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Sample records for mass labeled 13c14-decabromodiphenylethane

  1. Issues and Applications in Label-Free Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xianyin; Wang, Lianshui; Witzmann, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    To address the challenges associated with differential expression proteomics, label-free mass spectrometric protein quantification methods have been developed as alternatives to array-based, gel-based, and stable isotope tag or label-based approaches. In this paper, we focus on the issues associated with label-free methods that rely on quantitation based on peptide ion peak area measurement. These issues include chromatographic alignment, peptide qualification for quantitation, and normalization. In addressing these issues, we present various approaches, assembled in a recently developed label-free quantitative mass spectrometry platform, that overcome these difficulties and enable comprehensive, accurate, and reproducible protein quantitation in highly complex protein mixtures from experiments with many sample groups. As examples of the utility of this approach, we present a variety of cases where the platform was applied successfully to assess differential protein expression or abundance in body fluids, in vitro nanotoxicology models, tissue proteomics in genetic knock-in mice, and cell membrane proteomics. PMID:23401775

  2. Combinatorial Labeling Method for Improving Peptide Fragmentation in Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchibhotla, Bhanuramanand; Kola, Sankara Rao; Medicherla, Jagannadham V.; Cherukuvada, Swamy V.; Dhople, Vishnu M.; Nalam, Madhusudhana Rao

    2017-06-01

    Annotation of peptide sequence from tandem mass spectra constitutes the central step of mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Peptide mass spectra are obtained upon gas-phase fragmentation. Identification of the protein from a set of experimental peptide spectral matches is usually referred as protein inference. Occurrence and intensity of these fragment ions in the MS/MS spectra are dependent on many factors such as amino acid composition, peptide basicity, activation mode, protease, etc. Particularly, chemical derivatizations of peptides were known to alter their fragmentation. In this study, the influence of acetylation, guanidinylation, and their combination on peptide fragmentation was assessed initially on a lipase (LipA) from Bacillus subtilis followed by a bovine six protein mix digest. The dual modification resulted in improved fragment ion occurrence and intensity changes, and this resulted in the equivalent representation of b- and y-type fragment ions in an ion trap MS/MS spectrum. The improved representation has allowed us to accurately annotate the peptide sequences de novo. Dual labeling has significantly reduced the false positive protein identifications in standard bovine six peptide digest. Our study suggests that the combinatorial labeling of peptides is a useful method to validate protein identifications for high confidence protein inference. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Label-Free Detection of Breast Masses Using Multiphoton Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianping; Zhu, Weifeng; Qiu, Jingting; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Histopathology forms the gold standard for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been proposed to be a potentially powerful adjunct to current histopathological techniques. A label-free imaging based on two- photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation is developed for differentiating normal breast tissues, benign, as well as breast cancer tissues. Human breast biopsies (including human normal breast tissues, benign as well as breast cancer tissues ) that are first imaged (fresh, unfixed, and unstained) with MPM and are then processed for routine H-E histopathology. Our results suggest that the MPM images, obtained from these unprocessed biopsies, can readily distinguish between benign lesions and breast cancers. In the tissues of breast cancers, MPM showed that the tumor cells displayed marked cellular and nuclear pleomorphism. The tumor cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, infiltrated into disrupted connective tissue, leading to the loss of second-harmonic generation signals. For breast cancer, MPM diagnosis was 100% correct because the tissues of breast cancers did not have second-harmonic generation signals in MPM imaging. On the contrary, in benign breast masses, second-harmonic generation signals could be seen easily in MPM imaging. These observations indicate that MPM could be an important potential tool to provide label-free noninvasive diagnostic impressions that can guide surgeon in biopsy and patient management. PMID:23755295

  4. Identification of isobaric product ions in electrospray ionization mass spectra of fentanyl using multistage mass spectrometry and deuterium labeling.

