Science.gov

Sample records for masing lauri lutsar

  1. The Management and Security Expert (MASE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Mark D.; Barr, Stanley J.; Gryphon, Coranth D.; Keegan, Jeff; Kniker, Catherine A.; Krolak, Patrick D.

    1991-01-01

    The Management and Security Expert (MASE) is a distributed expert system that monitors the operating systems and applications of a network. It is capable of gleaning the information provided by the different operating systems in order to optimize hardware and software performance; recognize potential hardware and/or software failure, and either repair the problem before it becomes an emergency, or notify the systems manager of the problem; and monitor applications and known security holes for indications of an intruder or virus. MASE can eradicate much of the guess work of system management.

  2. Hot Water In The ISM: Masing and Non-Masing Emission From Non-Dissociative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, M. J.; Neufeld, D. A.

    1993-12-01

    We investigate the possibility that dense non-dissociative shocks may be a source of water maser emission in regions of active star formation. Recent observations of maser line ratios in several star forming regions (Melnick et al. 1993 ApJ 416, L37) indicate that water masers are excited in T>1000K gas, temperatures too high for molecular emission behind dissociative shocks. We solve for the structure of, and emission from, multi-fluid shocks in gas with n(H_2)>10(7) cm(-3) and Vshock< 50 km s(-1) , using new treatments of molecular cooling and ion-neutral coupling in dense gas. Such high densities are required by maser collisional pumping schemes. In this gas, the fractional ionization is low and carried on grains; results are presented for a variety of assumed grain size distributions and as a function of shock velocity, magnetic field and preshock density. Suitable preshock conditions yield individual masing regions with sizes of ~ 10(13) cm, consistent with interferometric observations of 22 GHz maser spots, and peak masing gas temperatures of ~ fewtimes 10(3) K, consistent with the temperatures inferred from maser line ratios. Although these masers are an `exotic' manifestation of the passing shock waves, most of the shock energy emerges in non-masing rovibrational line emission from H_2O,OH,CO and H_2, and we investigate this emission from shocks with densities as low as n(H_2) ~ 10(5cm(-3)) . Our study of the expected H_2O far-IR line emissions is motivated, in particular, by the possibility of observing such emissions with the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory.

  3. An Application of MacLaury's Vantage Theory to Abstract Categories: Identity and the Process of Categorisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabiszak, Malgorzata

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an application of Robert E. MacLaury's Vantage Theory (VT) to the analysis of real life spoken discourse. It utilizes Dennis R. Preston's (1994) modification of MacLaury's VT. It elucidates how cognitive processes of coordinate selection and combination contribute to the on-line construction of category membership in the abstract…

  4. An Exchange between Laurie Grobman and Richard C. Raymond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching English in the Two-Year College, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a commentary exchange between authors Laurie Grobman and Richard C. Raymond regarding Raymond's article "Re-placing Lit in Comp II: Pragmatic/Humanistic Benefits." Grobman said that in her brief commentary on Raymond's article, she chooses not to explicitly address his thesis that literature belongs in a research-based…

  5. Laurie R. Santos: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. The 2012 winner is Laurie R. Santos for creative and insightful investigations of cognition across a broad range of species and psychological domains, illuminating cognitive…

  6. Antibacterial activity of LauriPure in vitro and on skin of processed broilers.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies were conducted to examine the ability of LauriPure to inhibit the growth of Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus simulans, and Listeria innocua isolates recovered from processed broiler carcasses. In vitro studies were conducted using the Bioscreen C Microbiology Reader t...

  7. [Persea schiedeana (Lauraceae), a new host of Heilipus lauri Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Veracruz, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Vildózola, Alvaro; Del Angel-Coronel, Oscar A; Cruz-Castillo, Juan G; Váldez-Carrasco, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    The presence of the Molytinae Heilipus lauri Boheman is reported for the first time attacking fruits of Persea schiedeana, commonly called 'chinene' in Huatusco and Zongolica, state of Veracruz, Mexico.

  8. Beyond Chloride Brines: Variable Metabolomic Responses in the Anaerobic Organism Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 to NaCl and MgSO4 at Identical Water Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schwendner, Petra; Bohmeier, Maria; Rettberg, Petra; Beblo-Vranesevic, Kristina; Gaboyer, Frédéric; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Perras, Alexandra K.; Vannier, Pauline; Marteinsson, Viggó T.; Garcia-Descalzo, Laura; Gómez, Felipe; Malki, Moustafa; Amils, Ricardo; Westall, Frances; Riedo, Andreas; Monaghan, Euan P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Cabezas, Patricia; Walter, Nicolas; Cockell, Charles

    2018-01-01

    Growth in sodium chloride (NaCl) is known to induce stress in non-halophilic microorganisms leading to effects on the microbial metabolism and cell structure. Microorganisms have evolved a number of adaptations, both structural and metabolic, to counteract osmotic stress. These strategies are well-understood for organisms in NaCl-rich brines such as the accumulation of certain organic solutes (known as either compatible solutes or osmolytes). Less well studied are responses to ionic environments such as sulfate-rich brines which are prevalent on Earth but can also be found on Mars. In this paper, we investigated the global metabolic response of the anaerobic bacterium Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 to osmotic salt stress induced by either magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) or NaCl at the same water activity (0.975). Using a non-targeted mass spectrometry approach, the intensity of hundreds of metabolites was measured. The compatible solutes L-asparagine and sucrose were found to be increased in both MgSO4 and NaCl compared to the control sample, suggesting a similar osmotic response to different ionic environments. We were able to demonstrate that Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 accumulated a range of other compatible solutes. However, we also found the global metabolic responses, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism and carbohydrate metabolism, to be salt-specific, thus, suggesting ion-specific regulation of specific metabolic pathways. PMID:29535699

  9. The responses of an anaerobic microorganism, Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 to individual and combined simulated Martian stresses

    PubMed Central

    Bohmeier, Maria; Perras, Alexandra K.; Schwendner, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Cockell, Charles S.; Pukall, Rüdiger; Vannier, Pauline; Marteinsson, Viggo T.; Monaghan, Euan P.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Garcia-Descalzo, Laura; Gómez, Felipe; Malki, Moustafa; Amils, Ricardo; Gaboyer, Frédéric; Westall, Frances; Cabezas, Patricia; Walter, Nicolas; Rettberg, Petra

    2017-01-01

    The limits of life of aerobic microorganisms are well understood, but the responses of anaerobic microorganisms to individual and combined extreme stressors are less well known. Motivated by an interest in understanding the survivability of anaerobic microorganisms under Martian conditions, we investigated the responses of a new isolate, Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 to individual and combined stresses associated with the Martian surface. This organism belongs to an adaptable and persistent genus of anaerobic microorganisms found in many environments worldwide. The effects of desiccation, low pressure, ionizing radiation, varying temperature, osmotic pressure, and oxidizing chemical compounds were investigated. The strain showed a high tolerance to desiccation, with a decline of survivability by four orders of magnitude during a storage time of 85 days. Exposure to X-rays resulted in dose-dependent inactivation for exposure up to 600 Gy while applied doses above 750 Gy led to complete inactivation. The effects of the combination of desiccation and irradiation were additive and the survivability was influenced by the order in which they were imposed. Ionizing irradiation and subsequent desiccation was more deleterious than vice versa. By contrast, the presence of perchlorates was not found to significantly affect the survival of the Yersinia strain after ionizing radiation. These data show that the organism has the capacity to survive and grow in physical and chemical stresses, imposed individually or in combination that are associated with Martian environment. Eventually it lost its viability showing that many of the most adaptable anaerobic organisms on Earth would be killed on Mars today. PMID:29069099

  10. KSC-2014-3077

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-30

    VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – A memorial plaque honoring Laurie K. Walls is affixed to the umbilical tower on Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California for the launch of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, or OCO-2. Walls, a thermal analysis engineer with the Launch Services Program, or LSP, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, died June 4. This dedication to Walls from the members of the launch team was read during the OCO-2 countdown commentary: "The OCO-2 mission has special meaning to NASA's Launch Services Program as we have dedicated it to one of our LSP Teammates, Laurie Walls. Laurie began her career over 30 years ago as a thermal engineer for McDonnell Douglas in Huntsville, Alabama, supporting NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. She moved to Florida in 1985. Shortly after coming to Florida, Laurie became a civil servant working on the Shuttle program return to flight effort post-Challenger. In 1998, Laurie joined the newly formed Launch Services Program as one of the founding members of the flight analysis group. She served in LSP as the thermal discipline expert until her untimely death earlier this month. Laurie worked thermal issues for numerous NASA Delta II and Atlas V missions. Additionally, she provided key thermal support for both Delta II Heavy development and Atlas V Certification. Laurie was an integral member of LSP's family and she was truly dedicated to NASA and the LSP team. She will be greatly missed. We honor Laurie with a special memorial placed on the SLC-2 umbilical tower, and we thank ULA for helping to make this happen." Launch of OCO-2 is scheduled for 5:56 a.m. EDT on July 1. To learn more about NASA's Launch Services Program, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/kennedy/launchingrockets/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Randy Beaudoin

  11. 76 FR 14372 - Glenn/Colusa County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... agenda items contact Eduardo Olmedo, DFO, 825 N. Humboldt Ave., Willows, CA 95988 or Laurie Pearson..., Stonyford, CA 95979. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie Pearson, Glenn/Colusa RAC Coordinator, USDA...

  12. Uterine sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 88. Crum CP, Laury AR, Hirsch MS, Quick CM, Peters WA. Undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. In: Crum CP, Quick CM, Laury AR, Peters WA, Hirsch MS, eds. Gynecologic and Obstetric ...

  13. 76 FR 35399 - Glenn/Colusa Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... building to view comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie L. Pearson, Visitor Information...: Laurie L. Pearson, Glenn/Colusa R.A.C. Coordinator, PO Box 160, Stonyford, CA 95979, or by e-mail to...

  14. 76 FR 14042 - San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Alamosa, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... the subject line of the message. Fax: Attn: Laurie Shannon, Planning Team Leader, 303/236-4792. U.S. Mail: Laurie Shannon, Planning Team Leader, Division of Refuge Planning, P.O. Box 25486, Denver, CO 80225-0486. In-Person Drop-off: You may drop off comments during regular business hours at the above...

  15. RESOLVING THE BRIGHT HCN(1–0) EMISSION TOWARD THE SEYFERT 2 NUCLEUS OF M51: SHOCK ENHANCEMENT BY RADIO JETS AND WEAK MASING BY INFRARED PUMPING?

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Satoki; Trung, Dinh-V-; Boone, Frédéric

    2015-01-20

    We present high angular resolution observations of the HCN(1-0) emission (at ∼1'' or ∼34 pc), together with CO J = 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 observations, toward the Seyfert 2 nucleus of M51 (NGC 5194). The overall HCN(1-0) distribution and kinematics are very similar to that of the CO lines, which have been indicated as the jet-entrained molecular gas in our past observations. In addition, high HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio of about unity is observed along the jets, similar to that observed at the shocked molecular gas in our Galaxy. These results strongly indicate that both diffuse and dense gases are entrained bymore » the jets and outflowing from the active galactic nucleus. The channel map of HCN(1-0) at the systemic velocity shows a strong emission right at the nucleus, where no obvious emission has been detected in the CO lines. The HCN(1-0)/CO(1-0) brightness temperature ratio at this region reaches >2, a value that cannot be explained considering standard physical/chemical conditions. Based on our calculations, we suggest infrared pumping and possibly weak HCN masing, but still requiring an enhanced HCN abundance for the cause of this high ratio. This suggests the presence of a compact dense obscuring molecular gas in front of the nucleus of M51, which remains unresolved at our ∼1'' (∼34 pc) resolution, and consistent with the Seyfert 2 classification picture.« less

  16. Breast Cancer Research Training Grant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    review the Program and its requirements and opportunities, and to answer questions and plan each student’s curriculum. Trainees are encouraged to...course requirements and plans to take the qualifying exmaination in summer, 1997. Yvette is an African- American. Laurie Hafer (BS, Microbiology...breast cancer research and plans to work with Dr. Fenton in studies of macrophage function. She was a co-author on Laurie Hafer’s poster at the AACR

  17. Lecture to inquiry: The transformation of a tech prep biology teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskell, Deborah Harris

    As teachers implement the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996) many have to reform the instructional methods they have used throughout their careers. This case study examines the transformation of Laurie, a 20-year teacher, during her first year of change from a "traditional" textbook/lecture style of teaching to a facilitator of an inquiry-based classroom. Implementing change requires not only pedagogical expertise, but also the belief that the modifications can be made and that the outcomes are significant. Using Bandura's social cognitive theory as a framework, changes in Laurie's self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and motivation are followed throughout the transition. During her first year of change, Laurie used worksheets, small group activities, and guided inquiry activities, all strategies in which she had high self-efficacy and experienced positive student outcomes. She rarely used class forums, authentic assessment, and formative assessment. Factors that influenced her change were experiential professional development opportunities that allowed her to practice inquiry-based techniques, a change in her teaching environment from college prep chemistry to tech prep biology, autonomy regarding classroom decisions, and reflective decision making as she learned through experience. Using a standards-based biology textbook increased her self-efficacy toward using inquiry-based practices. The textbook format of embedding text in activities rather than adding activities to the text resulted in an increase of the number and frequency of activities done. Facilitating the textbook's Guided Inquiries and Extended Inquiries helped Laurie gain experience with inquiry-based methods. She also realized that when building from the students' concrete experiences, her students were able to attain higher-level thinking skills. The study revealed six factors contributing to Laurie's change process: (a) experiential professional development, (b) motivation for change

  18. "The Earth Under my Shoes", a Poster Where Research and Outreach Merge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Artola, O. A.; Pérez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment is a cooperative research project that will help a lot of people to know about the behavior of the subduction of Cocos plate beneath North America, especially in rural communities where its 100 seismic stations are located. MASE is not only focused in its research results, it is also concerned about outreach to the community. To achieve this, MASE conducts an information program on the experiment and seismology, especially targetted to children, to educate them about seismic prevention. MASE field operations in Guerrero, Morelos, Distrito Federal, Estado de México, Hidalgo and Veracruz are ending this year, and our last outreach activity is providing MASE host sites with a poster informing about the experiment and its results. This poster will include pictures about the instruments, a collection of key seismograms, figures of the final seismic model obtained by the MASE research group, showing our enhanced knowledge of the interior of the Earth under each particular site, and a reminder that Mexico is a seismic country and they should be always prepared.

  19. Miniature Robotic Submarine for Exploring Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto; Bruhn, Fredrik; Carsey, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The miniature autonomous submersible explorer (MASE) has been proposed as a means of scientific exploration -- especially, looking for signs of life -- in harsh, relatively inaccessible underwater environments. Basically, the MASE would be a small instrumented robotic submarine (see figure) that could launch itself or could be launched from another vehicle. Examples of environments that might be explored by use of the MASE include subglacial lakes, deep-ocean hydrothermal vents, acidic or alkaline lakes, brine lenses in permafrost, and ocean regions under Antarctic ice shelves.

  20. Carol Laurie | NREL

    Science.gov Websites

    Wind Energy Association WINDPOWER. Prior to joining the wind communications team, Carol served on NREL's solar communications team, where she managed communications for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon, a highly visible international student competition. Carol led a team of writers

  1. ARC-1984-AC85-0023-1-Edit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1984-12-10

    Medium Altitude Missions Branch: C-141 KAO Personnel, Mike Robinson, Mike Landis, Ed Hall, Tom Jones, John Graybeal, Louis Haughney, Brian Wright, Allan Meyer, Dick Gallant, Al Silva, Louis Russo, Hap Arnold, Randy Hobbs, Bill Laurie, Louis Foss, Sue Laurie, Tony Tieas, Tom Connors, Dave Brown, Alan Dunn, Don Oishi, Don Olson, Jim McClenahan, Wally Stahl, Sandy Mayville, Hank Hermosillo, Doug Ziebell, Ben Horita, Bill Hightower, Ron Sanchez, Terry Stoeffler, Lee Montz, Gene Moniz, John Brown, Bob America, Mike Craig, Kent Shiffer, Sandy Kogan, George Gull, Judy Pipher, Larry Helpher, Don MacKinnon, Jesse Bregmann, Jim Eilers, Nabil Hanania, Jim Cockrell, Keith Ackerman, Dave Walton, Lloyd Domeier, Pat Atchison

  2. In-port derivatization coupled to different extraction techniques for the determination of alkylphenols in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, J; Monperrus, M; Amouroux, D; Preud'Homme, H; Prieto, A; Zuloaga, O

    2014-05-02

    Large volume injection (LVI)-in port silylation coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for the determination of alkylphenols (APs) in water samples applying four different extraction approaches was evaluated. Among the variables studied for in-port derivatization, vent time, cryo-focusing temperature and the ratio solvent volume/N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) volume were optimized using an experimental design approach. Regarding the extraction techniques, different approaches previously optimized in the research group were tested. On the one hand different polymeric materials were tested: silicon rod (SR), polyethersulfone (PES) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the latter in the stir-bar sorptive extraction format (SBSE-PDMS). PES was chosen among the polymeric materials due to the higher recoveries (compared with SR) and lower price (compared to PDMS in the stir-bar sorptive extraction, SBSE-PDMS). Both MASE and PES protocols were selected at this point for further method validation and application to real samples. Finally, the developed methods were validated and applied to the determination of target analytes in various aqueous environmental matrices, including estuarine water and wastewater. Acceptable repeatability in the case of MASE (5-17%) and PES (7-21%) procedures and method detection limits (MDLs, 5-123 and 28-328 ng L(-1) for PES and MASE, respectively) were obtained for most analytes. In terms of apparent recoveries in the presence of matrix, estuarine and effluent samples showed no significant matrix effect (apparent recoveries in the 73-121% for PES and 74-128% for MASE), while a stronger matrix effect was observed for influent wastewater samples (98-132% for PES and 65-156% for MASE). Both MASE and PES extractions combined with LVI-in-port derivatization-GC-MS were applied to the determination of APs in the estuary of Bilbao (Gulf of Biscay, Spain). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Empowering Mobile Assisted Social E-Learning: "Students' Expectations and Perceptions"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jenny; Yu, Wei-Chieh Wayne; Wu, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to empower mobile assisted social e-learning (eMASE) module that was designed based on social constructivism theory in higher education settings. This study reports findings from a group of undergraduates' expectations and perceptions of e-cooperative learning using mobile social networking apps. The eMASE module…

  4. Smoot Cosmology Group

    Science.gov Websites

    Paul Higgins Bryan B Holbrook Lance Pollard Jeff Yen Nicholas Tapia Laurie Kerrigan - High School Gordon Administrative Support Lilian Deporcel Technical Support Jon Aymon John Gibson Jozef Ludwig Gerald

  5. Lack of correlation of desiccation and radiation tolerance in microorganisms from diverse extreme environments tested under anoxic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bohmeier, Maria; Perras, Alexandra K; Schwendner, Petra; Rabbow, Elke; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine; Cockell, Charles S; Vannier, Pauline; Marteinsson, Viggo T; Monaghan, Euan P; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Garcia-Descalzo, Laura; Gómez, Felipe; Malki, Moustafa; Amils, Ricardo; Gaboyer, Frédéric; Westall, Frances; Cabezas, Patricia; Walter, Nicolas; Rettberg, Petra

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Four facultative anaerobic and two obligate anaerobic bacteria were isolated from extreme environments (deep subsurface halite mine, sulfidic anoxic spring, mineral-rich river) in the frame MASE (Mars Analogues for Space Exploration) project. The isolates were investigated under anoxic conditions for their survivability after desiccation up to 6 months and their tolerance to ionizing radiation up to 3000 Gy. The results indicated that tolerances to both stresses are strain-specific features. Yersinia intermedia MASE-LG-1 showed a high desiccation tolerance but its radiation tolerance was very low. The most radiation-tolerant strains were Buttiauxella sp. MASE-IM-9 and Halanaerobium sp. MASE-BB-1. In both cases, cultivable cells were detectable after an exposure to 3 kGy of ionizing radiation, but cells only survived desiccation for 90 and 30 days, respectively. Although a correlation between desiccation and ionizing radiation resistance has been hypothesized for some aerobic microorganisms, our data showed that there was no correlation between tolerance to desiccation and ionizing radiation, suggesting that the physiological basis of both forms of tolerances is not necessarily linked. In addition, these results indicated that facultative and obligate anaerobic organisms living in extreme environments possess varied species-specific tolerances to extremes. PMID:29474542

  6. 75 FR 48729 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice TIME AND DATE: The Legal Services... the Committee's agenda. LOCATION: Legal Services Corporation, 3333 K Street, NW., Washington, DC 20007... by Laurie Tarantowicz, Assistant Inspector General and Legal Counsel; Public Comment. 4. Public...

  7. 75 FR 62921 - Senior Executive Service; Legal Division Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-13

    ... Law and Regulation); M.J.K. Maher, Jr., Deputy Assistant General Counsel (Enforcement & Intelligence... General Counsel; Mark Monborne, Assistant General Counsel (Enforcement & Intelligence); Clarissa C. Potter... Engraving and Printing; Laurie Schaffer, Assistant General Counsel (Banking and Finance); Daniel P. Shaver...

  8. 77 FR 72869 - Guidance for Industry on Limiting the Use of Certain Phthalates as Excipients in Center for Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... and Research-Regulated Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... guidance to the Division of Drug Information, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug... INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie Muldowney, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (HFD-003), Food and Drug...

  9. 76 FR 52862 - Courtesy Notice of Liquidation; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... discontinuation of electronic courtesy notices of liquidation to importers of record whose entry summaries are... a misstatement in a comment response regarding the availability to an importer of an Importer Trade... implementation through electronic notification (see CBP.gov ). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Laurie Dempsey...

  10. Sparking Innovative Learning & Creativity. 2008 NMC Summer Conference Proceedings (Princeton, NJ, Jun 11-14, 2008))

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel S., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The conference proceedings include the following papers: (1) Digital Storytelling: An Alternative Instructional Approach (Ruben R. Puentedura); (2) Digital Storytelling: Old Ways, New Tools (Laurie Burruss); (3) The Adding Machine: Remote Digital Storytelling and Performance (George Brown and James Ferolo); (4) Building and Supporting a…

  11. An Analysis of Counterinsurgency in Iraq: Mosul, Ramadi, and Samarra from 2003-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    Information Operations as Part of COIN Warfare”, School of Advanced Military Studies, May 2005. Mounir Elkhamri, Lester W. Grau, Laurie King-Irani, Amanda S...Lieutenant Colonel, USA, July, 22, 2006 Lovelace , Daniel, Captain, USA, August 6, 2006. Mathews, Tim, Captain, USA, August 11, 2006. McLamb, Joseph

  12. 77 FR 75147 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Interim Procedures for Considering Requests...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-19

    ... specifications and the production capabilities of Panamanian and U.S. textile producers to determine whether... information collection instrument and instructions should be directed to Laurie Mease, Office of Textiles and... Agreement, pursuant to the textile provisions of the Agreement, fabric, yarn, and fiber produced in Panama...

  13. Authors in the Fast Lane!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follos, Alison M. G.; Rubin, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    This article introduces various writers, including Laurie Halse Anderson, Linda Sue Park, Richard Peck, James Patterson, and Charles R. Smith, Jr., who will give their presentations at the 2009 American Association of School Librarians (AASL) National Conference & Exhibition in Charlotte. This November the AASL National Conference and…

  14. Divorce: The Impact on Children and Families. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session (June 19, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families.

    This document contains witness testimonies and prepared statements from the Congressional hearing called to examine the impact of divorce on children and families. Opening statements are included from Congressmen George Miller, Dan Coats, and Thomas Bliley. Witnesses providing testimony include: (1) Laurie Dixon, managing editor of "The…

  15. Women and Work. Exploring Race, Ethnicity, and Class. Women and Work, Volume 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higginbotham, Elizabeth, Ed.; Romero, Mary, Ed.

    This book contains 10 papers exploring the effects of race, ethnicity, and class on women in the workplace. The following papers are included: "Series Editors' Introduction" (Ann Stromberg, Barbara A. Gutek, Laurie Larwood); "Introduction" (Elizabeth Higginbotham). The book is organized in four parts. Part I, "Historical…

  16. Families, Disability, and Empowerment: Active Coping Skills and Strategies for Family Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, George H. S., Ed.; Powers, Laurie E., Ed.

    This book presents strategies for building strong partnerships between service providers and the families of individuals with disabilities. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Contributing to Resilience in Families: An Overview" (George H. S. Singer and Laurie E. Powers); "Parent to Parent Programs: A Unique Form of…

  17. The Universe Adventure - Credits

    Science.gov Websites

    Basel), and George Smoot (LBNL) Content, Graphic/Web Design Artie Konrad (student, UC Berkeley) 2004 Berkeley) Laurie Kerrigan (teacher, Mercy High School) Graphic/Web Design Melissa McClure (student ) Graphic/Web Design Paul Higgins (student, Contra Costa College) Other Gordon Aubrecht (Ohio State

  18. Feminist Pedagogy: Building Community Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Laurie; Russo, Ann

    2018-01-01

    As antiviolence activists and university professors teaching and learning about violence prevention and feminist movements, authors Laurie Fuller and Ann Russo write that they are inspired by the collaborative visioning of Critical Resistance and Incite! Women of Color Against Violence with regard to ending violence without reproducing it. Fuller…

  19. The Navy Supply Corps Newsletter. Contracting Innovations: Navy Electronic Commerce Online Navy Afloat Purchase Card Program. Volume 62, No. 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    Mike Lyden John Lantelme Andy Mackel Jesus Malgapo Carol Marcinek Greg Martin Michelle McAtee Molly McClellan Jerry McEnerney Laurie McKee...Paul McNeill Walt Melton Rich Mendez Mike Metts Jon Miller Ron Mosley Jim Naber Craig Nostrant NAVSUP USSNORMANDY(CG60) DDRE NORFOLK NPGS

  20. 7 CFR 319.56-30 - Hass avocados from Michoacan, Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... fund agreement. The avocados may be imported only if the Mexican avocado industry association...) and found to be free from the large avocado seed weevil Heilipus lauri, the avocado seed moth Stenoma catenifer, and the small avocado seed weevils Conotrachelus aguacatae and C. perseae. (iii) Trapping must be...

  1. 7 CFR 319.56-30 - Hass avocados from Michoacan, Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... be imported only if the Mexican avocado industry association representing Mexican avocado growers... during the wet season and once during the dry season) and found to be free from the large avocado seed weevil Heilipus lauri, the avocado seed moth Stenoma catenifer, and the small avocado seed weevils...

  2. Cliché, Gossip, and Anecdote as Supervision Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grealy, Liam

    2016-01-01

    This article expands on a co-authored project with Timothy Laurie on the practices and ethics of higher degree research (HDR) supervision (or advising): "What does good HDR supervision look like?" in contemporary universities. It connects that project with scholarship on the relevance of "common sense" to questions of…

  3. Learning Technologies: Prospects and Pathways. Selected papers from EdTech '96 Biennial Conference of the Australian Society for Educational Technology (Melbourne, Australia, July 7-10, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedberg, John G., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents a series of conference papers dealing with educational technology. The papers are: "The Role of Educational Technology in Upgrading Teacher Education in Pakistan" (M. Hashim Abbasi and Alex C. Millar); "Report on the Teaching and Learning on the Internet Project--RMIT TAFE" (Laurie Armstrong); "A…

  4. Iberian Spanish "Macho": Vantages and Polysemy in Culturally Defined Meaning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Caroline A.; Glaz, Adam

    2010-01-01

    This study explores some specific aspects of compatibility between cognitive models. Robert E. MacLaury's theory of vantages as arrangements of coordinates and Lakoff's concept of radial categories are mutually reinforcing to an analysis of semantic polysemy. Vantage Theory (VT) includes the notions of "zooming in" and "zooming out", allowing…

  5. Scaffolding for Discovery in the Third Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert-Krocker, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Laurie Ewert-Krocker emphasizes the teacher's role in nature's prepared environment. Without directing or controlling the child's work, learning spaces can be maximized for concentration by connecting the adolescent's intrinsic learning to the beauty and order of the natural world. The most artful balance is the global understanding of the…

  6. 78 FR 51327 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for the Austin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... surface habitat (Nathan Bendik and Laurie Dries, City of Austin, personal observation), (2) use of... ``surface'' species (i.e., have well- developed eyes and pigmentation) occurring in both springs and caves... opposite side of a drainage to go dry or flow at a lower rate. (27) Comment: Krienke Springs has an...

  7. Early Childhood Folio 3: A Collection of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Judith, Ed.; Podmore, Valerie, Ed.

    This booklet is a collection of articles addressing current issues in early childhood education. The first article, "Would You Like to Pack Away Now?: Improving the Quality of Talk in Early Childhood Programs," (Laurie Makin) addresses how teachers talk to children. The second article, "Persistence When It's Difficult: A Disposition…

  8. The Pull of the Earth: Participatory Ethnography in the School Garden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Laurie

    2006-01-01

    This book is Laurie Thorp's dirt-under-the-fingernails ethnography of four years in an elementary school garden and the ways in which this garden catalyzed cultural transformation and inspired hope, growth, and community. Filled with photographs, sketches, poetry, and journal entries, Thorp's engaging book describes the educational benefits of…

  9. MODIS comparisons with northeastern Pacific in situ stratocumulus microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Stephen R.; Hudson, James G.

    2015-08-01

    Vertical sounding measurements within stratocumuli during two aircraft field campaigns, Marine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST), are used to validate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud effective radius (re). In situ COT, LWP, and re were calculated using 5 m vertically averaged droplet probe measurements of complete vertical cloud penetrations. MODIS COT, LWP, and re 1 km pixels were averaged along these penetrations. COT comparisons in POST showed strong correlations and a near 1:1 relationship. In MASE, comparisons showed strong correlations; however, MODIS COT exceeded in situ COT, likely due to larger temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements. LWP comparisons between two cloud probes show good agreement for POST but not MASE, giving confidence to POST data. Both projects provided strong LWP correlations but MODIS exceeded in situ by 14-36%. MODIS in situ re correlations were strong, but MODIS 2.1 µm re exceeded in situ re, which contributed to LWP bias; in POST, MODIS re was 20-30% greater than in situ re. Maximum in situ re near cloud top showed comparisons nearer 1:1. Other MODIS re bands (3.7 µm and 1.6 µm) showed similar comparisons. Temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements, airplane speed differences, and cloud probe artifacts were likely causes of weaker MASE correlations. POST COT comparison was best for temporal differences under 20 min. POST data validate MODIS COT but it also implies a positive MODIS re bias that propagates to LWP while still capturing variability.

