2016-04-01

    The effects of climate change on eroding landscapes and the sedimentary record remain poorly understood. The measurement of regional grain size trends in stream-flow deposits provides one way to address this issue because, in principle, these trends embed important information on the dynamics of sediment routing systems and their sensitivity to external forcings. In many cases, downstream stratigraphic fining is primarily driven by selective deposition of sediment. The relative efficiency of this process is determined by the physical characteristics of the input sediment supply and the spatial distribution of subsidence rate, which generates the accommodation necessary for mass extraction. Here, we measure grain size fining rates from apex to toe for alluvial fan systems in Death Valley, California, which have well-exposed modern and late Pleistocene deposits, where the long-term tectonic boundary conditions are known and where climatic variation over this time period is well-constrained. Our field data demonstrate that input grain sizes and input fining rates do vary noticeably over the late Pleistocene-Holocene period in this study area, although there is little evidence for significant changes in rates of faulting in the last 200 ky. For two catchments in the Grapevine Mountains for which we have excellent stratigraphic constraints on modern and 70 ka fan deposits, we use a self-similarity based grain size fining model to understand changes in sediment flux to the fans over this time period. When calibrated with cosmogenically-derived catchment erosion rates, our results show that a 30 % decrease in average precipitation rate over this time-frame led to a 20 % decrease in sediment flux to the fans, and a clear increase in the down-fan rate of fining. This supports existing landscape evolution models that relate a decrease in precipitation rate to a decrease in sediment flux, but implies that the relationship between sediment flux and precipitation rate may be

  9. Low pressure gas study for a direction-sensitive dark matter search experiment with MPGD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Miuchi, K.; Iwaki, S.; Kubo, H.; Mizumoto, T.; Nishimura, H.; Parker, J. D.; Sawano, T.; Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Sekiya, H.; Takeda, A.

    2012-02-01

    The NEWAGE project (NEw generation WIMP search with an Advanced Gaseous tracking device Experiment) is a direction-sensitive dark matter search experiment, searching for WIMPs (Weakly Interacting Massive Particle) via nuclear recoil. The NEWAGE detector, a micro time-projection-chamber with a 400μm pitch read out, detects three-dimensional nuclear tracks. A low-pressure gas study (76 torr) was performed in order to lower the energy threshold, one of the most effective improvements for the next underground measurement. We measured the gas gain, the angular resolution and the detection efficiency. We have consequently lowered the energy threshold from 100 keV to 50 keV by decreasing the gas pressure.

  10. Posterior rat eye during acute intraocular pressure elevation studied using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fialová, Stanislava; Augustin, Marco; Fischak, Corinna; Schmetterer, Leopold; Handschuh, Stephan; Glösmann, Martin; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Baumann, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 840 nm with axial resolution of 3.8 µm in tissue was used for investigating the posterior rat eye during an acute intraocular pressure (IOP) increase experiment. IOP was elevated in the eyes of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats by cannulation of the anterior chamber. Three dimensional PS-OCT data sets were acquired at IOP levels between 14 mmHg and 105 mmHg. Maps of scleral birefringence, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardation and relative RNFL/retina reflectivity were generated in the peripapillary area and quantitatively analyzed. All investigated parameters showed a substantial correlation with IOP. In the low IOP range of 14-45 mmHg only scleral birefringence showed statistically significant correlation. The polarization changes observed in the PS-OCT imaging study presented in this work suggest that birefringence of the sclera may be a promising IOP-related parameter to investigate. PMID:28101419

  11. Sensitivity study of Space Station Freedom operations cost and selected user resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accola, Anne; Fincannon, H. J.; Williams, Gregory J.; Meier, R. Timothy

    1990-01-01

    The results of sensitivity studies performed to estimate probable ranges for four key Space Station parameters using the Space Station Freedom's Model for Estimating Space Station Operations Cost (MESSOC) are discussed. The variables examined are grouped into five main categories: logistics, crew, design, space transportation system, and training. The modification of these variables implies programmatic decisions in areas such as orbital replacement unit (ORU) design, investment in repair capabilities, and crew operations policies. The model utilizes a wide range of algorithms and an extensive trial logistics data base to represent Space Station operations. The trial logistics data base consists largely of a collection of the ORUs that comprise the mature station, and their characteristics based on current engineering understanding of the Space Station. A nondimensional approach is used to examine the relative importance of variables on parameters.