    PubMed

    Wichitnithad, Wisut; McManus, Terence J; Callery, Patrick S

    2010-09-15

    Isobaric product ions cannot be differentiated by exact mass determinations, although in some cases deuterium labeling can provide useful structural information for identifying isobaric ions. Proposed fragmentation pathways of fentanyl were investigated by electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometry coupled with deuterium labeling experiments and spectra of regiospecific deuterium labeled analogs. The major product ion of fentanyl under tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) conditions (m/z 188) was accounted for by a neutral loss of N-phenylpropanamide. 1-(2-Phenylethyl)-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (1) was proposed as the structure of the product ion. However, further fragmentation (MS(3)) of the fentanyl m/z 188 ion gave product ions that were different from the product ion in the MS/MS fragmentation of synthesized 1, suggesting that the m/z 188 product ion from fentanyl includes an isobaric structure different from the structure of 1. MS/MS fragmentation of fentanyl in deuterium oxide moved one of the isobars to 1 Da higher mass, and left the other isobar unchanged in mass. Multistage mass spectral data from deuterium-labeled proposed isobaric structures provided support for two fragmentation pathways. The results illustrate the utility of multistage mass spectrometry and deuterium labeling in structural assignment of isobaric product ions.

  5. Gelatin quantification by oxygen-18 labeling and liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sha, Xiao-Mei; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wang, Hui; Huang, Tao; Duan, Deng-Le; He, Na; Li, De-Jun; Xiao, Hui

    2014-12-10

    Combined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and linear-ion trap/Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry, trypsin-catalyzed (16)O-to-(18)O exchange was used to establish an accurate quantitative method for bovine or porcine gelatin. The sophisticated modifications for these two mammalian gelatins were unambiguously identified by accurate mass and tandem mass spectrometry. Eighteen marker peptides were successfully identified for the bovine and porcine gelatin, respectively. The gelatins were subjected to (18)O or (16)O labeling in the presence of trypsin and mixed together in various ratios for quantification. All of the (18)O-labeled peptides were also confirmed by accurate mass and tandem mass spectrometry. The 10 marker peptides with the strongest signals were chosen to calculate the average ratios of (18)O-labeled and (16)O-labeled gelatin. The measured ratios of (18)O-labeled and (16)O-labeled peptides were very close to the mixing ratios of 20:1, 5:1, 1:1, and 1:5 with low standard deviation values. The samples with a mixing ratio of 1:1 (18)O-labeled and (16)O-labeled peptides were determined to 1.00 and 0.99 with standard deviations of 0.02 and 0.04 for bovine and porcine gelatins, respectively, indicating the high accuracy of this method. Trypsin-catalyzed (18)O labeling was proved to be an excellent internal calibrant for gelatins. When combined with HPLC and high-resolution mass spectrometry, it is an accurate and sensitive quantitative method for gelatin in the food industry.

  6. Covalent Labeling with Isotopically Encoded Reagents for Faster Structural Analysis of Proteins by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) are increasingly used to obtain higher order structure of proteins and protein complexes. Because most covalent labels are relatively large, steps must be taken to ensure the structural integrity of the modified protein during the labeling reactions so that correct structural information can be obtained. Measuring labeling kinetics is a reliable way to ensure that a given labeling reagent does not perturb a protein’s structure, but obtaining such kinetic information is time and sample intensive because it requires multiple liquid chromatography (LC)/MS experiments. Here we present a new strategy that uses isotopically encoded labeling reagents to measure labeling kinetics in a single LC/MS experiment. We illustrate this new strategy by labeling solvent exposed lysine residues with commercially available tandem mass tags (TMTs). After tandem MS experiments, these tags enable simultaneous identification of modified sites and determination of the reaction rates at each site in a way that is just as reliable as experiments that involve multiple LC/MS measurements. PMID:24010814

  7. Probing Protein Structure by Amino Acid-Specific Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Vachet, Richard W.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, amino acid-specific covalent labeling has been a valuable tool to study protein structure and protein interactions, especially for systems that are difficult to study by other means. These covalent labeling methods typically map protein structure and interactions by measuring the differential reactivity of amino acid side chains. The reactivity of amino acids in proteins generally depends on the accessibility of the side chain to the reagent, the inherent reactivity of the label and the reactivity of the amino acid side chain. Peptide mass mapping with ESI- or MALDI-MS and peptide sequencing with tandem MS are typically employed to identify modification sites to provide site-specific structural information. In this review, we describe the reagents that are most commonly used in these residue-specific modification reactions, details about the proper use of these covalent labeling reagents, and information about the specific biochemical problems that have been addressed with covalent labeling strategies. PMID:19016300