  10. "Be the Tree": Classical Literature, Art Therapy, and Transcending Trauma in "Speak"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Jessi

    2014-01-01

    Laurie Halse Anderson's young adult novel "Speak" concerns the rape and subsequent silence of ninth grade protagonist Melinda Sordino. By relying on extensive literary allusions involving trees, rape, silence, and transformation, Anderson creates a young adult problem novel that is both of the moment and timeless in its themes. The…

  11. Laboring to Relate: Neoliberalism, Embodied Policy, and Network Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper builds on previous research (Ball, 2012, Ball & Junemann, 2012) to explore some aspects of the embodiment of policy. The author draws on Larner and Laurie's (2010) work on technocratic expertise and how, as she puts it, "privatisation ideas and practices are transferred in embodied forms," and in particular her argument…

  12. CFOs Talk about Finances: Glimmers of Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antolovic, Laurie G.; Horvath, Albert G.; Plympton, Margaret F.

    2009-01-01

    In May 2009, three senior financial leaders in higher education--Laurie G. Antolovic, Albert G. Horvath, and Margaret F. Plympton--participated in a panel session, moderated by Philip J. Goldstein, at the EDUCAUSE Enterprise Information and Technology Conference. The three also shared their thoughts in an audio interview conducted by Gerry Bayne,…

  13. Methodological Pluralism and Narrative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers how the integral theory model of Nancy Davis and Laurie Callihan might be enacted using a different qualitative methodology, in this case the narrative methodology. The focus of narrative research is shown to be on "what meaning is being made" rather than "what is happening here" (quadrant 2 rather than…

  14. Performance Improvement Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on performance improvement processes. In "Never the Twain Shall Meet?: A Glimpse into High Performance Work Practices and Downsizing" (Laurie J. Bassi, Mark E. Van Buren) evidence from a national cross-industry of more than 200 establishments is used to demonstrate that high-performance…

  15. "We Are Special, beyond Our Special Needs": E*LIT Project Entry Inspires Pride in Disabilities' Students. Spotlight Feature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke-Wilson, MariRae

    2007-01-01

    The spin on Frazer School Librarian Laurie LeFever's entry for Syracuse University's 2007 E*LIT competition is what made her school literacy project for children with disabilities really unique. Instead of working with students to create a project that would be targeted toward children with disabilities, she actually used students with…

  16. Beyond Looking: Using Data to Coach for Instructional Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Michael; Taylor, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    As a team of job-embedded instructional coaches in an ethnically and economically diverse learning environment, the authors are dedicated to thinking through and troubleshooting the improvement of teaching and learning in the three learning communities that make up Clover Park High School. They agree with commentator Laurie Olsen who writes, "Data…

  17. Teaching Mathematics for Spatial Justice: Beyond a Victory Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubel, Laurie H.; Hall-Wieckert, Maren; Lim, Vivian Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this reflective essay, Laurie H. Rubel, Maren Hall-Wieckert, and Vivian Y. Lim present a design heuristic for teaching mathematics for spatial justice (TMSpJ) based on their development of two curricular modules, one about the state lottery and the other about financial services in a city. Spatial tools, including data visualizations on maps…

  18. Teaching Public Goods Theory with a Classroom Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickhardt, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The author extends the work of Holt and Laury (1997) on a simple noncomputerized card game for teaching the essential aspects of public goods theory. He suggests a course of several lectures and discusses the behavior of subjects in various game sessions. Among other things, the results provide experimental evidence with respect to the private…

  19. The Adolescent: Taking on the Task of Humanity--Conducting the Dialogue between Nature and Supranature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert-Krocker, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    Defining what it means to be in the "bosom of nature," to use Montessori's words, Laurie Ewert-Krocker points out that the adolescent period of storm and stress is quelled by the natural world. But most important, when socialization is the essential developmental focus of the young adolescent, positive social organization is fostered by…

  20. 75 FR 8348 - Notice of a Regional Project Waiver of Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American Recovery and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... (``MWRA'') for the purchase of a 1.5 megawatt (MW) foreign manufactured wind turbine for the DeLauri Pump... domestically manufactured wind turbine available or one that can be supplied to meet its proposed project... action permits the purchase of a foreign manufactured 1.5 MW wind turbine by the MWRA, as specified in...

  1. Measurement Comparisons Towards Improving the Understanding of Aerosol-Cloud Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Stephen R.

    Cloud processing of aerosol is an aerosol-cloud interaction that is not heavily researched but could have implications on climate. The three types of cloud processing are chemical processing, collision and coalescence processing, and Brownian capture of interstitial particles. All types improve cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in size or hygroscopicity (kappa). These improved CCN affect subsequent clouds. This dissertation focuses on measurement comparisons to improve our observations and understanding of aerosol-cloud processing. Particle size distributions measured at the continental Southern Great Plains (SGP) site were compared with ground based measurements of cloud fraction (CF) and cloud base altitude (CBA). Particle size distributions were described by a new objective shape parameter to define bimodality rather than an old subjective one. Cloudy conditions at SGP were found to be correlated with lagged shape parameter. Horizontal wind speed and regional CF explained 42%+ of this lag time. Many of these surface particle size distributions were influenced by aerosol-cloud processing. Thus, cloud processing may be more widespread with more implications than previously thought. Particle size distributions measured during two aircraft field campaigns (MArine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment; MASE; and Ice in Cloud Experiment-Tropical; ICE-T) were compared to CCN distributions. Tuning particle size to critical supersaturation revealed hygroscopicity expressed as ? when the distributions were overlain. Distributions near cumulus clouds (ICE-T) had a higher frequency of the same ?s (48% in ICE-T to 42% in MASE) between the accumulation (processed) and Aitken (unprocessed) modes. This suggested physical processing domination in ICE-T. More MASE (stratus cloud) kappa differences between modes pointed to chemical cloud processing. Chemistry measurements made in MASE showed increases in sulfates and nitrates with distributions that were more processed. This supported

  2. History of Space Policy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-22

    21st Century (Maryland: Air Force Historical Foundation, 1995), 21. 10 McLucas, “U.S. Space Program Since 1961,” 82. 11 Alan Wasser , “LBJ’s Space Race...gr&GRid=7553231 (accessed 13 March 2012) 15 Wasser , “LBJ’s Space Race.” 16 Clayton D. Laurie, “Congress and the National Reconnaissance Office” in

  3. What I Learned about Higher Ed Assessment in a Small Village in South America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occhipinti, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Does assessment change what is being taught? Laurie Occhipinti uses an analogy to answer this question. While conducting research on economic development in a remote rural area of the Argentine Chaco, a community had received some public funds to construct a new community center. They discussed where to place the center. The middle of the village…

  4. Proceedings of the Thunder and Lighting Seminar and The 3D lightning Warning Workship Held in Las Cruces, New Mexico on February 27, 1990.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Dayton (513) 229-3951 Rsch Inst Peter Ahnert NOAA/MWS (703) 471-5302 Frank Schmidlin NASA/GSFC (804) 824-1618 Maurice Friedman Viz Mfg (617) 942-2000...NWS (801) 524-4000 G Mr. Tom Clemmons DPG (801) 831-4674 G Mr. Lloyd Corbett NAWCWPNS China Lake (619) 939-6058 M Ms Laurie Dalton (801) 776-6500 G

  5. Something to "Speak" about: Addressing Sensitive Issues through Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackett, Mark

    2007-01-01

    "Speak," by Laurie Halse Anderson, is one of the most powerful young adult novels to come along in the past decade. It has won numerous awards, including the "School Library Journal" award for "Best Book of the Year," and was a National Book Award Finalist. Despite this acclaim, many English teachers are uncomfortable teaching "Speak" in their…

  6. Using Second Life with Learning-Disabled Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Stephanie; Horspool, Agi; Willers, Renee; Safie, Omar; Richlin, Laurie

    2009-01-01

    The educational potential of Second Life is still in the process of being developed and harnessed. According to Stephanie McKinney, Agi Horspool, Renee Willers, Omar Safie, and Laurie Richlin, an essential step in this development will be to figure out how to use Second Life to support learning-disabled (LD) students who face numerous challenges…

  7. SciTech Connect

    Noble, Stephen R.; Hudson, James G.

    Here, vertical sounding measurements within stratocumuli during two aircraft field campaigns, Marine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST), are used to validate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud effective radius (r e). In situ COT, LWP, and r e were calculated using 5 m vertically averaged droplet probe measurements of complete vertical cloud penetrations. MODIS COT, LWP, and r e 1 km pixels were averaged along these penetrations. COT comparisons in POST showed strong correlations and a near 1:1 relationship. In MASE, comparisons showed strong correlations; however,more » MODIS COT exceeded in situ COT, likely due to larger temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements. LWP comparisons between two cloud probes show good agreement for POST but not MASE, giving confidence to POST data. Both projects provided strong LWP correlations but MODIS exceeded in situ by 14–36%. MODIS in situ r e correlations were strong, but MODIS 2.1 µm r e exceeded in situ r e, which contributed to LWP bias; in POST, MODIS r e was 20–30% greater than in situ r e. Maximum in situ r e near cloud top showed comparisons nearer 1:1. Other MODIS r e bands (3.7 µm and 1.6 µm) showed similar comparisons. Temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements, airplane speed differences, and cloud probe artifacts were likely causes of weaker MASE correlations. POST COT comparison was best for temporal differences under 20 min. POST data validate MODIS COT but it also implies a positive MODIS r e bias that propagates to LWP while still capturing variability.« less

  8. MODIS comparisons with northeastern Pacific in situ stratocumulus microphysics

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vertical sounding measurements within stratocumuli during two aircraft field campaigns, Marine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST), are used to validate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud effective radius (r e). In situ COT, LWP, and r e were calculated using 5 m vertically averaged droplet probe measurements of complete vertical cloud penetrations. MODIS COT, LWP, and r e 1 km pixels were averaged along these penetrations. COT comparisons in POST showed strong correlations and a near 1:1 relationship. In MASE, comparisons showed strong correlations; however, MODIS COT exceeded in situ COT, likely due to larger temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements. LWP comparisons between two cloud probes show good agreement for POST but not MASE, giving confidence to POST data. Both projects provided strong LWP correlations but MODIS exceeded in situ by 14–36%. MODIS in situ r e correlations were strong, but MODIS 2.1 µm r e exceeded in situ r e, which contributed to LWP bias; in POST, MODIS r e was 20–30% greater than in situ r e. Maximum in situ r e near cloud top showed comparisons nearer 1:1. Other MODIS r e bands (3.7 µm and 1.6 µm) showed similar comparisons. Temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements, airplane speed differences, and cloud probe artifacts were likely causes of weaker MASE correlations. POST COT comparison was best for temporal differences under 20 min. POST data validate MODIS COT but it also implies a positive MODIS r e bias that propagates to LWP while still capturing variability. PMID:27708990

  9. MODIS comparisons with northeastern Pacific in situ stratocumulus microphysics

    DOE PAGES

    Noble, Stephen R.; Hudson, James G.

    2015-07-22

    Here, vertical sounding measurements within stratocumuli during two aircraft field campaigns, Marine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) and Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST), are used to validate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (LWP), and cloud effective radius (r e). In situ COT, LWP, and r e were calculated using 5 m vertically averaged droplet probe measurements of complete vertical cloud penetrations. MODIS COT, LWP, and r e 1 km pixels were averaged along these penetrations. COT comparisons in POST showed strong correlations and a near 1:1 relationship. In MASE, comparisons showed strong correlations; however,more » MODIS COT exceeded in situ COT, likely due to larger temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements. LWP comparisons between two cloud probes show good agreement for POST but not MASE, giving confidence to POST data. Both projects provided strong LWP correlations but MODIS exceeded in situ by 14–36%. MODIS in situ r e correlations were strong, but MODIS 2.1 µm r e exceeded in situ r e, which contributed to LWP bias; in POST, MODIS r e was 20–30% greater than in situ r e. Maximum in situ r e near cloud top showed comparisons nearer 1:1. Other MODIS r e bands (3.7 µm and 1.6 µm) showed similar comparisons. Temporal differences between MODIS and in situ measurements, airplane speed differences, and cloud probe artifacts were likely causes of weaker MASE correlations. POST COT comparison was best for temporal differences under 20 min. POST data validate MODIS COT but it also implies a positive MODIS r e bias that propagates to LWP while still capturing variability.« less

  10. Vantage Theory, Statistics and the Mental Worldview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niewiara, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates Polish punk and hip hop (rap) song lyrics broken down into frequency lists. In an analysis inspired by MacLaury's view of categorization, the construals of punk and hip hop worldviews are shown to vary in the distance of the observer from the world, the width of the viewing frame, as well as the granularity and density of…

  11. Assessment and Rehabilitation of Central Sensory Impairments for Balance in mTBI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    Dr. Laurie King CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Oregon Health & Science University Portland, OR 97201 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT...ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Oregon Health & Science University 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road Portland...Oregon 97239 Veteran Affair Portland Health Care System 3710 SW US Veteran Hospital Rd, Portland, OR 97239 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY

  12. Vantage Theory and Linguistic Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Rob MacLaury's Vantage Theory, VT, models the way in which a cognizer constructs, recalls, uses, and modifies a category in terms of point of view or vantage. Alongside of VT, there is place for the kind of semantic specification found in the lexicon. VT2 [Allan, Keith, 2002. "Vantage theory, VT2, and number." "Language Sciences" 24(5-6), 679-703…

  13. What was that?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anglin, F. M.; Haddon, R. A. W.

    1988-01-01

    At 4:20 local time on September 19, 1986, Mrs. Laurie Harder saw a meteor passing across the sky above her home in Yellowknife, N.W.T. She reported her observation to Yellowknife Seismic Station staff who examined the records of the Yellowknife seismic array to see if the associated meteoroid had hit Earth and generated observalbe seismic signals. 

  14. Optimizing Citizen Engagement During Emergencies Through Use of Web 2.0 Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Technologies 6. AUTHOR( S ) Laurie J. Van Leuven 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School...Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING...Van Leuven Security and Emergency Management Strategic Advisor, City of Seattle B.A., University of Washington, 1998 Submitted in partial

  15. [Genitalia of three species of Heilipus Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that damage avocado fruits (Persea americana Mill.) in Mexico and Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Vildózola, Alvaro; Valdez-Carrasco, Jorge; Equihua-Martínez, Armando; González-Hernández, Héctor; Romero-Nápoles, Jesús; Solís-Aguilar, Juan F; Ramírez-Alarcón, Samuel

    2007-01-01

    The male and female genitaliae of three species of the genus Heilipus Germar (H. lauri Boheman, H. pittieri Barber and H. trifasciatus Fabricius) that damage avocado fruits (Persea americana Mill.) in Mexico and Costa Rica are described and illustrated. The aedeagus, spiculum gastrale, styli of 8th sternite are different in each one of the three species studied and can be used for specific identification.

  16. Nose Hill Artifacts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Vivian

    2008-01-01

    A Blackfoot woman, caught in the act of adultery, was condemned at this site to have her nose cut off as a penalty for her actions. People do not know her story. The tribe cast it on the ground. And so She, Nose Hill, was named. John Laurie Boulevard holds her mound in a circlet of asphalt, defining the map of her "terra incognita." She…

  17. Balloon Dilation of Sinus Ostia in the Department of Defense: Diagnoses, Actual Indications, and Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-18

    acute rhinosinusitis. However, this technology is often advertised and utilized for off-label indications, which lack evidence - based support...DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 59TH MEDICAL WING (AETC) JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO - LACKLAND TEXAS MEMORANDUM FOR 959 MDOS ATTN: MAJ ADRIENNE LAURY...McMains, MD1 1 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery , San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium (SAUSHEC), Ft. Sam

  18. Inverse Scattering and Applications. Proceedings of Conference on Inverse Scattering on the Line, Held in Amherst, Massachusetts on June 7 - 13, 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    J. Laurie Snell S. A. Amitsur, D. J. Saltman, and 2 Proceedings of the conference on G. B. Seligman , Editors integration, topology, and geometry in...Rational constructions of modules 17 Nonlinear partial differential equations. for simple Lie algebras, George B. Joel A. Smoller, Editor Seligman 18...number theory, Michael R. Stein and Linda Keen, Editor R. Keith Dennis, Editors 65 Logic and combinatorics, Stephen G. 84 Partition problems in

  19. Exploring the Association Between Military Base Neighborhood Characteristics and Soldiers’ and Airmen’s Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Martin , 2005). The community capacity- building model these researchers propose argues for both military-sponsored support of 23 service members and...Research/whatweknow200 7.pdf 128 Bowen, Gary L., James A. Martin , Jay A. Mancini, and John P. Nelson, “Community Capacity: Antecedents and Consequences...Anita, Laurie T. Martin , Stacy Ann Hawkins, and Amy Richardson, “The Impact of Parental Deployment on Child Social and Emotional Functioning

  20. Status Report on Speech Research, 1 April-30 June 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Fredericka Bell-Berti* Donald Hailey Steven Eady Catherine Best* Terry Halwes Jo Estill Gloria J. Borden* Sabina D. Koroluk Laurie B. Feldman Susan...folds in voicing control is whether activity of CT is associated with abduction or adduction. Stevens ’ model of glottal activity suggests that the...aerodynamic model provided for the efficient transfer of energy from the aerodynamic system to the mechanical system ( Stevens , 1977), given the nature of

  1. Speech Research, A Report on the Status and Progress of Studies on the Nature of Speech, Instrumentation for Its Investigation, and Practical Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-31

    Arthur S . Abramson* Eric L. Andreasson David Dechovitz Thomas Baer Elizabeth P. Clark Laurie Feldman Fredericka Bell -Berti+ Vincent Gulisano Hollis...the hearing-impaired child: Theory and practice. Washington, D.C.: A. G. Bell , 1976. Lisker, L., & Abramson, A. S . Some effects of context on voice...1977, 3, 673- 685. Bell -Berti, F., & Harris, K. S . Anticipatory coarticulation: Some implications from a study of lip rounding. Journal of the

  2. Distance in War: The Experience of MQ-1 and MQ-9 Aircrew

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    ged, and psychologically impacted by the work they perform. The continuing ethical and moral relativism society uses to place new weapons and methods...outcome of such ignorance results in moral disengagement for the RPA aircrew. Within her article titled, “The End of Military Virtue,” author Laurie...imaginary precipice that we should attempt to turn back from. Based upon centuries of military technological and cultural advancements, we should

  3. Mid-Infrared Properties of OH Megamaser Host Galaxies. I. Spitzer IRS Low- and High-Resolution Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Kyle W.; Darling, Jeremy; Spoon, Henrik W. W.; Charmandaris, Vassilis; Armus, Lee

    2011-03-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra and photometry from the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope for 51 OH megamasers (OHMs), along with 15 galaxies confirmed to have no megamaser emission above L OH = 102.3 L sun. The majority of galaxies display moderate-to-deep 9.7 μm amorphous silicate absorption, with OHM galaxies showing stronger average absorption and steeper 20-30 μm continuum emission than non-masing galaxies. Emission from multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), especially at 6.2, 7.7, and 11.3 μm, is detected in almost all systems. Fine-structure atomic emission (including [Ne II], [Ne III], [S III], and [S IV]) and multiple H2 rotational transitions are observed in more than 90% of the sample. A subset of galaxies show emission from rarer atomic lines, such as [Ne V], [O IV], and [Fe II]. Fifty percent of the OHMs show absorption from water ice and hydrogenated amorphous carbon grains, while absorption features from CO2, HCN, C2H2, and crystalline silicates are also seen in several OHMs. Column densities of OH derived from 34.6 μm OH absorption are similar to those derived from 1667 MHz OH absorption in non-masing galaxies, indicating that the abundance of masing molecules is similar for both samples. This data paper presents full mid-infrared spectra for each galaxy, along with measurements of line fluxes and equivalent widths, absorption feature depths, and spectral indices.

  4. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and beverages using membrane-assisted solvent extraction in combination with large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Rodil, Rosario; Schellin, Manuela; Popp, Peter

    2007-09-07

    Membrane-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) in combination with large volume injection-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (LVI-GC-MS) was applied for the determination of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in aqueous samples. The MASE conditions were optimized for achieving high enrichment of the analytes from aqueous samples, in terms of extraction conditions (shaking speed, extraction temperature and time), extraction solvent and composition (ionic strength, sample pH and presence of organic solvent). Parameters like linearity and reproducibility of the procedure were determined. The extraction efficiency was above 65% for all the analytes and the relative standard deviation (RSD) for five consecutive extractions ranged from 6 to 18%. At optimized conditions detection limits at the ng/L level were achieved. The effectiveness of the method was tested by analyzing real samples, such as river water, apple juice, red wine and milk.

  5. Exploration studies technical report, FY1988 status. Volume 1: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Exploration (OEXP) at NASA Headquarters has been tasked with defining and recommending alternatives for an early 1990's nationaL decision on a focused program of human exploration of the solar system. The Mission Analysis and System Engineering (MASE) group, which is managed by the Exploration Studies Office at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, is responsible for coordinating the technical studies necessary for accomplishing such a task. This technical report, produced by the MASE, describes the process that has been developed in a case study approach. The four case studies developed in FY88 include: (1) Human Expedition to Phobos; (2) Human Expedition to Mars; (3) Lunar Observatory; and (4) Lunar Outpost to Early Mars Evolution. The final outcome of this effort is a set of programmatic and technical conclusions and recommendations for the following year's work.

  6. Mental Health Stigma in the Military

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Laurie T. Martin , Raffaele Vardavas, Mary Ellen Slaughter, Terry L. Schell C O R P O R A T I O N Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...SAMHSA), 2012; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention et al., 2012; Pescosolido, Martin , et al., 2010; Schnittker, 2008; Kessler, 2002...schizophrenia (Pescosolido, Martin , et al., 2010; Schnittker, 2008). The BRFSS included an item measuring attitudes of the public toward PWMHDs. This item

  7. Speech Research. A Report on the Status and Progress of Studies on the Nature of Speech, Instrumentation for Its Investigation, and Practical Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Bell3 Donald Hailey Steven Eady Fredericka Bell-Berti* Terry Halwes Jo Estill Catherine Best+ Sabina D. Koroluk Laurie Feldman Gloria J. Borden* Agnes M...tract (Fant, 1971; Stevens & House, 1955, 1961). For oral phonemes, ,.he vocal tract may simply be viewed as a tube consisting of the pharyngeal and...coupling of the nasal and oral cavities. In experiments with synthesized speech, House and Stevens (1956) varied the ratio of the driving point impedance of

  8. Reversing Breast Cancer-Induced Immune Suppression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Species MDSC: Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells PI: Propidium iodide xC-: System xC- xCT: Cystine/Glutamate Antiporter Project Summary Aim 1- In...animals may live longer due to enhanced resistance to metastasis. Resistance to metastasis requires a competent immune system [27]. Since Nrf2...Smith C, Chang MY, Parker KH, Beury DW, DuHadaway JB, Flick HE, Boulden J, Sutanto-Ward E, Soler AP, Laury-Kleintop LD, Mandik-Nayak L, Metz R, Ostrand

  9. NASA Future Forum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-11

    Dr. Laurie Leshin, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator Exploration Systems Mission Directortorate, second from right, speaks as Dr. Waleed Abdalati, NASA Chief Scientist, right, Dr. Robert Braun, NASA Chief Technologist, and Leland Melvin, Assoicate Administrator for NASA Education, far left, at the NASA Future Forum held at the Riggs Alumni Center on the campus of the University of Maryland, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011 in College Park, Md. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  10. Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0205 TITLE: Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lisa Laury-Kleintop...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0205 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Systemic lupus erythematosus, autoantibodies. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 7 19a. NAME OF

  11. Hydrogen Masers. I. Theory and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strelnitski, Vladimir S.; Ponomarev, Victor O.; Smith, Howard A.

    1996-10-01

    The discovery of the first high-gain hydrogen recombination line (HRL) maser in the millimeter/ submillimeter spectrum of the emission-line star MWC 349A requires an expansion of current paradigms about HRLs. In this paper we reexamine the problem of non-LTE populations in recombining hydrogen and specify the conditions necessary for high-gain masing and lasing in HRLs. To do so, we use the extensive new results on hydrogen level populations produced by Storey & Hummer and our calculations for the net (that is, line plus continuum) absorption coefficient for HRLs. We present results for the α- and β-lines whose principal quantum numbers n are between five and 100, for gas whose electron number density 3 ≤ log Ne(cm-3) ≤ 11, at two electron temperatures, Te = 5000 and 10,000 K. We show that the unsaturated maser gain in an HRL is a sharp function of Ne, and thus to achieve high-gain masing, each line requires a sufficiently extended region over which the density is rather closely specified. Saturation of masing recombination lines is a critical consideration. We derive a simple equation for estimating the degree of saturation from the observed flux density and the interferometric and/or model information about the amplification path length, avoiding the vague issue of the solid angle of masing. We also present a qualitative way to approach the effects of saturation on adjacent emission lines, although the detailed modeling is highly case-specific. We draw attention to another non-LTE phenomenon active in hydrogen: the overcooling of populations. This occurs for HRLs with n ≲ 20, in gas where Ne ≲ 105 cm-3. Observationally, the HRL over- cooling might manifest itself as an anomalously weak emission recombination line, or as a "dasar," that is, an anomalously strong absorption line. In the simplest case of a homogeneous H II region, the absorption can be observed on the proper free-free continuum of the region, if some conditions for the line or

  12. OEXP exploration studies technical report. Volume 3: Special reports, studies, and indepth systems assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.; Bland, Dan

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Exploration (OEXP) at NASA has been tasked with defining and recommending alternatives for an early 1990's national decision on a focused program of manned exploration of the Solar System. The Mission analysis and System Engineering (MASE) group, which is managed by the Exploration Studies Office at the Johnson Space Center, is responsible for coordinating the technical studies necessary for accomplishing such a task. This technical report, produced by the MASE, describes the process used to conduct exploration studies and discusses the mission developed in a case study approach. The four case studies developed in FY88 include: (1) a manned expedition to PHOBOS; (2) a manned expedition to MARS; (3) a lunar surface observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution. The final outcome of this effort is a set of programmatic and technical conclusions and recommendations for the following year's work.

  13. Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Emesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-31

    in these studies. The assistance of Mr. Laurie Duncan, Mr. Joseph Hutchinson, and Mr. Robert Bochniewicz in dosimetry and irradiaion is greatly...rectal probe (model 555) was inserted and centered in the port window to record the radiation exposure. TLDs were al~o munted, with three on both back...and stomach at the center and extremes of the port, and one on each side and on the dorsal surface of the head. Te TLDs were used only to independently

  14. Monroe, Utah, Hydrothermal System: Results from Drilling of Test Wells MC1 and MC2

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, D.S.; Harrison, Roger

    1978-10-01

    Following detailed geological (Parry et al., 1976; Miller, 1976) and geophysical (Mase, Chapman, and Ward, 1978; Kilty, Mase, and Chapman, 1978) studies of the Monroe, Utah hydrothermal system, a program of drilling two intermediate depth test wells was undertaken. The objectives of the test well drilling were three-fold: (1) to obtain structural information bearing on the poorly known dip of the Sevier Fault, (2) to obtain temperature information below the shallow depths (approximately 300 ft.) sampled in the first phase of exploration, and (3) to provide cased wells which could act as monitor wells during the production phase of themore » project. The test well drilling was seen to be vital to the selection of a site for a production well. This report describes the results from the drilling of the two test wells, designated MC1 and MC2, and offers interpretation of the hydrothermal system which may be used as a basis for selecting production wells.« less

  15. Dust Grains and the Luminosity of Circumnuclear Water Masers in Active Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collison, Alan J.; Watson, William D.

    1995-01-01

    In previous calculations for the luminosities of 22 GHz water masers, the pumping is reduced and ultimately quenched with increasing depth into the gas because of trapping of the infrared (approximately equals 30-150 micrometers), spectral line radiation of the water molecule. When the absorption (and reemission) of infrared radiation by dust grains is included, we demonstrate that the pumping is no longer quenched but remains constant with increasing optical depth. A temperature difference between the grains and the gas is required. Such conditions are expected to occur, for example, in the circumnuclear masing environments created by X-rays in active galaxies. Here, the calculated 22 GHz maser luminosities are increased by more than an order of magnitude. Application to the well-studied, circumnuclear masing disk in the galaxy NGC 4258 yields a maser luminosity near that inferred from observations if the observed X-ray flux is assumed to be incident onto only the inner surface of the disk.