  12. Posterior rat eye during acute intraocular pressure elevation studied using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Fialová, Stanislava; Augustin, Marco; Fischak, Corinna; Schmetterer, Leopold; Handschuh, Stephan; Glösmann, Martin; Pircher, Michael; Hitzenberger, Christoph K; Baumann, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) operating at 840 nm with axial resolution of 3.8 µm in tissue was used for investigating the posterior rat eye during an acute intraocular pressure (IOP) increase experiment. IOP was elevated in the eyes of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats by cannulation of the anterior chamber. Three dimensional PS-OCT data sets were acquired at IOP levels between 14 mmHg and 105 mmHg. Maps of scleral birefringence, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) retardation and relative RNFL/retina reflectivity were generated in the peripapillary area and quantitatively analyzed. All investigated parameters showed a substantial correlation with IOP. In the low IOP range of 14-45 mmHg only scleral birefringence showed statistically significant correlation. The polarization changes observed in the PS-OCT imaging study presented in this work suggest that birefringence of the sclera may be a promising IOP-related parameter to investigate.

  13. Investigation of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography towards the study of microstructure of articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasaragod, Deepa; Lu, Zenghai; Le Maitre, Christine; Wilkinson, J. Mark; Matcher, Stephen

    2013-03-01

    This paper highlights the extended Jones matrix calculus based multi-angle study carried out to understand the depth dependent structural orientation of the collagen fibers in articular cartilage using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). A 3D lamellar model for the collagen fiber orientation, with a quadratic profile for the arching of the collagen fibers in transitional zone which points towards an ordered arrangement of fibers in that zone is the basis of the organization architecture of collagen fibers in articular cartilage. Experimental data for both ex-vivo bovine fetlock and human patellar cartilage samples are compared with theoretical predictions, with a good quantitative agreement for bovine and a reasonable qualitative agreement for human articular cartilage samples being obtained

  14. Study of factors determining the radiation sensitivity of quartz crystal oscillators (A0189)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venables, J. D.; Ahearn, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    The correlation between defect cluster concentrations observed for different grades of quartz examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the electrical stability of quartz resonators exposed to complex radiation in an orbital LDEF was determined. It is demonstrated that the technique TEM provides a powerful method for studying the effect of radiation on crystalline quartz. Two factors suggest that the observed clusters may be responsible for the radiation-induced frequency drift and acoustic absorption effects associated with irradiated quartz resonators: (1) the clusters are expected to be very effective in modifying the piezoelectric properties of quartz because of the large strain fields associated with them; (2) both phenomena appear to be sensitive to the impurity concentration. It is suggested that TEM can be used to classify grades of quartz according to their suitability for use in radiation-hard resonators. This technique may identify the impurities that are responsible and thereby effect an improvement in the stability of quartz oscillators.

  15. Increase in sensitization to common airborne allergens among adults – two population-based studies 15 years apart

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies on time trends of allergic sensitization among adults are rare. The aim of the study was to compare the prevalence of allergic sensitization to common airborne allergens among adults 15 years apart and to identify risk factors for allergic sensitization. Methods Clinical examinations including skin prick test (SPT) and structured interviews were performed in two random population samples in 1994 and 2009. Furthermore, specific IgE was analyzed in 2009. SPT data were available for 483 subjects in 1994 and for 463 subjects in 2009 in ages 20–60 years. Specific IgE was analyzed in 692 subjects in ages 20–79 years. Results Sensitization to cat (16% to 26%, p < 0.001), dog (13% to 25%, p < 0.001), birch (13% to 18%, p = 0.031) and timothy (12% to 21%, p < 0.001), based on SPT, increased significantly from 1994 to 2009. Sensitization to any positive SPT increased from 35% to 39%, p = 0.13.The proportion of having ≥3 positive SPT reactions increased from 40% to 56%, p = 0.002. The sensitization pattern yielded similar results based on specific IgE. Risk factors for allergic sensitization were having a family history of allergy (OR 3.1, 95% CI 2.0-4.8 for any positive SPT; OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.0 for any elevated IgE) and urban living (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.7; OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0-2.4). Conclusions The prevalence of allergic sensitization to major airborne allergens as well as multi-sensitization increased significantly between the study years. Young age, a family history of allergy and urban living were significant risk factors for allergic sensitization. PMID:23758681

  16. Sensitivity-based analytical approaches to support human absolute bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohui Sophia; Jiang, Hao; Christopher, Lisa J; Shen, Jim X; Zeng, Jianing; Arnold, Mark E

    2014-02-01

    The characterization of absolute bioavailability (BA) is useful for non-intravenous (iv.) formulations during drug development and is required by some health authorities. A study design of co-administrating an iv. isotopically labeled microdose with a therapeutic oral dose is a viable approach for the determination of human PK and has been accepted by regulatory agencies. The implementation of an iv.-microdose with oral therapeutic dose in absolute BA studies speeds up clinical development. In recent years, AMS to measure a radiolabeled microdose has been utilized to support several clinical absolute BA studies. An alternative approach for conducting microdose studies is using LC-MS/MS alone to quantitate both the iv. drug and the oral drug. Because both labeled and unlabeled drugs can be measured simultaneously with LC-MS/MS, it is cost effective. However, for compounds with high volume of distribution and/or poor LC-MS/MS response, AMS still provides a superior LLOQ. In this Perspective, we discuss a paradigm for selecting either an LC-MS/MS or AMS-based approach for generating concentration data in absolute BA studies dependent on the required sensitivity.