  8. Quantifying proteomes and their post-translational modifications by stable isotope label-based mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Anna E.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling coupled with mass spectrometry has revolutionized the scope and impact of protein expression studies. Label incorporation can occur metabolically or chemically, and each method bears specific strengths and weaknesses. Quantitative proteomics confidently identifies specific interactions between proteins and other biological species, such as nucleic acids and metabolites. Extending label-based methods to phosphorylation-modified forms of proteins enables the construction of signaling networks and their temporal responses to stimuli. The integration of multiple data types offers systems-level insight on coordinated biological processes. Finally, the development of methods applicable to tissue quantification suggests the emerging role of label-based, quantitative mass spectrometry in translational science. PMID:23835517

  9. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  10. SILEC: a protocol for generating and using isotopically labeled coenzyme A mass spectrometry standards.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sankha S; Blair, Ian A

    2011-12-08

    Stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture (SILEC) was recently developed to generate isotopically labeled coenzyme A (CoA) and short-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. This was accomplished by modifying the widely used technique of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to include [(13)C(3)(15)N]-pantothenate (vitamin B(5)), a CoA precursor, instead of the isotopically labeled amino acids. The lack of a de novo pantothenate synthesis pathway allowed for efficient and near-complete labeling of the measured CoA species. This protocol provides a step-by-step approach for generating stable isotope-labeled short-chain acyl-CoA internal standards in mammalian and insect cells as well as instructions on how to use them in stable isotope dilution mass spectrometric-based analyses. Troubleshooting guidelines, as well as a list of unlabeled and labeled CoA species, are also included. This protocol represents a prototype for generating stable isotope internal standards from labeled essential nutrients such as pantothenate. The generation and use of SILEC standards takes approximately 2-3 weeks.

  11. SILEC: a protocol for generating and using isotopically labeled coenzyme A mass spectrometry standards

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sankha S; Blair, Ian A

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling by essential nutrients in cell culture (SILEC) was recently developed to generate isotopically labeled coenzyme A (CoA) and short-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. This was accomplished by modifying the widely used technique of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to include [13C315N]-pantothenate (vitamin B5), a CoA precursor, instead of the isotopically labeled amino acids. The lack of a de novo pantothenate synthesis pathway allowed for efficient and near-complete labeling of the measured CoA species. This protocol provides a step-by-step approach for generating stable isotope-labeled short-chain acyl-CoA internal standards in mammalian and insect cells as well as instructions on how to use them in stable isotope dilution mass spectrometric-based analyses. Troubleshooting guidelines, as well as a list of unlabeled and labeled CoA species, are also included. This protocol represents a prototype for generating stable isotope internal standards from labeled essential nutrients such as pantothenate. The generation and use of SILEC standards takes approximately 2–3 weeks. PMID:22157971

  12. Passive and active fragment ion mass defect labeling: distinct proteomics potential of iodine-based reagents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Bajrami, Bekim; Yao, Xudong

    2009-08-01

    The exact mass of a peptide differs characteristically from its nominal mass by a value called the mass defect. Limited by possible elemental compositions, the mass defect of peptides has a restricted range, resulting in an unoccupied mass spectral space in every mass-to-charge unit. The method of fragment ion mass defect labeling (FIMDL) places characteristic fragment ions of modified peptides as reporters into unused spectral space where no native peptide fragment ions exist. In this labeling method, peptides are chemically modified in solution and the modified peptides, upon gas-phase collision in a mass spectrometer, generate fragment ions with significantly shifted mass defects. In this work, the efficiency of iodine stable isotope-containing reagents for shifting mass defects of peptide fragment ions was systematically investigated, through derivatization of peptide N-termini with various reagents containing one or more chlorine, bromine, or iodine atoms. The observed efficiency for the iodine atom placing the labeled fragment ions into unoccupied spectral space agreed well with theoretical predictions from averagine-scaling analysis of ion masses. On the basis of the gas-phase stability of different labeling groups and their involvement in collisional dissociation of modified peptides, peptide modifications were classified into three categories: passive, type I active, and type II active. Each modification type has its unique potential in different proteome analyses. Possible proteomics applications of FIMDL are discussed and compared with proteome analyses currently being practiced in the field. Principles obtained from this survey study will provide a guideline in developing novel FIMDL reagents for advanced proteomics analysis.