  16. Nonparametric Regression Subject to a Given Number of Local Extreme Value

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    compilation report: ADP013708 thru ADP013761 UNCLASSIFIED Nonparametric regression subject to a given number of local extreme value Ali Majidi and Laurie...locations of the local extremes for the smoothing algorithm. 280 A. Majidi and L. Davies 3 The smoothing problem We make the smoothing problem precise...is the solution of QP3. k--oo 282 A. Majidi and L. Davies FiG. 2. The captions top-left, top-right, bottom-left, bottom-right show the result of the

  17. NASA Future Forum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-08-11

    Dr. Robert Braun, NASA Chief Technologist, second from left, makes a point, as panelists Leland Melvin, Assoicate Administrator for NASA Education, left, Dr. Laurie Leshin, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator Exploration Systems Mission Directortorate, and Dr. Waleed Abdalati, NASA Chief Scientist, right, look on during a panel discussion at the NASA Future Forum held at the Riggs Alumni Center on the campus of the University of Maryland, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011 in College Park, Md. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  18. Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Security Forces Storage Building, Hanscom AFB, Lexington, Massachusetts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    during World War II. The Base currently contains 846 acres of which 153 acres are leased to organizations outside of the Air Force (Benham, 1991). The...Compliance Assessment (25-1-2) Laurie Weinacht, Contractor 66 MSGICEV (Mara Tech) Commuter Progra~ Manager 781-377-2904 Fax 781-377- 8545 ...Information is available in alte1113te format. Call Debra Doherty, ADA Coordinator at 617-292·5565. TDD Service ·1·800·298·2207. DEP on the World

  19. Alterations of Cloud Microphysics Due to Cloud Processed CCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Tabor, S. S.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution CCN spectra have revealed bimodality (Hudson et al. 2015) similar to aerosol size spectra (e.g., Hoppel et al. 1985). Bimodality is caused by chemical and physical cloud processes that increase mass or hygroscopicity of only CCN that produced activated cloud droplets. Bimodality is categorized by relative CCN concentrations (NCCN) within the two modes, Nu-Np; i.e., NCCN within the higher critical supersaturation, Sc, mode that did not undergo cloud processing minus NCCN within the lower Sc mode that was cloud processed. Lower, especially negative, Nu-Np designates greater processing. The table shows regressions between Nu-Np and characteristics of clouds nearest the CCN measurements. ICE-T MASE parameter R SL R SL Nc 0.17 93.24 -0.26 98.65 MD -0.31 99.69 0.33 99.78 σ -0.27 99.04 0.48 100.00 Ld -0.31 99.61 0.38 99.96 Table. Correlation coefficients, R, and one-tailed significance levels in percent, SL, for Nu-Np with microphysics of the clouds closest to each CCN measurement, 75 ICE-T and 74 MASE cases. Nc is cloud droplet concentration, MD is cloud droplet mean diameter, σ is standard deviation of cloud droplet spectra, Ldis drizzle drop LWC. Two aircraft field campaigns, Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) and Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) show opposite R signs because coalescence dominated cloud processing in low altitude ICE-T cumuli whereas chemical transformations predominated in MASE low altitude polluted stratus. Coalescence reduces Nc and NCCN, which thus increases MD, and σ, which promote Ld. Chemical transformations, e.g., SO2 to SO4, increase CCN hygroscopicity, thus reducing Sc, but not affecting Nc or NCCN. Lower Sc CCN are capable of producing greater Nc in subsequent cloud cycles, which leads to lower MD and σ which reduce Ld (figure). These observations are consistent with cloud droplet growth models for the higher vertical wind (W) of cumuli and lower W of stratus. Coalescence thus reduces the indirect

  20. First record of a cave species of Euscorpiops Vachon from Viet Nam (Scorpiones, Euscorpiidae, Scorpiopinae).

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Wilson R; Pham, Dinh-Sac

    2013-07-01

    Euscorpiops cavernicola sp. n., belonging to the family Euscorpiidae Laurie, is described on the basis of two male and two female specimens collected in the Hua Ma cave located in the Quang Khe commune, Ba Be district of Bac Kan province in Viet Nam. The new species presents most features exhibited by scorpions within the genus Euscorpiops, however it may represent the first discovered Scorpiopinae species exhibiting certain adaptations to cave life. Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Seismic velocity change and slip rate during the 2006 Guerrero (Mexico) slow slip event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Diane; Radiguet, Mathilde; Campillo, Michel; Cotton, Fabrice; Shapiro, Nikolai; Krishna Singh, Shri; Kostoglodov, Vladimir

    2010-05-01

    We measure temporal change of the seismic velocity in the crust below the Guerrero region during the 2006 slow sleep event (SSE). We use repeated cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at 26 broad-band stations of the MesoAmerica Seismic Experiment (MASE). The cross-correlations are computed over 90 days with a moving window of 10 days from January 2005 to July 2007. To insure measurements independent of noise source variations, we only take into account the travel time change within the coda. For period of 8 to 20s, we observe a decrease in velocity starting in April 2006 with a maximum change of -0.3% of the initial velocity in June 2006. At these periods, the Rayleigh waves are sensitive to velocity changes down to the lower crust. In the other hand, we compute the deformation rate below the MASE array from a slip propagation model of the SSE observed by means of the displacement time-series of 15 continuous GPS stations. Slip initiates in the western part of the Guerrero Gap and propagates southeastward. The propagation velocity is of the order of 1 km/day. We then compare the seismic velocity change measured from continuous seismological data with the deformation rate inferred from geodetic measurements below the MASE array. We obtain a good agreement between the time of maximal seismic velocity change (July 2006) and the time of maximum deformation associated with the SSE (July to August 2006). This result shows that the long-term velocity change associated with the SSE can be detected using continuous seismic recordings. Since the SSE does not emit seismic waves, which interact with the superficial layers, the result indicates that the velocity change is due to deformation at depth.

  2. NASA Future Forum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-21

    Laurie Leshin, dean of the School of Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, moderates the NASA Future Forum panel titled "Importance of Technology, Science and Innovation for our Economic Future" at The Ohio State University on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012 in Columbus, Ohio. The NASA Future Forum features panel discussions on the importance of education to our nation's future in space, the benefit of commercialized space technology to our economy and lives here on Earth, and the shifting roles for the public, commercial and international communities in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Alexander G.

    2013-10-01

    I am deeply honored to be the inaugural recipient of the Ronald Greeley Early Career Award. Ron was an icon in the field of planetary science, and the establishment of this award is a fitting way to pay tribute to his legacy. I applaud Laurie Leshin, Bill McKinnon, and the rest of the AGU Planetary Science section officers and selection committee for taking the time to organize this memorial. Ron is remembered not only for his fundamental scientific contributions but also for his mentorship and support of early-career scientists, both his own students and postdocs and those of his colleagues.

  4. Talking about Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, Chris

    2010-08-01

    Preface; Part I. Introduction Timothy Ferris, Iris Fry, Steven Dick, Ann Druyan, Pinky Nelson, Neil Tyson, Steve Benner and William Bains; Part II. Earth Roger Buick, Lynn Rothschild, John Baross, Joe Kirschvink, Andrew Knoll, Simon Conway Morris, Roger Hanlon and Lori Marino; Part III. Solar System Chris McKay, David Grinspoon, Jonathan Lunine, Carolyn Porco, Laurie Leshin, Guy Consolmagno and Peter Smith; Part IV. Exoplanets Alan Boss, Geoff Marcy, Debra Fischer, Sara Seager, David Charbonneau and Vikki Meadows; Part V. Frontiers Jill Tarter, Seth Shostak, Ray Kurzweil, Nick Bostrom, Paul Davies, Martin Rees, Ben Bova and Jennifer Michael Hecht; Reading list; Glossary; Index.

  5. Novel Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Lupus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    RhoB, animal model, antibody secretion, antibody therapy, Systemic lupus erythematosus , autoantibodies. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...6 References………………………………………………………………………………..6 Appendices………………………………………………………………………………..N/A 4 INTRODUCTION: Systemic lupus ...Treatment of Lupus PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lisa Laury-Kleintop, Ph.D. Laura Mandik-Nayak, Ph.D

  6. Optimisation of Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seed Oil and Evaluation 
of Its Physicochemical and Bioactive Properties.

    PubMed

    Çavdar, Hasene Keskin; Yanık, Derya Koçak; Gök, Uğur; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2017-03-01

    Pomegranate seed oil was extracted in a closed-vessel high-pressure microwave system. The characteristics of the obtained oil, such as fatty acid composition, free fatty acidity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and colour, were compared to those of the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. Response surface methodology was applied to optimise extraction conditions: power (176-300 W), time (5-20 min), particle size ( d =0.125-0.800 mm) and solvent to sample ratio (2:1, 6:1 and 10:1, by mass). The predicted highest extraction yield (35.19%) was obtained using microwave power of 220 W, particle size in the range of d =0.125-0.450 mm and solvent-to-sample ratio of 10:1 (by mass) in 5 min extraction time. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) resulted in higher extraction yield than that of Soxhlet (34.70% in 8 h) or cold (17.50% in 8 h) extraction. The dominant fatty acid of pomegranate seed oil was punicic acid (86%) irrespective of the extraction method. Oil obtained by MASE had better physicochemical properties, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity than the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction.

  7. A masing event in NGC 6334I: contemporaneous flaring of hydroxyl, methanol, and water masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, G. C.; Smits, D. P.; Goedhart, S.; Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Chibueze, J. O.; van den Heever, S. P.; Thesner, C. J.; Banda, P. J.; Paulsen, J. D.

    2018-07-01

    As a product of the maser monitoring program with the 26 m telescope of the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO), we present an unprecedented, contemporaneous flaring event of 10 maser transitions in hydroxyl, methanol, and water that began in 2015 January in the massive star-forming region NGC 6334I in the velocity range -10 to -2 km s-1. The 6.7 GHz methanol and 22.2 GHz water masers began flaring within 22 d of each other, while the 12.2 GHz methanol and 1665 MHz hydroxyl masers flared 80 and 113 d later, respectively. The 1665 MHz, 6.7 GHz, and 22.2 GHz masers have all remained in their flared state for nearly 3 yr. The brightest flaring components increased by factors of 66, 21, 26, and 20 in the 12.2 and 6.7 GHz methanol, 1665 MHz hydroxyl, and 22.2 GHz water maser transitions, respectively; some weaker components increased by up to a factor of 145. We also report new maser emission in the 1720, 6031, and 6035 MHz OH lines and the 23.1 GHz methanol line, along with the detection of only the fifth 4660 MHz OH maser. We note the correlation of this event with the extraordinary (sub)millimetre continuum outburst from the massive protostellar system NGC 6334I-MM1 and discuss the implications of the observed time lags between different maser velocity components on the nature of the outburst. Finally, we identify two earlier epoch maser flaring events likely associated with this object, which suggest a recurring accretive phenomenon that generates powerful radiative outbursts.

  8. A Masing Event in NGC 6334I: Contemporaneous Flaring of Hydroxyl, Methanol and Water Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, G. C.; Smits, D. P.; Goedhart, S.; Hunter, T. R.; Brogan, C. L.; Chibueze, J. O.; van den Heever, S. P.; Thesner, C. J.; Banda, P. J.; Paulsen, J. D.

    2018-04-01

    As a product of the maser monitoring program with the 26 m telescope of the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO), we present an unprecedented, contemporaneous flaring event of 10 maser transitions in hydroxyl, methanol, and water that began in 2015 January in the massive star-forming region NGC 6334I in the velocity range -10 to -2 km s-1. The 6.7 GHz methanol and 22.2 GHz water masers began flaring within 22 days of each other, while the 12.2 GHz methanol and 1665 MHz hydroxyl masers flared 80 and 113 days later respectively. The 1665 MHz, 6.7 GHz, and 22.2 GHz masers have all remained in their flared state for nearly 3 years. The brightest flaring components increased by factors of 66, 21, 26, and 20 in the 12.2 and 6.7 GHz methanol, 1665 MHz hydroxyl and 22.2 GHz water maser transitions respectively; some weaker components increased by up to a factor of 145. We also report new maser emission in the 1720, 6031, and 6035 MHz OH lines and the 23.1 GHz methanol line, along with the detection of only the fifth 4660 MHz OH maser. We note the correlation of this event with the extraordinary (sub)millimeter continuum outburst from the massive protostellar system NGC 6334I-MM1 and discuss the implications of the observed time lags between different maser velocity components on the nature of the outburst. Finally, we identify two earlier epoch maser flaring events likely associated with this object, which suggest a recurring accretive phenomenon that generates powerful radiative outbursts.

  9. CHASE Survey of Technology Needs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-01

    CHASE Survey of Technology Needs Shahed Enamul Quadir ECE Department University of Connecticut Storrs, CT, USA Daniel DiMase Honeywell, Inc...based on a survey conducted in late 2015. Counterfeits and Hardware Trojans have been identified as areas needing continued research and focus... survey of its advisory board and industry professionals to determine the technology needs in the area of IC counterfeits, hardware assurance

  10. Determination of linuron and related compounds in soil by microwave-assisted solvent extraction and reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Molins, C; Hogendoorn, E A; Dijkman, E; Heusinkveld, H A; Baumann, R A

    2000-02-11

    The combination of microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) with UV detection has been investigated for the efficient determination of phenylurea herbicides in soils involving the single-residue method (SRM) approach (linuron) and the multi-residue method (MRM) approach (monuron, monolinuron, isoproturon, metobromuron, diuron and linuron). Critical parameters of MASE, viz, extraction temperature, water content and extraction solvent were varied in order to optimise recoveries of the analytes while simultaneously minimising co-extraction of soil interferences. The optimised extraction procedure was applied to different types of soil with an organic carbon content of 0.4-16.7%. Besides freshly spiked soil samples, method validation included the analysis of samples with aged residues. A comparative study between the applicability of RPLC-UV without and with the use of column switching for the processing of uncleaned extracts, was carried out. For some of the tested analyte/matrix combinations the one-column approach (LC mode) is feasible. In comparison to LC, coupled-column LC (LC-LC mode) provides high selectivity in single-residue analysis (linuron) and, although less pronounced in multi-residue analysis (all six phenylurea herbicides), the clean-up performance of LC-LC improves both time of analysis and sample throughput. In the MRM approach the developed procedure involving MASE and LC-LC-UV provided acceptable recoveries (range, 80-120%) and RSDs (<12%) at levels of 10 microg/kg (n=9) and 50 microg/kg (n=7), respectively, for most analyte/matrix combinations. Recoveries from aged residue samples spiked at a level of 100 microg/kg (n=7) ranged, depending of the analyte/soil type combination, from 41-113% with RSDs ranging from 1-35%. In the SRM approach the developed LC-LC procedure was applied for the determination of linuron in 28 sandy soil samples collected in a field study. Linuron could be determined in

  11. Modelling of Cosmic Molecular Masers: Introduction to a Computation Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Andrej M.; Gray, Malcolm D.

    2012-07-01

    Numerical modeling of molecular masers is necessary in order to understand their nature and diagnostic capabilities. Model construction requires elaboration of a basic description which allows computation, that is a definition of the parameter space and basic physical relations. Usually, this requires additional thorough studies that can consist of the following stages/parts: relevant molecular spectroscopy and collisional rate coefficients; conditions in and around the masing region (that part of space where population inversion is realized); geometry and size of the masing region (including the question of whether maser spots are discrete clumps or line-of-sight correlations in a much bigger region) and propagation of maser radiation. Output of the maser computer modeling can have the following forms: exploration of parameter space (where do inversions appear in particular maser transitions and their combinations, which parameter values describe a `typical' source, and so on); modeling of individual sources (line flux ratios, spectra, images and their variability); analysis of the pumping mechanism; predictions (new maser transitions, correlations in variability of different maser transitions, and the like). Described schemes (constituents and hierarchy) of the model input and output are based mainly on the experience of the authors and make no claim to be dogmatic.

  12. Comparison of various extraction techniques for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in worms.

    PubMed

    Mooibroek, D; Hoogerbrugge, R; Stoffelsen, B H G; Dijkman, E; Berkhoff, C J; Hogendoorn, E A

    2002-10-25

    Two less laborious extraction methods, viz. (i) a simplified liquid extraction using light petroleum or (ii) microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE), for the analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in samples of the compost worm Eisenia andrei, were compared with a reference method. After extraction and concentration, analytical methodology consisted of a cleanup of (part) of the extract with high-performance gel permeation chromatography (HPGPC) and instrumental analysis of 15 PAHs with reversed-phase liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (RPLC-FLD). Comparison of the methods was done by analysing samples with incurred residues (n=15, each method) originating from an experiment in which worms were exposed to a soil contaminated with PAHs. Simultaneously, the performance of the total lipid determination of each method was established. Evaluation of the data by means of principal component analysis (PCA) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the performance of the light petroleum method for both the extraction of PAHs (concentration range 1-30 ng/g) and lipid content corresponds very well with the reference method. Compared to the reference method, the MASE method yielded somewhat lower concentrations for the less volatile PAHs, e.g., dibenzo[ah]anthracene and benzo[ghi]perylene and provided a significant higher amount of co-extracted material.

  13. Optimisation of Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seed Oil and Evaluation 
of Its Physicochemical and Bioactive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Çavdar, Hasene Keskin; Gök, Uğur; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pomegranate seed oil was extracted in a closed-vessel high-pressure microwave system. The characteristics of the obtained oil, such as fatty acid composition, free fatty acidity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and colour, were compared to those of the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. Response surface methodology was applied to optimise extraction conditions: power (176–300 W), time (5–20 min), particle size (d=0.125–0.800 mm) and solvent to sample ratio (2:1, 6:1 and 10:1, by mass). The predicted highest extraction yield (35.19%) was obtained using microwave power of 220 W, particle size in the range of d=0.125–0.450 mm and solvent-to-sample ratio of 10:1 (by mass) in 5 min extraction time. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) resulted in higher extraction yield than that of Soxhlet (34.70% in 8 h) or cold (17.50% in 8 h) extraction. The dominant fatty acid of pomegranate seed oil was punicic acid (86%) irrespective of the extraction method. Oil obtained by MASE had better physicochemical properties, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity than the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. PMID:28559737

  14. Manned Mars System Study (MMSS): Mars transportation and facility infrastructure study. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Manned Mars System Study (MMSS) was conducted for the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) over the 35 month period between May 15, 1987 and April 30, 1990. During the course of the study, the NASA Office of Exploration (OEXP; Code Z) was created and MSFC was subsequently designated the Transportation Integration Agent (TIA) for support of the OEXP Mission Analysis and Systems Engineering (MASE) team. As a result of this action, modifications to the contract redirected the efforts to be consistent with NASA's overall objectives, including lunar transportation system design. A large number of written submittals were required in order to provide TIA support to MASE. A list summarizing the documents which have been prepared and delivered by Martin Marietta under this contract during the course of this work is presented. In nearly all cases, full sets of view-graphs were also provided to the MSFC COTR, and in several cases magnetic media were provided as well. To incorporate all of these materials (more than 2,000 pages) into the present report would obviously produce an extremely unwieldy and confusing document. Therefore, a summary of key findings are presented in this final report, supplemented by other material produced under this contract but not already available in the widespread literature.

  15. Evidence of Chemical Cloud Processing from In Situ Measurements in the Polluted Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Chemical cloud processing alters activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Aqueous oxidation of trace gases dissolved within cloud droplets adds soluble material. As most cloud droplets evaporate, the residual material produces CCN that are larger and with a different hygroscopicity (κ). This improves the CCN, lowering the critical supersaturation (Sc), making it more easily activated. This process separates the processed (accumulation) and unprocessed (Aitken) modes creating bimodal CCN distributions (Hudson et al., 2015). Various measurements made during the MArine Stratus/stratocumulus Experiment (MASE), including CCN, exhibited aqueous processing signals. Particle size distributions; measured by a differential mobility analyzer; were compared with CCN distributions; measured by the Desert Research Institute CCN spectrometer; by converting size to Sc using κ to overlay concurrent distributions. By tuning each mode to the best agreement, κ for each mode is determined; processed κ (κp), unprocessed κ (κu). In MASE, 59% of bimodal distributions had different κ for the two modes indicating dominance of chemical processing via aqueous oxidation. This is consistent with Hudson et al. (2015). Figure 1A also indicates chemical processing with larger κp between 0.35-0.75. Processed CCN had an influx of soluble material from aqueous oxidation which increased κp versus κu. Above 0.75 κp is lower than κu (Fig. 1A). When κu is high and sulfate material is added, κp tends towards κ of the added material. Thus, κp is reduced by additional material that is less soluble than the original material. Chemistry measurements in MASE also indicate in-cloud aqueous oxidation (Fig. 1B and 1C). Higher fraction of CCN concentrations in the processed mode are also associated with larger amounts of sulfates (Fig. 1B, red) and nitrates (Fig. 1C, orange) while SO2 (Fig. 1B, black) and O3 (Fig. 1C, blue) have lower amounts. This larger amount of sulfate is at the expense of

  16. A second species of Euscorpiops Vachon from caves in Vietnam (Scorpiones, Euscorpiidae, Scorpiopinae). Cave Euscorpiops scorpion from Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Wilson R; Pham, Dinh-Sac

    2014-09-01

    Euscorpiops dakrong sp. n., belonging to the family Euscorpiidae Laurie, is described on the basis of one male and one female collected in the Dakrong Nature Reserve cave system, Dakrong District, Quang Tri Province, Vietnam. The new species presents most features exhibited by scorpions of the genus Euscorpiops, but it is characterized by a slender body and elongated pedipalps. This new scorpion taxon represents the second species of Scorpiopinae discovered in a cave system and may be yet another endemic element in the fauna of Vietnam. Some taxonomic propositions on the generic position of Scorpiops oligotrichus Fage, 1933 are also suggested. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Female babies and risk-aversion: Causal evidence from hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Pogrebna, Ganna; Oswald, Andrew J; Haig, David

    2018-03-01

    Using ultrasound scan data from paediatric hospitals, and the exogenous 'shock' of learning the gender of an unborn baby, the paper documents the first causal evidence that offspring gender affects adult risk-aversion. On a standard Holt-Laury criterion, parents of daughters, whether unborn or recently born, become almost twice as risk-averse as parents of sons. The study demonstrates this in longitudinal and cross-sectional data, for fathers and mothers, for babies in the womb and new-born children, and in a West European nation and East European nation. These findings may eventually aid our understanding of risky health behaviors and gender inequalities. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of 10CrNi3MoV High Strength Steel and Its Undermatched Welds

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuesong; Berto, Filippo

    2018-01-01

    The use of high strength steel allows the design of lighter, more slender and simpler structures due to high strength and favorable ductility. Nevertheless, the increase of yield strength does not guarantee the corresponding improvement of fatigue resistance, which becomes a major concern for engineering structure design, especially for the welded joints. The paper presents a comparison of the low cycle fatigue behaviors between 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel and its undermatched weldments. Uniaxial tension tests, Push-pull, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on base metal and weldments in the strain range of 0.2–1.2%. The monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves, stress-life, strain-life and energy-life in terms of these materials were analyzed for fatigue assessment of materials discrepancy. The stress-life results of base metal and undermatched weld metal exhibit cyclic softening behaviors. Furthermore, the shapes of 10CrNi3MoV steel hysteresis loops show a satisfactory Masing-type behavior, while the weld metal shows a non-Masing type behavior. Strain, plastic and total strain energy density amplitudes against the number of reversals to failure results demonstrate that the undermatched weld metal presents a higher resistance to fatigue crack initiation than 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel. Finally, fatigue fracture surfaces of specimens were compared by scanning electron microscopy to identify the differences of crack initiation and the propagation between them. PMID:29695140

  19. Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of 10CrNi3MoV High Strength Steel and Its Undermatched Welds.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Liu, Xuesong; Berto, Filippo; Razavi, S M J

    2018-04-24

    The use of high strength steel allows the design of lighter, more slender and simpler structures due to high strength and favorable ductility. Nevertheless, the increase of yield strength does not guarantee the corresponding improvement of fatigue resistance, which becomes a major concern for engineering structure design, especially for the welded joints. The paper presents a comparison of the low cycle fatigue behaviors between 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel and its undermatched weldments. Uniaxial tension tests, Push-pull, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on base metal and weldments in the strain range of 0.2⁻1.2%. The monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves, stress-life, strain-life and energy-life in terms of these materials were analyzed for fatigue assessment of materials discrepancy. The stress-life results of base metal and undermatched weld metal exhibit cyclic softening behaviors. Furthermore, the shapes of 10CrNi3MoV steel hysteresis loops show a satisfactory Masing-type behavior, while the weld metal shows a non-Masing type behavior. Strain, plastic and total strain energy density amplitudes against the number of reversals to failure results demonstrate that the undermatched weld metal presents a higher resistance to fatigue crack initiation than 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel. Finally, fatigue fracture surfaces of specimens were compared by scanning electron microscopy to identify the differences of crack initiation and the propagation between them.

  20. Crosstalk: The Journal of Defense Software Engineering. Volume 18, Number 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    d o t . o r g / a s k slashdot/04/04/12/1757244.shtml>. 5. Dibona , C., et al. Open Sources: Voices From the Open Source Rev- olution. 1st ed. O’Reilly...Volume 18, Number 1, January 2005 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) OO-ALC/MASE,6022 Fir Ave,Hill AFB,UT,84056-5820 8. PERFORMING

  1. The thinking ape: the enigma of human consciousness.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Steve; Chalmers, David; Kahneman, Daniel; Santos, Laurie; Schiff, Nicholas

    2013-11-01

    What is the origin and nature of consciousness? If consciousness is common to humans and animals alike, what are the defining traits of human consciousness? Moderated by Steve Paulson, executive producer and host of To the Best of Our Knowledge, Nobel laureate psychologist Daniel Kahneman, philosopher David Chalmers, expert in primate cognition Laurie Santos, and physician-scientist Nicholas Schiff discuss what it means to be conscious and examine the human capacities displayed in cognitive, aesthetic, and ethical behaviors, with a focus on the place and function of the mind within nature. The following is an edited transcript of the discussion that occurred October 10, 2012, 7:00-8:15 PM, at the New York Academy of Sciences in New York City. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. 2014 NASA Centennial Challenges Sample Return Robot Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-14

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) President Laurie Leshin, speaks at a breakfast opening the TouchTomorrow Festival, held in conjunction with the 2014 NASA Centennial Challenges Sample Return Robot Challenge, Saturday, June 14, 2014, at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, Mass. Eighteen teams are competing for a $1.5 million NASA prize purse. Teams will be required to demonstrate autonomous robots that can locate and collect samples from a wide and varied terrain, operating without human control. The objective of this NASA-WPI Centennial Challenge is to encourage innovations in autonomous navigation and robotics technologies. Innovations stemming from the challenge may improve NASA's capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation's robotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP-DR1) catalogs (Lutz+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, D.; Poglitsch, A.; Altieri, B.; Andreani, P.; Aussel, H.; Berta, S.; Bongiovanni, A.; Brisbin, D.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Cimatti, A.; Daddi, E.; Dominguez-Sanchez, H.; Elbaz, D.; Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Grazian, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Harwit, M.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magdis, G.; Magnelli, B.; Maiolino, R.; Nordon, R.; Perez Garcia, A. M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Shao, L.; Sturm, E.; Tacconi, L. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Wetzstein, M.; Wieprecht, E.

    2013-11-01

    PACS catalogs built by the PEP team, with key contributions by Stefano Berta, Benjamin Magnelli, Paola Popesso, Dieter Lutz, Francesca Pozzi, Bruno Altieri, Herve Aussel, Hoseong Hwang, Emeric Le Floc'h, Georgios Magdis, Raanan Nordon, Albrecht Poglitsch, Laurie Riguccini, Amelie Saintonge, Li Shao. For more details, please refer to Lutz et al. (2011A&A...532A..90L) and to the PDF documentation associated to the release. Data and catalogs can be retrieved from the web page http://www.mpe.mpg.de/ir/Research/PEP/publicdatareleases.php See the PDF documentation associated to the PEP DR1 release, http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_global.pdf and http://www.mpe.mpg.de/resources/PEP/DR1tarballs/readmePEP_SPIRE.pdf for more details. (69 data files).

  4. Two-Decade Monitoring of MWC349 in Optical and Radio: New Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomashow, Eydon; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Strelnitski, Vladimir; Walker, Gary; Maria Mitchell Observatory (MMO) Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) Interns, 2017

    2018-01-01

    Maria Mitchell Observatory (MMO) has completed the two-decade long monitoring of MWC 349 in the optical and radio domains. This poster presentation will be primarily devoted to the new results obtained by optical photometry with broad and narrow band filters and observations of the variability in the masing H30 radio line during the observational season of 2017. The H30 emission arises in the circumstellar disk of the MWC 349A component of the visual double star (with 2.4 arcsec separation between the A and B components). Variable optical emission is also believed to be due to star A. By combining our optical observations with earlier MMO observations, we not only confirmed the previously known quasi-period of ~230 days, but confirmed a second period of ~700 days. One of the most interesting results of radio monitoring is the long-term variability of the systemic radial velocity of star A, as determined through averaging the radial velocities of the two masing peaks arising in the circumstellar disk. This may be the first case where a possible hidden close companion of a star (a lower mass star or a massive protoplanet) is detected by monitoring the radial velocity of the star via the spectral line radiation from its disk. E.T. completed this project as a 2017 MMO NSF REU intern and would like to thank the other interns for their help in conducting the optical observations. This project was supported in part by the NSF REU grant AST-1358980 and by the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  5. Xerophthalmia in a traditional Quran boarding school in Sudan.

    PubMed

    Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Dirar, Tarig O M O; Elhassan, Haifa O M; Elshikh, Maha A H; Ahmed, Mohamed B M; Abbass, Mohammed A; Idris, Salma S

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of xerophthalmia at a traditional boarding school where children do not receive a diet adequate in vitamin A. A cross-sectional survey of 406 males residing in a Quranic traditional school was conducted using the World Health Organization xerophthalmia checklist. The association between the prevalence of night blindness and proportion of students staying at the school for 6 consecutive months and those eating solely at the school was investigated. The difference in age between children with night blindness and those without was investigated. Statistical significance was indicated by P<0.05. The prevalence of night blindness, conjunctival xerosis and Bitot's spots was 24%, 12.5% and 1%, respectively. None of the boys had corneal ulceration, corneal scars and corneal xerosis. No significant association was observed between the differences in mean age and development of night blindness (P=0.657). There was a significant association between the duration of stay (cut-off of 6 months continuously) at the institute and the development of night blindness (P=0.023). There was no statistical significance between regularly eating at the maseed and outside the "maseed" and the development of night blindness (P=0.75). Children residing at a traditional school are vulnerable to developing xerophthalmia where the diet is inadequate in vitamin A. Institutional caregivers should be made aware of the importance of providing a balanced diet rich in vitamin A. Institutional caregivers should also be educated on the signs and symptoms of vitamin A deficiency for early detection of xerophthalmia.