  17. Study of sensitivity of hydraulic properties of unconfined aquifer with oscillatory pumping test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, A.; Goderniaux, P.

    2016-12-01

    Oscillatory pumping tests provide several advantages compared to classical hydraulic tests. The frequency of the induced stresses is known, and the aquifer response can be isolated quite easily from any possible noise, so that the accuracy of the results is improved. Another advantage relates to the fact that there is no net extraction or injection of groundwater over the total duration of the test. In contaminated sites, the possible plume of pollutant is potentially less affected and there is no cost related to water treatment. Recently, several studies have shown that multi-frequency sinusoidal pumping tests may be able to characterize the aquifer properties and their spatial distribution. However, most of the performed oscillatory tests have being conducted and studied in confined aquifers. The idea of this work is to investigate the use the sinusoidal pumping tests in unconfined aquifers, to performed a sensitivity analysis of the method, and to applied it in the field. Generic sinusoidal pumping tests have been numerically simulated. A sensitivity analysis was performed using a coupling between Modflow and Ucode_2005. The amplitude and the phase shift of the groundwater head fluctuation around the solicited well were considered relatively to the flow hydraulic parameters. Periodic pumping tests have been carried out in two different unconfined aquifers, composed of (1) fractured chalk and (2) fractured and slightly karstified limestone. In both experimental sites, pumping/injection cycles have been imposed to the water table with different frequencies. Groundwater heads were monitored in the well and in an adjacent observation piezometer. Measured data were automatically calibrated, to estimate the hydraulic parameters. Results were compared for different sets of observations. The calibrated hydraulic conductivity is generally quite similar to values calculated with classical pumping tests. The specified yield values are however lower.

  18. Sensitivity Studies of Advanced Reactors Coupled to High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) Hydrogen Production Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-04-01

    High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE), when coupled to an advanced nuclear reactor capable of operating at reactor outlet temperatures of 800 °C to 950 °C, has the potential to efficiently produce the large quantities of hydrogen needed to meet future energy and transportation needs. To evaluate the potential benefits of nuclear-driven hydrogen production, the UniSim process analysis software was used to evaluate different reactor concepts coupled to a reference HTE process design concept. The reference HTE concept included an Intermediate Heat Exchanger and intermediate helium loop to separate the reactor primary system from the HTE process loops and additional heat exchangers to transfer reactor heat from the intermediate loop to the HTE process loops. The two process loops consisted of the water/steam loop feeding the cathode side of a HTE electrolysis stack, and the steam or air sweep loop used to remove oxygen from the anode side. The UniSim model of the process loops included pumps to circulate the working fluids and heat exchangers to recover heat from the oxygen and hydrogen product streams to improve the overall hydrogen production efficiencies. The reference HTE process loop model was coupled to separate UniSim models developed for three different advanced reactor concepts (a high-temperature helium cooled reactor concept and two different supercritical CO2 reactor concepts). Sensitivity studies were then performed to evaluate the affect of reactor outlet temperature on the power cycle efficiency and overall hydrogen production efficiency for each of the reactor power cycles. The results of these sensitivity studies showed that overall power cycle and hydrogen production efficiencies increased with reactor outlet temperature, but the power cycle producing the highest efficiencies varied depending on the temperature range considered.

  19. Communicative sensitivity in the bilingual healthcare setting: a qualitative study of language awareness.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Fiona E; Roberts, Gwerfyl W; Jones, Peter; Spencer, Llinos H; Baker, Colin R; Williams, Cen

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports on the second phase of a national study in Wales. The research aimed to assess the level of Welsh language awareness amongst healthcare professionals across Wales, and to identify the factors that enhance language choice within service delivery. The literature suggests that language sensitive healthcare practice is central to ensuring high quality care. However, it is evident that language barriers continue to compromise the quality of care within nursing and other health services. One issue that has received little attention is the level of language awareness that healthcare professionals currently demonstrate. Furthermore the factors that influence language choice for bilingual/multilingual speakers are not well explored in the literature. The study involved semi-structured interviews with a range of healthcare professionals in acute and community settings across Wales. Using a systematic sampling matrix, a purposeful sample of 83 professionals was selected to participate. Twenty-seven of the respondents were nurses, health visitors and midwives. The interviews focussed on the factors that facilitate or impede language sensitive healthcare practice. All interviews were audiotaped and, using a framework analysis approach, conceptual codes were developed and defined and categories and sub-categories were constructed to create thematic charts. Three main themes were identified: care enhancement, which focussed on the process and outcome of offering language choice to bilingual patients; organizational issues, which reflected issues relating to the infrastructure of service provision; and training implications, which focused on Welsh language learning in health care. Complex dynamics of language use are in operation within bilingual healthcare settings and organizational as well as individual factors are important in facilitating appropriate language use. Many of the issues highlighted are not peculiar to the Welsh context, but apply to healthcare