  13. Applications and Advantages of Stable Isotope Phosphate Labeling of RNA in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borland, Kayla; Limbach, Patrick A

    2017-04-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an enabling technology for the characterization of post-transcriptionally modified nucleosides within ribonucleic acids (RNAs). These modified RNAs tend to be more challenging to completely characterize using conventional genomic-based sequencing technologies. As with many biological molecules, information relating to the presence or absence of a particular compound (i.e., qualitative measurement) is only one step in sample characterization. Additional useful information is found by performing quantitative measurements on the levels of the compound of interest in the sample. Phosphate labeling of modified RNAs has been developed by our laboratory to enhance conventional mass spectrometry techniques. By taking advantage of the mechanism of action of many ribonucleases (RNases), digesting RNA samples in the presence of (18)O-labeled water generates an (18)O-labeled 3'-phosphate in each digestion product. We describe the historical development of this approach, contrast this stable isotope labeling strategy with others used in RNA mass spectrometry, and provide examples of new analytical mass spectrometry methods that are enabled by phosphate labeling in this fashion.

  14. Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants and high-performance mass spectrometry for quantitative plant proteomics.

    PubMed

    Bindschedler, Laurence V; Mills, Davinia J S; Cramer, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic isotope labeling of entire plants (HILEP) combines hydroponic plant cultivation and metabolic labeling with stable isotopes using (15)N-containing inorganic salts to label whole and mature plants. Employing (15)N salts as the sole nitrogen source for HILEP leads to the production of healthy-looking plants which contain (15)N proteins labeled to nearly 100%. Therefore, HILEP is suitable for quantitative plant proteomic analysis, where plants are grown in either (14)N- or (15)N-hydroponic media and pooled when the biological samples are collected for relative proteome quantitation. The pooled (14)N-/(15)N-protein extracts can be fractionated in any suitable way and digested with a protease for shotgun proteomics, using typically reverse phase liquid chromatography nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-nESI-MS/MS). Best results were obtained with a hybrid ion trap/FT-MS mass spectrometer, combining high mass accuracy and sensitivity for the MS data acquisition with speed and high-throughput MS/MS data acquisition, increasing the number of proteins identified and quantified and improving protein quantitation. Peak processing and picking from raw MS data files, protein identification, and quantitation were performed in a highly automated way using integrated MS data analysis software with minimum manual intervention, thus easing the analytical workflow. In this methodology paper, we describe how to grow Arabidopsis plants hydroponically for isotope labeling using (15)N salts and how to quantitate the resulting proteomes using a convenient workflow that does not require extensive bioinformatics skills.

  15. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased used together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g. diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g. hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues, and thus protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g. 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g. microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. As compared to typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 Å to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 Å to 10 Å for

  16. Increased Protein Structural Resolution from Diethylpyrocarbonate-based Covalent Labeling and Mass Spectrometric Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuping; Vachet, Richard W.