  6. An experimental study on dredge spoil of estuarine sediments in the bay of seine (France): A morphosedimentary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmin, Stella; Lesueur, Patrick; Dauvin, Jean Claude; Samson, Sandrine; Tournier, Patrice; Gallicher Lavanne, Albert; Dubrulle-Brunaud, Carole; Thouroude, Coralie

    2016-03-01

    Studies on the consequences of dredging on estuarine morphology and its sedimentary dynamics are common, but the impacts of dumping dredge spoil in coastal open settings are rarely found in scientific literature. An experimental study was conducted over the period 2012-2013 to monitor the physical impacts of dredged material dumped at two adjacent sites (one million cubic metres at each) on the inner shelf of the Bay of Seine in France (eastern part of the English Channel, La Manche). As recently reinforced in the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), knowledge on the location and intensity of human impacts (e.g. on marine ecosystems) is critical for effective marine management and conservation. So, two methods of disposition were tested to evaluate the impacts of dumping on the environment and thus propose recommendations for future dumping. The strategy is based on a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) approach, in which the spatio-temporal variability was studied by analysing the morphological and sedimentological characteristics over a period of 28 months, from November 2011 to April 2014, also including recovery of the seafloor after cessation of the dumping activities. The first experimental dumping operation (MASED) was carried out regularly for 8 months at a single point and generating a conical deposit of 5 m in height, while the second dumping (MABIO) lasted for 12 months involving four steps in the dumping process. In the second case, a wider area was covered, leading to the formation of a smaller deposit of 2 m in height. The dumped deposits consisted of muddy fine sand, whereas the inner shelf seafloor in this area is covered with fine to medium sand. As a result, muddy fine sand accumulated at or near the two dumping sites, with a maximum mud (i.e. particles<63 μm or>4 Φ) content of 50% compared to<5% before dumping operations. Videos obtained from a LVB200 Seabotix ROV, highlighted the heterogeneity of the sea floor around the dumping areas

  7. NASA Future Forum

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-02-21

    Laurie Leshin, dean of the School of Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, left, Mason Peck, NASA Chief Technologist, 2nd from left, Ron Sega, Vice president and enterprise executive for Energy and the Environment, The Ohio State University and Colorado State University, Michael Donovan, technology consultant, New Services Development, Hewlett-Packard Company, and, Jordan Hansell, chairman and CEO, NetJets Inc., right, participate in the NASA Future Forum panel titled "Importance of Technology, Science and Innovation for our Economic Future" at The Ohio State University on Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2012 in Columbus, Ohio. The NASA Future Forum features panel discussions on the importance of education to our nation's future in space, the benefit of commercialized space technology to our economy and lives here on Earth, and the shifting roles for the public, commercial and international communities in space. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  8. Tomography of the subducting Cocos plate in central Mexico using data from the installation of a prototype wireless seismic network: Images of a truncated slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husker, Allen Leroy, Jr.

    The central Mexican subduction zone exhibits an oblique strike of the volcanic arc, the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), with respect to the trench, flat-slab subduction, and has no Wadati-Benioff zone. The oblique strike of the TMVB is explained by the changing rate of subduction at the trench. The shape of the slab beyond the flat slab section has been unknown until now due to a lack of seismicity, but inferred by the position of the volcanic arc. Here we use data from the Middle America Seismic Experiment (MASE) to image the slab both with tomography and inverting for a slab temperature model. MASE is a collaboration between the Center for Embedded Networked Sensing (CENS) at UCLA, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), and the California Institute of Technology (CIT). The data used in this study was from the MASE seismic network. It consisted of 100 seismic stations running, in a line, every 5-6 km from Acapulco, north through TMVB, and to almost the Gulf of Mexico. Half of the seismic stations were the typical standalone style station. These stations were visited once a month to change memory disks and for maintenance. The other 50 stations were developed to send data wirelessly through the network to a base station where the data is linked to the Internet. The 50 stations, called the Wirelessly Linked Seismological Network (WiLSoN), utilize standard Internet tools and protocols to make it both robust and portable to other systems. WiLSoN is described and compared to the standalone stations. The time to permit and install WiLSoN was double that of the standalone network. However, the benefits of WiLSoN included near real-time data and knowledge of system health as compared to only once a month visits to collect data from the standalone stations. However, the data collected from the standalone sites was more complete than that collected from WiLSoN. The lack of data completeness is attributed to the development of both software and hardware for

  9. Influence of the extraction mode on the yield of some furanocoumarins from Pastinaca sativa fruits.

    PubMed

    Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika; Petruczynik, Anna; Dragan, Anna; Wianowska, Dorota; Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Sowa, Ireneusz

    2004-02-05

    Analysis of plant material is an important task in chemotaxonomical investigations, in search of plants with pharmacological activity or in standardisation of plant drugs. The choice of optimal conditions for the analysis of plant material and effect of extraction method on the yield of furanocoumarins from Pastinaca sativa fruits were examined. The following extraction methods were used in experiments: exhaustive extraction in Soxhlet apparatus, ultrasonification (USAE) at 25 and 60 degrees C, microwave-assisted solvent extraction in open and closed system (MASE) and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). In most cases, the yield of furanocoumarins was highest by use of ASE method as well as by ultrasonification at 60 degrees C.

  10. Microwave assisted solvent extraction and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography with UV detection use of an analytical restricted-access-medium column for the efficient multi-residue analysis of acidic pesticides in soils.

    PubMed

    Hogendoom, E A; Huls, R; Dijkman, E; Hoogerbrugge, R

    2001-12-14

    A screening method has been developed for the determination of acidic pesticides in various types of soils. Methodology is based on the use of microwave assisted solvent extraction (MASE) for fast and efficient extraction of the analytes from the soils and coupled-column reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC-LC) with UV detection at 228 nm for the instrumental analysis of uncleaned extracts. Four types of soils, including sand, clay and peat, with a range in organic matter content of 0.3-13% and ten acidic pesticides of different chemical families (bentazone, bromoxynil, metsulfuron-methyl, 2,4-D, MCPA, MCPP, 2,4-DP, 2,4,5-T, 2,4-DB and MCPB) were selected as matrices and analytes, respectively. The method developed included the selection of suitable MASE and LC-LC conditions. The latter consisted of the selection of a 5-microm GFF-II internal surface reversed-phase (ISRP, Pinkerton) analytical column (50 x 4.6 mm, I.D.) as the first column in the RAM-C18 configuration in combination with an optimised linear gradient elution including on-line cleanup of sample extracts and reconditioning of the columns. The method was validated with the analysis of freshly spiked samples and samples with aged residues (120 days). The four types of soils were spiked with the ten acidic pesticides at levels between 20 and 200 microg/kg. Weighted regression of the recovery data showed for most analyte-matrix combinations, including freshly spiked samples and aged residues, that the method provides overall recoveries between 60 and 90% with relative standard deviations of the intra-laboratory reproducibility's between 5 and 25%; LODs were obtained between 5 and 50 microg/kg. Evaluation of the data set with principal component analysis revealed that the parameters (i) increase of organic matter content of the soil samples and (ii) aged residues negatively effect the recovery of the analytes.

  11. PREFACE: 6th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwat, David; Ayadi, Zoubir; Jamart, Brigitte

    2012-02-01

    The 6th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2011) was held at the European School of Materials Engineering (EEIGM) on the 7-8 November 2011 in Nancy, France. This biennial conference organized by the EEIGM is a wonderful opportunity for all scientists involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE), to present their research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering. This conference is also open to other universities who have strong links with the EEIGM and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas, co-operation and future orientations by means of regular presentations, posters and a round-table discussion. This edition of the conference included a round-table discussion on composite materials within the Interreg IVA project '+Composite'. Following the publication of the proceedings of AMR 2009 in Volume 5 of this journal, it is with great pleasure that we present this selection of articles to the readers of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Once again it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering, covering basic and applicative research on organic and composite materials, metallic materials and ceramics, and characterization methods. The editors are indebted to all the reviewers for reviewing the papers at very short notice. Special thanks are offered to the sponsors of the conference including EEIGM-Université de Lorraine, AMASE, DocMASE, Grand Nancy, Ville de Nancy, Region Lorraine, Fédération Jacques Villermaux, Conseil Général de Meurthe et Moselle, Casden and '+Composite'. Zoubir Ayadi, David Horwat and Brigitte Jamart

  12. International Materials Research Meeting in the Greater Region: “Current Trends in the Characterisation of Materials and Surface Modification”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-10-01

    Preface Dear ladies and gentlemen, On 6th and 7th of April 2017 took place the “International Materials Research Meeting in the Greater Region” at the Saarland University, Saarbrücken, Germany. This meeting corresponded to the 9th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research and it was intended as a meeting place for researchers of the Greater Region as well as their partners of the different cooperation activities, like the EEIGM program, the ‘Erasmus Mundus’ Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master program (AMASE), the ‘Erasmus Mundus’ Doctoral Program in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE) and the CREATe-Network. On this meeting, 72 participants from 15 countries and 24 institutions discussed and exchanged ideas on the latest trends in the characterization of materials and surface modifications. Different aspects of the material research of metals, ceramics, polymers and biomaterials were presented. As a conclusion of the meeting, the new astronaut of the European Space Agency Dr. Matthias Maurer, who is an alumni of the Saarland University and the EEIGM, held an exciting presentation about his activities. Following the publication of selected papers of the 2009 meeting in Volume 5 and 2012 meeting in Volume 31 of this journal, it is a great pleasure to present this selection of 9 articles to the readers of the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The editors are thankful to all of the reviewers for reviewing the papers. Special praise is also given to the sponsors of the conference: European Commission within the program Erasmus Mundus (AMASE and DocMASE), Erasmus+ (AMASE), and Horizon2020 (CREATe-Network, Grant agreement No 644013): the DAAD (Alumni Program), and the German-French University (PhD-Track). List of Author signatures, Conference topics, Organization, Conference impressions and list of the participants are available in this PDF.

  13. The Influence of Vegetation Function towards the Langsep Street Thermal Comfort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfian, R.; Setyabudi, I.; Uran, R. S.

    2017-10-01

    Streetscape is an important element for character building of the environment, spatial, and visual in order to provide an urban identity, especially in Malang City protocol streets. Langsep Street is one of the protocol streets in Malang City. Langsep Street famous with central education and offices area. This study aims (1) to identify vegetation of streetscape; (2) to analyze the thermal comfort of the streetscape, and (3) to evaluate the comfort level of Langsep Street. The method used was the THI approach. THI value that obtained was analyzed using the standard of Laurie (1990). Based on observations, the THI value of Langsep Street was 27.60. This was influenced by the trees canopy density and spacing of the trees on the streetscape. It can be concluded that streetscape required (1) shaded plants that have root systems that do not damage the construction of roads, (2) the branching plants are not easily broken and easy to maintain, and (3) the combination of trees, shrubs and ground cover.

  14. Interposition Dermal Matrix Xenografts: A Successful Alternative to Traditional Treatment of Massive Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Julie A; Zgonis, Miltiadis H; Rickert, Kathleen D; Bradley, Kendall E; Kremen, Thomas J; Boggess, Blake R; Toth, Alison P

    2017-05-01

    Management of massive rotator cuff tears in shoulders without glenohumeral arthritis remains problematic for surgeons. Repairs of massive rotator cuff tears have failure rates of 20% to 94% at 1 to 2 years postoperatively as demonstrated with arthrography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. Additionally, inconsistent outcomes have been reported with debridement alone of massive rotator cuff tears, and limitations have been seen with other current methods of operative intervention, including arthroplasty and tendon transfers. The use of interposition porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft in patients with massive rotator cuff tears will result in improved subjective outcomes, postoperative pain, function, range of motion, and strength. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Sixty patients (61 shoulders) were prospectively observed for a mean of 50.3 months (range, 24-63 months) after repair of massive rotator cuff tears with porcine acellular dermal matrix xenograft as an interposition graft. Subjective outcome data were obtained with visual analog scale for pain score (0-10, 0 = no pain) and Modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (MASES) score. Active range of motion in flexion, external rotation, and internal rotation were recorded. Strength in the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles was assessed manually on a 10-point scale and by handheld dynamometer. Ultrasound was used to assess the integrity of the repair during latest follow-up. Mean visual analog scale pain score decreased from 4.0 preoperatively to 1.0 postoperatively ( P < .001). Mean active forward flexion improved from 140.7° to 160.4° ( P < .001), external rotation at 0° of abduction from 55.6° to 70.1° ( P = .001), and internal rotation at 90° of abduction from 52.0° to 76.2° ( P < .001). Supraspinatus manual strength increased from 7.7 to 8.8 ( P < .001) and infraspinatus manual strength from 7.7 to 9.3 ( P < .001). Mean dynamometric strength in forward flexion was 77.7 N

  15. A Nonlocal Calculation of Circumstellar OH Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collison, A. J.; Nedoluha, G. E.

    1993-12-01

    We present calculations for circumstellar OH masers which explicitly account for the nonlocal interaction throughout the masing region. Excitation temperatures and observed emission are calculated for all four ground state maser lines. All other transitions are treated using a modified Sobolev approximation. Calculations are performed within the context of a simplified dust/outflow model which provides the pumping conditions and their variation with radius. Total velocity relaxation is implicitly assumed in the calculations. We find general agreement with the qualitative results of earlier work (Collison & Nedoluha, ApJ, 10 Feb 94 issue) and agree with the conclusions of Alcock & Ross (1986, ApJ, 305, 837) who showed that observed profiles can not be produced by a smooth, spherically symmetric wind model of the outflow.

  16. Interstellar molecules and dense clouds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rank, D. M.; Townes, C. H.; Welch, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Current knowledge of the interstellar medium is discussed on the basis of recent published studies. The subjects considered include optical identification of interstellar molecules, radio molecular lines, interstellar clouds, isotopic abundances, formation and disappearance of interstellar molecules, and interstellar probing techniques. Diagrams are plotted for the distribution of galactic sources exhibiting molecular lines, for hydrogen molecule, hydrogen atom and electron abundances due to ionization, for the densities, velocities and temperature of NH3 in the direction of Sagitarius B2, for the lower rotational energy levels of H2CO, and for temporal spectral variations in masing H2O clouds of the radio source W49. Future applications of the maser and of molecular microscopy in this field are visualized.

  17. Influence of pressure on acoustic and rheologic parameters in water solutions of laury sodium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamidov, B. T.; Lezhnev, N. B.

    1995-10-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and density in water solutions of lauril sodium sulphate at frequency 36 MHz, within the range of pressures from 0.1 to 105 MPa at temperature T equals 293 K were measured. According to data of ultrasonic velocity and density under high pressures there was calculated adiabatic compressibility in objects studied from pressure. It was found out that the region of critical concentration of micelle formation has been shifted to the zone of much more low concentrations.

  18. Food and the body politic.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Americans are in the midst of a food-consciousness revival: on television, in the mouth of the First Lady, in endless articles celebrating urban agriculture can be found a sudden enthusiasm for the politically and, perhaps, spiritually curated dinner table. In this special section, writers explore the perilous state of food and food politics in America and a wide range of responses on the Left. Marion Nestle, in her essay on the farm bill, describes how the existing policy disaster came to be, along with the relationship between Reagan-era deregulation and the obesity epidemic. Mark Engler describes both the successes and coopting of the strands of left-wing responses—buying organic, eating local, and agitating for fair trade—and asks, "What's a radical to eat?" Laurie Woolever uncovers the kind of labor exploitation endemic to the elite dining experience. Karen Bakker Le Billon compares American to French school lunches, unpacking the relationship between food and citizenship. Juliana DeVries explores vegetarianism and the politics of everyday life.

  19. The General History of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2010-04-01

    Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; Part I. The Birth of Astrophysics and Other Late Nineteenth-Century Trends (c.1850-c.1920); 1. The origins of astrophysics A. J. Meadows; 2. The impact of photography on astronomy John Lankford; 3. Telescope building, 1850-1900 Albert Van Helden; 4. The new astronomy A. J. Meadows; 5. Variable stars Helen Sawyer Hogg; 6. Stellar evolution and the origin of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram David DeVorkin; Part II. Observatories and Instrumentation: 7. Astronomical institutions. Introduction Owen Gingerich, Greenwich Observatory Philip S. Laurie, Paris Observatory Jacques Lévy, Pulkovo Observatory Aleksandr A. Mikhailov, Harvard College Observatory Howard Plotkin, United States Naval Observatory Deborah Warner, Lick Observatory Trudy E. Bell, Potsdam Astrophysical Observatory Dieter B. Herrmann; 8. Building large telescopes, 1900-1950 Albert Van Helden; 9. Astronomical institutions in the southern hemisphere, 1850-1950 David S. Evans; 10. Twentieth-century instrumentation Charles Fehrenbach, with a section on 'Early rockets in astronomy' Herbert Friedman; 11. Early radio astronomy Woodruff T. Sullivan III; Appendix: The world's largest telescopes, 1850-1950 Barbara L. Welther; Illustrations: acknowledgements and sources; Index.

  20. Impact of personal economic environment and personality factors on individual financial decision making

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Susanne; Gründer, Gerhard; Hilgers, Ralf D.; Holtemöller, Oliver; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This study on healthy young male students aimed to enlighten the associations between an individual’s financial decision making and surrogate makers for environmental factors covering long-term financial socialization, the current financial security/responsibility, and the personal affinity to financial affairs as represented by parental income, funding situation, and field of study. A group of 150 male young healthy students underwent two versions of the Holt and Laury (2002) lottery paradigm (matrix and random sequential version). Their financial decision was mainly driven by the factor “source of funding”: students with strict performance control (grants, scholarships) had much higher rates of relative risk aversion (RRA) than subjects with support from family (ΔRRA = 0.22; p = 0.018). Personality scores only modestly affected the outcome. In an ANOVA, however, also the intelligence quotient significantly and relevantly contributed to the explanation of variance; the effects of parental income and the personality factors “agreeableness” and “openness” showed moderate to modest – but significant – effects. These findings suggest that environmental factors more than personality factors affect risk aversion. PMID:24624100

  1. Impact of personal economic environment and personality factors on individual financial decision making.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Susanne; Gründer, Gerhard; Hilgers, Ralf D; Holtemöller, Oliver; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This study on healthy young male students aimed to enlighten the associations between an individual's financial decision making and surrogate makers for environmental factors covering long-term financial socialization, the current financial security/responsibility, and the personal affinity to financial affairs as represented by parental income, funding situation, and field of study. A group of 150 male young healthy students underwent two versions of the Holt and Laury (2002) lottery paradigm (matrix and random sequential version). Their financial decision was mainly driven by the factor "source of funding": students with strict performance control (grants, scholarships) had much higher rates of relative risk aversion (RRA) than subjects with support from family (ΔRRA = 0.22; p = 0.018). Personality scores only modestly affected the outcome. In an ANOVA, however, also the intelligence quotient significantly and relevantly contributed to the explanation of variance; the effects of parental income and the personality factors "agreeableness" and "openness" showed moderate to modest - but significant - effects. These findings suggest that environmental factors more than personality factors affect risk aversion.

  2. PLE in the analysis of plant compounds. Part I. The application of PLE for HPLC analysis of caffeine in green tea leaves.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Wianowska, Dorota

    2005-04-29

    A broad spectrum of sample preparation methods is currently used for the isolation of pharmacologically active compounds from plant and herbal materials. The paper compares the effectiveness of infusion, microwave assisted solvent extraction (MASE), matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) and pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) as sample preparation methods for the isolation of caffeine from green tea leaves. The effect of PLE variables, such as extraction temperature, pressure and time, on the yield of caffeine from the investigated matrix is discussed. The obtained results revealed that PLE, in comparison with other sample preparation methods applied, has significantly lower efficacy for caffeine isolation from green tea leaves. The evaluation of PLE conditions leads to the conclusion that elevated pressure applied in the PLE process is the factor hindering the extraction.

  3. Aimulet: a multilingual spatial optical voice card terminal for location and direction based information services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hideo; Lin, Xin; Kaji, Ryosaku; Niwa, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takuichi

    2006-01-01

    The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan has been developing Aimulet, which is a compact low-power consuming information terminal for a personal information services. Conventional Aimulet, which is called Aimulet ver. 1 or CoBIT, has features of location and direction sensitive information service device without batteries. On the other hand, the Aimulet ver. 1 has two subjects, one is multiplex and demultiplex of some contents, and another is operation under sunshine. In Former subject is of solved by the wavelength multiplex technique using LED emitter with different wavelength and dielectric optical filters. Latter subject is solved by new micro spherical solar cells with a visible-light-eliminating optical filter and a new design of light irradiation. These techniques are applied to the EXPO 2005, Aichi Japan and introduced in public. The former technique is applied on Aimulet GH, which is used in Orange Hall of the Global House, scientific museum with a fossil of a frozen mammoth. The latter technique is applied on Aimulet LA, which is used in the Laurie Anderson's WALK project in the Japanese Garden.

  4. Some prehistory of New Zealand intensive care medicine.

    PubMed

    Trubuhovich, R V

    2009-07-01

    In taking 1960 as the foundation year for the practice of intensive care medicine in New Zealand, this paper briefly looks into the previous two centuries for some interventions in life-threatening conditions. With the help of descriptions in early 19th century journals and books by perceptive observers, the author focuses on some beliefs and practices of the Maori people during pre-European and later times, as well as aspects of medical treatment in New Zealand for early settlers and their descendents. Dr Laurie Gluckman's book Tangiwai has proved a valuable resource for New Zealand's medical history prior to 1860, while the recent publication of his findings from the examination of coroners' records for Auckland, 1841 to 1864, has been helpful. Drowning is highlighted as a common cause of accidental death, and consideration is given to alcohol as a factor. Following the 1893 foundation of the New Zealand Medical Journal, a limited number of its papers which are historically relevant to today's intensive care are explored: topics include tetanus, laryngeal diphtheria, direct cardiac massage, traumatic shock, thiopentone management for fitting and the ventilatory failure due to poliomyelitis.

  5. Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    This project is a multiyear effort focusing on energy flow in the Palace of Fine Arts lagoon just outside the Exploratorium in San Francisco. Phase 1 was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of improving biological energy flow through the small freshwater lagoon, using the expertise and resources of an environmental artist in collaboration with museum biologists and arts department staff. The primary outcome of Phase 1 is an experimental fountain exhibit inside the museum designed by public artist Laurie Lundquist with Exploratorium staff. This fountain, with signage, functions both as a model for natural aeration and filtration systemsmore » and as a focal point for museum visitors to learn about how biological processes cycle energy through aquatic systems. As part of the study of the lagoon`s health, volunteers continued biweekly bird consus from March through September, 1994. The goal was to find out whether the poor water quality of the lagoon is affecting the birds. Limited dredging was undertaken by the city Parks and Recreation Department. However, a more peermanent solution to the lagoon`s ecological problems would require an ambitious redesign of the lagoon.« less

  6. Cloud Processed CCN Suppress Stratus Cloud Drizzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Conversion of sulfur dioxide to sulfate within cloud droplets increases the sizes and decreases the critical supersaturation, Sc, of cloud residual particles that had nucleated the droplets. Since other particles remain at the same sizes and Sc a size and Sc gap is often observed. Hudson et al. (2015) showed higher cloud droplet concentrations (Nc) in stratus clouds associated with bimodal high-resolution CCN spectra from the DRI CCN spectrometer compared to clouds associated with unimodal CCN spectra (not cloud processed). Here we show that CCN spectral shape (bimodal or unimodal) affects all aspects of stratus cloud microphysics and drizzle. Panel A shows mean differential cloud droplet spectra that have been divided according to traditional slopes, k, of the 131 measured CCN spectra in the Marine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) off the Central California coast. K is generally high within the supersaturation, S, range of stratus clouds (< 0.5%). Because cloud processing decreases Sc of some particles, it reduces k. Panel A shows higher concentrations of small cloud droplets apparently grown on lower k CCN than clouds grown on higher k CCN. At small droplet sizes the concentrations follow the k order of the legend, black, red, green, blue (lowest to highest k). Above 13 µm diameter the lines cross and the hierarchy reverses so that blue (highest k) has the highest concentrations followed by green, red and black (lowest k). This reversed hierarchy continues into the drizzle size range (panel B) where the most drizzle drops, Nd, are in clouds grown on the least cloud-processed CCN (blue), while clouds grown on the most processed CCN (black) have the lowest Nd. Suppression of stratus cloud drizzle by cloud processing is an additional 2nd indirect aerosol effect (IAE) that along with the enhancement of 1st IAE by higher Nc (panel A) are above and beyond original IAE. However, further similar analysis is needed in other cloud regimes to determine if MASE was

  7. Applications of non-parametric statistics and analysis of variance on sample variances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Nonparametric methods that are available for NASA-type applications are discussed. An attempt will be made here to survey what can be used, to attempt recommendations as to when each would be applicable, and to compare the methods, when possible, with the usual normal-theory procedures that are avavilable for the Gaussion analog. It is important here to point out the hypotheses that are being tested, the assumptions that are being made, and limitations of the nonparametric procedures. The appropriateness of doing analysis of variance on sample variances are also discussed and studied. This procedure is followed in several NASA simulation projects. On the surface this would appear to be reasonably sound procedure. However, difficulties involved center around the normality problem and the basic homogeneous variance assumption that is mase in usual analysis of variance problems. These difficulties discussed and guidelines given for using the methods.

  8. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a ferritic reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Apu; Kumawat, Bhupendra K.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2015-07-01

    The cyclic stress-strain response and the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 20MnMoNi55 pressure vessel steel were studied. Tensile strength and LCF properties were examined at room temperature (RT) using specimens cut from rolling direction of a rolled block. The fully reversed strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant total strain rate with different axial strain amplitude levels. The cyclic strain-stress relationships and the strain-life relationships were obtained through the test results, and related LCF parameters of the steel were calculated. The studied steel exhibits cyclic softening behavior. Furthermore, analysis of stabilized hysteresis loops showed that the steel exhibits non-Masing behavior. Complementary scanning electron microscopy examinations were also carried out on fracture surfaces to reveal dominant damage mechanisms during crack initiation, propagation and fracture. Multiple crack initiation sites were observed on the fracture surface. The investigated LCF behavior can provide reference for pressure vessel life assessment and fracture mechanisms analysis.

  9. Dissolution and solubility behavior of fenofibrate in sodium lauryl sulfate solutions.

    PubMed

    Granero, Gladys E; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Amidon, Gordon L

    2005-10-01

    The solubility of fenofibrate in pH 6.8 McIlvaine buffers containing varying concentrations of sodium lauryl sulfate was determined. The dissolution behavior of fenofibrate was also examined in the same solutions with rotating disk experiments. It was observed that the enhancement in intrinsic dissolution rate was approximately 500-fold and the enhancement in solubility was approximately 2000-fold in a pH 6.8 buffer containing 2% (w/v) sodium lauryl sulfate compared to that in buffer alone. The micellar solubilization equilibrium coefficient (k*) was estimated from the solubility data and found to be 30884+/-213 L/mol. The diffusivity for the free solute, 7.15x10(-6) cm2/s, was calculated using Schroeder's additive molal volume estimates and Hayduk-Laurie correlation. The diffusivity of the drug-loaded micelle, estimated from the experimental solubility and dissolution data and the calculated value for free solute diffusivity, was 0.86x10(-6) cm2/s. Thus, the much lower enhancement in dissolution of fenofibrate compared to its enhancement in solubility in surfactant solutions appears to be consistent with the contribution to the total transport due to enhanced micellar solubilization as well as a large decrease (approximately 8-fold) in the diffusivity of the drug-loaded micelle.

  10. KSC-2011-5310

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-08

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Launch controllers wave their STS-135 shuttle launch team member flags and cheer in Firing Room 4 of the Launch Control Center following the successful launch of space shuttle Atlantis from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the foreground, from left, are NASA Test Directors Charlie Blackwell-Thompson, Jeremy Graeber, and Jeff Spaulding; Orbiter Test Conductor Roberta Wyrick; and Assistant Orbiter Test Conductor Laurie Sally. Atlantis began its final flight, the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station, at 11:29 a.m. EDT on July 8. STS-135 will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts for the International Space Station. Atlantis also is flying the Robotic Refueling Mission experiment that will investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing satellites in orbit. In addition, Atlantis will return with a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 is the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  11. 2014 NASA Centennial Challenges Sample Return Robot Challenge

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-14

    The NASA Centennial Challenges prize, level one, is presented to team Mountaineers for successfully completing level one of the NASA 2014 Sample Return Robot Challenge, from left, Ryan Watson, Team Mountaineers; Lucas Behrens, Team Mountaineers; Jarred Strader, Team Mountaineers; Yu Gu, Team Mountaineers; Scott Harper, Team Mountaineers; Dorothy Rasco, NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate; Laurie Leshin, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) President; David Miller, NASA Chief Technologist; Alexander Hypes, Team Mountaineers; Nick Ohi,Team Mountaineers; Marvin Cheng, Team Mountaineers; Sam Ortega, NASA Program Manager for Centennial Challenges; and Tanmay Mandal, Team Mountaineers;, Saturday, June 14, 2014, at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, Mass. Team Mountaineers was the only team to complete the level one challenge. During the competition, teams were required to demonstrate autonomous robots that can locate and collect samples from a wide and varied terrain, operating without human control. The objective of this NASA-WPI Centennial Challenge was to encourage innovations in autonomous navigation and robotics technologies. Innovations stemming from the challenge may improve NASA's capability to explore a variety of destinations in space, as well as enhance the nation's robotic technology for use in industries and applications on Earth. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  12. Right Language to Release the River of Health in the Medical Industry.

    PubMed

    Weeks, John

    2015-11-01

    Performance artist Laurie Anderson appropriated an idea from beat writer William Burroughs a few years back. Language, Anderson sings, is a virus.(1) The words we choose lock in ideas and discharge reverberations. They subtly evoke personal, professional, and societal power relationships. Language is a virus. By extension, changes of language can shift power relations. The removal of a conquest name of a former US president from the highest point in the northern part of the western hemisphere is a case in point. US President Barack Obama re-anointed Mt McKinley as Mt Denali, the name used by the indigenous people whose descendants still live in its presence.(2) The act replaced a European surname linked to cultural suppression and colonization with one that honors the first human inhabitants. The renaissance of indigenous medical practices is effecting a similar renaming of what many view to be the high point in the development of medicine. "Traditional medicine" has for decades been misused to describe biomedical and industrial practices that are less than a century old. Better to qualify this medicine with "conventional" or "bio-." Let "traditional medicine" indicate practices that carry the weight of history. These choices move toward right language.

