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Sample records for mass concrete mixture

  1. The development of a lower heat concrete mixture for mass concrete placement conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Aaron Martin

    The hydration process of portland cement (PC) is exothermic; therefore, the thermal behavior of concrete has to be taken into consideration when placed in a large mass. The research presented involves a Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) Class S (seal) portland cement concrete (PCC) which is used as a foundation seal during construction of bridge abutments and piers. A Class S PCC mixture meeting the 2006 TDOT specifications has the potential to generate excessive amounts of heat and induce thermal cracking in structural elements. The purpose of the study is to reduce the heat generation of a Class S PCC while maintaining adequate values of other engineering properties. Due to the possibility of underwater placement of a Class S PCC, reduction in the total cementing materials content were not considered in this study. Five candidate mixtures were used to compare against a typical TDOT Class S mixture. The five candidate Class S-LH (lower heat) mixtures were 45, 60, 70% Grade 120 slag substitutions for PC as well as two ternary mixtures containing Grade 120 slag and Class F fly ash. Ten batches of each mixture were produced. All plastic and hardened properties met TDOT 604.03 Class S requirements for analytical comparison. The 70% Grade 120 slag Class S-LH mixture was analytically superior for all hardened properties and at reducing heat generation. Since the 70% Grade 120 slag Class S-LH mixture proved to be superior in laboratory conditions; it was selected for further evaluation in the field testing portion of the research. The 70% Grade 120 slag mixture produced a significantly lower maximum temperature as well as a significantly lower maximum differential temperature than a TDOT Class S mixture with 20% Class C fly ash in side-by-side 18 cubic yard cube field placements. Research results and literature recommend that engineers should decide when mass concrete conditions are appropriate during construction practices. When mass concrete conditions are

  2. Tracking traces of transition metals present in concrete mixtures by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry studies.

    PubMed

    Bassioni, Ghada; Pillay, Alvin E; El Kadi, Mirella; Fegali, Fadi; Fok, Sai Cheong; Stephen, Sasi

    2010-01-01

    Transition metals can have a significant impact in research related to the dosage optimization of superplasticizers. It is known that the presence of transition metals can influence such doses, and the application of a contemporary instrumental method to obtain the profiles of subsisting transition elements in concrete mixtures would be useful. In this work, inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is investigated as a possible tool to track traces of transition metals in concrete mixtures. Depth profiling using ICP-MS on proofed and unproofed concrete shows the presence of Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at trace intensities in the bulk of the samples under investigation. The study demonstrates that the transition metals present in the concrete sample are largely a part of the cement composition and, to a minor degree, a result of exposure to the seawater after curing. The coated concrete samples have a metal distribution pattern similar to the uncoated samples, but slight differences in intensity bear testimony to the very low levels that originate from the exposure to seawater. While X-ray diffraction fails to detect these traces of metals, ICP-MS is successful in detecting ultra-trace intensities to parts per trillion. This method is not only a useful application to track traces of transition metals in concrete, but also provides information to estimate the pore size distribution in a given sample by very simple means.

  3. Concrete mixture characterization. Cementitious barriers partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.; Protiere, Yannick

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the characterization study performed on two concrete mixtures used for radioactive waste storage. Both mixtures were prepared with approximately 425 kg of binder. The testing protocol mostly focused on determining the transport properties of the mixtures; volume of permeable voids (porosity), diffusion coefficients, and water permeability were evaluated. Tests were performed after different curing durations. In order to obtain data on the statistical distribution of transport properties, the measurements after 2 years of curing were performed on 10+ samples. Overall, both mixtures exhibited very low tortuosities and permeabilities, a direct consequence of their low water-to-binder ratio and the use of supplementary cementitious materials. The data generated on 2-year old samples showed that porosity, tortuosity and permeability follow a normal distribution. Chloride ponding tests were also performed on test samples. They showed limited chloride ingress, in line with measured transport properties. These test results also showed that both materials react differently with chloride, a consequence of the differences in the binder chemical compositions.

  4. Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Use in Underwater Repairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    Review ....... . of This Study Scope ••••••••••••••••••• PART II: EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM Phase I: Concrete Mixture Proportions ....... Phase I...to determine the combination of materials necessary to produce concrete with the desired properties. Significant correlations that exist between...Test Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... Phase II: Concrete Mixture Proportions Phase II: Test Procedures . . . . . . . ..... PART III

  5. 27. View of underside of ninth bridge, showing concrete mixture, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View of underside of ninth bridge, showing concrete mixture, view to the NW. - Vicksburg National Military Park Roads & Bridges, Melan Arch Bridges, Spanning various tributaries at Confederate Avenue, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  6. Use of waste plastic in concrete mixture as aggregate replacement.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Al-Hashmi, Enas A

    2008-11-01

    Industrial activities in Iraq are associated with significant amounts of non-biodegradable solid waste, waste plastic being among the most prominent. This study involved 86 experiments and 254 tests to determine the efficiency of reusing waste plastic in the production of concrete. Thirty kilograms of waste plastic of fabriform shapes was used as a partial replacement for sand by 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% with 800 kg of concrete mixtures. All of the concrete mixtures were tested at room temperature. These tests include performing slump, fresh density, dry density, compressive strength, flexural strength, and toughness indices. Seventy cubes were molded for compressive strength and dry density tests, and 54 prisms were cast for flexural strength and toughness indices tests. Curing ages of 3, 7, 14, and 28 days for the concrete mixtures were applied in this work. The results proved the arrest of the propagation of micro cracks by introducing waste plastic of fabriform shapes to concrete mixtures. This study insures that reusing waste plastic as a sand-substitution aggregate in concrete gives a good approach to reduce the cost of materials and solve some of the solid waste problems posed by plastics.

  7. A Statistical Approach to Optimizing Concrete Mixture Design

    PubMed Central

    Alghamdi, Saeid A.

    2014-01-01

    A step-by-step statistical approach is proposed to obtain optimum proportioning of concrete mixtures using the data obtained through a statistically planned experimental program. The utility of the proposed approach for optimizing the design of concrete mixture is illustrated considering a typical case in which trial mixtures were considered according to a full factorial experiment design involving three factors and their three levels (33). A total of 27 concrete mixtures with three replicates (81 specimens) were considered by varying the levels of key factors affecting compressive strength of concrete, namely, water/cementitious materials ratio (0.38, 0.43, and 0.48), cementitious materials content (350, 375, and 400 kg/m3), and fine/total aggregate ratio (0.35, 0.40, and 0.45). The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for compressive strength in terms of the three design factors considered in this study. The developed statistical model was used to show how optimization of concrete mixtures can be carried out with different possible options. PMID:24688405

  8. The optimization of concrete mixtures for use in highway applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moini, Mohamadreza

    Portland cement concrete is most used commodity in the world after water. Major part of civil and transportation infrastructure including bridges, roadway pavements, dams, and buildings is made of concrete. In addition to this, concrete durability is often of major concerns. In 2013 American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) estimated that an annual investment of 170 billion on roads and 20.5 billion for bridges is needed on an annual basis to substantially improve the condition of infrastructure. Same article reports that one-third of America's major roads are in poor or mediocre condition [1]. However, portland cement production is recognized with approximately one cubic meter of carbon dioxide emission. Indeed, the proper and systematic design of concrete mixtures for highway applications is essential as concrete pavements represent up to 60% of interstate highway systems with heavier traffic loads. Combined principles of material science and engineering can provide adequate methods and tools to facilitate the concrete design and improve the existing specifications. In the same manner, the durability must be addressed in the design and enhancement of long-term performance. Concrete used for highway pavement applications has low cement content and can be placed at low slump. However, further reduction of cement content (e.g., versus current specifications of Wisconsin Department of Transportation to 315-338 kg/m 3 (530-570 lb/yd3) for mainstream concrete pavements and 335 kg/m3 (565 lb/yd3) for bridge substructure and superstructures) requires delicate design of the mixture to maintain the expected workability, overall performance, and long-term durability in the field. The design includes, but not limited to optimization of aggregates, supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs), chemical and air-entraining admixtures. This research investigated various theoretical and experimental methods of aggregate optimization applicable for the reduction of cement content

  9. Variability in properties of Salado Mass Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Harrington, P.T.; Hansen, F.D.

    1995-08-01

    Salado Mass Concrete (SMC) has been developed for use as a seal component in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This concrete is intended to be mixed from pre-bagged materials, have an initial slump of 10 in., and remain pumpable and placeable for two hours after mixing. It is a mass concrete because it will be placed in monoliths large enough that the heat generated during cement hydration has the potential to cause thermal expansion and subsequent cracking, a phenomenon to avoid in the seal system. This report describes effects on concrete properties of changes in ratio of water to cement, batch size, and variations in characteristics of different lots of individual components of the concrete. The research demonstrates that the concrete can be prepared from laboratory-batched or pre-bagged dry materials in batches from 1.5 ft{sup 3} to 5.0 yd{sup 3}, with no chemical admixtures other than the sodium chloride added to improve bonding with the host rock, at a water-to-cement ratio ranging from 0.36 to 0.42. All batches prepared according to established procedures had adequate workability for at least 1.5 hours, and achieved or exceeded the target compressive strength of 4500 psi at 180 days after casting. Portland cement and fly ash from different lots or sources did not have a measurable effect on concrete properties, but variations in a shrinkage-compensating cement used as a component of the concrete did appear to affect workability. A low initial temperature and the water-reducing and set-retarding functions of the salt are critical to meeting target properties.

  10. No-slump Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) for use in mass concrete construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucier, K. L.

    1984-10-01

    The use of no-slump, roller-compacted concrete (RCC) in mass concrete construction was investigated. RCC is concrete having no slump but containing the minimum amount of water necessary to achieve consolidation with a vibrating roller. Tests were conducted to: (1) optimize mixtures for application of no-slump techniques, (2) develop a consistency and quality control technique, (3) determine methods of improving hardened lifts joints, (4) determine the relative frost resistance of RCC, (5) evaluate the erosion susceptibility, and (6) discover economical methods of obtaining void-free vertical surfaces. Indications are that: (1) the curb concrete is viable method of forming and containing RCC; (2) the degree of compaction achieved is dependent on the stiffness and the paste content of the mixture, the lift thickness, and the individual roller; (3) the tensile strength of the untreated joints increased with paste content and quality from approximately 25 percent for relatively lean RCC to approximately 50 percent for richer RCC; (4) erosion resistance at 35-ft/sec fluid velocity of RCC is good; (5) resistance to freezing and thawing of the RCC is poor, apparently due to a poor air void system; and (6) surface treatment with a mortar gun (shotcrete) appears to be a practical method to achieve smooth vertical surfaces.

  11. Thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified asphalt concrete mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Amy Louise

    Thermal cracking is one of the primary forms of distress in asphalt concrete pavements, resulting from either a single drop in temperature to an extreme low or from multiple temperature cycles above the fracture temperature of the asphalt-aggregate mixture. The first mode described is low temperature cracking; the second is thermal fatigue. The addition of crumb-rubber, manufactured from scrap tires, to the binder in asphalt concrete pavements has been suggested to minimize both types of thermal cracking. Four experiments were designed and completed to evaluate the thermal behavior of crumb-rubber modified (CRM) asphalt-aggregate mixtures. Modified and unmodified mixture response to thermal stresses was measured in four laboratory tests. The Thermal Stress Restrained Specimen Test (TSRST) and the Indirect Tensile Test (IDT) were used to compare mixture resistance to low temperature cracking. Modified mixtures showed improved performance, and cooling rate did not affect mixture resistance according to the statistical analysis. Therefore results from tests with faster rates can predict performance under slower field rates. In comparison, predicted fracture temperatures and stresses (IDT) were generally higher than measured values (TSRST). In addition, predicted fracture temperatures from binder test results demonstrated that binder testing alone is not sufficient to evaluate CRM mixtures. Thermal fatigue was explored in the third experiment using conventional load-induced fatigue tests with conditions selected to simulate daily temperature fluctuations. Test results indicated that thermal fatigue may contribute to transverse cracking in asphalt pavements. Both unmodified and modified mixtures had a finite capacity to withstand daily temperature fluctuations coupled with cold temperatures. Modified mixtures again exhibited improved performance. The fourth experiment examined fracture properties of modified and unmodified mixtures using a common fracture toughness test

  12. Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program: Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Use in Underwater Repairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    19. ABSTRACT (Continued). ,&The results of these tests were used to determine the combination of materials necessary to produce concrete with the...19 Phase I: Concrete Mixture Proportions..............................19 Phase I: Test Procedures...20 Phase II: Concrete Mixture Proportions.............................20 Phase II: Test Procedures..........................................21

  13. Workability of Mass Concrete. Report 2. Supplemental Proportioning Parameters.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    proportions for mass concrete with assurance that the concrete will have adequate workability. The initial phase of this study was to obtain information...Corps of Engineers (HQUSACE), as a part of Civil Works Investigation Studies Work Unit 32768, "Workability of Mass Concrete ." The study was conducted...Paul F. Mlakar, Chief, Concrete and Materials Division (CMD), and Mr. Edward F. O’Neil, Acting Chief, Engineering Mechanics Branch (EMB), CMD. Dr

  14. Behavior of asphalt concrete mixtures in triaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Siewann; Low Boonhwee; Fwa Tienfang . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    The triaxial compression test is one of the most common standard tests for determining the stress-strain behavior and strength parameters of soil under drained and undrained conditions. The use of the test method in asphaltic mixtures is less well known and seldom practiced. This paper describes the use of the triaxial compression test for asphaltic mixtures for determining their engineering properties such as the friction angle [phi], the cohesion, c, and the elastic compression modulus, E. Effects of test temperatures, strain rates, and confining pressures on the compressive behavior of asphalt concrete were studied. The results showed that the friction angle is primarily a function of aggregate friction and interlocking being independent of test temperature and strain rate. The cohesion, on the other hand, is largely dependent on the binder and fines mixture being sensitive to both test temperature and strain rate changes. The confining pressures have no influence on c and [phi], but have significant influence on the compression modulus, E. The tests can be conducted at controlled temperatures, constant strain-rate, and confining pressures so as to allow the determination of the basic engineering stress-strain and strength properties of these materials under controlled environmental conditions. Using these properties, a constitutive plasticity model based on the Drucker-Prager yield condition can then be applied in the axisymmetric finite element model to describe the mechanical behavior of the asphaltic material in triaxial compression.

  15. Reuse of municipal solid wastes incineration fly ashes in concrete mixtures.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, Carlo; Sorlini, Sabrina

    2002-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing the feasibility of concrete production using stabilized m.s.w. (municipal solid waste) incineration fly ashes in addition to natural aggregates. The tested fly ashes were washed and milled, then stabilized by a cement-lime process and finally were reused as a "recycled aggregate" for cement mixture production, in substitution of a natural aggregate (with dosage of 200-400 kg m(-3)). These mixtures, after curing, were characterized with conventional physical-mechanical tests (compression, traction, flexure, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage). In samples containing 200 kg(waste) m(-3)(concrete), a good compressive strength was achieved after 28 days of curing. Furthermore, concrete leaching behavior was evaluated by means of different leaching tests, both on milled and on monolithic samples. Experimental results showed a remarkable reduction of metal leaching in comparison with raw waste. In some cases, similar behavior was observed in "natural" concrete (produced with natural aggregates) and in "waste containing" concrete.

  16. 13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. MASS OF POURED CONCRETE IN IRREGULAR STEPPED LAYERS AT THE BASE OF THE LEFT (EAST) BUTTRESS. CAMERA FACING SOUTHWEST. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  17. Influence of roofing shingles on asphalt concrete mixture properties. Final report, 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, D.; Stroup-Gardiner, M.; Weikle, B.; Drescher, A.

    1993-06-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the use of waste shingles from manufacturing and roof reconstruction projects in hot mix asphalt concrete mixtures. In dense-graded asphalt mixtures, it was hypothesized that the waste material might serve as an extender for the new asphalt in the mix as well as a fiber reinforcement. In the stone mastic asphalt (SMA), it could serve as the binder stiffener typically used to prevent the asphalt from draining out of these types of mixtures.

  18. Effect of the key mixture parameters on shrinkage of reactive powder concrete.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Zubair, Ahmed; Maslehuddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 3(3) factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content.

  19. Effect of the Key Mixture Parameters on Shrinkage of Reactive Powder Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 33 factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content. PMID:25050395

  20. Mixtures of Ultracold Fermions with Unequal Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Carlos A. R. Sa

    2008-05-01

    The quantum phases of ultracold fermions with unequal masses are discussed in continuum and lattice models for a wide variety of mixtures which exhibit Feshbach resonances, e.g., mixtures of ^6Li and ^40K. The evolution of superfluidity from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) to the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) regime in the continuum is analyzed as a function of scattering parameter, population imbalance and mass anisotropy. In the continuum case, regions corresponding to normal, phase-separated or coexisting uniform-superfluid/excess-fermion phases are identified and the possibility of topological phase transitions is discussed [1]. For optical lattices, the phase diagrams as a function of interaction strength, population imbalance, filling fraction and tunneling parameters are presented [2]. In addition to the characteristic phases of the continuum, a series of insulating phases emerge in the phase diagrams of optical lattices, including a Bose-Mott insulator (BMI), a Fermi-Pauli insulator (FPI), a phase-separated BMI/FPI mixture, and a Bose-Fermi checkerboard (BFC) phase. Lastly, the effects of harmonic traps and the emergence of unusual shell structures are discussed for mixtures of fermions with unequal masses. [1] M. Iskin, and C. A. R. S' a de Melo, Phys. Rev. Lett 97, 100404 (2006); [2] M. Iskin, and C. A. R. S' a de Melo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 080403 (2007).

  1. Assessing Workability Complaints in Mass Concrete Construction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    IL 171 Improper consolidation equipment/procedures 33 5216 Pegs 5 of 5 able 2 Survey Results of Contractor Staff 1. PROBLEMS RELATING TO MATERIALS A...plant and placement. Ap"encrm D Deta • d D"edpto of Complaint D29 Workability problems Usually a plant problem (excessive variation in concrete

  2. Evaluation of Parameters Affecting Thermal Stresses in Mass Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    ABAQUS , a finite-element program capable of performing complete incremental construction analyses of complex mass concrete structures during and...following construction. ’The report describes a user-defined aging creep material model, UMAT, used with ABAQUS to account for the changes in concrete...model to evolve the onset and effects of cracking. In addition to material aging, ABAQUS includes the (Continued) 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES

  3. The use of waste materials in asphalt concrete mixtures.

    PubMed

    Tuncan, Mustafa; Tuncan, Ahmet; Cetin, Altan

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) the effects of rubber and plastic concentrations and rubber particle sizes on properties of asphalt cement, (b) on properties of asphalt concrete specimens and (c) the effects of fly ash, marble powder, rubber powder and petroleum contaminated soil as filler materials instead of stone powder in the asphalt concrete specimens. One type of limestone aggregate and one penetration-graded asphalt cement (75-100) were used. Three concentrations of rubber and plastic (i.e. 5%, 10% and 20% of the total weight of asphalt cement), three rubber particle sizes (i.e. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 20 [0.85 mm], No. 20 [0.85mm] - 200 [0.075mm] and No. 4 [4.75mm] - 200 [0.075mm]) and one plastic particle size (i.e. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 10 [2.00mm]) were also used. It was found that while the addition of plastic significantly increased the strength of specimens, the addition of rubber decreased it. No. 4 [4.75mm] - 200 [0.075mm] rubber particles showed the best results with respect to the indirect tensile test. The Marshall stability and indirect tensile strength properties of plastic modified specimens increased. Marble powder and fly ash could be used as filler materials instead of stone powder in the asphalt concrete pavement specimens.

  4. Abrasion-Erosion Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Repair of Low-Flow Channel, Los Angeles, River.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Concrete-)Deteriorat ion. Concrete--Test ing Silica _19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number...Los Angeles. Concrete was placed in the field between 21 and 23 September 1983. Conclusions included (1) the mixtures tested could provide excellent...12 Discussion ............ .............................. . 12 PART IV: FIELD PLACEMENTS

  5. Optimization of High-Strength Concrete Mixture Proportions for the ANMCC Improvement Project.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    and tested in order to achieve compressive strengths in excess of 9,000 psi at 1 year of age and 11,000 psi at 2 years of age . These mixtures were...heat generation, especially that occurring at early ages , serves to minimize thermal strains occurring in the concrete cavity liners. (Cont inued) O...indicated that all mixtures containing pozzolan failed to gain appre- ciable strength after 28 days age when cured at 122 F. This was the appropriate curing

  6. Mechanical Properties of Mass Concrete at Early Ages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    material properties during the time that concrete is undergoing the greatest amount of thermal activity and physical change (i.e. early ages, less than 3...Type II, low alkali (LA) portland cement meeting ASTM C 150 and a Class C fly ash meeting ASTM C 618 [11 i]. The fine aggregate was a natural sand...usually require that specially developed or modified models be used. It should also be noted that the use- of high percentages of pozzolans in mass

  7. Characterization of concrete hardness by using sugarcane bagasse waste mixture by carbon oven curing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rino, Agus; Farida, Elvaswer, Dahlan, Dahyunir

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is one of the solid waste that can be processed as a mixture of structure materials. In the previous research, sugarcane bagasse has been processed and used as a mixture of portland cement, the manufacture of asbestos and also mixtures for manufacturing of brake pads that are frequently used in motor vehicle. Based on the previous research results, it is strongly necessary to develop a research about sugarcane bagasse for structure materials. The method used to determine the mechanical properties is tensile test and compression test. To obtain the intensity of material variations, it is needed to make various sizes of filtration carbon in the form of aggregate that is mixed into the tiles material. The size of the aggregate used in concrete material can be on 200 µm, 400 µm and 600 µm. This measure is taken in accordance with the size of the filtration apparatus. Furthermore, in obtaining sugarcane bagasse carbon, the researcher must do the oven curing process on 200 °C temperature and 3 hours in curing oven. In this research the best result is used bagasse powder mixtured 200 µm is 7. 2 MPa.

  8. Identification of Tandem Mass Spectra of Mixtures of Isomeric Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Drogaris, Paul; Bern, Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Shotgun proteomics separates peptides by chromatography and precursor mass over charge, yet in almost any large data set of a complex sample there will be some tandem mass spectra containing more than one peptide. These mixture spectra contain two co-eluting peptides with close precursor mass over charge, and sometimes contain exact isomers, often the same peptide with the same modification in two different positions. Isomers present a problem when the position of the modification is of special interest, as in histone modification studies or “oxidative footprinting” studies of protein structure. Here we give algorithms for identifying isomeric mixtures, and present results on two different histones and four oxidative footprinting targets. Five of the six targets contain at least one peptide that appears in isomeric mixtures, but in none of the cases are mixtures so prevalent that they greatly impact the overall identification rate. PMID:20329787

  9. Performance of intact and partially degraded concrete barriers in limiting mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, J.C. )

    1992-06-01

    Mass transport through concrete barriers and release rate from concrete vaults are quantitatively evaluated. The thorny issue of appropriate diffusion coefficients for use in performance assessment calculations is covered, with no ultimate solution found. Release from monolithic concrete vaults composed of concrete waste forms is estimated with a semi-analytical solution. A parametric study illustrates the importance of different parameters on release. A second situation of importance is the role of a concrete shell or vault placed around typical waste forms in limiting mass transport. In both situations, the primary factor controlling concrete performance is cracks. The implications of leaching behavior on likely groundwater concentrations is examined. Frequently, lower groundwater concentrations can be expected in the absence of engineered covers that reduce infiltration.

  10. The foundation mass concrete construction technology of Hongyun Building B tower raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Yin, Suhua; Wu, Yanli; Zhao, Ying

    2017-08-01

    The foundation of Hongyun building B tower is made of raft board foundation which is 3300mm in the thickness and 2800mm beside side of the core tube. It is researched that the raft foundation mass concrete construction technology is expatiated from temperature and cracks of the raft foundation and the temperature control and monitoring of the concrete base slab construction and concrete curing.

  11. Contrastive Numerical Investigations on Thermo-Structural Behaviors in Mass Concrete with Various Cements

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Feng, Chuqiao; Liu, Xinghong; Liu, Shuhua; Zhang, Chao; Yuan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This work is a contrastive investigation of numerical simulations to improve the comprehension of thermo-structural coupled phenomena of mass concrete structures during construction. The finite element (FE) analysis of thermo-structural behaviors is used to investigate the applicability of supersulfated cement (SSC) in mass concrete structures. A multi-scale framework based on a homogenization scheme is adopted in the parameter studies to describe the nonlinear concrete behaviors. Based on the experimental data of hydration heat evolution rate and quantity of SSC and fly ash Portland cement, the hydration properties of various cements are studied. Simulations are run on a concrete dam section with a conventional method and a chemo-thermo-mechanical coupled method. The results show that SSC is more suitable for mass concrete structures from the standpoint of temperature control and crack prevention. PMID:28773517

  12. Contrastive Numerical Investigations on Thermo-Structural Behaviors in Mass Concrete with Various Cements.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Feng, Chuqiao; Liu, Xinghong; Liu, Shuhua; Zhang, Chao; Yuan, Wei

    2016-05-20

    This work is a contrastive investigation of numerical simulations to improve the comprehension of thermo-structural coupled phenomena of mass concrete structures during construction. The finite element (FE) analysis of thermo-structural behaviors is used to investigate the applicability of supersulfated cement (SSC) in mass concrete structures. A multi-scale framework based on a homogenization scheme is adopted in the parameter studies to describe the nonlinear concrete behaviors. Based on the experimental data of hydration heat evolution rate and quantity of SSC and fly ash Portland cement, the hydration properties of various cements are studied. Simulations are run on a concrete dam section with a conventional method and a chemo-thermo-mechanical coupled method. The results show that SSC is more suitable for mass concrete structures from the standpoint of temperature control and crack prevention.

  13. Thermodynamic evaluation of mass diffusion in ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, Grigory; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2014-02-15

    The thermodynamic technique of Landau and Lifshitz originally developed for inter-species diffusion in a binary neutral gas mixture is extended to a quasi-neutral plasma with two ion species. It is shown that, while baro- and electro-diffusion coefficients depend on the choice of the thermodynamic system, prediction for the total diffusive mass flux is invariant.

  14. Progress Towards a Quantum Degenerate Mixture with Extreme Mass Imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desalvo, B. J.; Johansen, Jacob; Chin, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We report experimental progress towards a quantum degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of 133 Cs and 6 Li. Beyond providing the largest mass imbalance of any bi-alkali mixture, this system exhibits multiple interspecies Feshbach resonances allowing wide tuning of the interaction strength and Efimov resonances potentially inducing three-body interactions. The use of a dual-color optical dipole trap in our experiment overcomes the large differential gravitational sag due to the mass imbalance and facilitates mixing the species nano-Kelvin temperatures allowing precision studies of interspecies interactions. Turning from few-body physics to many-body, we will present our efforts to reach simultaneous quantum degeneracy as well as discuss prospects of high resolution imaging of both species.

  15. Effects of the air–steam mixture on the permeability of damaged concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Medjigbodo, Sonagnon; Darquennes, Aveline; Khelidj, Abdelhafid; Loukili, Ahmed

    2013-12-15

    Massive concrete structures such as the containments of nuclear power plant must maintain their tightness at any circumstances to prevent the escape of radioactive fission products into the environment. In the event of an accident like a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), the concrete wall is submitted to both hydric and mechanical loadings. A new experimental device reproducing these extreme conditions (water vapor transfer, 140 °C and 5 bars) is developed in the GeM Laboratory to determine the effect of the saturation degree, the mechanical loading and the flowing fluid type on the concrete transfer properties. The experimental tests show that the previous parameters significantly affect the concrete permeability and the gas leakage rate. Their evolution as a function of the mechanical loading is characterized by two phases that are directly related to concrete microstructure and crack development.

  16. Mass-imbalanced fermionic mixture in a harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazak, B.

    2017-08-01

    The mass-imbalanced fermionic mixture is studied, where N ≤5 identical fermions interact resonantly with an impurity, a distinguishable atom. The shell structure is explored, and the physics of a dynamic light-impurity is shown to be different from that of the static heavy-impurity case. The energies in a harmonic trap at unitarity are calculated and extrapolated to the zero-range limit. In doing so, the scale factor of the ground state, as well as of a few excited states, is calculated. In the 2 ≤N ≤4 systems, pure (N +1 ) Efimov states exist for large enough mass ratio. However, no sign for a six-body Efimov state in the (5 +1 ) system is found in the mass ratio explored, M /m ≤12 .

  17. Bayesian decision and mixture models for AE monitoring of steel-concrete composite shear walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhidzadeh, Alireza; Epackachi, Siamak; Salamone, Salvatore; Whittaker, Andrew S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an approach based on an acoustic emission technique for the health monitoring of steel-concrete (SC) composite shear walls. SC composite walls consist of plain (unreinforced) concrete sandwiched between steel faceplates. Although the use of SC system construction has been studied extensively for nearly 20 years, little-to-no attention has been devoted to the development of structural health monitoring techniques for the inspection of damage of the concrete behind the steel plates. In this work an unsupervised pattern recognition algorithm based on probability theory is proposed to assess the soundness of the concrete infill, and eventually provide a diagnosis of the SC wall’s health. The approach is validated through an experimental study on a large-scale SC shear wall subjected to a displacement controlled reversed cyclic loading.

  18. Internal structure of shock waves in disparate mass mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Jeng, Duen-Ren; Penko, Paul F.

    1992-01-01

    The detailed flow structure of a normal shock wave for a gas mixture is investigated using the direct-simulation Monte Carlo method. A variable diameter hard-sphere (VDHS) model is employed to investigate the effect of different viscosity temperature exponents (VTE) for each species in a gas mixture. Special attention is paid to the irregular behavior in the density profiles which was previously observed in a helium-xenon experiment. It is shown that the VTE can have substantial effects in the prediction of the structure of shock waves. The variable hard-sphere model of Bird shows good agreement, but with some limitations, with the experimental data if a common VTE is chosen properly for each case. The VDHS model shows better agreement with the experimental data without adjusting the VTE. The irregular behavior of the light-gas component in shock waves of disparate mass mixtures is observed not only in the density profile, but also in the parallel temperature profile. The strength of the shock wave, the type of molecular interactions, and the mole fraction of heavy species have substantial effects on the existence and structure of the irregularities.

  19. Internal structure of shock waves in disparate mass mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Chan-Hong; De Witt, Kenneth J.; Jeng, Duen-Ren; Penko, Paul F.

    1992-01-01

    The detailed flow structure of a normal shock wave for a gas mixture is investigated using the direct-simulation Monte Carlo method. A variable diameter hard-sphere (VDHS) model is employed to investigate the effect of different viscosity temperature exponents (VTE) for each species in a gas mixture. Special attention is paid to the irregular behavior in the density profiles which was previously observed in a helium-xenon experiment. It is shown that the VTE can have substantial effects in the prediction of the structure of shock waves. The variable hard-sphere model of Bird shows good agreement, but with some limitations, with the experimental data if a common VTE is chosen properly for each case. The VDHS model shows better agreement with the experimental data without adjusting the VTE. The irregular behavior of the light-gas component in shock waves of disparate mass mixtures is observed not only in the density profile, but also in the parallel temperature profile. The strength of the shock wave, the type of molecular interactions, and the mole fraction of heavy species have substantial effects on the existence and structure of the irregularities.

  20. Abrasion-Erosion Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Stilling Basin Repairs, Kinzua Dam, Pennsylvania.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Federal Building Pittsburgh, PA 15222 Attention: Mr. Anton Krysa Re: Mix Compositions of Microsilica Concrete for the Neville Island Test Dear Mr. Krysa...and look forward to further r associations. Please do not hesitate to contact us regarding further information on the microsilica concrete as needed...wt. 159.2 156.7 156.6 (Ibs/cu. fz-.) Air content. , 1.2 2.5 2.6 S) ump. i n. 10 __;____________ I The surrv contains 50, solid microsilica by we irht

  1. Characterization of VX on concrete using ion trap secondary ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groenewold, G S; Appelhans, A D; Gresham, G L; Olson, J E; Jeffery, M; Weibel, M

    2000-01-01

    The nerve agent VX (O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methyl phosphonothiolate) was analyzed on the surface of concrete samples using an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS). It was found that VX could be detected down to an absolute quantity of 5 ng on a concrete chip, or to a surface coverage of 0.0004 monolayers on crushed concrete. To achieve these levels of detection, the m/z 268-->128 ion fragmentation was measured using MS2, where m/z 268 corresponds to [VX + H]+, and 128 corresponds to a diisopropylvinylammonium isomer, that is formed by the elimination of the phosphonothiolate moiety. Detection at these levels was accomplished by analyzing samples that had been recently exposed to VX, i.e., within an hour. When the VX-exposed concrete samples were aged, the SIMS signature for intact VX had disappeared, which signaled the degradation of the compound on the concrete surface. The VX signature was replaced by ions which are interpreted in terms of VX degradation products, which appear to be somewhat long lived on the concrete surface. These compounds include ethylmethylphosphonic acid (EMPA), diisopropyl taurine (DIPT), diisopropylaminoethanethiol (DESH), bis(diisopropylaminoethane) disulfide [(DES)2], and a particularly tenacious compound that may correspond to diisopropylvinylamine (DIVA), or an isomer thereof. It was found that the thiolamine-derived degradation products DIPT, DESH, and (DES)2 were removed with isopropyl alcohol extraction. However, the DIVA-related degradation product was observed to strongly adhere to the concrete surface for longer than one week. Although quantitation was not possible in this set of experiments, the results clearly show the rapid degradation of VX on concrete, as well as the surface sensitivity of the IT-SIMS for intact VX and its adsorptive degradation products.

  2. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.

  3. Design and Properties of Asphalt Concrete Mixtures Using Renewable Bioasphalt Binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, A.; Djumari; Irfansyah, P. A.; Shidiq, A. M.; Wibisono, I. S.; Fauzy, M. N.; Hadi, F. N.

    2017-02-01

    The needs of petroleum asphalt as materials for pavement is very large, while the petroleum classified as natural resources that cannot be renewable. As a result of petroleum dwindling and prices tend to be more expensive. So that requiring other alternative materials as a substitute for conventional asphalt derived from biomass or often called bioasphalt. This study aims to know the volumetric and Marshall characteristics on Asphalt Cement ( AC ) using the Damar asphalt modification to substitute 60/70 penetration asphalt as a binder. The volumetric and Marshall characteristic are porosity, density, flow, stability, and Marshall quotient. The characteristic of asphalt concrete at optimum bitumen content are compared to the conditions from highway agency 1987 and the general specification of asphalt concrete Bina Marga 2010 the third revision. The research uses experimental method in the laboratory with the samples made using the dasphalt modification as binder and incorporating the aggregate gradation no. VII SNI 03-1737-1989. The research is using 15 samples divided into 5 contents of damar asphalt, they are 5%, 5,5%, 6%, 6,5%, dan 7%. Tests carried out using Marshall test equipment to get the value of flow and stability and then be searched the value of optimum damar asphalt content. The result of asphalt concrete analysis using dasphalt modification as binder gives the value of optimum dasphalt content at 5,242%. The most characteristics already met the requirements and specifications.

  4. Determination of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of 20MPa Mass Concrete Using Granite Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee Siang, GO

    2017-07-01

    Experimental test was carried out to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value of 20MPa mass concrete using granite aggregate. The CTE value was established using procedure proposed by Kada et al. 2002 in determining the magnitude of early-ages CTE through laboratory test which is a rather accurate way by eliminating any possible superimposed effect of others early-age thermal deformation shrinkages such as autogenous, carbonation, plastic and drying shrinkage. This was done by submitting granite concrete block samples instrumented with ST4 vibrating wire extensometers to thermal shocks. The response of the concrete samples to this shock results in a nearly instantaneous deformation, which are measured by the sensor. These deformations, as well as the temperature signal, are used to calculate the CTE. By repeating heat cycles, the variation in the early-ages of concrete CTE over time was monitored and assessed for a period of upto 7 days. The developed CTE value facilitating the verification and validation of actual maximum permissible critical temperature differential limit (rather than arbitrarily follow published value) of cracking potential. For thick sections, internal restraint is dominant and this is governed by differentials mainly. Of the required physical properties for thermal modelling, CTE is of paramount importance that with given appropriate internal restraint factor the condition of cracking due to internal restraint is governs by equation, ΔTmax= 3.663ɛctu / αc. Thus, it can be appreciated that an increase in CTE will lower the maximum allowable differential for cracking avoidance in mass concrete while an increase of tensile strain capacity will increase the maximum allowable temperature differential.

  5. Use of plastic waste (poly-ethylene terephthalate) in asphalt concrete mixture as aggregate replacement.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Abolfazl; Ganjidoust, Hossein; Maghanaki, Amir Abedin

    2005-08-01

    One of the environmental issues in most regions of Iran is the large number of bottles made from poly-ethylene terephthalate (PET) deposited in domestic wastes and landfills. Due to the high volume of these bottles, more than 1 million m3 landfill space is needed for disposal every year. The purpose of this experimental study was to investigate the possibility of using PET waste in asphalt concrete mixes as aggregate replacement (Plastiphalt) to reduce the environmental effects of PET disposal. For this purpose the mechanical properties of plastiphalt mixes were compared with control samples. This study focused on the parameters of Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient (stability-to-flow ratio) and density. The waste PET used in this study was in the form of granules of about 3 mm diameter which would replace (by volume) a portion of the mineral coarse aggregates of an equal size (2.36-4.75 mm). In all prepared mixes the determined 6.6% optimum bitumen content was used. In this investigation, five different percentages of coarse aggregate replacement were used. The results showed that the aggregate replacement of 20% by volume with PET granules would result in a reduction of 2.8% in bulk compacted mix density. The value of flow in the plastiphalt mix was lower than that of the control samples. The results also showed that when PET was used as partial aggregate replacement, the corresponding Marshall stability and Marshall quotient were almost the same as for the control samples. According to most of specification requirement, these results introduce an asphalt mix that has properties that makes it suitable for practical use and furthermore, the recycling of PET for asphalt concrete roads helps alleviate an environmental problem and saves energy.

  6. Mass effect on the Soret coefficient in n-alkane mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso de Mezquia, David; Mounir Bou-Ali, M.; Madariaga, J. Antonio; Santamaría, Carlos

    2014-02-28

    We have determined the Soret coefficient of different equimolar and non equimolar n-alkane mixtures from measurements of the molecular diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients. It is shown that equimolar mixtures behave as isotopic-like mixtures in which only the mass effect contributes to the Soret effect. In non equimolar mixtures, a small linear dependence with the molar fraction is observed. Finally, we have obtained a new correlation, which allows the determination of the Soret coefficient of n-alkane mixtures using the data of viscosity, the thermal expansion coefficient of the pure components, and the density of the equimolar mixture.

  7. HIGH-COMPRESSIVE-STRENGTH CONCRETE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CONCRETE , COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES), PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), AGING(MATERIALS), MANUFACTURING, STRUCTURES, THERMAL PROPERTIES, CREEP, DEFORMATION, REINFORCED CONCRETE , MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS, STRESSES, MIXTURES, TENSILE PROPERTIES

  8. A faster iterative method for solving temperature field of mass concrete with cooling pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Keshi; Wang, Feng; Wang, Liujiang; Zhao, Zhongwei; Liu, Yun

    2017-05-01

    Due to the low convergence speed of the conventional iterative method for solving temperature field of mass concrete with cooling pipes, the oscillation phenomenon in the process of iterative calculation was studied, and a new method, which can be used to avoid the numerical dispersion in the calculation of temperature field of mass concrete with cooling pipes and to raise the convergence speed, was put forward by improve the conventional iterative method in this paper. Using the proposed method, the concrete temperature field of the lock floor with cooling pipes during construction was simulated, and the calculated results and measured results were compared. The result show that the calculated values and measured values are in good agreement. Besides, this new method has higher convergence speed than the conventional iterative method, especially when the temperature increment of the water along the pipe is high enough, which approached maximum 10 times higher in this simulation. So this method is meaningful in the engineering application to save the calculation time.

  9. Using biological and physico-chemical test methods to assess the role of concrete mixture design in resistance to microbially induced corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Mitchell Wayne

    to evaluate performance of concrete specimens under conditions designed to accelerate MIC. Concrete specimens representing 12 mixture designs were inoculated with 5 species of Thiobacillus bacteria and placed in a biological growth chamber designed to encourage bacterial growth and sulfuric acid production by optimizing temperature, delivering necessary nutrients, and providing hydrogen sulfide gas. Results indicate that using supplementary cementitious materials, limestone aggregates, and sulfate resistant cement can improve resistance to MIC. It is interesting to note that this study showed that unlike many other durability problems the role of water to cement ratio was unclear. The second method presented is a sulfuric acid immersion study designed to evaluate the resistance of 12 concrete mixture designs to 5 concentrations of sulfuric acid. Experimental protocols (like those in ASTM) previously considered trivial were found to have a dramatic effect on experimental results. It was found that using supplementary cementitious materials, limestone coarse aggregate, and sulfate resistant cement can increase concrete resistance to moderate sulfuric acid concentrations. The primary damage mechanism was observed to change depending on sulfuric acid concentration. Rapid deterioration of specimens exposed to aggressive sulfuric acid solutions indicates that degradation of concrete under the most severe MIC conditions (i.e., a pH < 1.0) cannot be prevented by strictly manipulating concrete mixture proportions. A holistic approach is needed for these situations that considers environmental conditions as well.

  10. The Value Compressive Strength and Split Tensile Strength on Concrete Mixture With Expanded Polystyrene Coated by Surfactant Span 80 as a Partial Substitution of Fine Aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Irpan; Siauwantara, Alice

    2014-03-01

    The value of the density normal concrete which ranges between 2200-2400 kg/m3. Therefore the use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) as a subitute to fine aggregate can reduce the density of concrete. The purpose this research is to reduce the density of normal concrete but increase compressive strength of EPS concrete, with use surfactant as coating for the EPS. Variables of substitution percentage of EPS and EPS coated by surfactant are 5%,10%,15%,20%,25%. Method of concrete mix design based on SNI 03-2834-2000 "Tata Cara Pembuatan Rencana Campuran Beton Normal (Provisions for Proportioning Normal Concrete Mixture)". The result of testing, every increase percentage of EPS substitution will decrease the compressive strength around 1,74 MPa and decrease density 34,03 kg/m3. Using Surfactant as coating of EPS , compressive strength increase from the EPS's compressive strength. Average of increasing compressive strength 0,19 MPa and increase the density 20,03 kg/m3,average decrease of the tensile split strength EPS coated surfaktan is 0,84 MPa.

  11. Signal Partitioning Algorithm for Highly Efficient Gaussian Mixture Modeling in Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Polanski, Andrzej; Marczyk, Michal; Pietrowska, Monika; Widlak, Piotr; Polanska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Mixture - modeling of mass spectra is an approach with many potential applications including peak detection and quantification, smoothing, de-noising, feature extraction and spectral signal compression. However, existing algorithms do not allow for automated analyses of whole spectra. Therefore, despite highlighting potential advantages of mixture modeling of mass spectra of peptide/protein mixtures and some preliminary results presented in several papers, the mixture modeling approach was so far not developed to the stage enabling systematic comparisons with existing software packages for proteomic mass spectra analyses. In this paper we present an efficient algorithm for Gaussian mixture modeling of proteomic mass spectra of different types (e.g., MALDI-ToF profiling, MALDI-IMS). The main idea is automated partitioning of protein mass spectral signal into fragments. The obtained fragments are separately decomposed into Gaussian mixture models. The parameters of the mixture models of fragments are then aggregated to form the mixture model of the whole spectrum. We compare the elaborated algorithm to existing algorithms for peak detection and we demonstrate improvements of peak detection efficiency obtained by using Gaussian mixture modeling. We also show applications of the elaborated algorithm to real proteomic datasets of low and high resolution. PMID:26230717

  12. Signal Partitioning Algorithm for Highly Efficient Gaussian Mixture Modeling in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Andrzej; Marczyk, Michal; Pietrowska, Monika; Widlak, Piotr; Polanska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Mixture - modeling of mass spectra is an approach with many potential applications including peak detection and quantification, smoothing, de-noising, feature extraction and spectral signal compression. However, existing algorithms do not allow for automated analyses of whole spectra. Therefore, despite highlighting potential advantages of mixture modeling of mass spectra of peptide/protein mixtures and some preliminary results presented in several papers, the mixture modeling approach was so far not developed to the stage enabling systematic comparisons with existing software packages for proteomic mass spectra analyses. In this paper we present an efficient algorithm for Gaussian mixture modeling of proteomic mass spectra of different types (e.g., MALDI-ToF profiling, MALDI-IMS). The main idea is automated partitioning of protein mass spectral signal into fragments. The obtained fragments are separately decomposed into Gaussian mixture models. The parameters of the mixture models of fragments are then aggregated to form the mixture model of the whole spectrum. We compare the elaborated algorithm to existing algorithms for peak detection and we demonstrate improvements of peak detection efficiency obtained by using Gaussian mixture modeling. We also show applications of the elaborated algorithm to real proteomic datasets of low and high resolution.

  13. Direct analysis of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on concrete by reactive-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, D; Reiller, P E; Lamouroux, C

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of organic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is today an important challenge due to their ability to increase the mobility of radionuclides and metals. Reactive desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (reactive-DESI-MS) was used for direct analysis of EDTA on concrete samples. EDTA forms complexes and those with Fe(III) ions are among the most thermodynamically favored. This complexing capacity was used to improve the specific detection of EDTA directly on a concrete matrix by doping the solvent spray of DESI with a solution of FeCl3 to selectively create the complex between EDTA and Fe(III). Thus, EDTA sensitivity was largely improved by two orders of magnitude with reactive-DESI-MS experiments thanks to the specific detection of EDTA as a [EDTA-4H+Fe(III)](-) complex. The proof of principle that reactive DESI can be applied to concrete samples to detect EDTA has been demonstrated. Its capacity for semi-quantitative determination and localization of EDTA under ambient conditions and with very little sample preparation, minimizing sample manipulations and solvent volumes, two important conditions for the development of new methodologies in the field of analytical chemistry, has been shown.

  14. Determination of the sequences of protein-derived peptides and peptide mixtures by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Howard R.; Williams, Dudley H.; Ambler, Richard P.

    1971-01-01

    Micro-quantities of protein-derived peptides have been converted into N-acetylated permethyl derivatives, and their sequences determined by low-resolution mass spectrometry without prior knowledge of their amino acid compositions or lengths. A new strategy is suggested for the mass spectrometric sequencing of oligopeptides or proteins, involving gel filtration of protein hydrolysates and subsequent sequence analysis of peptide mixtures. Finally, results are given that demonstrate for the first time the use of mass spectrometry for the analysis of a protein-derived peptide mixture, again without prior knowledge of the protein or components within the mixture. PMID:5158904

  15. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-01

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi2O3 + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μm) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Zeff) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  16. Mass transport properties of Pu/DT mixtures from orbital free molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kress, Joel David; Ticknor, Christopher; Collins, Lee A.

    2015-09-16

    Mass transport properties (shear viscosity and diffusion coefficients) for Pu/DT mixtures were calculated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The results were fitted to simple functions of mass density (for ρ=10.4 to 62.4 g/cm3) and temperature (for T=100 up to 3,000 eV) for Pu/DT mixtures consisting of 100/0, 25/75, 50/50, and 75/25 by number.

  17. Numerical Analysis of Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in Cork Lightweight Concretes Used in Building Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotehi, Nassima; Chaker, Abla

    A numerical study was carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of building envelopes made of lightweight concretes. In this work, we are particularly interested to the building envelopes which are consist of cement paste with incorporation of cork aggregates in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. The mathematical formulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in wet porous materials has been made using Luikov's model, the system describing temperature and moisture transfer processes within building walls is solved numerically with the finite elements method. The obtained results illustrate the temporal evolutions of the temperature and the moisture content, and the distributions of the temperature and moisture content inside the wall for several periods of time. They allow us to specify the effect of the nature and dosage of fibre on the heat and mass transfer.

  18. Traces of Integrability in Relaxation of One-Dimensional Two-Mass Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Zaijong; Cao, Frank; Olshanii, Maxim

    2015-10-01

    We study relaxation in a one-dimensional two-mass mixture of hard-core particles. A heavy-light-heavy triplet of three neighboring particles can form a little known unequal mass generalization of Newton's cradle at particular light-to-heavy mass ratios. An anomalous slow-down in the relaxation of the whole system is expected due to the presence of these triplets, and we provide numerical evidence to support this prediction. The expected experimental realization of our model involves mixtures of two internal states in optical lattices, where the ratio between effective masses can be controlled at will.

  19. Data Self-Recalibration and Mixture Mass Fingerprint Searching (DASER-MMF) to enhance protein identification within complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Danell, Ryan M; Ouvry-Patat, Severine A; Scarlett, Cameron O; Speir, J Paul; Borchers, Christoph H

    2008-12-01

    A novel algorithm based on Data Self-Recalibration and a subsequent Mixture Mass Fingerprint search (DASER-MMF) has been developed to improve the performance of protein identification from online 1D and 2D-LC-MS/MS experiments conducted on high-resolution mass spectrometers. Recalibration of 40% to 75% of the MS spectra in a human serum dataset is demonstrated with average errors of 0.3 +/- 0.3 ppm, regardless of the original calibration quality. With simple protein mixtures, the MMF search identifies new proteins not found in the MS/MS based search and increases the sequence coverage for identified proteins by six times. The high mass accuracy allows proteins to be identified with as little as three peptide mass hits. When applied to very complex samples, the MMF search shows less dramatic performance improvements. However, refinements such as additional discriminating factors utilized within the search space provide significant gains in protein identification ability and indicate that further enhancements are possible in this realm.

  20. Estimation of explosive charge mass used for explosions on concrete surface for the forensic purpose.

    PubMed

    Bjelovuk, Ivana D; Jaramaz, Slobodan; Mickovic, Dejan

    2012-03-01

    The method of choice used by most terrorists for achieving political goals remains the utilization of explosive devices and there is always visible evidence at a crime scene after the deployment of such devices. Given favorable circumstances, forensic analysis can determine the cause of the explosion - the type of the explosive device, the means of detonation, the type and mass of the explosive charge that has been used and perhaps provide information to lead to the identity of the individual who may have constructed or deployed the explosive device, etc. Evidence of an explosion may take the form of a crater or other damage which may provide some information facilitating and estimating the mass of explosive material used. This paper reports the findings obtained by performing experimental explosions of known charges on a concrete surface, in order to establish the correlation between the charge weight and the effects of the explosion. Known masses of explosives were fired and the dimensions of craters made by explosions were measured. Five empirical equations for estimation of the explosive charge mass from crater dimensions were used.

  1. Effect of coal combustion fly ash use in concrete on the mass transport release of constituents of potential concern.

    PubMed

    Garrabrants, Andrew C; Kosson, David S; DeLapp, Rossane; van der Sloot, Hans A

    2014-05-01

    Concerns about the environmental safety of coal combustion fly ash use as a supplemental cementitious material have necessitated comprehensive evaluation of the potential for leaching concrete materials containing fly ash used as a cement replacement. Using concrete formulations representative of US residential and commercial applications, test monoliths were made without fly ash replacement (i.e., controls) and with 20% or 45% of the portland cement fraction replaced by fly ash from four coal combustion sources. In addition, microconcrete materials were created with 45% fly ash replacement based on the commercial concrete formulation but with no coarse aggregate and an increased fine aggregate fraction to maintain aggregate-paste interfacial area. All materials were cured for 3 months prior to mass transport-based leach testing of constituents of potential concern (i.e., Sb, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Mo, Pb, Se, Tl and V) according to EPA Method 1315. The cumulative release results were consistent with previously tested samples of concretes and mortars from international sources. Of the 11 constituents tested, only Sb, Ba, B, Cr and V were measured in quantifiable amounts. Microconcretes without coarse aggregate were determined to be conservative surrogates for concrete in leaching assessment since cumulative release from microconcretes were only slightly greater than the associated concrete materials. Relative to control materials without fly ash, concretes and microconcretes with fly ash replacement of cement had increased 28-d and 63-d cumulative release for a limited number 10 comparison cases: 2 cases for Sb, 7 cases for Ba and 1 case for Cr. The overall results suggest minimal leaching impact from fly ash use as a replacement for up to 45% of the cement fraction in typical US concrete formulations; however, scenario-specific assessment based on this leaching evaluation should be used to determine if potential environmental impacts exist.

  2. Traces of Integrability in Relaxation of One-Dimensional Two-Mass Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Zaijong; Cao, Frank; Olshanii, Maxim

    2014-05-01

    We study relaxation in a one-dimensional two-mass mixture of hard-core particles. Special attention is paid to the region of light-to-heavy mass ratios around m / M =√{ 5} - 2 = 0 . 236 ... . At this mass ratio, each heavy-light-heavy subsystem constitutes a little known non-equal-mass generalization of Newton's Cradle, and an anomalous slow-down of relaxation is expected as a result. We further list and classify all other instances of integrability in the one-dimensional three-body hard-core systems, where integrability is especially prominent at the quantum level and leads to the famous ``scattering without diffraction'' phenomenon. The principal experimental application of our results is with two-specie mixtures in optical lattices, in which the effective masses--that can be controlled at will--are assumed to replace the real ones. Supported by the NSF and ONR.

  3. High-strength lightweight concrete mixtures based on hollow microspheres: technological features and industrial experience of preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inozemtcev, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    The research results concerning dependencies between technological parameters and physical properties of structural lightweight concrete are presented in the article. High-strength lightweight concrete has unique performance characteristics: low average density (less than 1500 kg/m3) and high compressive strength (more than 70 MPa). Hollow alumina-silicate microspheres with nanoscale modifier are used for obtaining these properties. It is shown in the article that the preparation of high-strength lightweight concrete in industrial conditions must be implemented using a turbine mixer having six paddles and engine power more than 39.2 kW. Oscillation frequency of more than 3000 rpm, vibro-compacting time less than 15 seconds, heat-humid treatment temperature approximately 60-65 °C and heat-humid treatment time 6-7 hours are optimal for production. The results of industrial mixing-test are presented.

  4. Study of mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers of bismuth-ground granulated blast furnace slag concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Sukhpal

    2016-05-06

    Five samples of Bismuth-Ground granulated blast furnace slag (Bi-GGBFS) concretes were prepared using composition (0.6 cement + x Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} + (0.4-x) GGBFS, x = 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25) by keeping constant water (W) cement (C) ratio. Mass attenuation coefficients (μ{sub m}) of these prepared samples were calculated using a computer program winXCOM at different gamma ray energies, whereas effective atomic numbers (Z{sub eff}) is calculated using mathematical formulas. The radiation shielding properties of Bi-GGBFS concrete has been compared with standard radiation shielding concretes.