    2012-04-01

    Covalent labeling and mass spectrometry are seeing increased use together as a way to obtain insight into the 3-dimensional structure of proteins and protein complexes. Several amino acid specific (e.g., diethylpyrocarbonate) and non-specific (e.g., hydroxyl radicals) labeling reagents are available for this purpose. Diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC) is a promising labeling reagent because it can potentially probe up to 30% of the residues in the average protein and gives only one reaction product, thereby facilitating mass spectrometric analysis. It was recently reported, though, that DEPC modifications are labile for some amino acids. Here, we show that label loss is more significant and widespread than previously thought, especially for Ser, Thr, Tyr, and His residues, when relatively long protein digestion times are used. Such label loss ultimately decreases the amount of protein structural information that is obtainable with this reagent. We find, however, that the number of DEPC modified residues and, thus, protein structural information, can be significantly increased by decreasing the time between the covalent labeling reaction and the mass spectrometric analysis. This is most effectively accomplished using short (e.g., 2 h) proteolytic digestions with enzymes such as immobilized chymotrypsin or Glu-C rather than using methods (e.g., microwave or ultrasonic irradiation) that accelerate proteolysis in other ways. Using short digestion times, we show that the percentage of solvent accessible residues that can be modified by DEPC increases from 44% to 67% for cytochrome c, 35% to 81% for myoglobin, and 76% to 95% for β-2-microglobulin. In effect, these increased numbers of modified residues improve the protein structural resolution available from this covalent labeling method. Compared with typical overnight digestion conditions, the short digestion times decrease the average distance between modified residues from 11 to 7 Å for myoglobin, 13 to 10 Å for

  17. Dynamic analysis of CO₂ labeling and cell respiration using membrane-inlet mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tae Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Here, we introduce a mass spectrometry-based analytical method and relevant technical details for dynamic cell respiration and CO2 labeling analysis. Such measurements can be utilized as additional information and constraints for model-based (13)C metabolic flux analysis. Dissolved dynamics of oxygen consumption and CO2 mass isotopomer evolution from (13)C-labeled tracer substrates through different cellular processes can be precisely measured on-line using a miniaturized reactor system equipped with a membrane-inlet mass spectrometer. The corresponding specific rates of physiologically relevant gases and CO2 mass isotopomers can be quantified within a short-term range based on the liquid-phase dynamics of dissolved fermentation gases.

  18. INVESTIGATION OF ARSINE-GENERATING REACTIONS USING DEUTERIUM-LABELED REAGENTS AND MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mass spectrometry was used to detect transfer of deuterium from labeled reagents to arsines following hydride-generation reactions. The arsine gases liberated from the reactions of arsenite, arsenate, methylarsonic acid, and dimethylarsinic acid with HC1 and NaBD4 in H2O, or with...

  19. Use of quantum dots as mass and fluorescence labels in microarray biosensing.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Chiara; Plavisch, Lauren; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-01-15

    In this work, we demonstrate the efficacy of a Quantum Dot (QD) mass label strategy to enhance sensitivity in an interferometric technique called interferometric reflectance imaging sensor (IRIS). This biomass detection platform confers the advantage of absolute mass quantification and lower cost, easily implementable equipment. We discuss the advantages of this label when used in parallel with fluorescence detection. QDs represent a unique opportunity to improve sensitivity in both mass-label detection methods due to their large detectable mass, as well as in fluorescence detection, as they fluoresce without quenching. Streptavidin-conjugated QDs (SA-QDs) have been investigated as such a dual-role probe because of their large shape and mass, their 655nm emission peak for fluorescent detection platforms, and their robust insensitivity to photobleaching and quenching. In particular we explored their dual role in a microarrays immunoassay designed to detect antibodies against β-lactoglobulin, a common milk allergen. The SA-QDs formed a large detectable monolayer of 6.2ng/mm(2) in the saturation conditions, a mass signal corroborated by previous studies by Platt et al..

  20. Label-free imaging, detection, and mass measurement of single viruses by surface plasmon resonance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaopeng; Shan, Xiaonan; Patel, Urmez; Huang, Xinping; Lu, Jin; Li, Jinghong; Tao, Nongjian

    2010-01-01

    We report on label-free imaging, detection, and mass/size measurement of single viral particles in solution by high-resolution surface plasmon resonance microscopy. Diffraction of propagating plasmon waves along a metal surface by the viral particles creates images of the individual particles, which allow us to detect the binding of the viral particles to surfaces functionalized with and without antibodies. We show that the intensity of the particle image is related to the mass of the particle, from which we determine the mass and mass distribution of influenza viral particles with a mass detection limit of approximately 1 ag (or 0.2 fg/mm2). This work demonstrates a multiplexed method to measure the masses of individual viral particles and to study the binding activity of the viral particles. PMID:20798340