  13. SAM Team Celebrates Landing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-11-30

    Who Should Be TIME's Person of the Year 2012? - The Mars Rover! VOTE here: ti.me/YxJU1i Caption - SAM Team celebrates a picture perfect landing! Pictured from left to rights: Mehdi Benna, Laurie Leshin, Chris Webster, Will Brinckerhoff, Paul Mahaffy, Pan Conrad, Florence Tan, and Jen Eigenbrode. Credit: NASA ----- The Curiosity rover bristles with multiple cameras and instruments, including Goddard's Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite. By looking for evidence of water, carbon, and other important building blocks of life in the Martian soil and atmosphere, SAM will help discover whether Mars ever had the potential to support life. Curiosity was delivered to Gale crater, a 96-mile-wide crater that contains a record of environmental changes in its sedimentary rock, in August 2012. Related links: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html science.gsfc.nasa.gov/699/marsSAM.shtml mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  14. Proposal for a room-temperature diamond maser

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Liang; Pfender, Matthias; Aslam, Nabeel; Neumann, Philipp; Yang, Sen; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2015-01-01

    The application of masers is limited by its demanding working conditions (high vacuum or low temperature). A room-temperature solid-state maser is highly desirable, but the lifetimes of emitters (electron spins) in solids at room temperature are usually too short (∼ns) for population inversion. Masing from pentacene spins in p-terphenyl crystals, which have a long spin lifetime (∼0.1 ms), has been demonstrated. This maser, however, operates only in the pulsed mode. Here we propose a room-temperature maser based on nitrogen-vacancy centres in diamond, which features the longest known solid-state spin lifetime (∼5 ms) at room temperature, high optical pumping efficiency (∼106 s−1) and material stability. Our numerical simulation demonstrates that a maser with a coherence time of approximately minutes is feasible under readily accessible conditions (cavity Q-factor ∼5 × 104, diamond size ∼3 × 3 × 0.5 mm3 and pump power <10 W). A room-temperature diamond maser may facilitate a broad range of microwave technologies. PMID:26394758

  15. Massive star evolution and SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, David

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of massive stars through hydrogen and helium burning is addressed. A set of stellar evolutionary sequences for mass/solar mass of 15, 20, and 25, and metallicity of 0.002, 0.005, 0.007, 0.010, and 0.20 are presented; semiconvection is restricted to operating slower than the local thermal time scale. Using these sequences, simple models of the massive star content of the LMC are found to agree moderately well with the new observational data of Fitzpatrick and Garmany (1990). LMC supergiants were detected only in their postmain-sequence phases, so that 5-10 times more massive stars are there but not identified as such. It is argued that SN 1987A exhibits the normal evolution of a single star of about 20 solar mases having LMC abundances. Despite the variety of envelope behavior, the structure of the core at collapse is rather similar for the stars of a given mass. Variations due to different rates of mass loss are likely to be larger than those due to composition.

  16. Water maser emission in the Saturnian system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horiuchi, Shinji; Cimo, Giuseppe; Gurvits, Leonid; Pogrebenko, Sergei; Molera Calves, Guifré

    2010-10-01

    Prompted by the recent discovery of a water vapour plume of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft, our team started an observational programme to search for possible 22 GHz water vapour maser emission associated with different objects in the Kronian system. The observations have been conducted so far with the 32 m Medicina radio telescope (INAF-IRA, Italy) and the 14 m Metsahovi radio telescope (Aalto University, MRO, Finland). During the 2006-2008 campaigns, more than 300 hours of data have been analysed, and initial results including maser detections up to 7.0 sigma level have been presented. The detections attracted considerable interest and attempts to confirm them and investigate the phenomenon in depth. No confirmations have been published so far. In order to provide critical verification of these detections and study the details of masing conditions efficiently, we request a total of 20 hours on the Tidbinbilla 70 m telescope (DSS43) to observe Saturn and its moons during several, non-consecutive days. Due to natural changes of the planetary target positions, targets' coordinates will be provided after the antenna time is allocated.

  17. An Integral, Multidisciplinary and Global Geophysical Field Experience for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, O.; Carrillo, D. J.; Pérez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The udergraduate program of Geophysical Engineering at the School of Engineering, of the Univesidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), went through an update process that concluded in 2006. As part of the program, the student takes three geophysical prospecting courses (gravity and magnetics, electric, electromagnetics, and seismic methods). The older program required a three-week field experience for each course in order to gradute. The new program considers only one extended field experience. This work stresses the importance of international academic exchange, where undergraduate students could participate, such as the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE), and interaction with research programs, such as the MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment (MASE). Also, we propose a scheeme for this activity based on those examples; both of them have in common real geophysical problems, from which students could benefit. Our proposal covers academic and logistic aspects to be taken into account, enhancing the relevance of interaction between other academic institutions, industry, and UNAM, in order to obtain a broader view of geophysics.

  18. Paving the Path for Human Space Exploration: The Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Lauri

    2016-01-01

    Lauri Hansen, Director of Engineering at NASA Johnson Space Center will discuss the challenges of human space exploration. The future of human exploration begins with our current earth reliant missions in low earth orbit. These missions utilize the International Space Station to learn how to safely execute deep space missions. In addition to serving as an exploration test bed and enabling world class research, the International Space Station enables NASA to build international and commercial partnerships. NASA's next steps will be to enable the commercialization of low earth orbit while concentrating on developing the spacecraft and infrastructure necessary for deep space exploration and long duration missions. The Orion multi-purpose crew vehicle and the Space Launch System rocket are critical building blocks in this next phase of exploration. There are many challenges in designing spacecraft to perform these missions including safety, complex vehicle design, and mass challenges. Orion development is proceeding well, and includes a significant partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA) to develop and build the Service Module portion of the spacecraft. Together, NASA and ESA will provide the capability to take humans further than we have ever been before - 70,000 km past the moon. This will be the next big step in expanding the frontiers of human exploration, eventually leading to human footprints on Mars.

  19. Seismic wave propagation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A hybrid, finite-difference technique was developed for modeling nonlinear soil amplification from three-dimensional, finite-fault radiation patters for earthquakes in arbitrary earth models. The method was applied to the 17 January 1994 Northridge earthquake. Particle velocities were computed on a plane at 5-km depth, immediately above the causative fault. Time-series of the strike-perpendicular, lateral velocities then were propagated vertically in a soil column typical of the San Fernando Valley. Suitable material models were adapted from a suite used tomore » model ground motions at the US Nevada Test Site. The effects of nonlinearity reduced relative spectral amplitudes by about 40% at frequencies above 1.5 Hz but only by 10% at lower frequencies. Runs made with source-depth amplitudes increased by a factor of two showed relative amplitudes above 1.5 Hz reduced by a total of 70% above 1.5 Hz and 20% at lower frequencies. Runs made with elastic-plastic material models showed similar behavior to runs made with Masing-Rule models.« less

  20. Quantification of the xenoestrogens 4-tert.-octylphenol and bisphenol A in water and in fish tissue based on microwave assisted extraction, solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, S N; Lindholst, C

    1999-12-09

    Extraction methods were developed for quantification of the xenoestrogens 4-tert.-octylphenol (tOP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in water and in liver and muscle tissue from the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The extraction of tOP and BPA from tissue samples was carried out using microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE). Water samples were extracted using only SPE. For the quantification of tOP and BPA, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation interface (APCI) was applied. The combined methods for tissue extraction allow the use of small sample amounts of liver or muscle (typically 1 g), low volumes of solvent (20 ml), and short extraction times (25 min). Limits of quantification of tOP in tissue samples were found to be approximately 10 ng/g in muscle and 50 ng/g in liver (both based on 1 g of fresh tissue). The corresponding values for BPA were approximately 50 ng/g in both muscle and liver tissue. In water, the limit of quantification for tOP and BPA was approximately 0.1 microg/l (based on 100 ml sample size).

  1. Radiative instabilities and 1000 second fluctuations in astrophysical masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scappaticci, Gerardo A.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    A stability analysis for small (linear) perturbations is presented for the radiation in astrophysical masers treated in the usual, linear maser approximation. Instabilities that oscillate with a period of about L/c, where L is the length of the maser are found. They occur (1) when the maser is partly but not heavily saturated, (2) when the decay rate Gamma for the molecular states is near c/L, and (3) when the product of the brightness temperature T sub 0 of the incident radiation and the angle for the beaming is less than a critical value that depends upon the particular masing transition. A fourth parameter, the fractional inversion in the pumping multiplied by (T sub 0/frequency), determines the importance of spontaneous emission which can eliminate the instabilities. These instabilities are a likely cause for the fluctuations in the radiation from the 18 cm OH masers that have been reported to occur on time scales as short as 1000 s. The calculations are applicable to other types of astrophysical masers as well, and suggest that spontaneous emission will prevent similar instabilities in the H2O and SiO masers.

  2. Monitor Variability of Millimeter Lines in IRC+10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J. H.; Dinh-V-Trung; Hasegawa, T. I.

    2017-08-01

    A single dish monitoring of millimeter maser lines SiS J = 14-13 and HCN {ν }2={1}f J = 3-2 and several other rotational lines is reported for the archetypal carbon star IRC+10216. Relative line strength variations of 5% ∼ 30% are found for eight molecular line features with respect to selected reference lines. Definite line-shape variations are found in limited velocity intervals of the SiS and HCN line profiles. The asymmetrical line profiles of the two lines are mainly due to the varying components. The dominant varying components of the line profiles have similar periods and phases to the IR light variation, though both quantities show some degree of velocity dependence; there is also variability asymmetry between the blue and red line wings of both lines. Combining the velocities and amplitudes with a wind velocity model, we suggest that the line profile variations are due to SiS and HCN masing lines emanating from the wind acceleration zone. The possible link of the variabilities to thermal, dynamical, and/or chemical processes within or under this region is also discussed.

  3. Explicit crystal host effects on excited state properties of linear polyacenes: towards a room-temperature maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Robert; Bogatko, Stuart; Zuehlsdorff, Tim; Hine, Nicholas; Horsfield, Andrew; Haynes, Peter

    Maser technology has been held back for decades by the impracticality of the operating conditions of traditional masing devices, such as cryogenic freezing and strong magnetic fields. Recently it has been experimentally demonstrated that pentacene in p-terphenyl can act as a viable solid-state room-temperature maser by exploiting the alignment of the low-lying singlet and triplet excited states of pentacene. To understand the operation of this device from first principles, an ab initio study of the excitonic properties of pentacene in p-terphenyl has been carried out using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), implemented in the linear-scaling ONETEP software (www.onetep.org). In particular, we focus on the impact that the wider crystal has on the localised pentacene excitations by performing an explicit DFT treatment of the p-terphenyl environment. We demonstrate the importance of explicit crystal host effects in calculating the excitation energies of pentacene in p-terphenyl, providing important information for the operation of the maser. We then use this same approach to test the viability of other linear polyacenes as maser candidates as a screening step before experimental testing.

  4. More Than A SketchUp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Derrick D.

    2014-01-01

    This 2014 summer internship assignment at John F. Kennedy Space Center (K.S.C) was conducted with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Engineering and Technology (NE) group in support of the Control and Data Systems Division (NE-C) within the Test, Operations & Support Software Engineering Branch (NE-C2). The primary focus of this project was to assist Branch Chief Laurie B. Griffin, to support NASA's Small Payload Launch Integrated Testing Services (SPLITS) mission, by mastering the capabilities of 3-D modeling software called SketchUp. I used SketchUp to create a virtual environment for different laboratories of the NE-00 Division. My mission was to have these models uploaded into a K.S.C Partnerships Website and be used as a visual aid to viewers who browsed the site. The leads of this project were Kay L. Craig, Business and Industry Specialist (AD-A) and Steven E. Cain, (FA-C). I teamed with fellow intern Tait Sorenson of the Flight Structures and Thermal Protection Systems Branch (NE-M5) and met with many K.S.C lab managers willing to display their lab's structure and capabilities. The information collected during these lab tours was vital to the building of the K.S.C Partnerships Website. To accomplish this goal Sorenson and I later teamed with fellow Marketing intern Marlee Pereda-Ramos, of the Spaceport Planning Office In Center Planning And Development (AD-A) Along with Ramos, Tait and I toured an array of laboratories and got first hand exposure to their functions and capabilities.

  5. Simulation of fatigue crack growth under large scale yielding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, Christoph; Seifert, Thomas; Riedel, Hermann

    2010-07-01

    A simple mechanism based model for fatigue crack growth assumes a linear correlation between the cyclic crack-tip opening displacement (ΔCTOD) and the crack growth increment (da/dN). The objective of this work is to compare analytical estimates of ΔCTOD with results of numerical calculations under large scale yielding conditions and to verify the physical basis of the model by comparing the predicted and the measured evolution of the crack length in a 10%-chromium-steel. The material is described by a rate independent cyclic plasticity model with power-law hardening and Masing behavior. During the tension-going part of the cycle, nodes at the crack-tip are released such that the crack growth increment corresponds approximately to the crack-tip opening. The finite element analysis performed in ABAQUS is continued for so many cycles until a stabilized value of ΔCTOD is reached. The analytical model contains an interpolation formula for the J-integral, which is generalized to account for cyclic loading and crack closure. Both simulated and estimated ΔCTOD are reasonably consistent. The predicted crack length evolution is found to be in good agreement with the behavior of microcracks observed in a 10%-chromium steel.

  6. Threshold Dynamics of a Semiconductor Single Atom Maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yinyu

    Photon emission from single emitters provides fundamental insight into the detailed interaction between light and matter. Here we demonstrate a semiconductor single atom maser (SeSAM) that consists of a single InAs double quantum dot (DQD) that is coupled to a high quality factor microwave cavity. A finite bias results in population inversion in the DQD, enabling sizable cavity gain and stimulated emission. We develop a pulsed-gate approach that allows the SeSAM to be tuned across the masing threshold. The cavity output power as a function of DQD current is in good agreement with single atom maser theory once a small correction for lead emission is included. Photon statistics measurements show that the second-order correlation function of intra-cavity photon number, nc, crosses over from 〈nc2 〉 /〈nc 〉 2 = 2.1 below threshold to 〈nc2 〉 /〈nc 〉 2 = 1.2 above threshold. Large fluctuations are observed at threshold. In collaboration with J. Stehlik, C. Eichler, X. Mi, T. R. Hartke, M. J. Gullans, J. M. Taylor and J. R. Petta. Supported by the NSF and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS initiative through Grant No. GBMF4535.

  7. VLBA SURVEYS OF OH MASERS IN STAR-FORMING REGIONS. I. SATELLITE LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Velasco, A. E.; Felli, D.; Migenes, V.

    2016-05-10

    Using the Very Long Baseline Array we performed a high-resolution OH maser survey in Galactic star-forming regions (SFRs). We observed all the ground state spectral lines: the main lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz and the satellite lines at 1612 and 1720 MHz. Due to the exceptionality of finding satellite lines in SFRs, we will focus our discussion on those lines. In our sample of 41 OH maser sources, five (12%) showed the 1612 MHz line and ten (24%) showed the 1720 MHz line, with only one source showing both lines. We find that 1720 MHz emission is correlated withmore » the presence of H ii regions, suggesting that this emission could be used to diagnose or trace high-mass star formation. We include an analysis of the possible mechanisms that could be causing this correlation as well as assessing the possible relationships between lines in our sample. In particular, the presence of magnetic fields seems to play an important role as we found Zeeman splitting in four of our sources (W75 N, W3(OH), W51 and NGC 7538). Our results have implications for current understanding of the formation of high-mass stars as well as on the masing processes present in SFRs.« less

  8. Once in a Blue Moon: Airmen in Theater Command. Lauris Norstad, Albrecht Kesselring, and their Relevance to the Twenty-First Century Air Force

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    good soldier, Norstad wrote the air plan for Anvil—then Arnold brought him back to Washington and turned his attention to the Pacific. Norstad returned...to “a concert pianist , who is asked to play a Beethoven sonata before a large audience on an 103...threatening the Allied landings in North Africa. 115 Ibid., 248. 64 over Poland in 1939. Kesselring divided his time between personal flights to reconnoiter

  9. KSC-2011-5312

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-08

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Launch controllers wave their STS-135 shuttle launch team member flags and cheer in Firing Room 4 of the Launch Control Center following the successful launch of space shuttle Atlantis from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the foreground, from left, are NASA Test Directors Steve Payne and Bob Holl; Landing and Recovery Director Greg Gaddis; Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach; Atlantis' NASA Flow Director Angie Brewer; NASA Test Director Charlie Blackwell-Thompson; STS-135 Launch Commentator George Diller; NASA Test Directors Jeremy Graeber, Tim Potter, and Jeff Spaulding; Orbiter Test Conductor Roberta Wyrick; Assistant Orbiter Test Conductor Laurie Sally; Assistant Launch Director Pete Nickolenko; United Space Alliance Vice President of Launch and Recovery Systems Mark Nappi; and United Space Alliance Test Conductor Mark Paxton. Atlantis began its final flight, the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station, at 11:29 a.m. EDT on July 8. STS-135 will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts for the International Space Station. Atlantis also is flying the Robotic Refueling Mission experiment that will investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing satellites in orbit. In addition, Atlantis will return with a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 is the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

  10. Office of Exploration: Exploration studies technical report. Volume 2: Studies approach and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.; Bland, Dan

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Office of Exploration has been tasked with defining and recommending alternatives for an early 1990's national decision on a focused program of human exploration of the solar system. The Mission Analysis and System Engineering (MASE) group, which is managed by the Exploration Studies Office at the Johnson Space Center, is responsible for coordinating the technical studies necessary for accomplishing such a task. This technical report describes the process that has been developed in a case study approach. The four case studies that were developed in FY88 include: (1) human expedition to Phobos; (2) human expeditions to Mars; (3) lunar observatory; and (4) lunar outpost to early Mars evolution. The final outcome of this effort is a set of programmatic and technical conclusions and recommendations for the following year's work. Volume 2 describes the case study process, the technical results of each of the case studies, and opportunities for additional study. Included in the discussion of each case study is a description of the mission key features and profile. Mission definition and manifesting are detailed, followed by a description of the mission architecture and infrastructure. Systems concepts for the required orbital nodes, transportation systems, and planetary surface systems are discussed. Prerequisite implementation plans resulting from the synthesized case studies are described and in-depth assessments are presented.

  11. Integrated microwave processing system for the extraction of organophosphorus pesticides in fresh vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lijie; Song, Ying; Hu, Mingzhu; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Hanqi; Yu, Aimin; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Ziming

    2015-03-01

    A simple and efficient integrated microwave processing system (IMPS) was firstly assembled and validated for the extraction of organophosphorus pesticides in fresh vegetables. Two processes under microwave irradiation, dynamic microwave-assisted extraction (DMAE) and microwave-accelerated solvent elution (MASE), were integrated for simplifying the pretreatment of the sample. Extraction, separation, enrichment and elution were finished in a simple step. The organophosphorus pesticides were extracted from the fresh vegetables into hexane with DMAE, and then the extract was directly introduced into the enrichment column packed with active carbon fiber (ACF). Subsequently, the organophosphorus pesticides trapped on the ACF were eluted with ethyl acetate under microwave irradiation. No further filtration or cleanup was required before analysis of the eluate by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Some experimental parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized, such as microwave output power, kind and volume of extraction solvent, extraction time, amount of sorbent, elution microwave power, kind and volume of elution solvent, elution solvent flow rate. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries were in the range of 71.5-105.2%, and the relative standard deviations were lower than 11.6%. The experiment results prove that the present method is a simple and effective sample preparation method for the determination of pesticides in solid samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pressurized hot water extraction followed by miniaturized membrane assisted solvent extraction for the green analysis of alkylphenols in sediments.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Muniategui-Lorenzo, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2015-02-27

    A novel and Green analytical methodology for the determination of alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol) in sediments was developed and validated. The method was based on pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE) followed by miniaturized membrane assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry detection (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The extraction conditions were optimized by a Plackett-Burman design in order to minimize the number of assays according to Green principles. Matrix effect was studied and compensated using deuterated labeled standards as surrogate standards for the quantitation of the target compounds. The analytical features of the method were satisfactory: relative recoveries varied between 92 and 103% and repeatability and intermediate precision were <9% for all compounds. Quantitation limits of the method (MQL) ranged from 0.061 (4-n-nonylphenol) to 1.7ngg(-1) dry weight (nonylphenol). Sensitivity, selectivity, automaticity and fastness are the main advantages of the exposed methodology. Reagent consumption, analysis time and waste generation were minimized. The "greenness" of the proposed method was evaluated using an analytical Eco-Scale approach and satisfactory results were obtained. The applicability of the proposed method was demonstrated analysing sediment samples of Galicia coast (NW of Spain) and the ubiquity of alkylphenols in the environment was demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Relation between chemical composition or antioxidant activity and antihypertensive activity for six essential oils.

    PubMed

    Yvon, Yan; Raoelison, Emmanuel Guy; Razafindrazaka, René; Randriantsoa, Adolphe; Romdhane, Mehrez; Chabir, Naziha; Mkaddem, Mounira Guedri; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2012-08-01

    Six essential oils (EOs), Juniperus phoenicea (leaves and berries), Thymus capitatus, Lauris nobilis, Melaleuca armillaris, and Eucalyptus gracilis, were screened for their antioxidant and antihypertensive activity as well as their chemical compositions. We identified and quantified 24 compounds (representing 99.8% of total oil) for J. phoenicea leaves, 14 compounds (representing 98.8% of total oil) for J. phoenicea berries, 11 compounds (representing 99.6% of total oil) for T. capitatus, 32 compounds (representing 98.9% of total oil) for L. nobilis, 32 compounds (representing 98.7% of total oil) for M. armillaris, and 26 compounds (representing 99.3% of total oil) for E. gracilis. In the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, the antioxidant activity was in the range of 0.59 to 2183.6 mg/L, whereas T. capitatus (1.24 ± 0.05 mg/L) gave the best activity in the 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate assay. Antihypertensive activity was evaluated by testing the vasorelaxing capacity of EOs on rat aorta precontracted by phenylephrine (10(-6) M). T. capitatus and L. nobilis were most active for an antihypertensive activity (29 ± 3 and 59 ± 2 mg/L, respectively). Correlations between chemical composition or antioxidant activity and/or antihypertensive activity were studied. Significant correlation has been found for antihypertensive activity and p-cymene (R(2) = 0.86), β-elemene (R(2) = 0.90), and β-myrcene (R(2) = 0.76). A good correlation has been found between antihypertensive activity and antioxidant activity by DPPH assay (R(2) = 0.98). Antioxidant activity can contribute to the prevention of the increase of the blood pressure. According to the literature, no study has been reported until now of correlation between antihypertensive activity and antioxidant activity. Natural EOs can find its interest and application in a medicinal area. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Maximizing your return on people.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Laurie; McMurrer, Daniel

    2007-03-01

    Though most traditional HR performance metrics don't predict organizational performance, alternatives simply have not existed--until now. During the past ten years, researchers Laurie Bassi and Daniel McMurrer have worked to develop a system that allows executives to assess human capital management (HCM) and to use those metrics both to predict organizational performance and to guide organizations' investments in people. The new framework is based on a core set of HCM drivers that fall into five major categories: leadership practices, employee engagement, knowledge accessibility, workforce optimization, and organizational learning capacity. By employing rigorously designed surveys to score a company on the range of HCM practices across the five categories, it's possible to benchmark organizational HCM capabilities, identify HCM strengths and weaknesses, and link improvements or back-sliding in specific HCM practices with improvements or shortcomings in organizational performance. The process requires determining a "maturity" score for each practice, based on a scale of 1 (low) to 5 (high). Over time, evolving maturity scores from multiple surveys can reveal progress in each of the HCM practices and help a company decide where to focus improvement efforts that will have a direct impact on performance. The authors draw from their work with American Standard, South Carolina's Beaufort County School District, and a bevy of financial firms to show how improving HCM scores led to increased sales, safety, academic test scores, and stock returns. Bassi and McMurrer urge HR departments to move beyond the usual metrics and begin using HCM measurement tools to gauge how well people are managed and developed throughout the organization. In this new role, according to the authors, HR can take on strategic responsibility and ensure that superior human capital management becomes central to the organization's culture.

  15. The Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene (DRD4) and Financial Risk-Taking: Stimulating and Instrumental Risk-Taking Propensity and Motivation to Engage in Investment Activity

    PubMed Central

    Muda, Rafał; Kicia, Mariusz; Michalak-Wojnowska, Małgorzata; Ginszt, Michał; Filip, Agata; Gawda, Piotr; Majcher, Piotr

    2018-01-01

    The Dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4) has been previously linked to financial risk-taking propensity. Past works demonstrated that individuals with a specific variant of the DRD4 gene (7R+) are more risk-seeking than people without it (7R−). The most prominent explanation for this effect is the fact that 7R+ individuals are less sensitive to dopamine and thus seek more stimulation to generate “normal” dopaminergic activity and feel pleasure. However, results about this relationship have not been conclusive, and some revealed a lack of the relationship. In the current work, we tested if those unclear results might be explained by the motivation that underlies the risk-taking activity; i.e., if people take risks to feel excitement or if they take risk to obtain a specific goal. In our study we tested the differences in risk-taking between 7R+ and 7R− among people who are experienced in financial risk-taking (113 investors) and non-experienced financial decision makers (104 non-investors). We measured risk-taking propensity with the Holt-Laury test and the Stimulating-Instrumental Risk Inventory. Moreover, we asked investors about their motivations for engaging in investment activity. Our study is the next one to report a lack of differences in risk-taking between 7R+ and 7R− individuals. As well, our results did not indicate any differences between the 7R+ and 7R− investors in motivation to engage in investment activity. We only observed that risk-taking propensity was higher among investors than non-investors and this was noticed for all measures. More research is needed to better understand the genetic foundations of risk-taking, which could answer the question about the substantial variation in the domain of risky financial decisions. PMID:29551965

  16. Effects of reflection on clinical decision-making of intensive care unit nurses.

    PubMed

    Razieh, Shahrokhi; Somayeh, Ghafari; Fariba, Haghani

    2018-07-01

    Nurses are one of the most influential factors in overcoming the main challenges faced by health systems throughout the world. Every health system should, hence, empower nurses in clinical judgment and decision-making skills. This study evaluated the effects of implementing Tanner's reflection method on clinical decision-making of nurses working in an intensive care unit (ICU). This study used an experimental, pretest, posttest design. The setting was the intensive care unit of Amin Hospital Isfahan, Iran. The convenience sample included 60 nurses working in the ICU of Amin Hospital (Isfahan, Iran). This clinical trial was performed on 60 nurses working in the ICU of Amin Hospital (Isfahan, Iran). The nurses were selected by census sampling and randomly allocated to either the case or the control group. Data were collected using a questionnaire containing demographic characteristics and the clinical decision-making scale developed by Laurie and Salantera (NDMI-14). The questionnaire was completed before and one week after the intervention. The data were analyzed using SPSS 21.0. The two groups were not significantly different in terms of the level and mean scores of clinical decision-making before the intervention (P = 0.786). Based on the results of independent t-test, the mean score of clinical decision-making one week after the intervention was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group (P = 0.009; t = -2.69). The results of Mann Whitney test showed that one week after the intervention, the nurses' level of clinical decision-making in the case group rose to the next level (P = 0.001). Reflection could improve the clinical decision-making of ICU nurses. It is, thus, recommended to incorporate this method into the nursing curriculum and care practices. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Early onset of magma ocean crystallization revealed by coupled 146,147Sm-142,143Nd systematics of Nulliak ultramafics (3.78 Ga, Labrador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, P.; Caro, G.; Reisberg, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    Early onset of magma ocean crystallization revealed by coupled 146,147Sm-142,143Nd systematics of Nulliak ultramafics (3.78 Ga, Labrador) Precillia Morino1, Guillaume Caro1, Laurie Reisberg 1 1CRPG-CNRS, Université de Lorraine, Nancy, France Coupled 146,147Sm-142,143Nd systematics provides constraints on the timing of magma ocean crystallization on Mars, the Moon and Vesta. Estimates for the Earth's mantle, however, are less accurate owing to the sparsity of Eoarchean mantle-derived rocks with undisturbed 147Sm-143Nd systematics. This study attempts to establish a coherent 142,143Nd dataset for the Eoarchean mantle using well-preserved ultramafic rocks from the Nulliak assemblage (Labrador). Samples include meta-dunites, -pyroxenites and -peridotites exhibiting only minor serpentinization and limited element mobility. The presence of "Barberton type" komatiitic compositions (low Al/Ti, HREE depletion) is suggestive of a deep mantle source. 146,147Sm-142,143Nd and 187Re-187Os analyses yield a crystallization age of 3.78±0.09 Ga with ɛ143Ndi=1.5±0.2 and ɛ142Nd=8.6±2 ppm. This 142,143Nd signature yields a model age of mantle differentiation of 4.43±0.05 Ga (assuming a BSE with chondritic Sm/Nd and ɛ142Nd=0). Superchondritic Sm/Nd compositions for the BSE would translate into older model ages. Irrespective of the choice of primitive mantle composition, Nulliak ultramafics provide differentiation ages 100 Ma older than those estimated from Akilia tonalites but remarkably similar to that estimated from the 2.7 Ga Theo's flow (Abitibi). If Nulliak ultramafics originated from deep melting of a hot plume, their model age could reflect the early onset of magma ocean crystallization in the lowermost mantle.