  20. Respiratory diseases and allergic sensitization in swine breeders: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Galli, Luigina; Facchetti, Susanna; Raffetti, Elena; Donato, Francesco; D'Anna, Mauro

    2015-11-01

    The daily occupation as a swine breeder involves exposure to several bacterial components and organic dusts and inhalation of a large amount of allergens. To investigate the risk of respiratory diseases and atopy in swine breeders compared with the general population living in the same area. A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted in an agricultural area of northern Italy that enrolled a random sample of resident male breeders and non-breeders. Demographic features, comorbidities, and presence of allergic respiratory disease were retrieved through interview. Prick tests for common allergens were performed. An evaluation of pollen and mold in air samples taken inside and outside some swine confinement buildings also was performed. One hundred one male breeders (78 native-born, mean age ± SD 43.0 ± 11.1 years) and 82 non-breeders (43.0 ± 11.1 years) were enrolled. When restricting the analysis to native-born subjects, breeders vs non-breeders showed a lower prevalence of respiratory allergy (12.8% vs 31.1%, respectively, P = .002), asthma (6.4% vs 15.8%, P = .059), rhinitis (16.7% vs 51.2%, P < .001), persistent cough (5.1% vs 15.9%, P = .028), and sensitization to grass (7.7% vs 25.6%, P = .002). There was no difference in prick test positivity, polysensitization, nasal cytologic pattern, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity between breeders and non-breeders. Air concentration of molds and pollens was lower inside than outside the swine buildings investigated, particularly when the pigs were inside vs outside the buildings. This study suggests that swine breeding does not increase, and might decrease, the risk of pollen sensitization and allergic disease. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF AGGREGATED ENVIRONMENTAL INDICES WITH A CASE-STUDY OF THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental indicators are often aggregated into a single index for various purposes in environmental studies. Aggregated indices derived from the same data set can differ, usually because the aggregated indices' sensitivities are not thoroughly analyzed. Furthermore, if a sens...

  2. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS OF AGGREGATED ENVIRONMENTAL INDICES WITH A CASE-STUDY OF THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental indicators are often aggregated into a single index for various purposes in environmental studies. Aggregated indices derived from the same data set can differ, usually because the aggregated indices' sensitivities are not thoroughly analyzed. Furthermore, if a sens...

  3. Sensitivity of different generations and developmental stages in studies on reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Schulz, F; Batke, M; Mangelsdorf, I; Pohlenz-Michel, C; Simetska, N; Lewin, G

    2014-04-21

    Numerous studies on reproductive toxicity are expected to be necessary under the EU program on Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH). Therefore, it is important to analyse existing testing strategies including also the recently implemented extended one-generation reproduction toxicity study (EOGRTS, OECD guideline 443). For this purpose the responsiveness of the different generations and developmental stages in studies on reproductive toxicity is analysed and critical targets of reproductive toxicity are identified by using the Fraunhofer FeDTex database. The F1 generation is identified as most responsive generation in more than 50% of one-generation and multi-generation reproduction studies. Within the F1 generation the adult stage is mostly affected compared to the prenatal or postnatal stage. The target analysis in F1 has revealed alterations in body weight as highly sensitive for all developmental stages. Other important targets are the liver, kidney, testes, prostate, sperm parameters as well as developmental landmarks. The findings in the F2 generation have shown a higher responsiveness than F1 only in 3% of the studies. Although in 29 studies new effects are observed in F2 offspring compared to F1 irrespective of dose levels, overall no severe new effects have emerged that would change classification and labelling and justify an F1 mating. The presented data support the importance of F1 for risk assessment and demonstrate that the study design of the EOGRTS is a suitable alternative to two-generation studies. However, compared to a conventional one-generation study the EOGRTS may identify additional effects but will change risk assessment with respect to NOELs only in rare cases.