  5. Mass spectral similarity for untargeted metabolomics data analysis of complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Neha; Kapono, Clifford; Lim, Yan Wei; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Vermeij, Mark J.A; Conrad, Douglas; Rohwer, Forest; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2014-01-01

    While in nucleotide sequencing, the analysis of DNA from complex mixtures of organisms is common, this is not yet true for mass spectrometric data analysis of complex mixtures. The comparative analyses of mass spectrometry data of microbial communities at the molecular level is difficult to perform, especially in the context of a host. The challenge does not lie in generating the mass spectrometry data, rather much of the difficulty falls in the realm of how to derive relevant information from this data. The informatics based techniques to visualize and organize datasets are well established for metagenome sequencing; however, due to the scarcity of informatics strategies in mass spectrometry, it is currently difficult to cross correlate two very different mass spectrometry data sets from microbial communities and their hosts. We highlight that molecular networking can be used as an organizational tool of tandem mass spectrometry data, automated database search for rapid identification of metabolites, and as a workflow to manage and compare mass spectrometry data from complex mixtures of organisms. To demonstrate this platform, we show data analysis from hard corals and a human lung associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:25844058

  6. Advantages of mass-imbalanced ultracold fermionic mixtures for approaching quantum magnetism in optical lattices.

    PubMed

    Sotnikov, Andrii; Cocks, Daniel; Hofstetter, Walter

    2012-08-10

    We study magnetic phases of two-component mixtures of ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions in optical lattices in the presence of hopping imbalance. Our analysis is based on dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) and its real-space generalization at finite temperature. We study the temperature dependence of the transition into the ordered state as a function of the interaction strength and the imbalance parameter in two and three spatial dimensions. We show that below the critical temperature for Néel order mass-imbalanced mixtures also exhibit a charge-density wave, which provides a directly observable signature of the ordered state. For the trapped system, we compare our results obtained by real-space DMFT to a local-density approximation. We calculate the entropy for a wide range of parameters and identify regions, in which mass-imbalanced mixtures could have clear advantages over balanced ones for the purpose of obtaining and detecting quantum magnetism.

  7. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    When tentatively identifying compounds in complex mixtures using mass spectral libraries, multiple matches or no plausible matches due to a high level of chemical noise or interferences can occur. Worse yet, most analytes are not in the libraries. In each case, Ion Composition El...

  8. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE): A HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    When tentatively identifying compounds in complex mixtures using mass spectral libraries, multiple matches or no plausible matches due to a high level of chemical noise or interferences can occur. Worse yet, most analytes are not in the libraries. In each case, Ion Composition El...

  9. MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry of Naturally-Occurring Mixtures of Mono- and Di-rhamnolipids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been developed for high-throughput screening of naturally-occurring mixtures of rhamnolipids from Pseudomonas spp. Mono- and di-rhamnolipids are readily distinguished by characteristic molecular adduct i...

  10. Heat and mass transfer prediction of binary refrigerant mixtures condensing in a horizontal microfin tube

    SciTech Connect

    Koyama, Shigeru; Yu, Jian; Ishibashi, Akira

    1999-07-01

    In the face of the phase-out of HCFC22 for its effect on globe environment, the alternative refrigerant has been paid attention in the refrigeration and heat pump industry. In the present stage, it is found that any pure refrigerant is not a good substitute of HCFC22 for the system in use. The authors have to use binary or ternary refrigerant mixtures as the substitute to meet industrial requirement. But until now, although the heat transfer characteristics of the refrigerant mixtures can be measured in experiments and predicted in some degree, the mass transfer characteristics in condensation process, which is a main part in most systems, can not be clarified by both experimental and theoretical methods. In the present study a non-equilibrium model for condensation of binary refrigerant mixtures inside a horizontal microfin tube is proposed. In this model it is assumed that the phase equilibrium is only established at the vapor-liquid interface, while the bulk vapor and the bulk liquid are in non-equilibrium in the same cross section. The mass transfer characteristic in vapor core is obtained from the analogy between mass and momentum transfer. In the liquid layer, the mass fraction distribution is neglected, but the mass transfer coefficient is treated as infinite that can keep a finite value for the mass transfer rate in liquid phase. From the calculation results compared with the experimental ones for the condensation of HFC134a/HCFC123 and HCFC22/CFC114 mixtures, it is found that the calculated heat flux distribution along the tube axis is in good agreement with that of experiment, and the calculated values of condensing length agree well with the experimental ones. Using the present model, the local mass faction distribution, the diffusion mass transfer rate and the mass transfer characteristics in both vapor and liquid phase are demonstrated. From these results, the effect of mass transfer resistance on condensation heat transfer characteristics for binary

  11. Quantitative analysis of polypropyleneglycol mixtures by desorption/ionization on porous silicon mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Shoji; Wada, Yoshinao; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2005-02-01

    Mixtures of diol and triol types of polypropyleneglycol (PPG) bearing two and three hydroxyl end groups were analyzed quantitatively by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and desorption ionization on porous silicon (DIOS) with the conventional dried droplet method. The reproducibility of MALDI mass spectra depended on the factors regarding sample preparation such as the analyte/matrix ratio, and the type of solvent and/or chemical matrix employed. For DIOS, the analyte concentration and the selection of solvents were important for good reproducibility. Optimization of these factors allowed reliable quantification of the polymer mixtures. Under optimized conditions, DIOS would be suitable than MALDI for this purpose.

  12. Complex mixtures of antibodies generated from a single production qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated by native Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Natalie J; Hendriks, Linda J A; de Kruif, John; Throsby, Mark; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-01-01

    Composite antibody mixtures designed to combat diseases present a new, rapidly emerging technology in the field of biopharmaceuticals. The combination of multiple antibodies can lead to increased effector response and limit the effect of escape variants that can propagate the disease. However, parallel development of analytical technologies is required to provide fast, thorough, accurate, and robust characterization of these mixtures. Here, we evaluate the utility of native mass spectrometry on an Orbitrap platform with high mass resolving power to characterize composite mixtures of up to 15 separate antibodies. With this technique, unambiguous identification of each antibody in the mixtures was achieved. Mass measurements of the intact antibodies varied 7 ppm on average, allowing highly reproducible identification and quantitation of each compound in these complex mixtures. We show that with the high mass-resolving power and robustness of this technology, high-resolution native mass spectrometry can be used efficiently even for batch-to batch characterization.

  13. Effect of insulating concrete forms in concrete compresive strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez Jerez, Silvio R.

    The subject presented in this thesis is the effect of Insulating Concrete Forms (ICF's) on concrete compressive strength. This work seeks to identify if concrete cured in ICF's has an effect in compressive strength due to the thermal insulation provided by the forms. Modern construction is moving to energy efficient buildings and ICF's is becoming more popular in new developments. The thesis used a concrete mixture and a mortar mixture to investigate the effects of ICF's on concrete compressive strength. After the experimentations were performed, it was concluded that the ICF's do affect concrete strength. It was found that the forms increase concrete strength without the need for additional curing water. An increase of 50% in strength at 56 days was obtained. It was concluded that the longer concrete cures inside ICF's, the higher strength it reaches, and that ICF's effect on concrete strength is proportional to volume of concrete.

  14. Cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Jose A.; Tabares, Francisco L.

    2007-03-15

    A simple method is described for the unambiguous identification of the individual components in a gas mixture showing strong overlapping of their mass spectrometric cracking patterns. The method, herein referred to as cryotrapping assisted mass spectrometry, takes advantage of the different vapor pressure values of the individual components at low temperature (78 K for liquid nitrogen traps), and thus of the different depletion efficiencies and outgassing patterns during the fast cooling and slow warming up of the trap, respectively. Examples of the use of this technique for gas mixtures with application to plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon and carbon-nitrogen hard films are shown. Detection of traces of specific C{sub 3} hydrocarbons (<50 ppm of initial methane) in methane/hydrogen plasmas and the possible trapping of thermally unstable C-N compounds in N{sub 2} containing deposition plasmas are addressed as representative examples of specific applications of the technique.

  15. Quasiparticle Lifetime in Ultracold Fermionic Mixtures with Density and Mass Imbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zhihao; Bruun, Georg M.; Lobo, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    We show that atomic Fermi mixtures with density and mass imbalance exhibit a rich diversity of scaling laws for the quasiparticle decay rate beyond the quadratic energy and temperature dependence of conventional Fermi liquids. For certain densities and mass ratios, the decay rate is linear, whereas in other cases, it exhibits a plateau. Remarkably, this plateau extends from the deeply degenerate to the high temperature classical regime of the light species. Many of these scaling laws are analogous to what is found in very different systems, including dirty metals, liquid metals, and high temperature plasmas. The Fermi mixtures can in this sense span a whole range of seemingly diverse and separate physical systems. Our results are derived in the weakly interacting limit, making them quantitatively reliable. The different regimes can be detected with radio-frequency spectroscopy.

  16. Observation of Coupled Vortex Lattices in a Mass-Imbalance Bose and Fermi Superfluid Mixture.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xing-Can; Chen, Hao-Ze; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Xiang-Pei; Wang, Xiao-Qiong; Jiang, Xiao; Deng, Youjin; Chen, Yu-Ao; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-09-30

    Quantized vortices play an essential role in diverse superfluid phenomena. In a Bose-Fermi superfluid mixture, especially of two mass-imbalance species, such macroscopic quantum phenomena are particularly rich due to the interplay between the Bose and Fermi superfluidity. However, generating a Bose-Fermi two-species superfluid, producing coupled vortex lattices within, and further probing interspecies interaction effects remain challenging. Here, we experimentally realize a two-species superfluid with dilute gases of lithium-6 and potassium-41, having a mass ratio of about seven. By rotating the superfluid mixture, we simultaneously produce coupled vortex lattices of the two species and thus present a definitive visual evidence for the double superfluidity. Moreover, we report several unconventional behaviors, due to the Bose-Fermi interaction, on the formation and decay of two-species vortices.

  17. Heat and Mass Transfer in the Concrete of Special Industrial Installations (Teplo- i Massoperenos v Betone Spetsial’nykh Promyshlennykh Sooruzheniy)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    calculating the effective coefficient of heat tranfer based on the necessity for reducing the intensity of thermal exchange by approximately 100 times...TL 538 ADA03O93 Draft Transl’ation 5384 July 197 HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN THE CONCRETE OF SPECIAL INDUSTRIAL INSTALLATIONS I.V. Zasedatelev and V.G...gations of special features of the heat and mass transfer processes in concrete Exunination and analysis of mathematical models of the processes, experi

  18. Effects of micro-sized and nano-sized WO3 on mass attenauation coefficients of concrete by using MCNPX code.

    PubMed

    Tekin, H O; Singh, V P; Manici, T

    2017-03-01

    In the present work the effect of tungsten oxide (WO3) nanoparticles on mass attenauation coefficients of concrete has been investigated by using MCNPX (version 2.4.0). The validation of generated MCNPX simulation geometry has been provided by comparing the results with standard XCOM data for mass attenuation coefficients of concrete. A very good agreement between XCOM and MCNPX have been obtained. The validated geometry has been used for definition of nano-WO3 and micro-WO3 into concrete sample. The mass attenuation coefficients of pure concrete and WO3 added concrete with micro-sized and nano-sized have been compared. It was observed that shielding properties of concrete doped with WO3 increased. The results of mass attenauation coefficients also showed that the concrete doped with nano-WO3 significanlty improve shielding properties than micro-WO3. It can be concluded that addition of nano-sized particles can be considered as another mechanism to reduce radiation dose.

  19. Analysis of naphthenic acid mixtures as pentafluorobenzyl derivatives by gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Villagomez, Juan Manuel; Vázquez-Martínez, Juan; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Trudeau, Vance L

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report for the first time the efficiency of pentafluorobenzyl bromide (PFBBr) for naphthenic acid (NA) mixtures derivatization, and the comparison in the optimal conditions to the most common NAs derivatization reagents, BF3/MeOH and N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-N-methyltrifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Naphthenic acids are carboxylic acid mixtures of petrochemical origin. These compounds are important for the oil industry because of their corrosive properties, which can damage oil distillation infrastructure. Moreover, NAs are commercially used in a wide range of products such as paint and ink driers, wood and fabric preservatives, fuel additives, emulsifiers, and surfactants. Naphthenic acids have also been found in sediments after major oils spills in the United States and South Korea. Furthermore, the toxicity of the oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), product of the oil sands extraction activities in Canada's oil sands, has largely been attributed to NAs. One of the main challenges for the chromatographic analysis of these mixtures is the resolution of the components. The derivatization optimization was achieved using surface response analysis with molar ratio and time as factors for derivatization signal yield. After gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry (GC/EIMS) analysis of a mixture of NA standards, it was found that the signal produced by PFB-derivatives was 2.3 and 1.4 times higher than the signal produced by methylated and MTBS-derivatives, respectively. The pentafluorobenzyl derivatives have a characteristic fragment ion at 181m/z that is diagnostic for the differentiation of carboxylic and non-carboxylic acid components within mixtures. In the analysis of a Sigma and a Merichem derivatized oil extract NA mixtures, it was found that some peaks lack the characteristic fragment ion; therefore they are not carboxylic acids. Open column chromatography was used to obtain a hexane and a methanol fraction of the Sigma and

  20. Properties of low-strength concrete for Meeks Cabin Dam modification project, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Dolen, T.P.; Benavidez, A.A.

    1998-10-01

    Low-strength, plastic concrete mixtures were proportioned to construct a cut-off wall through permeable features in the foundation of Meeks Cabin Dam, Wyoming. Low strength concrete was required to match the deformation properties of the concrete with the embankment materials in the dam. The mixtures were proportioned with zero (control mixture), 10, 15, and 20% bentonite by mass of cement plus bentonite. The bentonite reduces compressive strength and elastic properties when compared to conventional concrete. Mixtures were proportioned to meet the desired fresh and hardened concrete properties. All mixtures met the 8 in. (200 mm) slump required for tremie placing. The design compressive strength is 200 lb/in.{sup 2} (1,380 kPa) at 7 days and 400 lb/in.{sup 2} (2,760 kPa) at 28 days. The 15% bentonite mixture met the strength requirements and was chosen for more detailed testing. Additional tests evaluated the triaxial shear strength, flow-pump permeability, and erodibility of the low-strength, hardened concrete, and determined the effect of adding a retarding mixture on setting time and slump loss of fresh concrete.

  1. Development of a rapid test method for asphalt concrete content determination in hot-mix paving mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, J. J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid test method was developed for the determination of asphalt cement content in hot-mix bituminous paving mixtures. It is based on the extraction of asphalt cement from mixtures with trichloroethylene and subsequent measurement of the transmittance of light through the extracted solution. A good correlation was found between the results obtained using the rapid test and those obtained using the standard test (ASTM D-2172, Method E1) for samples tested in the field at asphalt mix plants. The test uses a portable spectrophotometer and a metal can for extraction. The asphalt content can be determined in less than ten minutes. The possibility of using the rapid test on materials containing emulsified asphalt, slag aggregate, unusually high amounts of fine material and recycled material was also studied.

  2. Determination of Temperature Rise and Temperature Differentials of CEMII/B-V Cement for 20MPa Mass Concrete using Adiabatic Temperature Rise Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chee Siang, GO

    2017-07-01

    Experimental test was carried out to determine the temperature rise characteristics of Portland-Fly-Ash Cement (CEM II/B-V, 42.5N) of Blaine fineness 418.6m2/kg and 444.6m2/kg respectively for 20MPa mass concrete under adiabatic condition. The estimation on adiabatic temperature rise by way of CIRIA C660 method (Construction Industry Research & Information Information) was adopted to verify and validate the hot-box test results by simulating the heat generation curve of the concrete under semi-adiabatic condition. Test result found that Portland fly-ash cement has exhibited decrease in the peak value of temperature rise and maximum temperature rise rate. The result showed that the temperature development and distribution profile, which is directly contributed from the heat of hydration of cement with time, is affected by the insulation, initial placing temperature, geometry and size of concrete mass. The mock up data showing the measured temperature differential is significantly lower than the technical specifications 20°C temperature differential requirement and the 27.7°C limiting temperature differential for granite aggregate concrete as stipulated in BS8110-2: 1985. The concrete strength test result revealed that the 28 days cubes compressive strength was above the stipulated 20MPa characteristic strength at 90 days. The test demonstrated that with proper concrete mix design, the use of Portland flyash cement, combination of chilled water and flake ice, and good insulation is effective in reducing peak temperature rise, temperature differential, and lower adiabatic temperature rise for mass concrete pours. As far as the determined adiabatic temperature rise result was concern, the established result could be inferred for in-situ thermal properties of 20MPa mass concrete application, as the result could be repeatable on account of similar type of constituent materials and concrete mix design adopted for permanent works at project site.

  3. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  4. Chemical structure influence on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Mark C; Tick, Geoffrey R; Carroll, Kenneth C; Burke, William R

    2017-03-01

    The influence of chemical structure on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux was examined. The variability of measured and UNIFAC modeled NAPL activity coefficients as a function of mole fraction was compared for two NAPL mixtures containing structurally-different contaminants of concern including toluene (TOL) or trichloroethene (TCE) within a hexadecane (HEXDEC) matrix. The results showed that dissolution from the NAPL mixtures transitioned from ideality for mole fractions >0.05 to nonideality as mole fractions decreased. In particular, the TCE generally exhibited more ideal dissolution behavior except at lower mole fractions, and may indicate greater structural/polarity similarity between the two compounds. Raoult's Law and UNIFAC generally under-predicted the batch experiment results for TOL:HEXDEC mixtures especially for mole fractions ≤0.05. The dissolution rate coefficients were similar for both TOL and TCE over all mole fractions tested. Mass flux reduction (MFR) analysis showed that more efficient removal behavior occurred for TOL and TCE with larger mole fractions compared to the lower initial mole fraction mixtures (i.e. <0.2). However, compared to TOL, TCE generally exhibited more efficient removal behavior over all mole fractions tested and may have been the result of structural and molecular property differences between the compounds. Activity coefficient variability as a function of mole fraction was quantified through regression analysis and incorporated into dissolution modeling analyses for the dynamic flushing experiments. TOL elution concentrations were modeled (predicted) reasonable well using ideal and equilibrium assumptions, but the TCE elution concentrations could not be predicted using the ideal model. Rather, the dissolution modeling demonstrated that TCE elution was better described by the nonideal model whereby NAPL-phase activity coefficient varied as a function of COC mole fraction

  5. Deconvolution of Mixture Spectra from Ion-Trap Data-Independent-Acquisition Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bern, Marshall; Finney, Gregory; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Merrihew, Gennifer; Toth, Michael J.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Data-independent tandem mass spectrometry isolates and fragments all of the molecular species within a given mass-to-charge window, regardless of whether a precursor ion was detected within the window. For shotgun proteomics on complex protein mixtures, data-independent MS/MS offers certain advantages over the traditional data-dependent MS/MS: identification of low-abundance peptides with insignificant precursor peaks; more direct relative quantification, free of biases caused by competing precursors and dynamic exclusion; and faster throughput due to simultaneous fragmentation of multiple peptides. However, data-independent MS/MS, especially on low-resolution ion-trap instruments, strains standard peptide identification programs, because of less precise knowledge of the peptide precursor mass and large numbers of spectra composed of two or more peptides. Here we describe a computer program called DeMux that deconvolves mixture spectra and improves the peptide identification rate by ~25%. We compare the number of identifications made by data-independent and data-dependent MS/MS at the peptide and protein levels: conventional data-dependent MS/MS makes a greater number of identifications but is less reproducible from run to run. PMID:20039681

  6. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddi, Chanchala D.; Bennett, Rachel V.; Paine, Martin R. L.; Banks, Mitchel D.; Weber, Arthur L.; Fernández, Facundo M.; Wang, May D.

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis.

  7. Two-Dimensional Gas-Phase Separations Coupled to Mass Spectrometry for Analysis of Complex Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Keqi; Li, Fumin; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Smith*, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been explored for decades, and its versatility in separation and identification of gas-phase ions is well established. Recently, field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) has been gaining acceptance in similar applications. Coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), both IMS and FAIMS have shown the potential for broad utility in proteomics and other biological analyses. A major attraction of these separations is extremely high speed, exceeding that of condensed-phase alternatives by orders of magnitude. However, modest separation peak capacities have limited the utility of FAIMS and IMS for analyses of complex mixtures. We report 2-D gas-phase separations that join FAIMS to IMS, in conjunction with high-resolution and accuracy time-of-flight MS. Implementation of FAIMS/IMS and IMS/MS interfaces using electrodynamic ion funnels greatly improves sensitivity. Evaluation of FAIMS/IMS/TOF performance for a protein mixture tryptic digest reveals high orthogonality between FAIMS and IMS dimensions, and hence the benefit of FAIMS filtering prior to IMS/MS. The effective peak capacities in analyses of tryptic peptides are ~500 for FAIMS/IMS separations and ~106 for 3-D FAIMS/IMS/MS, providing a potential platform for ultrahigh-throughput analyses of complex mixtures. PMID:16194103

  8. DetectTLC: Automated Reaction Mixture Screening Utilizing Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Image Features.

    PubMed

    Kaddi, Chanchala D; Bennett, Rachel V; Paine, Martin R L; Banks, Mitchel D; Weber, Arthur L; Fernández, Facundo M; Wang, May D

    2016-02-01

    Full characterization of complex reaction mixtures is necessary to understand mechanisms, optimize yields, and elucidate secondary reaction pathways. Molecular-level information for species in such mixtures can be readily obtained by coupling mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with thin layer chromatography (TLC) separations. User-guided investigation of imaging data for mixture components with known m/z values is generally straightforward; however, spot detection for unknowns is highly tedious, and limits the applicability of MSI in conjunction with TLC. To accelerate imaging data mining, we developed DetectTLC, an approach that automatically identifies m/z values exhibiting TLC spot-like regions in MS molecular images. Furthermore, DetectTLC can also spatially match m/z values for spots acquired during alternating high and low collision-energy scans, pairing product ions with precursors to enhance structural identification. As an example, DetectTLC is applied to the identification and structural confirmation of unknown, yet significant, products of abiotic pyrazinone and aminopyrazine nucleoside analog synthesis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Assessment of actinide mass embedded in large concrete waste packages by photon interrogation and photofission.

    PubMed

    Gmar, M; Jeanneau, F; Lainé, F; Makil, H; Poumarède, B; Tola, F

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a method based on photofission developed in our laboratory to characterize in depth large waste packages. The method consists in using photons of high-energy (Bremsstrahlung radiation) in order to induce reactions of photofission on the heavy nuclei present in the wastes. The measurement of the delayed neutrons allows quantifying the actinides in the wastes. We present the first results of measurement performed with a concrete mock-up of 870l and two real waste packages.

  10. Flow of variably fluidized granular masses across three-dimensional terrain I. Coulomb mixture theory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, R.M.; Denlinger, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    Rock avalanches, debris flows, and related phenomena consist of grain-fluid mixtures that move across three-dimensional terrain. In all these phenomena the same basic forces, govern motion, but differing mixture compositions, initial conditions, and boundary conditions yield varied dynamics and deposits. To predict motion of diverse grain-fluid masses from initiation to deposition, we develop a depth-averaged, threedimensional mathematical model that accounts explicitly for solid- and fluid-phase forces and interactions. Model input consists of initial conditions, path topography, basal and internal friction angles of solid grains, viscosity of pore fluid, mixture density, and a mixture diffusivity that controls pore pressure dissipation. Because these properties are constrained by independent measurements, the model requires little or no calibration and yields readily testable predictions. In the limit of vanishing Coulomb friction due to persistent high fluid pressure the model equations describe motion of viscous floods, and in the limit of vanishing fluid stress they describe one-phase granular avalanches. Analysis of intermediate phenomena such as debris flows and pyroclastic flows requires use of the full mixture equations, which can simulate interaction of high-friction surge fronts with more-fluid debris that follows. Special numerical methods (described in the companion paper) are necessary to solve the full equations, but exact analytical solutions of simplified equations provide critical insight. An analytical solution for translational motion of a Coulomb mixture accelerating from rest and descending a uniform slope demonstrates that steady flow can occur only asymptotically. A solution for the asymptotic limit of steady flow in a rectangular channel explains why shear may be concentrated in narrow marginal bands that border a plug of translating debris. Solutions for static equilibrium of source areas describe conditions of incipient slope instability

  11. Flow of variably fluidized granular masses across three-dimensional terrain: 1. Coulomb mixture theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iverson, Richard M.; Denlinger, Roger P.

    2001-01-01

    Rock avalanches, debris flows, and related phenomena consist of grain-fluid mixtures that move across three-dimensional terrain. In all these phenomena the same basic forces govern motion, but differing mixture compositions, initial conditions, and boundary conditions yield varied dynamics and deposits. To predict motion of diverse grain-fluid masses from initiation to deposition, we develop a depth-averaged, three-dimensional mathematical model that accounts explicitly for solid- and fluid-phase forces and interactions. Model input consists of initial conditions, path topography, basal and internal friction angles of solid grains, viscosity of pore fluid, mixture density, and a mixture diffusivity that controls pore pressure dissipation. Because these properties are constrained by independent measurements, the model requires little or no calibration and yields readily testable predictions. In the limit of vanishing Coulomb friction due to persistent high fluid pressure the model equations describe motion of viscous floods, and in the limit of vanishing fluid stress they describe one-phase granular avalanches. Analysis of intermediate phenomena such as debris flows and pyroclastic flows requires use of the full mixture equations, which can simulate interaction of high-friction surge fronts with more-fluid debris that follows. Special numerical methods (described in the companion paper) are necessary to solve the full equations, but exact analytical solutions of simplified equations provide critical insight. An analytical solution for translational motion of a Coulomb mixture accelerating from rest and descending a uniform slope demonstrates that steady flow can occur only asymptotically. A solution for the asymptotic limit of steady flow in a rectangular channel explains why shear may be concentrated in narrow marginal bands that border a plug of translating debris. Solutions for static equilibrium of source areas describe conditions of incipient slope instability

  12. How Concrete Is Concrete?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravemeijer, Koeno

    2011-01-01

    If we want to make something concrete in mathematics education, we are inclined introduce, what we call, "manipulatives", in the form of tactile objects or visual representations. If we want to make something concrete in a everyday-life conversation, we look for an example. In the former, we try to make a concrete model of our own,…

  13. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) of "bath salt" cathinone drug mixtures.

    PubMed

    Lesiak, Ashton D; Musah, Rabi A; Cody, Robert B; Domin, Marek A; Dane, A John; Shepard, Jason R E

    2013-06-21

    Rapid and versatile direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) methods were developed for detection and characterization of synthetic cathinone designer drugs, also known as "bath salts". The speed and efficiency associated with DART-MS testing of such highly unpredictable samples demonstrate the technique as an attractive alternative to conventional GC-MS and LC-MS methods. A series of isobaric and closely related synthetic cathinones, alone and in mixtures, were differentiated using high mass accuracy and in-source collision induced dissociation (CID). Crime laboratories have observed a dramatic rise in the use of these substances, which has caused sample testing backlogs, particularly since the myriad of structurally related compounds are challenging to efficiently differentiate. This challenge is compounded by the perpetual emergence of new structural variants as soon as older generation derivatives become scheduled. Because of the numerous chemical substances that fall into these categories, along with the varying composition and complexity of mixtures of these drugs, DART-MS CID has the potential to dramatically streamline sample analysis, minimize the number of sample preparation steps, and enable rapid characterization of emerging structural analogs.

  14. Direct quantitation of peptide mixtures without standards using clusters formed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leib, Ryan D; Flick, Tawnya G; Williams, Evan R

    2009-05-15

    In electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, ion abundances depend on a number of different factors, including analyte surface activity, competition between analytes for charge, analyte concentration, as well as instrumental factors, including mass-dependent ion transmission and detection. Here, a novel method for obtaining quantitative information about solution-phase concentrations of peptide mixtures is described and demonstrated for five different peptide mixtures with relative concentrations ranging from 0.05% to 50%. In this method, the abundances of large clusters containing anywhere from 0 to 13 impurity molecules are measured and directly related to the relative solution-phase concentration of the peptides. For clusters containing approximately 15 or more peptides, the composition of the clusters approaches the statistical value indicating that these clusters are formed nonspecifically and that any differences in ion detection or ionization efficiency are negligible at these large cluster sizes. This method is accurate to within approximately 20% or better, even when the relative ion intensities of the protonated monomers can differ by over an order of magnitude compared to their solution-phase concentrations. Although less accurate than other quantitation methods that employ internal standards, this method does have the key advantages of speed, simplicity, and the ability to quantitate components in solution even when the identities of the components are unknown.

  15. Mixture model-based atmospheric air mass classification: a probabilistic view of thermodynamic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernin, Jérôme; Vrac, Mathieu; Crevoisier, Cyril; Chédin, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Air mass classification has become an important area in synoptic climatology, simplifying the complexity of the atmosphere by dividing the atmosphere into discrete similar thermodynamic patterns. However, the constant growth of atmospheric databases in both size and complexity implies the need to develop new adaptive classifications. Here, we propose a robust unsupervised and supervised classification methodology of a large thermodynamic dataset, on a global scale and over several years, into discrete air mass groups homogeneous in both temperature and humidity that also provides underlying probability laws. Temperature and humidity at different pressure levels are aggregated into a set of cumulative distribution function (CDF) values instead of classical ones. The method is based on a Gaussian mixture model and uses the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to estimate the parameters of the mixture. Spatially gridded thermodynamic profiles come from ECMWF reanalyses spanning the period 2000-2009. Different aspects are investigated, such as the sensitivity of the classification process to both temporal and spatial samplings of the training dataset. Comparisons of the classifications made either by the EM algorithm or by the widely used k-means algorithm show that the former can be viewed as a generalization of the latter. Moreover, the EM algorithm delivers, for each observation, the probabilities of belonging to each class, as well as the associated uncertainty. Finally, a decision tree is proposed as a tool for interpreting the different classes, highlighting the relative importance of temperature and humidity in the classification process.

  16. Mixture model-based atmospheric air mass classification: a probabilistic view of thermodynamic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernin, Jérôme; Vrac, Mathieu; Crevoisier, Cyril; Chédin, Alain

    2017-04-01

    Air mass classification has become an important area in synoptic climatology, simplifying the complexity of the atmosphere by dividing the atmosphere into discrete similar thermodynamic patterns. However, the constant growth of atmospheric databases in both size and complexity implies the need to develop new adaptive classifications. Here, we propose a robust unsupervised and supervised classification methodology of a large thermodynamic dataset, on a global scale and over several years, into discrete air mass groups homogeneous in both temperature and humidity that also provides underlying probability laws. Temperature and humidity at different pressure levels are aggregated into a set of cumulative distribution function (CDF) values instead of classical ones. The method is based on a Gaussian mixture model and uses the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to estimate the parameters of the mixture. Spatially gridded thermodynamic profiles come from ECMWF reanalyses spanning the period 2000-2009. Different aspects are investigated, such as the sensitivity of the classification process to both temporal and spatial samplings of the training dataset. Comparisons of the classifications made either by the EM algorithm or by the widely used k-means algorithm show that the former can be viewed as a generalization of the latter. Moreover, the EM algorithm delivers, for each observation, the probabilities of belonging to each class, as well as the associated uncertainty. Finally, a decision tree is proposed as a tool for interpreting the different classes, highlighting the relative importance of temperature and humidity in the classification process.

  17. Species Determination and Quantitation in Mixtures Using MRM Mass Spectrometry of Peptides Applied to Meat Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, Yvonne; Watson, Andrew D.; Rigby, Neil M.; Philo, Mark; Peazer, Joshua K.; Kemsley, E. Kate

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple protocol for identifying and quantifying the two components in binary mixtures of species possessing one or more similar proteins. Central to the method is the identification of 'corresponding proteins' in the species of interest, in other words proteins that are nominally the same but possess species-specific sequence differences. When subject to proteolysis, corresponding proteins will give rise to some peptides which are likewise similar but with species-specific variants. These are 'corresponding peptides'. Species-specific peptides can be used as markers for species determination, while pairs of corresponding peptides permit relative quantitation of two species in a mixture. The peptides are detected using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry, a highly specific technique that enables peptide-based species determination even in complex systems. In addition, the ratio of MRM peak areas deriving from corresponding peptides supports relative quantitation. Since corresponding proteins and peptides will, in the main, behave similarly in both processing and in experimental extraction and sample preparation, the relative quantitation should remain comparatively robust. In addition, this approach does not need the standards and calibrations required by absolute quantitation methods. The protocol is described in the context of red meats, which have convenient corresponding proteins in the form of their respective myoglobins. This application is relevant to food fraud detection: the method can detect 1% weight for weight of horse meat in beef. The corresponding protein, corresponding peptide (CPCP) relative quantitation using MRM peak area ratios gives good estimates of the weight for weight composition of a horse plus beef mixture. PMID:27685654

  18. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric characterisation of amiton and the recovery of amiton from concrete, paint, rubber and soil matrices.

    PubMed

    Borrett, Veronica T; Gan, Tiang-Hong; Lakeland, Barry R; Leslie, D Ralph; Mathews, Robert J; Mattsson, Eric R; Riddell, Stuart; Tantaro, Vince

    2003-06-27

    Amiton [O,O-diethyl S-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl] phosphorothiolate], is an organophosphorus chemical included in Schedule 2 of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Verification provisions under the CWC rely on the existence of a database of analytical information for scheduled chemicals and related compounds. Little analytical information is available for amiton. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) characterisation of amiton and its typical impurities (including by-products and degradation products), supported by selective GC detection and 31P NMR data, was undertaken. Twenty-one compounds, including a by-product unique to amiton from an industrial source, were identified. Involatile degradation products of amiton were derivatised to enable their identification by GC-MS. The recovery of amiton from matrices that may be expected in an inspection scenario (i.e. concrete, paint, rubber and soil) was also examined. Paint and concrete matrices were the most useful matrices for the detection of amiton, and its by-products and degradation products. Amiton was readily detected in these matrices after 28 days.

  19. Identifying technical aliases in SELDI mass spectra of complex mixtures of proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomarker discovery datasets created using mass spectrum protein profiling of complex mixtures of proteins contain many peaks that represent the same protein with different charge states. Correlated variables such as these can confound the statistical analyses of proteomic data. Previously we developed an algorithm that clustered mass spectrum peaks that were biologically or technically correlated. Here we demonstrate an algorithm that clusters correlated technical aliases only. Results In this paper, we propose a preprocessing algorithm that can be used for grouping technical aliases in mass spectrometry protein profiling data. The stringency of the variance allowed for clustering is customizable, thereby affecting the number of peaks that are clustered. Subsequent analysis of the clusters, instead of individual peaks, helps reduce difficulties associated with technically-correlated data, and can aid more efficient biomarker identification. Conclusions This software can be used to pre-process and thereby decrease the complexity of protein profiling proteomics data, thus simplifying the subsequent analysis of biomarkers by decreasing the number of tests. The software is also a practical tool for identifying which features to investigate further by purification, identification and confirmation. PMID:24010718

  20. Sampling and analysis method for measuring airborne coal dust mass in mixtures with limestone (rock) dust

    PubMed Central

    Barone, T. L.; Patts, J. R.; Janisko, S. J.; Colinet, J. F.; Patts, L. D.; Beck, T. W.; Mischler, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Airborne coal dust mass measurements in underground bituminous coal mines can be challenged by the presence of airborne limestone dust, which is an incombustible dust applied to prevent the propagation of dust explosions. To accurately measure the coal portion of this mixed airborne dust, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) developed a sampling and analysis protocol that used a stainless steel cassette adapted with an isokinetic inlet and the low temperature ashing (LTA) analytical method. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) routinely utilizes this LTA method to quantify the incombustible content of bulk dust samples collected from the roof, floor, and ribs of mining entries. The use of the stainless steel cassette with isokinetic inlet allowed NIOSH to adopt the LTA method for the analysis of airborne dust samples. Mixtures of known coal and limestone dust masses were prepared in the laboratory, loaded into the stainless steel cassettes, and analyzed to assess the accuracy of this method. Coal dust mass measurements differed from predicted values by an average of 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.1% for samples containing 20%, 91%, and 95% limestone dust, respectively. The ability of this method to accurately quantify the laboratory samples confirmed the validity of this method and allowed NIOSH to successfully measure the coal fraction of airborne dust samples collected in an underground coal mine. PMID:26618374

  1. Sampling and analysis method for measuring airborne coal dust mass in mixtures with limestone (rock) dust.

    PubMed

    Barone, T L; Patts, J R; Janisko, S J; Colinet, J F; Patts, L D; Beck, T W; Mischler, S E

    2016-01-01

    Airborne coal dust mass measurements in underground bituminous coal mines can be challenged by the presence of airborne limestone dust, which is an incombustible dust applied to prevent the propagation of dust explosions. To accurately measure the coal portion of this mixed airborne dust, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) developed a sampling and analysis protocol that used a stainless steel cassette adapted with an isokinetic inlet and the low temperature ashing (LTA) analytical method. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) routinely utilizes this LTA method to quantify the incombustible content of bulk dust samples collected from the roof, floor, and ribs of mining entries. The use of the stainless steel cassette with isokinetic inlet allowed NIOSH to adopt the LTA method for the analysis of airborne dust samples. Mixtures of known coal and limestone dust masses were prepared in the laboratory, loaded into the stainless steel cassettes, and analyzed to assess the accuracy of this method. Coal dust mass measurements differed from predicted values by an average of 0.5%, 0.2%, and 0.1% for samples containing 20%, 91%, and 95% limestone dust, respectively. The ability of this method to accurately quantify the laboratory samples confirmed the validity of this method and allowed NIOSH to successfully measure the coal fraction of airborne dust samples collected in an underground coal mine.

  2. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of a mixture of isobars using the survival yield technique.

    PubMed

    Memboeuf, Antony; Jullien, Laure; Lartia, Rémy; Brasme, Bernard; Gimbert, Yves

    2011-10-01

    Collision induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry experiments were performed to unequivocally separate compounds from an isobaric mixture of two products. The Survival Yield curve was obtained and is shown to consist in a linear combination of the curves corresponding to the two components separately. For such a mixture, a plateau appears on the diagram in lieu of the continuous decrease expected allowing for the structural study of the two components separately. The width of the plateau critically relates to the fragmentation parameters of the two molecular ions, which need to be sufficiently different structurally for the plateau to be observed. However, at constant fragmentation parameters, we have observed the width significantly increases at large m/z. This makes the separation more and more efficient as isobars have larger m/z and the technique complementary to those applicable at low m/z only. We have observed that the vertical position of the plateau relates linearly to the relative concentration of the two compounds that may be useful for quantification. Repeatability was estimated at 2% on a quadrupole ion trap. An advantage of using survival yield curves only, is that a priori knowledge of the respective fragmentation patterns of the two isobars becomes unnecessary. Consequently, similar performances are obtained if fragments are isobaric, which is also demonstrated in our study. The critical case of reverse peptides, at low m/z and similar fragmentation parameters, is also presented as a limitation of the method.

  3. Chemical Discrimination in Turbulent Gas Mixtures with MOX Sensors Validated by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance. PMID:25325339

  4. Doubled heterogeneous crystal nucleation in sediments of hard sphere binary-mass mixtures.

    PubMed

    Löwen, Hartmut; Allahyarov, Elshad

    2011-10-07

    Crystallization during the sedimentation process of a binary colloidal hard spheres mixture is explored by Brownian dynamics computer simulations. The two species are different in buoyant mass but have the same interaction diameter. Starting from a completely mixed system in a finite container, gravity is suddenly turned on, and the crystallization process in the sample is monitored. If the Peclet numbers of the two species are both not too large, crystalline layers are formed at the bottom of the cell. The composition of lighter particles in the sedimented crystal is non-monotonic in the altitude: it is first increasing, then decreasing, and then increasing again. If one Peclet number is large and the other is small, we observe the occurrence of a doubled heterogeneous crystal nucleation process. First, crystalline layers are formed at the bottom container wall which are separated from an amorphous sediment. At the amorphous-fluid interface, a secondary crystal nucleation of layers is identified. This doubled heterogeneous nucleation can be verified in real-space experiments on colloidal mixtures. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  5. Chemical discrimination in turbulent gas mixtures with MOX sensors validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fonollosa, Jordi; Rodríguez-Luján, Irene; Trincavelli, Marco; Vergara, Alexander; Huerta, Ramón

    2014-10-16

    Chemical detection systems based on chemo-resistive sensors usually include a gas chamber to control the sample air flow and to minimize turbulence. However, such a kind of experimental setup does not reproduce the gas concentration fluctuations observed in natural environments and destroys the spatio-temporal information contained in gas plumes. Aiming at reproducing more realistic environments, we utilize a wind tunnel with two independent gas sources that get naturally mixed along a turbulent flow. For the first time, chemo-resistive gas sensors are exposed to dynamic gas mixtures generated with several concentration levels at the sources. Moreover, the ground truth of gas concentrations at the sensor location was estimated by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We used a support vector machine as a tool to show that chemo-resistive transduction can be utilized to reliably identify chemical components in dynamic turbulent mixtures, as long as sufficient gas concentration coverage is used. We show that in open sampling systems, training the classifiers only on high concentrations of gases produces less effective classification and that it is important to calibrate the classification method with data at low gas concentrations to achieve optimal performance.

  6. Heat and mass transfer in reacting mixtures: Molecular dynamics and kinetic theory approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kustova, E.; Nabokova, M.; Kjelstrup, S.; Bedeaux, D.

    2016-11-01

    Transport properties of a binary H2-H mixture with strongly-non-equilibrium dissociation reaction are studied on the basis of two approaches: kinetic theory and molecular dynamics. The gas in the thermostat under the action of temperature gradient is considered. Mass diffusive and measurable heat flux are obtained in the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations; the transport coefficients are extracted from the fluxes using the constitutive equations given by irreversible thermodynamics. For the same conditions, the transport coefficients and the corresponding fluxes are calculated using the modified Chapman-Enskog method for the rarefied flows with non-equilibrium chemical reactions. While the qualitative agreement between the results obtained using the two approaches is found, quantitative differences are however noticeable. The discrepancy in the heat conductivity coefficient is not large but is significant for diffusion coefficients. Possible sources of discrepancies are discussed.

  7. Computerised gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of complex mixtures of alkyl porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Marriott, P J; Gill, J P; Evershed, R P; Hein, C S; Eglinton, G

    1984-01-01

    Computerised capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of complex mixtures of alkyl porphyrins, as their bis-(trimethylsiloxy)silicon(IV) and bis(tert.-butyldimethylsiloxy)silicon(IV) derivatives, is described. The latter derivative is more suitable for routine GC-MS analysis. This computerised GC-MS approach, when applied to the alkyl porphyrins of two geological samples, a bitumen (Gilsonite, Eocene age, UT, U.S.A.) and a crude oil (Boscan, Cretaceous age, West Venezuela), has revealed the highly complex compositions of these fractions. Computer-aided data processing, using relative retention index (RRI) calculations, facilitated the classification of the chromatographic peaks according to structural type and membership of pseudo-homologous series. Computerised GC-MS is compared with, and contrasted to high-performance liquid chromatography as a means of petroporphyrin analysis.

  8. Interspecies transfer of momentum and energy in disparate-mass gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesco-Chueca, P.; Fernandez-Feria, R.; Fernandez de La Mora, J.

    1987-01-01

    A determination is made of collision integrals for the rate of exchange of momentum and tensorial energy between components of a neutral gas binary mixture, for the case where said components have very different atomic masses. Collision integral values are obtained for arbitrary temperatures and velocities of the two components, allowing for large departures of the heavy gas from equilibrium conditions. The range of present interest is that in which the system is perturbed within times of the order of magnitude of the slow relaxation time that characterizes energy transfer between unlike molecules; the light gas distribution function is then Maxwellian to lowest order. The computation is conducted in detail for the case of atomic interactions describable in terms of a Lennard-Jones potential; by combining numerical computations with optimal matching of analytical expressions valid for large and small slip velocities, a set of compact formulas is obtained that holds for high and low temperatures.

  9. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, Arun S.; Singh, Dileep; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Knox, Lerry

    1997-01-01

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising hydrng a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO.sub.3 of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  10. Refractory concretes

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1979-01-01

    Novel concrete compositions comprise particles of aggregate material embedded in a cement matrix, said cement matrix produced by contacting an oxide selected from the group of Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3, Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3, Sm.sub.2 O.sub.3, Eu.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Gd.sub.2 O.sub.3 with an aqueous solution of a salt selected from the group of NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3, NH.sub.4 Cl, YCl.sub.3 and Mg(NO.sub.3).sub.2 to form a fluid mixture; and allowing the fluid mixture to harden.

  11. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of a complex triterpene saponin mixture of Chenopodium quinoa.

    PubMed

    Madl, Tobias; Sterk, Heinz; Mittelbach, Martin; Rechberger, Gerald N

    2006-06-01

    A nano-HPLC electrospray ionization multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) approach was applied to a complex crude triterpene saponin extract of Chenopodium quinoa seed coats. In ESI-MS/MS spectra of triterpene saponins, characteristic fragmentation reactions are observed and allow the determination of aglycones, saccharide sequences, compositions, and branching. Fragmentation of aglycones provided further structural information. The chemical complexity of the mixture was resolved by a complete profiling. Eighty-seven triterpene saponins comprising 19 reported and 68 novel components were identified and studied by MS. In addition to four reported, five novel triterpene aglycones were detected and characterized according to their fragmentation reactions in ESI-MS/MS and electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS). As a novelty fragmentation pathways were proposed and analyzed based upon quantum chemical calculations using a hybrid Hartree-Fock density functional method. Accuracy of the assignment procedure was proven by isolation and structure determination of a novel compound. As the relative distribution and composition of saponins varies between different cultivars and soils, the presented strategy allows a rapid and complete analysis of Chenopodium quinoa saponin distribution and composition, and is particularly suitable for quality control and screening of extracts designated for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and industrial applications.

  12. Permeability of Clay Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, F.; Ekolu, S. O.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the effect of clay addition on water permeability and air permeability of concretes. Clay concrete mixes consisted of 0 to 40% clay content incorporated as cement replacement. Flow methods using triaxial cells and air permeameters were used for measuring the injected water and air flows under pressure. It was found that the higher the clay content in the mixture, the greater the permeability. At higher water-cement ratios (w/c), the paste matrix is less dense and easily allows water to ingress into concrete. But at high clay contents of 30 to 40% clay, the variation in permeability was significantly diminished among different concrete mixtures. It was confirmed that air permeability results were higher than the corresponding water permeability values when all permeability coefficients were converted to intrinsic permeability values.

  13. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  14. Introducing Students to Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analysis and Determination of Kerosene Components in a Complex Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacot, Giselle Mae M.; Lee, Lyn May; Chin, Sung-Tong; Marriott, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-tandem MS (GC-MS/MS) are useful in many separation and characterization procedures. GC-MS is now a common tool in industry and research, and increasingly, GC-MS/MS is applied to the measurement of trace components in complex mixtures. This report describes an upper-level undergraduate experiment…

  15. Mixture model normalization for non-targeted gas chromatography/mass spectrometry metabolomics data.

    PubMed

    Reisetter, Anna C; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Bain, James R; Nodzenski, Michael; Stevens, Robert D; Ilkayeva, Olga; Metzger, Boyd E; Newgard, Christopher B; Lowe, William L; Scholtens, Denise M

    2017-02-02

    Metabolomics offers a unique integrative perspective for health research, reflecting genetic and environmental contributions to disease-related phenotypes. Identifying robust associations in population-based or large-scale clinical studies demands large numbers of subjects and therefore sample batching for gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) non-targeted assays. When run over weeks or months, technical noise due to batch and run-order threatens data interpretability. Application of existing normalization methods to metabolomics is challenged by unsatisfied modeling assumptions and, notably, failure to address batch-specific truncation of low abundance compounds. To curtail technical noise and make GC/MS metabolomics data amenable to analyses describing biologically relevant variability, we propose mixture model normalization (mixnorm) that accommodates truncated data and estimates per-metabolite batch and run-order effects using quality control samples. Mixnorm outperforms other approaches across many metrics, including improved correlation of non-targeted and targeted measurements and superior performance when metabolite detectability varies according to batch. For some metrics, particularly when truncation is less frequent for a metabolite, mean centering and median scaling demonstrate comparable performance to mixnorm. When quality control samples are systematically included in batches, mixnorm is uniquely suited to normalizing non-targeted GC/MS metabolomics data due to explicit accommodation of batch effects, run order and varying thresholds of detectability. Especially in large-scale studies, normalization is crucial for drawing accurate conclusions from non-targeted GC/MS metabolomics data.

  16. Multiscale Constitutive Modeling of Asphalt Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Benjamin Shane

    Multiscale modeling of asphalt concrete has become a popular technique for gaining improved insight into the physical mechanisms that affect the material's behavior and ultimately its performance. This type of modeling considers asphalt concrete, not as a homogeneous mass, but rather as an assemblage of materials at different characteristic length scales. For proper modeling these characteristic scales should be functionally definable and should have known properties. Thus far, research in this area has not focused significant attention on functionally defining what the characteristic scales within asphalt concrete should be. Instead, many have made assumptions on the characteristic scales and even the characteristic behaviors of these scales with little to no support. This research addresses these shortcomings by directly evaluating the microstructure of the material and uses these results to create materials of different characteristic length scales as they exist within the asphalt concrete mixture. The objectives of this work are to; 1) develop mechanistic models for the linear viscoelastic (LVE) and damage behaviors in asphalt concrete at different length scales and 2) develop a mechanistic, mechanistic/empirical, or phenomenological formulation to link the different length scales into a model capable of predicting the effects of microstructural changes on the linear viscoelastic behaviors of asphalt concrete mixture, e.g., a microstructure association model for asphalt concrete mixture. Through the microstructural study it is found that asphalt concrete mixture can be considered as a build-up of three different phases; asphalt mastic, fine aggregate matrix (FAM), and finally the coarse aggregate particles. The asphalt mastic is found to exist as a homogenous material throughout the mixture and FAM, and the filler content within this material is consistent with the volumetric averaged concentration, which can be calculated from the job mix formula. It is also

  17. Enantiomer-specific analysis of multi-component mixtures by correlated electron imaging–ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fanood, Mohammad M Rafiee; Ram, N. Bhargava; Lehmann, C. Stefan; Powis, Ivan; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous, enantiomer-specific identification of chiral molecules in multi-component mixtures is extremely challenging. Many established techniques for single-component analysis fail to provide selectivity in multi-component mixtures and lack sensitivity for dilute samples. Here we show how enantiomers may be differentiated by mass-selected photoelectron circular dichroism using an electron–ion coincidence imaging spectrometer. As proof of concept, vapours containing ∼1% of two chiral monoterpene molecules, limonene and camphor, are irradiated by a circularly polarized femtosecond laser, resulting in multiphoton near-threshold ionization with little molecular fragmentation. Large chiral asymmetries (2–4%) are observed in the mass-tagged photoelectron angular distributions. These asymmetries switch sign according to the handedness (R- or S-) of the enantiomer in the mixture and scale with enantiomeric excess of a component. The results demonstrate that mass spectrometric identification of mixtures of chiral molecules and quantitative determination of enantiomeric excess can be achieved in a table-top instrument. PMID:26104140

  18. Aerodynamic acceleration of heavy particles in a supersonic jet of a binary mixture of gases with disparate-mass components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarev, Alexander V.; Tatarenko, Kira A.; Amerik, Alexander Yu.

    2017-08-01

    The method of moments for the ellipsoidal distribution function was used for solving the Boltzmann equation describing binary gas mixtures with large mass disparity and highly diluted heavy component. Analysis of the system of moment equations results in a simple analytic expression for the terminal slip velocities of components that depends on the conditions in the source of jet, composition of mixture, and C6 constant of the attractive branch of the interaction potential. The results are in good agreement with experimental data including low pressure conditions when the Miller-Andres correlation is unsatisfactory.

  19. Frost resistance of concrete surfaces coated with waterproofing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klovas, A.; Dauksys, M.; Ciuprovaite, G.

    2015-03-01

    Present research lays emphasis on the problem of concrete surface exposed to aggressive surrounding quality. The test was conducted with concrete surfaces coated with different waterproofing materials exposed in solution of 3 % of sodium sulphate. Research was performed according to LST EN 1338:2003 standard requirements. Technological properties of concrete mixture as well as physical-mechanical properties of formed concrete specimens were established. The resistance of concrete to freezing - thawing cycles was prognosticated according to the porosity parameters established by the kinetic of water absorption. Five different waterproofing materials (coatings) such as liquid bitumen-rubber based, elastic fiber-strengthened, silane-siloxane based emulsion, mineral binder based and liquid rubber (caoutchouc) based coatings were used. Losses by mass of coating materials and specimens surface fractures were calculated based on the results of frost resistance test. Open code program "ImageJ" was used for visual analysis of concrete specimens. Based on the results, aggressive surrounding did not influence specimens coated with elastic, fibre-strengthened, mineral materials. On the other hand, specimens coated with liquid rubber (caoutchouc) based material were greatly influenced by aggressive surrounding. The biggest losses of specimen surface concrete (fractures) were obtained with silane-siloxane based emulsion coating. Generally, specimens coated with waterproofing materials were less influenced by aggressive surrounding compared with those without.

  20. Optical cell with periodic resistive heating for the measurement of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartung, M; Köhler, W

    2007-08-01

    A new technique for the measurement of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in liquids has been developed. Similar to laser induced dynamic gratings, a temperature grating is created in the sample. Thermal expansion transforms the temperature into a refractive-index grating, which is read by diffraction of a readout laser beam. In a multicomponent mixture an additional concentration grating is formed by thermal diffusion driven by the temperature gradients of the temperature grating. Differently to laser induced dynamic grating experiments we use Joule heating instead of optical heating. For that purpose we have built cuvettes which have a grating of transparent conducting strips on the inner side of one of their windows. If heated by an electric current a temperature grating will build up in the sample. Both the heat equation and the extended diffusion equation have been solved in two dimensions to allow for quantitative data analysis. Our apparatus and method of analysis have been validated by measurements of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in pure and binary liquids. Heat diffusion can be correctly determined as was shown for pure toluene, pure dodecane, and the symmetric mixture of isobutylbenzene dodecane. Mass and thermal diffusions were studied in the three symmetric mixtures of dodecane, isobutylbenzene, and tetralin. The obtained diffusion and Soret coefficients agree with the literature values within the experimental errors. Uncompensated transient heating effects limit the resolution of the experimental technique.

  1. Improved Resolution of Hydrocarbon Structures and Constitutional Isomers in Complex Mixtures Using Gas Chromatography-Vacuum Ultraviolet-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacman, Gabriel; Wilson, Kevin R.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Worton, David R.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Nah, Theodora; Hohaus, Thorsten; Gonin, Marc; Kroll, Jesse H.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2012-01-30

    Understanding the composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important for environmental studies in a variety of fields, but many prevalent compounds cannot be confidently identified using traditional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) techniques. In this study, we use vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) ionization to elucidate the structures of a traditionally “unresolved complex mixture” by separating components by GC retention time, tR, and mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, which are used to determine carbon number, NC, and the number of rings and double bonds, NDBE. Constitutional isomers are resolved on the basis of tR, enabling the most complete quantitative analysis to date of structural isomers in an environmentally relevant hydrocarbon mixture. Unknown compounds are classified in this work by carbon number, degree of saturation, presence of rings, and degree of branching, providing structural constraints. The capabilities of this analysis are explored using diesel fuel, in which constitutional isomer distribution patterns are shown to be reproducible between carbon numbers and follow predictable rules. Nearly half of the aliphatic hydrocarbon mass is shown to be branched, suggesting branching is more important in diesel fuel than previously shown. Lastly, the classification of unknown hydrocarbons and the resolution of constitutional isomers significantly improves resolution capabilities for any complex hydrocarbon mixture.

  2. Observation of a Strong Atom-Dimer Attraction in a Mass-Imbalanced Fermi-Fermi Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jag, Michael; Zaccanti, Matteo; Cetina, Marko; Lous, Rianne S.; Schreck, Florian; Grimm, Rudolf; Petrov, Dmitry S.; Levinsen, Jesper

    2014-02-01

    We investigate a mixture of ultracold fermionic K40 atoms and weakly bound Li6K40 dimers on the repulsive side of a heteronuclear atomic Feshbach resonance. By radio-frequency spectroscopy we demonstrate that the normally repulsive atom-dimer interaction is turned into a strong attraction. The phenomenon can be understood as a three-body effect in which two heavy K40 fermions exchange the light Li6 atom, leading to attraction in odd partial-wave channels (mainly p wave). Our observations show that mass imbalance in a fermionic system can profoundly change the character of interactions as compared to the well-established mass-balanced case.