  18. The Growth of Central Black Hole and the Ionization Instability of Quasar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ye; Cheng, K. S.; Zhang, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    A possible accretion model associated with the ionization instability of quasar disks is proposed to address the growth of the central black hole harbored in the host galaxy. The evolution of quasars in cosmic time is assumed to change from a highly active state to a quiescent state triggered by the S-shaped ionization instability of the quasar accretion disk. For a given external mass transfer rate supplied by the quasar host galaxy, ionization instability can modify accretion rate in the disk and separates the accretion flows of the disk into three different phases, like a S-shape. We suggest that the bright quasars observed today are those quasars with disks in the upper branch of S-shaped instability, and the faint or 'dormant' quasars are simply the system in the lower branch. The middle branch is the transition state which is unstable. We assume the quasar disk evolves according to the advection-dominated inflow-outflow solutions (ADIOS) configuration in the stable lower branch of S-shaped instability, and Eddington accretion rate is used to constrain the accretion rate in each phase. The mass ratio between black hole and its host galactic bulge is a nature consequence of ADIOS. Our model also demonstrates that a seed black hole (BH) similar to those found in spiral galaxies today is needed to produce a BH with a final mass 2 x 10(exp 8) solar mases.

  19. Numerical simulation of multi-directional random wave transformation in a yacht port

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Qiaoling; Dong, Sheng; Zhao, Xizeng; Zhang, Guowei

    2012-09-01

    This paper extends a prediction model for multi-directional random wave transformation based on an energy balance equation by Mase with the consideration of wave shoaling, refraction, diffraction, reflection and breaking. This numerical model is improved by 1) introducing Wen's frequency spectrum and Mitsuyasu's directional function, which are more suitable to the coastal area of China; 2) considering energy dissipation caused by bottom friction, which ensures more accurate results for large-scale and shallow water areas; 3) taking into account a non-linear dispersion relation. Predictions using the extended wave model are carried out to study the feasibility of constructing the Ai Hua yacht port in Qingdao, China, with a comparison between two port layouts in design. Wave fields inside the port for different incident wave directions, water levels and return periods are simulated, and then two kinds of parameters are calculated to evaluate the wave conditions for the two layouts. Analyses show that Layout I is better than Layout II. Calculation results also show that the harbor will be calm for different wave directions under the design water level. On the contrary, the wave conditions do not wholly meet the requirements of a yacht port for ship berthing under the extreme water level. For safety consideration, the elevation of the breakwater might need to be properly increased to prevent wave overtopping under such water level. The extended numerical simulation model may provide an effective approach to computing wave heights in a harbor.

  20. Observations of Non Typical Masers at the RT-22 Radio Telescope in 2004-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, V. M.; Antyufeyev, O. V.; Zubrin, S. Y.; Myshenko, V. V.; Piddyachiy, V. I.; Korolev, A. M.; Patoka, O. M.

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Some peculiarities of emission of Class I methanol masers on the 80-71A+ transition at 95 GHz in sources closely associated with protostar-forming regions and in supernova remnants are studied. Here belongs the investigation of SiO (J=2-1) maser variability in R Cassiopeiae, too. Design/methodology/approach: Search for Class I methanol masers is based on the idea of coincidence of regions of their emission with sources of OH masing transition in the bottom level of energy at frequency of 1720 MHz (2Π3/2 J=3/2 F=2-1). Findings: Two methanol masers on transition 80-71A+ (95 GHz) in the supernova remnants IC 443 and Kes 79 are detected. Variabilities of SiO maser emission on transition J=2-1 in R Cassiopeiae are shown for the first time. Conclusions: Variability of methanol and SiO masers is their general feature. On the example of three objects, the possibility of using the 1720 MHz OH maser as an indicator in the search for Class I methanol masers is shown. Especially it is important in the study of methanol maser emission in supernova remnants that has been proved to be true by detection of methanol masers on transition 80-71A+ (95 GHz) in IC 443 and Kes 79. Features of spectra variability of emission in R Cassiopeiae testify to formation and disappearance of SiO (J=2-1) masers.

  1. NuSTAR Observations of Water Megamaser AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masini, A.; Comastri, A.; Balokvic, M.; Zaw, I.; Puccetti, S.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We study the connection between the masing disk and obscuring torus in Seyfert 2 galaxies. Methods. We present a uniform X-ray spectral analysis of the high energy properties of 14 nearby megamaser active galactic nuclei observed by NuSTAR. We use a simple analytical model to localize the maser disk and understand its connection with the torus by combining NuSTAR spectral parameters with the available physical quantities from VLBI mapping.Results. Most of the sources that we analyzed are heavily obscured, showing a column density in excess of approx.10(exp 23) cm(exp -2); in particular, 79% are Compton-thick [NH is greater than 1.5 x 10(exp 24) cm(exp -2)]. When using column densities measured by NuSTAR with the assumption that the torus is the extension of the maser disk, and further assuming a reasonable density profile, we can predict the torus dimensions. They are found to be consistent with mid-IR interferometry parsec-scale observations of Circinus and NGC 1068. In this picture, the maser disk is intimately connected to the inner part of the torus. It is probably made of a large number of molecular clouds that connect the torus and the outer part of the accretion disk, giving rise to a thin disk rotating in most cases in Keplerian or sub-Keplerian motion. This toy model explains the established close connection between water megamaser emission and nuclear obscuration as a geometric effect.

  2. [Analysis of triterpenoids in Ganoderma lucidum by microwave-assisted continuous extraction].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan-fang; An, Jing; Jiang, Ye

    2015-04-01

    For further improving the extraction efficiency of microwave extraction, a microwave-assisted contijuous extraction (MACE) device has been designed and utilized. By contrasting with the traditional methods, the characteristics and extraction efficiency of MACE has also been studied. The method was validated by the analysis of the triterpenoids in Ganoderma lucidum. The extraction conditions of MACE were: using 95% ethanol as solvent, microwave power 200 W and radiation time 14.5 min (5 cycles). The extraction results were subsequently compared with traditional heat reflux extraction ( HRE) , soxhlet extraction (SE), ultrasonic extraction ( UE) as well as the conventional microwave extraction (ME). For triterpenoids, the two methods based on the microwaves (ME and MACE) were in general capable of finishing the extraction in 10, 14.5 min, respectively, while other methods should consume 60 min and even more than 100 min. Additionally, ME can produce comparable extraction results as the classical HRE and higher extraction yield than both SE and UE, however, notably lower extraction yield than MASE. More importantly, the purity of the crud extract by MACE is far better than the other methods. MACE can effectively combine the advantages of microwave extraction and soxhlet extraction, thus enabling a more complete extraction of the analytes of TCMs in comparison with ME. And therefore makes the analytic result more accurate. It provides a novel, high efficient, rapid and reliable pretreatment technique for the analysis of TCMs, and it could potentially be extended to ingredient preparation or extracting techniques of TCMs.

  3. RNA sequencing supports distinct reactive oxygen species-mediated pathways of apoptosis by high and low size mass fractions of Bay leaf (Lauris nobilis) in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Annabelle L; Ververis, Katherine; Sayakkarage, Dheeshana; Khan, Abdul W; Rafehi, Haloom; Ziemann, Mark; Loveridge, Shanon J; Lazarus, Ross; Kerr, Caroline; Lockett, Trevor; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C; Bennett, Louise E

    2015-08-01

    Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) in mammalian cancer and HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells have been previously attributed to effects of polyphenolic and essential oil chemical species. Recently, we demonstrated differentiated growth-regulating effects of high (HFBL) versus low molecular mass (LFBL) aqueous fractions of bay leaf and now confirm by comparative effects on gene expression, that HFBL and LFBL suppress HT-29 growth by distinct mechanisms. Induction of intra-cellular lesions including DNA strand breakage by extra-cellular HFBL, invoked the hypothesis that iron-mediated reactive oxygen species with capacity to penetrate cell membrane, were responsible for HFBL-mediated effects, supported by equivalent effects of HFBL in combination with γ radiation. Activities of HFBL and LFBL were interpreted to reflect differentiated responses to iron-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS), occurring either outside or inside cells. In the presence of LFBL, apoptotic death was relatively delayed compared with HFBL. ROS production by LFBL mediated p53-dependent apoptosis and recovery was suppressed by promoting G1/S phase arrest and failure of cellular tight junctions. In comparison, intra-cellular anti-oxidant protection exerted by LFBL was absent for extra-cellular HFBL (likely polysaccharide-rich), which potentiated more rapid apoptosis by producing DNA double strand breaks. Differentiated effects on expression of genes regulating ROS defense and chromatic condensation by LFBL versus HFBL, were observed. The results support ferrous iron in cell culture systems and potentially in vivo, can invoke different extra-cellular versus intra-cellular ROS-mediated chemistries, that may be regulated by exogenous, including dietary species.

  4. Motion of isolated open vortex filaments evolving under the truncated local induction approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2017-11-01

    The study of nonlinear waves along open vortex filaments continues to be an area of active research. While the local induction approximation (LIA) is attractive due to locality compared with the non-local Biot-Savart formulation, it has been argued that LIA appears too simple to model some relevant features of Kelvin wave dynamics, such as Kelvin wave energy transfer. Such transfer of energy is not feasible under the LIA due to integrability, so in order to obtain a non-integrable model, a truncated LIA, which breaks the integrability of the classical LIA, has been proposed as a candidate model with which to study such dynamics. Recently Laurie et al. ["Interaction of Kelvin waves and nonlocality of energy transfer in superfluids," Phys. Rev. B 81, 104526 (2010)] derived truncated LIA systematically from Biot-Savart dynamics. The focus of the present paper is to study the dynamics of a section of common open vortex filaments under the truncated LIA dynamics. We obtain the analog of helical, planar, and more general filaments which rotate without a change in form in the classical LIA, demonstrating that while quantitative differences do exist, qualitatively such solutions still exist under the truncated LIA. Conversely, solitons and breather solutions found under the LIA should not be expected under the truncated LIA, as the existence of such solutions relies on the existence of an infinite number of conservation laws which is violated due to loss of integrability. On the other hand, similarity solutions under the truncated LIA can be quite different to their counterparts found for the classical LIA, as they must obey a t1/3 type scaling rather than the t1/2 type scaling commonly found in the LIA and Biot-Savart dynamics. This change in similarity scaling means that Kelvin waves are radiated at a slower rate from vortex kinks formed after reconnection events. The loss of soliton solutions and the difference in similarity scaling indicate that dynamics emergent under

  5. Rep. Ken Calvert, R-Calif., chairman of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, was briefed by X-43A engineer Laurie Grindle during his tour of Dryden

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-06-02

    Rep. Ken Calvert, (R-Calif.), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, received an update on the mission of NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center during a visit on June 2, 2005. Rep. Calvert, accompanied by several staff members, was briefed by center management on the Dryden's role as a flight research institution, and then reviewed some of the center's recent, current and upcoming flight research projects during a tour of the facility. During the afternoon, Rep. Calvert received similar briefings on a variety of projects at several aerospace development firms at the Civilian Flight Test Center in Mojave. Rep. Calvert's tour of NASA Dryden was the second in a series of visits to all 10 NASA field centers to better acquaint him with the roles and responsibilities of each center.

  6. Quantitative analysis of antibiotics in aquifer sediments by liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lei; Liu, Hui; Xie, Cong; Li, Minjing

    2016-06-24

    A highly effective analytical method for multi-residue determination of antibiotics in aquifer sediments was first established in this study. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and solid-phase extraction were used for sample pre-concentration and purification, ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to hybrid quadrupole-high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-Orbitrap) was applied for detection. For high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), the target compounds were tentatively identified by retention time and accurate mass which was measured with precursor ions in Target-SIM scan, and then confirmed by the monitoring of daughter ion fragments which were generated in dd-MS(2) scan. The results provided good mass accuracy with mass deviations below 2ppm (except norfloxacin with -2.3ppm) for quantitative analysis of the compounds by HRMS. Reasonable recoveries of all analytes were obtained more than 60% (except doxytetracycline) in fortification samples at concentrations higher than 10μgkg(-1). Relative standard deviations of repeatability and inter-day precision were below 21% and 11%. Limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.1 to 3.8μgkg(-1), whereas limits of quantification (LOQ) were established between 0.3-9.0μgkg(-1). The method was applied to analyze real aquifer sediment samples in different aquifer depth of 4.0, 7.5, 13.0 and 18.0m. Chlorotetracycline and ofloxacin were observed at relative high concentrations of 53 and 19μgkg(-1) respectively in 18.0m deepness. The exposure to low doses of these compounds in subsurface environment increases concerns on long-term ecological security of underground system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Managing Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to Reduce Methane Emissions and Increase Carbon Uptake Laurie Koteen, Sara Knox, Cove Sturtevant, Joseph Verfaillie, Jaclyn Hatala, Dennis Baldocchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koteen, L. E.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Matthes, J. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California is a region transformed by more than a century of agricultural practices. Beginning in the 19th century, substantial regions were first drained of water and then converted to cropland in order to take advantage of the area's rich peatland soils. In the intervening time period, soil oxidation and subsidence have led to huge peat losses of up to 10 m in some places, and river water now threatens to topple the levees that were erected to keep fields from flooding. Within this region, we have been monitoring greenhouse gas exchange of several agricultural sites, a degraded pasture, and two restored wetlands. Of these land use types, restoration of wetlands is of particular interest to Delta managers as these sites attain many of the region's most pressing ecological goals, including improved water quality, increased wildlife habitat, and soil accretion. In our current investigation, we hope to assess if wetland management activities can be implemented to achieve greenhouse gas management goals as well. While we find that the restored wetlands are able to take up and store a substantial amount of carbon via rapid growth rates, they also emit methane; a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than CO¬2. We are currently in the process of implementing two management activities with the goals of reducing methane emissions and increasing carbon uptake. Evidence from the wetland literature indicates that periodic lowering of the water table below the soil surface can reduce wetland methane emissions by: 1. Reintroducing oxygen into the soil column. This both supports growth of the methanotrophic bacteria that consume methane produced in the anaerobic zones of the soil column, and suppresses the methanogens that produce it. 2. Re-oxidization of formerly reduced compounds in the soil, (i.e. NO3-, SO42-) which can serve as alternative terminal electron acceptors of the decomposition byproducts (i.e. H2 and acetate) that lead to methane formation. Under these conditions, it becomes more energetically favorable for alternative chemical transformations to occur in which CO2 and not CH4¬ is released. A second management activity would be implemented to see if wetland carbon uptake could be increased. As wetlands mature, perennial wetland vegetation often develops a significant thatch layer which can reduce photosynthesis of growing shoots by blocking radiation from leaf surfaces. Here we propose to remove the stalks of established vegetation. This would serve two goals: 1. Decomposing vegetation would be incorporated into the soil, leading to soil accretion, and 2. Thatch removal would liberate fledgling shoots, potentially increasing carbon uptake through subsequent seasons. A third investigation would compare CO2 and CH4 fluxes at an existing tower atop low salinity sediments with a new tower where site salinity is relatively high. This effort would inform new site selection efforts for wetland restoration projects. Sites located closer to the San Francisco Bay Area are tidally-influenced, and therefore have higher salinity than the impounded freshwater systems of our current study within the Delta region.

  8. Effect of thermal pressurization on dynamic rupture propagation under depth-dependent stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urata, Y.; Kuge, K.; Kase, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Fluid and pore pressure evolution can affect dynamic propagation of earthquake ruptures owing to thermal pressurization (e.g., Mase and Smith, 1985). We investigate dynamic rupture propagation with thermal pressurization on a fault subjected to depth-dependent stress, on the basis of 3-D numerical simulations for spontaneous dynamic ruptures. We put a vertical strike-slip rectangular fault in a semi-infinite, homogenous, and elastic medium. The length and width of the fault are 8 and 3 km, respectively. We assume a depth-dependent stress estimated by Yamashita et al. (2004). The numerical algorithm is based on the finite-difference method by Kase and Kuge (2001). A rupture is initiated by increasing shear stress in a small patch at the bottom of the fault, and then proceeds spontaneously, governed by a slip-weakening law with the Coulomb failure criteria. Coefficients of friction and Dc are homogeneous on the fault. On a fault with thermal pressurization, we allow effective normal stress to vary with pore pressure change due to frictional heating by the formulation of Bizzarri and Cocco (2006). When thermal pressurization does not work, tractions drop in the same way everywhere and rupture velocity is subshear except near the free surface. Due to thermal pressurization, dynamic friction on the fault decreases and is heterogeneous not only vertically but horizontally, slip increases, and rupture velocity along the strike direction becomes supershear. As a result, plural peaks of final slip appear, as observed in the case of undrained dip-slip fault by Urata et al. (2008). We found in this study that the early stage of rupture growth under the depth-dependent stress is affected by the location of an initial crack. When a rupture is initiated at the center of the fault without thermal pressurization, the rupture cannot propagate and terminates. Thermal pressurization can help such a powerless rupture to keep propagating.

  9. Factorial-design optimization of gas chromatographic analysis of tetrabrominated to decabrominated diphenyl ethers. Application to domestic dust.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Llompart, Maria; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Cela, Rafael

    2007-07-01

    Gas chromatographic analysis of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) has been evaluated in an attempt to achieve better control of the separation process, especially for highly substituted congeners. Use of a narrow-bore capillary column enabled adequate determination of tetra, penta, hexa, hepta, octa, nona and decaBDE congeners in only one chromatographic run while maintaining resolution power similar to that of conventional columns. A micro electron-capture detector (GC-microECD) was used. Chromatographic conditions were optimized by multifactorial experimental design, with the objective of obtaining not only high sensitivity but also good precision. In this way two different approaches to maximizing response and minimizing variability were tested, and are fully discussed. These optimum chromatographic conditions were then used to determine PBDEs extracted from domestic dust samples by microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE). Quantitative recovery (90-108%) was achieved for all the PBDEs and method precision (RSD < 13%) was satisfactory. Accuracy was tested by use of the standard reference material SRM 2585, and sub-ng g(-1) limits of detection were obtained for all compounds except BDE-209 (1.44 ng g(-1)). Finally, several samples of house dust were analysed by use of the proposed method and all the target PBDEs were detected in all the samples. BDE-209 was the predominant congener. Amounts varied from 58 to 1615 ng g(-1) and the average contribution to the total PBDE burden of 52%. The main congeners of the octaBDE mixture (BDE-183, BDE-197, BDE-207 and BDE-196) also made an important contribution (29%) to the total. These are the first data about the presence of these compounds in European house-dust samples. Finally, the sum of the main congeners in the pentaBDE commercial mixture (BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-100) contributed 14% to the total. Figure Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in House Dust.

  10. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF

  11. Detection of the Water Maser Line at 1.35 cm in Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosmovici, Christiano1, Pluchino S. 2, Pogrebenko S. 3, Montebugnoli S. 2, Bartolini M. 2, Schillirò F. 2

    2012-05-01

    The discovery of the first water emission in the atmosphere of Jupiter induced by a catastrophic cometary impact [1] has shown that the water Maser line at 22 GHz (1.35 cm) can be used as a diagnostic tool for cometary-[2] and also for planetary-water search outside the solar system, as comets are able to deliver very large amounts of water to planets raising the fascinating possibility of extraterrestrial life evolution. Furthermore, assuming that a sufficient amount of water may be present in the upper layers of a planetary atmosphere, it is possible to show that masing conditions may apply for a planet independently from cometary bombardment. The calculations of the feasibility of the Maser detection are reported in [3,4]. In 1999 we started the search for the water maser line on 35 targets up to 50 LY away from the Sun and by using fast multichannel spectrometers coupled to the 32 m dish of the Medicina and Noto Radiotelescopes (Italy) we carried out observations of : 1) stellar regions where either cometary clouds have been discovered, or planetary systems have been indirectly detected (up to now about 700); 2) peculiar stars, like red and brown dwarfs with sufficient IR- radiation to produce Maser emission. From the 35 targets investigated by us the following showed faint transient signals during different periods : Epsilon Eridani, Lalande 21185, EQ Peg, Ups And, 47 UMa, Tau Ceti and Gliese 581. The first two are the most reliable as we could detect signals with S/N > 4 with both telescopes. Eps Eri is particularly interesting for our purposes as it is only 10.8 LY away and among the closest star systems to the Sun. This target represents the terrestrial conditions 4 Gyr ago when cometary bombardment is supposed to have ended and life started.

  12. Conference Comments by the Editors

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Laboratory. We acknowledge our corporate supporters: Caen Nuclear, Eljen Technology, Hilger Crystals and GE Global Research. Finally, we thank the members of the local organizing committee: Diana Attila, Thomas Budinger, Joe Chew, Daniel Chivers, Rob Johnson, Laurie O'Brien, Donna Raziano, Emily Sause, and Brian Wirth for doing all the work that actually made this conference happen.« less

  13. Recovering the slip history of a scenario earthquake in the Mexican subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjorleifsdottir, V.; Perez-Campos, X.; Iglesias, A.; Cruz-Atienza, V.; Ji, C.; Legrand, D.; Husker, A. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Valdes Gonzalez, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Guerrero segment of the Mexican subduction zone has not experienced a large earthquake for almost 100 years (Singh et al., 1981). Due to its proximity to Mexico City, which was devastated by an earthquake in the more distant Michoacan segment in 1985, it has been studied extensively in recent years. Silent slip events have been observed by a local GPS network (Kostoglodov et al. 2003) and seismic observations from a dense linear array of broadband seismometers (MASE) have provided detailed images of the crustal structure of this part of the subduction zone (see for example Pérez-Campos et al., 2008, Iglesias et al., 2010). Interestingly the part of the fault zone that is locked during the inter-seismic period is thought to reach up to or inland from the coast line. In the event of a large megathrust earthquake, this geometry could allow recordings from above the fault interface. These types of recordings can be critical to resolve the history of slip as a function of time on the fault plane during the earthquake. A well constrained model of slip-time history, together with other observations as mentioned above, could provide very valuable insights into earthquake physics and the earthquake cycle. In order to prepare the scientific response for such an event we generate a scenario earthquake in the Guerrero segment of the subduction zone. We calculate synthetic strong motion records, seismograms for global stations and static offsets on the Earth's surface. To simulate the real data available we add real noise, recorded during times of no earthquake, to the synthetic data. We use a simulated annealing inversion algorithm (Ji et al., 1999) to invert the different datasets and combinations thereof for the time-history of slip on the fault plane. We present the recovery of the slip model using the different datasets, as well as idealized datasets, investigating the expected and best possible levels of recovery.

  14. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-05-01

    Throughout the Option I period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company - Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) provided support to both the Planetary Surface Systems (PSS) Office at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center and to the Flight and Ground Systems Projects Office (Payload Projects Management) at the Kennedy Space Center. The primary objective of the Option I phase of the study was to assist the above NASA centers in developing Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) concepts. MDSSC-KSC conducted three analyses which provided launch and landing detail to the proposed exploration concepts. One analysis, the Lunar Ejecta Assessment, was conducted to determine the effects of launch and landing a vehicle in a dusty environment. A second analysis, the Thermal/Micrometeoroid Protection Trade Study, was refined to determine the impacts that Reference Architecture Option 5A would have on thermal/micrometeoroid protection approaches. The third analysis, the Centaur Prelaunch Procedure Analysis, used a Centaur prelaunch test and checkout flow to identify key considerations that would be important if a Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) was to use an expander cycle liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine. Several 'quick look' assessments were also conducted. One quick look assessment, the Storable Propellant Quick Look Assessment, was conducted to identify design considerations that should be made if storable propellants were to be used instead of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The LEV Servicer Maintenance Analysis provided an early look at the effort required to maintain an LEV Servicer on the lunar surface. Also, support was provided to the PSS Logistics Manager to develop initial LEV Servicer cost inputs. Consideration was given to the advanced development that must be provided to accomplish a lunar and/or Mars mission. MDSS-KSC also provided support to both MASE

  15. Seasonality and Trend Forecasting of Tuberculosis Prevalence Data in Eastern Cape, South Africa, Using a Hybrid Model.

    PubMed

    Azeez, Adeboye; Obaromi, Davies; Odeyemi, Akinwumi; Ndege, James; Muntabayi, Ruffin

    2016-07-26

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a deadly infectious disease caused by Mycobacteria tuberculosis. Tuberculosis as a chronic and highly infectious disease is prevalent in almost every part of the globe. More than 95% of TB mortality occurs in low/middle income countries. In 2014, approximately 10 million people were diagnosed with active TB and two million died from the disease. In this study, our aim is to compare the predictive powers of the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) and neural network auto-regression (SARIMA-NNAR) models of TB incidence and analyse its seasonality in South Africa. TB incidence cases data from January 2010 to December 2015 were extracted from the Eastern Cape Health facility report of the electronic Tuberculosis Register (ERT.Net). A SARIMA model and a combined model of SARIMA model and a neural network auto-regression (SARIMA-NNAR) model were used in analysing and predicting the TB data from 2010 to 2015. Simulation performance parameters of mean square error (MSE), root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), mean percent error (MPE), mean absolute scaled error (MASE) and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) were applied to assess the better performance of prediction between the models. Though practically, both models could predict TB incidence, the combined model displayed better performance. For the combined model, the Akaike information criterion (AIC), second-order AIC (AICc) and Bayesian information criterion (BIC) are 288.56, 308.31 and 299.09 respectively, which were lower than the SARIMA model with corresponding values of 329.02, 327.20 and 341.99, respectively. The seasonality trend of TB incidence was forecast to have a slightly increased seasonal TB incidence trend from the SARIMA-NNAR model compared to the single model. The combined model indicated a better TB incidence forecasting with a lower AICc. The model also indicates the need for resolute intervention to reduce infectious disease

  16. Interannual variability of the frequency and intensity of tropical cyclones striking the California coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, F. J.; Rueda, A.; Barnard, P.; Mori, N.; Nakajo, S.; Albuquerque, J.

    2016-12-01

    Hurricanes hitting California have a very low ocurrence probability due to typically cool ocean temperature and westward tracks. However, damages associated to these improbable events would be dramatic in Southern California and understanding the oceanographic and atmospheric drivers is of paramount importance for coastal risk management for present and future climates. A statistical analysis of the historical events is very difficult due to the limited resolution of atmospheric and oceanographic forcing data available. In this work, we propose a combination of: (a) climate-based statistical downscaling methods (Espejo et al, 2015); and (b) a synthetic stochastic tropical cyclone (TC) model (Nakajo et al, 2014). To build the statistical downscaling model, Y=f(X), we apply a combination of principal component analysis and the k-means classification algorithm to find representative patterns from large-scale may-to-november averaged monthly anomalies of SST and thermocline depth fields in Tropical Pacific (predictor X) and the associated historical tropical cyclones in Eastern North Pacific basin (predictand Y). As data for the historical occurrence and paths of tropical cyclones are scarce, we apply a stochastic TC model which is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the joint distribution of track, minimum sea level pressure and translation speed of the historical events in the Eastern Central Pacific Ocean. Results will show the ability of the approach to explain the interannual variability of the frequency and intensity of TCs in Southern California, which is clearly related to post El Niño Eastern Pacific and El Niño Central Pacific. References Espejo, A., Méndez, F.J., Diez, J., Medina, R., Al-Yahyai, S. (2015) Seasonal probabilistic forecasting of tropical cyclone activity in the North Indian Ocean, Journal of Flood Risk Management, DOI: 10.1111/jfr3.12197 Nakajo, S., N. Mori, T. Yasuda, and H. Mase (2014) Global Stochastic Tropical Cyclone Model Based on

  17. Analysis of the interannual variability of tropical cyclones striking the California coast based on statistical downscaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, F. J.; Rueda, A.; Barnard, P.; Mori, N.; Nakajo, S.; Espejo, A.; del Jesus, M.; Diez Sierra, J.; Cofino, A. S.; Camus, P.

    2016-02-01

    Hurricanes hitting California have a very low ocurrence probability due to typically cool ocean temperature and westward tracks. However, damages associated to these improbable events would be dramatic in Southern California and understanding the oceanographic and atmospheric drivers is of paramount importance for coastal risk management for present and future climates. A statistical analysis of the historical events is very difficult due to the limited resolution of atmospheric and oceanographic forcing data available. In this work, we propose a combination of: (a) statistical downscaling methods (Espejo et al, 2015); and (b) a synthetic stochastic tropical cyclone (TC) model (Nakajo et al, 2014). To build the statistical downscaling model, Y=f(X), we apply a combination of principal component analysis and the k-means classification algorithm to find representative patterns from a potential TC index derived from large-scale SST fields in Eastern Central Pacific (predictor X) and the associated tropical cyclone ocurrence (predictand Y). SST data comes from NOAA Extended Reconstructed SST V3b providing information from 1854 to 2013 on a 2.0 degree x 2.0 degree global grid. As data for the historical occurrence and paths of tropical cycloneas are scarce, we apply a stochastic TC model which is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the joint distribution of track, minimum sea level pressure and translation speed of the historical events in the Eastern Central Pacific Ocean. Results will show the ability of the approach to explain seasonal-to-interannual variability of the predictor X, which is clearly related to El Niño Southern Oscillation. References Espejo, A., Méndez, F.J., Diez, J., Medina, R., Al-Yahyai, S. (2015) Seasonal probabilistic forecasting of tropical cyclone activity in the North Indian Ocean, Journal of Flood Risk Management, DOI: 10.1111/jfr3.12197 Nakajo, S., N. Mori, T. Yasuda, and H. Mase (2014) Global Stochastic Tropical Cyclone Model Based on

  18. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide: A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions.

    PubMed

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (i.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O 2 has been carried out. An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N , J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N , J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N , J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N , J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N , J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions.