  4. Prospective multicentre study of the U-SENS test method for skin sensitization testing.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Piroird, C; Aujoulat, M; Dreyfuss, S; Hoffmann, S; Hohenstein, A; Meloni, M; Nardelli, L; Gerbeix, C; Cotovio, J

    2015-12-25

    The U-SENS™ is a test method based on the human myeloid U937 cell line to assess the skin sensitisation potential of substances. To demonstrate its robustness, a multicentre validation study with four laboratories testing 24 coded substances has been conducted according to internationally agreed principles. The primary objective of the study was to enlarge the U-SENS™'s reproducibility database. Secondary objectives were to provide additional evidence on its transferability and its predictive capability. Reproducibility within laboratories was approximately 92%, while the reproducibility between laboratories was 87.5%. Predictivity for the 24 validation substances was high, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy being on average at least 93.8%. Similar performances are obtained for 38 substances when combining the study results with those of an earlier multicentre study, as well as with an automated version of the U-SENS™. With reliability and relevance similar to comparable non-animal skin sensitisation test methods, which have achieved regulatory acceptance, it is concluded that the U-SENS™ is a well reproducible and predictive test method. This profiles the U-SENS™ as a valuable addition to the suite of non-animal testing methods for skin sensitisation with the potential to significantly contribute to the development of integrated testing strategies.

  5. Study of Low Energy Electron Inelastic Scattering Mechanisms Using Spin Sensitive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hongbing

    1995-01-01

    Spin sensitive electron spectroscopies were used to study low energy electron inelastic scattering from metal surfaces and thin films. In these experiments, a beam of spin polarized electrons from a GaAs source is directed on the sample surface, and the spin polarization and intensity are measured as a function of energy loss and scattering angle by a Mott electron polarimeter coupled with a concentric hemispherical energy analyzer. Systematic studies of the angular dependence of inelastically scattered electrons were conducted on a Cu(100) surface, and Mo/Cu(100), non-magnetized Fe/Cu(100), and Co/Cu(100) films. The polarization and intensity of scattered electrons were measured as function of energy loss and scattering angle. Further studies were also conducted on Ag(100) surface and amorphous Cu/Ag(100) films. From the experimental results, the angular distributions of dipole and impact scattered electrons can be determined individually and both are found to peak in the specular scattering direction. Preliminary studies were conducted on magnetized Co/Cu(100) films. The spin dependent scattering intensity asymmetry was measured, with a clearly observable peak at energy loss of ~1 eV, which coincides with the band splitting. The polarizations of secondary electrons produced by an unpolarized primary beam were also measured. The polarizations can be related to the band polarization of magnetized cobalt films.

  6. Experimental study of sensitivity enhancement in surface plasmon resonance biosensors by use of periodic metallic nanowires.

    PubMed

    Byun, Kyung Min; Yoon, Soon Joon; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Sung June

    2007-07-01

    We have experimentally confirmed sensitivity enhancement of a nanowire-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor structure. Gold nanowires with periods of 200 and 500 nm were fabricated, respectively, by electron-beam and interference lithography on a gold/SF10 substrate. Sensitivity enhancement was measured to be 44% compared with a conventional thin-film-based SPR structure for nanowires of 200 nm period and 31% for 500 nm when evaluated using ethanol at a varied concentration. This result is consistent with numerical data. Surface roughness is responsible for sensitivity reduction by more than 10%. More significant sensitivity improvement can be achieved by inducing strong localized plasmon coupling with finer nanowires.

  7. Sensitivity study of multilayer thin-film bulk acoustic resonator for mass sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiqiang; Li, Fang; Qin, Lifeng; Wang, Qing-Ming

    2016-10-01

    The sensitivity of multilayer thin-film bulk acoustic resonators (MTFBARs) used as mass sensors is investigated. MTFBAR sensors with the structure of a mass-sensitive layer/electrode layer/piezo layer/electrode layer were used. Two methods, one using electric impedance and the other displacement, were adopted for the determination of sensitivity. Simulation results show that the two methods agree well, and the characteristic acoustic impedance and thickness of the non-piezo layers strongly affect mass sensitivity. It was found that high acoustic impedance in the non-piezo layer is not helpful for sensitivity improvement. Sensitivity is improved by choosing an appropriate thickness for the low acoustic impedance non-piezo layer, and the maximum sensitivity can be obtained by choosing suitable thickness combinations for the layers. Moreover, it was found that MTFBAR quality factor and sensitivity are simultaneously improved by adopting a high-quality-factor non-piezo layer with low acoustic impedance for an air working environment, whereas a balance between quality factor and sensitivity is found through optimization of the non-piezo layers for a water working environment. These results can be used for the design and application of MTFBAR mass sensors.