  3. Asphalt Concrete for Cold Regions, A Comparative Laboratory Study and Analysis of Mixtures Containing Soft and Hard Grades of Asphalt Cement,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    ilto n aggregate ................................................................................................. ... 4 4 . B razil test eq u ipm en...t .................................................................................................... 5 5. D iagram o f B razil test...80 B J1 DEMPSEY, J INGERSOLL, T CJOHNSON UNCLAS7SIFIED CRREL-80-5 N ’~EVEL. Asphalt concrete tor cold regions Cold DTIC o , ELECTE i i L MAR 2 5 1980

  4. Accurate mass measurements for peptide and protein mixtures by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, T W D; Duan, L; Sze, T P E

    2002-10-15

    A new analytical scheme based on a combination of scanning FTMS, multiple-ion filling, and potential ramping methods has been developed for accurate molecular mass measurement of peptide and protein mixtures using broadband MALDI-FTMS. The scanning FTMS method alleviates the problems of time-of-flight effect for FTMS with an external MALDI ion source and provides a systematic means of sampling ions of different mass-to-charge ratios. The multiple-ion filling method is an effective way of trapping and retaining ions from successive ion generation/accumulation events. The potential ramping method allows the use of high trapping potentials for effective trapping of ions of high kinetic energies and the use of low trapping potentials for high-resolution detection of the trapped ions. With this analytical scheme, high-resolution broadband MALDI mass spectra covering a wide mass range of 1000-5700 Da were obtained. For peptide mixtures of mass range 1000-3500 Da, calibration errors of low part-per-millions were demonstrated using a parabolic calibration equation f2 = ML1/m2 + ML2/m + ML3, where f is the measured cyclotron frequency and ML1, ML2, and ML3 are calibration constants.

  5. The Application of Gaussian Mixture Models for Signal Quantification in MALDI-ToF Mass Spectrometry of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Spainhour, John Christian G.; Janech, Michael G.; Schwacke, John H.; Velez, Juan Carlos Q.; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) coupled with stable isotope standards (SIS) has been used to quantify native peptides. This peptide quantification by MALDI-TOF approach has difficulties quantifying samples containing peptides with ion currents in overlapping spectra. In these overlapping spectra the currents sum together, which modify the peak heights and make normal SIS estimation problematic. An approach using Gaussian mixtures based on known physical constants to model the isotopic cluster of a known compound is proposed here. The characteristics of this approach are examined for single and overlapping compounds. The approach is compared to two commonly used SIS quantification methods for single compound, namely Peak Intensity method and Riemann sum area under the curve (AUC) method. For studying the characteristics of the Gaussian mixture method, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin-2-10, and Angiotenisn-1-9 and their associated SIS peptides were used. The findings suggest, Gaussian mixture method has similar characteristics as the two methods compared for estimating the quantity of isolated isotopic clusters for single compounds. All three methods were tested using MALDI-TOF mass spectra collected for peptides of the renin-angiotensin system. The Gaussian mixture method accurately estimated the native to labeled ratio of several isolated angiotensin peptides (5.2% error in ratio estimation) with similar estimation errors to those calculated using peak intensity and Riemann sum AUC methods (5.9% and 7.7%, respectively). For overlapping angiotensin peptides, (where the other two methods are not applicable) the estimation error of the Gaussian mixture was 6.8%, which is within the acceptable range. In summary, for single compounds the Gaussian mixture method is equivalent or marginally superior compared to the existing methods of peptide quantification and is capable of quantifying overlapping (convolved) peptides within the

  6. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as to their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete for OTEC plants. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6-1/2 years in seawater.

  7. Antifouling marine concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Vind, H P; Mathews, C W

    1980-07-01

    Various toxic agents were evaluated as the their capability to prevent or inhibit the attachment of marine fouling organisms to concrete. Creosote and bis-(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) were impregnated into porous aggregate which was used in making concrete. Cuprous oxide, triphenyltin hydroxide (TPTH), and 2-2-bis-(p-methoxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (methoxychlor) were used as dry additives. Two proprietary formulations were applied as coatings on untreated concrete. Test specimens were exposed at Port Hueneme, CA, and Key Biscayne, FL. The efficacy of toxicants was determined by periodically weighing the adhering fouling organisms. Concrete prepared with an aggregate impregnated with a TBTO/creosote mixture has demonstrated the best antifouling performance of those specimens exposed for more than one year. The two proprietary coatings and the concrete containing methoxychlor, TPTH, and cuprous oxide as dry additives have exhibited good antifouling properties, but they have been exposed for a shorter time. The strength of concrete containing the toxicants was acceptable, and the toxicants did not increase the corrosion rate of reinforcing rods. Organotin compounds were essentially unchanged in concrete specimens exposed 6 1/2 years in seawater.

  8. The Interplay of In Situ Stress Ratio and Transverse Isotropy in the Rock Mass on Prestressed Concrete-Lined Pressure Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanjuntak, T. D. Y. F.; Marence, M.; Schleiss, A. J.; Mynett, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical and hydraulic behaviour of passively prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels embedded in elastic transversely isotropic rocks subjected to non-uniform in situ stresses. Two cases are distinguished based on whether the in situ vertical stress in the rock mass is higher, or lower than the in situ horizontal stress. A two-dimensional finite element model was used to study the influence of dip angle, α, and horizontal-to-vertical stress ratio, k, on the bearing capacity of prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels. The study reveals that the in situ stress ratio and the orientation of stratifications in the rock mass significantly affect the load sharing between the rock mass and the lining. The distribution of stresses and deformations as a result of tunnel construction processes exhibits a symmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with either horizontal or vertical stratification planes, whereas it demonstrates an unsymmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with inclined stratification planes. The results obtained for a specific value α with coefficient k are identical to that for α + 90° with coefficient 1/ k by rotating the tunnel axis by 90°. The maximum internal water pressure was determined by offsetting the prestress-induced hoop strains at the final lining intrados against the seepage-induced hoop strains. As well as assessing the internal water pressure, this approach is capable of identifying potential locations where longitudinal cracks may occur in the final lining.

  9. Tall fescue forage mass in a grass-legume mixture: predicted efficiency of indirect selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High fertilizer prices and improved environmental stewardship have increased interest in grass-legume mixed pastures. It has been hypothesized, but not validated, that the ecological combining ability between grasses and legumes can be improved by breeding specifically for mixture performance. Thi...

  10. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J; Bartish, Igor V; Cornelissen, Johannes H C; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-05-07

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability.

  11. Larger phylogenetic distances in litter mixtures: lower microbial biomass and higher C/N ratios but equal mass loss

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu; Berg, Matty P.; Butenschoen, Olaf; Murray, Phil J.; Bartish, Igor V.; Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.; Dong, Ming; Prinzing, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic distances of coexisting species differ greatly within plant communities, but their consequences for decomposers and decomposition remain unknown. We hypothesized that large phylogenetic distance of leaf litter mixtures increases differences of their litter traits, which may, in turn, result in increased resource complementarity or decreased resource concentration for decomposers and hence increased or decreased chemical transformation and reduction of litter. We conducted a litter mixture experiment including 12 common temperate tree species (evolutionarily separated by up to 106 Myr), and sampled after seven months, at which average mass loss was more than 50%. We found no effect of increased phylogenetic distance on litter mass loss or on abundance and diversity of invertebrate decomposers. However, phylogenetic distance decreased microbial biomass and increased carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of litter mixtures. Consistently, four litter traits showed (marginally) significant phylogenetic signal and in three of these traits increasing trait difference decreased microbial biomass and increased C/N. We suggest that phylogenetic proximity of litter favours microbial decomposers and chemical transformation of litter owing to a resource concentration effect. This leads to a new hypothesis: closely related plant species occurring in the same niche should promote and profit from increased nutrient availability. PMID:25876845

  12. A NEW MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory



    Most organic compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and cannot be easily identified from low resolution mass spectra. Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer in a new way to determine exact mas...

  13. A NEW MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory



    Most organic compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and cannot be easily identified from low resolution mass spectra. Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer in a new way to determine exact mas...

  14. Purification and Quantification of an Isomeric Compound in a Mixture by Collisional Excitation in Multistage Mass Spectrometry Experiments.

    PubMed

    Jeanne Dit Fouque, Dany; Maroto, Alicia; Memboeuf, Antony

    2016-11-15

    The differentiation, characterization, and quantification of isomers and/or isobars in mixtures is a recurrent problem in mass spectrometry and more generally in analytical chemistry. Here we present a new strategy to assess the purity of a compound that is susceptible to be contaminated with another isomeric side-product in trace levels. Providing one of the isomers is available as pure sample, this new strategy allows the detection of isomeric contamination. This is done thanks to a "gas-phase collisional purification" inside an ion trap mass spectrometer paving the way for an improved analysis of at least similar samples. This strategy consists in using collision induced dissociation (CID) multistage mass spectrometry (MS(2) and MS(3)) experiments and the survival yield (SY) technique. It has been successfully applied to mixtures of cyclic poly(L-lactide) (PLA) with increasing amounts of its linear topological isomer. Purification in gas phase of PLA mixtures was established based on SY curves obtained in MS(3) mode: all samples gave rise to the same SY curve corresponding then to the pure cyclic component. This new strategy was sensitive enough to detect traces of linear PLA (<3%) in a sample of cyclic PLA that was supposedly pure according to other characterization techniques ((1)H NMR, MALDI-HRMS, and size-exclusion chromatography). Moreover, in this case, the presence of linear isomer was undetectable according to MS/MS or MS/MS/MS analysis only as fragment ions are also of the same m/z values. This type of approach could easily be implemented in hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques to improve the structural and quantitative analysis of complex samples.

  15. Enzyme-Coupled Nanoparticles-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Searching for Low-Mass Inhibitors of Enzymes in Complex Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Da Silva, David; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2014-04-01

    In this report, enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles (EMPs) were shown to be an effective affinity-based tool for finding specific interactions between enzymatic targets and the low-mass molecules in complex mixtures using classic MALDI-TOF apparatus. EMPs used in this work act as nonorganic matrix enabling ionization of small molecules without any interference in the low-mass range (enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization MS, ENALDI MS) and simultaneously carry the superficial specific binding sites to capture inhibitors present in a studied mixture. We evaluated ENALDI approach in two complementary variations: `ion fading' (IF-ENALDI), based on superficial adsorption of inhibitors and `ion hunting' (IH-ENALDI), based on selective pre-concentration of inhibitors. IF-ENALDI was applied for two sets of enzyme-inhibitor pairs: tyrosinase-glabridin and trypsin-leupeptin and for the real plant sample: Sparrmannia discolor leaf and stem methanol extract. The efficacy of IH-ENALDI was shown for the pair of trypsin-leupeptin. Both ENALDI approaches pose an alternative for bioassay-guided fractionation, the common method for finding inhibitors in the complex mixtures.

  16. Enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for searching for low-mass inhibitors of enzymes in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Salwiński, Aleksander; Da Silva, David; Delépée, Raphaël; Maunit, Benoît

    2014-04-01

    In this report, enzyme-coupled magnetic nanoparticles (EMPs) were shown to be an effective affinity-based tool for finding specific interactions between enzymatic targets and the low-mass molecules in complex mixtures using classic MALDI-TOF apparatus. EMPs used in this work act as nonorganic matrix enabling ionization of small molecules without any interference in the low-mass range (enzyme-coupled nanoparticles-assisted laser desorption ionization MS, ENALDI MS) and simultaneously carry the superficial specific binding sites to capture inhibitors present in a studied mixture. We evaluated ENALDI approach in two complementary variations: 'ion fading' (IF-ENALDI), based on superficial adsorption of inhibitors and 'ion hunting' (IH-ENALDI), based on selective pre-concentration of inhibitors. IF-ENALDI was applied for two sets of enzyme-inhibitor pairs: tyrosinase-glabridin and trypsin-leupeptin and for the real plant sample: Sparrmannia discolor leaf and stem methanol extract. The efficacy of IH-ENALDI was shown for the pair of trypsin-leupeptin. Both ENALDI approaches pose an alternative for bioassay-guided fractionation, the common method for finding inhibitors in the complex mixtures.

  17. METALLURGICAL PROGRAMS: CALCULATION OF MASS FROM VOLUME, DENSITY OF MIXTURES, AND CONVERSION OF ATOMIC TO WEIGHT PERCENT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, H.

    1994-01-01

    The Metallurgical Programs include three simple programs which calculate solutions to problems common to metallurgical engineers and persons making metal castings. The first program calculates the mass of a binary ideal (alloy) given the weight fractions and densities of the pure components and the total volume. The second program calculates the densities of a binary ideal mixture. The third program converts the atomic percentages of a binary mixture to weight percentages. The programs use simple equations to assist the materials staff with routine calculations. The Metallurgical Programs are written in Microsoft QuickBASIC for interactive execution and have been implemented on an IBM PC-XT/AT operating MS-DOS 2.1 or higher with 256K bytes of memory. All instructions needed by the user appear as prompts as the software is used. Data is input using the keyboard only and output is via the monitor. The Metallurgical programs were written in 1987.

  18. Large-scale inhomogeneities in solutions of low molar mass compounds and mixtures of liquids: supramolecular structures or nanobubbles?

    PubMed

    Sedlák, Marián; Rak, Dmytro

    2013-02-28

    In textbooks, undersaturated solutions of low molar mass compounds and mixtures of freely miscible liquids are considered as homogeneous at larger length scales exceeding appreciably dimensions of individual molecules. However, growing experimental evidence reveals that it is not the case. Large-scale structures with sizes on the order of 100 nm are present in solutions and mixtures used in everyday life and research practice, especially in aqueous systems. These mesoscale inhomogeneities are long-lived, and (relatively slow) kinetics of their formation can be monitored upon mixing the components. Nevertheless, the nature of these structures and mechanisms behind their formation are not clear yet. Since it was previously suggested that these can be nanobubbles stabilized by adsorbed solute at the gas/solvent interface, we devote the current study to addressing this question. Static and dynamic light scattering was used to investigate solutions and mixtures prepared at ordinary conditions (equilibrated with air at 1 atm), prepared with degassed solvent, and solutions and mixtures degassed after formation of large structures. The behavior of large structures in strong gravitational centrifugal fields was also investigated. Systems from various categories were chosen for this study: aqueous solutions of an inorganic ionic compound (MgSO4), organic ionic compound (citric acid), uncharged organic compound (urea), and a mixture of water with organic solvent freely miscible with water (tert-butyl alcohol). Obtained results show that these structures are not nanobubbles in all cases. Visualization of large-scale structures via nanoparticle tracking analysis is presented. NTA results confirm conclusions from our previous light scattering work.

  19. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry interlaboratory comparison of mixtures of polystyrene with different end groups: statistical analysis of mass fractions and mass moments.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Charles M; Wetzel, Stephanie J; Flynn, Kathleen M; Fanconi, Bruno M; VanderHart, David L; Wallace, William E

    2005-07-15

    A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) interlaboratory comparison was conducted on mixtures of synthetic polymers having the same repeat unit and closely matching molecular mass distributions but with different end groups. The interlaboratory comparison was designed to see how well the results from a group of experienced laboratories would agree on the mass fraction, and molecular mass distribution, of each polymer in a series of binary mixtures. Polystyrenes of a molecular mass near 9000 u were used. Both polystyrenes were initiated with the same butyl initiator; however, one was terminated with -H (termed PSH) and the other was terminated with -CH2CH2OH (termed PSOH). End group composition of the individual polymers was checked by MALDI-TOF MS and by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Five mixtures were created gravimetrically with mass ratios between 95:5 and 10:90 PSOH/PSH. Mixture compositions where measured by NMR and by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR). NMR and FT-IR were used to benchmark the performance of these methods in comparison to MALDI-TOF MS. Samples of these mixtures were sent to any institution requesting it. A total of 14 institutions participated. Analysis of variance was used to examine the influences of the independent parameters (participating laboratory, MALDI matrix, instrument manufacturer, TOF mass separation mode) on the measured mass fractions and molecular mass distributions for each polymer in each mixture. Two parameters, participating laboratory and instrument manufacturer, were determined to have a statistically significant influence. MALDI matrix and TOF mass separation mode (linear or reflectron) were found not to have a significant influence. Improper mass calibration, inadequate instrument optimization with respect to high signal-to-noise ratio across the entire mass range, and poor data analysis methods (e.g., baseline subtraction and peak integration

  20. Durability of concrete materials in high-magnesium brine

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, L.D.; Poole, T.S.; Burkes, J.P.

    1994-03-01

    Cement pastes and mortars representing 11 combinations of candidate concrete materials were cast in the laboratory and monitored for susceptibility to chemical deterioration in high-magnesium brine. Mixtures were selected to include materials included in the current leading candidate concrete for seals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Some materials were included in the experimental matrix to answer questions that had arisen during study of the concrete used for construction of the liner of the WIPP waste-handling shaft. Mixture combinations compared Class C and Class F fly ashes, presence or absence of an expansive component, and presence or absence of salt as a mixture component. Experimental conditions exposed the pastes and mortars to extreme conditions, those being very high levels of Mg ion and an effectively unlimited supply of brine. All pastes and mortars showed deterioration with brine exposure. In general, mortars deteriorated more extensively than the corresponding pastes. Two-inch cube specimens of mortar were not uniformly deteriorated, but showed obvious zoning even after a year in the brine, with a relatively unreacted zone remaining at the center of each cube. Loss of calcium from the calcium hydroxide of paste/aggregate interfaces caused measurable strength loss in the reacted zone comprising the outer portion of every mortar specimen. The current candidate mass concrete for WIPP seals includes salt as an initial component, and has a relatively closed initial microstructure. Both of these features contribute to its suitability for use in large placements within the Salado Formation.

  1. Targeted high-resolution ion mobility separation coupled to ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry of endocrine disruptors in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Paolo; Thompson, Christopher J; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-04-21

    Traditional separation and detection of targeted compounds from complex mixtures from environmental matrices requires the use of lengthy prefractionation steps and high-resolution mass analyzers due to the large number of chemical components and their large structural diversity (highly isomeric). In the present work, selected accumulation trapped ion mobility spectrometry (SA-TIMS) is coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) for direct separation and characterization of targeted endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDC) from a complex environmental matrix in a single analysis. In particular, targeted identification based on high-resolution mobility (R ∼ 70-120) and ultrahigh-resolution mass measurements (R > 400 000) of seven commonly targeted EDC and their isobars (e.g., bisphenol A, (Z)- and (E)-diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, estrone, α-estradiol, and 17-ethynylestradiol) is shown from a complex mixture of water-soluble organic matter (e.g., Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Standard II) complemented with reference standard measurements and theoretical calculations (<3% error).

  2. The direct determination of double bond positions in lipid mixtures by liquid chromatography/in-line ozonolysis/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chenxing; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2013-01-31

    The direct determination of double bond positions in unsaturated lipids using in-line ozonolysis-mass spectrometry (O(3)-MS) is described. In this experiment, ozone penetrates through the semi-permeable Teflon AF-2400 tubing containing a flow of a solution of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). Unsaturated FAME are thus oxidized by the ozone and cleaved at the double bond positions. The ozonolysis products then flow directly into the atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source of a mass spectrometer for analysis. Aldehyde products retaining the methyl ester group are indicative of the double bond positions in unsaturated FAME. For the first time, O(3)-MS is able to couple directly to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), making the double bond localization in lipid mixtures possible. The application of LC/O(3)-MS has been demonstrated for a fat sample from bovine adipose tissue. A total of 9 unsaturated FAME including 6 positional isomers were identified unambiguously, without comparison to standards. The in-line ozonolysis reaction apparatus is applicable to most mass spectrometers without instrumental modification; it is also directly compatible with various LC columns. The LC/O(3)-MS method described here is thus a practical, versatile and easy to use new approach to the direct determination of double bond positions in lipids, even in complex mixtures.

  3. Two-dimensional mass defect matrix plots for mapping genealogical links in mixtures of lignin depolymerisation products.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-07-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant natural biopolymer, and lignin wastes are therefore potentially significant sources for renewable chemicals such as fuel compounds, as alternatives to fossil fuels. Waste valorisation of lignin is currently limited to a few applications such as in the pulp industry, however, because of the lack of effective extraction and characterisation methods for the chemically highly complex mixtures after decomposition. Here, we have implemented high resolution mass spectrometry and developed two-dimensional mass defect matrix plots as a data visualisation tool, similar to the Kendrick mass defect plots implemented in fields such as petroleomics. These 2D matrix plots greatly simplified the highly convoluted lignin mass spectral data acquired from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)-mass spectrometry, and the derived metrics provided confident peak assignments and strongly improved structural mapping of lignin decomposition product series from the various linkages within the lignin polymer after electrochemical decomposition. Graphical Abstract 2D mass defect matrix plot for a lignin sample after decomposition.

  4. Performance of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, H. A.; Grugel, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in a lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and, by oxidation of the soil, iron and sulfur can be produced. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approx.]91 C) and room temperature (^21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (^21 C) and ^-101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, the compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibres. The lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt- Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to i hour. Glass fibres and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass fibres were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Beams strengthened with glass fibres showed to exhibit an increase in the flexural strength by as much as 45%.

  5. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    DOEpatents

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1997-04-29

    A method for producing quick setting concrete is provided comprising mixing a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring. 2 figs.

  6. Physical properties of double-sound modes in disparate-mass gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, R. J.; Johnson, E. A.

    For gas mixtures of very heavy with very light molecules, solution of the dispersion relation shows that at moderately high frequencies there are two distinct modes that must be taken into account in describing forced sound propagation, a fast wave and a slow one. Detailed properties of these modes (incorporating small corrections to published results) are presented for Xe-He, and the physical nature of the modes is discussed. The slow wave is found to be essentially a sound wave in the heavy species alone, whereas, at sufficiently high frequencies, the fast wave becomes a dusty-gas-type disturbance in the light species.

  7. Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

    2011-05-21

    Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

  8. Enhancement of concrete properties for pavement slabs using waste metal drillings and silica fume.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Abolfazl; Arjmandi, Mohsen

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study on the effects of steel fibres and waste metal drillings on the mechanical/physical behaviour of conventional and silica fume concrete. The amount of silica fume used was 10% of cement by mass and the amount of steel fibres and metal drillings used in both concrete mixtures was 0.5% by concrete volume for steel fibres and 0.0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75% for metal drillings, respectively. In total, 10 different mixtures were made and tested for compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, flexural strength and toughness. Our data reveal the significant impact of the effect of silica fume, steel fibres and industrial waste metal drillings on the mechanical and physical characteristics of concrete mixtures. The results also show that mixtures with steel fibres and waste metal drillings have comparable behaviour. Hence, there is a potential for use of waste metal drillings as an alternative to steel fibres for specific cases such as concrete pavement slabs.

  9. Identification of microbial mixtures by capillary electrophoresis/selective tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Anren; Tsai, Pei-Jen; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for identifying specific bacteria in bacterial mixtures by using CE-selective MS/MS of peptide marker ions associated with the bacteria of interest. We searched the CE-MS/MS spectra acquired from the proteolytic digests of pure bacterial cell extracts against protein databases. The identified peptides that match the protein associated with the corresponding species were selected as marker ions for bacterial identification. Specific peptide marker ions were obtained for each of the following three pathogens: Pseudomonas aeruginasa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. To identify a bacterial species in a sample, we performed CE-MS/MS analysis of the selected marker ions in the proteolytic digest of the cell extract and then performed protein database searches. The selected peptides that we identified correctly from Xcorr values ranking at the top of the search results allowed us to identify the corresponding bacterial species present in the sample. We have applied this method successfully to the identification of various mixtures of the three pathogens. Even minor bacterial species present at a concentration of 1% can be identified with great confidence. This method for CE-MS/MS analysis of bacteria-specific marker peptides provides excellent selectivity and high accuracy when identifying bacterial species in complex systems. In addition, we have used this approach to identify P. aeruginasa in a saliva sample spiked with E.coli and P. aeruginasa.

  10. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of a complex mixture of native and oxidized phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Losito, I; Facchini, L; Diomede, S; Conte, E; Megli, F M; Cataldi, T R I; Palmisano, F

    2015-11-27

    A mixture of native and oxidized phospholipids (PLs), generated by the soybean lipoxygenase type V-catalyzed partial oxidation of a lipid extract obtained from human platelets, was analyzed by Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography-ElectroSpray Ionization-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (HILIC-ESI-MS/MS). The complexity of the resulting mixture was remarkable, considering that the starting lipid extract, containing (as demonstrated in a previous study) about 130 native PLs, was enriched with enzymatically generated hydroperoxylated derivatives and chemically generated hydroxylated forms of PLs bearing polyunsaturated side chains. Nonetheless, the described analytical approach proved to be very powerful; indeed, focusing on phosphatidylcolines (PCs), the most abundant PL class in human platelets, about fifty different native/oxidized species could be identified in a single HILIC-ESI-MS/MS run. Low-energy collision induced dissociation tandem MS (CID-MS/MS) experiments on chromatographically separated species showed single neutral losses of H2O2 and H2O to be typical fragmentation pathways of hydroperoxylated PCs, whereas a single H2O loss was observed for hydroxylated ones. Moreover, diagnostic losses of n-hexanal or n-pentanol were exploited to recognize PCs hydroperoxylated on the last but five carbon atom of a ɷ-6 polyunsaturated side chain. Despite the low resolution of the 3D ion trap mass analyzer used, the described HILIC-ESI-MS/MS approach appears very promising for the identification of oxidized lipids in oxidatively stressed complex biological systems.

  11. The analysis of aqueous mixtures using liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Steven

    1999-02-12

    The focus of this dissertation is the use of chromatographic methods coupled with electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS) for the determination of both organic and inorganic compounds in aqueous solutions. The combination of liquid chromatography (LC) methods and ES-MS offers one of the foremost methods for determining compounds in complex aqueous solutions. In this work, LC-ES-MS methods are devised using ion exclusion chromatography, reversed phase chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, as well as capillary electrophoresis (CE). For an aqueous sample, these LC-ES-MS and CE-ES-MS techniques require no sample preparation or analyte derivatization, which makes it possible to observe a wide variety of analytes as they exist in solution. The majority of this work focuses on the use of LC-ES-MS for the determination of unknown products and intermediates formed during electrochemical incineration (ECI), an experimental waste remediation process. This report contains a general introduction to the project and the general conclusions. Four chapters have been removed for separate processing. Titles are: Chapter 2: Determination of small carboxylic acids by ion exclusion chromatography with electrospray mass spectrometry; Chapter 3: Electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone in aqueous media using a quaternary metal oxide electrode in the absence of a soluble supporting electrolyte; Chapter 4: The determination of electrochemical incineration products of 4-chlorophenol by liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry; and Chapter 5: Determination of small carboxylic acids by capillary electrophoresis with electrospray mass spectrometry.

  12. Fast, high-sensitivity, multipesticide analysis of complex mixtures with supersonic gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Maya; Gordin, Alexander; Goldshlag, Paulina; Lehotay, Steven J; Amnirav, Aviv

    2002-10-18

    We developed a new instrumental approach, termed Supersonic GC-MS, which achieves fast, sensitive, confirmatory and quantitative analysis of a broad range of pesticides in complex agricultural matrices. Our Supersonic GC-MS system is a modification of a bench-top Agilent 6890 GC+5972 MSD with a supersonic molecular beam (SMB) interface and fly-through EI ion source. One of the main advantages of Supersonic GC-MS is an enhanced molecular ion (M+) in the resulting mass spectra. For example, the M+ was observed in all 88 pesticides that we studied using the Supersonic GC-MS whereas only 36 of 63 (57%) pesticides that we investigated in standard GC-MS exhibited a M+. We also found that the degree of matrix interference is exponentially reduced with the fragment mass by about 20-fold per 100 amu increasing mass. The enhancement of the M+ combined with the reduction in matrix background noise permit rapid full scan analysis of a potentially unlimited number of pesticides, unlike selected ion monitoring or MS-MS in which specific conditions are required in segments for targeted pesticides. Furthermore, unlike the case with chemical ionization, EI-SMB-MS spectra still give accurate identification of compounds using common mass spectral libraries. In practice,we found thatlibraries favor mass spectra in which the M+ appears, thus Supersonic GC-MS produced better spectra for compound identification than standard GC-MS. To achieve even lower identification limits, the M+ plus a second major ion (still using full scan data) gives higher signal-to-chemical noise ratios than the traditional 3-ion approach. The replacement of two low-mass ions with the M+ (supersonic two-ions method) results in a significant reduction of matrix interference by a factor of up to 90. Another main advantage of Supersonic GC-MS is its exceptional suitability for fast GC-MS with high carrier gas flow-rate. Fast Supersonic GC-MS was able to analyze thermally labile pesticides, such as carbamates, that

  13. Examination of Behavior of Fresh Concrete Under Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, K. T.

    2012-05-01

    Transporting fresh concrete constitutes a significant part of the production process. Transferring ready-mixed concrete on-site is done using concrete pumps. Recent developments in concrete technology, and in mineral and chemical additives, have resulted in new developments in pumping techniques and the use of different concrete mixtures and equipment. These developments required further knowledge of the behavior of fresh concrete under pressure. Two criteria were determined for the pumpability of concrete: the power required to move the concrete or of the repulsive force; and the cohesion of the fresh concrete. It would be insufficient to relate pumpability to these two criteria; the values of segregation pressure, diffusion ability, water retention capacity, and side friction of the mixture are significant parameters in ensuring that concrete is pumped freely along the pipe. To solve the pumpability problem, friction stresses should be determined as a function of the linear pressure gradient, the pressure leading to segregation of the fresh concrete should be determined, and tests for the bleeding of concrete under pressure should be examined. The scope of the research is the examination of the behavior of fresh concrete under pressure. To determine the segregation pressures, a test apparatus was designed for the bleeding of concrete under pressure. The main purpose of the study is to determine whether the concrete can be pumped easily and whether it will lose its cohesion during the pumping, based on tests of concrete workability and bleeding of concrete under pressure.

  14. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in dry snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.; Foslien, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10-20 K m-1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation) and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the effective thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for effective thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  15. Reactions and mass transport in high temperature co-electrolysis of steam/CO2 mixtures for syngas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si-Won; Kim, Hyoungchul; Yoon, Kyung Joong; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Byung-Kook; Choi, Wonjoon; Lee, Jong-Heun; Hong, Jongsup

    2015-04-01

    High temperature co-electrolysis of steam/CO2 mixtures using solid oxide cells has been proposed as a promising technology to mitigate climate change and power fluctuation of renewable energy. To make it viable, it is essential to control the complex reacting environment in their fuel electrode. In this study, dominant reaction pathway and species transport taking place in the fuel electrode and their effect on the cell performance are elucidated. Results show that steam is a primary reactant in electrolysis, and CO2 contributes to the electrochemical performance subsequently in addition to the effect of steam. CO2 reduction is predominantly governed by thermochemical reactions, whose influence to the electrochemical performance is evident near limiting currents. Chemical kinetics and mass transport play a significant role in co-electrolysis, given that the reduction reactions and diffusion of steam/CO2 mixtures are slow. The characteristic time scales determined by the kinetics, diffusion and materials dictate the cell performance and product compositions. The fuel electrode design should account for microstructure and catalysts for steam electrolysis and thermochemical CO2 reduction in order to optimize syngas production and store electrical energy effectively and efficiently. Syngas yield and selectivity are discussed, showing that they are substantially influenced by operating conditions, fuel electrode materials and its microstructure.

  16. Direct Analysis of Triacylglycerols from Crude Lipid Mixtures by Gold Nanoparticle-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jeongjin; Lee, Gwangbin; Cha, Sangwon

    2014-05-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs), essential energy storage lipids, are easily detected by conventional MALDI MS when occurring on their own. However, their signals are easily overwhelmed by other lipids, mainly phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and, therefore, require purification. In order to profile TAGs from crude lipid mixtures without prefractionation, we investigated alternative matrixes that can suppress phospholipid ion signals and enhance cationization of TAGs. We found that an aqueous solution of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a diameter of 12 nm is a superior matrix for the laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) of TAGs in crude lipid mixtures. The AuNP matrix effectively suppressed other lipid signals such as phospholipids and also provided 100 times lower detection limit for TAGs than 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), the best conventional MALDI matrix for TAGs. The AuNP-assisted LDI MS enabled us to obtain detailed TAG profiles including minor species directly from crude beef lipid extracts without phospholipid interference. In addition, we could detect TAGs at a trace level from a total brain lipid extract.

  17. Direct analysis of triacylglycerols from crude lipid mixtures by gold nanoparticle-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Son, Jeongjin; Lee, Gwangbin; Cha, Sangwon

    2014-05-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs), essential energy storage lipids, are easily detected by conventional MALDI MS when occurring on their own. However, their signals are easily overwhelmed by other lipids, mainly phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and, therefore, require purification. In order to profile TAGs from crude lipid mixtures without prefractionation, we investigated alternative matrixes that can suppress phospholipid ion signals and enhance cationization of TAGs. We found that an aqueous solution of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a diameter of 12 nm is a superior matrix for the laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS) of TAGs in crude lipid mixtures. The AuNP matrix effectively suppressed other lipid signals such as phospholipids and also provided 100 times lower detection limit for TAGs than 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB), the best conventional MALDI matrix for TAGs. The AuNP-assisted LDI MS enabled us to obtain detailed TAG profiles including minor species directly from crude beef lipid extracts without phospholipid interference. In addition, we could detect TAGs at a trace level from a total brain lipid extract.

  18. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of mixtures of triterpene glycosides with L-phenylalanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekar, A. V.; Vetrova, E. V.; Borisenko, N. I.; Yakovishin, L. A.; Grishkovets, V. I.; Borisenko, S. N.

    2011-09-01

    Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to investigate for the first time the molecular complexation of L-phenylalanine with hederagenin 3-O- α- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-O- α- L-arabinopyranoside ( α-hederin) and its 28-O- α- L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-O-β- D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-O-β- D-glucopyranosyl ester (hederasaponin C). The glycoside/ L-phenylalanine complexes with a 1:1 molar ratio turned out to be most stable. The structures of the glycosides and L-phenylalanine have been concluded to have an impact on the complexation process.

  19. Electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry of mixtures of triterpene glycosides with paracetamol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekar, A. V.; Vetrova, E. V.; Borisenko, N. I.; Yakovishin, L. A.; Grishkovets, V. I.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular complexation of paracetamol with hederagenin 3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 2)-O-α-L-arabinopyranoside (α-hederin) and its 28-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 4)-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-O-β-Dglucopyranosyl ether (hederasaponin C) was investigated for the first time using electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The glycosides form complexes with paracetamol in a 1:1 molar ratio. The hederasaponin C complex is more stable. The structures of the glycosides and paracetamol are concluded to have an impact on the complexation process.

  20. Estimation of Concrete's Porosity by Ultrasounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benouis, A.; Grini, A.

    Durability of concrete depends strongly on porosity; this conditions the intensity of the interactions of the concrete with the aggressive agents. The pores inside the concrete facilitate the process of damage, which is generally initiated on the surface. The most used measurement is undoubtedly the measurement of porosity accessible to water. The porosimetry by intrusion with mercury constitutes a tool for investigation of the mesoporosity. The relationship between concrete mixtures, porosity and ultrasonic velocity of concrete samples measured by ultrasonic NDT is investigated. This experimental study is interested in the relations between the ultrasonic velocity measured by transducers of 7.5 mm and 49.5 mm diameter and with 54 kHz frequency. Concrete specimens (160 mm diameter and 320 mm height) are fabricated with concrete of seven different mixtures (various W/C and S/S + G ratios), which gave porosities varying between 7% and 16%. Ultrasonic velocities in concrete were measured in longitudinal direction. Finally the results showed the influence of ratio W/C, where the porosity of the concretes of a ratio W/C _0,5 have correctly estimated by ultrasonic velocity. The integration of the concretes of a lower ratio, in this relation, caused a great dispersion. Porosity estimation of concretes with a ratio W/C lower than 0,5 became specific to each ratio.

  1. Mass Diffusion and Thermal Diffusivity of the Decane-pentane Mixture Under High Pressure as a Ground-based Study for SCCO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarraga, Ion; Giraudet, Cédric; Croccolo, Fabrizio; Bou-Ali, M. Mounir; Bataller, Henri

    2016-10-01

    Thermodiffusion experiments on isomassic binary mixture of decane and pentane in the liquid phase have been performed between 25 ∘C and 50 ∘C and for pressures from 1MPa until 20MPa. By dynamic analysis of the light scattered by concentration non-equilibrium fluctuations in the binary mixture we obtained the mass diffusion coefficients of the mixture at each temperature and pressure. For the first time we were able to apply similar analysis to thermal fluctuations thus getting a simultaneous measurement of the thermal diffusivity coefficient. While mass diffusion coefficients decrease linearly with the pressure, thermal diffusivity coefficients increase linearly. In principle the proposed method can be used also for measuring the Soret coefficients at the same time. However, for the present mixture the intensity of the optical signal is limited by the optical contrast factor. This affects our capability of providing a reliable estimate of the Soret coefficient by means of dynamic Shadowgraph. Therefore the mass diffusion coefficients measurements would need to be combined with independent measurements of the thermodiffusion coefficients, e.g. thermogravitational column, to provide Soret coefficients. The obtained values constitute the on-ground reference measurements for one of the mixture studied in the frame of the project SCCO-SJ10, which aims to measure the Soret coefficients of multicomponents mixtures under reservoir conditions. Microgravity experiments will be performed on the Chinese satellite SJ10 launched in April 2016.

  2. Quick-setting concrete and a method for making quick-setting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.D.; Knox, L.

    1995-12-31

    This invention relates to a method for producing concrete, and more specifically, this invention relates to a method for producing quick-setting concrete while simultaneously minimizing the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, said release of carbon dioxide inherent in cement production. A method for producing quick setting concrete comprises hydrating a concrete dry mixture with carbonate solution to create a slurry, and allowing the slurry to cure. The invention also provides for a quick setting concrete having a predetermined proportion of CaCO{sub 3} of between 5 and 23 weight percent of the entire concrete mixture, and whereby the concrete has a compression strength of approximately 4,000 pounds per square inch (psi) within 24 hours after pouring.

  3. Complex mixture analysis by photoionization mass spectrometry with a VUV hydrogen laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, T. C.; Denton, M. B.

    1985-12-01

    Trace organic analysis in complex matrix presents one of the most challenging problems in analytical mass spectrometry. When ionization is accomplished non-selectively using electron impact, extensive sample clean-up is often necessary in order to isolate the analyte from the matrix. Sample preparation can be greatly reduced when the VUV H2 laser is used to selectively photoionize only a small fraction of compounds introduced into the ion source. This device produces parent ions only for all compounds whose ionization potentials lie below a threshold value determined by the photon energy of 7.8 eV. The only observed interference arises from electron impact ionization, when scattered laser radiation interacts with metal surfaces, producing electrons which are then accelerated by potential fields inside the source. These can be suppressed to levels acceptable for practical analysis through proper instrumental design. Results are presented which indicate the ability of this ion source to discriminate against interfering matrix components, in simple extracts from a variety of complex real world matrices, such as brewed coffee, beer, and urine.

  4. A microscale electrospray interface for on-line, capillary liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry of complex peptide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Davis, M T; Stahl, D C; Hefta, S A; Lee, T D

    1995-12-15

    A microcapillary liquid chromatography (HPLC) system designed for the gradient elution of peptide and protein samples at flow rates < 1 microL/min has been coupled to a triple-sector quadrupole mass spectrometer via a simple sheathless electrospray interface (microspray). The microspray interface used a flame-drawn, uncoated, fused silica needle with tip outer diameters in the range of 15-20 microm and an opening less than 5 microm in diameter. Online sample filtration to prevent clogging of the drawn needle was accomplished by using a hydrophilic PVDF membrane filter integrated into the needle assembly. The spray potential (0.5-1 kV) was applied directly to the sample stream through the capillary union. Stable electrospray conditions were obtained over the full range of the gradient (0-90% acetonitrile in water) and was generally independent of flow rate. Both off-line and online analyses of proteins and peptide digest mixtures were performed at sample levels less than 10 fmol. HPLC parameters could be optimized for either rapid LC/MS analysis or enhanced performance in LC/MS/MS experiments by modulation of the eluting peak widths. Additionally, flow could be greatly reduced as selected components pass through the interface to prolong the time available to collect mass spectral data. The reduced spectral background and peak width manipulation facilitated the acquisition of peptide production spectra (MS/MS) using real-time, automated instrument control procedures.

  5. Characterization of direct current He-N{sub 2} mixture plasma using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, O.; Castillo, F.; Martinez, H.; Villa, M.; Reyes, P. G.; Villalobos, S.

    2014-05-15

    This study analyses the glow discharge of He and N{sub 2} mixture at the pressure of 2.0 Torr, power of 10 W, and flow rate of 16.5 l/min, by using optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The emission bands were measured in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm. The principal species observed were N{sub 2}{sup +} (B{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub u}→X{sup 2}Σ{sup +}{sub g}), N{sub 2} (C{sup 3}Π{sub u}→B{sup 3}Π{sub g}), and He, which are in good agreement with the results of mass spectrometry. Besides, the electron temperature and ion density were determined by using a double Langmuir probe. Results indicate that the electron temperature is in the range of 1.55–2.93 eV, and the electron concentration is of the order of 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}. The experimental results of electron temperature and ion density for pure N{sub 2} and pure He are in good agreement with the values reported in the literature.

  6. Development of techniques for complex mixture analysis by means of gas chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Current technology in several phases of organic mixture analysis have been integrated to demonstrate the analytical power of the combined technique of gas chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC/TQMS). This research has included capillary gas chromatography, chemical ionization, triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, and the high speed instrument control and data systems which are required to make such a powerful instrument feasible. The feasibility of GC/TQMS was enhanced by an increase in overall system speed and the development of programs to allow trace-level targeted component analyses on time variant samples introduced via the gas chromatograph. The performance of the instrument control system was achieved by dividing instrument control tasks among multiple processors rather than by increasing the power of the processor being used. Methanol chemical ionization was investigated as a tool for the mass spectrometric determination of trace level polar components in petroleum products. Results from this study indicate that methanol enhances both the selectivity and sensitivity of the ionization when compared to the more conventional technique of methane chemical ionization. Studies on the effect of varying the pressure of the methanol reagent demonstrated a simple approach through which the analyst can adjust both the sensitivity and selectivity of the ionization. Detection limits were determined for the determination of several thiophenes in a commercial jet aviation fuel by means of GC/TQMS. The combined use of capillary gas chromatography, methanol chemical ionization, and TQMS with specialized data acquisition programs, enabled the detection of these targeted components down to the low parts per million.

  7. Enhancement of intensities in glow discharge mass spectrometry by using mixtures of argon and helium as plasma gases.

    PubMed

    Lange, Britta; Matschat, Ralf; Kipphardt, Heinrich

    2007-12-01

    Glow discharge mass spectrometry (GD-MS) is an excellent technique for fast multi-element analysis of pure metals. In addition to metallic impurities, non-metals also can be determined. However, the sensitivity for these elements can be limited due to their high first ionization potentials. Elements with a first ionization potential close to or higher than that of argon, which is commonly used as discharge gas in GD-MS analysis, are ionized with small efficiency only. To improve the sensitivity of GD-MS for such elements, the influence of different glow-discharge parameters on the peak intensity of carbon, chlorine, fluorine, nitrogen, phosphorus, oxygen, and sulfur in pure copper samples was investigated with an Element GD (Thermo Fisher Scientific) GD-MS. Discharge current, discharge gas flow, and discharge gas composition, the last of which turned out to have the greatest effect on the measured intensities, were varied. Argon-helium mixtures were used because of the very high potential of He to ionize other elements, especially in terms of the high energy level of its metastable states. The effect of different Ar-He compositions on the peak intensity of various impurities in pure copper was studied. With Ar-He mixtures, excellent signal enhancements were achieved in comparison with use of pure Ar as discharge gas. In this way, traceable linear calibration curves for phosphorus and sulfur down to the microg kg(-1) range could be established with high sensitivity and very good linearity using pressed powder samples for calibration. This was not possible when pure argon alone was used as discharge gas.

  8. Rapid Characterization of Microalgae and Microalgae Mixtures Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Duane; Diaz, Regina; Zhang, Lin; Sandrin, Todd; Gerken, Henri; Dempster, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Current molecular methods to characterize microalgae are time-intensive and expensive. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) may represent a rapid and economical alternative approach. The objectives of this study were to determine whether MALDI-TOF MS can be used to: 1) differentiate microalgae at the species and strain levels and 2) characterize simple microalgal mixtures. A common protein extraction sample preparation method was used to facilitate rapid mass spectrometry-based analysis of 31 microalgae. Each yielded spectra containing between 6 and 56 peaks in the m/z 2,000 to 20,000 range. The taxonomic resolution of this approach appeared higher than that of 18S rDNA sequence analysis. For example, two strains of Scenedesmus acutus differed only by two 18S rDNA nucleotides, but yielded distinct MALDI-TOF mass spectra. Mixtures of two and three microalgae yielded relatively complex spectra that contained peaks associated with members of each mixture. Interestingly, though, mixture-specific peaks were observed at m/z 11,048 and 11,230. Our results suggest that MALDI-TOF MS affords rapid characterization of individual microalgae and simple microalgal mixtures. PMID:26271045

  9. Rapid Characterization of Microalgae and Microalgae Mixtures Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).

    PubMed

    Barbano, Duane; Diaz, Regina; Zhang, Lin; Sandrin, Todd; Gerken, Henri; Dempster, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Current molecular methods to characterize microalgae are time-intensive and expensive. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) may represent a rapid and economical alternative approach. The objectives of this study were to determine whether MALDI-TOF MS can be used to: 1) differentiate microalgae at the species and strain levels and 2) characterize simple microalgal mixtures. A common protein extraction sample preparation method was used to facilitate rapid mass spectrometry-based analysis of 31 microalgae. Each yielded spectra containing between 6 and 56 peaks in the m/z 2,000 to 20,000 range. The taxonomic resolution of this approach appeared higher than that of 18S rDNA sequence analysis. For example, two strains of Scenedesmus acutus differed only by two 18S rDNA nucleotides, but yielded distinct MALDI-TOF mass spectra. Mixtures of two and three microalgae yielded relatively complex spectra that contained peaks associated with members of each mixture. Interestingly, though, mixture-specific peaks were observed at m/z 11,048 and 11,230. Our results suggest that MALDI-TOF MS affords rapid characterization of individual microalgae and simple microalgal mixtures.

  10. PREPACKED CONCRETE.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Twenty four hardened plain concrete wallettes , each 31 in. high by 25 in. wide by 6 in. thick, were sawed into various rectangular parallelepipeds...The wallettes represented three groups of prepacked concrete: reference aggregate intruded with fresh-water grout, coral aggregate with fresh-water...prismatic test specimens were involved in the program for determining the effectsof: type of mixing water, type of wiremesh cover atop the wallette form

  11. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  12. Analysis of Phospholipid Mixtures from Biological Tissues by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption and Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): A Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eibisch, Mandy; Fuchs, Beate; Schiller, Jurgen; Sub, Rosmarie; Teuber, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is increasingly used to investigate the phospholipid (PL) compositions of tissues and body fluids, often without previous separation of the total mixture into the individual PL classes. Therefore, the questions of whether all PL classes are detectable…

  13. Micro Environmental Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanez, M.; Oudjit, M. N.; Zenati, A.; Arroudj, K.; Bali, A.

    Reactive powder concretes (RPC) are characterized by a particle diameter not exceeding 600 μm and having very high compressive and tensile strengths. This paper describes a new generation of micro concrete, which has an initial as well as a final high physicomechanical performance. To achieve this, 15% by weight of the Portland cement have been substituted by materials rich in Silica (Slag and Dune Sand). The results obtained from the tests carried out on the RPC show that compressive and tensile strengths increase when incorporating the addition, thus improving the compactness of mixtures through filler and pozzolanic effects. With a reduction in the aggregate phase in the RPC and the abundance of the dune sand (southern of Algeria) and slag (industrial by-product of the blast furnace), the use of the RPC will allow Algeria to fulfil economical as well as ecological requirements.

  14. Resonance ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry for the analysis of trace substances in complex gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagel, Holger; Weickhardt, Christian; Boesl, Ulrich; Frey, Rüdiger

    1995-04-01

    The analysis of mixtures of technical gases still comprises a lot of problems: the large number of components with very different and often rapidly varying concentrations makes great demands on analytical methods. By use of conventional analytical methods, signals of trace substances may interfere with signals of main components, whereas small signals representing low concentrations are covered by signals of main substances. The resonant-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) makes use of excited intermediate states of molecules. As these states are characteristic of each substance, one or more components of interest can be ionized with high efficiency without interference of other molecules by using a special laser-wavelength. The combination of the above mentioned ionization method with a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer permits a very fast and sensitive detection of preselected trace substances. As ionization processes of higher order strongly depend on the laser intensity, there is no direct relation between ion signals and concentrations of exhaust components. Quantitative assessments are based on an especially developed calibration technique that makes use of internal standards. Applied under environmental aspects, this new analytical method helps to analyze a large number of components extracted from exhaust gases of combustion engines with high time resolution (<20 ms motor synchronously), high sensitivity (1 ppm) and high quantitative accuracy (more than 10%). A preliminary list of detectable compounds contains 30 substances.

  15. Testing the accuracy of correlations for multicomponent mass transport of adsorbed gases in metal-organic frameworks: diffusion of H2/CH4 mixtures in CuBTC.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Seda; Liu, Jinchen; Johnson, J Karl; Sholl, David S

    2008-08-05

    Mass transport of chemical mixtures in nanoporous materials is important in applications such as membrane separations, but measuring diffusion of mixtures experimentally is challenging. Methods that can predict multicomponent diffusion coefficients from single-component data can be extremely useful if these methods are known to be accurate. We present the first test of a method of this kind for molecules adsorbed in a metal-organic framework (MOF). Specifically, we examine the method proposed by Skoulidas, Sholl, and Krishna (SSK) ( Langmuir, 2003, 19, 7977) by comparing predictions made with this method to molecular simulations of mixture transport of H 2/CH 4 mixtures in CuBTC. These calculations provide the first direct information on mixture transport of any species in a MOF. The predictions of the SSK approach are in good agreement with our direct simulations of binary diffusion, suggesting that this approach may be a powerful one for examining multicomponent diffusion in MOFs. We also use our molecular simulation data to test the ideal adsorbed solution theory method for predicting binary adsorption isotherms and a method for predicting mixture self-diffusion coefficients.

  16. Improved resolution of hydrocarbon structures and constitutional isomers in complex mixtures using Gas Chromatography-Vacuum Ultraviolet-Mass Spectrometry (GC-VUV-MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Aerosol Dynamics Inc; Aerodyne Research, Inc.,; Tofwerk AG, Thun; Isaacman, Gabriel; Wilson, Kevin R.; Chan, Arthur W. H.; Worton, David R.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Nah, Theodora; Hohaus, Thorsten; Gonin, Marc; Kroll, Jesse H.; Worsnop, Doug R.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2011-09-13

    Understanding the composition of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important for environmental studies in a variety of fields, but many prevalent compounds cannot be confidently identified using traditional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) techniques. This work uses vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) ionization to elucidate the structures of a traditionally"unresolved complex mixture" by separating components by GC retention time, tR, and mass-to-charge ratio, m/Q, which are used to determine carbon number, NC, and the number of rings and double bonds, NDBE. Constitutional isomers are resolved based on tR, enabling the most complete quantitative analysis to date of structural isomers in an environmentally-relevant hydrocarbon mixture. Unknown compounds are classified in this work by carbon number, degree of saturation, presence of rings, and degree of branching, providing structural constraints. The capabilities of this analysis are explored using diesel fuel, in which constitutional isomer distribution patterns are shown to be reproducible between carbon numbers and follow predictable rules. Nearly half of the aliphatic hydrocarbon mass is shown to be branched, suggesting branching is more important in diesel fuel than previously shown. The classification of unknown hydrocarbons and the resolution of constitutional isomers significantly improves resolution capabilities for any complex hydrocarbon mixture.

  17. Assessment of deterioration in RHA-concrete due to magnesium sulphate attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb, G. A.; Mahmud, H. B.; Hamid, N. B. A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The assessment of magnesium sulphate attack on concretes containing rice husk ash (RHA, 20wt% of the cementitious materials) with various average particle sizes was investigated. The total cementitious materials were 390 kg and the water-to-binder ratio (W/B) was 0.53 for all mixtures. Specimens were initially cured in water for 7 d and then immersed in the 3wt% magnesium sulphate solution for up to 111 d of exposure. The specimens were subjected to drying-wetting cycles to accelerate sulphate attack. In addition to the visual monitoring of the specimens, the concrete specimens were subsequently tested for compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, and length and mass changes. The results show that the specimens exposed to sulphate attack exhibit higher strength and dynamic modulus than those kept in water. The length change is negligible and can be attributed to the normal swelling of concrete. On the other hand, concretes suffers mass loss and surface spalling and softening; the fine RHA-concrete results in a better resistance. For the accelerated sulphate attack method used in this study, mass change and visual monitoring are recommended for assessing the deterioration degree and the effectiveness of supplementary cementitious materials to resist sulphate attack.

  18. Use of Residual Solids from Pulp and Paper Mills for Enhancing Strength and Durability of Ready-Mixed Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Tarun R. Naik; Yoon-moon Chun; Rudolph N. Kraus

    2003-09-18

    This research was conducted to establish mixture proportioning and production technologies for ready-mixed concrete containing pulp and paper mill residual solids and to study technical, economical, and performance benefits of using the residual solids in the concrete. Fibrous residuals generated from pulp and paper mills were used, and concrete mixture proportions and productions technologies were first optimized under controlled laboratory conditions. Based on the mixture proportions established in the laboratory, prototype field concrete mixtures were manufactured at a ready-mixed concrete plant. Afterward, a field construction demonstration was held to demonstrate the production and placement of structural-grade cold-weather-resistant concrete containing residual solids.

  19. Radiological and material characterization of high volume fly ash concrete.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, I; Sas, Z; Dragaš, J; Somlai, J; Kovács, T

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of research presented in this paper was the material and radiological characterization of high volume fly ash concrete (HVFAC) in terms of determination of natural radionuclide content and radon emanation and exhalation coefficients. All concrete samples were made with a fly ash content between 50% and 70% of the total amount of cementitious materials from one coal burning power plant in Serbia. Physical (fresh and hardened concrete density) and mechanical properties (compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity) of concrete were tested. The radionuclide content ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) and radon massic exhalation of HVFAC samples were determined using gamma spectrometry. Determination of massic exhalation rates of HVFAC and its components using radon accumulation chamber techniques combined with a radon monitor was performed. The results show a beneficial effect of pozzolanic activity since the increase in fly ash content resulted in an increase in compressive strength of HVFAC by approximately 20% for the same mass of cement used in the mixtures. On the basis of the obtained radionuclide content of concrete components the I -indices of different HVFAC samples were calculated and compared with measured values (0.27-0.32), which were significantly below the recommended 1.0 index value. The prediction was relatively close to the measured values as the ratio between the calculated and measured I-index ranged between 0.89 and 1.14. Collected results of mechanical and radiological properties and performed calculations clearly prove that all 10 designed concretes with a certain type of fly ash are suitable for structural and non-structural applications both from a material and radiological point of view.