  19. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide: A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions⋆

    PubMed Central

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Context Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. Aims We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. Methods We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (i.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O2 has been carried out. Results An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N, J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N, J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N, J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N, J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N, J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions. PMID:29151607

  20. Groundwater intensive use and mining in south-eastern peninsular Spain: Hydrogeological, economic and social aspects.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Emilio; Andreu-Rodes, José Miguel; Aragón, Ramón; Estrela, Teodoro; Ferrer, Javier; García-Aróstegui, José Luis; Manzano, Marisol; Rodríguez-Hernández, Luis; Sahuquillo, Andrés; Del Villar, Alberto

    2016-07-15

    Intensive groundwater development is a common circumstance in semiarid and arid areas. Often abstraction exceeds recharge, thus continuously depleting reserves. There is groundwater mining when the recovery of aquifer reserves needs more than 50years. The MASE project has been carried out to compile what is known about Spain and specifically about the south-eastern Iberian Peninsula and the Canary Islands. The objective was the synthetic analysis of available data on the hydrological, economic, managerial, social, and ethical aspects of groundwater mining. Since the mid-20th century, intensive use of groundwater in south-eastern Spain allowed extending and securing the areas with traditional surface water irrigation of cash crops and their extension to former dry lands, taking advantage of good soils and climate. This fostered a huge economic and social development. Intensive agriculture is a main activity, although tourism plays currently an increasing economic role in the coasts. Many aquifers are relatively high yielding small carbonate units where the total groundwater level drawdown may currently exceed 300m. Groundwater storage depletion is estimated about 15km(3). This volume is close to the total contribution of the Tagus-Segura water transfer, but without large investments paid for with public funds. Seawater desalination complements urban supply and part of cash crop cultivation. Reclaimed urban waste water is used for irrigation. Groundwater mining produces benefits but associated to sometimes serious economic, administrative, legal and environmental problems. The use of an exhaustible vital resource raises ethical concerns. It cannot continue under the current legal conditions. A progressive change of water use paradigm is the way out, but this is not in the mind of most water managers and politicians. The positive and negative results observed in south-eastern Spain may help to analyse other areas under similar hydrogeological conditions in a less

  1. Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study, option 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Throughout the Option I period of the Lunar Transportation Facilities and Operations Study (LTFOS), McDonnell Douglas Space Systems Company - Kennedy Space Center (MDSSC-KSC) provided support to both the Planetary Surface Systems (PSS) Office at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at the Johnson Space Center and to the Flight and Ground Systems Projects Office (Payload Projects Management) at the Kennedy Space Center. The primary objective of the Option I phase of the study was to assist the above NASA centers in developing Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) concepts. MDSSC-KSC conducted three analyses which provided launch and landing detail to the proposed exploration concepts. One analysis, the Lunar Ejecta Assessment, was conducted to determine the effects of launch and landing a vehicle in a dusty environment. A second analysis, the Thermal/Micrometeoroid Protection Trade Study, was refined to determine the impacts that Reference Architecture Option 5A would have on thermal/micrometeoroid protection approaches. The third analysis, the Centaur Prelaunch Procedure Analysis, used a Centaur prelaunch test and checkout flow to identify key considerations that would be important if a Lunar Excursion Vehicle (LEV) was to use an expander cycle liquid oxygen-liquid hydrogen engine. Several 'quick look' assessments were also conducted. One quick look assessment, the Storable Propellant Quick Look Assessment, was conducted to identify design considerations that should be made if storable propellants were to be used instead of liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. The LEV Servicer Maintenance Analysis provided an early look at the effort required to maintain an LEV Servicer on the lunar surface. Also, support was provided to the PSS Logistics Manager to develop initial LEV Servicer cost inputs. Consideration was given to the advanced development that must be provided to accomplish a lunar and/or Mars mission. MDSS-KSC also provided support to both MASE

  2. Earthquake source properties from pseudotachylite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, Nicholas M.; Di Toro, Giulio; Nielsen, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The motions radiated from an earthquake contain information that can be interpreted as displacements within the source and therefore related to stress drop. Except in a few notable cases, the source displacements can neither be easily related to the absolute stress level or fault strength, nor attributed to a particular physical mechanism. In contrast paleo-earthquakes recorded by exhumed pseudotachylite have a known dynamic mechanism whose properties constrain the co-seismic fault strength. Pseudotachylite can also be used to directly address a longstanding discrepancy between seismologically measured static stress drops, which are typically a few MPa, and much larger dynamic stress drops expected from thermal weakening during localized slip at seismic speeds in crystalline rock [Sibson, 1973; McKenzie and Brune, 1969; Lachenbruch, 1980; Mase and Smith, 1986; Rice, 2006] as have been observed recently in laboratory experiments at high slip rates [Di Toro et al., 2006a]. This note places pseudotachylite-derived estimates of fault strength and inferred stress levels within the context and broader bounds of naturally observed earthquake source parameters: apparent stress, stress drop, and overshoot, including consideration of roughness of the fault surface, off-fault damage, fracture energy, and the 'strength excess'. The analysis, which assumes stress drop is related to corner frequency by the Madariaga [1976] source model, is restricted to the intermediate sized earthquakes of the Gole Larghe fault zone in the Italian Alps where the dynamic shear strength is well-constrained by field and laboratory measurements. We find that radiated energy exceeds the shear-generated heat and that the maximum strength excess is ~16 MPa. More generally these events have inferred earthquake source parameters that are rate, for instance a few percent of the global earthquake population has stress drops as large, unless: fracture energy is routinely greater than existing models allow

  3. Outflow structure and velocity field of Orion source. I. ALMA imaging of SiO isotopologue maser and thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhofer, F.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Goddi, C.

    2012-12-01

    Using Science Verification data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have identified and imaged five rotational transitions (J = 5-4 and J = 6-5) of the three silicon monoxide isotopologues 28SiO v = 0, 1, 2 and 29SiO v = 0 and 28Si18O v = 0 in the frequency range from 214 to 246 GHz towards the Orion BN/KL region. The emission of the ground-state 28SiO, 29SiO and 28Si18O shows an extended bipolar shape in the northeast-southwest direction at the position of Radio Source I, indicating that these isotopologues trace an outflow ( 18 km s-1, PA 50°, 5000 AU in diameter) that is driven by this embedded high-mass young stellar object (YSO). Whereas on small scales (10-1000 AU) the outflow from Source I has a well-ordered spatial and velocity structure, as probed by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging of SiO masers, the large scales (500-5000 AU) probed by thermal SiO with ALMA reveal a complex structure and velocity field, most likely related to the effects of the environment of the BN/KL region on the outflow emanating from Source I. The emission of the vibrationally-excited species peaks at the position of Source I. This emission is compact and not resolved at an angular resolution of 1farcs5 ( 600 AU at a distance of 420 pc). 2D Gaussian fitting to individual velocity channels locates emission peaks within radii of 100 AU, i.e. they trace the innermost part of the outflow. A narrow spectral profile and spatial distribution of the v = 1 J = 5-4 line similar to the masing v = 1 J = 1-0 transition, provide evidence for the most highly rotationally excited (frequency > 200 GHz) SiO maser emission associated with Source I known to date. The maser emission will enable studies of the Source I disk-outflow interface with future ALMA longest baselines.

  4. SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David

    In the January 2002 edition of SIAM News, Nick Trefethen announced the '$100, 100-Digit Challenge'. In this note he presented ten easy-to-state but hard-to-solve problems of numerical analysis, and challenged readers to find each answer to ten-digit accuracy. Trefethen closed with the enticing comment: 'Hint: They're hard! If anyone gets 50 digits in total, I will be impressed.' This challenge obviously struck a chord in hundreds of numerical mathematicians worldwide, as 94 teams from 25 nations later submitted entries. Many of these submissions exceeded the target of 50 correct digits; in fact, 20 teams achieved a perfect score of 100more » correct digits. Trefethen had offered $100 for the best submission. Given the overwhelming response, a generous donor (William Browning, founder of Applied Mathematics, Inc.) provided additional funds to provide a $100 award to each of the 20 winning teams. Soon after the results were out, four participants, each from a winning team, got together and agreed to write a book about the problems and their solutions. The team is truly international: Bornemann is from Germany, Laurie is from South Africa, Wagon is from the USA, and Waldvogel is from Switzerland. This book provides some mathematical background for each problem, and then shows in detail how each of them can be solved. In fact, multiple solution techniques are mentioned in each case. The book describes how to extend these solutions to much larger problems and much higher numeric precision (hundreds or thousands of digit accuracy). The authors also show how to compute error bounds for the results, so that one can say with confidence that one's results are accurate to the level stated. Numerous numerical software tools are demonstrated in the process, including the commercial products Mathematica, Maple and Matlab. Computer programs that perform many of the algorithms mentioned in the book are provided, both in an appendix to the book and on a website. In the process

  5. 2D Simulations of Earthquake Cycles at a Subduction Zone Based on a Rate and State Friction Law -Effects of Pore Fluid Pressure Changes-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsui, Y.; Hirahara, K.

    2006-12-01

    There have been a lot of studies that simulate large earthquakes occurring quasi-periodically at a subduction zone, based on the laboratory-derived rate-and-state friction law [eg. Kato and Hirasawa (1997), Hirose and Hirahara (2002)]. All of them assume that pore fluid pressure in the fault zone is constant. However, in the fault zone, pore fluid pressure changes suddenly, due to coseismic pore dilatation [Marone (1990)] and thermal pressurization [Mase and Smith (1987)]. If pore fluid pressure drops and effective normal stress rises, fault slip is decelerated. Inversely, if pore fluid pressure rises and effective normal stress drops, fault slip is accelerated. The effect of pore fluid may cause slow slip events and low-frequency tremor [Kodaira et al. (2004), Shelly et al. (2006)]. For a simple spring model, how pore dilatation affects slip instability was investigated [Segall and Rice (1995), Sleep (1995)]. When the rate of the slip becomes high, pore dilatation occurs and pore pressure drops, and the rate of the slip is restrained. Then the inflow of pore fluid recovers the pore pressure. We execute 2D earthquake cycle simulations at a subduction zone, taking into account such changes of pore fluid pressure following Segall and Rice (1995), in addition to the numerical scheme in Kato and Hirasawa (1997). We do not adopt hydrostatic pore pressure but excess pore pressure for initial condition, because upflow of dehydrated water seems to exist at a subduction zone. In our model, pore fluid is confined to the fault damage zone and flows along the plate interface. The smaller the flow rate is, the later pore pressure recovers. Since effective normal stress keeps larger, the fault slip is decelerated and stress drop becomes smaller. Therefore the smaller flow rate along the fault zone leads to the shorter earthquake recurrence time. Thus, not only the frictional parameters and the subduction rate but also the fault zone permeability affects the recurrence time of

  6. Informed baseline subtraction of proteomic mass spectrometry data aided by a novel sliding window algorithm.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Tyman E; Bagley, Christopher J; Solomon, Patty J

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) linear time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) may be used to produce protein profiles from biological samples with the aim of discovering biomarkers for disease. However, the raw protein profiles suffer from several sources of bias or systematic variation which need to be removed via pre-processing before meaningful downstream analysis of the data can be undertaken. Baseline subtraction, an early pre-processing step that removes the non-peptide signal from the spectra, is complicated by the following: (i) each spectrum has, on average, wider peaks for peptides with higher mass-to-charge ratios ( m / z ), and (ii) the time-consuming and error-prone trial-and-error process for optimising the baseline subtraction input arguments. With reference to the aforementioned complications, we present an automated pipeline that includes (i) a novel 'continuous' line segment algorithm that efficiently operates over data with a transformed m / z -axis to remove the relationship between peptide mass and peak width, and (ii) an input-free algorithm to estimate peak widths on the transformed m / z scale. The automated baseline subtraction method was deployed on six publicly available proteomic MS datasets using six different m/z-axis transformations. Optimality of the automated baseline subtraction pipeline was assessed quantitatively using the mean absolute scaled error (MASE) when compared to a gold-standard baseline subtracted signal. Several of the transformations investigated were able to reduce, if not entirely remove, the peak width and peak location relationship resulting in near-optimal baseline subtraction using the automated pipeline. The proposed novel 'continuous' line segment algorithm is shown to far outperform naive sliding window algorithms with regard to the computational time required. The improvement in computational time was at least four-fold on real MALDI TOF-MS data and at least an order of

  7. Advancing Migrant Access to Health Services in Europe (AMASE): Protocol for a Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-del Arco, Débora; Monge, Susana; Copas, Andrew J; Gennotte, Anne-Francoise; Volny-Anne, Alain; Göpel, Siri; Touloumi, Giota; Prins, Maria; Barros, Henrique; Staehelin, Cornelia; del Amo, Julia; Burns, Fiona M

    2016-01-01

    Background Migrants form a substantial proportion of the population affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Europe, yet HIV prevention for this population is hindered by poor understanding of access to care and of postmigration transmission dynamics. Objective We present the design and methods of the advancing Migrant Access to health Services in Europe (aMASE) study, the first European cross-cultural study focused on multiple migrant populations. It aims to identify the structural, cultural, and financial barriers to HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and to determine the likely country of HIV acquisition in HIV-positive migrant populations. Methods We delivered 2 cross-sectional electronic surveys across 10 countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, and United Kingdom). A clinic survey aimed to recruit up to 2000 HIV-positive patients from 57 HIV clinics in 9 countries. A unique study number linked anonymized questionnaire data to clinical records data (viral loads, CD4 cell counts, viral clades, etc). This questionnaire was developed by expert panel consensus and cognitively tested, and a pilot study was carried out in 2 countries. A Web-based community survey (n=1000) reached those living with HIV but not currently accessing HIV clinics, as well as HIV-negative migrants. It was developed in close collaboration with a community advisory group (CAG) made up of representatives from community organizations in 9 of the participating countries. The CAG played a key role in data collection by promoting the survey to higher-risk migrant groups (sub-Saharan Africans, Latin Americans, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs). The questionnaires have considerable content overlap, allowing for comparison. Questions cover ethnicity, migration, immigration status, HIV testing and treatment, health-seeking behavior, sexual risk, and drug use. The electronic questionnaires

  8. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide. A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. Aims: We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. Methods: We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (I.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O2 has been carried out. Results: An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N,J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N,J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N,J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions. The complete list of measured Zeeman components is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  9. Advancing Migrant Access to Health Services in Europe (AMASE): Protocol for a Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Fakoya, Ibidun; Álvarez-Del Arco, Débora; Monge, Susana; Copas, Andrew J; Gennotte, Anne-Francoise; Volny-Anne, Alain; Göpel, Siri; Touloumi, Giota; Prins, Maria; Barros, Henrique; Staehelin, Cornelia; Del Amo, Julia; Burns, Fiona M

    2016-05-16

    Migrants form a substantial proportion of the population affected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic in Europe, yet HIV prevention for this population is hindered by poor understanding of access to care and of postmigration transmission dynamics. We present the design and methods of the advancing Migrant Access to health Services in Europe (aMASE) study, the first European cross-cultural study focused on multiple migrant populations. It aims to identify the structural, cultural, and financial barriers to HIV prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and to determine the likely country of HIV acquisition in HIV-positive migrant populations. We delivered 2 cross-sectional electronic surveys across 10 countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, and United Kingdom). A clinic survey aimed to recruit up to 2000 HIV-positive patients from 57 HIV clinics in 9 countries. A unique study number linked anonymized questionnaire data to clinical records data (viral loads, CD4 cell counts, viral clades, etc). This questionnaire was developed by expert panel consensus and cognitively tested, and a pilot study was carried out in 2 countries. A Web-based community survey (n=1000) reached those living with HIV but not currently accessing HIV clinics, as well as HIV-negative migrants. It was developed in close collaboration with a community advisory group (CAG) made up of representatives from community organizations in 9 of the participating countries. The CAG played a key role in data collection by promoting the survey to higher-risk migrant groups (sub-Saharan Africans, Latin Americans, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs). The questionnaires have considerable content overlap, allowing for comparison. Questions cover ethnicity, migration, immigration status, HIV testing and treatment, health-seeking behavior, sexual risk, and drug use. The electronic questionnaires, which were available in 15

  10. Modeling of the hydrogen maser disk in MWC 349

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Victor O.; Smith, Howard A.; Strelnitski, Vladimir S.

    1994-04-01

    Maser amplification in a Keplerian circumstellar disk seen edge on-the idea put forward by Gordon (1992), Martin-Pintado, & Serabyn (1992), and Thum, Martin-Pintado, & Bachiller (1992) to explain the millimeter hydrogen recombination lines in MWC 349-is further justified and developed here. The double-peaked (vs. possible triple-peaked) form of the observed spectra is explained by the reduced emission from the inner portion of the disk, the portion responsible for the central ('zero velocity') component of a triple-peaked spectrum. Radial gradient of electron density and/or free-free absorption within the disk are identified as the probable causes of this central 'hole' in the disk and of its opacity. We calculate a set of synthetic maser spectra radiated by a homogeneous Keplerian ring seen edge-on and compare them to the H30-alpha observations of Thum et al., averaged over about 1000 days. We used a simple graphical procedure to solve an inverse problem and deduced the probable values of some basic disk and maser parameters. We find that the maser is essentially unsaturated, and that the most probable values of electron temperature. Doppler width of the microturbulence, and electron density, all averaged along the amplification path are, correspondingly, Te less than or equal to 11,000 K, Vmicro less than or equal to 14 km/s, ne approx. = (3 +/- 2) x 107/cu cm. The model shows that radiation at every frequency within the spectrum arises in a monochromatic 'hot spot.' The maximum optical depth within the 'hot spot' producing radiation at the spectral peak maximum is taumax approx. = 6 +/- 1; the effective width of the masing ring is approx. = 0.4-0.7 times its outer diameter; the size of the 'hot spot' responsible for the radiation at the spectral peak frequency is approx. = 0.2-0.3 times the distance between the two 'hot spots' corresponding to two peaks. An important derivation of our model is the dynamical mass of the central star, M* approx. = 26 solar masses

  11. NASA Space Science Day Events-Engaging Students in Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foxworth, S.; Mosie, A.; Allen, J.; Kent, J.; Green, A.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Space Science Day Event follows the same format of planning and execution at all host universities and colleges. These institutions realized the importance of such an event and sought funding to continue hosting NSSD events. In 2014, NASA Johnson Space Center ARES team has supported the following universities and colleges that have hosted a NSSD event; the University of Texas at Brownsville, San Jacinto College, Georgia Tech University and Huston-Tillotson University. Other universities and colleges are continuing to conduct their own NSSD events. NASA Space Science Day Events are supported through continued funding through NASA Discovery Program. Community Night begins with a NASA speaker and Astromaterials display. The entire community surrounding the host university or college is invited to the Community Night. This year at the Huston-Tillotson (HTU) NSSD, we had Dr. Laurie Carrillo, a NASA Engineer, speak to the public and students. She answered questions, shared her experiences and career path. The speaker sets a tone of adventure and discovery for the NSSD event. After the speaker, the public is able to view Lunar and Meteorite samples and ask questions from the ARES team. The students and teachers from nearby schools attended the NSSD Event the following day. Students are able to see the university or college campus and the university or college mentors are available for questions. Students rotate through hour long Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) sessions and a display area. These activities are from the Discovery Program activities that tie in directly with k- 12 instruction. The sessions highlight the STEM in exploration and discovery. The Lunar and Meteorite display is again available for students to view and ask questions. In the display area, there are also other interactive displays. Angela Green, from San Jacinto College, brought the Starlab for students to watch a planetarium exhibit for the NSSD at Huston

  12. Recruiting Young Gay and Bisexual Men for a Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intervention Through Social Media: The Effects of Advertisement Content.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Paul L; Katz, Mira L; Bauermeister, Jose A; Shoben, Abigail B; Paskett, Electra D; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2017-06-02

    individuals (US $2.76 per enrolled participant). Facebook ads are a convenient and cost-efficient strategy for reaching and recruiting young gay and bisexual men for a Web-based HPV vaccination intervention. To help optimize ad performance among this population, researchers should consider the importance of the text and image included in the social media recruitment ads. ©Paul L Reiter, Mira L Katz, Jose A Bauermeister, Abigail B Shoben, Electra D Paskett, Annie-Laurie McRee. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 02.06.2017.

  13. Modelling strong seismic ground motion: three-dimensional loading path versus wavefield polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santisi d'Avila, Maria Paola; Lenti, Luca; Semblat, Jean-François

    2012-09-01

    Seismic waves due to strong earthquakes propagating in surficial soil layers may both reduce soil stiffness and increase the energy dissipation into the soil. To investigate seismic wave amplification in such cases, past studies have been devoted to one-directional shear wave propagation in a soil column (1D-propagation) considering one motion component only (1C-polarization). Three independent purely 1C computations may be performed ('1D-1C' approach) and directly superimposed in the case of weak motions (linear behaviour). This research aims at studying local site effects by considering seismic wave propagation in a 1-D soil profile accounting for the influence of the 3-D loading path and non-linear hysteretic behaviour of the soil. In the proposed '1D-3C' approach, the three components (3C-polarization) of the incident wave are simultaneously propagated into a horizontal multilayered soil. A 3-D non-linear constitutive relation for the soil is implemented in the framework of the Finite Element Method in the time domain. The complex rheology of soils is modelled by mean of a multisurface cyclic plasticity model of the Masing-Prandtl-Ishlinskii-Iwan type. The great advantage of this choice is that the only data needed to describe the model is the modulus reduction curve. A parametric study is carried out to characterize the changes in the seismic motion of the surficial layers due to both incident wavefield properties and soil non-linearities. The numerical simulations show a seismic response depending on several parameters such as polarization of seismic waves, material elastic and dynamic properties, as well as on the impedance contrast between layers and frequency content and oscillatory character of the input motion. The 3-D loading path due to the 3C-polarization leads to multi-axial stress interaction that reduces soil strength and increases non-linear effects. The non-linear behaviour of the soil may have beneficial or detrimental effects on the seismic

  14. Boosting of Nonvolcanic Tremor by Regional Earthquakes 2011-2012 in Guerrero, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real, J. A.; Kostoglodov, V.; Husker, A. L.; Payero, J. S.; G-GAP Research Team

    2013-05-01

    Sistematic observation of nonvolcanic tremor (NVT) in Guerrero, Mexico started in 2005 after the installation of MASE broadband seismic network. Since 2008 the new "G-GAP" network of 10 seismic mini-arrays provides the data for the NVT detailed studies together with the broadband stations of the Servicio Seimologogico Nacional (SSN). Most of the NVT recorded in the central Guerrero area are of so called ambient type, which in most cases are related with the occurrence of aseismic slow slip events (SSE). While the locations of NVT are estimated relatively well, their depths are not reliable but distributed close to the subduction plate interface. The ambient NVT activity increases periodically every 3-4 months and is strongly modulated by large SSE. Another type of tremor has been observed in Guerrero during and after several large teleseismic events, such as Mw=8.8, 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake. This NVT was triggered by the surface waves when they traveled across the tremor-generating area. Large teleseismic events may also activate a noticeable post-seismic NVT activity. In subduction zones, triggering of the NVT and its post-seismic activation by the regional and local earthquakes have not yet been observed. We tried to detect the NVT triggered or boosting of post-seismic tremor activity by two recent large earthquakes that occurred in Guerrero: December 11, 2011, Mw=6.5 Zumpango, and March 20, 2012, Mw=7.4 Ometepec. The first earthquake was of the intraplate type, with normal focal mechanism, at the depth of 58 km, and the second was the shallow interplate event of the thrust type, at the depth of ~15 km. It is technically difficult to separate the NVT signal in its characteristic 1-10 Hz frequency range from the high frequency input from the regional earthquake. The Zumpango event, which is located closer to the NVT area, produced a noticeable boosting of post-seismic NVT activity to the North of its epicenter. Meanwhile the larger magnitude Ometepec

  15. The Ionization Fraction in the Obscuring ``Torus'' of an Active Galactic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. S.; Roy, A. L.; Ulvestad, J. S.; Colbert, E. J. M.; Weaver, K. A.; Braatz, J. A.; Henkel, C.; Matsuoka, M.; Xue, S.; Iyomoto, N.; Okada, K.

    1998-10-01

    The LINER galaxy NGC 2639 contains a water vapor megamaser, suggesting the presence of a nuclear accretion disk or torus viewed close to edge-on. This galaxy is thus a good candidate for revealing absorption by the torus of any compact nuclear continuum emission. In this paper, we report VLBA radio maps at three frequencies and an ASCA X-ray spectrum obtained to search for free-free and photoelectric absorptions, respectively. The radio observations reveal a compact (<0.2 pc) nuclear source with a spectrum that turns over sharply near 5 GHz. This turnover may reflect either synchrotron self-absorption or free-free absorption. The galaxy is detected by ASCA with an observed luminosity of 1.4 × 1041 ergs s-1 in the 0.6-10 keV band. The X-ray spectrum shows emission in excess of a power-law model at energies greater than 4 keV; we interpret this excess as compact, nuclear, hard X-ray emission with the lower energies photoelectrically absorbed by an equivalent hydrogen column of ~= 5 × 1023 cm-2. If we assume that the turnover in the radio spectrum is caused by free-free absorption and that both the free-free and photoelectric absorptions are produced by the same gaseous component, the ratio n2edl/nHdl may be determined. If the masing molecular gas is responsible for both absorptions, the required ionization fraction is >~1.3 × 10-5, which is comparable to the theoretical upper limit derived by Neufeld, Maloney, and Conger for X-ray heated molecular gas. The two values may be reconciled if the molecular gas is very dense: nH2>~109 cm-3. The measured ionization fraction is also consistent with the idea that both absorptions occur in a hot (~6000 K), weakly ionized (ionization fraction a few times 10-2) atomic region that may coexist with the warm molecular gas. If this is the case, the absorbing gas is ~1 pc from the nucleus. We rule out the possibility that both absorptions occur in a fully ionized gas near 104 K. If our line of sight passes through more than one

  16. Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence reveals strong representation of photosynthesis at ecosystem level in rice paddy field in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, T.; Tsujimoto, K.; Nasahara, K. N.; Akitsu, T.; Ono, K.; Miyata, A.

    2015-12-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence emission from ecosystem induced by sunlight (Sun-Induced Fluorescence: SIF) is now a key factor to accurately estimate the ecosystem-level photosynthesis activity as suggested by satellite studies, and has been recently detected by satellites [Frankenberg et al., 2011; Guanter et al., 2012; Joiner et al., 2013] and measured at field stations [Daumard et al., 2010; Porcar-Castell, 2011]. However, the few example of field-based assessment on the representation ability reduces its value for the availability to better understand the dynamics in CO2uptake by land ecosystem. To elucidate the potential of SIF to estimate ecosystem GPP in typical Asian crop type, the canopy-top SIF was calculated from the spectrum data in Japanese rice paddy field in Mase in central Japan (36°03'N, 140°01'E, 11 m a.s.l.), and compared with eddy-tower measured GPP on half-hourly and daily bases during seven years from 2006 to 2012. The rice (Oriza sativa L.; cultivar Koshihikari) was transplanted in May and harvested in September normally. The SIF was estimated from the spectrums of downward Sun irradiance and upward canopy-reflected radiance measured at the height of 3m above ground by HemiSpherical Spectro-Radiometer (HSSR), consisting of the spectroradiometer (MS-700, Eko inc., Tokyo, Japan) with the full-width at half maximum (FWHM) of 10 nm and wavelength interval of 3.3 nm. The SIF around 760nm (O2-A band: Fs760) was calculated according to the Fraunhofer Line Depth principle [Maier et al., 2003] with several additional arrangements. The GPP increased almost linearly as both Fs760 and APAR (Absorbed Photosyntethically Active Radiation) increased based on monthly-averaged diurnal courses during the growing season in 2006. The slopes of their regression lines differed much among the months in APAR, but in Fs760. These nearly constant relationships among the months between GPP and Fs760 were kept for all the observation years. Daily averaged GPP and Fs760

  17. Using Social Listening Data to Monitor Misuse and Nonmedical Use of Bupropion: A Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Laurie S; Bell, Heidi G; Gilbert, Michael; Davidson, Julie E; Winter, Christina; Barratt, Monica J; Win, Beta; Painter, Jeffery L; Menone, Christopher; Sayegh, Jonathan; Dasgupta, Nabarun

    2017-02-01

    , and venlafaxine, respectively. The most commonly reported desired effects were similar to stimulants with bupropion, sedatives with amitriptyline, and dissociatives with venlafaxine. The nasal route of administration was most frequently reported for bupropion, whereas the oral route was most frequently reported for amitriptyline and venlafaxine. Bupropion and venlafaxine were most commonly procured from health care providers, whereas amitriptyline was most commonly obtained or stolen from a third party. The Fleiss kappa for interrater agreement among 20 items with 7 categorical response options evaluated by all 11 raters was 0.448 (95% CI 0.421-0.457). Social listening, conducted in collaboration with harm-reduction Web forums, offers a valuable new data source that can be used for monitoring nonmedical use of antidepressants. Additional work on the capabilities of social listening will help further delineate the benefits and limitations of this rapidly evolving data source. ©Laurie Anderson, Heidi G Bell, Michael Gilbert, Julie E Davidson, Christina Winter, Monica J Barratt, Beta Win, Jeffery L Painter, Christopher Menone, Jonathan Sayegh, Nabarun Dasgupta. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 01.02.2017.

  18. Survey of Preventable Disaster Deaths at Medical Institutions in Areas Affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: Retrospective Survey of Medical Institutions in Miyagi Prefecture.

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Mase, Tomohiko; Otomo, Yasuhiro; Koido, Yuichi; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2017-10-01

    institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake occurred mainly at coastal hospitals with insufficient medical resources, disrupted lifelines, delayed medical intervention, and deteriorated environmental conditions in homes and emergency shelters constituting the main contributing factors. Preventing PDD, in addition to strengthening organizational support and functional enhancement of DBHs, calls for the development of business continuity plans (BCPs) for medical facilities in directly affected areas, including non-DBHs. Yamanouchi S , Sasaki H , Kondo H , Mase T , Otomo Y , Koido Y , Kushimoto S . Survey of preventable disaster deaths at medical institutions in areas affected by the Great East Japan Earthquake: retrospective survey of medical institutions in Miyagi Prefecture. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(5):515-522.