  8. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Nanostructured Electrodes for Use in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiawei

    Among various photovoltaic technologies available in the emerging market, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are deemed as an effective, competitive solution to the increasing demand for high-efficiency PV devices. To move towards full commercialization, challenges remain in further improvement of device stability as well as reduction of material and manufacturing costs. This study aims at rational synthesis and photovoltaic characterization of two nanostructured electrode materials (i.e. SnO2 nanofibers and activated graphene nanoplatelets) for use as photoanode and counter electrode in dye-sensitized solar cells. The main objective is to explore the favorable charge transport features of SnO2 nanofiber network and simultaneously replace the high-priced conventional electrocatalytic nanomaterials (e.g. Pt nanoparticles) used in existing counter electrode of DSSCs. To achieve this objective, a multiphysics model of electrode kinetics was developed to optimize various design parameters and cell configurations. The porous hollow SnO2 nanofibers were successfully synthesized via a facile route consisting of electrospinning precursor polymer nanofibers, followed by controlled carbonization. The novel SnO2/TiO2 composite photoanode materials carry advantages of SnO2 nanofiber network (e.g. nanostructural continuity, high electron mobility) and TiO2 nanoparticles (e.g. high specific area), and therefore show excellent photovoltaic properties including improved short-circuit current and fill factors. In addition, hydrothermally activated graphene nanoplatelets (aGNP) were used as a catalytic counter electrode material to substitute for conventionally used platinum nanoparticles. Improved catalytic performance of aGNP electrode was achieved through increased surface area and better control of morphology. Dye-sensitized solar cells using these aGNP electrodes had power conversion efficiencies comparable to those using platinum nanoparticles with I-/I3- redox mediators

  9. Fibrinolysis and insulin sensitivity in imidapril and candesartan (FISIC study) recipients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fogari, Roberto; Zoppi, Annalisa; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Mugellini, Amedeo; Lazzari, Pierangelo; Santoro, Tara; Derosa, Giuseppe

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of imidapril and candesartan on fibrinolysis and insulin sensitivity in normoweight hypertensive patients. After a 2-week wash-out period, 61 patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension were randomized to imidapril or candesartan for 12 weeks. Blood pressure (BP), plasma tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) antigen activities were evaluated at baseline and during treatment. The patients underwent a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (insulin sensitivity was evaluated as glucose infusion rate during the last 30 min) and a desmopressin test (with desmopressin infusion in the brachial artery) to evaluate endothelial ability to release t-PA. Imidapril and candesartan induced similar systolic/diastolic BP reductions (-16/12.6 and -16.1/12.2 mm Hg, respectively, P<0.001 vs. baseline). Imidapril increased glucose infusion rate (+1.1 mg min(-1) per kg, P<0.02), whereas candesartan did not change it. Both drugs decreased PAI-1 antigen activity after 4 weeks of treatment; subsequently, only the decreasing effect of imidapril was sustained throughout the 12 weeks, whereas candesartan increased PAI-1 activity at week 12 (P<0.05 vs. baseline, P<0.01 vs. imidapril). Activity of t-PA decreased with candesartan (from 0.48±0.16 to 0.43±0.14 IU ml(-1), P<0.05) but not with imidapril. Activity of t-PA in response to desmopressin was increased more by imidapril (+4.45 IU ml(-1)) than by candesartan (+2.73 IU ml(-1), P<0.01 vs. imidapril). These results indicate that in normoweight hypertensive patients, despite similar BP reduction, imidapril but not candesartan improved the fibrinolytic balance, suggesting that mechanisms other than Ang II inhibition, possibly including bradykinin-mediated effects on insulin sensitivity and endothelial function, may be responsible for these different effects.

  10. Postprandial glucose fluxes and insulin sensitivity during exercise: a study in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Michele; Hinshaw, Ling; Mallad, Ashwini; Dalla Man, Chiara; Sparacino, Giovanni; Johnson, Matthew; Carter, Rickey; Basu, Rita; Kudva, Yogish; Cobelli, Claudio; Basu, Ananda