  20. Concrete Behavior under Dynamic Tensile-Compressive Load.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    be reviewed as well. Although structural concrete does not possess the thermal cracking problems during curing to the extent that mass concrete does...3 Hil H1 2 H13 H0 - OUTSIDE SURFACE OF CONCRETE CYLINDER Hl - INSIDE SURFACE OF CONCRETE CYLINDER Figure 2.4 Location of strain gages. CHAPTER 3...34 Fatigue Failure of Concrete Under Periodic Compressive Load," Trans Japanese Soc Civil Engrs, Vol 3, Part 1, pp 106-107. Kirillov, A. P. 1977. "Strength

  1. Detection of bacteria from biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madonna, A.J.; Basile, F.; Furlong, E.; Voorhees, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying specific bacteria from complex biological mixtures using immunomagnetic separation coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry has been developed. The technique employs commercially available magnetic beads coated with polycolonal antibodies raised against specific bacteria and whole cell analysis by MALDI-MS. A suspension of a bacterial mixture is mixed with the immunomagnetic beads specific for the target microorganism. After a short incubation period (20 mins) the bacteria captured by the beads are washed, resuspended in deionized H2O and directly applied onto a MALDI probe. Liquid suspensions containing bacterial mixtures can be screened within 1 h total analysis time. Positive tests result in the production of a fingerprint mass spectrum primarily consisting of protein biomarkers characteristic of the targeted microorganism. Using this procedure, Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated and detected from standard bacterial mixtures and spiked samples of river water, human urine, and chicken blood. Copyright ?? 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Diffusion of Radionuclides in Concrete and Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Clayton, Libby N.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2012-04-25

    One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The objective of our study was to measure the diffusivity of Re, Tc and I in concrete containment and the surrounding vadose zone soil. Effects of carbonation, presence of metallic iron, and fracturing of concrete and the varying moisture contents in soil on the diffusivities of Tc and I were evaluated.

  3. Comparison of Seismic Responses for Reinforced Concrete Buildings with Mass and Stiffness Irregularities Using Pushover and Nonlinear Time History Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruna, D. R.

    2017-03-01

    Pushover analysis or also known as nonlinear static procedures (NSP) have been recognized in recent years for practical evaluation of seismic demands and for structural design by estimating a structural building capacities and deformation demands. By comparing these demands and capacities at the performance level interest, the seismic performance of a building can be evaluated. However, the accuracy of NSP for assessment irregular building is not yet a fully satisfactory solution, since irregularities of a building influence the dynamic responses of the building. The objective of the study presented herein is to understand the nonlinear behaviour of six story RC building with mass irregularities at different floors and stiffness irregularity at first story (soft story) using NSP. For the purpose of comparison on the performance level obtained with NSP, nonlinear time history analysis (THA) were also performed under ground motion excitation with compatible to response spectra design. Finally, formation plastic hinges and their progressive development from elastic level to collapse prevention are presented and discussed.

  4. Material and Flexural Properties of Fiber-reinforced Rubber Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminger, Nicholas P.

    The purpose of this research is to determine the material properties of rubber concrete with the addition of fibers, and to determine optimal mixture dosages of rubber and fiber in concrete for structural applications. Fiber-reinforced concrete and rubberized concrete have been researched separately extensively, but this research intends to combine both rubber and fiber in a concrete matrix in order to create a composite material, fiber-reinforced rubber concrete (FRRC). Sustainability has long been important in engineering design, but much of the previous research performed on sustainable concrete does not result in a material that can be used for practical purposes. While still achieving a material that can be used for structural applications, economical considerations were given when choosing the proportions and types of constituents in the concrete mix. Concrete mixtures were designed, placed, and tested in accordance with common procedures and standards, with an emphasis on practicality. Properties that were investigated include compressive strength, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and ductility. The basis for determining the optimal concrete mixture is one that is economical, practical, and exhibits ductile properties with a significant strength. Results show that increasing percentages of rubber tend to decrease workability, unit weight, compressive strength, split tensile strength, and modulus of elasticity while the toughness is increased. The addition of steel needle fibers to rubber concrete increases unit weight, compressive strength, split tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, toughness, and ductility of the composite material.

  5. Mass Transport Properties of LiD-U Mixtures from Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics Simulations and a Pressure-Matching Mixing Rule

    SciTech Connect

    Burakovsky, Leonid; Kress, Joel D.; Collins, Lee A.

    2012-05-31

    Mass transport properties for LiD-U mixtures were calculated using a pressure matching mixture rule for the mixing of LiD and of U properties simulated with Orbital Free Molecular Dynamics (OFMD). The mixing rule was checked against benchmark OFMD simulations for the fully interacting three-component (Li, D, U) system. To obtain transport coefficients for LiD-U mixtures of different (LiD){sub x}U{sub (1-x)} compositions as functions of temperature and mixture density is a tedious task. Quantum molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can be employed, as in the case LiD or U. However, due to the presence of the heavy constituent U, such simulations proceed so slowly that only a limited number of numerical data points in the (x, {rho}, T) phase space can be obtained. To finesse this difficulty, transport coefficients for a mixture can be obtained using a pressure-matching mixing rule discussed. For both LiD and U, the corresponding transport coefficients were obtained earlier from quantum molecular dynamics simulations. In these simulations, the quantum behavior of the electrons was represented using an orbital free (OF) version of density functional theory, and ions were advanced in time using classical molecular dynamics. The total pressure of the system, P = nk{sub B}T/V + P{sub e}, is the sum of the ideal gas pressure of the ions plus the electron pressure. The mass self-diffusion coefficient for species {alpha}, D{sub {alpha}}, the mutual diffusion coefficient for species {alpha} and {beta}, D{alpha}{beta}, and the shear viscosity, {eta}, are computed from the appropriate autocorrelation function. The details of similar QMD calculations on LiH are described in Ref. [1] for 0.5 eV < T < 3 eV, and in Ref. [2] for 2 eV < T < 6 eV.

  6. Evaluation of properties of recycled asphalt concrete hot mix

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the laboratory performance of recycled asphalt concrete mixtures and to compare these results to those measured for conventional asphalt concrete mixtures. To make these comparisons, samples of aged asphalt concrete were obtained from three locations where recycling was planned. These samples were blended with new aggregate and new asphalt materials to produce six different recycled mixtures. Two aggregate types, a crushed gravel and a crushed limestone, were used to produce two conventional mixtures and to blend with the reclaimed asphalt pavement to produce the six recycled mixtures. Three asphalt materials which were obtained to produce the various mixtures being evaluated consisted of AC-20 for preparing the conventional mixtures and AC-5 and a recycling agent for preparing the recycled mixtures. The Shell BISAR computer program was used to predict the stesses and strains for two typical pavement sections under a given loading conditions. The computed stresses and strains were then analyzed along with the laboratory fatigue tests to predict the fatigue performance of the various mixtures. The results of this study indicated a satisfactory comparison between laboratory performance of recycled mixtures and conventional mixtures. Fatigue analysis indicated that the conventional mixtures would provide the greatest fatigue resistance in thick asphalt concrete layers at lower temperatures while the recycled mixtures would provide the greatest fatigue resistance in thin asphalt layers at higher temperatures.

  7. Identification of Individual Mycotoxin Threat Agents from Mycotoxin Mixtures Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Mass Spectroscopy, and Chemometrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-16

    mixtures of mycotoxins using NMR, MS, and chemometrics. We used LC-MS and 2D NMR to identify aflatoxins G1, G2, B1 and B2 in mixtures based on...11 10 11a 1 2 33a3b 4 5 5a 6 6a 7 8 B2 G2 Figure 1. Structures of aflatoxins B1 , B2, G1, and G2. 4 PURPOSES 1. Identify individual...MATERIALS and METHODS NMR Sample Preparation: Between 9 and 10 mg of individual aflatoxins B1 , B2, G1 and G2 were dissolved in 1.0 mL of CDCl3 and

  8. Radiation resistant concrete for applications in nuclear power and radioactive waste industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Steven Robert

    Elemental components of ordinary concrete contain a variety of metals and rare earth elements that are susceptible to neutron activation. This activation occurs by means of radiative capture, a neutron interaction that results in formation of radioisotopes such as Co-60, Eu-152, and Eu-154. Studies have shown that these three radioisotopes are responsible for the residual radioactivity found in nuclear power plant concrete reactor dome and shielding walls. Such concrete is classified as Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and Very Low Level Waste (VLLW) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and requires disposal at appropriate disposal sites. There are only three such sites in the USA, and every nuclear power plant will produce at the time of decommissioning approximately 1,500 tonnes of activated concrete classified as LLRW and VLLW. NAVA ALIGA (ancient word for a new stone) is a new concrete mixture developed mainly by research as presented in this thesis. The purpose of NAVA ALIGA is to satisfy IAEA clearance levels if used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, or radioactive waste canisters. NAVA ALIGA will never be activated above the IAEA clearance level after long-term exposure to neutron radiation when used as a material for reactor dome, spent fuel pool, and radioactive waste canisters. Components of NAVA ALIGA were identified using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ISP-MS) to determine trace element composition. In addition, it was tested for compressive strength and permeability, important for nuclear infrastructure. The studied mixture had a high water to cement ratio of 0.56, which likely resulted in the high measured permeability, yet the mixture also showed a compressive strength greater than 6 000 psi after 28 days. In addition to this experimental analysis, which goal was to develop a standard approach to define the concrete mixtures in satisfying the IAEA

  9. Solid-phase microextraction low temperature plasma mass spectrometry for the direct and rapid analysis of chemical warfare simulants in complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dumlao, Morphy C; Jeffress, Laura E; Gooding, J Justin; Donald, William A

    2016-06-21

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is directly integrated with low temperature plasma ionisation mass spectrometry to rapidly detect organophosphate chemical warfare agent simulants and their hydrolysis products in chemical mixtures, including urine. In this sampling and ionization method, the fibre serves: (i) to extract molecules from their native environment, and (ii) as the ionization electrode that is used to desorb and ionize molecules directly from the SPME surface. By use of a custom fabricated SPME fibre consisting of a stainless steel needle coated with a Linde Type A (LTA) zeolitic microporous material and low temperature plasma mass spectrometry, protonated dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), diethyl ethylphosphonate (DEEP) and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acid (PinMPA) can be detected at less than 100 ppb directly in water and urine. Organophosphates were not readily detected by this approach using an uncoated needle in negative control experiments. The use of the LTA coating significantly outperformed the use of a high alumina Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) coating of comparable thickness that is significantly less polar than LTA. By conditioning the LTA probe by immersion in an aqueous CuSO4 solution, the ion abundance for protonated DMMP increased by more than 300% compared to that obtained without any conditioning. Sample recovery values were between 96 and 100% for each analyte. The detection of chemical warfare agent analogues and hydrolysis products required less than 2 min per sample. A key advantage of this sampling and ionization method is that analyte ions can be directly and rapidly sampled from chemical mixtures, such as urine and seawater, without sample preparation or chromatography for sensitive detection by mass spectrometry. This ion source should prove beneficial for portable mass spectrometry applications because relatively low detection limits can be obtained without the use of compressed gases, fluid pumps, and lasers. Moreover, the

  10. Aerated concrete with mineral dispersed reinforcing additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdov, G. I.; Ilina, L. V.; Mukhina, I. N.; Rakov, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    To guarantee the production of aerated concrete with the lowest average density while ensuring the required strength it is necessary to use a silica component with a surface area of 250-300 m2 / kg. The article presents experimental data on grinding the silica component together with clinker to the optimum dispersion. This allows increasing the strength of non-autoclaved aerated concrete up to 33%. Furthermore, the addition to aerated concrete the mixture of dispersed reinforcing agents (wollastonite, diopside) and electrolytes with multiply charged cations and anions (1% Fe2 (SO4)3; Al2 (SO4)3) provides the growth of aerated concrete strength at 30 - 75%. As a cohesive the clinker, crushed together with silica and mineral supplements should be used. This increases the strength of aerated concrete at 65% in comparing with Portland cement.

  11. Enhancement effect of mass imbalance on Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov type of pairing in Fermi-Fermi mixtures of ultracold quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jibiao; Che, Yanming; Zhang, Leifeng; Chen, Qijin

    2017-01-01

    Ultracold two-component Fermi gases with a tunable population imbalance have provided an excellent opportunity for studying the exotic Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) states, which have been of great interest in condensed matter physics. However, the FFLO states have not been observed experimentally in Fermi gases in three dimensions (3D), possibly due to their small phase space volume and extremely low temperature required for an equal-mass Fermi gas. Here we explore possible effects of mass imbalance, mainly in a 6Li–40K mixture, on the one-plane-wave FFLO phases for a 3D homogeneous case at the mean-field level. We present various phase diagrams related to the FFLO states at both zero and finite temperatures, throughout the BCS-BEC crossover, and show that a large mass ratio may enhance substantially FFLO type of pairing.

  12. Enhancement effect of mass imbalance on Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov type of pairing in Fermi-Fermi mixtures of ultracold quantum gases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jibiao; Che, Yanming; Zhang, Leifeng; Chen, Qijin

    2017-01-01

    Ultracold two-component Fermi gases with a tunable population imbalance have provided an excellent opportunity for studying the exotic Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) states, which have been of great interest in condensed matter physics. However, the FFLO states have not been observed experimentally in Fermi gases in three dimensions (3D), possibly due to their small phase space volume and extremely low temperature required for an equal-mass Fermi gas. Here we explore possible effects of mass imbalance, mainly in a 6Li–40K mixture, on the one-plane-wave FFLO phases for a 3D homogeneous case at the mean-field level. We present various phase diagrams related to the FFLO states at both zero and finite temperatures, throughout the BCS-BEC crossover, and show that a large mass ratio may enhance substantially FFLO type of pairing. PMID:28051145

  13. Estimating crack growth in temperature damaged concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recalde, Juan Jose

    2009-12-01

    Evaluation of the structural condition of deteriorated concrete infrastructure and evaluation of new sustainable cementitious materials require an understanding of how the material will respond to applied loads and environmental exposures. A fundamental understanding of how microstructural changes in these materials relate to changes in mechanical properties and changes in fluid penetrability is needed. The ability to provide rapid, inexpensive assessment of material characteristics and relevant engineering properties is valuable for decision making and asset management purposes. In this investigation, the effects of changes in dynamic elastic properties with water content and fluid penetrability properties before and after a 300°C exposure were investigated based on estimates of the crack density parameter from dry and saturated cracked media. The experimental and analytical techniques described in this dissertation allow calculation of a value for the crack density parameter using nondestructive determination of wet and dry dynamic shear modulus of relatively thin disks. The techniques were used to compare a conventional concrete mixture to several mixtures with enhanced sustainability characteristics. The three enhanced sustainable materials investigated were a very high fly ash mixture, a magnesium phosphate cement based mortar, and a magnesium phosphate cement based concrete, and were compared to a conventional concrete mixture. The analysis provided both quantitative assessment of changes with high temperature damage and autogenous healing, and estimates of changes in mean crack trace lengths. The results showed that water interaction, deterioration due to damage, and autogenous healing recovery were different for the magnesium phosphate cement based mixtures than the portland cement based concrete mixtures. A strong correlation was found between log-transformed Air Permeability Index, dynamic shear modulus, and crack density parameter. The findings imply

  14. Experimental testing of the fracture of concrete and reinforced concrete plates under impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyaev, A. A.; Tolkachev, V. F.; Platova, T. M.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the results of experimental studies on penetration of cylindrical projectiles into concrete and reinforced concrete at impact velocities reaching 0.5 km/s. An algorithm is proposed for calculating the depth of penetration of a projectile, making it possible to find the depth of penetration of high-strength steel projectiles with a mass of up to 13.5 kg into concrete on the basis of measurements of the specific work required to remove concrete using projectiles with a mass of up to 8 g.

  15. UV-Vis, infrared, and mass spectroscopy of electron irradiated frozen oxygen and carbon dioxide mixtures with water

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Brant M.; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Strazzulla, Giovanni

    2014-02-01

    Ozone has been detected on the surface of Ganymede via observation of the Hartley band through the use of ultraviolet spectroscopy and is largely agreed upon to be formed by radiolytic processing via interaction of magnetospheric energetic ions and/or electrons with oxygen-bearing ices on Ganymede's surface. Interestingly, a clearly distinct band near 300 nm within the shoulder of the UV-Vis spectrum of Ganymede was also observed, but currently lacks an acceptable physical or chemical explanation. Consequently, the primary motivation behind this work was the collection of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of ozone formation by energetic electron bombardment of a variety of oxygen-bearing ices (oxygen, carbon dioxide, water) relevant to this moon as well as other solar system. Ozone was indeed synthesized in pure ices of molecular oxygen, carbon dioxide and a mixture of water and oxygen, in agreement with previous studies. The Hartley band of the ozone synthesized in these ice mixtures was observed in the UV-Vis spectra and compared with the spectrum of Ganymede. In addition, a solid state ozone absorption cross section of 6.0 ± 0.6 × 10{sup –17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup –1} was obtained from the UV-Vis spectral data. Ozone was not produced in the irradiated carbon dioxide-water mixtures; however, a spectrally 'red' UV continuum is observed and appears to reproduce well what is observed in a large number of icy moons such as Europa.

  16. AB INITIO EQUATION OF STATE FOR HYDROGEN-HELIUM MIXTURES WITH RECALIBRATION OF THE GIANT-PLANET MASS-RADIUS RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Militzer, B.; Hubbard, W. B.

    2013-09-10

    Using density functional molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the equation of state (EOS) for hydrogen-helium mixtures spanning density-temperature conditions typical of giant-planet interiors, {approx}0.2-9 g cm{sup -3} and 1000-80,000 K for a typical helium mass fraction of 0.245. In addition to computing internal energy and pressure, we determine the entropy using an ab initio thermodynamic integration technique. A comprehensive EOS table with 391 density-temperature points is constructed and the results are presented in the form of a two-dimensional free energy fit for interpolation. Deviations between our ab initio EOS and the semi-analytical EOS model by Saumon and Chabrier are analyzed in detail, and we use the results for initial revision of the inferred thermal state of giant planets with known values for mass and radius. Changes are most pronounced for planets in the Jupiter mass range and below. We present a revision to the mass-radius relationship that makes the hottest exoplanets increase in radius by {approx}0.2 Jupiter radii at fixed entropy and for masses greater than {approx}0.5 Jupiter mass. This change is large enough to have possible implications for some discrepant ''inflated giant exoplanets''.

  17. Investigation of mass dependence effects for the accurate determination of molybdenum isotope amount ratios by MC-ICP-MS using synthetic isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Malinovsky, Dmitry; Dunn, Philip J H; Petrov, Panayot; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Methodology for absolute Mo isotope amount ratio measurements by multicollector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) using calibration with synthetic isotope mixtures (SIMs) is presented. For the first time, synthetic isotope mixtures prepared from seven commercially available isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders ((92)Mo, (94)Mo, (95)Mo, (96)Mo, (97)Mo, (98)Mo, and (100)Mo) are used to investigate whether instrumental mass discrimination of Mo isotopes in MC-ICP-MS is consistent with mass-dependent isotope distribution. The parent materials were dissolved and mixed as solutions to obtain mixtures with accurately known isotope amount ratios. The level of elemental impurities in the isotopically enriched molybdenum metal powders was quantified by ICP-MS by using both high-resolution and reaction cell instruments to completely resolve spectral interferences. The Mo isotope amount ratio values with expanded uncertainty (k = 2), determined by MC-ICP-MS for a high-purity Mo rod from Johnson Matthey, were as follows: (92)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.9235(9), (94)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.5785(8), (96)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.0503(9), (97)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6033(6), (98)Mo/(95)Mo = 1.5291(20), and (100)Mo/(95)Mo = 0.6130(7). A full uncertainty budget for the measurements is presented which shows that the largest contribution to the uncertainty budget comes from correction for elemental impurities (∼51%), followed by the contribution from weighing operations (∼26 %). The atomic weight of molybdenum was calculated to be 95.947(2); the uncertainty in parentheses is expanded uncertainty with the coverage factor of 2. A particular advantage of the developed method is that calibration factors for all six Mo isotope amount ratios, involving the (95)Mo isotope, were experimentally determined. This allows avoiding any assumption on mass-dependent isotope fractions in MC-ICP-MS, inherent to the method of double spike previously used for Mo isotope amount ratio

  18. Selective identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of different types of gluten in foods made with cereal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Camafeita, E; Solís, J; Alfonso, P; López, J A; Sorell, L; Méndez, E

    1998-10-09

    The gluten toxic fractions responsible for the mucosal damage in coeliac disease (CD), so-called gliadins, hordeins, secalins and avenins from a large number (30-40) of wheat, barley, rye and oats cultivars respectively, have been mass analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Gliadin, secalin and avenin characteristic mass profiles are nearly identical amongst distinct cultivars from the corresponding cereal, while hordeins profiles show more variability depending on the particular barley cultivar. On the basis of these four distinguishable characteristic mass patterns spreading within the 20,000-40,000 Da range, MALDI-TOF-MS has permitted the direct and simultaneous visualization of gliadins, hordeins, secalins and avenins in foods elaborated with cereal mixtures of wheat, barley, rye and oats. This capacity has been demonstrated by mass analyzing foods made with these four cereals in varying ratios. Thus MALDI-TOF-MS can be preliminarily established as a unique system with the ability to discriminate the specific type of gluten toxic fractions present in food samples.

  19. Two- and three-dimensional van krevelen diagrams: a graphical analysis complementary to the kendrick mass plot for sorting elemental compositions of complex organic mixtures based on ultrahigh-resolution broadband fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass measurements.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhigang; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2004-05-01

    Ultrahigh-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry has resolved and identified the elemental compositions of over 10000 organic constituents of coal and petroleum crude oil. A plot of Kendrick mass defect versus Kendrick nominal mass sorts compounds into homologous series according to compound class (i.e., numbers of N, O, and S heteroatoms), type (number of rings plus double bonds), and degree of alkylation (number of CH(2) groups), to yield unique elemental assignments from ultrahigh-resolution mass measurements in the 200-900 Da range. Interpretation of such a vast compilation requires a simple (preferably graphical) means to differentiate between complex organic mixtures of different origin or processing. In an extension of the recently revived van Krevelen plot, each elemental composition is projected onto two or three axes according to its H/C, O/C, and/or N/C atomic ratios. The H/C ratio separates compounds according to degree of saturation, whereas O/C or N/C ratios separate according to O and N classes. We show that the three-dimensional van Krevelen diagram can completely separate different classes in pyridine-extracted coal or petroleum samples and can also graphically distinguish fossil fuels according to their nature (coal vs petroleum), maturation (coals of different rank), and processing (the same coal at two stages of liquefaction). The van Krevelen diagram thus appears well suited to amplifying and exposing compositional differences within and between complex organic mixtures.

  20. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-12-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  1. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specification required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  2. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-04-29

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs. 33 figs.

  3. Compressive strength of concrete and mortar containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention includes a method for predicting the compressive strength of such a hardenable mixture, which is very important for planning a project. The invention also relates to hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash which can achieve greater compressive strength than hardenable mixtures containing only concrete over the time period relevant for construction. In a specific embodiment, a formula is provided that accurately predicts compressive strength of concrete containing fly ash out to 180 days. In other specific examples, concrete and mortar containing about 15% to 25% fly ash as a replacement for cement, which are capable of meeting design specifications required for building and highway construction, are provided. Such materials can thus significantly reduce construction costs.

  4. Mass spectrometry of diffuse coplanar surface barrier discharge: influence of discharge frequency and oxygen content in N2/O2 mixture*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čech, Jan; Brablec, Antonín; Černák, Mirko; Puač, Nevena; Selaković, Nenad; Petrović, Zoran Lj.

    2017-02-01

    Diffuse Coplanar Surface Barrier Discharge (DCSBD) has been studied extensively for industrial applications in recent decade. So far, limited information was available on the production of ozone or nitrogen oxides important for industrial deployment of DCSBD. In this paper results of mass spectrometry of DCSBD performed at atmospheric pressure are presented. DCSBD mass spectra were studied for different oxygen contents in N2/O2 working gas mixture at low flow rate (estimated residence time in discharge chamber was approx. 3 s). Influence of the driving frequency (15, 30 and 50 kHz) at constant high voltage amplitude was studied as well. Ozone and NO production in DCSBD are given as typical representatives. Production of ozone decreases with the driving frequency, which could be attributed to the gas heating at higher frequencies.

  5. Application of a High-Resolution Mass-Spectrometry-Based DNA Adductomics Approach for Identification of DNA Adducts in Complex Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is the method of choice for analysis of covalent modification of DNA. DNA adductomics is an extension of this approach allowing for the screening for both known and unknown DNA adducts. In the research reported here, a new high-resolution/accurate mass MSn methodology has been developed representing an important advance for the investigation of in vivo biological samples and for the assessment of DNA damage from various human exposures. The methodology was tested and optimized using a mixture of 18 DNA adducts representing a range of biologically relevant modifications on all four bases and using DNA from liver tissue of mice exposed to the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). In the latter experiment, previously characterized adducts, both expected and unexpected, were observed. PMID:24410521

  6. Multiple ligand detection and affinity measurement by ultrafiltration and mass spectrometry analysis applied to fragment mixture screening.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shanshan; Ren, Yiran; Fu, Xu; Shen, Jie; Chen, Xin; Wang, Quan; Bi, Xin; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Lixin; Liang, Guangxin; Yang, Cheng; Shui, Wenqing

    2015-07-30

    Binding affinity of a small molecule drug candidate to a therapeutically relevant biomolecular target is regarded the first determinant of the candidate's efficacy. Although the ultrafiltration-LC/MS (UF-LC/MS) assay enables efficient ligand discovery for a specific target from a mixed pool of compounds, most previous analysis allowed for relative affinity ranking of different ligands. Moreover, the reliability of affinity measurement for multiple ligands with UF-LC/MS has hardly been strictly evaluated. In this study, we examined the accuracy of K(d) determination through UF-LC/MS by comparison with classical ITC measurement. A single-point K(d) calculation method was found to be suitable for affinity measurement of multiple ligands bound to the same target when binding competition is minimized. A second workflow based on analysis of the unbound fraction of compounds was then developed, which simplified sample preparation as well as warranted reliable ligand discovery. The new workflow implemented in a fragment mixture screen afforded rapid and sensitive detection of low-affinity ligands selectively bound to the RNA polymerase NS5B of hepatitis C virus. More importantly, ligand identification and affinity measurement for mixture-based fragment screens by UF-LC/MS were in good accordance with single ligand evaluation by conventional SPR analysis. This new approach is expected to become a valuable addition to the arsenal of high-throughput screening techniques for fragment-based drug discovery.

  7. Segregation in like-charged polyelectrolyte-surfactant mixtures can be precisely tuned via manipulation of the surfactant mass ratio.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter W; Lopez, Sonia G; Burr, Jocelyn; Taboada, Pablo; Yeates, Stephen G

    2013-04-09

    In this study, we consider segregative phase separation in aqueous mixtures of quaternary ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDQ) and alkyl (C12, 70%; C14 30%) dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride (BAC) upon the addition of poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (pDADMAC) as a function of both concentration and molecular weight. The nature of the surfactant type is dominant in determining the concentration at which separation into an upper essentially surfactant-rich phase and lower polyelectrolyte-rich phase is observed. However, for high-molecular-weight pDADMAC there is a clear indication of an additional depletion flocculation effect. When the BAC/DDQ ratio is tuned, the segregative phase separation point can be precisely controlled. We propose a phase separation mechanism for like-charged quaternary ammonium polyelectrolyte/surfactant/water mixtures induced by a reduction in the ionic atmosphere around the surfactant headgroup and possible ion pair formation. An additional polyelectrolyte-induced depletion flocculation effect was also observed.

  8. Enhanced Mixture Separations of Metal Adducted Tetrasaccharides Using Frequency Encoded Ion Mobility Separations and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Kelsey A.; Bendiak, Brad K.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2016-10-01

    Using five isomeric tetrasaccharides in combination with seven multivalent metals, the impact on mobility separations and resulting CID spectra were examined using a hybrid ion mobility atmospheric pressure drift tube system coupled with a linear ion trap. By enhancing the duty cycle of the drift tube system using a linearly chirped frequency, the collision-induced dissociation spectra were encoded in the mobility domain according to the drift times of each glycan isomer precursor. Differential fragmentation patterns correlated with precursor drift times ensured direct assignment of fragments with precursor structure whether as individual standards or in a mixture of isomers. In addition to certain metal ions providing higher degrees of separation than others, in select cases more than one arrival time distribution was observed for a single pure carbohydrate isomer. These observations suggest the existence of alternative coordination sites within a single monomeric species, but more interesting was the observation of different fragmentation ion yields for carbohydrate dimers formed through metal adduction. Positive-ion data were also compared with negative-ion species, where dimer formation did not occur and single peaks were observed for each isomeric tetrasaccharide-alditol. This enhanced analytical power has implications not only for carbohydrate molecules but also for a wide variety of complex mixtures of molecules where dissociation spectra may potentially be derived from combinations of monomeric, homodimeric, and heterodimeric species having identical nominal m/z values.

  9. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1981-11-04

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  10. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.H.

    1983-05-13

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions are described which are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate which may be wet and a source of bivalent metallic ions which will set to polymer concrete with excellent structural properties.

  11. Electropositive bivalent metallic ion unsaturated polyester complexed polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Horn, William H.

    1985-01-01

    Quick setting polymer concrete compositions with excellent structural properties are disclosed; these polymer concrete compositions are mixtures of unsaturated polyesters and crosslinking monomers together with appropriate initiators and promoters in association with aggregate, which may be wet, and with a source of bivalent metallic ions.

  12. Phase Diagram Calculation of Gas Mixtures for Refrigeration; Reflection & Transmission Coefficients and the Effective Mass: Superconducting Proximity I-V Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedmann, Gideon

    The efficiency of Joule-Thomson refrigerators greatly improves with the addition of hydrocarbons to nitrogen as coolant, and is highly dependent on the mixture composition. To optimize it, we calculated the mixture phase diagram using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. A program was developed to solve numerically a set of coupled non-linear equations for the equilibrium of the vapor and liquid phases of each mixture component. The program is highly efficient, quite stable, and reliable. Gases can be easily added to the program's database. We found that the cooling efficiency of the mixtures has a sharp ridge in composition space, and explain this. To better understand tunneling spectra of the high T_{rm c} cuprate superconductors, we analyzed the one-dimensional behavior of the wavefunction of a free particle striking a crystal interface. We describe the free particle using a wavepacket of plane waves, and the crystal using the Kronig-Penney model. We find that when the wavepacket is spread over many unit cells, it behaves like a free particle wavepacket striking a small potential step. The reflection and transmission coefficients are derived and one finds that they do not contain the particle's effective mass. We determine that the boundary conditions used in a standard effective mass approach must be modified to make it work. We conclude that one should not use the effective mass approximation in treating high T_{rm c} superconductor interfaces. We measured the dynamic resistance of a superconducting -normal metal-normal metal (SNN') geometry and observed that N', a superconductor at low enough temperatures, displays superconducting properties above its critical temperature. They disappear well below the critical temperature of S. We present a simple model of the proximity effect, which is self-consistent at any temperature and good for arbitrary thicknesses of N. The model shows how the superconducting gap decays with the distance from S. We observe that the

  13. Synthesis of polychlorinated terphenyl mixtures and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry data of tetra- to octachlorinated ortho-, meta-, and para-terphenyls.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Walter; Kirres, Jochen; Bendig, Paul

    2012-11-09

    Polychlorinated terphenyls (PCTs) are a class of polyhalogenated compounds previously used in similar applications as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). According to present knowledge all industrial production was closed in the 1970s. The total PCT manufacture reached about 5% of the production of PCBs. Unlike the PCBs, PCTs have been scarcely analyzed in environmental samples mostly due to analytical difficulties. PCTs were synthesized by the chlorination of technical terphenyl which consists of ortho-, meta- and para-terphenyls. This procedure led to very complex mixtures of polychlorinated compounds whose composition, especially with regard to the terphenyl backbones, remained unknown. Here we report the individual chlorination of the three terphenyl backbones to mixtures of Tetra- to OctaCTs, respectively. The average degree of chlorination of the ortho-, meta- and para-PCTs ranged from 6.8 to 7.4. These products were analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in electron ionization (GC/EI-MS) and electron capture negative ion (GC/ECNI-MS) modes. The elution order of isomers was ortho-PCTs≪meta-PCTsmass spectra of ortho-PCTs differed from those of the meta- and para-homologues in that the molecular ion was less prominent (GC/EI-MS) or very frequently absent (GC/ECNI-MS). In addition, the relative GC/ECNI-MS responses of para-PCTs were on average higher compared with meta- and ortho-PCTs.

  14. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes mass-produced by dc arc discharge in He-H2 gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Guo, Y.; Inoue, S.; Zhao, X.; Ohkohchi, M.; Ando, Y.

    2006-04-01

    Uniform cathode deposits (longer than 15 mm), containing multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) inside, were produced by dc arc discharge evaporation with a computer-controlled feeder of a pure-carbon electrode without a metal catalyst in a He-H2 gas mixture. The purification of MWNTs was carried out to remove amorphous carbon and carbon nanoparticles. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations and Raman scattering studies show that the MWNTs possess a high crystallinity and a mean outermost diameter of ˜ ˜10 nm. It has been confirmed that the current density in the electron field emission from a purified MWNT mat can reach 77.92 mA/cm2, indicating that the purified MWNTs are a promising candidate electron source in a super high-luminance light-source tube or a miniature X-ray source.

  15. Polymer concrete patching manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, J. J.; Bartholomew, J.

    1982-06-01

    The practicality of using polymer concrete to repair deteriorated portland cement concrete bridge decks and pavements was demonstrated. This manual outlines the procedures for using polymer concrete as a rapid patching material to repair deteriorated concrete. The process technology, materials, equipment, and safety provisions used in manufacturing and placing polymer concrete are discussed. Potential users are informed of the various steps necessary to insure successful field applications of the material.

  16. Development of Methods to Determine the Hugoniot Equation-of-State of Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Methods used to determine the Hugoniot equation - of - state were experimentally evaluated for structural concrete having 3/4 in. (prototype) and 1/8 in... equation - of - state of the prototype concrete can be matched with a modeled concrete mixture. Shock propagation simulations of a computer modeled

  17. The Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Pozzolana Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessenouci, M. Z.; Triki, N. E. Bibi; Khelladi, S.; Draoui, B.; Abene, A.

    The recent development of some lightweight construction materials, such as light concrete, can play an important role as an insulator, while maintaining sufficient levels of mechanical performance. The quality of insulation to provide depends on the climate, the exposure of the walls and also the materials used in the construction. The choice of a material to be used as an insulator, obviously, depends on its availability and its cost. This is a study of natural pozzolanas as basic components in building materials. It is intended to highlight their thermal advantage. It is economically advantageous to use pozzolana in substitution for a portion of the clinker as hydraulically active additions, as well as in compositions of lightweight concretes in the form of pozzolanic aggregate mixtures, which provide mechanical strengths that comply with current standards. A theoretical study is conducted on the apparent thermal conductivity of building materials, namely concrete containing pozzolana. Thermal modeling, apparent to that commonly used for porous materials, has been applied to pozzolana concrete. Experimental results on measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of pozzolana concrete are reported in this study, using an approach that considers that concrete is composed of two solid ingredients, a binding matrix (hydrated cement paste) and all aggregates. A second comparative theoretical approach is used for the case where concrete consists of a solid phase and a fluid phase (air).

  18. Single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy analysis of size and number concentration in mixtures of monometallic and bimetallic (core-shell) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, Ruth C; Stephan, Chady; Lead, Jamie R

    2017-01-01

    It is challenging to separate and measure the physical and chemical properties of monometallic and bimetallic engineered nanoparticles (NPs), especially when mixtures are similar in size and at low concentration. We report that single particle inductively coupled mass spectroscopy (SP-ICP-MS), alongside field flow fractionation (FFF), has allowed for the accurate measurement of size and particle number concentrations of mixed metallic nanoparticles (NPs) containing monometallic NPs of gold (Au) and silver (Ag) and a bimetallic core-shell structured NP (Au@Ag) of equivalent size. Two sets of these NPs were measured. The first contained only 60nm particles, where the Au@Ag NP had a 30nm core and 15nm shell to make a total diameter of 60nm. The second contained only 80nm particles (Au@Ag NP core particle of 50nm with a 15nm shell). FFF separation was used here as a sizing technique rather than a separation technique. It was used to confirm that suspensions containing either individual or mixtures of the Au 60nm, Ag 60nm and AuAg 60nm suspensions eluted together and were of the same size. Similarly, FFF was used to show that suspensions containing individual or mixtures of the equivalent 80nm, eluted together and were of the same size. Although the 60nm and 80nm suspensions did not elute at the same time they were not run together. SP-ICP-MS is then used to identify the size and concentration of the particles within the suspension. Successful separation of the NPs was effected and the limits of the instrument were obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiǧit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-01

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes' added Silica fume have been investigated.

  20. Guidelines for identification of concrete in a materials property database

    SciTech Connect

    Oland, C.B.; Frohnsdorff, G.

    1995-12-31

    Guidelines for the identification of concrete in a materials property database are presented to address the complex problem of distinguishing one concrete from another. These guidelines are based on a logical scheme for systematically organizing and subdividing data and information about concrete and its constituents; they reflect consensus recommendations for a multilevel material description and designation system. Aspects of the guidelines include a classification system used to establish a series of primary identifiers, methods for reporting constituent information and mixture proportions, fields describing the source of the concrete and its processing history, and recommendations for reporting baseline or reference properties.

  1. Characterization of a mixture of lobster digestive cysteine proteinases by ionspray mass spectrometry and tryptic mapping with LC--MS and LC--MS--MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, P.; Pleasance, S.; Laycock, M. V.; Mackay, R. M.; Boyd, R. K.

    1991-12-01

    An inseparable mixture of two cysteine proteinases, isolated from the digestive tract of the American lobster, was investigated by ionspray mass spectrometry (ISP-MS), using a combination of infusion of intact proteins with on-line liquid chromatography--mass spectrometry (LC--MS) and LC--MS--MS analyses of tryptic digests. These data were interpreted by comparisons with predictions from results of molecular cloning of cysteine-proteinase-encoding messenger RNA sequences previously isolated from the lobster hepatopancreas. Investigations of the numbers of free thiol groups and of disulfide bonds were made by measuring the molecular weights of the alkylated proteins with and without prior reduction of disulfide bonds, and comparison with the corresponding data for the native proteins. Identification of tyrptic fragment peptides containing cysteine residues was facilitated by comparing LC--MS analyses of tryptic digests of denatured and of denatured and alkylated proteins, since such tryptic peptides are subject to shifts in both mass and retention time upon reduction and alkylation. Confirmation of amino acid sequences was obtained from fragment ion spectra of each tryptic peptide (alkylated or not) as it eluted from the column. Acquisition of such on-line LC--MS data was possible through use of the entire effluent from a standard 1 mm high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) column by an IonsSpray® LC--MS interface (pneumatically assisted electrospray).

  2. Effective Ion Mobility Peak Width as a New Isomeric Descriptor for the Untargeted Analysis of Complex Mixtures Using Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenc, Mathilde; Paupy, Benoit; Marceau, Sabrina; Riches, Eleanor; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    Ion mobility coupled with mass spectrometry was proven to be an efficient way to characterize complex mixtures such as petroleum samples. However, the identification of isomeric species is difficult owing to the molecular complexity of petroleum and no availability of standard molecules. This paper proposes a new simple indicator to estimate the isomeric content of highly complex mixtures. This indicator is based on the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the extracted ion mobility peak measured in millisecond or square angstrom that is corrected for instrumental factors such as ion diffusion. This value can be easily obtained without precisely identifying the number of isomeric species under the ion mobility peaks. Considering the Boduszynski model, the ion mobility profile for a particular elemental composition is expected to be a continuum of various isomeric species. The drift time-dependent fragmentation profile was studied and confirmed this hypothesis, a continuous evolution of the fragmentation profile showing that the larger alkyl chain species were detected at higher drift time values. This new indicator was proven to be a fast and efficient method to compare vacuum gas oils for which no difference was found using other analytical techniques.

  3. Simultaneous quantification of Aroclor mixtures in soil samples by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with solid phase microextraction using partial least-squares regression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengliang; Harrington, Peter de B

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate partial least-squares (PLS) method was applied to the quantification of two complex polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) commercial mixtures, Aroclor 1254 and 1260, in a soil matrix. PCBs in soil samples were extracted by headspace solid phase microextraction (SPME) and determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Decachlorinated biphenyl (deca-CB) was used as internal standard. After the baseline correction was applied, four data representations including extracted ion chromatograms (EIC) for Aroclor 1254, EIC for Aroclor 1260, EIC for both Aroclors and two-way data sets were constructed for PLS-1 and PLS-2 calibrations and evaluated with respect to quantitative prediction accuracy. The PLS model was optimized with respect to the number of latent variables using cross validation of the calibration data set. The validation of the method was performed with certified soil samples and real field soil samples and the predicted concentrations for both Aroclors using EIC data sets agreed with the certified values. The linear range of the method was from 10μgkg(-1) to 1000μgkg(-1) for both Aroclor 1254 and 1260 in soil matrices and the detection limit was 4μgkg(-1) for Aroclor 1254 and 6μgkg(-1) for Aroclor 1260. This holistic approach for the determination of mixtures of complex samples has broad application to environmental forensics and modeling.

  4. Determination of ion mobility collision cross sections for unresolved isomeric mixtures using tandem mass spectrometry and chemometric deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K; Stow, Sarah M; May, Jody C; McLean, John A; Solouki, Touradj

    2016-10-05

    Ion mobility (IM) is an important analytical technique for determining ion collision cross section (CCS) values in the gas-phase and gaining insight into molecular structures and conformations. However, limited instrument resolving powers for IM may restrict adequate characterization of conformationally similar ions, such as structural isomers, and reduce the accuracy of IM-based CCS calculations. Recently, we introduced an automated technique for extracting "pure" IM and collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra of IM overlapping species using chemometric deconvolution of post-IM/CID mass spectrometry (MS) data [J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom., 2014, 25, 1810-1819]. Here we extend those capabilities to demonstrate how extracted IM profiles can be used to calculate accurate CCS values of peptide isomer ions which are not fully resolved by IM. We show that CCS values obtained from deconvoluted IM spectra match with CCS values measured from the individually analyzed corresponding peptides on uniform field IM instrumentation. We introduce an approach that utilizes experimentally determined IM arrival time (AT) "shift factors" to compensate for ion acceleration variations during post-IM/CID and significantly improve the accuracy of the calculated CCS values. Also, we discuss details of this IM deconvolution approach and compare empirical CCS values from traveling wave (TW)IM-MS and drift tube (DT)IM-MS with theoretically calculated CCS values using the projected superposition approximation (PSA). For example, experimentally measured deconvoluted TWIM-MS mean CCS values for doubly-protonated RYGGFM, RMFGYG, MFRYGG, and FRMYGG peptide isomers were 288.8 Å(2), 295.1 Å(2), 296.8 Å(2), and 300.1 Å(2); all four of these CCS values were within 1.5% of independently measured DTIM-MS values.

  5. Investigation of gamma ray shielding efficiency and mechanical performances of concrete shields containing bismuth oxide as an environmentally friendly additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ya; Zhang, Xiaowen; Li, Mi; Yang, Rong; Jiang, Tianjiao; Lv, Junwen

    2016-10-01

    Concrete has a proven ability to attenuate gamma rays and neutrons without compromising structural property; therefore, it is widely used as the primary shielding material in many nuclear facilities. Recently, there is a tendency toward using various additives to enhance the shielding properties of these concrete mixtures. However, most of these additives being used either pose hygiene hazards or require special handling processes. It would be ideal if environmentally friendly additives were available for use. The bismuth oxide (Bi2O3) additive shows promise in various shielding applications due to its proven radiation attenuation ability and environmentally friendly nature. To the best of our knowledge, however, Bi2O3 has never been used in concrete mixtures. Therefore, for this research, we fabricated the Bi2O3-based concrete mixtures by adding Bi2O3 powder in the ordinary concrete mixture. Concrete mixtures with lead oxide (PbO) additives were used for comparison. Radiation shielding parameters like the linear attenuation coefficients (LAC) of all these concrete mixtures showing the effects of the Bi2O3 additions are presented. The mechanical performances of concrete mixtures incorporated with Bi2O3 additive were also investigated. It suggested that the concrete mixture containing 25% Bi2O3 powder (B5 in this study) provided the best shielding capacity and mechanical performance among other mixes. It has a significant potential for application as a structural concrete where radiological protection capability is required.

  6. A Multivariate Mixture Model to Estimate the Accuracy of Glycosaminoglycan Identifications Made by Tandem Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) and Database Search.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yulun; Schliekelman, Paul; Orlando, Ron; Sharp, Joshua S

    2017-02-01

    We present a statistical model to estimate the accuracy of derivatized heparin and heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assignments to tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra made by the first published database search application, GAG-ID. Employing a multivariate expectation-maximization algorithm, this statistical model distinguishes correct from ambiguous and incorrect database search results when computing the probability that heparin/HS GAG assignments to spectra are correct based upon database search scores. Using GAG-ID search results for spectra generated from a defined mixture of 21 synthesized tetrasaccharide sequences as well as seven spectra of longer defined oligosaccharides, we demonstrate that the computed probabilities are accurate and have high power to discriminate between correctly, ambiguously, and incorrectly assigned heparin/HS GAGs. This analysis makes it possible to filter large MS/MS database search results with predictable false identification error rates.

  7. An investigation on the use of shredded waste PET bottles as aggregate in lightweight concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Akcaoezoglu, Semiha; Atis, Cengiz Duran; Akcaoezoglu, Kubilay

    2010-02-15

    In this work, the utilization of shredded waste Poly-ethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle granules as a lightweight aggregate in mortar was investigated. Investigation was carried out on two groups of mortar samples, one made with only PET aggregates and, second made with PET and sand aggregates together. Additionally, blast-furnace slag was also used as the replacement of cement on mass basis at the replacement ratio of 50% to reduce the amount of cement used and provide savings. The water-binder (w/b) ratio and PET-binder (PET/b) ratio used in the mixtures were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. The size of shredded PET granules used in the preparation of mortar mixtures were between 0 and 4 mm. The results of the laboratory study and testing carried out showed that mortar containing only PET aggregate, mortar containing PET and sand aggregate, and mortars modified with slag as cement replacement can be drop into structural lightweight concrete category in terms of unit weight and strength properties. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a potential for the use of shredded waste PET granules as aggregate in the production of structural lightweight concrete. The use of shredded waste PET granules due to its low unit weight reduces the unit weight of concrete which results in a reduction in the death weight of a structural concrete member of a building. Reduction in the death weight of a building will help to reduce the seismic risk of the building since the earthquake forces linearly dependant on the dead-weight. Furthermore, it was also concluded that the use of industrial wastes such as PET granules and blast-furnace slag in concrete provides some advantages, i.e., reduction in the use of natural resources, disposal of wastes, prevention of environmental pollution, and energy saving.

  8. An investigation on the use of shredded waste PET bottles as aggregate in lightweight concrete.

    PubMed

    Akçaözoğlu, Semiha; Atiş, Cengiz Duran; Akçaözoğlu, Kubilay

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the utilization of shredded waste Poly-ethylene Terephthalate (PET) bottle granules as a lightweight aggregate in mortar was investigated. Investigation was carried out on two groups of mortar samples, one made with only PET aggregates and, second made with PET and sand aggregates together. Additionally, blast-furnace slag was also used as the replacement of cement on mass basis at the replacement ratio of 50% to reduce the amount of cement used and provide savings. The water-binder (w/b) ratio and PET-binder (PET/b) ratio used in the mixtures were 0.45 and 0.50, respectively. The size of shredded PET granules used in the preparation of mortar mixtures were between 0 and 4 mm. The results of the laboratory study and testing carried out showed that mortar containing only PET aggregate, mortar containing PET and sand aggregate, and mortars modified with slag as cement replacement can be drop into structural lightweight concrete category in terms of unit weight and strength properties. Therefore, it was concluded that there is a potential for the use of shredded waste PET granules as aggregate in the production of structural lightweight concrete. The use of shredded waste PET granules due to its low unit weight reduces the unit weight of concrete which results in a reduction in the death weight of a structural concrete member of a building. Reduction in the death weight of a building will help to reduce the seismic risk of the building since the earthquake forces linearly dependent on the dead-weight. Furthermore, it was also concluded that the use of industrial wastes such as PET granules and blast-furnace slag in concrete provides some advantages, i.e., reduction in the use of natural resources, disposal of wastes, prevention of environmental pollution, and energy saving.

  9. Tandem mass tags: a novel quantification strategy for comparative analysis of complex protein mixtures by MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Andrew; Schäfer, Jürgen; Kuhn, Karsten; Kienle, Stefan; Schwarz, Josef; Schmidt, Günter; Neumann, Thomas; Johnstone, R; Mohammed, A Karim A; Hamon, Christian

    2003-04-15

    A novel MS/MS-based analysis strategy using isotopomer labels, referred to as "tandem mass tags" (TMTs), for the accurate quantification of peptides and proteins is described. The new tags are designed to ensure that identical peptides labeled with different TMTs exactly comigrate in all separations. The tags require novel methods of quantification analysis using tandem mass spectrometry. The new tags and analysis methods allow peptides from different samples to be identified by their relative abundance with greater ease and accuracy than other methods. The new TMTs permit simultaneous determination of both the identity and relative abundances of peptide pairs using a collision induced dissociation (CID)-based analysis method. Relative abundance measurements made in the MS/MS mode using the new tags are accurate and sensitive. Compared to MS-mode measurements, a very high signal-to-noise ratio is achieved with MS/MS based detection. The new tags should be applicable to a wide variety of peptide isolation methods.

  10. Time-of-flight mass spectrometric analysis of reflected shock zone gas mixtures and high speed data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, R.D.; Chen, H.; Singh, H.J.; Branley, E.A.; Yao, J.

    1995-03-01

    The shock tube technique has been applied to the study of high temperature gas reactions employing a variety of analytical devices to monitor selected key species. The reader is referred to a recent review of the shock tube literature for examples and as a guide to previous work. The focus herein is on a particular technique; the dynamic sampling of the reflected shock zone by time-of-flight mass spectrometry over typical temperature and total pressure ranges of 1200-2500 K and 0.15 to 0.5 atm. Recent examples involve the thermal decompositions of propargyl chloride and propargyl bromide. A review of previous work devoted to the reactions pertaining to the pre-particle soot formation process is also available. Although the coupling of a shock tube to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer offers the kineticist a well controlled environment to investigate the time histories of major and minor species, it must be acknowledged that there are several deficiencies and problems associated with the technique. The deficiencies are identified as an inability to perform trace analysis, detection of H atoms, differentiation of structural isomers, and limitations on the variability of the total pressure in the reaction zone. Many of these deficiencies are resolved with the reliance on complementary techniques such as laser schlieren densitometry, atomic resonance absorption spectrometry, UV and visible absorption, and single pulse shock tube analysis.

  11. Preliminary studies on identification of inorganic species in complex mixtures by electrospray mass spectrometry in the counter ion mode

    SciTech Connect

    Mollah, Sahana

    1999-11-08

    Suppression of mass spectral peaks due to matrix problem is a major hurdle to overcome during identification work. So far, preliminary studies have been done in investigating solutions containing various percentages of nitric and hydrochloric acid. Since other anions would also be present in real samples, also needed to be examined is how the extent of suppression of metal complexes by Cl- compares with suppression by other anions such as PO43- or SO42-. If suppression of other anions is as severe as that of the chloride ion, then it would be virtually impossible to analyze unknown samples containing large amount of such anions by direct infusion electrospray mass spectrometry. It seems like a separation step is needed to separate these matrix anions from the metal complexes prior to putting the solution through the electrospray. However, separation of inorganic complexes can be difficult and has not been studied thoroughly as LC separation of bioorganic compounds. Both zinc and copper chloro complexes have been observed to be more tolerant to higher amount of chloride ion present in a solution compared to the group I and II metal chloro complexes. Other transition metals including the lanthanide complexes need to be examined more intensively to see how they fare against other transition metal complexes. So far, only preliminary work has been done in identifying inorganic species in solutions using both ICP-MS and ES-MS. The solution contained a number of metals but only one major anion, NO3-. Therefore, complex solutions containing a number of anions and metals can be examined to see if identification is still feasible. This identification work can be continued on into investigating real samples.

  12. Environmental performance and mechanical analysis of concrete containing recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) and waste precast concrete as aggregate.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Savaş; Blankson, Marva Angela

    2014-01-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating 100% recycled aggregates, either waste precast concrete or waste asphalt planning, as replacements for virgin aggregates in structural concrete and to determine the mechanical and environmental performance of concrete containing these aggregates. Four different types of concrete mixtures were designed with the same total water cement ratio (w/c=0.74) either by using natural aggregate as reference or by totally replacing the natural aggregate with recycled material. Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS) was used as a mineral addition (35%) in all mixtures. The test results showed that it is possible to obtain satisfactory performance for strength characteristics of concrete containing recycled aggregates, if these aggregates are sourced from old precast concrete. However, from the perspective of the mechanical properties, the test results indicated that concrete with RAP aggregate cannot be used for structural applications. In terms of leaching, the results also showed that the environmental behaviour of the recycled aggregate concrete is similar to that of the natural aggregate concrete.

  13. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1992-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar base construction was discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the Moon are provided in this paper, along with specific conclusions from the existing database.

  14. Lunar concrete for construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; Keller, M. Dean

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base.

  15. Lunar concrete for construction

    SciTech Connect

    Cullingford, H.S.; Keller, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    Feasibility of using concrete for lunar-base construction has been discussed recently without relevant data for the effects of vacuum on concrete. Our experimental studies performed earlier at Los Alamos have shown that concrete is stable in vacuum with no deterioration of its quality as measured by the compressive strength. Various considerations of using concrete successfully on the moon are provided in this paper along with specific conclusions from the existing data base. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Mass-fractal growth in niobia/silsesquioxane mixtures: a small-angle X-ray scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Besselink, Rogier; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2014-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of niobium pentaethoxide (NPE)-derived clusters in ethanol, through acid-catalyzed hydrolysis/condensation in the presence and absence of the silsesquioxane 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (BTESE), was monitored at 298–333 K by small-angle X-ray scattering. The data were analyzed with a newly derived model for polydisperse mass-fractal-like structures. At 298–313 K in the absence of BTESE the data indicated the development of relatively monodisperse NPE-derived structures with self-preserving polydispersity during growth. The growth exponent was consistent with irreversible diffusion-limited cluster agglomeration. At 333 K the growth exponent was characteristic for fast-gelling reaction-limited cluster agglomeration. The reaction yielded substantially higher degrees of polydispersity. In the presence of BTESE the growth exponents were substantially smaller. The smaller growth exponent in this case is not consistent with irreversible Smoluchowski-type agglomeration. Instead, reversible Lifshitz–Slyozov-type agglomeration seems to be more consistent with the experimental data. PMID:25294980

  17. Properties of Sulfur Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-06

    This report summarizes the state of the art of sulfur concrete . Sulfur concrete is created by mixing molten sulfur with aggregate and allowing the...and many organic compounds. It works well as a rapid runway repair material. Sulfur concrete also has unfavorable properties. It has poor durability

  18. Analyzing complex mixtures of drug-like molecules: Ion mobility as an adjunct to existing liquid chromatography-(tandem) mass spectrometry methods.

    PubMed

    Boschmans, Jasper; Lemière, Filip; Sobott, Frank

    2017-03-24

    The use of traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS) is evaluated in conjunction with, and as a possible alternative to, conventional LC-MS(/MS) methods for the separation and characterization of drug-like compounds and metabolites. As a model system we use an in vitro incubation mixture of the chemotherapeutic agent melphalan, which results in more than ten closely related hydrolysis products and chain-like oligomers. Ion mobility as a filtering tool results in the separation of ions of interest from interfering ions, based on charge state and shape/size. Different classes of chemical compounds often display different mobilities even if they show the same LC behavior - thereby providing an orthogonal separation dimension. Small molecules with identical or similar m/z that only differ in shape/size (e.g. isomers and isobars, monomers/dimers) can also be distinguished using ion mobility. Similar to retention times and mass-to-charge ratios, drift times are analyte-dependent and can be used as an additional identifier. We find that the compound melphalan shows two different drift times due to the formation of gas-phase charge isomers (protomers). The occurrence of protomers has important implications for ion mobility characterization of such analytes, and also for the interpretation of their fragmentation behavior (CID) in the gas phase.