  19. CME/CNE Article: A Framework of Care in Multiple Sclerosis, Part 1: Updated Disease Classification and Disease-Modifying Therapy Use in Specific Circumstances.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Scott D; Aliotta, Philip J; Bainbridge, Jacquelyn; Bennett, Susan E; Cutter, Gary; Fenton, Kaylan; Lublin, Fred; Northrop, Dorothy; Rintell, David; Walker, Bryan D; Weigel, Megan; Zackowski, Kathleen; Jones, David E

    2016-01-01

    Activity Available Online: To access the article, post-test, and evaluation online, go to http://www.cmscscholar.org. The target audience for this activity is physicians, physician assistants, nursing professionals, and other health-care providers involved in the management of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Apply new information about MS to a comprehensive individualized treatment plan for patients with MSIntegrate the team approach into long-term planning in order to optimize rehabilitation care of patients with MSAccreditation Statement: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC), Nurse Practitioner Alternatives (NPA), and Delaware Media Group. The CMSC is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The CMSC designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) ™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Nurse Practitioner Alternatives (NPA) is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. NPA designates this enduring material for 1.0 Continuing Nursing Education credit. Laurie Scudder, DNP, NP, has served as Nurse Planner for this activity. She has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Disclosures: Francois Bethoux, MD , Editor in Chief of the International Journal of MS Care (IJMSC), has served as Physician Planner for this activity. He has received royalties from Springer Publishing and has received intellectual property rights from Biogen. Laurie Scudder, DNP, NP , has served as Nurse Planner for this activity. She has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. Scott D. Newsome, DO, MSCS

  20. Assessment of Active Video Gaming Using Adapted Controllers by Individuals With Physical Disabilities: A Protocol.

    PubMed

    Malone, Laurie A; Padalabalanarayanan, Sangeetha; McCroskey, Justin; Thirumalai, Mohanraj

    2017-06-16

    collected during an initial 20-minute baseline, followed by 40 minutes of game play. The controller (balance board or gaming mat) played was randomly selected. A set of games was played for 10 minutes, followed by 5 minutes of rest, and then another set of games was played for 10 minutes, followed by rest. Quality of game play was observed and documented for each set. During rest, the participant completed questions regarding enjoyment. Following the same procedures, the participant then played the two sets of games using the other version (off-the-shelf or adapted) of the controller. The entire procedure was repeated during Visit 3 with the controller that was not played. Enrollment began in February 2016 and ended in September 2016. Study results will be reported in late 2017. We hypothesized that the adapted versions of the Wii Fit balance board and gaming mat would produce greater quality of game play, enjoyment, and energy expenditure in persons with mobility impairments compared to off-the-shelf versions. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02994199; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02994199 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6qpPszPJ7). ©Laurie A Malone, Sangeetha Padalabalanarayanan, Justin McCroskey, Mohanraj Thirumalai. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 16.06.2017.

  1. Adapting the Wii Fit Balance Board to Enable Active Video Game Play by Wheelchair Users: User-Centered Design and Usability Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Mohanraj; Kirkland, William B; Misko, Samuel R; Padalabalanarayanan, Sangeetha; Malone, Laurie A

    2018-03-06

    of the controller, enabling stable and safe game play; and (3) included a sensitivity control feature, allowing users to fine-tune the controller to match the users' range of COB motion. More than half the sample could not use the OTS version of the Wii Fit Balance Board, while all participants were able to use the adapted version. All participants rated the adapted Wii Fit Balance Board at a minimum as "good," while those who could not use the OTS Wii Fit Balance Board rated the adapted Wii Fit Balance Board as "excellent." We found a significant negative correlation between lower-extremity function and differences between OTS and adapted SUS scores, indicating that as lower-extremity function decreased, participants perceived the adapted Wii Fit Balance Board as more usable. This study demonstrated a successful adaptation of a widely used AVG controller. The adapted controller's potential to increase physical activity levels among people with mobility impairments will be evaluated in a subsequent trial. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02994199; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02994199 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6xWTyiJWf). ©Mohanraj Thirumalai, William B Kirkland, Samuel R Misko, Sangeetha Padalabalanarayanan, Laurie A Malone. Originally published in JMIR Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology (http://rehab.jmir.org), 06.03.2018.

  2. Application of Behavior Change Techniques in a Personalized Nutrition Electronic Health Intervention Study: Protocol for the Web-Based Food4Me Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Macready, Anna L; Fallaize, Rosalind; Butler, Laurie T; Ellis, Judi A; Kuznesof, Sharron; Frewer, Lynn J; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Livingstone, Katherine M; Araújo-Soares, Vera; Fischer, Arnout Rh; Stewart-Knox, Barbara J; Mathers, John C; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2018-04-09

    for dietary use where necessary. A posteriori, a further 9 techniques were included. Examination of excluded items highlighted the distinction between techniques considered appropriate for face-to-face versus internet-based delivery. The use of existing taxonomies facilitated the description and standardization of techniques used in Food4Me. We recommend that for complex studies of this nature, technique analysis should be conducted a priori to develop standardized procedures and training and reviewed a posteriori to audit the techniques actually adopted. The present framework description makes a valuable contribution to future systematic reviews and meta-analyses that explore technique efficacy and underlying psychological constructs. This was a novel application of the behavior change taxonomies and was the first internet-based personalized nutrition intervention to use such a framework remotely. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01530139; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01530139 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6y8XYUft1). ©Anna L Macready, Rosalind Fallaize, Laurie T Butler, Judi A Ellis, Sharron Kuznesof, Lynn J Frewer, Carlos Celis-Morales, Katherine M Livingstone, Vera Araújo-Soares, Arnout RH Fischer, Barbara J Stewart-Knox, John C Mathers, Julie A Lovegrove. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 09.04.2018.

  3. Ozonolysis of a series of biogenic organic volatile compounds and secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, François; Quilgars, Alain; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Grosselin, Benoît.; Daele, Véronique; Mellouki, Abdelwahid; Winterhalter, Richard; Moortgat, Geert K.

    2010-05-01

    obtained will be compared with those from the literature when available and discussed in terms of their atmospheric impact. Berndt, T., O. Böge and F. Stratmann (2003). Gas-phase ozonolysis of a-pinene: gaseous products and particle formation. Atmospheric Environment, 37: 3933-3945. Bonn, B. and G.K. Moortgat (2003). Sesquiterpene ozonolysis: Origin of atmospheric new particle formation from biogenic hydrocarbons. Journal of Geophysical Research, 30(11). Kavouras, I. and E.G. Stephanou (2002). Direct evidence of atmospheric secondary organic aerosol formation in forest atmosphere through heteromolecular nucleation. Environmental Science and Technology, 36: 5083-5091. Koch, S., R. Winterhalter, E. Uherek, A. Kolloff, P. Neeb and G.K. Moortagt (2000). Formation of new particles in the gas-phase ozonolysis of monoterpenes. Atmospheric Environment, 34: 4031-4042. Kulmala, M., V.-M. Kerminen, T. Anttila, A. Laaksonen and C.D. O'Dowd (2004b). Organic aerosol formation via sulphate cluster activation. Journal of Geophysical Research, 109(D04205): 1-7. Kulmala, M., H. Vehkamäki, T. Petäjä, M. Dal Maso, A. Lauri, V.-M. Kerminen, W. Birmili and P.H. McMurry (2004a). Formation and growth rates of ultra-fine atmospheric particles: a review of observations. Journal of Aerosol Science, 35: 143-176. Lee, S. and R.M. Kamens (2005). Particle nucleation from the reaction of a-pinene and O3. Atmospheric Environment, 39: 6822-6832.

  4. Vertical velocity-CCN correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    The realization that smaller cloud droplets evaporate more readily (Xue and Feingold 2006; Jiang et al. 2002) gives rise to an anti-indirect aerosol effect (IAE); less cloudiness with pollution. The greater latent heat exchange of the greater evaporation in more polluted clouds adds TKE and buoyancy gradients that can enhance vertical velocity (W), mixing and entrainment (Zhao and Austin 2005). Stronger W can increase horizontal motions, which can further enhance droplet evaporation, which further enhances latent heat exchange and vertical motions, thus, positive feedback. This could also include latent heat released during condensation (Lee and Feingold 2010), which is more rapid for the greater surface areas of the smaller more numerous droplets. These theories imply a positive relationship between within-cloud W variations; i.e., standard deviation of W (σw) and CCN concentration (NCCN) rather than W and NCCN. This implies greater turbulence in polluted clouds, which could possibly counteract the reduction of cloudiness of anti-IAE. During two stratus cloud projects, 50 cloud penetrations in 9 MASE flights and 34 cloud penetrations in 13 POST flights, within-cloud σw-NCCN showed correlation coefficients (R) of 0.50 and 0.39. Panel a shows similar within-cloud σw-NCCN R in all altitude bands for 17 RICO flights in small cumulus clouds. R for W-NCCN showed similar values but only at low altitudes. Out-of-cloud σw-NCCN showed similar high values except at the highest altitudes. Within-cloud σw showed higher R than within-cloud W with droplet concentrations (Nc), especially at higher altitudes. Panel b for 13 ICE-T cumulus cloud flights in the same location as RICO but during the opposite season, however, showed σw and W uncorrelated with NCCN at all altitudes; and W and σw correlated with Nc only at the highest altitudes. On the other hand, out-of-cloud σw was correlated with NCCN at all altitudes with R similar to the corresponding R of the other projects

  5. Vibrationally excited water emission at 658 GHz from evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudry, A.; Humphreys, E. M. L.; Herpin, F.; Torstensson, K.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Richards, A. M. S.; Gray, M. D.; De Breuck, C.; Olberg, M.

    2018-01-01

    ) stars and one supergiant (AH Sco) are new detections. Three AGBs and one supergiant (VY CMa) exhibit relatively weak 13CO J = 6-5 line emission while o Ceti shows stronger 13CO emission. We have shown that the 658 GHz line is masing and we found that the 658 GHz velocity extent tends to be correlated with that of the SiO maser suggesting that both emission lines are excited in circumstellar layers close to the central star. Broad and stable line profiles are observed at 658 GHz. This could indicate maser saturation although we have tentatively provided first information on time variability at 658 GHz.

  6. Walking to Olympus: An EVA Chronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portree, David S. F.; Trevino, Robert C.

    1997-01-01

    display the large num- ber of flights in which EVA played a role. This approach also makes apparent significant EVA gaps, for example, the U.S. gap between 1985 and 1991 following the Challenger accident. This NASA History Monograph is an edited extract from an extensive EVA Chronology and Reference Book being produced by the EVA Project Office, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. The larger work will be published as part of the NASA Formal Series in 1998. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered by Max Ary, Ashot Bakunts, Gert-Jan Bartelds, Frank Cepollina, Andrew Chaikin, Phillip Clark, Richard Fullerton, Steven Glenn, Linda Godwin, Jennifer Green, Greg Harris, Clifford Hess, Jeffrey Hoffman, David Homan, Steven Hopkins, Nicholas Johnson, Eric Jones, Neville Kidger, Joseph Kosmo, Alexei Lebedev, Mark Lee, James LeBlanc, Dmitri Leshchenskii, Jerry Linenger, Igor Lissov, James McBarron, Clay McCullough, Joseph McMann, Story Musgrave, Dennis Newkirk, James Oberg, Joel Powell, Lee Saegesser, Andy Salmon, Glen Swanson, Joseph Tatarewicz, Kathy Thornton, Chris Vandenberg, Charles Vick, Bert Vis, David Woods, Mike Wright, John Young, and Keith Zimmerman. Special thanks to Laurie Buchanan, John Charles, Janet Kovacevich, Joseph Loftus, Sue McDonald, Martha Munies, Colleen Rapp, and Jerry Ross. Any errors remain the responsibility of the authors.

  7. Obituary: Charles Latif Hyder, 1930-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Oran Richard

    2004-12-01

    My friend and colleague, Charles Hyder, was a true physicist with a sound intuitive grasp of fundamentals in modern physics and the underlying mathematics. I admired his knowledge of the history of modern physics and quantum mechanics when we discussed contemporary problems in interpreting solar observations. He had the ability to present his ideas clearly and persuasively to both students and his colleagues. His insatiable curiosity about life in general led him to consider the effects of nuclear weapons development on the human race. Appreciation of the biological effects of radioactive materials produced in the course of weapons and power reactor development led him to a more public career beyond traditional research. Charles Hyder was born April 18, 1930 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He graduated from Albuquerque High School and served in the Air Force during the Korean War. He received a BS and MS in physics from the University of New Mexico (1958, 1960) and a PhD in astrogeophysics at the University of Colorado (1964). His positions included the Department of Astronomy and Institute of Geophysics at UCLA (1964-65), Sacramento Peak Solar Observatory (1965-1970) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (1970-1977). He also taught at the University of New Mexico (1970-1977) and was active on the Solar Maximum Mission science team (1970-1977, 1980-1984). He was married twice with both marriages ending in divorce. He and his first wife Ann had three children (Paul, Roxanne and Querida) and he and his second wife Laurie had a son Niels. Charles Hyder's professional career in solar physics began in 1961 during his graduate studies at the Department of AstroGeophysics of the University of Colorado and continued until 1983 when he chose to follow his convictions to expose the threat of nuclear proliferation. His early research was in the study of the quantum mechanics of polarized light produced in the presence of magnetic fields. Application of this work to interpretation

  8. Pions to Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie Mark; Dresden, Max; Hoddeson, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Introduction; 1. Pions to quarks: particle physics in the 1950s Laurie M Brown, Max Dresden and Lillian Hoddeson; 2. Particle physics in the early 1950s Chen Ning Yang; 3. An historian's interest in particle physics J. L. Heilbron; Part II. Particle discoveries in cosmic rays; 4. Cosmic-ray cloud-chamber contributions to the discovery of the strange particles in the decade 1947-1957 George D. Rochester; 5. Cosmic-ray work with emulsions in the 1940s and 1950s Donald H. Perkins; Part III. High-energy nuclear physics; Learning about nucleon resonances with pion photoproduction Robert L. Walker; 7. A personal view of nucleon structure as revealed by electron scattering Robert Hofstadter; 8. Comments on electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon Robert G. Sachs and Kameshwar C. Wali; Part IV. The new laboratory; 9. The making of an accelerator physicist Matthew Sands; 10. Accelerator design and construction in the 1950s John P. Blewett; 11. Early history of the Cosmotron and AGS Ernest D. Courant; 12. Panel on accelerators and detectors in the 1950s Lawrence W. Jones, Luis W. Alvarez, Ugo Amaldi, Robert Hofstadter, Donald W. Kerst, Robert R. Wilson; 13. Accelerators and the Midwestern Universities Research Association in the 1950s Donald W. Kerst; 14. Bubbles, sparks and the postwar laboratory Peter Galison; 15. Development of the discharge (spark) chamber in Japan in the 1950s Shuji Fukui; 16. Early work at the Bevatron: a personal account Gerson Goldhaber; 17. The discovery of the antiproton Owen Chamberlain; 18. On the antiproton discovery Oreste Piccioni; Part V. The Strange Particles; 19. The hydrogen bubble chamber and the strange resonances Luis W. Alvarez; 20. A particular view of particle physics in the fifties Jack Steinberger; 21. Strange particles William Chinowsky; 22. Strange particles: production by Cosmotron beams as observed in diffusion cloud chambers William B. Fowler; 23. From the 1940s into the 1950s Abraham Pais; Part VI. Detection of the

  9. Usable Translational Hand Controllers for NASA's Habitability Design Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westbrook, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    Arduino itself. When I successfully achieved the goal I wrote an instructions manual for the process so that the HDC will be able to do this easily in the future for any human interface device they may want to create. I also created a detailed CAD model of my THC design with construction instructions. My THC utilizes three ultrasonic sensors, one for each axis of motion. I wrote a code that stimulates these sensors continuously and feeds back values from each axis ranging from -%100 to %100 of the min/max position in relation to the neutral position of each axis. This was the data that the Graphics and Visualization Lab required to interface with their simulation. I truly enjoyed working in the HDC surrounded by passionate, proactive, and brilliantly creative people. I felt valued and respected as a part of their team. I was given the time and support of my mentor whenever I asked for it. Beyond my positive project experience, I was fortunate enough to be able to take advantage of many of the extra activities that JSC has to offer. I took Russian Phase One during my lunch break every day and can now read Russian and accomplish basic verbal communication. I was heavily involved with the co-tern music video, which led to numerous incredible experiences and friendships. I saw every facility, attended every lecture, and met everyone that I could. I had coffee with Lauri Hansen. I played on an intern volleyball team at the Gilruth. I traveled to Michoud, Stennis, NOLA, and Big Bend National Park. I had the time of my life and I fell in love with JSC. In the next month I will return to Maryland and start my senior year of my undergraduate degree. As I work through it I will remember that all of the studying I do, all of the concentration I give, and all of the sacrifices that I make for school are so that I can work at a place like JSC where I am proud and excited to go into work every day. This internship was an invaluable experience for me, both professionally and personally.

  10. Formation and growth rates of atmospheric nanoparticles: four years of observations at two West Siberian stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshinov, Mikhail Yu.; Belan, Boris D.; Davydov, Denis K.; Kozlov, Artem V.; Arshinova, Victoria

    2015-04-01

    the Ministry of Education and Science of Russia No. 14.604.21.0100, (RFMTFIBBB210290) and No. 14.613.21.0013 (RFMEFI61314X0013); and Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant No. 14-05-00590). Dal Maso, M., Kulmala, M., Riipinen, I., Wagner, R., Hussein, T., Aalto, P. P., and Lehtinen, K. E. J. (2005). Formation and growth of fresh atmospheric aerosols: eight years of aerosol size distribution data from SMEAR II, Hyytiälä, Finland, Boreal Environ. Res. 10, 323-336. Dal Maso, M., Sogacheva, L., Aalto, P., Riipinen, I., Komppula, M., Tunved, P., Korhonen, L., Suur-uski, V., Hirsikko, A., Kurten, T., Kerminen, V., Lihavainen, H., Viisanen, Y., Hansson, H., and Kulmala, M. (2007). Aerosol size distribution measurements at four Nordic field stations: identification, analysis and trajectories analysis of new particle formation bursts, Tellus B 59, 350-361. Hamed, A., Joutsensaari, J., Mikkonen, S., Sogacheva, L., Dal Maso, M., Kulmala, M., Cavalli F., Fuzzi S., Facchini, M. C., Decesari, S., Mircea, M., Lehtinen, K. E. J., and Laaksonen, A. (2007). Nucleation and growth of new particles in Po Valley, Italy, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 355-376. Hirsikko, A., Nieminen, T., Gagné, S., Lehtipalo, K., Manninen, H. E., Ehn, M., Hõrrak, U., Kerminen, V.-M., Laakso, L., McMurry, P. H., Mirme, A., Mirme, S., Petäjä, T., Tammet, H., Vakkari, V., Vana, M., and Kulmala, M. (2011). Atmospheric ions and nucleation: a review of observations, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 767-798. Kulmala, M., Vehkamäki, H., Petäjä, T., Dal Maso, M., Lauri A., Kerminen, V.-M., Birmili, W., and McMurry, P. H. (2004a) Formation and growth rates of ultrafine atmospheric particles: a review of observations, J. Aerosol Science 35, 143-176.

  11. Fatigue Behavior under Multiaxial Stress States Including Notch Effects and Variable Amplitude Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Nicholas R.

    life predictions were found to improve for all loading conditions considered in this study. The quantification of multiaxial fatigue damage was identified as being a key area of improvement, where the shear-based Fatemi-Socie (FS) critical plane damage parameter was shown to correlate all fully-reversed constant amplitude fatigue data relatively well. Additionally, a proposed modification to the FS parameter was found to result in improved life predictions in the presence of high tensile mean stress and for different ratios of nominal shear to axial stress. For notched specimens, improvements were also gained through the use of more robust notch deformation and stress gradient models. Theory of Critical Distances (TCD) approaches, together with pseudo stress-based plasticity modeling techniques for local stress-strain estimation, resulted in better correlation of multiaxial fatigue data when compared to traditional approaches such as Neuber's rule with fatigue notch factor. Since damage parameters containing both stress and strain terms, such as the FS parameter, are able to reflect changes in fatigue damage due to transient material hardening behavior, this issue was also investigated with respect to its impact on variable amplitude life predictions. In order to ensure that material deformation behavior was properly accounted for, stress-strain predictions based on an Armstrong-Frederick-Chaboche style cyclic plasticity model were first compared to results from deformation tests performed under a variety of complex multiaxial loading conditions. The model was simplified based on the assumption of Masing material behavior, and a new transient hardening formulation was proposed so that all modeling parameters could be determined from a relatively limited amount of experimental data. Overall, model predictions were found to agree fairly well with experimental results for all loading histories considered. Finally, in order to evaluate life prediction procedures under

  12. Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, Aleisa C

    2015-01-01

    Bioremediation of a Large Chlorinated Solvent Plume, Dover AFB, DE Aleisa Bloom, (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA) Robert Lyon (bob.lyon@aecom.com), Laurie Stenberg, and Holly Brown (AECOM, Germantown, Maryland, USA) ABSTRACT: Past disposal practices at Dover Air Force Base (AFB), Delaware, created a large solvent plume called Area 6 (about 1 mile long, 2,000 feet wide, and 345 acres). The main contaminants are PCE, TCE, and their degradation products. The remedy is in-situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB). AAB started in 2006 and is focusing on source areas and downgradient plume cores. Direct-push injections occurred in source areas wheremore » contamination is typically between 5 and 20 feet below ground surface. Lower concentration dissolved-phased contamination is present downgradient at 35 and 50 feet below ground surface. Here, permanent injection/extraction wells installed in transects perpendicular to the flow of groundwater are used to apply AAB. The AAB substrate is a mix of sodium lactate, emulsified vegetable oil, and nutrients. After eight years, dissolved contaminant mass within the main 80-acre treatment area has been reduced by over 98 percent. This successful application of AAB has stopped the flux of contaminants to the more distal portions of the plume. While more time is needed for effects to be seen in the distal plume, AAB injections will soon cease, and the remedy will transition to natural attenuation. INTRODUCTION Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Science Division (ORNL) and AECOM (formerly URS Corporation) have successfully implemented in situ accelerated anaerobic bioremediation (AAB) to remediate chlorinated solvent contamination in a large, multi-sourced groundwater plume at Dover Air Force Base (AFB). AAB has resulted in significant reductions of dissolved phase chlorinated solvent concentrations. This plume, called Area 6, was originally over 1 mile in length and over 2,000 feet wide

  13. Nėščiųjų ir jaunų negimdžiusių moterų krūtų tūrio, kūno dydžio ir pasyviosios masės lyginamasis tyrimas

    PubMed Central

    Drąsutis, Jonas; Barkus, Arūnas; Kairienė, Elena; Drąsutienė, Gražina; Norvilaitė, Kristina; Tutkuvienė, Janina

    2016-01-01

    Tikslas. Palyginti nėščiųjų ir jaunų negimdžiusių moterų kūno ir krūtų dydžio rodiklius. Medžiaga ir metodika. 2008–2009 m. (I tyrimas) ištirti 82 jaunų negimdžiusių devyniolikos metų amžiaus merginų krūtų ir kūno dydžio rodikliai, jie palyginti su 2013–2015 m. (II tyrimas) Vilniuje tirtų nėščiųjų (pirmuoju nėštumo trečdaliu) tais pačiais kūno stambumo ir krūtų parametrais – ūgiu, svoriu, įvairių kūno dalių apimtimis, odos klostėmis, pasyviąja kūno mase ir krūtų tūriu. Kūno dydžio rodikliams palyginti visos tiriamosios buvo skirstomos į grupes pagal krūtų dydį ir kūno stambumą (procentiliniu metodu). Nėščiosios suskirstytos į gimdančias pirmą kartą ir pakartotinai. Abiejuose tyrimuose naudota standartinė antropometrinė metodika. Krūties tūris apskaičiuotas pagal R. Kramerio ir G. Dexlerio (1981) formulę. Pasyviosios kūno masės (riebalinio audinio) kiekis procentais – pagal odos ir poodžio riebalines klostes naudojant W. E. Sirio (1961), J. H. Wilmorės ir A. R. Behnkės (1970) formules. Rezultatai, nustatyti visų parametrų aprašomosios statistikos, įvairovės ir pasiskirstymo rodikliais, apdoroti naudojant SPSS 22.0 programą. Skirtumai tarp tiriamųjų grupių vertinti pagal Stjudento t kriterijų. Pasirinktas patikimumo lygmuo p < 0,05. Rezultatai. Statistiškai reikšmingai didesni nei jaunų negimdžiusių nėščiųjų grupės moterų rodikliai buvo šie: krūtinės, juosmens, klubų apimties, krūties tūrio ir juosmens klubų indeksas. Nėščių moterų riebalinis audinys kaupėsi daugiau viršutinėje kūno dalyje, nors santykinė ir absoliuti pasyvioji kūno masė tarp grupių skyrėsi nereikšmingai. Lyginant pirmą kartą ir pakartotinai gimdančių su jaunų negimdžiusių moterų rodmenimis paaiškėjo, kad pakartotinai gimdančios moterys turėjo didesnį riebalinio audinio kiekį, o pirmąkart ir jaunų negimdžiusių merginų rodikliai reikšmingai nesiskyrė. Ma

  14. Obituary: Edmond M. Reeves, 1934-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, Robert; Parkinson, William

    2009-01-01

    . At a Retirement Symposium dedicated to Ralph Nicholls in 1992, Ed recalled that at a coffee break about twenty years earlier, during the Skylab program at Houston, he, Bob Noyes, and Bob MacQueen outlined the need to develop a rocket-borne coronagraph to observe the hydrogen Lyman-alpha corona. Later, after returning to the CfA, Ed, Bob Noyes, and Bill Parkinson planned a rocket-borne spectrograph to image the extended corona, expecting to use a circular occulter. John Kohl joined the fledgling coronagraph project, and he realized that a linear external occulter would be better and also would match a spectrometer slit. This project became the origin of the Lyman-Alpha Coronagraph series of rocket and Spacelab experiments under John Kohl's leadership, culminating in the still-operating Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer [UVCS] experiment on the SOHO spacecraft. In 1978, Ed joined the High Altitude Observatory in Boulder, Colorado, where he was Head of Administration and Support before moving to NASA Headquarters in 1982. There he became Director of the Flight Systems Office in the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Applications, with responsibility for integrated planning and science operations for research using the Spacelab, Spacehab, and Mir missions. He led the activities for the research requirements and planning for the International Space Station and served as the Space Station Senior Scientist, the Executive Secretary of the Space Station Utilization Advisory Subcommittee, and the Executive Secretary of the Space Station Utilization Board at NASA Headquarters He also served as NASA's representative to the international Users Operations Panel, which coordinates the utilization planning for the Station across the international partners. Ed retired from NASA in 1998. Ed was an outdoors man who enjoyed camping, canoeing, and cross-country skiing with his family. He is survived by his wife Vivian, son Dr. Geoffrey Reeves, daughter Laurie Webster, and

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Generations. A history of physics in the twentieth century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Neil

    2000-03-01

    project ever undertaken, is discussed. Since World War II support from governments for physics has increased enormously, but the fortunes of many physicists have remained entwined with the military establishment and many others now work within megaprojects such as CERN. At the end of the century the numbers of physicists and of papers published have grown a hundred-fold, and funding by an even larger factor. Other aspects have changed less. Physics is still male-dominated and largely a North American and European enterprise. Latterly there has been some reduction in support. Physics, along with the rest of science, has also been under attack for the problems it has created. The beginning of the twenty-first century promises to be as interesting for physics as recent decades have been. Comparison with the other recent work in this field, the three-volume Twentieth Century Physics edited by Laurie Brown, Abraham Pais and Brian Pippard (Institute of Physics Publishing and American Institute of Physics Press, 1995), is unavoidable. They fill different niches. Twentieth Century Physics is a massive and expensive work by some 30 leading physicists, destined mainly for the shelves of academic libraries. Quantum Generations is a book by a professional historian covering much of the same physics, albeit more briefly, but written with a broader sweep that takes in more of the political and cultural milieu within which the physicists worked. References are given sparingly so as not to break up the text, but there are suggestions for further reading for each chapter, and there is an extensive bibliography. It is not a book for those with no background at all in physics - there are too many equations of nuclear reactions for that, and in any case such a book would be a superficial thing. Even many physicists will find some of the more esoteric ideas, such as the grand unified theories and superstring theory, heavy going. It is, however, accessible to a wide readership, and a book that

  16. MALT-45: A 7 mm survey of the southern Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher Harry

    2015-09-01

    -0 for CS lies within the 7mm waveband, which also contains the poorly understood class I CH3OH maser. Unlike the class II variant, class I masers are not exclusively associated with HMSF, but do appear in star-forming regions across a wide range of evolutionary stages. A large problem for class I CH3OH maser studies is the bias in the targeted searches which have been used to find them; they have only been identified towards other masing regions (such as class II CH3OH), and therefore the properties of these masers are somewhat unclear. In this thesis, results focus on the MALT-45 survey using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) in auto-correlation ('single-dish' mode). To date, MALT-45 has mapped the Galactic plane within 330° *lt; < l < 335°, jbj< 0:5°, which contains several known star-forming regions, including the G333 giant molecular cloud. MALT-45 surveys 12 spectral lines, but primarily CS (1-0), class I CH3OH masers and SiO (1-0) v = 0; 1; 2; 3. Bright, extended CS emission is detected across the survey region, and highlight two distinct velocities, due to different spiral arms of the Galaxy. In addition to the previously known 19 class I CH3OH masers, 58 new masers were detected. SiO masers were detected towards 47 regions, in various combinations of vibrational mode v = 1; 2; 3, all towards evolved infrared stars. Thermal SiO v = 0 emission is also detected across the survey region. Major science results from MALT-45 include: (i) A CS to NH3 comparison, which highlights cold, dense clumps as well as hot, evolved clumps. The cold and dense clumps appear to have self-absorption of CS emission in their centres and a relative over-abundance of NH3, while evolved clumps appear to have very little NH3 emission, despite being a dense gas tracer; (ii) Almost all (94 per cent) of ATLASGAL 870 um dust emission point sources are associated with at least a 3σ peak of CS emission; (iii) By comparing with peak CS velocities, class I CH3OH masers are good

  17. hwhap_Ep37 Human vs Machine

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2018-03-23

    actually have a lot to do with some of the research that goes aboard the International Space Station, so you can listen to more stories from them. They're actually doing some pretty cool stuff on Twitch right now. You can follow us on social media, the International Space Station accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Go to anyone of those accounts and use the hashtag askNASA on your favorite platform to submit an idea or a question for the show. Make sure to mention it's for Houston, We Have A Podcast, and we may bring it on a future episode! So this broadcast was recorded on February 27th, 2018. Thanks to Alex Perryman, Isidro Reyna, Kathy Reeves, Pat Ryan, and Laurie Abadie. And thanks again to Dr. Tina Holden for coming on the show! We'll be back next week!