    2013-08-15

    Quantifying the effect size of acute exercise on insulin sensitivity (SI(exercise)) and simultaneous measurement of glucose disappearance (R(d)), endogenous glucose production (EGP), and meal glucose appearance in the postprandial state has not been developed in humans. To do so, we studied 12 healthy subjects [5 men, age 37.1 ± 3.1 yr, body mass index 24.1 ± 1.1 kg/m², fat-free mass (FFM) 50.9 ± 3.9 kg] during moderate exercise at 50% V(O₂max) for 75 min, 120-195 min after a triple-tracer mixed meal consumed at time 0. Tracer infusion rates were adjusted to achieve constant tracer-to-tracee ratio and minimize non-steady-state errors. Glucose turnover was estimated by accounting for the nonstationary kinetics introduced by exercise. Insulin sensitivity index was calculated in each subject both in the absence [time (t) = 0-120 min, SI(rest)] and presence (t = 0-360 min, SI(exercise)) of physical activity. EGP at t = 0 min (13.4 ± 1.1 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) fell at t = 120 min (2.4 ± 0.4 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) and then rapidly rose almost eightfold at t = 180 min (18.2 ± 2.6 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) before gradually falling at t = 360 min (10.6 ± 0.9 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹). R(d) rapidly peaked at t = 120 min at the start of exercise (89.5 ± 11.6 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) and then gradually declined at t = 195 min (26.4 ± 3.3 μM·kg FFM⁻¹·min⁻¹) before returning to baseline at t = 360 min. SI(exercise) was significantly higher than SI(rest) (21.6 ± 3.7 vs. 12.5 ± 2.0 10⁻⁴ dl·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹ per μU/ml, P < 0.0005). Glucose turnover was estimated for the first time during exercise with the triple-tracer technique. Our results, applying state-of-the-art techniques, show that moderate exercise almost doubles postprandial insulin sensitivity index in healthy subjects.

  11. Photobiomodulation in the Prevention of Tooth Sensitivity Caused by In-Office Dental Bleaching. A Randomized Placebo Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Calheiros, Andrea Paiva Corsetti; Moreira, Maria Stella; Gonçalves, Flávia; Aranha, Ana Cecília Correa; Cunha, Sandra Ribeiro; Steiner-Oliveira, Carolina; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Ramalho, Karen Müller

    2017-08-01

    Analyze the effect of photobiomodulation in the prevention of tooth sensitivity after in-office dental bleaching. Tooth sensitivity is a common clinical consequence of dental bleaching. Therapies for prevention of sensitivity have been investigated in literature. This study was developed as a randomized, placebo blind clinical trial. Fifty patients were selected (n = 10) and randomly divided into five groups: (1) control, (2) placebo, (3) laser before bleaching, (4) laser after bleaching, and (5) laser before and after bleaching. Irradiation was performed perpendicularly, in contact, on each tooth during 10 sec per point in two points. The first point was positioned in the middle of the tooth crown and the second in the periapical region. Photobiomodulation was applied using the following parameters: 780 nm, 40 mW, 10 J/cm(2), 0.4 J per point. Pain was analyzed before, immediately after, and seven subsequent days after bleaching. Patients were instructed to report pain using the scale: 0 = no tooth sensitivity, 1 = gentle sensitivity, 2 = moderate sensitivity, 3 = severe sensitivity. There were no statistical differences between groups at any time (p > 0.05). More studies, with others parameters and different methods of tooth sensitivity analysis, should be performed to complement the results found. Within the limitation of the present study, the laser parameters of photobiomodulation tested in the present study were not efficient in preventing tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

  12. A Pilot Study of a Picture- and Audio-Assisted Self-Interviewing Method (PIASI) for the Study of Sensitive Questions on HIV in the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarnio, Pauliina; Kulmala, Teija

    2016-01-01

    Self-interview methods such as audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI) are used to improve the accuracy of interview data on sensitive topics in large trials. Small field studies on sensitive topics would benefit from methodological alternatives. In a study on male involvement in antenatal HIV testing in a largely illiterate population…

  13. Quantitative study of stratum corneum ceramides contents in patients with sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Jin; Chung, Bo Young; Lee, Hee Bong; Kim, Hye One; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Cheol Heon

    2012-03-01

    People with sensitive skin (SS) are those who state their skin is more sensitive than that of average persons. The stratum corneum is responsible for maintaining skin barrier function. Ceramides, major constituents of stratum corneum lipids, have been shown to predominantly contribute to the role. It has been suggested that barrier function in SS is decreased. However, we could find very few reports about stratum corneum ceramides in SS. This study was done to find out differences in stratum corneum ceramides between SS and non-SS groups. Fifty individuals (20 with SS and 30 with non-SS) were recruited. Lactic acid sting test (LAST) was performed on the left cheek. On six sites including the right cheek, arm, thigh, leg, back and palm, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and erythema index (EI) were measured. On the above six sites, stratum corneum sheets were obtained by stripping with cyanoacrylate resin and stratum corneum lipids were extracted, then, analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. LAST scores were higher in the SS group, but not statistically significant. There were no differences in TEWL and EI values between the two groups. The mean value of the quantity of stratum corneum ceramides on the face was significantly lower in the SS group. On other sites, mean values were also lower in the SS group, but not statistically significant. The quantity of ceramides was significantly decreased in the face of the SS group compared to that of the non-SS group. These results suggest that the decrease in stratum corneum ceramides on facial skin could be related to SS development.