  19. Characterization of polyoxyethylene tallow amine surfactants in technical mixtures and glyphosate formulations using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tush, Daniel; Loftin, Keith A.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the occurrence, fate, and effects of the ancillary additives in pesticide formulations. Polyoxyethylene tallow amine (POEA) is a non-ionic surfactant used in many glyphosate formulations, a widely applied herbicide both in agricultural and urban environments. POEA has not been previously well characterized, but has been shown to be toxic to various aquatic organisms. Characterization of technical mixtures using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and mass spectrometry shows POEA is a complex combination of homologs of different aliphatic moieties and ranges of ethoxylate units. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments indicate that POEA homologs generate no product ions readily suitable for quantitative analysis due to poor sensitivity. A comparison of multiple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UHPLC analytical columns indicates that the stationary phase is more important in column selection than other parameters for the separation of POEA. Analysis of several agricultural and household glyphosate formulations confirms that POEA is a common ingredient but ethoxylate distributions among formulations vary.

  20. Matrix-Assisted Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry: Selective Analysis of a Europium-PEG Complex in a Crude Mixture.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Joshua L; Lutomski, Corinne A; El-Baba, Tarick J; Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N; Weidner, Steffen M; Falkenhagen, Jana; Allen, Matthew J; Trimpin, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The analytical utility of a new and simple to use ionization method, matrix-assisted ionization (MAI), coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) is used to characterize a 2-armed europium(III)-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (Eu-PEG) complex directly from a crude sample. MAI was used with the matrix 1,2-dicyanobenzene, which affords low chemical background relative to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). MAI provides high ion abundance of desired products in comparison to ESI and MALDI. Inductively coupled plasma-MS measurements were used to estimate a maximum of 10% of the crude sample by mass was the 2-arm Eu-PEG complex, supporting evidence of selective ionization of Eu-PEG complexes using the new MAI matrix, 1,2-dicyanobenzene. Multiply charged ions formed in MAI enhance the IMS gas-phase separation, especially relative to the singly charged ions observed with MALDI. Individual components are cleanly separated and readily identified, allowing characterization of the 2-arm Eu-PEG conjugate from a mixture of the 1-arm Eu-PEG complex and unreacted starting materials. Size-exclusion chromatography, liquid chromatography at critical conditions, MALDI-MS, ESI-MS, and ESI-IMS-MS had difficulties with this analysis, or failed. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  1. Characterization of polyoxyethylene tallow amine surfactants in technical mixtures and glyphosate formulations using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tush, Daniel; Loftin, Keith A; Meyer, Michael T

    2013-12-06

    Little is known about the occurrence, fate, and effects of the ancillary additives in pesticide formulations. Polyoxyethylene tallow amine (POEA) is a non-ionic surfactant used in many glyphosate formulations, a widely applied herbicide both in agricultural and urban environments. POEA has not been previously well characterized, but has been shown to be toxic to various aquatic organisms. Characterization of technical mixtures using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) and mass spectrometry shows POEA is a complex combination of homologs of different aliphatic moieties and ranges of ethoxylate units. Tandem mass spectrometry experiments indicate that POEA homologs generate no product ions readily suitable for quantitative analysis due to poor sensitivity. A comparison of multiple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UHPLC analytical columns indicates that the stationary phase is more important in column selection than other parameters for the separation of POEA. Analysis of several agricultural and household glyphosate formulations confirms that POEA is a common ingredient but ethoxylate distributions among formulations vary.

  2. Immobilization of iodine in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Walter E.; Thompson, Clarence T.

    1977-04-12

    A method for immobilizing fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel comprises combining material comprising water, Portland cement and about 3-20 wt. % iodine as Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 to provide a fluid mixture and allowing the fluid mixture to harden, said Ba(IO.sub.3).sub.2 comprising said radioactive iodine. An article for solid waste disposal comprises concrete prepared by this method. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of, or under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. It relates in general to reactor waste solidification and more specifically to the immobilization of fission product radioactive iodine recovered from irradiated nuclear fuel for underground storage.

  3. Insight into unresolved complex mixtures of aromatic hydrocarbons in heavy oil via two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Na; Wan, Shan; Wang, Huitong; Zhang, Shuichang; Zhu, Guangyou; Liu, Jingfu; Cai, Di; Yang, Yunxu

    2015-06-12

    The aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of five crude oils representing a natural sequence of increasing degree of biodegradation from the Liaohe Basin, NE, China, were analyzed using conventional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). Because of the limited peak capability and low resolution, compounds in the aromatic fraction of a heavily biodegraded crude oil that were analyzed by GC-MS appeared as unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) or GC "humps". They could be separated based on their polarity by GC×GC. UCMs are composed mainly of aromatic biomarkers and aromatic hydrocarbons with branched alkanes or cycloalkanes substituents. The quantitative results achieved by GC×GC-FID were shown that monoaromatic hydrocarbons account for the largest number and mass of UCMs in the aromatic hydrocarbon fraction of heavily biodegraded crude oil, at 45% by mass. The number and mass of diaromatic hydrocarbons ranks second at 33% by mass, followed by the aromatic biomarker compounds, triaromatic, tetraaromatic, and pentaaromatic hydrocarbons, that account for 10%, 6%, 1.5%, and 0.01% of all aromatic compounds by mass, respectively. In the heavily biodegraded oil, compounds with monocyclic cycloalkane substituents account for the largest proportion of mono- and diaromatic hydrocarbons, respectively. The C4-substituted compounds account for the largest proportion of naphthalenes and the C3-substituted compounds account for the largest proportion of phenanthrenes, which is very different from non-biodegraded, slightly biodegraded, and moderately biodegraded crude oil. It is inferred that compounds of monoaromatic, diaromatic and triaromatic hydrocarbons are affected by biodegradation, that compounds with C1-, C2-substituents are affected by the increase in degree of biodegradation, and that their relative content decreased, whereas compounds with C3-substituents or more were affected slightly or unaffected, and their

  4. The effects of utilizing silica fume in Portland Cement Pervious Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Daniel Allen

    Silica fume has long been used as a supplementary cementing material to provide a high density, high strength, and durable building material. Silica fume has a particle size a fraction of any conventional cement, which allows it to increase concrete strength by decreasing the porosity especially near the aggregates surface. Because Portland Cement Pervious Concrete (PCPC) has a smaller bond area between aggregate and paste, silica fume has significant impacts on the properties of the PCPC. The research in this paper studies the workability of a cement paste containing silica fume in addition to analyzing the results of testing on Portland Cement Pervious Concrete mixtures that also contained silica fume. Testing conducted included a study of the effects of silica fume on cement's rheological properties at various dosage rates ranging from zero to ten percent by mass. It was determined that silica fume has negligible effects on the viscosity of cement paste until a dosage rate of five percent, at which point the viscosity increases rapidly. In addition to the rheological testing of the cement paste, trials were also conducted on the pervious concrete samples. Sample groups included mixes with river gravel and chipped limestone as aggregate, washed and unwashed, and two different void contents. Workability tests showed that mixtures containing a silica fume dosage rate of 5 percent or less had comparable or slightly improved workability when compared to control groups. Workability was found to decrease at a 7 percent dosage rate. Samples were tested for compressive strength at 7 and 28 days and splitting tensile strength at 28 days. It was found in most sample groups, strength increased with dosage rates of 3 to 5 percent but often decreased when the dosage reached 7 percent. Abrasion testing showed that both samples containing washed aggregate and samples containing silica fume exhibited a reduced mass loss.

  5. Cast-concrete products made with FBC ash and wet-collected coal-ash

    SciTech Connect

    Naik, T.R.; Kraus, R.N.; Chun, Y.M.; Botha, F.D.

    2005-12-01

    Cast-concrete hollow blocks, solid blocks, and paving stones were produced at a manufacturing plant by replacing up to 45% (by mass) of portland cement with fluidized bed combustion (FBC) coal ash and up to 9% of natural aggregates with wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash (WA). Cast-concrete product specimens of all three types exceeded the compressive strength requirements of ASTM from early ages, with the exception of one paving-stone mixture, which fell short of the requirement by less than 10%. The cast-concrete products made by replacing up to 40% of cement with FBC ash were equivalent in strength (89-113% of control) to the products without ash. The abrasion resistance of paving stones was equivalent for up to 34% FBC ash content. Partial replacement of aggregates with WA decreased strength of the products. The resistance of hollow blocks and paving stones to freezing and thawing decreased appreciably with increasing ash contents. The cast-concrete products could be used indoors in regions where freezing and thawing is a concern, and outdoors in a moderate climate.

  6. The effect of recycled concrete aggregate properties on the bond strength between RCA concrete and steel reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L. West, J.S.; Tighe, S.L.

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence that replacing natural coarse aggregate with recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) has on concrete bond strength with reinforcing steel. Two sources of RCA were used along with one natural aggregate source. Numerous aggregate properties were measured for all aggregate sources. Two types of concrete mixture proportions were developed replacing 100% of the natural aggregate with RCA. The first type maintained the same water-cement ratios while the second type was designed to achieve the same compressive strengths. Beam-end specimens were tested to determine the relative bond strength of RCA and natural aggregate concrete. On average, natural aggregate concrete specimens had bond strengths that were 9 to 19% higher than the equivalent RCA specimens. Bond strength and the aggregate crushing value seemed to correlate well for all concrete types.

  7. Quality control of lightweight aggregate concrete based on initial and final water absorption tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghfouri, M.; Shafigh, P.; Ibrahim, Z. Binti; Alimohammadi, V.

    2017-06-01

    Water absorption test is used to evaluate overall performance of concrete in terms of durability. The water absorption of lightweight concrete might be considerably higher than the conventional concrete due to higher rate of pores in concrete and lightweight aggregate. Oil palm shell is a bio-solid waste in palm oil industry, which could be used as lightweight aggregate in the concrete mixture. The present study aims to measure the initial and final water absorption and compressive strength of oil palm shell lightweight concrete in order to evaluation of quality control and durability performance. Total normal coarse aggregates were substituted with coarse oil palm shell in a high strength concrete mixture. The quality of concrete was then evaluated based on the compressive strength and water absorption rates. The results showed that fully substitution of normal coarse aggregates with oil palm shell significantly reduced the compressive strength. However, this concrete with the 28-day compressive strength of 40 MPa still can be used as structural concrete. The initial and final water absorption test results also showed that this concrete is not considered as a good concrete in terms of durability. Therefore, it is recommended that both compressive strength and waster absorption tests must be performed for quality control of oil palm shell concretes.

  8. Reusing recycled aggregates in structural concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Shicong

    The utilization of recycled aggregates in concrete can minimize environmental impact and reduce the consumption of natural resources in concrete applications. The aim of this thesis is to provide a scientific basis for the possible use of recycled aggregates in structure concrete by conducting a comprehensive programme of laboratory study to gain a better understanding of the mechanical, microstructure and durability properties of concrete produced with recycled aggregates. The study also explored possible techniques to of improve the properties of recycled aggregate concrete that is produced with high percentages (≧ 50%) of recycled aggregates. These techniques included: (a) using lower water-to-cement ratios in the concrete mix design; (b) using fly ash as a cement replacement or as an additional mineral admixture in the concrete mixes, and (c) precasting recycled aggregate concrete with steam curing regimes. The characteristics of the recycled aggregates produced both from laboratory and a commercially operated pilot construction and demolition (C&D) waste recycling plant were first studied. A mix proportioning procedure was then established to produce six series of concrete mixtures using different percentages of recycled coarse aggregates with and without the use of fly ash. The water-to-cement (binder) ratios of 0.55, 0.50, 0.45 and 0.40 were used. The fresh properties (including slump and bleeding) of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) were then quantified. The effects of fly ash on the fresh and hardened properties of RAC were then studied and compared with those RAC prepared with no fly ash addition. Furthermore, the effects of steam curing on the hardened properties of RAC were investigated. For micro-structural properties, the interfacial transition zones of the aggregates and the mortar/cement paste were analyzed by SEM and EDX-mapping. Moreover, a detailed set of results on the fracture properties for RAC were obtained. Based on the experimental

  9. Radon emanation fractions from concretes containing fly ash and metakaolin.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Lange, Sarah C; Juenger, Maria C G; Siegel, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) and progenies emanate from soil and building components and can create an indoor air quality hazard. In this study, nine concrete constituents, including the supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) fly ash and metakaolin, were used to create eleven different concrete mixtures. We investigated the effect of constituent radium specific activity, radon effective activity and emanation fraction on the concrete emanation fraction and the radon exhalation rate. Given the serious health effects associated with radionuclide exposure, experimental results were coupled with Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate predictive differences in the indoor radon concentration due to concrete mixture design. The results from this study show that, on average, fly ash constituents possessed radium specific activities ranging from 100 Bq/kg to 200 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 1.1% to 2.5%. The lowest emitting concrete mixture containing fly ash resulted in a 3.4% reduction in the concrete emanation fraction, owing to the relatively low emanation that exists when fly ash is part of concrete. On average, the metakaolin constituents contained radium specific activities ranging from 67 Bq/kg to 600 Bq/kg and emanation fractions ranging from 8.4% to 15.5%, and changed the total concrete emanation fraction by roughly ±5% relative to control samples. The results from this study suggest that SCMs can reduce indoor radon exposure from concrete, contingent upon SCM radionucleotide content and emanation fraction. Lastly, the experimental results provide SCM-specific concrete emanation fractions for indoor radon exposure modeling.

  10. Structure formation control of foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steshenko, Aleksei; Kudyakov, Aleksander; Konusheva, Viktoriya; Syrkin, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    The process of predetermined foam concrete structure formation is considered to be a crucial issue from the point of process control and it is currently understudied thus defining the need for additional research. One of the effective ways of structure formation control in naturally hardening foam concrete is reinforcement with dispersed fibers or introduction of plasticizers. The paper aims at studying the patterns of influence of microreinforcing and plasticizing additives on the structure and performance properties of foam concrete. Preparation of foam concrete mix has been conducted using one-step technology. The structure of modified foam concrete has been studied by means of electron microscopy. The cellular structure of foam concrete samples with the additives is homogeneous; the pores are uniformly distributed over the total volume. It has been revealed that introduction of the Neolas 5.2 plasticizer and microreinforcing fibers in the foam concrete mixture in the amount of 0.4 - 0.1 % by weight of cement leads to reduction of the average pore diameter in the range of 45.3 to 30.2 microns and the standard deviation of the pore average diameter from 23.6 to 9.2 in comparison with the sample without additive. Introduction of modifying additives has stimulated formation of a large number of closed pores. Thus porosity of conditionally closed pores has increased from 16.06 % to 34.48 %, which has lead to increase of frost resistance brand of foam concrete from F15 to F50 and to reduction of its water absorption by weight by 20 %.

  11. Controlling chloride ions diffusion in concrete.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lunwu; Song, Runxia

    2013-11-28

    The corrosion of steel in concrete is mainly due to the chemical reaction between the chloride ions and iron ions. Indeed, this is a serious threaten for reinforced concrete structure, especially for the reinforced concrete structure in the sea. So it is urgent and important to protect concrete against chloride ions corrosion. In this work, we report multilayer concrete can cloak chloride ions. We formulated five kinds of concrete A, B, C, D and E, which are made of different proportion of cement, sand and glue, and fabricated six-layer (ABACAD) cylinder diffusion cloak and background media E. The simulation results show that the six-layer mass diffusion cloak can protect concrete against chloride ions penetration, while the experiment results show that the concentration gradients are parallel and equal outside the outer circle in the diffusion flux lines, the iso-concentration lines are parallel outside the outer circle, and the concentration gradients in the inner circle are smaller than those outside the outer circle.

  12. Microstructure of high-strength foam concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Just, A.; Middendorf, B.

    2009-07-15

    Foam concretes are divided into two groups: on the one hand the physically foamed concrete is mixed in fast rotating pug mill mixers by using foaming agents. This concrete cures under atmospheric conditions. On the other hand the autoclaved aerated concrete is chemically foamed by adding aluminium powder. Afterwards it is cured in a saturated steam atmosphere. New alternatives for the application of foam concretes arise from the combination of chemical foaming and air curing in manufacturing processes. These foam concretes are new and innovative building materials with interesting properties: low mass density and high strength. Responsible for these properties are the macro-, meso- and microporosity. Macropores are created by adding aluminium powder in different volumes and with different particle size distributions. However, the microstructure of the cement matrix is affected by meso- and micropores. In addition, the matrix of the hardened cement paste can be optimized by the specific use of chemical additives for concrete. The influence of aluminium powder and chemical additives on the properties of the microstructure of the hardened cement matrices were investigated by using petrographic microscopy as well as scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Controlling chloride ions diffusion in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Song, Runxia

    2013-11-01

    The corrosion of steel in concrete is mainly due to the chemical reaction between the chloride ions and iron ions. Indeed, this is a serious threaten for reinforced concrete structure, especially for the reinforced concrete structure in the sea. So it is urgent and important to protect concrete against chloride ions corrosion. In this work, we report multilayer concrete can cloak chloride ions. We formulated five kinds of concrete A, B, C, D and E, which are made of different proportion of cement, sand and glue, and fabricated six-layer (ABACAD) cylinder diffusion cloak and background media E. The simulation results show that the six-layer mass diffusion cloak can protect concrete against chloride ions penetration, while the experiment results show that the concentration gradients are parallel and equal outside the outer circle in the diffusion flux lines, the iso-concentration lines are parallel outside the outer circle, and the concentration gradients in the inner circle are smaller than those outside the outer circle.

  14. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  15. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  16. Organic–inorganic binary mixture matrix for comprehensive laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis and imaging of medium-size molecules including phospholipids, glycerolipids, and oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, Adam D.; O'Neill, Kelly C.; Yagnik, Gargey B.; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-10-13

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a widely adopted, versatile technique, especially in high-throughput analysis and imaging. However, matrix-dependent selectivity of analytes is often a severe limitation. In this work, a mixture of organic 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and inorganic Fe3O4 nanoparticles is developed as a binary MALDI matrix to alleviate the well-known issue of triacylglycerol (TG) ion suppression by phosphatidylcholine (PC). In application to lipid standards and maize seed cross-sections, the binary matrix not only dramatically reduced the ion suppression of TG, but also efficiently desorbed and ionized a wide variety of lipids such as cationic PC, anionic phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), and neutral digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). The binary matrix was also very efficient for large polysaccharides, which were not detected by either of the individual matrices. As a result, the usefulness of the binary matrix is demonstrated in MS imaging of maize seed sections, successfully visualizing diverse medium-size molecules and acquiring high-quality MS/MS spectra for these compounds.

  17. Surface structures of binary mixtures of imidazolium-based ionic liquids using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Miyashita, Motoki; Suzuki, Motofumi; Kimura, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Surface structures of binary mixtures of imidazolium-based ionic liquids having a common anion (bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([TFSI]), namely [C2MIM]1-x[C10MIM]x[TFSI] (x = 0.5 and 0.1), are studied using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). Although both measurements show surface segregation of [C10MIM] the degrees of the segregation are different. The surface fraction xsurf of [C10MIM] is estimated to be 0.6 ± 0.05 and 0.18 ± 0.02 by HRBS for x = 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. On the other hand, TOF-SIMS indicates much stronger surface segregation, namely xsurf = 0.83 ± 0.03 and 0.42 ± 0.04 for x = 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. The observed discrepancy can be attributed to the difference in the probing depth between HRBS and TOF-SIMS. The observed surface segregation can be roughly explained in terms of surface tension.

  18. Surface structures of binary mixtures of imidazolium-based ionic liquids using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kaoru; Miyashita, Motoki; Suzuki, Motofumi; Kimura, Kenji

    2013-12-14

    Surface structures of binary mixtures of imidazolium-based ionic liquids having a common anion (bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([TFSI]), namely [C2MIM]1-x[C10MIM]x[TFSI] (x = 0.5 and 0.1), are studied using high-resolution Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (HRBS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). Although both measurements show surface segregation of [C10MIM] the degrees of the segregation are different. The surface fraction xsurf of [C10MIM] is estimated to be 0.6 ± 0.05 and 0.18 ± 0.02 by HRBS for x = 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. On the other hand, TOF-SIMS indicates much stronger surface segregation, namely xsurf = 0.83 ± 0.03 and 0.42 ± 0.04 for x = 0.5 and 0.1, respectively. The observed discrepancy can be attributed to the difference in the probing depth between HRBS and TOF-SIMS. The observed surface segregation can be roughly explained in terms of surface tension.

  19. Optimization of the Use of Consensus Methods for the Detection and Putative Identification of Peptides via Mass Spectrometry Using Protein Standard Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Tamanna; Jordan, Rick; Lyons-Weiler, James

    2009-01-01

    Correct identification of peptides and proteins in complex biological samples from proteomic mass-spectra is a challenging problem in bioinformatics. The sensitivity and specificity of identification algorithms depend on underlying scoring methods, some being more sensitive, and others more specific. For high-throughput, automated peptide identification, control over the algorithms’ performance in terms of trade-off between sensitivity and specificity is desirable. Combinations of algorithms, called ‘consensus methods’, have been shown to provide more accurate results than individual algorithms. However, due to the proliferation of algorithms and their varied internal settings, a systematic understanding of relative performance of individual and consensus methods are lacking. We performed an in-depth analysis of various approaches to consensus scoring using known protein mixtures, and evaluated the performance of 2310 settings generated from consensus of three different search algorithms: Mascot, Sequest, and X!Tandem. Our findings indicate that the union of Mascot, Sequest, and X!Tandem performed well (considering overall accuracy), and methods using 80–99.9% protein probability and/or minimum 2 peptides and/or 0–50% minimum peptide probability for protein identification performed better (on average) among all consensus methods tested in terms of overall accuracy. The results also suggest method selection strategies to provide direct control over sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19779596

  20. Organic–inorganic binary mixture matrix for comprehensive laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis and imaging of medium-size molecules including phospholipids, glycerolipids, and oligosaccharides

    DOE PAGES

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Ames Lab., Ames, IA; O'Neill, Kelly C.; ...

    2016-10-13

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a widely adopted, versatile technique, especially in high-throughput analysis and imaging. However, matrix-dependent selectivity of analytes is often a severe limitation. In this work, a mixture of organic 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and inorganic Fe3O4 nanoparticles is developed as a binary MALDI matrix to alleviate the well-known issue of triacylglycerol (TG) ion suppression by phosphatidylcholine (PC). In application to lipid standards and maize seed cross-sections, the binary matrix not only dramatically reduced the ion suppression of TG, but also efficiently desorbed and ionized a wide variety of lipids such as cationic PC, anionic phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)more » and phosphatidylinositol (PI), and neutral digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). The binary matrix was also very efficient for large polysaccharides, which were not detected by either of the individual matrices. As a result, the usefulness of the binary matrix is demonstrated in MS imaging of maize seed sections, successfully visualizing diverse medium-size molecules and acquiring high-quality MS/MS spectra for these compounds.« less

  1. Chiral mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitjean, Michel

    2002-08-01

    An index evaluating the amount of chirality of a mixture of colored random variables is defined. Properties are established. Extreme chiral mixtures are characterized and examples are given. Connections between chirality, Wasserstein distances, and least squares Procrustes methods are pointed out.

  2. Sulfate resistance of high calcium fly ash concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhole, Rajaram

    Sulfate attack is one of the mechanisms which can cause deterioration of concrete. In general, Class C fly ash mixtures are reported to provide poor sulfate resistance. Fly ashes, mainly those belonging to the Class C, were tested as per the ASTM C 1012 procedure to evaluate chemical sulfate resistance. Overall the Class C fly ashes showed poor resistance in the sulfate environment. Different strategies were used in this research work to improve the sulfate resistance of Class C fly ash mixes. The study revealed that some of the strategies such as use of low W/CM (water to cementing materials by mass ratio), silica fume or ultra fine fly ash, high volumes of fly ash and, ternary or quaternary mixes with suitable supplementary cementing materials, can successfully improve the sulfate resistance of the Class C fly ash mixes. Combined sulfate attack, involving physical and chemical action, was studied using sodium sulfate and calcium sulfate solutions. The specimens were subjected to wetting-drying cycles and temperature changes. These conditions were found to accelerate the rate of degradation of concrete placed in a sodium sulfate environment. W/CM was found to be the main governing factor in providing sulfate resistance to mixes. Calcium sulfate did not reveal damage as a result of mainly physical action. Characterization of the selected fly ashes was undertaken by using SEM, XRD and the Rietveld analysis techniques, to determine the relation between the composition of fly ashes and resistance to sulfate attack. The chemical composition of glass represented on the ternary diagram was the main factor which had a significant influence on the sulfate resistance of fly ash mixtures. Mixes prepared with fly ashes containing significant amounts of vulnerable crystalline phases offered poor sulfate resistance. Comparatively, fly ash mixes containing inert crystalline phases such as quartz, mullite and hematite offered good sulfate resistance. The analysis of hydrated lime

  3. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilinçarslan, Şemsettin; Mavi, Betül; Günoǧlu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender; Akkaş, Ayşe

    2011-12-01

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  4. Investigating Radiation Shielding Properties of Different Mineral Origin Heavyweight Concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Basyigit, Celalettin; Uysal, Volkan; Kilincarslan, Semsettin; Akkas, Ayse; Mavi, Betuel; Guenoglu, Kadir; Akkurt, Iskender

    2011-12-26

    The radiation although has hazardous effects for human health, developing technologies bring lots of usage fields to radiation like in medicine and nuclear power station buildings. In this case protecting from undesirable radiation is a necessity for human health. Heavyweight concrete is one of the most important materials used in where radiation should be shielded, like those areas. In this study, used heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin (Limonite, Siderite), in order to prepare different series in concrete mixtures and investigated radiation shielding properties. The experimental results on measuring the radiation shielding, the heavyweight concrete prepared with heavyweight aggregates of different mineral origin show that, are useful radiation absorbents when they used in concrete mixtures.

  5. High-strength concrete for Peacekeeper facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucier, K. L.

    1984-03-01

    An investigation is described which was conducted to determine the processes and techniques required to produce portland-cement concrete with a compressive strength of 15,000 psi or greater using conventional concreting methods and equipment, and to develop physical property data on the mixtures. It was permitted that special materials and admixtures be used, but a requirement was set that the aggregates and cements be selected from those available in the Cheyenne, Wyoming, area. Results indicated that it is feasible to achieve the 15,000-psi compressive strengths but that workability may decrease over a 2-hour period, and this latter development should be studied under job conditions. It is recommended that: (1) all materials and procedures to be used on a specific project be tested in the laboratory for basic property information, and (2) selected mixtures be tested in the field under expected environmental conditions prior to actual job use.

  6. Reinforced Concrete Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    AFWL-TR-82-9 AFWL-TR-82-9 REINFORCED CONCRETE MODELING H. L. Schreyer J. W. Jeter, Jr. New Mexico Engineering Reseprch Institute University of New...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED REINFORCED CONCRETE MODELING Final Report 6. PERFORMING OtG. REPORT NUMBER NMERI TA8-9 7. AUTHORg) S...loading were identified and used to evaluate current concrete models . Since the endochronic and viscoplastic models provide satisfactory descriptions

  7. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1998-06-30

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance. 6 figs.

  8. Sulfate and acid resistant concrete and mortar

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction and other applications, which hardenable mixtures demonstrate significant levels of acid and sulfate resistance while maintaining acceptable compressive strength properties. The acid and sulfate hardenable mixtures of the invention containing fly ash comprise cementitious materials and a fine aggregate. The cementitous materials may comprise fly ash as well as cement. The fine aggregate may comprise fly ash as well as sand. The total amount of fly ash in the hardenable mixture ranges from about 60% to about 120% of the total amount of cement, by weight, whether the fly ash is included as a cementious material, fine aggregate, or an additive, or any combination of the foregoing. In specific examples, mortar containing 50% fly ash and 50% cement in cementitious materials demonstrated superior properties of corrosion resistance.

  9. Characterization and genesis interpretation of charcoal-bearing concretions from the early Eocene Ione Formation, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, D.; Aburto, F.

    2013-12-01

    Charcoal core concretions have been discovered in the kaolinitic soil horizons of the Ione formation (early Eocene epoch ~52Ma BP). It is thought that the Ione Formation in the Ione Basin was deposited in delta and estuarine waters that were subsequently exhumed and exposed to a warmer, humid, tropical-like environment during the early Eocene. The formation of concretions is indicative of seasonal dryness, and the charcoal cores are evidence of wildfires and of the existence of a forest ecosystem. The mineral outer shells of the concretions have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, Electron Microprobe and Laser Ablation Quadruple Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Micro-computed tomography (MCT) scans indicate that these concretions have at least three distinct shells and a inner core with fragments of charcoal without apparent internal organization. The outer shell is mainly composed of a layered mix of kaolinite, quartz, goethite, hematite and birnessite. Some pyrite and jarosite have also been found, which could indicate that goethite may be post-depositional and a product of the bacteria-mediated oxidation of pyrite. The central shell has a similar composition, but with a higher content of iron oxyhydroxides and jarosite. The inner cores of the concretions are mainly composed of a mixture of kaolinite and quartz which correspond to the layer in which the concretions were found. The concretion cores contain loose charcoal fragments in a unsolidified kaolinite matrix. The charcoal fragments have been characterized by Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), C/N isotope analysis, and Synchrotron radiation FTIR (SR-FTIR). Analysis of the ATR-FTIR spectra showed significant absorbance peaks at wavenumbers that coincided with the chemical functionality of other wood biochars. Charcoal from different concretions display (n =12) extremely similar spectra which suggest that they were originated from similar species and

  10. Early-age volume changes of extrudable reactive powder concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkaoui, K.; Courtial, M.; Dunstetter, F.; Khelidj, A.; Mounanga, P.; de Noirfontaine, M. N.

    2010-06-01

    This article presents a study on the early-age autogenous deformations of Extrudable Reactive Powder Concretes (ERPCs), especially designed for the making of concrete pipes by extrusion. Different ERPC mixtures, with variable amounts of polycarboxylate superplasticizer (SP), have been investigated. Results on 28-day mechanical properties, early-age hydration rate, autogenous shrinkage and premature cracking risk are analyzed and discussed in relation with the ERPC mix parameters.

  11. Waste tyre rubberized concrete: properties at fresh and hardened state.

    PubMed

    Aiello, M A; Leuzzi, F

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to investigate the properties of various concrete mixtures at fresh and hardened state, obtained by a partial substitution of coarse and fine aggregate with different volume percentages of waste tyres rubber particles, having the same dimensions of the replaced aggregate. Workability, unit weight, compressive and flexural strength and post-cracking behaviour were evaluated and a comparison of the results for the different rubcrete mixtures were proposed in order to define the better mix proportions in terms of mechanical properties of the rubberized concrete. Results showed in this paper were also compared to data reported in literature. Moreover, a preliminary geometrical, physical and mechanical characterization on scrap tyre rubber shreds was made. The rubberized concrete mixtures showed lower unit weight compared to plain concrete and good workability. The results of compressive and flexural tests indicated a larger reduction of mechanical properties of rubcrete when replacing coarse aggregate rather than fine aggregate. On the other hand, the post-cracking behaviour of rubberized concrete was positively affected by the substitution of coarse aggregate with rubber shreds, showing a good energy absorption and ductility indexes in the range observed for fibrous concrete, as suggested by standard (ASTM C1018-97, 1997).

  12. Blasted copper slag as fine aggregate in Portland cement concrete.

    PubMed

    Dos Anjos, M A G; Sales, A T C; Andrade, N

    2017-07-01

    The present work focuses on assessing the viability of applying blasted copper slag, produced during abrasive blasting, as fine aggregate for Portland cement concrete manufacturing, resulting in an alternative and safe disposal method. Leaching assays showed no toxicity for this material. Concrete mixtures were produced, with high aggregate replacement ratios, varying from 0% to 100%. Axial compressive strength, diametrical compressive strength, elastic modulus, physical indexes and durability were evaluated. Assays showed a significant improvement in workability, with the increase in substitution of fine aggregate. With 80% of replacement, the concrete presented lower levels of water absorption capacity. Axial compressive strength and diametrical compressive strength decreased, with the increase of residue replacement content. The greatest reductions of compressive strength were found when the replacement was over 40%. For tensile strength by diametrical compression, the greatest reduction occurred for the concrete with 80% of replacement. After the accelerated aging, results of mechanic properties showed a small reduction of the concrete with blasted copper slag performance, when compared with the reference mixture. Results indicated that the blasted copper slag is a technically viable material for application as fine aggregate for concrete mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Mechanical and Durability Properties of Crumb Rubber Concrete.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanbing; Wang, Xianqiang; Jiao, Yubo; Sha, Tao

    2016-03-07

    Recycling waste tire rubber by incorporating it into concrete has become the preferred solution to dispose of waste tires. In this study, the effect of the volume content of crumb rubber and pretreatment methods on the performances of concrete was evaluated. Firstly, the fine aggregate and mixture were partly replaced by crumb rubber to produce crumb rubber concrete. Secondly, the mechanical and durability properties of crumb rubber concrete with different replacement forms and volume contents had been investigated. Finally, the crumb rubber after pretreatment by six modifiers was introduced into the concrete mixture. Corresponding tests were conducted to verify the effectiveness of pretreatment methods as compared to the concrete containing untreated crumb rubber. It was observed that the mechanical strength of crumb rubber concrete was reduced, while durability was improved with the increasing of crumb rubber content. 20% replacement of fine aggregate and 5% replacement of the total mixture exhibited acceptable properties for practical applications. In addition, the results indicated that the modifiers had a positive impact on the mechanical and durability properties of crumb rubber concrete. It avoided the disadvantage of crumb rubber concrete having lower strength and provides a reference for the production of modified crumb rubber concrete.

  14. Experimental Investigation of the Mechanical and Durability Properties of Crumb Rubber Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hanbing; Wang, Xianqiang; Jiao, Yubo; Sha, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Recycling waste tire rubber by incorporating it into concrete has become the preferred solution to dispose of waste tires. In this study, the effect of the volume content of crumb rubber and pretreatment methods on the performances of concrete was evaluated. Firstly, the fine aggregate and mixture were partly replaced by crumb rubber to produce crumb rubber concrete. Secondly, the mechanical and durability properties of crumb rubber concrete with different replacement forms and volume contents had been investigated. Finally, the crumb rubber after pretreatment by six modifiers was introduced into the concrete mixture. Corresponding tests were conducted to verify the effectiveness of pretreatment methods as compared to the concrete containing untreated crumb rubber. It was observed that the mechanical strength of crumb rubber concrete was reduced, while durability was improved with the increasing of crumb rubber content. 20% replacement of fine aggregate and 5% replacement of the total mixture exhibited acceptable properties for practical applications. In addition, the results indicated that the modifiers had a positive impact on the mechanical and durability properties of crumb rubber concrete. It avoided the disadvantage of crumb rubber concrete having lower strength and provides a reference for the production of modified crumb rubber concrete. PMID:28773298

  15. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    SciTech Connect

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiğit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-16

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated.

  16. 51. DETAIL VIEW OF VIVIANNA ERA CONCRETE HOUSE WITH CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. DETAIL VIEW OF VIVIANNA ERA CONCRETE HOUSE WITH CONCRETE PATIO SLAB LOOKING SOUTHWEST. NOTICE MINE WORKINGS BACKGROUND LEFT. - Mariscal Quicksilver Mine & Reduction Works, Terlingua, Brewster County, TX

  17. Experimental study on the strength parameter of Quarry Dust mixed Coconut Shell Concrete adding Coconut Fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matangulu Shrestha, Victor; Anandh, S.; Sindhu Nachiar, S.

    2017-07-01

    Concrete is a heterogeneous mixture constitute of cement as the main ingredient with a different mix of fine and coarse aggregate. The massive use of conventional concrete has a shortfall in its key ingredients, natural sand and coarse aggregate, due to increased industrialisation and globalisation. To overcome the shortage of material, an alternate material with similar mechanical properties and composition has to be studied, as replacement of conventional concrete. Coconut shell concrete is a prime option as replacement of key ingredients of conventional concrete as coconut is produced in massive quantity in south East Asia. Coconut shell concrete is lightweight concrete and different research is still ongoing concerning about its mix design and composition in the construction industry. Concrete is weak in tension as compared to compression, hence the fibre is used to refrain the crack in the concrete. Coconut fibre is one of many fibres which can be used in concrete. The main aim of this project is to analyse the use of natural by-products in the construction industry, make light weight concrete and eco-friendly construction. This project concerns with the comparison of the mechanical properties of coconut shell concrete and conventional concrete, replacing fine aggregate with quarry dust using coconut fibre. M25 grade of concrete was adopted and testing of concrete was done at the age of 3, 7 and 28 days. In this concrete mix, sand was replaced completely in volumetric measurement by quarry dust. The result was analysed and compared with addition of coconut fibre at varying percentage of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5%. From the test conducted, coconut shell concrete with quarry dust has the maximum value at 4% of coconut fibre while conventional concrete showed the maximum value at 2% of coconut fibre.

  18. Chemical, Mechanical, and Durability Properties of Concrete with Local Mineral Admixtures under Sulfate Environment in Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Qingke; Zhou, Changjun; Shu, Xiang; He, Qiang; Huang, Baoshan

    2014-01-01

    Over the vast Northwest China, arid desert contains high concentrations of sulfate, chloride, and other chemicals in the ground water, which poses serious challenges to infrastructure construction that routinely utilizes portland cement concrete. Rapid industrialization in the region has been generating huge amounts of mineral admixtures, such as fly ash and slags from energy and metallurgical industries. These industrial by-products would turn into waste materials if not utilized in time. The present study evaluated the suitability of utilizing local mineral admixtures in significant quantities for producing quality concrete mixtures that can withstand the harsh chemical environment without compromising the essential mechanical properties. Comprehensive chemical, mechanical, and durability tests were conducted in the laboratory to characterize the properties of the local cementitious mineral admixtures, cement mortar and portland cement concrete mixtures containing these admixtures. The results from this study indicated that the sulfate resistance of concrete was effectively improved by adding local class F fly ash and slag, or by applying sulfate resistance cement to the mixtures. It is noteworthy that concrete containing local mineral admixtures exhibited much lower permeability (in terms of chloride ion penetration) than ordinary portland cement concrete while retaining the same mechanical properties; whereas concrete mixtures made with sulfate resistance cement had significantly reduced strength and much increased chloride penetration comparing to the other mixtures. Hence, the use of local mineral admixtures in Northwest China in concrete mixtures would be beneficial to the performance of concrete, as well as to the protection of environment. PMID:28788648

  19. Chemical, Mechanical, and Durability Properties of Concrete with Local Mineral Admixtures under Sulfate Environment in Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qingke; Zhou, Changjun; Shu, Xiang; He, Qiang; Huang, Baoshan

    2014-05-13

    Over the vast Northwest China, arid desert contains high concentrations of sulfate, chloride, and other chemicals in the ground water, which poses serious challenges to infrastructure construction that routinely utilizes portland cement concrete. Rapid industrialization in the region has been generating huge amounts of mineral admixtures, such as fly ash and slags from energy and metallurgical industries. These industrial by-products would turn into waste materials if not utilized in time. The present study evaluated the suitability of utilizing local mineral admixtures in significant quantities for producing quality concrete mixtures that can withstand the harsh chemical environment without compromising the essential mechanical properties. Comprehensive chemical, mechanical, and durability tests were conducted in the laboratory to characterize the properties of the local cementitious mineral admixtures, cement mortar and portland cement concrete mixtures containing these admixtures. The results from this study indicated that the sulfate resistance of concrete was effectively improved by adding local class F fly ash and slag, or by applying sulfate resistance cement to the mixtures. It is noteworthy that concrete containing local mineral admixtures exhibited much lower permeability (in terms of chloride ion penetration) than ordinary portland cement concrete while retaining the same mechanical properties; whereas concrete mixtures made with sulfate resistance cement had significantly reduced strength and much increased chloride penetration comparing to the other mixtures. Hence, the use of local mineral admixtures in Northwest China in concrete mixtures would be beneficial to the performance of concrete, as well as to the protection of environment.

  20. Sludge ash as lightweight concrete material

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.H.; Yip, W.K.

    1989-02-01

    Sludge is an inevitable by-product of wastewater treatment. Its abundance poses disposal problems that can be drastically reduced if sludge can be converted for economical uses in construction as substitute materials. Digested and dewatered sludge, after incineration at a high temperature, yields a hard, cellular, porous mass with low unit weight. This hardened mass of sludge ash can be crushed to smaller-sized aggregates, which, when graded in suitable proportions, manifest the basic attributes required of lightweight aggregates. When used as aggregates in the production of lightweight concrete, experimental results show that the resulting concrete satisfies the physical requirements of a lightweight concrete in terms of unit weight, strength, heat-insulating properties, and fire resistance, thus indicating that sludge ash could be a potential source of suitable lightweight aggregates.

  1. Corium Spreading Over Concrete: The Vulcano VE-U7 and VE-U8 Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Journeau, Christophe; Boccaccio, Eric; Fouquart, Pascal; Jegou, Claude; Piluso, Pascal

    2002-07-01

    Two experiments have been performed in the VULCANO facility in which prototypic corium has been spread over concrete. In the VE-U7 test, a mixture representative of what can be expected at the opening of EPR reactor-pit gate has been spread on siliceous concrete and on a reference channel in inert refractory ceramic. The spreading progression was not much affected by the presence of concrete and sparging gases. In the VE-U8 test, a UO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} mixture, prototypic of in-vessel corium, has been spread over a lime-siliceous concrete. Although residual power was not simulated in this experiment, up to 2 cm of concrete have been eroded during the test. Results in terms of spreading behaviour, effects of gases, concrete erosion and thermal attack are presented and discussed. (authors)

  2. Study on the strength characteristics of High strength concrete with Micro steel fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowdham, K.; Sumathi, A.; Saravana Raja Mohan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The study of High Strength Concrete (HSC) has become interesting as concrete structures grow taller and larger. The usage of HSC in structures has been increased worldwide and has begun to make an impact in India. Ordinary cementitious materials are weak under tensile loads and fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCCs) have been developed to improve this weak point. High Strength concrete containing Alccofine as mineral admixture and reinforced with micro steel fibers were cast and tested to study the mechanical properties. The concrete were designed to have compressive strength of 60 MPa. Mixtures containing 0% and 10% replacement of cement by Alccofine and with 1%, 2% and 3% of micro steel fibers by weight of concrete were prepared. Mixtures incorporating Alccofine with fibers developed marginal increase in strength properties at all curing days when compared to control concrete.

  3. Pedogenic Carbonate Concretions in the Russian Chernozem

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailova, E. A.; Post, C. J.; Magrini-Bair, K.; Castle, J. W.

    2006-12-01

    Pedogenic carbonate concretions are commonly found in grassland soils, but their origin is not fully understood. This study was conducted to determine the radiocarbon age, the stable isotope geochemistry, and chemical composition of carbonate concretions in the Russian Chernozem, one of the typical soils in grasslands. Three sites were sampled: a native grassland field (not cultivated for at least 300 years), an adjacent 50-year continuous fallow field in the V. V. Alekhin Central-Chernozem Biosphere State Reserve in the Kursk region of Russia, and a continuously cropped field in the Experimental Station of the Kursk Institute of Agronomy and Soil Erosion Control. All sampled soils were classified as fine-silty, mixed, frigid Pachic Hapludolls. The mineralogical composition of concretions varies from low-magnesium calcite to pure calcite. The concretion contains 0.05% N, 6.4% C, and has [delta]13C and [delta]18O values of -10.9[per mille sign] (the per mill symbol, parts per thousand) and -7.8[per mille sign], respectively. The outside part of the carbonate concretion is 1909 +/- 40 14C age Before Present (B.P.) compared with 1693 +/- 40 14C age B.P. for the inside part of the same concretion, even though the concretion is found in the C horizon of much older age (10,902 +/- 63 14C age B.P.). Remnants of soil organic matter in concretions are closely associated with the cropped and fallow/plowed soils by pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry.

  4. Investigation of modified asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimich, Vita

    2016-01-01

    Currently the problem of improving the asphalt quality is very urgent. It is used primarily as topcoats exposed to the greatest relative to the other layers of the road, dynamic load - impact and shear. The number of cars on the road, the speed of their movement, as well as the traffic intensity increase day by day. We have to upgrade motor roads, which entails a huge cost. World experience shows that the issue is urgent not only in Russia, but also in many countries in Europe, USA and Asia. Thus, the subject of research is the resistance of asphalt concrete to water and its influence on the strength of the material at different temperatures, and resistance of pavement to deformation. It is appropriate to search for new modifiers for asphaltic binder and mineral additives for asphalt mix to form in complex the skeleton of the future asphalt concrete, resistant to atmospheric condensation, soil characteristics of the road construction area, as well as the growing road transport load. The important task of the work is searching special modifying additives for bitumen binder and asphalt mixture as a whole, which will improve the quality of highways, increasing the period between repairs. The methods described in the normative-technical documentation were used for the research. The conducted research allowed reducing the frequency of road maintenance for 7 years, increasing it from 17 to 25 years.

  5. Performance of concrete incorporating colloidal nano-silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, Mohamed Sabry

    Nanotechnology, as one of the most modern fields of science, has great market potential and economic impact. The need for research in the field of nanotechnology is continuously on the rise. During the last few decades, nanotechnology was developing rapidly into many fields of applied sciences, engineering and industrial applications, especially through studies of physics, chemistry, medicine and fundamental material science. These new developments may be attributed to the fact that material properties and performance can be significantly improved and controlled through nano-scale processes and nano-structures. This research program aims at 1) further understanding the behavior of cementitious materials when amended on the nano-scale level and 2) exploring the effect of this enhancement on the microstructure of cement matrix. This study may be considered as an important step towards better understanding the use of nano-silica in concrete. The main goal of the study is to investigate the effect of using colloidal nano-silica on properties of concrete, including mechanical properties, durability, transport properties, and microstructure. The experimental program that was conducted included a laboratory investigation of concrete mixtures in which nano-silica was added to cement or to a combination of cement and Class F fly ash. Various ratios of nano-silica were used in concrete mixtures to examine the extent and types of improvements that could be imparted to concrete. The conducted experimental program assessed these improvements in terms of reactivity, mechanical properties, and durability of the mixtures under investigation. Advanced testing techniques---including mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)---were used to investigate the effect of nano-silica on the microstructure of the tested mixtures. In addition, the effect of nano-silica on the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) was examined using various techniques, including testing

  6. The Structure of Concrete Operational Thought.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson-Keasey, C.: And Others

    1979-01-01

    In a four-year longitudinal study of the development of concrete operational thought, children were administered tests assessing seriation; numeration; class inclusion; hierarchical classification; and conservation of mass, weight, and volume. Levels of seriation and numeration skills in kindergarten were powerful predictors of the acquisition of…

  7. The Structure of Concrete Operational Thought.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson-Keasey, C.: And Others

    1979-01-01

    In a four-year longitudinal study of the development of concrete operational thought, children were administered tests assessing seriation; numeration; class inclusion; hierarchical classification; and conservation of mass, weight, and volume. Levels of seriation and numeration skills in kindergarten were powerful predictors of the acquisition of…

  8. Performance of Waterless Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Evans, Steve; Grugel, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    The development of permanent lunar bases is constrained by performance of construction materials and availability of in-situ resources. Concrete seems a suitable construction material for the lunar environment, but water, one of its major components, is an extremely scarce resource on the Moon. This study explores an alternative to hydraulic concrete by replacing the binding mix of concrete (cement and water) with sulfur. Sulfur is a volatile element on the lunar surface that can be extracted from lunar soils by heating. Sulfur concrete mixes were prepared to investigate the effect of extreme environmental conditions on the properties of sulfur concrete. A hypervelocity impact test was conducted, having as its target a 5-cm cubic sample of sulfur concrete. This item consisted of JSC-1 lunar regolith simulant (65%) and sulfur (35%). The sample was placed in the MSFC Impact Test Facility s Micro Light Gas Gun target chamber, and was struck by a 1-mm diameter (1.4e-03 g) aluminum projectile at 5.85 km/s. In addition, HZTERN code, provided by NASA was used to study the effectiveness of sulfur concrete when subjected to space radiation.

  9. CBP [TASK 12] experimental study of the concrete salstone two-layer system

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, Eric; Protiere, Yannick

    2016-11-01

    This report presents the results of a study which intended to study the behavior of concrete samples placed in contact with a wasteform mixture bearing high level of sulfate in its pore solution. A setup was prepared which consisted in a wasteform poured on top of vault concrete mixes (identified as Vault 1/4 and Vault 2 mixes) cured for approximately 6 months.

  10. Promoting the use of crumb rubber concrete in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Batayneh, Malek K; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2008-11-01

    The use of accumulated waste materials in third world countries is still in its early phases. It will take courage for contractors and others in the construction industry to recycle selected types of waste materials in the concrete mixes. This paper addresses the recycling of rubber tires accumulated every year in Jordan to be used in concrete mixes. The main objectives of this research were to provide more scientific evidence to support the use of legislation or incentive-based schemes to promote the reuse of accumulated waste tires. This research focused on using crumb tires as a replacement for a percentage of the local fine aggregates used in the concrete mixes in Jordan. Different concrete specimens were prepared and tested in terms of uniaxial compression and splitting tension. The main variable in the mixture was the volumetric percentage of crumb tires used in the mix. The test results showed that even though the compressive strength is reduced when using the crumb tires, it can meet the strength requirements of light weight concrete. In addition, test results and observations indicated that the addition of crumb rubber to the mix has a limited effect toward reducing the workability of the mixtures. The mechanical test results demonstrated that the tested specimens of the crumb rubber concrete remained relatively intact after failure compared to the conventional concrete specimens. It is also concluded that modified concrete would contribute to the disposal of the non-decaying scrap tires, since the amount being accumulated in third world countries is creating a challenge for proper disposal. Thus, obliging authorities to invest in facilitating the use of waste tires in concrete, a fundamental material to the booming construction industry in theses countries, serves two purposes.

  11. An Experimental Study of High Strength-High Volume Fly Ash Concrete for Sustainable Construction Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kate, Gunavant K.; Thakare, Sunil B., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Concrete is the most widely used building material in the construction of infrastructures such as buildings, bridges, highways, dams, and many other facilities. This paper reports the development, the basic idea, the main properties of high strength-high volume fly ash with application in concrete associated with the development and implementation of Sustainable Properties of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete (HVFAC) Mixtures and Early Age Shrinkage and mechanical properties of concrete for 7,28,56 and 90days. Another alternative to make environment-friendly concrete is the development of high strength-high-volume fly ash concrete which is an synthesized from materials of geological origin or by-product materials such as fly ash which is rich in silicon and aluminum. In this paper 6 concrete mixtures were produced to evaluate the effect of key parameters on the mechanical properties of concrete and its behavior. The study key parameters are; binder material content, cement replacement ratios, and the steel fibers used to High Volume Fly Ash mixtures for increasing performance of concrete.

  12. Effective determination of the long-lived nuclide 41Ca in nuclear reactor bioshield concretes: comparison of liquid scintillation counting and accelerator mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Warwick, P E; Croudace, I W; Hillegonds, D J

    2009-03-01

    The routine application of liquid scintillation counting to (41)Ca determination has been hindered by the absence of traceable calibration standards of known (41)Ca activity concentrations. The introduction of the new IRMM (41)Ca mass-spectrometric standards with sufficiently high (41)Ca activities for radiometric detection has partly overcome this although accurate measurement of stable Ca concentrations coupled with precise half-life data are still required to correct the certified (41)Ca:(40)Ca ratios to (41)Ca activity concentrations. In this study, (41)Ca efficiency versus quench curves have been produced using the IRMM standard, and their accuracy validated by comparison with theoretical calculations of (41)Ca efficiencies. Further verification of the technique was achieved through the analysis of (41)Ca in a reactor bioshield core that had been previously investigated for other radionuclide variations. Calcium-41 activity concentrations of up to 25 Bq/g were detected. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of the same suite of samples showed a very good agreement, providing validation of the procedure. Calcium-41 activity concentrations declined exponentially with distance from the core of the nuclear reactor and correlated well with the predicted neutron flux.

  13. Electrokinetic Strength Enhancement of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  14. Electrokenitic Corrosion Treatment of Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardenas, Henry E (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method and apparatus for strengthening cementitious concrete by placing a nanoparticle carrier liquid in contact with a first surface of a concrete section and inducing a current across the concrete section at sufficient magnitude and for sufficient time that nanoparticles in the nanoparticle carrier liquid migrate through a significant depth of the concrete section.

  15. Innovative reuse of concrete slurry waste from ready-mixed concrete plants in construction products.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Dongxing; Zhan, Baojian; Poon, Chi Sun; Zheng, Wei

    2016-07-15

    Concrete slurry waste (CSW) is generated from ready-mixed concrete plants during concrete production and is classified as a corrosive hazardous material. If it is disposed of at landfills, it would cause detrimental effects for our surrounding environment and ecosystems due to its high pH value as well as heavy metal contamination and accumulation. A new method in this study has been introduced to effectively reuse CSW in new construction products. In this method, the calcium-silicate rich CSW in the fresh state was considered as a cementitious paste as well as a CO2 capture medium. The experimental results showed that the pH values of the collected CSWs stored for 28 days ranged from 12.5 to 13.0 and a drastic decrease of pH value was detected after accelerated mineral carbonation. The theoretically calculated CO2 sequestration extent of CSWs was from 27.05% to 31.23%. The practical water to solid ratio in the fresh CSW varied from 0.76 to 1.12, which had a significant impact on the compressive strength of the mixture with CSWs. After subjecting to accelerated mineral carbonation, rapid initial strength development and lower drying shrinkage for the prepared concrete mixture were achieved.

  16. Concrete: Potential material for Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    To build a permanent orbiting space station in the next decade is NASA's most challenging and exciting undertaking. The space station will serve as a center for a vast number of scientific products. As a potential material for the space station, reinforced concrete was studied, which has many material and structural merits for the proposed space station. Its cost-effectiveness depends on the availability of lunar materials. With such materials, only 1 percent or less of the mass of a concrete space structure would have to be transported from earth.

  17. Biomarker- and similarity coefficient-based approaches to bacterial mixture characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Smart, Sonja; Sandrin, Todd R

    2015-01-01

    MALDI-TOF MS profiling has been shown to be a rapid and reliable method to characterize pure cultures of bacteria. Currently, there is keen interest in using this technique to identify bacteria in mixtures. Promising results have been reported with two- or three-isolate model systems using biomarker-based approaches. In this work, we applied MALDI-TOF MS-based methods to a more complex model mixture containing six bacteria. We employed: 1) a biomarker-based approach that has previously been shown to be useful in identification of individual bacteria in pure cultures and simple mixtures and 2) a similarity coefficient-based approach that is routinely and nearly exclusively applied to identification of individual bacteria in pure cultures. Both strategies were developed and evaluated using blind-coded mixtures. With regard to the biomarker-based approach, results showed that most peaks in mixture spectra could be assigned to those found in spectra of each component bacterium; however, peaks shared by two isolates as well as peaks that could not be assigned to any individual component isolate were observed. For two-isolate blind-coded samples, bacteria were correctly identified using both similarity coefficient- and biomarker-based strategies, while for blind-coded samples containing more than two isolates, bacteria were more effectively identified using a biomarker-based strategy. PMID:26537565

  18. Compressive strength and hydration processes of concrete with recycled aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Koenders, Eduardus A.B.; Pepe, Marco; Martinelli, Enzo

    2014-02-15

    This paper deals with the correlation between the time evolution of the degree of hydration and the compressive strength of Recycled Aggregate Concrete (RAC) for different water to cement ratios and initial moisture conditions of the Recycled Concrete Aggregates (RCAs). Particularly, the influence of such moisture conditions is investigated by monitoring the hydration process and determining the compressive strength development of fully dry or fully saturated recycled aggregates in four RAC mixtures. Hydration processes are monitored via temperature measurements in hardening concrete samples and the time evolution of the degree of hydration is determined through a 1D hydration and heat flow model. The effect of the initial moisture condition of RCAs employed in the considered concrete mixtures clearly emerges from this study. In fact, a novel conceptual method is proposed to predict the compressive strength of RAC-systems, from the initial mixture parameters and the hardening conditions. -- Highlights: •The concrete industry is more and more concerned with sustainability issues. •The use of recycled aggregates is a promising solution to enhance sustainability. •Recycled aggregates affect both hydration processes and compressive strength. •A fundamental approach is proposed to unveil the influence of recycled aggregates. •Some experimental comparisons are presented to validate the proposed approach.

  19. Recovery of MSWI and soil washing residues as concrete aggregates.

    PubMed

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Abbà, Alessandro; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study if municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues and aggregates derived from contaminated soil washing could be used as alternative aggregates for concrete production. Initially, chemical, physical and geometric characteristics (according to UNI EN 12620) of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ashes and some contaminated soils were evaluated; moreover, the pollutants release was evaluated by means of leaching tests. The results showed that the reuse of pre-treated MSWI bottom ash and washed soil is possible, either from technical or environmental point of view, while it is not possible for the raw wastes. Then, the natural aggregate was partially and totally replaced with these recycled aggregates for the production of concrete mixtures that were characterized by conventional mechanical and leaching tests. Good results were obtained using the same dosage of a high resistance cement (42.5R calcareous Portland cement instead of 32.5R); the concrete mixture containing 400 kg/m(3) of washed bottom ash and high resistance cement was classified as structural concrete (C25/30 class). Regarding the pollutants leaching, all concrete mixtures respected the limit values according to the Italian regulation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Strengthening lightweight concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auskern, A.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer absorption by lightweight concretes to improve bonding between cement and aggregate and to increase strength of cement is discussed. Compressive strength of treated cement is compared with strength of untreated product. Process for producing polymers is described.

  1. Lightweight polymer concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J.J.; Steinberg, M.; Reams, W.

    1985-08-01

    Lightweight polymer concrete composites have been developed with excellent insulating properties. The composites consist of lightweight aggregates such as expanded perlites, multicellular glass nodules, or hollow alumina silicate microspheres bound together with unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins. These composites, known as Insulating Polymer Concrete (IPC), have thermal conductivites from 0.09 to 0.19 Btu/h-ft-/sup 0/F. Compressive strengths, dependent upon the aggregates used, range from 1000 to 6000 psi. These materials can be precast or cast-in-place on concrete substrates. Recently, it has been demonstrated that these materials can also be sprayed onto concrete and other substrates. An overlay application of IPC is currently under way as dike insulation at an LNG storage tank facility. The composites have numerous potentials in the construction industry such as insulating building blocks or prefabricated insulating wall panels.

  2. Concrete Block Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Calif. 42 1 •1 90 NEW LEGEND 80 A VIBORG, DENMARK, BLOCKS A VIBORG, DENMARK, ASPHALTIC CONCRETE AFTER 00 MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA, BLOCKS VIBRATION MEAN ...the load-distributing characteristics of the Mlock pavements. *. 45 -, , - t 171 LEGENDT 0 CONCRETE BASE, MEAN OF 8 TESTS,9 KNAPTON (1978) I RANGE OF...45 to 60 min. 90. Table 11 summarizes the results of these tests. The mean penetration of water through the block pavements with a slope of I per

  3. Precast Concrete Pavements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    quirements. The concrete used low-weight sintered shale aggregate and high early-strength portland cement that obtained a 28-day compressive strength of...in- place concrete. Typical reasons suggested for precasting have included aggregate shortage, future pas.oment settlement or heaving, critical speed...pavements. Various devices such as dowel bars, tie bar, keyways, or aggregate interlock from sawn construction joints transfer a portion of the load

  4. Shear Resistance between Concrete-Concrete Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovačovic, Marek

    2013-12-01

    The application of precast beams and cast-in-situ structural members cast at different times has been typical of bridges and buildings for many years. A load-bearing frame consists of a set of prestressed precast beams supported by columns and diaphragms joined with an additionally cast slab deck. This article is focused on the theoretical and experimental analyses of the shear resistance at an interface. The first part of the paper deals with the state-of-art knowledge of the composite behaviour of concrete-concrete structures and a comparison of the numerical methods introduced in the relevant standards. In the experimental part, a set of specimens with different interface treatments was tested until failure in order to predict the composite behaviour of coupled beams. The experimental part was compared to the numerical analysis performed by means of FEM basis nonlinear software.

  5. Permeability of Concrete with Recycled Concrete Aggregate and Pozzolanic Materials under Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hailong; Sun, Xiaoyan; Wang, Junjie; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The research reported herein studied the permeability of concrete containing recycled-concrete aggregate (RA), superfine phosphorous slag (PHS), and ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) with and without stress. Test results showed that the chloride diffusion coefficient of RA concrete (RAC) without external loads decreased with time, and the permeability of RAC is much lower than that of the reference concrete due to the on-going hydration and the pozzolanic reaction provided by the PHS and GGBS additives in the RAC mixture. The permeability of chloride under flexural load is much more sensitive than that under compressive load due to the differences in porosity and cracking pattern. At low compressive stress levels, the permeability of chloride decreased by the closing of pores and microcracks within RAC specimens. However, in a relatively short time the chloride diffusion coefficient and the chloride content increased rapidly with the increase of compressive stress when it exceeded a threshold stress level of approximate 35% of the ultimate compressive strength. Under flexural stress, the chloride transport capability increased with the increase of stress level and time. At high compressive and flexural stress levels, creep had a significant effect on the permeability of chloride in the RAC specimens due to the damage from the nucleation and propagation of microcracks over time. It is apparent that mortar cracking has more of a significant effect on the chloride transport in concrete than cracking in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ). PMID:28773376

  6. Permeability of Concrete with Recycled Concrete Aggregate and Pozzolanic Materials under Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Sun, Xiaoyan; Wang, Junjie; Monteiro, Paulo J M

    2016-03-30

    The research reported herein studied the permeability of concrete containing recycled-concrete aggregate (RA), superfine phosphorous slag (PHS), and ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS) with and without stress. Test results showed that the chloride diffusion coefficient of RA concrete (RAC) without external loads decreased with time, and the permeability of RAC is much lower than that of the reference concrete due to the on-going hydration and the pozzolanic reaction provided by the PHS and GGBS additives in the RAC mixture. The permeability of chloride under flexural load is much more sensitive than that under compressive load due to the differences in porosity and cracking pattern. At low compressive stress levels, the permeability of chloride decreased by the closing of pores and microcracks within RAC specimens. However, in a relatively short time the chloride diffusion coefficient and the chloride content increased rapidly with the increase of compressive stress when it exceeded a threshold stress level of approximate 35% of the ultimate compressive strength. Under flexural stress, the chloride transport capability increased with the increase of stress level and time. At high compressive and flexural stress levels, creep had a significant effect on the permeability of chloride in the RAC specimens due to the damage from the nucleation and propagation of microcracks over time. It is apparent that mortar cracking has more of a significant effect on the chloride transport in concrete than cracking in the interfacial transition zone (ITZ).

  7. An attempt to validate the ultra-accelerated microbar and the concrete performance test with the degree of AAR-induced damage observed in concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas; Merz, Christine

    2013-07-15

    There is little knowledge about the relation between AAR-induced damage observed in structures and the expansion potential obtained with accelerated tests. In this study, aggregates used in structures damaged by AAR were tested with the microbar test (MBT/AFNOR XP 18-594) and the concrete performance test (CPT/AFNOR P18-454). After the tests, the samples were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Based on the results, the significance of the microbar test has to be examined very critically. The agreement of measured expansion, reacted rock types and the composition of the reaction products between the on-site concrete and the reproduced concrete subjected to the CPT clearly indicates that the reaction mechanisms in the structure and in the concrete performance test are comparable. As such, the concrete performance test seems to be an appropriate tool to test the potential reactivity of specific concrete mixtures.

  8. Application of ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabonomic techniques to analyze the joint toxic action of long-term low-level exposure to a mixture of organophosphate pesticides on rat urine profile.

    PubMed

    Du, Longfei; Wang, Hong; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Yan; Hou, Yurong; Zhang, Yuqiu; Zhao, Xiujuan; Sun, Changhao

    2013-07-01

    In previously published articles, we evaluated the toxicity of four organophosphate (OP) pesticides (dichlorvos, dimethoate, acephate, and phorate) to rats using metabonomic technology at their corresponding no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL). Results show that a single pesticide elicits no toxic response. This study aimed to determine whether chronic exposure to a mixture of the above four pesticides (at their corresponding NOAEL) can lead to joint toxic action in rats using the same technology. Pesticides were administered daily to rats through drinking water for 24 weeks. The above mixture of the four pesticides showed joint toxic action at the NOAEL of each pesticide. The metabonomic profiles of rats urine were analyzed by ultraperformance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The 16 metabolites statistically significantly changed in all treated groups compared with the control group. Dimethylphosphate and dimethyldithiophosphate exclusively detected in all treated groups can be used as early, sensitive biomarkers for exposure to a mixture of the OP pesticides. Moreover, exposure to the OP pesticides resulted in increased 7-methylguanine, ribothymidine, cholic acid, 4-pyridoxic acid, kynurenine, and indoxyl sulfate levels, as well as decreased hippuric acid, creatinine, uric acid, gentisic acid, C18-dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine, suberic acid, and citric acid. The results indicated that a mixture of OP pesticides induced DNA damage and oxidative stress, disturbed the metabolism of lipids, and interfered with the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Ensuring food safety requires not only the toxicology test data of each pesticide for the calculation of the acceptable daily intake but also the joint toxic action.

  9. Correct assignment of lipophilic dye mixtures? A case study for high-performance thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry and performance data for the TLC-MS Interface.

    PubMed

    Morlock, Gertrud E; Brett, Neil

    2015-04-17

    The TLC-MS Interface, the successor of the ChromeXtract, has been available for elution head-based coupling of high-performance thin-layer chromatography with mass spectrometry (HPTLC-MS) since 2009, and is meanwhile widespread in use, mainly for compound confirmation. Until now, quantitative performance data has not been reported in detail and thus were investigated in this study. The performance data of HPTLC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS via the TLC-MS Interface showed good mean precisions (%RSD, n=5) for 6 dyes in a commercially available dye mixture investigated at two different concentrations (7.3% for the 1:8 dilution, and 10.1% for the 1:16 diluted) in a selected worst case scenario. The respective mean precisions of absorbance measurements were ≤1.3%. For calibrations by HPTLC-ESI-MS, the mean determination coefficient was 0.9975 for the 6 dyes (versus 0.9997 for absorbance measurement). HPTLC-MS analysis revealed the incorrect assignment of components in two commercially available dye mixtures. Using an additional software (MassWorks) that delivered a 100 times increased mass accuracy, the proposal of molecular formulae was shown to be obtainable under certain conditions with a low resolution single quadrupole mass spectrometer and in the case of helpful information such as the double bond equivalents. This enabled the identification of the incorrectly assigned unknown dyes and clearly demonstrated the benefit of using HPTLC-MS for zone confirmation.

  10. Blast impact behaviour of concrete with different fibre reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdlová, Martina; Čechmánek, René; Řídký, Radek

    2015-09-01

    The paper summarizes the results of the development of special concrete intended for the explosion resistance applications, with the emphasis on minimal secondary fragments formation at the explosion. The fine-grained concrete matrix has been reinforced by various types of short dispersed fibers (metallic, mineral and polymer) of different sizes and by their combination and the effect of the fibre reinforcement on the physico-mechanical properties and blast resistance was observed. The concrete prism specimens have been subjected to the determination of mechanical parameters (compressive and flexural strength at quasi-static load). The blast tests were conducted on the slab specimens prepared from selected mixtures. The material characteristics and explosion test data have been used for numerical investigation, which defined the optimal wall composition and dimensions of the concrete element which should resist the explosion defined by type, size, weight and placement of the blast. In the next step the test elements resistance was verified by real explosion test.

  11. Wooden concrete: High thermal efficiency using waste wood

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, J.

    1994-09-01

    Wood concrete mixture of wood shavings, lime and cement is widely used in European building construction. In spite of many advantages, this material is almost unknown in the US. Eventual application of wooden concrete in building block production is discussed in this paper. Based on finite difference computer modeling, the thermal performance of several masonry wall systems and their components have been analyzed. The total wall system thermal performance for a typical single-story ranch house also has been determined. At present, typical experimental wall measurements and calculations do not include the effects of building envelope subsystems such as comers, window and door openings, and structural joints with roofs, floors, ceilings, and other walls. In masonry wall systems, these details may represent significant thermal bridges because of the highly conductive structural concrete. Many of the typical thermal bridges may be reduced by application of wood concrete elements.

  12. Identification of a Radical Formed in the Reaction Mixtures of Ram Seminal Vesicle Microsomes with Arachidonic Acid Using High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electron Spin Resonance Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electron Spin Resonance-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Minakata, Katsuyuki; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    The reaction of ram seminal vesicle (RSV) microsomes with arachidonic acid (AA) was examined using electron spin resonance (ESR), high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance spectrometry (HPLC-ESR), and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESR-MS) combined use of spin trapping technique. A prominent ESR spectrum (αN = 1.58 mT and αHβ = 0.26 mT) was observed in the complete reaction mixture of ram seminal vesicle microsomes with arachidonic acid containing 2.0 mg protein/ml ram seminal vesicle (RSV) microsomal suspension, 0.8 mM arachidonic acid, 0.1 M 4-POBN, and 24 mM tris/HCl buffer (pH 7.4). The ESR spectrum was hardly observed for the complete reaction mixture without the RSV microsomes. The formation of the radical appears to be catalyzed by the microsomal components. In the absence of AA, the intensity of the ESR signal decreased to 16 ± 15% of the complete reaction mixture, suggesting that the radical is derived from AA. For the complete reaction mixture with boiled microsomes, the intensity of the ESR signal decreased to 49 ± 4% of the complete reaction mixture. The intensity of the ESR signal of the complete reaction mixture with indomethacin decreased to 74 ± 20% of the complete reaction mixture, suggesting that cyclooxygenese partly participates in the reaction. A peak was detected on the elution profile of HPLC-ESR analysis of the complete reaction mixture. To determine the structure of the peak, an HPLC-ESR-MS analysis was performed. The HPLC-ESR-MS analysis of the peak showed two prominent ions, m/z 266 and m/z 179, suggesting that the peak is a 4-POBN/pentyl radical adduct. An HPLC-ESR analysis of the authentic 4-POBN/pentyl radical adduct comfirmed the identification. PMID:20216946

  13. NATURE OF UNRESOLVED COMPLEX MIXTURE IN SIZE-DISTRIBUTED EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL WOOD COMBUSTION AS MEASURED BY THERMAL DESORPTION-GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) in size resolved fine aerosol emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is examined. The aerosols are sorted by size in an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and subsequently analyzed by thermal desorbtion/gas chroma...

  14. NATURE OF UNRESOLVED COMPLEX MIXTURE IN SIZE-DISTRIBUTED EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL WOOD COMBUSTION AS MEASURED BY THERMAL DESORPTION-GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) in size resolved fine aerosol emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is examined. The aerosols are sorted by size in an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and subsequently analyzed by thermal desorbtion/gas chroma...

  15. Engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Sofi, M.; Deventer, J.S.J. van . E-mail: jannie@unimelb.edu.au; Mendis, P.A. . E-mail: pamendis@unimelb.edu.au; Lukey, G.C.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents the engineering properties of inorganic polymer concretes (IPCs) with a compressive strength of 50 MPa. The study includes a determination of the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, compressive strength, and the splitting tensile strength and flexural strength of IPCs, formulated using three different sources of Class-F fly ash. Six IPC mix designs were adopted to evaluate the effects of the inclusion of coarse aggregates and granulated blast furnace slag into the mixes. A total of 90 cylindrical and 24 small beam specimens were investigated, and all tests were carried out pursuant to the relevant Australian Standards. Although some variability between the mixes was observed, the results show that, in most cases, the engineering properties of IPCs compare favorably to those predicted by the relevant Australian Standards for concrete mixtures.

  16. Transport coefficients of hard-sphere mixtures. III. Diameter ratio 0.4 and mass ratio 0.03 at high fluid density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erpenbeck, Jerome J.

    1993-07-01

    The equation of state and the transport coefficients of shear viscosity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusion, and mutal diffusion are estimated for a binary, equimolar mixture of hard spheres having a diameter ratio of 0.4 and a mass ratio of 0.03 at volumes in the range 1.7V0 to 3V0 (V0=1/2 √2 Ntsumaxaσ3a, where xa are the mole fractions, σa are the diameters, and N is the number of particles), complementing and, in some cases, improving earlier low-density results through Monte Carlo, molecular-dynamics calculations using the Green-Kubo formulas. Calculations are reported for 108 to 2048 particles, so that both finite-system and, in the case of the transport coefficients, long-time tail corrections can be applied to obtain accurate estimates of the pressure and the transport coefficients in the thermodynamic limit. Corrections of both types are found to be increasingly important at higher densities, for which the pressure is observed to become nonlinear in 1/N over the range covered. The Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland (MCSL) equation is found to account for the pressure with considerable accuracy for V>=1.7V0 the difference between the observed (infinite-system) pressure and the MCSL prediction increases monotonically with density, reaching 0.4% at V=1.7V0. For volumes below 2V0 the pressure in excess of the MCSL prediction is found to ``soften'' slightly in its dependence on the density. The pressure is also compared with the known virial series (B2 and B3) and the difference is fitted to a rational polynomial from which estimates for B4 and B5 are derived. The transport coefficients are compared with the predictions of the revised Enskog theory, evaluated using the MCSL equation of state. The shear viscosity coefficient is found to lie within about 5% of the theory over much of the range of densities, exceeding the Enskog prediction at both high and low densities and rising sharply at the highest densities. The thermal conductivity drops to about 94

  17. Final Report: Self Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, Russell; Kahn, Lawrence; Kurtis, Kimberly; Petrovic, Bojan; Loreto, Giovanni; Van Wyk, Jurie; Canterero-Leal, Carlos

    2016-07-29

    This report outlines the development of a self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The self-roughening concrete produced as part of this research was assessed in SC structures at three scales: small-scale shear-friction specimens, mid-scale beams tested in in-plane and out-of-plane bending, and a full-scale validation test using an SC module produced by Westinghouse as part of the Plant Vogtle expansion. The experiments show that the self-roughening concrete can produce a cold-joint surface of 0.25 inches (6 mm) without external vibration during concrete placement. The experiments and subsequent analysis show that the shear friction provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9 can be used to assess the shear capacity of the cold-joints in SC modular construction, and that friction coefficient of 1.35 is appropriate for use with these provisions.

  18. Binary effect of fly ash and palm oil fuel ash on heat of hydration aerated concrete.

    PubMed

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa; Sajjadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern.

  19. Binary Effect of Fly Ash and Palm Oil Fuel Ash on Heat of Hydration Aerated Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Mehmannavaz, Taha; Ismail, Mohammad; Radin Sumadi, Salihuddin; Rafique Bhutta, Muhammad Aamer; Samadi, Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    The binary effect of pulverized fuel ash (PFA) and palm oil fuel ash (POFA) on heat of hydration of aerated concrete was studied. Three aerated concrete mixes were prepared, namely, concrete containing 100% ordinary Portland cement (control sample or Type I), binary concrete made from 50% POFA (Type II), and ternary concrete containing 30% POFA and 20% PFA (Type III). It is found that the temperature increases due to heat of hydration through all the concrete specimens especially in the control sample. However, the total temperature rises caused by the heat of hydration through both of the new binary and ternary concrete were significantly lower than the control sample. The obtained results reveal that the replacement of Portland cement with binary and ternary materials is beneficial, particularly for mass concrete where thermal cracking due to extreme heat rise is of great concern. PMID:24696646

  20. A new test procedure for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete

    PubMed

    Vincke; Verstichel; Monteny; Verstraete

    1999-01-01

    A new test method is described for biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion of concrete, more specifically in sewer conditions. The aim of the new test method is the development of an accelerated and reproducible procedure for monitoring the resistance of different types of concrete with regard to biogenic sulfuric acid corrosion. This experimental procedure reflects worst case conditions by providing besides H2S, also an enrichment of thiobacilli and biologically produced sulfur. By simulating the cyclic processes occurring in sewer pipes, significant differences between concrete mixtures could be detected after 51 days. Concrete modified by a styrene-acrylic ester polymer demonstrated a higher resistance against biogenic sulfuric acid attack.

  1. Proportioning and performance evaluation of self-consolidating concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuhao

    A well-proportioned self-consolidating concrete (SCC) mixture can be achieved by controlling the aggregate system, paste quality, and paste quantity. The work presented in this dissertation involves an effort to study and improve particle packing of the concrete system and reduce the paste quantity while maintaining concrete quality and performance. This dissertation is composed of four papers resulting from the study: (1) Assessing Particle Packing Based Self-Consolidating Concrete Mix Design; (2) Using Paste-To-Voids Volume Ratio to Evaluate the Performance of Self-Consolidating Concrete Mixtures; (3) Image Analysis Applications on Assessing Static Stability and Flowability of Self-Consolidating Concrete, and (4) Using Ultrasonic Wave Propagation to Monitor Stiffening Process of Self-Consolidating Concrete. Tests were conducted on a large matrix of SCC mixtures that were designed for cast-in-place bridge construction. The mixtures were made with different aggregate types, sizes, and different cementitious materials. In Paper 1, a modified particle-packing based mix design method, originally proposed by Brouwers (2005), was applied to the design of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) mixs. Using this method, a large matrix of SCC mixes was designed to have a particle distribution modulus (q) ranging from 0.23 to 0.29. Fresh properties (such as flowability, passing ability, segregation resistance, yield stress, viscosity, set time and formwork pressure) and hardened properties (such as compressive strength, surface resistance, shrinkage, and air structure) of these concrete mixes were experimentally evaluated. In Paper 2, a concept that is based on paste-to-voids volume ratio (Vpaste/Vvoids) was employed to assess the performance of SCC mixtures. The relationship between excess paste theory and Vpaste/Vvoids was investigated. The workability, flow properties, compressive strength, shrinkage, and surface resistivity of SCC mixtures were determined at various ages

  2. A mixture of the aqueous extract of Garcinia cambogia, soy peptide and l-carnitine reduces the accumulation of visceral fat mass in rats rendered obese by a high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Jung; Kim, Keun-Young; Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Kang Pyo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-obesity effect of a mixture composed of Garcinia cambogia extract, soypeptide, and l-carnitine (1.2:0.3:0.02, w/w/w) in rats rendered obese by a high-fat diet (HFD). Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either the high-fat control diet (CD) or the 0.38% mixture-supplemented HFD (CD + M) for 9 weeks. The mixture significantly reduced body weight gain and the accumulation of visceral fat mass in a rat model of HFD-induced obesity. Moreover, the mixture effectively lowered blood and hepatic lipid concentrations and serum glucose, insulin, c-peptide, and leptin levels in rats with HFD-induced obesity. Results from real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses indicated that the expression levels of leptin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) genes in the epididymal fat tissue of rats fed the CD + M diet were 0.4-, 0.6-, and 0.48-fold, respectively, of those found in the CD rats (P  < 0.05), while expression of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) gene in epididymal adipose tissue was 1.25-fold (P  < 0.05) of that found in CD rats. In conclusion, a mixture composed of G. cambogia extract, soy peptide, and l-carnitine attenuated visceral fat accumulation and improved dyslipidemia in a rat model with HFD-induced obesity. PMID:18850230

  3. Reclamation chain of waste concrete: A case study of Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianzhuang; Ma, Zhiming; Ding, Tao

    2016-02-01

    A mass of construction and demolition (C&D) waste are generated in Shanghai every year, and it has become a serious environment problem. Reclaiming the waste concrete to produce recycled aggregate (RA) and recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is an effective method to reduce the C&D waste. This paper develops a reclamation chain of waste concrete based on the researches and practices in Shanghai. C&D waste management, waste concrete disposition, RA production and RAC preparation are discussed respectively. In addition, technical suggestions are also given according to the findings in practical engineering, which aims to optimize the reclamation chain. The results show that the properties of RA and RAC can well meet the requirement of design and practical application through a series of technical measures. The reclamation chain of waste concrete is necessary and appropriate for Shanghai, which provides more opportunities for the wider application of RA and RAC, and it shows a favorable environmental benefit.

  4. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    SciTech Connect

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions.

  5. Properties of concrete containing scrap-tire rubber--an overview.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Rafat; Naik, Tarun R

    2004-01-01

    Solid waste management is one of the major environmental concerns in the United States. Over 5 billion tons of non-hazardous solid waste materials are generated in USA each year. Of these, more than 270 million scrap-tires (approximately 3.6 million tons) are generated each year. In addition to this, about 300 million scrap-tires have been stockpiled. Several studies have been carried out to reuse scrap-tires in a variety of rubber and plastic products, incineration for production of electricity, or as fuel for cement kilns, as well as in asphalt concrete. Studies show that workable rubberized concrete mixtures can be made with scrap-tire rubber. This paper presents an overview of some of the research published regarding the use of scrap-tires in portland cement concrete. The benefits of using magnesium oxychloride cement as a binder for rubberized concrete mixtures are also presented. The paper details the likely uses of rubberized concrete.

  6. Resin systems for producing polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1988-09-01

    When plastics are combined with mixtures of inorganic materials, high-strength, durable, fast-setting composites are produced. These materials are used in structural engineering and other applications, and as a result of the many commercial successes that have been achieved, considerable research and development work is in progress throughout the world. One family of polymer-based composites receiving considerable attention is called polymer concrete. Work in this area is directed toward developing new high-strength durable materials by combining cement and concrete technology with that of polymer chemistry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the types of resins that can be used to form polymer concretes. Resin selection is normally based upon the desired properties for the composite and cost. However, the physical and chemical properties of the resins before and during curing are also important, particularly for field-applied materials. Currently, for normal temperature (0/degree/ to 30/degree/C) applications, epoxy resins, vinyl monomers such as polyester-styrene, methylmethacrylate, furfuryl alcohol, furan derivatives, urethane, and styrene, are being used. Styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) mixtures and styrene-acrylamide-TMPTMA mixtures yield composites with excellent hydrothermal stability at temperatures up to 150/degree/ and 250/degree/C, respectively, and organosiloxane resins have been successfully tested at 300/degree/C. Of equal importance is the selection of the composition of the inorganic phase of the composite, since chemical interactions between the two phases can significantly enhance the final properties. Further work to elucidate the mechanisms of these interactions is needed. 6 refs.

  7. 10. CONCRETE BRIDGE, REINFORCED BEAM TYPE ON CONCRETE, SOUTH CAROLINA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. CONCRETE BRIDGE, REINFORCED BEAM TYPE ON CONCRETE, SOUTH CAROLINA STATE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA (photocopy of drawing) - Salkehatchie Bridge, State Route No. 64 spanning Salkehatchie River, Barnwell, Barnwell County, SC

  8. 26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Evening view of concrete mixing plant, concrete placement tower, cableway tower, power line and derrick. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  9. Mass Spectrometric and Langmuir Probe Measurements in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Ar, CHF3/Ar and CHF3/Ar/O2 Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J. S.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, S. P.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Absolute fluxes and energy distributions of ions in inductively coupled plasmas of Ar, CHF3/Ar, and CHF3/Ar/O2 have been measured. These plasmas were generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) cell modified for inductive coupling at pressures 10-50 mTorr and 100-300 W of 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) power in various feedgas mixtures. In pure Ar plasmas, the Ar(+) flux increases linearly with pressure as well as RF-power. Total ion flux in CHF3 mixtures decreases with increase in pressure and also CHF3 concentration. Relative ion fluxes observed in the present studies are analyzed with the help of available cross sections for electron impact ionization and charge-exchange ion-molecule reactions. Measurements of plasma potential, electron and ion number densities, electron energy distribution function, and mean electron energy have also been made in the center of the plasma with a RF compensated Langmuir probe. Plasma potential values are compared with the mean ion energies determined from the measured ion energy distributions and are consistent. Electron temperature, plasma potential, and mean ion energy vary inversely with pressure, but increase with CHF3 content in the mixture.

  10. Application of exogenous mixture of glutathione and stable isotope labeled glutathione for trapping reactive metabolites in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. Detection of the glutathione conjugates using high resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mezine, Igor; Bode, Chris; Raughley, Bethany; Bhoopathy, Sid; Roberts, Kenneth J; Owen, Albert J; Hidalgo, Ismael J

    2013-08-25

    Metabolites (including reactive metabolites) of troglitazone were generated by incubation with cryopreserved human hepatocytes and trapped in the presence of an exogenous mixture of unlabeled and stable isotope labeled (SIL: [1,2-(13)C, (15)N]-glycine) glutathione (GSH/SIL-GSH). The incubation samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-high resolution accurate mass spectrometry (LC-HRAMS) implemented on a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The GSH conjugates of the reactive metabolites were detected via a characteristic mono-isotopic pattern (peaks separated by 3.0037u). Analysis of the incubation samples led to detection of a number of previously described GSH conjugates, as well as two novel methylated GSH conjugates, which were partially characterized based on accurate mass measurements and MS/MS data. The addition of exogenous GSH led to an increase in the apparent level of detected GSH conjugates. Kinetic isotopic measurements showed that the rates of incorporation of exogenous GSH are conjugate-specific. In conclusion, this approach, based on the use of a mixture of GSH/SIL-GSH, allows facile capture and detection of reactive metabolites in human hepatocytes. Moreover, the data suggest that routine addition of glutathione to the assay medium may be advisable for experiments with cryopreserved hepatocytes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of Wind Pressure on the Carbonation of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dujian; Liu, Tiejun; Du, Chengcheng; Teng, Jun

    2015-07-24

    Carbonation is one of the major deteriorations that accelerate steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures. Many mathematical/numerical models of the carbonation process, primarily diffusion-reaction models, have been established to predict the carbonation depth. However, the mass transfer of carbon dioxide in porous concrete includes molecular diffusion and convection mass transfer. In particular, the convection mass transfer induced by pressure difference is called penetration mass transfer. This paper presents the influence of penetration mass transfer on the carbonation. A penetration-reaction carbonation model was constructed and validated by accelerated test results under high pressure. Then the characteristics of wind pressure on the carbonation were investigated through finite element analysis considering steady and fluctuating wind flows. The results indicate that the wind pressure on the surface of concrete buildings results in deeper carbonation depth than that just considering the diffusion of carbon dioxide. In addition, the influence of wind pressure on carbonation tends to increase significantly with carbonation depth.

  12. Mechanical, hydric and thermal properties of fine-grained high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KoÅáková, D.; Čáchová, M.; Doleželová, M.; Kočí, V.; Vejmelková, E.; Černý, R.

    2017-02-01

    The experimental analysis of several types of fine-grained high performance concretes is presented in this paper. Besides mechanical parameters, presented analysis aims also at determination of basic physical and heat and moisture transport and storage parameters. Within the frame of this paper, three different mixtures of fine-grained high performance concrete were designed, distinguished by the type of binder (unitary-, binary- or ternary-based) and their properties were compared with two types common concretes. Experimental results show that the compressive and bending strength, static modulus of elasticity of high performance concretes are significantly better than for other two concrete mixtures, regardless of the type of binder. Thermal conductivity of high performance concretes was higher in dry state, but due to lower open porosity and lower values of moisture diffusivity these concretes are more resistance to liquid moisture intake, therefore they evince better thermal properties in fully saturated state. Since the ternary-based high performance concrete contains also secondary raw materials as partial cement replacement and its properties were mostly better than other investigated concretes, it can be considered as an environmental friendly solution.

  13. Electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Lomasney, H.

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has assigned a priority to the advancement of technology for decontaminating concrete surfaces which have become contaminated with radionuclides, heavy metals, and toxic organics. This agency is responsible for decontamination and decommissioning of thousands of buildings. Electrokinetic extraction is one of the several innovative technologies which emerged in response to this initiative. This technique utilizes an electropotential gradient and the subsequent electrical transport mechanism to cause the controlled movement of ionics species, whereby the contaminants exit the recesses deep within the concrete. This report discusses the technology and use at the Oak Ridge k-25 plant.

  14. Structural Materials: 95. Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power plant concrete structures and their materials of construction are described, and their operating experience noted. Aging and environmental factors that can affect the durability of the concrete structures are identified. Basic components of a program to manage aging of these structures are identified and described. Application of structural reliability theory to devise uniform risk-based criteria by which existing facilities can be evaluated to achieve a desired performance level when subjected to uncertain demands and to quantify the effects of degradation is outlined. Finally, several areas are identified where additional research is desired.

  15. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  16. Mechanical Properties and Durability of "Waterless Concrete"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toutanji, Houssam; Grugel, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Waterless concrete consists of molten elementary sulfur and aggregate. The aggregates in lunar environment will be lunar rocks and soil. Sulfur is present on the Moon in Troilite soil (FeS) and by oxidation soil iron and sulfur can be produced. Iron can be used to reinforce the sulfur concrete. Sulfur concrete specimens were cycled between liquid nitrogen (approximately 191 C) and room temperature (approximately 21 C) to simulate exposure to a lunar environment. Cycled and control specimens were subsequently tested in compression at room temperatures (approximately 21 C) and approximately 101 C. Test results showed that due to temperature cycling, compressive strength of cycled specimens was 20% of those non-cycled. Microscopic examination of the fracture surfaces from the cycled samples showed clear de-bonding of the sulfur from the aggregate material whereas it was seen well bonded in those non-cycled. This reduction in strength can be attributed to the large differences in thermal coefficients of expansion of the materials constituting the concrete which promoted cracking. Similar sulfur concrete mixtures were strengthened with short and long glass fibers. The glass fibers from lunar regolith simulant was melted in a 25 cc Pt-Rh crucible in a Sybron Thermoline high temperature MoSi2 furnace at melting temperatures of 1450 to 1600 C for times of 30 min to 1 hour. Glass fibers were cast from the melt into graphite crucibles and were annealed for a couple of hours at 600 C. Glass fibers and small rods were pulled from the melt. The glass melt wets the ceramic rod and long continuous glass fibers were easily hand drawn. The glass fibers were immediately coated with a protective polymer to maintain the mechanical strength. The glass fibers were used to reinforce sulfur concrete plated to improve the flexural strength of the sulfur concrete. Prisms beams strengthened with glass fibers were tested in 4-point bending test. Beams strengthened with glass fiber showed to

  17. Development of high performance and high strength heavy concrete for radiation shielding structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Chu; Hwang, Chao-Lung

    2011-02-01

    Heavy concrete currently used for construction contains special materials that are expensive and difficult to work with. This study replaced natural aggregate (stones) in concrete with round steel balls, which are inexpensive and easily obtainable. The diameters of the steel balls were 0.5 and 1 cm, and their density was 7.8 kg/m3. Dense packing mixture methods were used to produce heavy concrete with densities of 3500 and 5000 kg/m3. The various properties of this concrete were tested according to the standards of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The results indicated that the construction slump of the concrete could reach 260-280 mm and its slump flow could reach 610-710 mm. More important, its compressive strength could reach 8848 MPa. These results will significantly alter traditional construction methods that use heavy concrete and enhance innovative ideas for structural design.

  18. Comminution and sizing processes of concrete block waste as recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gomes, P C C; Ulsen, C; Pereira, F A; Quattrone, M; Angulo, S C

    2015-11-01

    Due to the environmental impact of construction and demolition waste (CDW), recycling is mandatory. It is also important that recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) are used in concrete to meet market demands. In the literature, the influence of RCAs on concrete has been investigated, but very limited studies have been conducted on how the origin of concrete waste and comminution processes influence RCA characteristics. This paper aims to investigate the influence of three different comminution and sizing processes (simple screening, crushing and grinding) on the composition, shape and porosity characteristics of RCA obtained from concrete block waste. Crushing and grinding implies a reduction of RCA porosity. However, due to the presence of coarse quartz rounded river pebbles in the original concrete block mixtures, the shape characteristics deteriorated. A large amount of powder (<0.15 mm) without detectable anhydrous cement was also generated.

  19. Residual Mechanical Properties of Concrete Made with Crushed Clay Bricks and Roof Tiles Aggregate after Exposure to High Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Miličević, Ivana; Štirmer, Nina; Banjad Pečur, Ivana

    2016-04-19

    This paper presents the residual mechanical properties of concrete made with crushed bricks and clay roof tile aggregates after exposure to high temperatures. One referent mixture and eight mixtures with different percentages of replacement of natural aggregate by crushed bricks and roof tiles are experimentally tested. The properties of the concrete were measured before and after exposure to 200, 400, 600 and 800 °C. In order to evaluate the basic residual mechanical properties of concrete with crushed bricks and roof tiles after exposure to high temperatures, ultrasonic pulse velocity is used as a non-destructive test method and the results are compared with those of a destructive method for validation. The mixture with the highest percentage of replacement of natural aggregate by crushed brick and roof tile aggregate has the best physical, mechanical, and thermal properties for application of such concrete in precast concrete elements exposed to high temperatures.

  20. Residual Mechanical Properties of Concrete Made with Crushed Clay Bricks and Roof Tiles Aggregate after Exposure to High Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Miličević, Ivana; Štirmer, Nina; Banjad Pečur, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the residual mechanical properties of concrete made with crushed bricks and clay roof tile aggregates after exposure to high temperatures. One referent mixture and eight mixtures with different percentages of replacement of natural aggregate by crushed bricks and roof tiles are experimentally tested. The properties of the concrete were measured before and after exposure to 200, 400, 600 and 800 °C. In order to evaluate the basic residual mechanical properties of concrete with crushed bricks and roof tiles after exposure to high temperatures, ultrasonic pulse velocity is used as a non-destructive test method and the results are compared with those of a destructive method for validation. The mixture with the highest percentage of replacement of natural aggregate by crushed brick and roof tile aggregate has the best physical, mechanical, and thermal properties for application of such concrete in precast concrete elements exposed to high temperatures. PMID:28773420

  1. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, John W.; Wecharatana, Methi; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Cerkanowicz, deceased, Anthony E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points.

  2. Method for increasing the rate of compressive strength gain in hardenable mixtures containing fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Liskowitz, J.W.; Wecharatana, M.; Jaturapitakkul, C.; Cerkanowicz, A.E.

    1997-10-28

    The present invention relates to concrete, mortar and other hardenable mixtures comprising cement and fly ash for use in construction. The invention provides a method for increasing the rate of strength gain of a hardenable mixture containing fly ash by exposing the fly ash to an aqueous slurry of calcium oxide (lime) prior to its incorporation into the hardenable mixture. The invention further relates to such hardenable mixtures, e.g., concrete and mortar, that contain fly ash pre-reacted with calcium oxide. In particular, the fly ash is added to a slurry of calcium oxide in water, prior to incorporating the fly ash in a hardenable mixture. The hardenable mixture may be concrete or mortar. In a specific embodiment, mortar containing fly ash treated by exposure to an aqueous lime slurry are prepared and tested for compressive strength at early time points. 2 figs.

  3. A note on mixture bivariate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hanwen; Tian, Wei; Deng, Chengzhi

    2011-10-01

    L. Sendur and I. W. Selesnick suggest four jointly non-Gaussian bivariate models to characterize the dependency between a coefficient and its parent, and respectively derive the corresponding MAP estimators based on noisy wavelet coefficients in detail in [6]. Among the four models, the second is a mixture model and it is quite complicated to evaluate parameters, so L. Sendur and I.W. Selesnick didn't give a concrete method. In this letter, a concrete mixture bivariate model will be described by drawing inspiration from Model 2. Expectation maximization (EM) algorithm is employed to find the parameters of new model. The simulation results show that the values of PSNR have a bit improvement compared with Model 1. The results can be viewed as a supplementary of model 2 in [6].

  4. Comparison of Crack Initiation, Propagation and Coalescence Behavior of Concrete and Rock Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengin, Enes; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2017-04-01

    There are many previously studies carried out to identify crack initiation, propagation and coalescence behavior of different type of rocks. Most of these studies aimed to understand and predict the probable instabilities on different engineering structures such as mining galleries or tunnels. For this purpose, in these studies relatively smaller natural rock and synthetic rock-like models were prepared and then the required laboratory tests were performed to obtain their strength parameters. By using results provided from these models, researchers predicted the rock mass behavior under different conditions. However, in the most of these studies, rock materials and models were considered as contains none or very few discontinuities and structural flaws. It is well known that rock masses naturally are extremely complex with respect to their discontinuities conditions and thus it is sometimes very difficult to understand and model their physical and mechanical behavior. In addition, some vuggy rock materials such as basalts and limestones also contain voids and gaps having various geometric properties. Providing that the failure behavior of these type of rocks controlled by the crack initiation, propagation and coalescence formed from their natural voids and gaps, the effect of these voids and gaps over failure behavior of rocks should be investigated. Intact rocks are generally preferred due to relatively easy side of their homogeneous characteristics in numerical modelling phases. However, it is very hard to extract intact samples from vuggy rocks because of their complex pore sizes and distributions. In this study, the feasibility of concrete samples to model and mimic the failure behavior vuggy rocks was investigated. For this purpose, concrete samples were prepared at a mixture of %65 cement dust and %35 water and their physical and mechanical properties were determined by laboratory experiments. The obtained physical and mechanical properties were used to

  5. High temperature chemically resistant polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

    High temperature chemically resistant, non-aqueous polymer concrete composites consist of about 12 to 20% by weight of a water-insoluble polymer binder. The binder is polymerized in situ from a liquid vinyl-type monomer or mixture of vinyl containing monomers such as triallylcyanurate, styrene, acrylonitrile, acrylamide, methacrylamide, methyl-methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and divinyl benzene. About 5 to 40% by weight of a reactive inorganic filler selected from the group consisting of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate and mixtures containing less than 2% free lime, and about 48 to 83% by weight of silica sand/ and a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide, other orgaic peroxides and combinations to initiate polymerization of the monomer in the presence of the inorganic filers are used.

  6. Effect of monomer composition on the properties of high temperature polymer concretes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeldin, A.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of organic monomer composition on the thermomechanical properties of polymer concrete (PC) containing sand-cement mixtures as an agregate filler were investigated. The effects of various monomer mixtures on compressive strength and hydrolytic stability are discussed. Composites were fabricated in the same way as ordinary concrete, with monomer solutions of various compositions and concentrations used to bind the sand-cement mixture. The compressive strengths of th composites before and after exposure to air and to brine solutions at 240/sup 0/C are discussed.

  7. Transport in superfluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geracie, Michael

    2017-04-01

    We present a general method for constructing effective field theories for nonrelativistic superfluids, generalizing the previous approaches of Greiter, Witten, and Wilczek, and Son and Wingate to the case of several superfluids in solution. We investigate transport in mixtures with broken parity and find a parity-odd "Hall drag" in the presence of independent motion as well as a pinning of mass, charge, and energy to sites of nonzero relative velocity. Both effects have a simple geometric interpretation in terms of the signed volumes and directed areas of various subcomplexes of a "velocity polyhedron": the convex hull formed by the end points of the velocity vectors of a superfluid mixture. We also provide a simple quasi-one-dimensional model that exhibits nonzero Hall drag.

  8. Micromechanics of Concrete.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-25

    reflects the dispersion of the coarse aggregates on the mesoscale. Specifically, the experimental measure- ments indicate ( Mindess and Young 1981, Zaitsev...Mecanique des Materiaux Solides, Dunod, Paris. Mindess , S. and J. Young (1981), Concrete, Prentice-Hall Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ. Mura, T. (1982

  9. High temperature polymer concrete

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Reams, W.

    1984-05-29

    This invention is concerned with a polymer concrete composition, which is a two-component composition useful with many bases including metal. Component A, the aggregate composition, is broadly composed of silica, silica flour, portland cement, and acrylamide, whereas Component B, which is primarily vinyl and acrylyl reactive monomers, is a liquid system.

  10. Heidrun concrete TLP: Update

    SciTech Connect

    Munkejord, T.

    1995-10-01

    This paper gives a summary of the Heidrun substructure including tethers and foundations. The focus will although be on the concrete substructure. The Heidrun Field is located in 345 m water depth in the northern part of the Haltenbanken area, approximately 100N miles from the west coast of mid-Norway. The field is developed by means of a concrete Tension Leg Platform (TLP) by Conoco Norway Inc. The TLP will be moored by 16 steel tethers, arranged in groups of four per corner, which secure the substructure (hull) to the concrete foundations. A general view of the TLP is shown. The Heidrun TLP will be the northern most located platform in the North Sea when installed at Haltenbanken in 1995. Norwegian Contractors a.s (NC) is undertaking the Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Installation (EPCI) contract for the Heidrun TLP substructure. This comprises the complete delivery of the hull with two module support beams (MSB), including all mechanical outfitting. Furthermore, NC will perform all marine operations related to the substructure. For the concrete foundations NC has performed the detailed engineering work and has been responsible for the two to field and installation of the foundations.

  11. Electroosmotic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, W.D.; Bush, S.A.; Marsh, G.C.; Henson, H.M.; Box, W.D.; Morgan, I.L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for the electroosmotic decontamination of concrete surfaces, in which an electrical field is used to induce migration of ionic contaminants from porous concrete into an electrolyte solution that may be disposed of as a low-level liquid radioactive waste (LLRW); alternately, the contaminants from the solution can be sorbed onto anion exchange media in order to prevent contaminant buildup in the solution and to minimize the amount of LLRW generated. We have confirmed the removal of uranium (and infer the removal of {sup 99}Tc) from previously contaminated concrete surfaces. In a typical experimental configuration, a stainless steel mesh is placed in an electrolyte solution contained within a diked cell to serve as the negative electrode (cathode) and contaminant collection medium, respectively, and an existing metal penetration (e.g., piping, conduit, or rebar reinforcement within the concrete surface) serves as the positive electrode (anode) to complete the cell. Typically we have achieved 70 to >90% reductions in surface activity by applying <400 V and <1 A for 1--3 h (energy consumption of 0.4--12 kWh/ft{sup 2}).

  12. Concrete Forms; Carpentry: 901890.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in planning, laying out, and building various type forms for concrete. The course contains seven blocks of study totaling 135 hours in length. The student will be expected to have mastered basic construction skills and basic mathematics. Upon completing the course, the student will have an…

  13. Forterra Concrete Products, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Forterra Concrete Products, Inc., a business located at 511 E. John Carpenter Freeway, Irving, TX, 75062, for alleged violations at its facility located at 23600 W. 40th St

  14. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes.

    PubMed

    Batayneh, Malek; Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures.

  15. Use of selected waste materials in concrete mixes

    SciTech Connect

    Batayneh, Malek Marie, Iqbal; Asi, Ibrahim

    2007-07-01

    A modern lifestyle, alongside the advancement of technology has led to an increase in the amount and type of waste being generated, leading to a waste disposal crisis. This study tackles the problem of the waste that is generated from construction fields, such as demolished concrete, glass, and plastic. In order to dispose of or at least reduce the accumulation of certain kinds of waste, it has been suggested to reuse some of these waste materials to substitute a percentage of the primary materials used in the ordinary portland cement concrete (OPC). The waste materials considered to be recycled in this study consist of glass, plastics, and demolished concrete. Such recycling not only helps conserve natural resources, but also helps solve a growing waste disposal crisis. Ground plastics and glass were used to replace up to 20% of fine aggregates in concrete mixes, while crushed concrete was used to replace up to 20% of coarse aggregates. To evaluate these replacements on the properties of the OPC mixes, a number of laboratory tests were carried out. These tests included workability, unit weight, compressive strength, flexural strength, and indirect tensile strength (splitting). The main findings of this investigation revealed that the three types of waste materials could be reused successfully as partial substitutes for sand or coarse aggregates in concrete mixtures.

  16. Performance of rice husk ash produced using a new technology as a mineral admixture in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Nehdi, M.; Duquette, J.; El Damatty, A

    2003-08-01

    This article investigates the use of a new technique for the controlled combustion of Egyptian rice husk to mitigate the environmental concerns associated with its uncontrolled burning and provide a supplementary cementing material for the local construction industry. The reactor used provides efficient combustion of rice husk in a short residency time via the suspension of processed particles by jets of a process air stream that is forced though stationary angled blades at high velocity. Investigations on the rice husk ash (RHA) thus produced included oxide analysis, X-ray diffraction, carbon content, grindability, water demand, pozzolanic activity index, surface area, and particle size distribution measurements. In addition, concrete mixtures incorporating various proportions of silica fume (SF) and Egyptian RHA (EG-RHA) produced at different combustion temperatures were made and compared. The workability, superplasticizer and air-entraining admixture requirements, and compressive strength at various ages of these concrete mixtures were evaluated, and their resistance to rapid chloride penetrability and deicing salt surface scaling were examined. Test results indicate that contrary to RHA produced using existing technology, the superplasticizer and air-entraining agent requirements did not increase drastically when the RHA developed in this study was used. Compressive strengths achieved by concrete mixtures incorporating the new RHA exceeded those of concretes containing similar proportions of SF. The resistance to surface scaling of RHA concrete was better than that of concrete containing similar proportions of SF. While the chloride penetrability was substantially decreased by RHA, it remained slightly higher than that achieved by SF concrete.

  17. Discrete Velocity Models for Mixtures Without Nonphysical Collision Invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhoff, Niclas; Vinerean, Mirela

    2016-10-01

    An important aspect of constructing discrete velocity models (DVMs) for the Boltzmann equation is to obtain the right number of collision invariants. It is a well-known fact that DVMs can also have extra collision invariants, so called spurious collision invariants, in plus to the physical ones. A DVM with only physical collision invariants, and so without spurious ones, is called normal. For binary mixtures also the concept of supernormal DVMs was introduced, meaning that in addition to the DVM being normal, the restriction of the DVM to any single species also is normal. Here we introduce generalizations of this concept to DVMs for multicomponent mixtures. We also present some general algorithms for constructing such models and give some concrete examples of such constructions. One of our main results is that for any given number of species, and any given rational mass ratios we can construct a supernormal DVM. The DVMs are constructed in such a way that for half-space problems, as the Milne and Kramers problems, but also nonlinear ones, we obtain similar structures as for the classical discrete Boltzmann equation for one species, and therefore we can apply obtained results for the classical Boltzmann equation.

  18. High Modulus Asphalt Concrete with Dolomite Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haritonovs, V.; Tihonovs, J.; Smirnovs, J.

    2015-11-01

    Dolomite is one of the most widely available sedimentary rocks in the territory of Latvia. Dolomite quarries contain about 1,000 million tons of this material. However, according to Latvian Road Specifications, this dolomite cannot be used for average and high intensity roads because of its low quality, mainly, its LA index (The Los Angeles abrasion test). Therefore, mostly the imported magmatic rocks (granite, diabase, gabbro, basalt) or imported dolomite are used, which makes asphalt expensive. However, practical experience shows that even with these high quality materials roads exhibit rutting, fatigue, and thermal cracks. The aim of the research is to develop a high performance asphalt concrete for base and binder courses using only locally available aggregates. In order to achieve resistance against deformations at a high ambient temperature, a hard grade binder was used. Workability, fatigue and thermal cracking resistance, as well as sufficient water resistance is achieved by low porosity (3-5%) and higher binder content compared to traditional asphalt mixtures. The design of the asphalt includes a combination of empirical and performance based tests, which in laboratory circumstances allow simulating traffic and environmental loads. High performance AC 16 base asphalt concrete was created using local dolomite aggregate with polymer modified (PMB 10/40-65) and hard grade (B20/30) bitumen. The mixtures were specified based on fundamental properties in accordance with EN 13108-1 standard.

  19. Coupling thin-layer chromatography with vibrational cooling matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry for the analysis of ganglioside mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Vera B; Elkin, Yuri N; Budnik, Bogdan A; Moyer, Susanne C; O'Connor, Peter B; Costello, Catherine E

    2004-11-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC), which is widely used for separation of glycolipids, oligosaccharides, lipids, and compounds of environmental and pharmaceutical interest, can be readily coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight mass spectrometers, but this arrangement usually compromises mass spectral resolution due to the irregularity of the TLC surface. However, TLC can be coupled to an external ion source MALDI-Fourier transform (FT) MS instrument without compromising mass accuracy and resolution of the spectra. Furthermore, when the FTMS has a vibrationally cooled MALDI ion source, fragile glycolipids can be desorbed from TLC plates without fragmentation, even to the point that desorption of intact molecules from "hot"matrixes such as alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid is possible. In this work, whole brain gangliosides are separated using TLC; the TLC plates are attached directly to the MALDI target, where the gangliosides are desorbed, ionized, and detected in the FTMS with >70 000 resolving power.

  20. A polyethylene-B4C based concrete for enhanced neutron shielding at neutron research facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Cooper-Jensen, C. P.; Perrey, H.; Fissum, K.; Rofors, E.; Scherzinger, J.; Bentley, P. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present the development of a specialized concrete for neutron shielding at neutron research facilities, based on the addition of hydrogen atoms in the form of polyethylene and also B4C for enhancing the neutron capture properties of the concrete. We show information on the mechanical properties of the concrete and the neutronics, in particular its relevance to modern spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden. The new concrete exhibits a 15% lower mass density, a compressible strength of 50% relative to a standard concrete and a significant increase in performance of shielding against MeV neutrons and lower energies. The concrete could find application at the ESS in for example common shielding components, individual beamline shielding and instrument caves. Initial neutronic tests of the concrete, carried out at Lund University, have also verified the performance in the MeV neutron energy range and the results are presented.

  1. Analysis of the Optimum Usage of Slag for the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Seung; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li-Na; Koh, Kyung-Taek

    2015-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely used as a mineral admixture to replace partial Portland cement in the concrete industry. As the amount of slag increases, the late-age compressive strength of concrete mixtures increases. However, after an optimum point, any further increase in slag does not improve the late-age compressive strength. This optimum replacement ratio of slag is a crucial factor for its efficient use in the concrete industry. This paper proposes a numerical procedure to analyze the optimum usage of slag for the compressive strength of concrete. This numerical procedure starts with a blended hydration model that simulates cement hydration, slag reaction, and interactions between cement hydration and slag reaction. The amount of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is calculated considering the contributions from cement hydration and slag reaction. Then, by using the CSH contents, the compressive strength of the slag-blended concrete is evaluated. Finally, based on the parameter analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete with different slag inclusions, the optimum usage of slag in concrete mixtures is determined to be approximately 40% of the total binder content. The proposed model is verified through experimental results of the compressive strength of slag-blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different slag inclusions. PMID:28787998

  2. Analysis of the Optimum Usage of Slag for the Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Seung; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li-Na; Koh, Kyung-Taek

    2015-03-18

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely used as a mineral admixture to replace partial Portland cement in the concrete industry. As the amount of slag increases, the late-age compressive strength of concrete mixtures increases. However, after an optimum point, any further increase in slag does not improve the late-age compressive strength. This optimum replacement ratio of slag is a crucial factor for its efficient use in the concrete industry. This paper proposes a numerical procedure to analyze the optimum usage of slag for the compressive strength of concrete. This numerical procedure starts with a blended hydration model that simulates cement hydration, slag reaction, and interactions between cement hydration and slag reaction. The amount of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is calculated considering the contributions from cement hydration and slag reaction. Then, by using the CSH contents, the compressive strength of the slag-blended concrete is evaluated. Finally, based on the parameter analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete with different slag inclusions, the optimum usage of slag in concrete mixtures is determined to be approximately 40% of the total binder content. The proposed model is verified through experimental results of the compressive strength of slag-blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different slag inclusions.