  14. Instrument for elemental composition studies of solids on planetary surfaces with sub-ppm detection sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulej, M.; Riedo, A.; Meyer, S.; Iakovleva, M.; Neuland, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    Current space instruments prove to be successful for a global chemical mapping of the entire planetary body or to perform a local chemical analysis, helpful in determination of modal mineralogy. Nevertheless, the sensitivity and low spatial resolution of these spectroscopic instruments limit the chemical analysis to the most abundant elements with some exceptions (e.g., measurements of Th, K, and H elements by Gamma and neutron spectrometers). Furthermore, the spectroscopic analysis typically provides the chemical composition of 1 micrometer of the uppermost surface layers, which are frequently affected by space weathering effects, again, with the exception of Gamma/neutron investigation where the composition of up to 1 m thick subsurface can be measured. New and recently accepted space instruments, such as Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS) and Laser Ablation/Ionisation Mass Spectrometers (LIMS) are thought to improve these chemical analysis providing more localised chemical sampling with higher sensitivity and accuracy. We will demonstrate the performance of a highly miniaturised laser ablation time of flight mass spectrometer designed for space research for the elemental analysis of solid materials (Rohner et al., 2003). The instrument enables mass spectrometric analysis with sub-ppm detection limits and a typical mass resolution of ~700, sufficient to detect all elements and their isotopes. The studies of NIST standards, minerals and meteoritic samples will be reviewed to emphasize its capability for quantitative analysis and chemical mapping of the inhomogeneous samples with a high spatial (vertical and lateral) resolution. LIMS measurements provide means for investigation of principal elements (metals, non-metals) and allow an analysis of trace elements distributed within a suite of soils and rocks. Thus, LIMS measurements will allow the identification of the mineralogical context of planetary surface and better understanding of the geologic/geochemical structure

  15. A Sensitivity Study of the Thermodynamic Environment on GFDL Model Hurricane Intensity: Implications for Global Warming.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weixing; Tuleya, Robert E.; Ginis, Isaac

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to ±4°C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26° to 31°C given the same relative humidity profile.The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO2 is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity is highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO2.

  16. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  17. A parametric sensitivity study for single-stage-to-orbit hypersonic vehicles using trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, T. Alan; Schmidt, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The class of hypersonic vehicle configurations with single stage-to-orbit (SSTO) capability reflect highly integrated airframe and propulsion systems. These designs are also known to exhibit a large degree of interaction between the airframe and engine dynamics. Consequently, even simplified hypersonic models are characterized by tightly coupled nonlinear equations of motion. In addition, hypersonic SSTO vehicles present a major system design challenge; the vehicle's overall mission performance is a function of its subsystem efficiencies including structural, aerodynamic, propulsive, and operational. Further, all subsystem efficiencies are interrelated, hence, independent optimization of the subsystems is not likely to lead to an optimum design. Thus, it is desired to know the effect of various subsystem efficiencies on overall mission performance. For the purposes of this analysis, mission performance will be measured in terms of the payload weight inserted into orbit. In this report, a trajectory optimization problem is formulated for a generic hypersonic lifting body for a specified orbit-injection mission. A solution method is outlined, and results are detailed for the generic vehicle, referred to as the baseline model. After evaluating the performance of the baseline model, a sensitivity study is presented to determine the effect of various subsystem efficiencies on mission performance. This consists of performing a parametric analysis of the basic design parameters, generating a matrix of configurations, and determining the mission performance of each configuration. Also, the performance loss due to constraining the total head load experienced by the vehicle is evaluated. The key results from this analysis include the formulation of the sizing problem for this vehicle class using trajectory optimization, characteristics of the optimal trajectories, and the subsystem design sensitivities.

  18. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Isao; Hitsumoto, Shinichi; Maruyama, Koutatsu; Nishida, Wataru; Eguchi, Eri; Kato, Tadahiro; Kawamura, Ryoichi; Takata, Yasunori; Onuma, Hiroshi; Osawa, Haruhiko; Tanigawa, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI). Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV) indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN) and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD). Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF) power, low frequency (LF) power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10). Conclusions Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals. PMID:26277879

  19. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  20. Multi-Land Surface Models Sensitivity Study on Ecosystem Responses to Enhanced and Extended Drought Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Schlosser, C. A.; Kicklighter, D. W.; Felzer, B. S.; Paw U, K. T.; Chang, K. Y.

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of ecosystem's hydrological responses to droughts of different time scales and magnitudes using multiple land surface models. Four land surface models with different biogeophysical parameterizations and representations are used to simulate evapotranspiration and carbon dioxide fluxes during these extreme events. The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) is a process-based ecosystem model that uses spatially referenced information on climate, elevation, soils, vegetation and water availability to make monthly estimates of vegetation and soil carbon and nitrogen fluxes and pool sizes. There are two versions of TEM model, the TEM-