  3. Nondestructive evaluation techniques for thick concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Dwight A.

    2017-04-01

    The use of concrete structures has made its long-term performance crucial for the safe operation of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs), especially with license period extensions to sixty years and possibly beyond. Unlike most metallic materials, reinforced concrete used in NPPs is a heterogeneous material, a composite with a low-density matrix, a mixture of cement, sand, aggregate and water, and a high-density reinforcement, made up of steel rebar or tendons. This structural complexity makes nondestructive evaluation (NDE) a challenging task. While the standard Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) is adequate for many defects with shallow concrete cover, some defects that are located under deep concrete cover are not easily identified using the standard SAFT techniques. For many degradation mechanisms, particularly defects under deep cover, the use of advanced signal processing techniques is required. A variety of test specimens were evaluated using several advanced signal processing techniques ranging from a large specimen representative of a NPP containment wall (2.134 m x 2.134 m x 1.016 m) with twenty embedded defects, to specimens with accelerated alkali-silica reaction (ASR), and specimens with freeze-thaw damage. The first technique examined in this paper generates frequency banded SAFT reconstructions using wavelet packet decomposition and reconstruction. While the frequency banded SAFT reconstructions show a vast improvement over the standard SAFT for defects under deep cover, a second technique, Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBIR), has been initiated to address the limitations of the frequency banded SAFT (such as multiple reflections for a single defect).

  4. Penetration of concrete targets

    SciTech Connect

    Forrestal, M.J.; Cargile, J.D.; Tzou, R.D.Y.

    1993-08-01

    We developed penetration equations for ogive-nosed projectiles that penetrated concrete targets after normal impact. Our penetration equations predict axial force on the projectile nose, rigid-body motion, and final penetration depth. For target constitutive models, we conducted triaxial material experiments to confining pressures of 600 MPa and curve-fit these data with a linear pressure-volumetric strain relation and with a linear Mohr-Coulomb, shear strength-pressure relation. To verify our penetration equations, we conducted eleven penetration experiments with 0.90 kg, 26.9-mm-diameter, ogive-nosed projectiles into 1.37-m-diameter concrete targets with unconfined compressive strengths between 32-40 MPa. Predictions from our penetration equation are compared with final penetration depth measurements for striking velocities between 280--800 m/s.

  5. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseny, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry D.; Lindbergh, Charles

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar base subjected to 1-atm internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design (1) during construction, (2) under pressurization, and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the airtightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the Moon.

  6. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

  7. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

  8. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-01-01

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability. PMID:28793518

  9. Recyclability of Concrete Pavement Incorporating High Volume of Fly Ash.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Isamu; Ishida, Takeo; Fukumoto, Sunao

    2015-08-21

    Recyclable concrete pavement was made from fly ash and crushed limestone sand and gravel as aggregates so that the concrete pavement could be recycled to raw materials for cement production. With the aim to use as much fly ash as possible for the sustainable development of society, while achieving adequate strength development, pavement concrete having a cement-replacement ratio of 40% by mass was experimentally investigated, focusing on the strength development at an early age. Limestone powder was added to improve the early strength; flexural strength at two days reached 3.5 MPa, the minimum strength for traffic service in Japan. The matured fly ash concrete made with a cement content of 200 kg/m3 achieved a flexural strength almost equal to that of the control concrete without fly ash. Additionally, Portland cement made from the tested fly ash concrete was tested to confirm recyclability, with the cement quality meeting the Japanese classification of ordinary Portland cement. Limestone-based recyclable fly ash concrete pavement is, thus, a preferred material in terms of sustainability.

  10. Mechanics of Concrete II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-18

    diffusivity of undamaged concrete is a problem in itself since the diffusivity of the thin transition zones (at the aggregate- cement matrix interface...C3A anhydride remains in the cement after the hydration. Assuming that the amount of gypsum added to portland cement3 clinker is 4% of Mcm (Biczok 1972...enables establishment of rational relationships between the chemical composition of the hardened cement paste, morphology of the pore system, and defect

  11. Nondestructive Concrete Characterization System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-20

    Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV), Impact-Echo, Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo, Ultrasonic Attenuation, STTR Report Aldo... ultrasonic testing in conjunction with the resonance frequency. All results were within the specified tolerance of ±1 ft. The compressive strength of the...concrete blocks was measured by measuring the P-wave and S-wave time of travel with the pitch-catch method of ultrasonic testing. All results were

  12. Tonsil concretions and tonsilloliths.

    PubMed

    Pruet, C W; Duplan, D A

    1987-05-01

    Although infrequently seen in many clinical practices, tonsillar concretions can be the source of both fetor oris and physical and social concern for the patient. Though stones rarely form in the tonsil or peritonsillar area, the findings of calcified objects or stones anywhere within the body has long been a subject of interest. The salient features of these entities and their relevance to clinical practice are discussed in this article.

  13. Concrete containment aging study

    SciTech Connect

    Pachner, J.; Tai, T.M.; Naus, D.

    1994-04-01

    In 1989, IAEA initiated a pilot study on the management of aging of nuclear power plant components. The Phase I and II studies of concrete containment are discussed. With the data base, plant owners will be able to review and enhance their existing programs. IAEA will analyze data provided by participating plants and the report is scheduled to be released by late 1994 (final report release mid-1995).

  14. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  15. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT; Akash, Akash [Salt lake City, UT; Zhao, Qiang [Natick, MA

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  16. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    DOEpatents

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  17. Testing of Action of Direct Flame on Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Valek, Jaroslav; Novosad, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The paper states results of experimental exposition of concrete test specimens to direct flame. Concrete test specimens made from various mixtures differing in the type of aggregate, binder, dispersed reinforcement, and technological procedure were subjected to thermal load. Physicomechanical and other properties of all test specimens were tested before exposition to open flame: density, compressive strength, flexural strength, moisture content, and surface appearance. The specimens were visually observed during exposition to open flame and changes were recorded. Exposed surface was photographically documented before thermal load and at 10-minute intervals. Development of temperature of the specimens was documented with a thermocamera. After exposition to thermal load and cooling down, concrete specimens were visually observed, network of cracks was photographically documented, and maximal depth of spalled area was measured. PMID:25830162

  18. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  19. Testing of action of direct flame on concrete.

    PubMed

    Bodnarova, Lenka; Valek, Jaroslav; Novosad, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The paper states results of experimental exposition of concrete test specimens to direct flame. Concrete test specimens made from various mixtures differing in the type of aggregate, binder, dispersed reinforcement, and technological procedure were subjected to thermal load. Physicomechanical and other properties of all test specimens were tested before exposition to open flame: density, compressive strength, flexural strength, moisture content, and surface appearance. The specimens were visually observed during exposition to open flame and changes were recorded. Exposed surface was photographically documented before thermal load and at 10-minute intervals. Development of temperature of the specimens was documented with a thermocamera. After exposition to thermal load and cooling down, concrete specimens were visually observed, network of cracks was photographically documented, and maximal depth of spalled area was measured.

  20. Compressive Strength and Water Absorption of Pervious Concrete that Using the Fragments of Ceramics and Roof Tiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahara, E.; Meilani

    2014-03-01

    Pervious concrete was introduced in America in 2003, popularized by Dan Brown and used as a rigid pavement in the open parking lot. Rigid pavement using pervious concrete can absorb water in the surface to go straight through the concrete to the ground below.This water flow is one of the benefit of using the pervious concrete. Using of wastes such as broken roof and ceramics tiles are not commonly used in Indonesia. Utilization these kind of wastes is predicted lower the compressive strength of pervious concrete as they are used as a substitute for coarse aggregate.In this research, pervious concrete is made using a mixture of the fragment of ceramics and roof tiles.This research using broken ceramics and roof tiles with a grain size that loose from 38 mm sieve, retained on 19 mm sieve and the coarse aggregate from crushed stone that loose 12.5 mm sieve, retained on 9.5 mm sieve. The water cement ratio is 0.3 and to assist the mixing process, the addition of addictive in pervious concrete is used.The size of coarse aggregate used in the mixture affects the strength of pervious concrete. The larger the size of aggregate, the obtained compressive strength becomes smaller. It also affects the density of pervious concrete. The using of mixture of ceramics and roof tiles only reduce 2 MPa of pervious concrete compressive strength so this mixture can be used as a substitute for coarse aggregate with a maximum portion of 30 %. The high porosity of the specimens causes the reduction of pervious concrete density that affect the compressive strength. This high level of porosity can be seen from the high level of water absorption that exceed the required limit of water infiltration.

  1. Targeted Mass Spectrometry-Based Approach for Protein-Ligand Binding Analyses in Complex Biological Mixtures Using a Phenacyl Bromide Modification Strategy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lorrain; Wang, Dongyu; Gooden, David M; Ball, Carol H; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2016-11-15

    The characterization of protein folding stability changes on the proteomic scale is useful for protein-target discovery and for the characterization of biological states. The Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX) technique is one of several mass spectrometry-based techniques recently established for the making proteome-wide measurements of protein folding and stability. A critical part of proteome-wide applications of SPROX is the identification and quantitation of methionine-containing peptides. Demonstrated here is a targeted mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy for the detection and quantitation of methionine-containing peptides in SPROX experiments. The strategy involves the use of phenacyl bromide (PAB) for the targeted detection and quantitation of methionine-containing peptides in SPROX using selective reaction monitoring (SRM) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (QQQ-MS). As proof-of-principle, the known binding interaction of Cyclosporine A with cyclophilin A protein in a yeast cell lysate is successfully detected and quantified using a targeted SRM workflow. Advantages of the described workflow over other SPROX protocols include a 20-fold reduction in the amount of total protein needed for analysis and the ability to work with the endogenous proteins in a given sample (e.g., stabile isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture is not necessary).

  2. Leaching and retention of dissolved metals in particulate loaded pervious concrete columns.

    PubMed

    Vadas, Timothy M; Smith, Malcolm; Luan, Hongwei

    2017-04-01

    This study examined metal leaching and retention in pervious concrete with or without embedded particulate matter. Particulate matter was collected from an adjacent parking lot and from a nearby parking garage as examples of weathered and un-weathered particulate matter. Particle size distributions were similar, but metal content was 3-35-fold higher and organic matter content was 3-fold higher in the parking garage particulate matter compared to the parking lot particulate matter. Replicate columns were established with either no particulate added as the control, or 20 g of parking lot or parking garage particulate matter. Synthetic rainwater was passed through the columns at variable rainfall intensity or fixed intensity to assess leaching. Metals were leached at higher concentrations from the parking garage particulate amended column, but from all columns less than 1% of the metal mass leached. Rainfall intensity did not have a large effect on leached metal concentrations, only varying effluent by about 2-fold. Synthetic stormwater with elevated dissolved Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations was passed through the same columns and metal removal efficiencies were on the order of 85-95%, 30-95%, 60-90%, and 95+% for each metal, respectively. After loading the column with a year's worth of stormwater metal exposure, removal efficiencies in the no particulate and parking lot particulate amended columns decreased, while parking garage particulate amended columns performed similarly with a small drop in Cu and Pb removal efficiencies. Generally, columns with no particulate and parking lot particulate amendments performed similarly, suggesting the pervious concrete is responsible for the majority of the initial metal retention. The parking garage particulate amended columns retained more metals from stormwater, perhaps due to an increase in pH that promoted surface precipitation as hydroxides or carbonate species on the pervious concrete, or due to complexation in the

  3. Integrated approach for investigating the durability of self-consolidating concrete to sulfate attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassuoni, Mohamed Tamer F.

    The growing use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) in various infrastructure applications exposed to sulfate-rich environments necessitates conducting comprehensive research to evaluate its durability to external sulfate attack. Since the reliability and adequacy of standard sulfate immersion tests have been questioned, the current thesis introduced an integrated testing approach for assessing the durability of a wide scope of SCC mixtures to external sulfate attack. This testing approach involved progressive levels of complexity from single to multiple damage processes. A new series of sulfate attack tests involving multiple field-like parameters and combined damage mechanisms (various cations, controlled pH, wetting-drying, partial immersion, freezing-thawing, and cyclic cold-hot conditions with or without sustained flexural loading) were designed to evaluate the performance (suitability) of the SCC mixtures under various sulfate attack exposure scenarios. The main mixture design variables of SCC included the type of binder (single, binary, ternary and quaternary), air-entrainment, sand-to-aggregate mass ratio and hybrid fibre reinforcement. The comprehensive database and knowledge obtained from this research were used to develop smart models (fuzzy and neuro-fuzzy inference systems) based on artificial-intelligence to evaluate and predict the performance of the SCC mixtures under various sulfate attack exposure regimes implemented in this study. In full immersion tests involving high concentration sodium and magnesium sulfate solutions with controlled pH, the low penetrability of SCC was responsible for the high durability of specimens. Ternary and quaternary cementitious systems with or without limestone materials provided a passivating layer, with or without acid neutralization capacity, which protected SCC from severe damage in the aggressive sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate solutions. In contrast to conclusions drawn from the sodium sulfate immersion

  4. Laser ablation generation of clusters from As-Te mixtures, As-Te glass nano-layers and from Au-As-Te nano-composites. Quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Štěpánová, Vlasta; Prokeš, Lubomír; Slavíček, Pavel; Alberti, Milan; Havel, Josef

    2015-06-15

    Arsenic tellurides have found important applications in various fields of science, but only a few gold-arsenic tellurides have been reported. Laser ablation synthesis (LAS), a suitable method for the generation of new compounds, has been used to generate clusters from As-Te mixtures, an As-Te glass and Au-As-Te nano-composites. Chalcogenide glass nano-layers prepared via Physical Vapour Deposition - thermal evaporation were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). LAS with laser desorption ionisation quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LDI QIT TOFMS) was used for the generation and analysis of new AuxAsmTen clusters. The stoichiometry of the clusters was determined via isotopic envelope modelling. A simple procedure for the preparation of the Au-As-Te nano-composite was developed. From As-Te mixtures only five binary AsmTen clusters were generated, while from a glass layer 10 binary AsmTen clusters were identified, because during the deposition of the glass the elements reacted with each other to form a complex three-dimensional (3D) structure. Using LAS on the Au-As-Te nano-composite leads to the formation of six unary Ten (n = 1-6), 16 binary (AsmTen and AuxTen), and 31 ternary AuxAsmTen clusters. LAS was demonstrated to be a useful technique for the generation of AuxAsmTen clusters in the gas phase. More AsmTen clusters were generated from the deposited glass layers than from As-Te mixtures. Most of the ternary AuxAsmTen clusters generated from the nano-composite are reported here for the first time. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Effect of hot-dry environment on fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tioua, Tahar; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Salhi, Aimad; Barluenga, Gonzalo

    2016-07-01

    Drying shrinkage can be a major reason for the deterioration of concrete structures. Variation in ambient temperature and relative humidity cause changes in the properties of hardened concrete which can affect their mechanical and drying shrinkage characteristics. The present study investigated mechanical strength and particularly drying shrinkage properties of self-compacting concretes (SCC) reinforced with date palm fiber exposed to hot and dry environment. In this study a total of nine different fibers reinforced self compacting concrete (FRSCC) mixtures and one mixture without fiber were prepared. The volume fraction and the length of fibers reinforcement were 0.1-0.2-0.3% and 10-20-30 mm. It was observed that drying shrinkage lessened with adding low volumetric fraction and short length of fibers in curing condition (T = 20 °C and RH = 50 ± 5 %), but increased in hot and dry environment.

  6. Influence of compaction on the interfacial transition zone and the permeability of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch; Muench, Beat; Gasser, Philippe; Holzer, Lorenz

    2006-08-15

    The interfacial transition zone (ITZ) is regarded as a key feature for the transport properties and the durability of concrete. In this study one self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixture and two conventionally vibrated concrete (CVC) mixtures are studied in order to determine the influence of compaction on the porosity of the ITZ. Additionally oxygen permeability and water conductivity were measured in vertical and horizontal direction. The quantitative analysis of images made with an optical microscope and an environmental scanning electron microscope shows a significantly increased porosity and width of the ITZ in CVC compared to SCC. At the same time oxygen permeability and water conductivity of CVC are increased in comparison to SCC. Moreover, considerable differences in the porosity of the lower, lateral and upper ITZ are observed in both types of concrete. The anisotropic distribution of pores in the ITZ does not necessarily cause anisotropy in oxygen permeability and water conductivity though.

  7. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method.

  8. Fiber reinforced concrete solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Slemmons, A. J.; Newgard, P. J.

    1985-05-07

    A solar collector is disclosed comprising a glass member having a solar selective coating thereon, and a molded, glass-reinforced concrete member bonded to the glass member and shaped to provide a series of passageways between the glass member and the fiber-reinforced concrete member capable of carrying heat exchanging fluid therethrough. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may be formed by spraying a thin layer of concrete and chopped fibers such as chopped glass fibers onto a mold to provide an inexpensive and lightweight, thin-walled member. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may have a lightweight cellular concrete backing thereon for insulation purposes. The collector is further characterized by the use of materials which have substantially matching thermal coefficients of expansion over the temperature range normally encountered in the use of solar collectors.

  9. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-02-01

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system.

  10. Fracture Behavior and Properties of Functionally Graded Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Roesler, Jeffery; Bordelon, Amanda; Gaedicke, Cristian; Park, Kyoungsoo; Paulino, Glaucio

    2008-02-15

    In concrete pavements, a single concrete mixture design is selected to resist mechanical loading without attempting to adversely affect the concrete pavement shrinkage, ride quality, or noise attenuation. An alternative approach is to design distinct layers within the concrete pavement surface which have specific functions thus achieving higher performance at a lower cost. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials (FGCM) for rigid pavements by testing and modeling the fracture behavior of different combinations of layered plain and synthetic fiber-reinforced concrete materials. Fracture parameters and the post-peak softening behavior were obtained for each FGCM beam configuration by the three point bending beam test. The peak loads and initial fracture energy between the plain, fiber-reinforced, and FGCM signified similar crack initiation. The total fracture energy indicated improvements in fracture behavior of FGCM relative to full-depth plain concrete. The fracture behavior of FGCM depended on the position of the fiber-reinforced layer relative to the starter notch. The fracture parameters of both fiber-reinforced and plain concrete were embedded into a finite element-based cohesive zone model. The model successfully captured the experimental behavior of the FGCMs and predicted the fracture behavior of proposed FGCM configurations and structures. This integrated approach (testing and modeling) demonstrates the viability of FGCM for designing layered concrete pavements system.

  11. Evaluating damage potential of cryogenic concrete using acoustic emission sensors and permeability testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Parsaei, Boback; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-04-01

    This study evaluates the damage potential of concrete of different mix designs subjected to cryogenic temperatures, using acoustic emission (AE) and permeability testing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies that might be employed to produce concrete that resists damage when cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Such concrete would be suitable for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG) and could replace currently used 9% Ni steel, thereby leading to huge cost savings. In the experiments described, concrete cubes, 150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm, were cast using four different mix designs. The four mixes employed siliceous river sand as fine aggregate. Moreover, limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate were individually used as coarse aggregates in the mixes. The concrete samples were then cooled from room temperature (20°C) to cryogenic temperature (-165°C) in a temperature chamber. AE sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during the cryogenic freezing process. The damage potential was evaluated in terms of the growth of damage as determined from AE, as a function of temperature and concrete mixture design. The damage potential observed was validated with water permeability testing. Initial results demonstrate the effects of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the aggregates on damage growth. Concrete damage (cracking) resistance generally decreased with increasing coarse aggregate CTE, and was in the order, limestone ≥ trap rock << lightweight aggregate ≥ sandstone. Work is in progress to fully understand thermal dilation and damage growth in concrete due to differential CTE of its components.

  12. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  13. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  14. Fire Resistance of Geopolymer Concretes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-21

    1 Project report – Grant FA23860814096, "Fire resistance of geopolymer concretes" – J. Provis, University of Melbourne 1. Background and...experimental program This project provided funding for us to carry out fire testing of geopolymer concrete specimens and associated laboratory...testing. The focus of this report will be the outcomes of the series of pilot-scale (4’×4’×6”) tests on geopolymer concrete panels, which were conducted

  15. High temperature concrete composites containing organosiloxane crosslinked copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Zeldin, A.; Carciello, N.; Kukacka, L.; Fontana, J.

    High temperature polymer concrete composites comprising about 10 to 30% by weight of a liquid monomer mixture is described. It consists essentially of an organosiloxane polymer crosslinked with an olefinically unsaturated monomer selected from the group consisting of styrene, methyl methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, triallyl cyanurate, n-phenylmalimide, divinyl benzene and mixtures thereof. About 70 to 90% by weight of an inert inorganic filler system containing silica sand and portland cement, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, carbon black or mixtures thereof. Optionally a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobyutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide and other organic peroxides are used to initiate crosspolymerization of the monomer mixture in the presence of the inorganic filler.

  16. High temperature concrete composites containing organosiloxane crosslinked copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Zeldin, Arkady; Carciello, Neal; Kukacka, Lawrence; Fontana, Jack

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to high temperature polymer concrete composites comprising about 10-30% by weight of a liquid monomer mixture consisting essentially of an organosiloxane polymer crosslinked with an olefinically unsaturated monomer selected from the group consisting of styrene, methyl methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, triallyl cyanurate, n-phenylmalimide, divinyl benzene and mixtures theroef; and about 70-90% by weight of an inert inorganic filler system containing silica sand and preferably a member selected from the group consisting of portland cement, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3, carbon black and mixtures thereof; and optionally a free radical initiator such as di-tert-butyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide and other organic peroxides to initiate crosspolymerization of the monomer mixture in the presence of the inorganic filler.

  17. High temperature concrete composites containing organosiloxane crosslinked copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Carciello, N.; Fontana, J.; Kukacka, L.; Zeldin, A.

    1980-11-04

    This invention relates to high temperature polymer concrete composites comprising about 10-30% by weight of a liquid monomer mixture consisting essentially of an organosiloxane polymer crosslinked with an olefinically unsaturated monomer selected from the group consisting of styrene, methyl methacrylate, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, triallyl cyanurate, nphenylmalimide, divinyl benzene and mixtures theroef; and about 70-90% by weight of an inert inorganic filler system containing silica sand and preferably a member selected from the group consisting of portland cement, fe2o3, carbon black and mixtures thereof; and optionally a free radical initiator such as di-tertbutyl peroxide, azobisisobutyronitrile, benzoyl peroxide, lauryl peroxide and other organic peroxides to initiate crosspolymerization of the monomer mixture in the presence of the inorganic filler.

  18. Performance of volcanic ash and pumice based blended cement concrete in mixed sulfate environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, K.M.A. . E-mail: ahossain@ryerson.ca; Lachemi, M.

    2006-06-15

    The deterioration of concrete structures due to the presence of mixed sulfate in soils, groundwater and marine environments is a well-known phenomenon. The use of blended cements incorporating supplementary cementing materials and cements with low C{sub 3}A content is becoming common in such aggressive environments. This paper presents the results of an investigation on the performance of 12 volcanic ash (VA) and finely ground volcanic pumice (VP) based ASTM Type I and Type V (low C{sub 3}A) blended cement concrete mixtures with varying immersion period of up to 48 months in environments characterized by the presence of mixed magnesium-sodium sulfates. The concrete mixtures comprise a combination of two Portland cements (Type I and Type V) and four VA/VP based blended cements with two water-to-binder ratio of 0.35 and 0.45. Background experiments (in addition to strength and fresh properties) including X-ray diffraction (XRD), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) and rapid chloride permeability (RCP) were conducted on all concrete mixtures to determine phase composition, pozzolanic activity, porosity and chloride ion resistance. Deterioration of concrete due to mixed sulfate attack and corrosion of reinforcing steel were evaluated by assessing concrete weight loss and measuring corrosion potentials and polarization resistance at periodic intervals throughout the immersion period of 48 months. Plain (Type I/V) cement concretes, irrespective of their C{sub 3}A content performed better in terms of deterioration and corrosion resistance compared to Type I/V VA/VP based blended cement concrete mixtures in mixed sulfate environment.

  19. A multiscale model for predicting the viscoelastic properties of asphalt concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Cucalon, Lorena; Rahmani, Eisa; Little, Dallas N.; Allen, David H.

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that the accurate prediction of long term performance of asphalt concrete pavement requires modeling to account for viscoelasticity within the mastic. However, accounting for viscoelasticity can be costly when the material properties are measured at the scale of asphalt concrete. This is due to the fact that the material testing protocols must be performed recursively for each mixture considered for use in the final design.

  20. The curing of high-performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Kenneth Wayne

    This dissertation describes the latest information, technology, and research on the curing of high performance concrete (HPC). Expanded somewhat beyond the scope of HPC, it examines the current body of knowledge on the effects of various curing regimes on concrete. The significance and importance of curing are discussed as well as the various definitions of HPC. The current curing requirements, standards, and criteria as proposed by ACI, as well as those of other countries, are reviewed and discussed. The current prescriptive curing requirements may not be applicable to high performance concrete. The research program reported in this dissertation looked at one approach to development of curing criteria for this relatively new class of concrete. The program applies some of the basic concepts of the methodology developed by the German researcher, H. K. Hilsdorf, to the curing of HPC with the objective to determine minimum curing durations for adequate strength development. The approach is to determine what fraction of the standard-cured 28-day strength has to be attained at the end of the curing period to assure that the design strength is attained in the interior of the member. An innovative direct tension test was developed to measure the strength at specific depths from the drying surface of small mortar cylinders (50 x 127 mm (2 x 5 in.)). Two mortar mixtures were investigated, w/c = 0.30 and w/c = 0.45, and three different moist curing regimes, 1-day, 3-day, and 7-day. Specimens were stored in two environmental chambers at 25sp°C, 50% RH; and 25sp°C, 70% RH, until testing at the age of 28 days. Direct tensile tests were conducted using steel disks epoxied to the ends of the specimens. Also, the penetration of the drying front was calculated from the drying data using porosity and degree of hydration relationships. The major observation from these tests was that adequate strength is attained in both mortar mixtures with only one day of moist curing. The drying

  1. Precise quantification of mixtures of bispecific IgG produced in single host cells by liquid chromatography-Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jianhui; Dillon, Michael; McCarty, Luke; Spiess, Christoph; Sandoval, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bispecific IgG are heterotetramers comprising 2 pairs of heavy and light chains. Co-expression of the 4 component chains in a single host cell typically yields the desired bispecific IgG plus up to 9 additional incorrect chain pairings. Several protein engineering strategies have been reported to facilitate the heterodimerization of antibody heavy chains or cognate pairing of antibody heavy and light chains. These technologies have been used to direct the efficient assembly of bispecific IgG in single host cells and minimize unwanted chain pairings. When purifying bispecific IgGs, the identification and quantification of low levels of closely related IgG contaminants are substantial analytical challenges. Here we have developed a robust high-throughput method for quantitative analysis of bispecific IgG preparations using novel online liquid chromatography in conjunction with an extended mass range Orbitrap-based high-resolution mass spectrometer. A mathematical method was developed to estimate the yields of the 2 isobaric species, namely the desired bispecific IgG and the light chain-scrambled IgG. The analytical methods described herein are anticipated to be broadly applicable to the development of bispecific IgG as drugs and potentially to other complex next-generation biotherapeutics. PMID:27610742

  2. New, novel well-cementing polymer-concrete composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.; Carciello, N.

    1980-09-01

    The feasibility of using the products of free-radical copolymerization of cyclic and linear organosiloxanes in the formation of polymer concrete (PC) composites for use in the completion of geothermal wells has been demonstrated. The PC contained a mixture of tetramethylvinylcyclotetrasiloxane and polydimethylsiloxane used in conjunction with aggregate materials such as silica flour and portland cement. The use of these compounds resulted in composites with high strength and with thermal and hydrolytic stability.

  3. High stenghth concrete with high cement substitution by adding fly ash, CaCO3, silica sand, and superplasticizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicaksono, Muchammad Ridho Sigit; Qoly, Amelia; Hidayah, Annisaul; Pangestuti, Endah Kanti

    2017-03-01

    Concrete is a mixture of cement, fine aggregate, coarse aggregate and water with or without additives. Concrete can be made with substitution of cement with materials like Fly Ash, CaCO3 and silica sand that can increase the binding on pasta and also increase the compressive strength of concrete. The Superplasticizer on a mixture is used to reduce the high water content, improve concrete durability, low permeability concrete by making it more resilient, and improve the quality of concrete. The combination between Fly Ash (30% of cement required), CaCO3 (10% of cement required) and silica sand (5% of cement required) with added MasterGlenium ACE 8595 as much as 1,2% from total cement will produces compressive strength of up to 1080 kN/cm2 or 73,34 Mpa when the concrete is aged at 28 day. By using this technique and innovation, it proves that the cost reduction is calculated at 27%, which is much more efficient. While the strength of the concrete is increased at 5% compared with normal mixture.

  4. High performance of treated and washed MSWI bottom ash granulates as natural aggregate replacement within earth-moist concrete.

    PubMed

    Keulen, A; van Zomeren, A; Harpe, P; Aarnink, W; Simons, H A E; Brouwers, H J H

    2016-03-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash was treated with specially designed dry and wet treatment processes, obtaining high quality bottom ash granulate fractions (BGF) suitable for up to 100% replacement of natural gravel in concrete. The wet treatment (using only water for separating and washing) significantly lowers the leaching of e.g. chloride and sulfate, heavy metals (antimony, molybdenum and copper) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Two potential bottom ash granulate fractions, both in compliance with the standard EN 12620 (aggregates for concrete), were added into earth-moist concrete mixtures. The fresh and hardened concrete physical performances (e.g. workability, strength and freeze-thaw) of high strength concrete mixtures were maintained or improved compared with the reference mixtures, even after replacing up to 100% of the initial natural gravel. Final element leaching of monolithic and crushed granular state BGF containing concretes, showed no differences with the gravel references. Leaching of all mixtures did not exceed the limit values set by the Dutch Soil Quality Degree. In addition, multiple-life-phase emission (pH static test) for the critical elements of input bottom ash, bottom ash granulate (BGF) and crushed BGF containing concrete were assessed. Simulation pH lowering or potential carbonation processes indicated that metal (antimony, barium, chrome and copper) and sulfate element leaching behavior are mainly pH dominated and controlled, although differ in mechanism and related mineral abundance.

  5. The evaluation of ordinary Portland cement concrete subject to elevated temperatures in conjunction with acoustic emission and splitting tensile test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yu-Min; Hou, Tsung-Chin; Chen, Guan-Ying; Hou, Ping-Ni

    2017-04-01

    The research objective was to evaluate Ordinary Portland Cement concrete subject to various elevated temperatures. Single OPC concrete mixture with water to cementitious (w/c) equal to 0.45 was proportioned. Concrete specimens were cast and placed in the curing tank in which water was saturated with calcium hydroxide. After ninety days of moist-cure, three elevated temperatures, namely 300, 600, and 900-°C, were carried out upon hardened concrete specimens. Furthermore, two post-damaged curing conditions were executed to recover damaged concrete specimens: one was to recure under 23°C with 50% humidity in a controlled environmental chamber and the other was to recure in the same curing tank. Acoustic emission apparatus coupled with the splitting tensile test was utilized and found able to assess damaged concrete. Before concrete subject to elevated temperatures, the development of indirect tensile strength versus displacement diagram fit well with the tendency of AE energy release. It was found there was a large amount of AE energy released when stress and displacement diagram developed about 40-50%. As such could be identified as the onset of first fracture and the plain concrete generally exhibited a quasi-brittle fracture with two major series of AE energy dissipations; however when concrete specimens were subject to elevated temperatures, the damaged concrete specimens displayed neither fracture pattern nor the "double-hump" AE energy dissipation in comparison with those of plain concrete.

  6. Eco-friendly porous concrete using bottom ash aggregate for marine ranch application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung Jae; Prabhu, G Ganesh; Lee, Bong Chun; Kim, Yun Yong

    2016-03-01

    This article presents the test results of an investigation carried out on the reuse of coal bottom ash aggregate as a substitute material for coarse aggregate in porous concrete production for marine ranch applications. The experimental parameters were the rate of bottom ash aggregate substitution (30%, 50% and 100%) and the target void ratio (15%, 20% and 25%). The cement-coated granular fertiliser was substituted into a bottom ash aggregate concrete mixture to improve marine ranch applications. The results of leaching tests revealed that the bottom ash aggregate has only a negligible amount of the ten deleterious substances specified in the Ministry of Environment - Enforcement Regulation of the Waste Management Act of Republic Korea. The large amount of bubbles/air gaps in the bottom ash aggregate increased the voids of the concrete mixtures in all target void ratios, and decreased the compressive strength of the porous concrete mixture; however, the mixture substituted with 30% and 10% of bottom ash aggregate and granular fertiliser, respectively, showed an equal strength to the control mixture. The sea water resistibility of the bottom ash aggregate substituted mixture was relatively equal to that of the control mixture, and also showed a great deal of improvement in the degree of marine organism adhesion compared with the control mixture. No fatality of fish was observed in the fish toxicity test, which suggested that bottom ash aggregate was a harmless material and that the combination of bottom ash aggregate and granular fertiliser with substitution rates of 30% and 10%, respectively, can be effectively used in porous concrete production for marine ranch application.

  7. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, C F

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined.

  8. Concrete Mixing Methods and Concrete Mixers: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, Chiara F.

    2001-01-01

    As for all materials, the performance of concrete is determined by its microstructure. Its microstructure is determined by its composition, its curing conditions, and also by the mixing method and mixer conditions used to process the concrete. This paper gives an overview of the various types of mixing methods and concrete mixers commercially available used by the concrete industry. There are two main types of mixers used: batch mixers and continuous mixers. Batch mixers are the most common. To determine the mixing method best suited for a specific application, factors to be considered include: location of the construction site (distance from the batching plant), the amount of concrete needed, the construction schedule (volume of concrete needed per hour), and the cost. Ultimately, the quality of the concrete produced determines its performance after placement. An important measure of the quality is the homogeneity of the material after mixing. This paper will review mixing methods in regards to the quality of the concrete produced. Some procedures used to determine the effectiveness of the mixing will be examined. PMID:27500029

  9. Pull-Out Strength and Bond Behavior of Prestressing Strands in Prestressed Self-Consolidating Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Long, Wu-Jian; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Lemieux, Guillaume; Hwang, Soo-Duck; Xing, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the extensive use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) worldwide, it is important to ensure that such concrete can secure uniform in-situ mechanical properties that are similar to those obtained with properly consolidated concrete of conventional fluidity. Ensuring proper stability of SCC is essential to enhance the uniformity of in-situ mechanical properties, including bond to embedded reinforcement, which is critical for structural engineers considering the specification of SCC for prestressed applications. In this investigation, Six wall elements measuring 1540 mm × 2150 mm × 200 mm were cast using five SCC mixtures and one reference high-performance concrete (HPC) of normal consistency to evaluate the uniformity of bond strength between prestressing strands and concrete as well as the distribution of compressive strength obtained from cores along wall elements. The evaluated SCC mixtures used for casting wall elements were proportioned to achieve a slump flow consistency of 680 ± 15 mm and minimum caisson filling capacity of 80%, and visual stability index of 0.5 to 1. Given the spreads in viscosity and static stability of the SCC mixtures, the five wall elements exhibited different levels of homogeneity in in-situ compressive strength and pull-out bond strength. Test results also indicate that despite the high fluidity of SCC, stable concrete can lead to more homogenous in-situ properties than HPC of normal consistency subjected to mechanical vibration. PMID:28788223

  10. Pull-Out Strength and Bond Behavior of Prestressing Strands in Prestressed Self-Consolidating Concrete.

    PubMed

    Long, Wu-Jian; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Lemieux, Guillaume; Hwang, Soo-Duck; Xing, Feng

    2014-10-10

    With the extensive use of self-consolidating concrete (SCC) worldwide, it is important to ensure that such concrete can secure uniform in-situ mechanical properties that are similar to those obtained with properly consolidated concrete of conventional fluidity. Ensuring proper stability of SCC is essential to enhance the uniformity of in-situ mechanical properties, including bond to embedded reinforcement, which is critical for structural engineers considering the specification of SCC for prestressed applications. In this investigation, Six wall elements measuring 1540 mm × 2150 mm × 200 mm were cast using five SCC mixtures and one reference high-performance concrete (HPC) of normal consistency to evaluate the uniformity of bond strength between prestressing strands and concrete as well as the distribution of compressive strength obtained from cores along wall elements. The evaluated SCC mixtures used for casting wall elements were proportioned to achieve a slump flow consistency of 680 ± 15 mm and minimum caisson filling capacity of 80%, and visual stability index of 0.5 to 1. Given the spreads in viscosity and static stability of the SCC mixtures, the five wall elements exhibited different levels of homogeneity in in-situ compressive strength and pull-out bond strength. Test results also indicate that despite the high fluidity of SCC, stable concrete can lead to more homogenous in-situ properties than HPC of normal consistency subjected to mechanical vibration.

  11. Optimization of a Hybrid-Fiber-Reinforced High-Strength Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, L. E. T.; de Hanai, J. B.; Ferrari, V. J.

    2016-07-01

    The fracture performance of a high-strength concrete reinforced with steel fibers was studied. Tests of notched beams subjected to fracture in the three-point bend configuration were conducted in accordance with RILEM recommendations TC 162-TDF. The R-curve concepts based on load-CMOD responses and the RILEM criteria were used for the performance evaluation of concrete beams reinforced with steel fiber mixtures and loaded up to fracture. Steel fibers of different types (regular and microfibers), in different proportions were employed as the reinforcement. The hybrid-fiber-reinforced concrete demonstrated a superior performance regarding their resistance and toughness properties as a result of interaction between the fibers.

  12. Relating damage evolution of concrete cooled to cryogenic temperatures to permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogbara, Reginald B.; Iyengar, Srinath R.; Grasley, Zachary C.; Rahman, Syeda; Masad, Eyad A.; Zollinger, Dan G.

    2014-11-01

    Typically, 9% Ni steel is used for primary containment of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Utilization of concrete in place of 9% Ni steel for primary containment would lead to significant cost savings. Hence, this study investigates changes in the microstructure of concrete due to cryogenic freezing that would affect its relevant engineering properties for containment. The study also evaluates the effect of aggregate type on the damage potential of concrete subjected to cryogenic freezing. The aim is to investigate design methodologies to produce damage-resistant cryogenic concrete. The study employed four concrete mixture designs involving river sand as fine aggregate, and coarse aggregates with different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values. Specifically, the coarse aggregates were limestone, sandstone, trap rock and lightweight aggregate. Concrete cubes were cured under water for at least 28 days and thereafter frozen from ambient (20 °C) to cryogenic temperature (-165 °C). Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were placed on the concrete cubes during freezing. X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) was employed to study the microstructure of concrete cores, before and after cryogenic freezing. The impact of the microstructural evolution thus obtained from AE and XRCT on relevant engineering properties was determined via water and chloride permeability tests. Microcrack propagation determined from AE correlated with changes in permeability. There were no observable cracks in majority of the concrete mixtures after freezing. This implies that microcracks detected via AE and increased permeability was very well distributed and smaller than the XRCT's resolution. Damage (microcracking) resistance of the concrete with different aggregates was in the order limestone ⩾ trap rock ≫ lightweight aggregate ⩾ sandstone.

  13. Corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, D. D. L.

    2000-10-01

    The methods and materials for corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete are reviewed. The methods are steel surface treatment, the use of admixtures in concrete, surface coating on concrete, and cathodic protection.

  14. Recycling of rubble from building demolition for low-shrinkage concretes.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Valeria; Moriconi, Giacomo

    2010-04-01

    In this project concrete mixtures were prepared that were characterized by low ductility due to desiccation by using debris from building demolition, which after a suitable treatment was used as aggregate for partial replacement of natural aggregates. The recycled aggregate used came from a recycling plant, in which rubble from building demolition was selected, crushed, cleaned, sieved, and graded. Such aggregates are known to be more porous as indicated by the Saturated Surface Dry (SSD) moisture content. The recycled concrete used as aggregates were added to the concrete mixture in order to study their influence on the fresh and hardened concrete properties. They were added either after water pre-soaking or in dry condition, in order to evaluate the influence of moisture in aggregates on the performance of concrete containing recycled aggregate. In particular, the effect of internal curing, due to the use of such aggregates, was studied. Concrete behavior due to desiccation under dehydration was studied by means of both drying shrinkage test and German angle test, through which shrinkage under the restrained condition of early age concrete can be evaluated. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transport processes in partially saturate concrete: Testing and liquid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Chiara

    The measurement of transport properties of concrete is considered by many to have the potential to serve as a performance criterion that can be related to concrete durability. However, the sensitivity of transport tests to several parameters combined with the low permeability of concrete complicates the testing. Gas permeability and diffusivity test methods are attractive due to the ease of testing, their non-destructive nature and their potential to correlate to in-field carbonation of reinforced concrete structures. This work was aimed at investigating the potential of existing gas transport tests as a way to reliably quantify transport properties in concrete. In this study gas permeability and diffusivity test methods were analyzed comparing their performance in terms of repeatability and variability. The influence of several parameters was investigated such as moisture content, mixture proportions and gas flow. A closer look to the influence of pressure revealed an anomalous trend of permeability with respect to pressure. An alternative calculation is proposed in an effort to move towards the determination of intrinsic material properties that can serve as an input for service life prediction models. The impact of deicing salts exposure was also analyzed with respect to their alteration of the degree of saturation as this may affect gas transport in cementitious materials. Limited information were previously available on liquid properties over a wide range of concentrations. To overcome this limitation, this study quantified surface tension, viscosity in presence of deicing salts in a broad concentration range and at different temperatures. Existing models were applied to predict the change of fluid properties during drying. Vapor desorption isotherms were obtained to investigate the influence of deicing salts presence on the non-linear moisture diffusion coefficient. Semi-empirical models were used to quantify the initiation and the rate of drying using liquid

  16. Final Report: Self-Consolidating Concrete Construction for Modular Units

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, Russell; Kahn, Lawrence; Kurtis, Kimberly; Petrovic, Bojan; Loreto, Giovanni; Van Wyk, Jurie; Canterero-Leal, Carlos

    2016-07-29

    This report focuses on work completed on DE-NE0000667, Self-Consolidating Concrete for Modular Units, in connection with the Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (DOE-NEET) program. This project was completed in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, with Westinghouse Corporation as the industrial partner. The primary objective of this project was to develop self-consolidating concrete (also termed “self-compacting concrete” or SCC) mixtures so that concrete placement can be made into steel plate composite (SC) modular structures without the need for continuous concrete placement. As part of the research, SCC mixtures were developed and validated to ensure sufficient shear capacity across cold-joints, while minimizing shrinkage and temperature increase during curing to enhance concrete bonding with the steel plate construction found in modular units. The SCC mixtures developed were able to carry shearing forces across the cold-joint boundaries. This “self-roughening” was achieved by adding a tailored fraction of lightweight aggregate (LWA) to the concrete mix, some of which raised to the surface during curing, forming a rough surface on which subsequent concrete placements were made. The self-roughening behavior was validated through three sets of structural tests. Shear friction on small-scale specimens with cold joints was assessed using varying fractions of LWA and with varying amounts of external steel plate reinforcement. The results show that the shear friction coefficient, to be used with the provisions of ACI 318-14, Section 22.9, can be taken as 1.35. Mid-scale beam tests were completed to assess the cold-joint capacity in both in-plane and out-of-plane bending. The results showed that the self-roughened joints performed as well as monolithic joints. The final assessment was a full-scale test using a steel composite module supplied by Westinghouse and similar in construction to

  17. Terminal Ballistics of Concrete-Polymer Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    in Portland Cement Concrete 19 8. Effects of Butyl Acrylate on Cratering 20 9. Penetiation of LMC Made with CE1-P 22 10. Cratering in Latex -Modified...Penetration Craterlng Liquid Monomers Concrete Reinforcing Patterns Terminal Ballistics Concrete Cracking Latex -Modified Concrete 20 ABSTRACT...polymerization; (3) latex modified concrete which differed from portland cement concrete only in the sub- stitution of latex emulsion for portions of the

  18. Temperature and pore pressure distribution in a concrete slab during the microwave decontamination process

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Ebadian, M.A.; White, T.L.; Grubb, R.G.; Foster, D. Jr.

    1994-10-01

    As an application of microwave engineering, the new technology of concrete decontamination and decommissioning using microwave energy has been recently developed. The temperature and pore pressure within the concrete are studied theoretically in this paper. The heat and mass transfer within the porous concrete, coupled with temperature dependent dielectric property are investigated. The effects of microwave frequency (f), microwave power intensity (Q{sub 0,ave}), concrete porosity ({phi}) on the temperature and pore pressure distributions and their variations are fully discussed. The effects of the variation of complex dielectric permittivity ({epsilon}) and presentation of different steel reinforcements are also illustrated.

  19. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions in asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-07-01

    An analytical method using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt fractions has been developed. The 14 compounds determined, characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings, are expected to be present in asphalt and are considered carcinogenic and mutagenic. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all of the compounds. The limits of detection ranged from 0.5 to 346.5 μg/L and the limits of quantification ranged from 1.7 to 1550 μg/L. The method was validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (NIST SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations agreed with the certified values. The method was applied to asphalt samples after its fractionation according to ASTM D4124 and the method of Green. The concentrations of the seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons quantified in the sample ranged from 0.86 mg/kg for benzo[ghi]perylene to 98.32 mg/kg for fluorene. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  1. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  2. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  3. Concrete Masonry Designs: Educational Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Randi, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    This special journal issue addresses concrete masonry in educational facilities construction. The issue's feature articles are: (1) "It Takes a Village To Construct a Massachusetts Middle School," describing a middle school constructed almost entirely of concrete masonry and modeled after a typical small New England village; (2)…

  4. Concrete Operations and Attentional Capacity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Michael; Lindenberger, Ulman

    1989-01-01

    To test predictions regarding the attentional capacity requirements of Piaget's stage of concrete operations, a battery of concrete operational tasks and two measures of attentional capacity were administered to 120 first-, second-, and third-graders. Findings concern class inclusion, transitivity of length and weight, and multiplication of…

  5. The Concrete and Pavement Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The modern world is characterized by the extensive use of concrete and asphalt pavement. Periodically, these materials are replaced and the old materials disposed of. In this challenge, students will be asked to develop ways to reuse the old materials. It is important for students to understand how concrete and asphalt are made and applied, as…

  6. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  7. Deciphering the structure of isomeric oligosaccharides in a complex mixture by tandem mass spectrometry: photon activation with vacuum ultra-violet brings unique information and enables definitive structure assignment.

    PubMed

    Ropartz, David; Lemoine, Jérôme; Giuliani, Alexandre; Bittebière, Yann; Enjalbert, Quentin; Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2014-01-07

    Carbohydrates have a wide variety of structures whose complexity and heterogeneity challenge the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry, with its remarkable sensitivity and high information content, provides key advantages to addressing the structural elucidation of polysaccharides. Yet, classical fragmentation by collision-activated dissociation (CAD) in many cases fails to reach a comprehensive structural determination, especially when isomers have to be differentiated. In this work, for the first time, vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) synchrotron radiation is used as the activation process in tandem mass spectrometry of large oligosaccharides. Compared to low energy CAD (LE-CAD), photon activated dissociation brought more straightforward and valuable structural information. The outstanding feature was that complete series of informative ions were produced, with only minor neutral losses. Moreover, systematic fragmentation rules could be drawn thus facilitating the definitive assignments of fragment identities. As a result, most of the structures present in a complex mixture of oligogalacturonans could be comprehensively resolved, including many isomers differing in the position of methyl groups along the galacturonic acid backbone. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diffusion method of seperating gaseous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Pontius, Rex B.

    1976-01-01

    A method of effecting a relatively large change in the relative concentrations of the components of a gaseous mixture by diffusion which comprises separating the mixture into heavier and lighter portions according to major fraction mass recycle procedure, further separating the heavier portions into still heavier subportions according to a major fraction mass recycle procedure, and further separating the lighter portions into still lighter subportions according to a major fraction equilibrium recycle procedure.

  9. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  10. Alkali-silica reaction resistant concrete using pumice blended cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Uma

    Durability of structures is a major challenge for the building industry. One of the many types of concrete deterioration that can affect durability is alkali-silica reaction (ASR). ASR has been found in most types of concrete structures, including dams, bridges, pavements, and other structures that are 20 to 50 years old. The degradation mechanism of ASR produces a gel that significantly expands in the presence of water as supplied from the surrounding environment. This expansion gel product can create high stresses and cracking of the concrete, which can lead to other forms of degradation and expensive structural replacement costs. The four essential factors that produce an expansive ASR gel in concrete are the presence of alkalis, siliceous aggregate, moisture, and free calcium hydroxide (CH). If concrete is starved of any one of these essential components, the expansion can be prevented. Reducing CH through the use of a supplementary cementitious material (SCM) such as natural pozzolan pumice is the focus of this research. By using a pozzolan, the amount of CH is reduced with time based on the effectiveness of the pozzolan. Many pozzolans exist, but one such naturally occurring pozzolanic material is pumice. This research focuses on determining the effect of a finely ground pumice as a SCM in terms of its resistance to ASR expansion, as well as improving resistance to other potential concrete durability mechanisms. In spite of having high alkali contents in the pumice, mixtures containing the SCM pumice more effectively mitigated the ASR expansion reaction than other degradation mechanisms. Depending on the reactivity of the aggregates and fineness of the pumice, 10-15% replacement of cement with the pumice was found to reduce the ASR expansion to the acceptable limits. The amount of CH remaining in the concrete was compared to the ASR expansion in order to improve understanding of the role of CH in the ASR reaction. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X

  11. High temperature mass spectrometric investigation of the equilibrium vapor composition over three-component mixtures of CsI, NaI, and DyI/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Kaposi, O.; Szilagyi, J.; Lelik, L.

    1984-10-01

    The molar composition of the saturated vapor phase over ternary iodides of CsI, NaI, and DyI/sub 3/ at 860 to 1060 K was investigated by means of a mass spectrometer equipped with a Knudsen cell evaporator system. Fragmentation patterns and appearance potentials for the most intense ions were determined. Besides the previously detected fragments in the equilibrium vapor above the two-component systems, fragment ions from the complex molecules NaCsDyI/sub 5/, Na/sub 2/CsDyI/sub 6/, NaCs/sub 2/DyI/sub 6/, and Na/sub 3/Cs/sub 2/DyI/sub 8/ were found. Ion current vs temperature data yielded heats of sublimation: ..delta..H/sub s/ (NaCsDyI/sub 5/)/sub 960K/ = 320 +/- 13 kJ/mol; ..delta..H/sub s/ (Na/sub 2/CsDyI/sub 6/)/sub 960K/ = 325 +/- 11 kJ/mol; ..delta..H/sub s/ (NaCs/sub 2/DyI/sub 6/)/sub 960K/ = 348 +/- 15 kJ/mol; and ..delta..H/sub s/ (Na/sub 3/Cs/sub 2/DyI/sub 8/)/sub 960K/ = 366 +/- 17 kJ/mol. From the various high-temperature equilibrium reactions, one may calculate the following heats of formation: ..delta..H/sub f/ (NaCsDyI/sub 5/)/sub g/ = -863 +/- 23 kJ/mol; ..delta..H/sub f/ (Na/sub 2/CsDyI/sub 6/)/sub g/ = -1170 +/- 31 kJ/mol; ..delta..H/sub f/ (NaCs/sub 2/DyI/sub 6/)/sub g/ = -1235 +/- 33 kJ/mol; and ..delta..H/sub f/ (Na/sub 3/Cs/sub 2/DyI/sub 8/) = -1806 +/- 17 kJ/mol.

  12. Determination of oxygen and nitrogen derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fractions of asphalt mixtures using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Paulo Cicero; Gobo, Luciana Assis; Bohrer, Denise; Carvalho, Leandro Machado; Cravo, Margareth Coutinho; Leite, Leni Figueiredo Mathias

    2015-12-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was used for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, the oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, formed in asphalt fractions. Two different methods have been developed for the determination of five oxygenated and seven nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that are characterized by having two or more condensed aromatic rings and present mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. The parameters of the atmospheric pressure chemical ionization interface were optimized to obtain the highest possible sensitivity for all compounds. The detection limits of the methods ranged from 0.1 to 57.3 μg/L for nitrated and from 0.1 to 6.6 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The limits of quantification were in the range of 4.6-191 μg/L for nitrated and 0.3-8.9 μg/L for oxygenated derivatives. The methods were validated against a diesel particulate extract standard reference material (National Institute of Standards and Technology SRM 1975), and the obtained concentrations (two nitrated derivatives) agreed with the certified values. The methods were applied in the analysis of asphalt samples after their fractionation into asphaltenes and maltenes, according to American Society for Testing and Material D4124, where the maltenic fraction was further separated into its basic, acidic, and neutral parts following the method of Green. Only two nitrated derivatives were found in the asphalt sample, quinoline and 2-nitrofluorene, with concentrations of 9.26 and 2146 mg/kg, respectively, whereas no oxygenated derivatives were detected. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Mass spectrometric amino acid sequencing of a mixture of seed storage proteins (napin) from Brassica napus, products of a multigene family.

    PubMed

    Gehrig, P M; Krzyzaniak, A; Barciszewski, J; Biemann, K

    1996-04-16

    The amino acid sequences of a number of closely related proteins ("napin") isolated from Brassica napus were determined by mass spectrometry without prior separation into individual components. Some of these proteins correspond to those previously deduced (napA, BngNAP1, and gNa), chiefly from DNA sequences. Others were found to differ to a varying extent (BngNAP1', BngNAP1A, BngNAP1B, BngNAP1C, gNa', and gNaA). The short chains of gNa and gNa' and of BngNAP1 and BngNAP1' differ by the replacement of N-terminal proline by pyroglutamic acid; the long chains of gNaA and BngNAP1B contain a six amino acid stretch, MQGQQM, which is present in gNa (according to its DNA sequence) but absent from BngNAP1 and BngNAP1C. These alternations of sequences between napin isoforms are most likely due to homologous recombination of the genetic material, but some of the changes may also be due to RNA editing. The amino acids that follow the untruncated C termini of those napin chains for which the DNA sequences are known (napA, BngNAP1, and gNa) are aromatic amino acids. This suggests that the processing of the proprotein leading to the C termini of the two chains is due to the action of a protease that specifically cleaves a G/S-F/Y/W bond.

  14. Durability of an inorganic polymer concrete coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Kenneth

    The objective of the research program reported in this thesis is to evaluate the durability of an inorganic polymer composite coating exposed to freeze/thaw cycling and wet-dry cycling. Freeze/thaw cycling is performed following ASTM D6944-09 Standard Practice for Resistance of Cured Coatings to Thermal Cycling and wet/dry cycling is performed following guidelines set forth in a thesis written by Ronald Garon at Rutgers University. For both sets of experiments, four coating mixture proportions were evaluated. The variables were: silica/alumina ratio, mixing protocol using high shear and normal shear mixing, curing temperatures of 70 and 120 degrees Fahrenheit and use of nano size constituent materials. The mix with highest silica/alumina ratio was designated as Mix 1 and mixes with lower ratios were designated as Mix 2 and Mix 3. Mix 4 had nano silica particles. Four prisms were used for each variable including control that had no coating. The performance of the coating was evaluated using adhesion strength measured using: ASTM D7234 Test Method for Pull-Off Strength of Coatings on Concrete Using Portable Adhesion Testers. Tests were performed after every five consecutive cycles of thermal conditioning and six consecutive cycles of wet-dry exposure. Results from the thermal cycling and wet-dry testing demonstrate that all coating formulations are durable. The minimum adhesion strength was 300 psi even though a relatively weak base concrete surface was chosen for the study. The weak surface was chosen to simulate aged concrete surfaces present in actual field conditions. Due to the inherent nature of the test procedure the variation in test results is high. However, based on the test results, high shear mixer and high temperature curing are not recommended. As expected nano size constituent materials provide better performance.

  15. Ice melting properties of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures with induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hao; Sun, Yihan; Liu, Quantao; Li, Bin; Wu, Shaopeng; Tang, Jin

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the ice melting performance of asphalt concrete with steel fibers was studied. Steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures were prepared, five different fiber amount of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures were mixed to study their induction heating rate. The samples covered with different thickness of ice were heated with induction heating to study their ice melting efficency. It was proved that the induction heating of steel fiber modified asphalt mixtures could significantly improve their ice melting efficency compared with the natural condition. And it was found that the thickness of the ice had little influence on the induction heating rate of the asphalt concrete.

  16. Nuclear Power Plant Concrete Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Prabir; Labbe, Pierre; Naus, Dan

    2013-01-01

    A nuclear power plant (NPP) involves complex engineering structures that are significant items of the structures, systems and components (SSC) important to the safe and reliable operation of the NPP. Concrete is the commonly used civil engineering construction material in the nuclear industry because of a number of advantageous properties. The NPP concrete structures underwent a great degree of evolution, since the commissioning of first NPP in early 1960. The increasing concern with time related to safety of the public and environment, and degradation of concrete structures due to ageing related phenomena are the driving forces for such evolution. The concrete technology underwent rapid development with the advent of chemical admixtures of plasticizer/super plasticizer category as well as viscosity modifiers and mineral admixtures like fly ash and silica fume. Application of high performance concrete (HPC) developed with chemical and mineral admixtures has been witnessed in the construction of NPP structures. Along with the beneficial effect, the use of admixtures in concrete has posed a number of challenges as well in design and construction. This along with the prospect of continuing operation beyond design life, especially after 60 years, the impact of extreme natural events ( as in the case of Fukushima NPP accident) and human induced events (e.g. commercial aircraft crash like the event of September 11th 2001) has led to further development in the area of NPP concrete structures. The present paper aims at providing an account of evolution of NPP concrete structures in last two decades by summarizing the development in the areas of concrete technology, design methodology and construction techniques, maintenance and ageing management of concrete structures.

  17. Ion mobility mass spectrometry for extracting spectra of N-glycans directly from incubation mixtures following glycan release: application to glycans from engineered glycoforms of intact, folded HIV gp120.

    PubMed

    Harvey, David J; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N; Scarff, Charlotte A; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  18. Contribution to the benchmark for ternary mixtures: Measurement of the Soret and thermodiffusion coefficients of tetralin+isobutylbenzene+n-dodecane at a composition of (0.8/0.1/0.1) mass fractions by two-color optical beam deflection.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, M; Köhler, W

    2015-04-01

    Within the framework of an international benchmark test we have performed measurements of the Soret and thermodiffusion coefficients of the organic ternary mixture (0.8/0.1/0.1 mass fraction) of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthaline (THN), isobutylbenzene (IBB) and n -dodecane (n C12) at 298.15K by means of a two-color optical beam deflection technique (OBD). The data evaluation procedure is based on a least squares fitting routine for an approximate analytical solution for the Soret cell problem. The condition number of the contrast factor matrix and standard error propagation are used for an error estimation for the measured Soret and thermodiffusion coefficients. The Soret coefficients obtained are S (') T(THN) = (1.20±0.09)×10(-3) K^-1, S (') T(IBB) = (- 0.34±0.14)×10(-3) K^-1, and S (') T(nC12) = (- 0.86±0.06)×10(-3) K^-1 and the corresponding thermodiffusion coefficients are D (') T(THN) = (0.72±0.26)×10(-12) m^2(s K)^-1, D (') T(IBB) = (- 0.22±0.42)×10(-12) m^2(s K)^-1, and D (') T(nC12) = (- 0.50±0.16)×10(-12) m^2(s K)^-1. These results will be used as ground-based reference data for the DCMIX project, where thermodiffusion experiments of ternary mixtures are measured in a microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

  19. Reuse of waste iron as a partial replacement of sand in concrete.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zainab Z; Al-Hashmi, Enas A

    2008-11-01

    One of the major environmental issues in Iraq is the large quantity of waste iron resulting from the industrial sector which is deposited in domestic waste and in landfills. A series of 109 experiments and 586 tests were carried out in this study to examine the feasibility of reusing this waste iron in concrete. Overall, 130 kg of waste iron were reused to partially replace sand at 10%, 15%, and 20% in a total of 1703 kg concrete mixtures. The tests performed to evaluate waste-iron concrete quality included slump, fresh density, dry density, compressive strength, and flexural strength tests: 115 cubes of concrete were molded for the compressive strength and dry density tests, and 87 prisms were cast for the flexural strength tests. This work applied 3, 7, 14, and 28 days curing ages for the concrete mixes. The results confirm that reuse of solid waste material offers an approach to solving the pollution problems that arise from an accumulation of waste in a production site; in the meantime modified properties are added to the concrete. The results show that the concrete mixes made with waste iron had higher compressive strengths and flexural strengths than the plain concrete mixes.

  20. A PERMEABLE ACTIVE AMENDMENT CONCRETE (PAAC) FOR CONTAMINANT REMEDIATION AND EROSION CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A.; Paller, M.; Dixon, K.

    2012-06-29

    The final project report for SEED SERDP ER - 2134 describes the development of permeable active amendment concrete (PAAC), which was evaluated through four tasks: 1) development of PAAC; 2) assessment of PAAC for contaminant removal; 3) evaluation of promising PAAC formulations for potential environmental impacts; and 4) assessment of the hydraulic, physical, and structural properties of PAAC. Conventional permeable concrete (often referred to as pervious concrete) is concrete with high porosity as a result of an extensive and interconnected void content. It is made from carefully controlled amounts of water and cementitious materials used to create a paste that forms a coating around aggregate particles. The mixture has a substantial void content (e.g., 15% - 25%) that results in a highly permeable structure that drains quickly. In PAAC, the aggregate material is partly replaced by chemically-active amendments that precipitate or adsorb contaminants in water that flows through the concrete interstices. PAAC combines the relatively high structural strength, ample void space, and water permeability of pervious concrete with the contaminant sequestration ability of chemically-active amendments to produce a new material with superior durability and ability to control contaminant mobility. The high surface area provided by the concrete interstices in PAAC provides significant opportunity for contaminants to react with the amendments incorporated into the concrete matrix. PAAC has the potential to immobilize a large variety of organic and inorganic contaminants by incorporating different active sequestering agents including phosphate materials (rock phosphate), organoclays, zeolite, and lime individually or in combinations.

  1. Influence of the dosage of super plasticizer on properties of high performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroninsh, J.; Lagzdina, S.; Krage, L.; Shahmenko, G.

    2011-12-01

    High-performance concrete (HPC) is defined as concrete that meets special combinations of performance and uniformity requirements. That cannot always be achieved routinely using conventional constituents and ordinary mixing, placing, and curing practices. The objective of this study is to provide some experimental data that can be useful in engineering practice for producing HPC using conventional constituents and ordinary mixing and curing practices using less expensive raw materials. In the given study, the influence of the polycarboxylates based super plasticizer (SP) (high-range water reducer) at different dosages to the properties of HPC was investigated. SP in concrete mixtures was added with ratios of 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.5% by weight of cement. The samples characteristics of produced concrete were compared with each other. Performance of the concrete mixes was determined for fresh and hardened concrete, which included cone test, compressive strength and porosity measurements. Obtained results indicated that increasing dosage of SP to 2.5% by weight of cement improved the performance of concrete and contributed more to the improvement of its transportability properties as well as mechanical properties, but at the same time has considerably reduced water/cement (W/C) ratio. Porosity tests of hardened concrete showed influence of SP dosage to the volume of pores accessible to water.

  2. Evaluation of Early-Age Concrete Compressive Strength with Ultrasonic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Seok; Kang, Jun Won; Koh, Hyun-Moo

    2017-08-07

    Surface wave velocity measurement of concrete using ultrasonic sensors requires testing on only one side of a member. Thus, it is applicable to concrete cast inside a form and is often used to detect flaws and evaluate the compressive strength of hardened concrete. Predicting the in situ concrete strength at a very early stage inside the form helps with determining the appropriate form removal time and reducing construction time and costs. In this paper, the feasibility of using surface wave velocities to predict the strength of in situ concrete inside the form at a very early stage was evaluated. Ultrasonic sensors were used to measure a series of surface waves for concrete inside a form in the first 24 h after placement. A continuous wavelet transform was used to compute the travel time of the propagating surface waves. The cylindrical compressive strength and penetration resistance tests were also performed during the test period. Four mixtures and five curing temperatures were used for the specimens. The surface wave velocity was confirmed to be applicable to estimating the concrete strength at a very early age in wall-like elements. An empirical formula is proposed for evaluating the early-age compressive strength of concrete considering the 95% prediction intervals.

  3. Evaluation of Early-Age Concrete Compressive Strength with Ultrasonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyejin; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Hee Seok; Kang, Jun Won; Koh, Hyun-Moo

    2017-01-01

    Surface wave velocity measurement of concrete using ultrasonic sensors requires testing on only one side of a member. Thus, it is applicable to concrete cast inside a form and is often used to detect flaws and evaluate the compressive strength of hardened concrete. Predicting the in situ concrete strength at a very early stage inside the form helps with determining the appropriate form removal time and reducing construction time and costs. In this paper, the feasibility of using surface wave velocities to predict the strength of in situ concrete inside the form at a very early stage was evaluated. Ultrasonic sensors were used to measure a series of surface waves for concrete inside a form in the first 24 h after placement. A continuous wavelet transform was used to compute the travel time of the propagating surface waves. The cylindrical compressive strength and penetration resistance tests were also performed during the test period. Four mixtures and five curing temperatures were used for the specimens. The surface wave velocity was confirmed to be applicable to estimating the concrete strength at a very early age in wall-like elements. An empirical formula is proposed for evaluating the early-age compressive strength of concrete considering the 95% prediction intervals. PMID:28783128

  4. Silo discharge of binary granular mixtures.

    PubMed

    Madrid, M; Asencio, K; Maza, D

    2017-08-01

    We present numerical and experimental results on the mass flow rate during the discharge of three-dimensional silos filled with a bidisperse mixture of grains of different sizes. We analyzed the influence of the ratio between coarse and fine particles on the profile of volume fraction and velocity across the orifice. By using numerical simulations, we have shown that the velocity profile has the same shape as that in the monodisperse case and is insensitive to the composition of the mixture. On the contrary, the volume fraction profile is strongly affected by the composition of the mixture. Assuming that an effective particle size can be introduced to characterize the mixture, we have shown that previous expression for the mass flow rate of monodisperse particles can be used for binary mixtures. A comparison with Beverloo's correlation is also presented.

  5. Solar-Array Substrate From Glass-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eirls, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Design elminiates glass superstrate and associated metal framing. Panel has two trapezoidal stiffening ribs for structural support. Strategic placement of ribs with embedded support tubes (standard PVC tubing) minimizes bending moments and resulting stresses produced by installation and windloads. Glass-reinforced concrete panel has smooth flat surface suitable for solar substrate and includes structural bracing for rigidity and design adaptable to mass production.

  6. Solar-Array Substrate From Glass-Reinforced Concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eirls, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    Design elminiates glass superstrate and associated metal framing. Panel has two trapezoidal stiffening ribs for structural support. Strategic placement of ribs with embedded support tubes (standard PVC tubing) minimizes bending moments and resulting stresses produced by installation and windloads. Glass-reinforced concrete panel has smooth flat surface suitable for solar substrate and includes structural bracing for rigidity and design adaptable to mass production.

  7. Environmental durability of polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Palmese, G.R.; Chawalwala, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past two decades, polymer concrete has increasingly been used for a number of applications including piping, machine bases, chemically resistant flooring, and bridge overlays. Currently, the use of polymer concrete as a wear surface for polymeric composite bridge decks is being investigated. Polymer concrete is a particulate composite comprised of mineral aggregate bound by a polymeric matrix. Such materials possess significantly higher mechanical properties than Portland cement concrete. However, the mechanical characteristics and environmental durability of polymer concrete are influenced by a number of factors. Among these are the selection of aggregate and resin, surface treatment, and cure conditions. In this work the influence of matrix selection and cure history on the environmental durability of polymer concrete was investigated. Particular attention was given to the effects of water on composite properties and to the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. The basalt-based polymer concrete systems investigated were susceptible to attack by water. Furthermore, results suggest that property loss associated with water exposure was primarily a result of interfacial weakening.

  8. Evaluation of the environmental, material, and structural performance of recycled aggregate concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaud, Katherine Sarah

    Concrete is the most commonly used building material in the construction industry, and contributes to 52% of construction and demolition waste in Canada. Recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) is one way to reduce this impact. To evaluate the performance of coarse and granular (fine and coarse) RCA in structural concrete applications, four studies were performed: an environmental assessment, a material testing program, a shear performance study, and a flexural performance study. To determine the environmental benefits of recycled aggregate concrete (RAC), three case studies were investigated using different populations and proximities to city centres. Environmental modelling suggested that RCA replacement could result in energy savings and greenhouse gas emission reductions, especially in remote areas. Tests were performed to determine if the volumetric replacement of up to 30% coarse RCA and 20% granular RCA is suitable for structural concrete applications in Canada. Fresh, hardened, and durability properties were evaluated. All five (5) of the RCA mixes showed equivalent material performance to the control mixes and met the requirements for a structural concrete mix. The five (5) RAC mixes were also used in structural testing. One-way reinforced concrete slab specimens were tested to failure to evaluate the shear and flexural performance of the RAC members. Peak capacities of and crack formation within each member were analyzed to evaluate the performance of RAC compared to conventional concrete. The shear capacity of specimens made from four (4) of the five (5) RAC mixtures was higher or equivalent to the control specimens. Specimens of the concrete mixture containing the highest content of recycled aggregate, 20% volumetric replacement of granular RCA, had shear capacities 14.1% lower, and exhibited cracking at lower loads than the control. The average flexural capacities of all RAC specimens were within 3.7% of the control specimens. Results from this research

  9. Modifiers for Asphalt Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    approximately correct for bituminous mixtures, where the particulate character and granular nature of the material is wc1- r1czsognized. Earlier work on fiber...still exist; however, these correlations could be improved if the appropriate constitutive law is utilized. Advances in the fields of material ...development of constitutive relationships that better replicate material responses such as viscoelasticity and vis- coplasticity (i.e., viscous elastic-plastic

  10. A combined strategy of mass fragmentation, post-column cobalt complexation and shift in ultraviolet absorption spectra to determine the uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase metabolism profiling of flavones after oral administration of a flavone mixture in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Liping; Dai, Peimin; Zeng, Xuejun; Qi, Xiaoxiao; Zhu, Lijun; Yan, Tongmeng; Wang, Ying; Lu, Linlin; Hu, Ming; Wang, Xinchun; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2015-05-22

    The use of dietary flavones is becoming increasingly popular for their prevention of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and other diseases. Despite many pharmacokinetic studies on flavone mixtures, the position(s) of glucuronidation sites on the flavone skeleton in vivo remain(s) uncertain because of the lack of a convenient method to differentiate the isomers in biological samples. Accordingly, this study aimed to develop a new strategy to identify the position of the mono-O-glucuronide of flavones in vivo and to simultaneously determine the parent agent and its major metabolites responsible for complex pharmacokinetic characteristics. The novel strategy involves accurate mass measurements of flavone glucuronides, their [Co(II) (flavone glucuronide-H) (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)2](+) complexes generated via the post-column addition of CoBr2 and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, and their mass spectrometric fragmentation by UPLC-DAD-Q-TOF and the comparison of retention times with biosynthesized standards of different isomers that were identified by analyzing the shift in UV spectra compared with the spectra of their respective aglycones. We successfully generated a metabolite profiling of flavones in rat plasma after oral administration of a flavone mixture from Dracocephalum moldavica L., which was used here as the model to demonstrate the strategy. Twelve flavone glucuronides, which were glucuronidated derivatives of acacetin, apigenin, luteolin, diosmetin, chrysoeriol and cirsimaritin, were detected and identified. Glucuronidation of the flavone skeleton at the 3'-/7-position was more prevalent, however, luteolin 4'-glucuronide levels exceeded luteolin 7-glucuronide levels. Based on the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) metabolism profiling of flavones in rat plasma, six main compounds (tilianin, acacetin 7-glucuronide, apigenin 7-glucuronide, luteolin 3'-glucuronide, acacetin, and apigenin) were selected as pharmacokinetic markers. Pharmacokinetic

  11. Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Hervé; Biron, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) is a fast and simple method for determining hydrodynamic radii. In the case of sample mixtures, TDA, as the other nonseparative methods, leads to an average diffusion coefficient on the different molecules constituting the mixture. We set in this work the equations giving, on a consistent basis, the average values obtained by TDA with detectors with linear response functions. These equations confronted TDA experiments of sample mixtures containing different proportions of a small molecule and a polymer standard. Very good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. In a second part of this work, on the basis of monomodal or bimodal molar mass distributions of polymers, the different average diffusion coefficients corresponding to TDA were compared to the z-average diffusion coefficient (D(z)) obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments and to the weight average diffusion coefficient (D(w)). This latter value is sometimes considered as the most representative of the sample mixture. From these results, it appears that, for monomodal distribution and relatively low polydispersity (I = 1.15), the average diffusion coefficient generally derived from TDA is very close to Dw. However, for highly polydisperse samples (e.g., bimodal polydisperse distributions), important differences could be obtained (up to 35% between TDA and D(w)). In all the cases, the average diffusion coefficient obtained by TDA for a mass concentration detector was closer to the Dw value than the z-average obtained by DLS.

  12. Properties of concrete blocks prepared with low grade recycled aggregates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Chi-Sun; Kou, Shi-cong; Wan, Hui-wen; Etxeberria, Miren

    2009-08-01

    Low grade recycled aggregates obtained from a construction waste sorting facility were tested to assess the feasibility of using these in the production of concrete blocks. The characteristics of the sorted construction waste are significantly different from that of crushed concrete rubbles that are mostly derived from demolition waste streams. This is due to the presence of higher percentages of non-concrete components (e.g. >10% soil, brick, tiles etc.) in the sorted construction waste. In the study reported in this paper, three series of concrete block mixtures were prepared by using the low grade recycled aggregates to replace (i) natural coarse granite (10mm), and (ii) 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% replacement levels of crushed stone fine (crushed natural granite <5mm) in the concrete blocks. Test results on properties such as density, compressive strength, transverse strength and drying shrinkage as well as strength reduction after exposure to 800 degrees C are presented below. The results show that the soil content in the recycled fine aggregate was an important factor in affecting the properties of the blocks produced and the mechanical strength deceased with increasing low grade recycled fine aggregate content. But the higher soil content in the recycled aggregates reduced the reduction of compressive strength of the blocks after exposure to high temperature due probably to the formation of a new crystalline phase. The results show that the low grade recycled aggregates obtained from the construction waste sorting facility has potential to be used as aggregates for making non-structural pre-cast concrete blocks.

  13. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-01

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  14. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  15. Concrete density estimation by rebound hammer method

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Mohamad Pauzi bin Masenwat, Noor Azreen bin; Sani, Suhairy bin; Mohd, Shukri; Jefri, Muhamad Hafizie Bin; Abdullah, Mahadzir Bin; Isa, Nasharuddin bin; Mahmud, Mohamad Haniza bin

    2016-01-22

    Concrete is the most common and cheap material for radiation shielding. Compressive strength is the main parameter checked for determining concrete quality. However, for shielding purposes density is the parameter that needs to be considered. X- and -gamma radiations are effectively absorbed by a material with high atomic number and high density such as concrete. The high strength normally implies to higher density in concrete but this is not always true. This paper explains and discusses the correlation between rebound hammer testing and density for concrete containing hematite aggregates. A comparison is also made with normal concrete i.e. concrete containing crushed granite.

  16. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Flesher, Dann J.; Becker, David L.; Beem, William L.; Berry, Tommy C.; Cannon, N. Scott

    1997-01-01

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  17. Migrating corrosion inhibitor protection of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Bjegovic, D.; Miksic, B.

    1999-11-01

    Migrating corrosion inhibitors (MCI) were developed to protect steel rebar from corrosion in concrete. They were designed to be incorporated as an admixture during concrete batching or used for surface impregnation of existing concrete structures. Two investigations are summarized. One studied the effectiveness of MCIs as a corrosion inhibitor for steel rebar when used as an admixture in fresh concrete mix. The other is a long-term study of MCI concrete impregnation that chronicles corrosion rates of rebar in concrete specimens. Based on data from each study, it was concluded that migrating corrosion inhibitors are compatible with concrete and effectively delay the onset of corrosion.

  18. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  19. Microstructural investigations on aerated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, N.; Ramamurthy, K.

    2000-03-01

    Aerated concrete is characterized by the presence of large voids deliberately included in its matrix to reduce the density. This study reports the investigations conducted on the structure of cement-based autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) and non-AAC with sand or fly ash as the filler. The reasons for changes in compressive strength and drying shrinkage are explained with reference to the changes in the microstructure. Compositional analysis was carried out using XRD. It was observed that fly ash responds poorly to autoclaving. The process of pore refinement in fly ash mixes is discussed with reference to the formation of Hadley grains as well as fly ash hydration. The paste-void interface in aerated concrete investigated in relation to the paste-aggregate interface in normal concrete revealed the existence of an interfacial transition zone.

  20. Elemental ratios for characterization of quantum-dots populations in complex mixtures by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation on-line coupled to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Menendez-Miranda, Mario; Fernandez-Arguelles, Maria T; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2014-08-11

    Separation and identification of nanoparticles of different composition, with similar particle diameter, coexisting in heterogeneous suspensions of polymer-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have been thoroughly assessed by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) coupled on-line to fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) detectors. Chemical characterization of any previously on-line separated nanosized species was achieved by the measurement of the elemental molar ratios of every element involved in the synthesis of the QDs, using inorganic standards and external calibration by flow injection analysis (FIA). Such elemental molar ratios, strongly limited so far to pure single nanoparticles suspensions, have been achieved with adequate accuracy by coupling for the first time an ICP-QQQ instrument to an AF4 system. This hyphenation turned out to be instrumental to assess the chemical composition of the different populations of nanoparticles coexisting in the relatively complex mixtures, due to its capabilities to detect the hardly detectable elements involved in the synthesis. Interestingly such information, complementary to that obtained by fluorescence, was very valuable to detect and identify unexpected nanosized species, present at significant level, produced during QDs synthesis and hardly detectable by standard approaches.

  1. An Unsteady Dual Porosity Representation Of Concrete Rubble Disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G

    2006-03-29

    Decontamination and decommissioning at the Savannah River Site have produced on-site disposals of low-level solid radioactive waste in the form of concrete rubble. In the case of a former tritium extraction facility, building demolition produced a significant volume of rubble embedded with tritium. The contaminated debris comprises a heterogeneous mixture of sizes, shapes, and internal tritium distributions. The rubble was disposed in long, shallow, unlined, earthen trenches, that were subsequently backfilled with excavated soil and exposed to normal infiltration. To forecast tritium flux to the water table, an unsteady dual porosity model was developed to describe vadose zone leaching and transport. Tritium was assumed to be released through unsteady, one-dimensional, molecular diffusion within concrete, while advective and diffusive transport occur in the surrounding backfill. Rubble size and shape variations were characterized through a combination of physical measurement and photographic image analysis. For simplicity, the characterization data were reduced to an approximately equivalent distribution of one-dimensional slab thicknesses for representation in the dual porosity formulation. Each size classification was simulated separately, and individual flux results were then blended in proportion to the thickness distribution to produce a composite flux. The fractional flux from concrete rubble was predicted to be roughly 40% of that from tritium-contaminated soil. The lower flux is a result of slower release to soil pore water, and a reduced effective trench conductivity from the presence of impervious concrete.

  2. Measurement of Workability of Fresh Concrete Using a Mixing Truck.

    PubMed

    Amziane, Sofiane; Ferraris, Chiara F; Koehler, Eric P

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the workability of fresh portland cement concrete while it is still in the mixing truck by determining fundamental rheological parameters (plastic viscosity and yield stress). Nine concrete mixtures with different values of yield stress and plastic viscosity were tested in a concrete truck. The measurements made with the truck were based on the typical method of determining the flow behavior in a traditional fluid rheometer; that is, the shear rate in the mixing truck was swept from high to low by varying the rotation speed of the drum. The results of these experiments are discussed and compared with data provided by the ICAR rheometer, a portable rheometer designed for measuring concrete rheology. The test results indicate that the mixing truck equipment is sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in yield stress, slump, and plastic viscosity. However, the plastic viscosity determined by the truck measurement did not correlate with plastic viscosity as measured by the ICAR rheometer, while the yield stress determined by the truck measurement did correlate well with the measured slump and the ICAR rheometer results Suggestions are given on how to improve the mixing truck for better use as a rheometer.

  3. Measurement of Workability of Fresh Concrete Using a Mixing Truck

    PubMed Central

    Amziane, Sofiane; Ferraris, Chiara F.; Koehler, Eric P.

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to evaluate the workability of fresh portland cement concrete while it is still in the mixing truck by determining fundamental rheological parameters (plastic viscosity and yield stress). Nine concrete mixtures with different values of yield stress and plastic viscosity were tested in a concrete truck. The measurements made with the truck were based on the typical method of determining the flow behavior in a traditional fluid rheometer; that is, the shear rate in the mixing truck was swept from high to low by varying the rotation speed of the drum. The results of these experiments are discussed and compared with data provided by the ICAR rheometer, a portable rheometer designed for measuring concrete rheology. The test results indicate that the mixing truck equipment is sufficiently sensitive to detect differences in yield stress, slump, and plastic viscosity. However, the plastic viscosity determined by the truck measurement did not correlate with plastic viscosity as measured by the ICAR rheometer, while the yield stress determined by the truck measurement did correlate well with the measured slump and the ICAR rheometer results Suggestions are given on how to improve the mixing truck for better use as a rheometer. PMID:27308103

  4. Optimizing the use of fly ash in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, M.

    2007-07-01

    The optimum amount of fly ash varies not only with the application, but also with composition and proportions of all the materials in the concrete mixture (especially the fly ash), the conditions during placing (especially temperature), construction practices (for example, finishing and curing) and the exposure conditions. This document discusses issues related to using low to very high levels of fly ash in concrete and provides guidance for the use of fly ash without compromising the construction process or the quality of the finished product. The nature of fly ashes including their physical, mineralogical and chemical properties is covered in detail, as well as fly ash variability due to coal composition and plant operating conditions. A discussion on the effects of fly ash characteristics on fresh and hardened concrete properties includes; workability, bleeding, air entrainment, setting time, heat of hydration, compressive strength development, creep, drying shrinkage, abrasion resistance, permeability, resistance to chlorides, alkali-silica reaction (ASR), sulfate resistance, carbonation, and resistance to freezing and thawing and deicer salt scaling. Case studies were selected as examples of some of the more demanding applications of fly ash concrete for ASR mitigation, chloride resistance, and green building.

  5. Rapid Testing of Fresh Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    Board (1962), pp 1-29. 18 Lorman, W. R., "Plastic Concrete Quality Control," Technical Note N-395 (U.S. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, 1961...Fresh Concrete, Presented at the 54th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board , Washington, D.C., January, 1975. 11 30 solution Is...the 54th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board , Washington, D.C., January, 1975. 12 Chadda, L. R., "The Rapiri Determination of

  6. Concrete Construction Using Slipform Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    is a type of extrusion process. Plastic concrete is placed or pumped into moving forms which shape and hold the concrete until it is self-supporting...Various methods of moving and lifting sectional forms were tried, but all had the same defect of leaving numerous horizontal and vertical joints in the...skid-mounted box equipped with a vibrator and extrusion e plate. This machine was pulled by the ready-mix trucks or transit 6 trucks which supplied the

  7. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, Jack J.; Elling, David; Reams, Walter

    1990-01-01

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  8. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1990-03-13

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical d overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt % calcined coke breeze, 40 wt % vinyl ester with 3.5 wt % modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag.

  9. Electrically conductive polymer concrete coatings

    DOEpatents

    Fontana, J.J.; Elling, D.; Reams, W.

    1988-05-26

    A sprayable electrically conductive polymer concrete coating for vertical and overhead applications is described. The coating is permeable yet has low electrical resistivity (<10 ohm-cm), good bond strength to concrete substrates, and good weatherability. A preferred formulation contains about 60 wt% calcined coke breeze, 40 wt% vinyl ester resin with 3.5 wt% modified bentonite clay. Such formulations apply evenly and provide enough rigidity for vertical or overhead structures so there is no drip or sag. 4 tabs.

  10. Concrete waterproofing in nuclear industry.

    PubMed

    Scherbyna, Alexander N; Urusov, Sergei V

    2005-01-01

    One of the main points of aggregate safety during the transportation and storage of radioactive materials is to supply waterproofing for all constructions having direct contact with radiating substances and providing strength, seismic shielding etc. This is the problem with all waterside structures in nuclear industry and concrete installations in the treatment and storage of radioactive materials. In this connection, the problem of developing efficient techniques both for the repair of operating constructions and the waterproofing of new objects of the specified assignment is genuine. Various techniques of concrete waterproofing are widely applied in the world today. However, in conditions of radiation many of these techniques can bring not a profit but irreparable damage of durability and reliability of a concrete construction; for instance, when waterproofing materials contain organic constituents, polymers etc. Application of new technology or materials in basic construction elements requires in-depth analysis and thorough testing. The price of an error might be very large. A comparative analysis shows that one of the most promising types of waterproofing materials for radiation loaded concrete constructions is "integral capillary systems" (ICS). The tests on radiation, thermal and strength stability of ICS and ICS-treated concrete samples were initiated and fulfilled in RFNC-VNIITF. The main result is--ICS applying is increasing of waterproofing and strength properties of concrete in conditions of readiation The paper is devoted to describing the research strategy, the tests and their results and also to planning of new tests.

  11. Self Healing in Concrete Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Victor C.; Yang, En-Hua

    The phenomenon of self healing in concrete has been known for many years. It has been observed that some cracks in old concrete structures are lined with white crystalline material suggesting the ability of concrete to self-seal the cracks with chemical products by itself, perhaps with the aid of rainwater and carbon dioxide in air. Later, a number of researchers [1, 2] in the study of water flow through cracked concrete under a hydraulic gradient, noted a gradual reduction of permeability over time, again suggesting the ability of the cracked concrete to self-seal itself and slow the rate of water flow. The main cause of self-sealing was attributed to the formation of calcium carbonate, a result of reaction between unhydrated cement and carbon dioxide dissolved in water [1]. Thus, under limited conditions, the phenomenon of self-sealing in concrete is well established. Self-sealing is important to watertight structures and to prolonging service life of infrastructure.

  12. Factorial Design Approach in Proportioning Prestressed Self-Compacting Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Long, Wu-Jian; Khayat, Kamal Henri; Lemieux, Guillaume; Xing, Feng; Wang, Wei-Lun

    2015-01-01

    In order to model the effect of mixture parameters and material properties on the hardened properties of, prestressed self-compacting concrete (SCC), and also to investigate the extensions of the statistical models, a factorial design was employed to identify the relative significance of these primary parameters and their interactions in terms of the mechanical and visco-elastic properties of SCC. In addition to the 16 fractional factorial mixtures evaluated in the modeled region of −1 to +1, eight axial mixtures were prepared at extreme values of −2 and +2 with the other variables maintained at the central points. Four replicate central mixtures were also evaluated. The effects of five mixture parameters, including binder type, binder content, dosage of viscosity-modifying admixture (VMA), water-cementitious material ratio (w/cm), and sand-to-total aggregate ratio (S/A) on compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, as well as autogenous and drying shrinkage are discussed. The applications of the models to better understand trade-offs between mixture parameters and carry out comparisons among various responses are also highlighted. A logical design approach would be to use the existing model to predict the optimal design, and then run selected tests to quantify the influence of the new binder on the model. PMID:28787990

  13. Becoming Reactive by Concretization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prieditis, Armand; Janakiraman, Bhaskar

    1992-01-01

    One way to build a reactive system is to construct an action table indexed by the current situation or stimulus. The action table describes what course of action to pursue for each situation or stimulus. This paper describes an incremental approach to constructing the action table through achieving goals with a hierarchical search system. These hierarchies are generated with transformations called concretizations, which add constraints to a problem and which can reduce the search space. The basic idea is that an action for a state is looked up in the action table and executed whenever the action table has an entry for that state; otherwise, a path is found to the nearest (cost-wise in a graph with costweighted arcs) state that has a mappring from a state in the next highest hierarchy. For each state along the solution path, the successor state in the path is cached in the action table entry for that state. Without caching, the hierarchical search system can logarithmically reduce search. When the table is complete the system no longer searches: it simply reacts by proceeding to the state listed in the table for each state. Since the cached information is specific only to the nearest state in the next highest hierarchy and not the goal, inter-goal transfer of reactivity is possible. To illustrate our approach, we show how an implemented hierarchical search system can completely reactive.

  14. Protective coatings for concrete

    SciTech Connect

    NAGY, KATHRYN L.; CYGAN, RANDALL T.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY; SELLINGER, ALAN

    2000-05-01

    The new two-layer protective coating developed for monuments constructed of limestone or marble was applied to highway cement and to tobermorite, a component of cement, and tested in batch dissolution tests. The goal was to determine the suitability of the protective coating in retarding the weathering rate of concrete construction. The two-layer coating consists of an inner layer of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) applied as a 25% solution in methanol and an outer layer of A2** sol-gel. In previous work, this product when applied to calcite powders, had resulted in a lowering of the rate of dissolution by a factor of ten and was shown through molecular modeling to bind strongly to the calcite surface, but not too strongly so as to accelerate dissolution. Batch dissolution tests at 22 C of coated and uncoated tobermorite (1.1 nm phase) and powdered cement from Gibson Blvd. in Albuquerque indicated that the coating exhibits some protective behavior, at least on short time scales. However, the data suggest that the outer layer of sol-gel dissolves in the high-pH environment of the closed system of cement plus water. Calculated binding configuration and energy of AEAPS to the tobermorite surface suggests that AEAPS is well-suited as the inner layer binder for protecting tobermorite.

  15. Damage detection and artificial healing of asphalt concrete after trafficking with a load simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, M.; Arraigada, M.; Partl, M. N.

    2016-08-01

    Artificial healing of asphalt concrete by induction heating requires the addition of electrically conductive and/or magnetic materials into the asphalt mixture. Hence, bitumen can be heated up by an alternating electromagnetic field, decreasing therefore its viscosity and allowing it to flow for closing cracks and recover bonding among the mineral aggregates.

  16. Evaluation of Sulfur 'Concrete' for Use as a Construction Material on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Combining molten sulfur with any number of aggregate materials forms, when solid, a mixture having attributes similar, if not better, to conventional water-based concrete. As a result the use of sulfur "concrete" on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive environments. Consequently, discovery of troilite (FeS) on the lunar surface prompted numerous scenarios about its reduction to elemental sulfur for use, in combination with lunar regolith, as a potential construction material; not requiring water, a precious resource, for its manufacture is an obvious advantage. However, little is known about the viability of sulfur concrete in an environment typified by extreme temperatures and essentially no atmosphere. The experimental work presented here evaluates the response of pure sulfur and sulfur concrete subjected to laboratory conditions that approach those expected on the lunar surface, the results suggesting a narrow window of application.

  17. Influence of association of "EVA-NBR" on indirect tensile strength of modified bituminous concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinoun, M.; Soudani, K.; Haddadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the improvement of the mechanical properties of bituminous concrete by modification of bituminous concrete. In this study, we present the results of the indirect tensile strength "ITS" of modified bituminous concrete by the combination of two modifiers, one is a plastomer EVA (Ethylene Vinyl Acetate) and the other is a industrial waste from the shoe soles grinding NBR (Nitrile Butadiene Rubber) as crumb rubber. To modify the bitumen a wet process was used. The results show that the modification of bitumen by EVA-NBR combination increases their resistance to the indirect traction "ITS" compared to the bituminous concrete control. The mixture of 5% [50% EVA+ 50% NBR] is given the best result among the other associations.

  18. Corrosion Resistance of Calcium Aluminate Cement Concrete Exposed to a Chloride Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ann, Ki Yong; Cho, Chang-Geun

    2014-01-01

    The present study concerns a development of calcium aluminate cement (CAC) concrete to enhance the durability against an externally chemically aggressive environment, in particular, chloride-induced corrosion. To evaluate the inhibition effect and concrete properties, CAC was partially mixed with ordinary Portland cement (OPC), ranging from 5% to 15%, as a binder. As a result, it was found that an increase in the CAC in binder resulted in a dramatic decrease in the setting time of fresh concrete. However, the compressive strength was lower, ranging about 20 MPa, while OPC indicated about 30–35 MPa at an equivalent age. When it comes to chloride transport, there was only marginal variation in the diffusivity of chloride ions. The corrosion resistance of CAC mixture was significantly enhanced: its chloride threshold level for corrosion initiation exceeded 3.0% by weight of binder, whilst OPC and CAC concrete indicated about 0.5%–1.0%. PMID:28788491

  19. Feasibility study on cross-linked biopolymeric concrete encapsulating selenium glass wastes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daeik; Park, Joon-Seok; Yen, Teh Fu

    2012-08-01

    Feasibility study was conducted to encapsulate the selenium (Se) contained in glass waste, using the biopolymer-modified concrete. Biopolymer has unique characteristics to provide the chemical sites to metals or toxic compounds through the three-dimensional cross-linked structure. Very minute amount of biopolymer enhanced the characteristics of cementitious material. The resulting biopolymeric composite with selenium glass waste showed 20% higher compressive strength than ordinary concrete and the lower leaching concentration than the equipment detection limit. For a qualitative measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD; X-ray powder diffractogram) was used to characterize the biopolymeric concrete. The optimum waste content percentage with appropriate biopolymer concrete mixture ratio was identified for its possible commercial use.

  20. Investigations on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Recycled Aggregate Self Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, P.; Selvi, R. S.; Velin, S. S.

    2013-09-01

    In the recent years, construction and demolition waste management issues have attracted the attention from researchers around the world. In the present study, the potential usage of recycled aggregate obtained from crushed demolition waste for making self compacting concrete (SCC) was researched. The barriers in promoting the use of recycled material in new construction are also discussed. In addition, the results of an experimental study involving the use of recycled concrete aggregate as coarse aggregates for producing self-compacting concrete to study their flow and strength characteristics are also presented. Five series of mixture were prepared with 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 % coarse recycled aggregate adopting Nan Su's mix proportioning method. The fresh concrete properties were evaluated through the slump flow, J-ring and V-funnel tests. Compressive and tensile strengths were also determined. The results obtained showed that SCC could be successfully developed by incorporating recycled aggregates.

  1. Evaluation of Sulfur 'Concrete' for Use as a Construction Material on the Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.

    2008-01-01

    Combining molten sulfur with any number of aggregate materials forms, when solid, a mixture having attributes similar, if not better, to conventional water-based concrete. As a result the use of sulfur "concrete" on Earth is well established, particularly in corrosive environments. Consequently, discovery of troilite (FeS) on the lunar surface prompted numerous scenarios about its reduction to elemental sulfur for use, in combination with lunar regolith, as a potential construction material; not requiring water, a precious resource, for its manufacture is an obvious advantage. However, little is known about the viability of sulfur concrete in an environment typified by extreme temperatures and essentially no atmosphere. The experimental work presented here evaluates the response of pure sulfur and sulfur concrete subjected to laboratory conditions that approach those expected on the lunar surface, the results suggesting a narrow window of application.

  2. Chloride permeability and impact resistance of polypropylene-fiber-reinforced silica fume concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Toutanji, H.; McNeil, S.; Bayasi, Z.

    1998-07-01

    Permeability and impact resistance of polypropylene-fiber-reinforced concrete mixtures containing silica fume with variable design proportions were studied. Two fiber lengths were considered, 12.5 and 19 mm, and four fiber volume fractions, 0, 0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5%. Silica fume was used as a replacement by weight of cement. Two silica fume contents were used, 5% and 10%. Results showed that the incorporation of polypropylene fibers increased the permeability of conventional concrete. The addition of silica fume improved fiber dispersion in the cementitious matrix, causing a significant reduction in the permeability of the polypropylene fiber reinforced concrete. Moreover, the addition of silica fume was noted to significantly enhance the polypropylene fiber effectiveness in improving the impact resistance of concrete.

  3. Surface Chloride Concentration of Concrete under Shallow Immersion Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Tang, Kaifeng; Pan, Dong; Lei, Zongru; Wang, Weilun; Xing, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Deposition of chloride ions in the surface layer of concrete is investigated in this study. In real concrete structure, chloride ions from the service environment can penetrate into concrete and deposit in the surface layer, to form the boundary condition for further diffusion towards the interior. The deposit amount of chloride ions in the surface layer is normally a function of time, rather than a constant. In the experimental investigation, concrete specimens with different mix proportions are immersed in NaCl solution with a mass concentration of 5%, to simulate the shallow immersion condition in sea water, and the surface chloride concentrations are measured at different ages. It is found that the surface chloride concentration increases following the increasing immersion durations, and varies from a weight percentage of 0.161%–0.781% in concretes with different mix proportions. The w/c (water-to-cement ratio) influences the surface chloride concentration significantly, and the higher the w/c is, the higher the surface chloride concentration will be, at the same age. However, following the prolonging of immersion duration, the difference in surface chloride concentration induced by w/c becomes smaller and smaller. The incorporation of fly ash leads to higher surface chloride concentration. The phenomena are explained based on pore structure analyses. PMID:28788202

  4. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  5. Concrete-polymer composites: current status and future research needs

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L E

    1981-04-01

    When plastics are combined with mixtures of inorganic materials, high-strength, durable, fast-setting composites are produced. These materials are used in structural engineering and other applications, and as a result of the successes obtained to date, considerable research and development work is in progress throughout the world. One family of polymer-based composites receiving considerable attention is the concrete-polymer materials. Work in this area is directed toward developing new high-strength durable materials by combining cement and concrete technology with that of polymer chemistry. In addition to the significant property enhancement, many combinations of siliceous materials with polymers require lower energy inputs per unit of performance than either component alone.

  6. Durability assessments of concrete using electrical properties and acoustic emission testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todak, Heather N.

    Premature damage deterioration has been observed in pavement joints throughout the Midwestern region of the United States. Over time, severe joint damage creates a transportation safety concern and the necessary repairs can be an extreme economic burden. The deterioration is due in part to freeze-thaw damage associated with fluid accumulation at the pavement joints. This very preventable problem is an indication that current specifications and construction practices for freeze-thaw durability of concrete are inadequate. This thesis serves to create a better understanding of moisture ingress, freeze-thaw damage mechanisms, and the effect of variations in mixture properties on freeze-thaw behavior of concrete. The concepts of the nick point degree of saturation, sorptivity rates, and critical degree of saturation are discussed. These factors contribute to service life, defined in this study as the duration of time a concrete element remains below levels of critical saturation which are required for damage development to initiate. A theoretical model and a simple experimental procedure are introduced which help determine the nick point for a series of 32 concrete mixtures with unique mixture proportions and air entrainment properties. This simple experimental procedure is also presented as a method to measure important electrical properties in order to establish the formation factor, a valuable measure of concrete transport properties. The results of freeze-thaw testing with acoustic emission monitoring are presented to help understand and quantify damage development in concrete specimens when conditioned to various degrees of saturation. This procedure was used to study the relationship between air entrainment properties and the critical degree of saturation. Applying the concepts of degree of saturation and sorptivity, a performance-based model is proposed as a new approach to specifications for freeze-thaw durability. Finally, a conceptual model is presented to

  7. Retrofitting of Reinforced Concrete Beams using Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, S.; Sundaravadivelu, Karthik

    2017-07-01

    Strengthening of existing damaged structures is one of the leading studies in civil engineering. The purpose of retrofitting is to structurally treat the member with an aim to restore the structure to its original strength. The focus of this project is to study the behaviour of damaged Reinforced Concrete beam retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC) Overlay. Reinforced concrete beams of length 1200 mm, width 100 mm and depth 200 mm were casted with M30 grade of concrete in the laboratory and cured for 28 days. One beam is taken as control and are tested under two point loading to find out ultimate load. Remaining beams are subjected to 90 % ultimate load of control beams. The partially damaged beams are retrofitted with Reactive Powder Concrete Overlay at the full tension face of the beam and side overlay depends upon the respectable retrofitting techniques with 10 mm and 20 mm thick layer to find optimum. Materials like steel fibres are added to enhance the ductility by eliminating coarse particle for homogeneity of the structure. Finally, the modes of failure for retrofitted beams are analysed experimentally under two point loading & compared the results with Control beam.

  8. Effect of coarse aggregate type on mechanical properties of concretes with different strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Oezturan, T.; Cecen, C.

    1997-02-01

    Tests were carried out to study the effect of the type of coarse aggregate on the compressive, flexural and splitting tensile strength on concrete produced at different strength levels. Concretes with 28 day target compressive strengths of 30, 60 and 90 MPa were produced using basalt, limestone and gravel coarse aggregates. The gravel aggregate concrete with 90 MPa target strength was also replicated by using a cement of higher strength, keeping the other parameters same. Twenty eight day test results have indicated that, in high strength concrete, basalt produced the highest, whereas gravel gave the lowest compressive strengths. Normal strength concretes made with basalt and gravel gave similar compressive strengths while the concrete containing limestone attained somewhat higher strength. Higher tensile strengths were obtained with crushed basalt and limestone compared to the gravel aggregate when used in high strength concrete. In the replicate mixture, approximately 30 percent increase in flexural and splitting tensile strengths were obtained as a result of using a stronger cement, while the compressive strength was not affected at all.

  9. Upscaling Cement Paste Microstructure to Obtain the Fracture, Shear, and Elastic Concrete Mechanical LDPM Parameters.

    PubMed

    Sherzer, Gili; Gao, Peng; Schlangen, Erik; Ye, Guang; Gal, Erez

    2017-02-28

    Modeling the complex behavior of concrete for a specific mixture is a challenging task, as it requires bridging the cement scale and the concrete scale. We describe a multiscale analysis procedure for the modeling of concrete structures, in which material properties at the macro scale are evaluated based on lower scales. Concrete may be viewed over a range of scale sizes, from the atomic scale (10(-10) m), which is characterized by the behavior of crystalline particles of hydrated Portland cement, to the macroscopic scale (10 m). The proposed multiscale framework is based on several models, including chemical analysis at the cement paste scale, a mechanical lattice model at the cement and mortar scales, geometrical aggregate distribution models at the mortar scale, and the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) at the concrete scale. The analysis procedure starts from a known chemical and mechanical set of parameters of the cement paste, which are then used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the LDPM concrete parameters for the fracture, shear, and elastic responses of the concrete. Although a macroscopic validation study of this procedure is presented, future research should include a comparison to additional experiments in each scale.

  10. Effects of lightweight fly ash aggregate properties on the behavior of lightweight concretes.

    PubMed

    Kockal, Niyazi Ugur; Ozturan, Turan

    2010-07-15

    Influence of different lightweight fly ash aggregates on the behavior of concrete mixtures was discussed. The performance characteristics of lightweight concretes (LWCs) and normalweight concrete (NWC) were investigated through compressive strength, modulus of elasticity and splitting tensile strength representing the mechanical behavior; through rapid chloride permeability representing the transport properties and through rapid freezing and thawing cycling representing the durability of concrete. In order to investigate the aggregate-cement paste interfacial transition zone (ITZ), SEM observations were performed. Regression and graphical analysis of the experimental data obtained were also performed. An increase in compressive strength was observed with the increase in oven-dry density. The ratios of splitting tensile strength to compressive strength of lightweight aggregate concretes were found to be similar to that of normalweight concrete. All the 28- and 56-day concrete specimens had a durability factor greater than 85 and 90, respectively, which met the requirement for freezing and thawing durability. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of the recycling potential of fresh concrete waste using a factorial design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Correia, S L; Souza, F L; Dienstmann, G; Segadães, A M

    2009-11-01

    Recycling of industrial wastes and by-products can help reduce the cost of waste treatment prior to disposal and eventually preserve natural resources and energy. To assess the recycling potential of a given waste, it is important to select a tool capable of giving clear indications either way, with the least time and work consumption, as is the case of modelling the system properties using the results obtained from statistical design of experiments. In this work, the aggregate reclaimed from the mud that results from washout and cleaning operations of fresh concrete mixer trucks (fresh concrete waste, FCW) was recycled into new concrete with various water/cement ratios, as replacement of natural fine aggregates. A 3(2) factorial design of experiments was used to model fresh concrete consistency index and hardened concrete water absorption and 7- and 28-day compressive strength, as functions of FCW content and water/cement ratio, and the resulting regression equations and contour plots were validated with confirmation experiments. The results showed that the fresh concrete workability worsened with the increase in FCW content but the water absorption (5-10 wt.%), 7-day compressive strength (26-36 MPa) and 28-day compressive strength (32-44 MPa) remained within the specified ranges, thus demonstrating that the aggregate reclaimed from FCW can be recycled into new concrete mixtures with lower natural aggregate content.

  12. Panel zone behavior of moment connections between rectangular concrete-filled steel tubes and wide flange beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Bradley Donald

    2000-10-01

    During the 1990s, guidelines for the detailing of composite joints for seismic safety have been proposed and adopted. Such guidelines were based on the testing of composite joint subassemblies under cyclic loads. The role of the confined concrete core in composite joints has been documented and quantified for systems using steel shapes encased in concrete, as well as for other mixtures of reinforced concrete and structural steel. The need to understand the role of the concrete core in moment connections utilizing concrete-fined tube (CFT) columns still exists. In this research program, the split-tee through-bolted moment connection between wide-flange steel beams and concrete-filled tubes was studied. The aim of the study was to understand the role of the confined concrete core in transferring forces through the joint. Fifteen half-scale panel-zone specimens were designed and tested to model the shear behavior of the split-tee connection. Following an analysis of the results of the panel-zone tests, six fun-scale moment connections were designed and tested. Variables studied were: concrete compressive strength, the b/t ratio (slenderness) of the steel tube walls, and the split-tee contact area against the steel tube. Following an analysis of the test data, design criteria for the concrete contribution to the joint strength are presented, and recommendations are made for the inclusion of CFT systems in the design recommendations for composite joints. Suggestions are made for further research.

  13. Influence of Wind Pressure on the Carbonation of Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dujian; Liu, Tiejun; Du, Chengcheng; Teng, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Carbonation is one of the major deteriorations that accelerate steel corrosion in reinforced concrete structures. Many mathematical/numerical models of the carbonation process, primarily diffusion-reaction models, have been established to predict the carbonation depth. However, the mass transfer of carbon dioxide in porous concrete includes molecular diffusion and convection mass transfer. In particular, the convection mass transfer induced by pressure difference is called penetration mass transfer. This paper presents the influence of penetration mass transfer on the carbonation. A penetration-reaction carbonation model was constructed and validated by accelerated test results under high pressure. Then the characteristics of wind pressure on the carbonation were investigated through finite element analysis considering steady and fluctuating wind flows. The results indicate that the wind pressure on the surface of concrete buildings results in deeper carbonation depth than that just considering the diffusion of carbon dioxide. In addition, the influence of wind pressure on carbonation tends to increase significantly with carbonation depth. PMID:28793462

  14. Voids characteristics of asphaltic concrete containing coconut shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezree Abdullah, Mohd; Hannani Madzaili, Amirah; Putra Jaya, Ramadhansyah; Yaacob, Haryati; Hassan, Norhidayah Abdul; Nazri, Fadzli Mohamed

    2017-07-01

    Asphalt durability is often linked to the thickness of the asphalt coating on the aggregate particles. In order to have adequate film thickness in asphaltic concrete, there must be sufficient space between the aggregate particles in the compacted pavement. This void space is referred to as voids in total mix (VTM), voids with filled bitumen (VFB), and voids in mineral aggregate (VMA). Hence, this study investigates the performance of coconut shell (CS) as coarse aggregate replacement on voids characteristics of asphaltic concrete. Four CS were used as coarse aggregates replacement in asphalt mixture namely 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% (by weight volume). The voids properties of asphalt mixture were determined based on Marshall Mix design test. Test results show that VTM and VMA values were decrease with the increasing bitumen content where VFB was increase with increasing bitumen content. Furthermore, increasing the percentage of coconut shell in asphalt mixture was found to increases the voids value up to a peak level and then decreases with further additions of CS.

  15. Fly ash-based geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent.

    PubMed

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity.

  16. Electrical resistance of carbon-nanofiber concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Di; Sturm, Mariel; Mo, Y. L.

    2009-09-01

    Concrete is the most widely used construction material, and carbon nanofibers have many advantages in both mechanical and electrical properties such as high strength, high Young's modulus and high conductivity. In this paper, the mechanical and electrical properties of concrete containing carbon nanofibers (CNF) are experimentally studied. The test results indicate that the compressive strength and per cent reduction in electrical resistance while loading concrete containing CNF are much greater than those of plain concrete. Finally, a reasonable concentration of CNF is obtained for use in concrete which not only enhances compressive strength, but also improves the electrical properties required for strain monitoring, damage evaluation and self-health monitoring of concrete.

  17. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep.

    PubMed

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-06-30

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C-S-H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C-S-H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate ( approximately 1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years.

  18. Nanogranular origin of concrete creep

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, Matthieu; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Concrete, the solid that forms at room temperature from mixing Portland cement with water, sand, and aggregates, suffers from time-dependent deformation under load. This creep occurs at a rate that deteriorates the durability and truncates the lifespan of concrete structures. However, despite decades of research, the origin of concrete creep remains unknown. Here, we measure the in situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H), the nano-meter sized particles that form the fundamental building block of Portland cement concrete. We show that C–S–H exhibits a logarithmic creep that depends only on the packing of 3 structurally distinct but compositionally similar C–S–H forms: low density, high density, ultra-high density. We demonstrate that the creep rate (≈1/t) is likely due to the rearrangement of nanoscale particles around limit packing densities following the free-volume dynamics theory of granular physics. These findings could lead to a new basis for nanoengineering concrete materials and structures with minimal creep rates monitored by packing density distributions of nanoscale particles, and predicted by nanoscale creep measurements in some minute time, which are as exact as macroscopic creep tests carried out over years. PMID:19541652

  19. 27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. DIVERSION STRUCTURE WITH CONCRETE SIDEWALLS AND CONCRETE CHANNEL BEYOND, A SHORT DISTANCE WEST OF D STREET ABOUT ONE-QUARTER MILE SOUTH OF 9TH AVENUE (SECTION 26). - Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  20. Nucleate pool boiling of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, R.G.; Palen, J.W.; Thome, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Schlunder method can be correctly used to predict boiling heat transfer coefficient of multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures. The method was tested against experimental mixtures containing up to five components. The Stephan-Abdelsalam correlation can be used to calculate a ''pseudo-single component'' boiling heat transfer coefficient for a mixture using weighted properties. The effective temperature driving force term and the high mass flux correction term in the Schlunder formulation are empirically adjusted to improve the accuracy of prediction. Predictions of the Schlunder method are sensitive to the VLE calculations. The UNIFAC method is used in this study for reasons discussed in the paper.