  1. Stable Isotope Labeling for Improved Comparative Analysis of RNA Digests by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulines, Mellie June; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2017-03-01

    Even with the advent of high throughput methods to detect modified ribonucleic acids (RNAs), mass spectrometry remains a reliable method to detect, characterize, and place post-transcriptional modifications within an RNA sequence. Here we have developed a stable isotope labeling comparative analysis of RNA digests (SIL-CARD) approach, which improves upon the original 18O/16O labeling CARD method. Like the original, SIL-CARD allows sequence or modification information from a previously uncharacterized in vivo RNA sample to be obtained by direct comparison with a reference RNA, the sequence of which is known. This reference is in vitro transcribed using a 13C/15N isotopically enriched nucleoside triphosphate (NTP). The two RNAs are digested with an endonuclease, the specificity of which matches the labeled NTP used for transcription. As proof of concept, several transfer RNAs (tRNAs) were characterized by SIL-CARD, where labeled guanosine triphosphate was used for the reference in vitro transcription. RNase T1 digestion products from the in vitro transcript will be 15 Da higher in mass than the same digestion products from the in vivo tRNA that are unmodified, leading to a doublet in the mass spectrum. Singlets, rather than doublets, arise if a sequence variation or a post-transcriptional modification is present that results in a relative mass shift different from 15 Da. Moreover, the use of the in vitro synthesized tRNA transcript allows for quantitative measurement of RNA abundance. Overall, SIL-CARD simplifies data analysis and enhances quantitative RNA modification mapping by mass spectrometry.

  2. Stable Isotope Labeling for Improved Comparative Analysis of RNA Digests by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paulines, Mellie June; Limbach, Patrick A

    2017-03-01

    Even with the advent of high throughput methods to detect modified ribonucleic acids (RNAs), mass spectrometry remains a reliable method to detect, characterize, and place post-transcriptional modifications within an RNA sequence. Here we have developed a stable isotope labeling comparative analysis of RNA digests (SIL-CARD) approach, which improves upon the original (18)O/(16)O labeling CARD method. Like the original, SIL-CARD allows sequence or modification information from a previously uncharacterized in vivo RNA sample to be obtained by direct comparison with a reference RNA, the sequence of which is known. This reference is in vitro transcribed using a (13)C/(15)N isotopically enriched nucleoside triphosphate (NTP). The two RNAs are digested with an endonuclease, the specificity of which matches the labeled NTP used for transcription. As proof of concept, several transfer RNAs (tRNAs) were characterized by SIL-CARD, where labeled guanosine triphosphate was used for the reference in vitro transcription. RNase T1 digestion products from the in vitro transcript will be 15 Da higher in mass than the same digestion products from the in vivo tRNA that are unmodified, leading to a doublet in the mass spectrum. Singlets, rather than doublets, arise if a sequence variation or a post-transcriptional modification is present that results in a relative mass shift different from 15 Da. Moreover, the use of the in vitro synthesized tRNA transcript allows for quantitative measurement of RNA abundance. Overall, SIL-CARD simplifies data analysis and enhances quantitative RNA modification mapping by mass spectrometry. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Stable Isotope Labeling for Improved Comparative Analysis of RNA Digests by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulines, Mellie June; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2017-01-01

    Even with the advent of high throughput methods to detect modified ribonucleic acids (RNAs), mass spectrometry remains a reliable method to detect, characterize, and place post-transcriptional modifications within an RNA sequence. Here we have developed a stable isotope labeling comparative analysis of RNA digests (SIL-CARD) approach, which improves upon the original 18O/16O labeling CARD method. Like the original, SIL-CARD allows sequence or modification information from a previously uncharacterized in vivo RNA sample to be obtained by direct comparison with a reference RNA, the sequence of which is known. This reference is in vitro transcribed using a 13C/15N isotopically enriched nucleoside triphosphate (NTP). The two RNAs are digested with an endonuclease, the specificity of which matches the labeled NTP used for transcription. As proof of concept, several transfer RNAs (tRNAs) were characterized by SIL-CARD, where labeled guanosine triphosphate was used for the reference in vitro transcription. RNase T1 digestion products from the in vitro transcript will be 15 Da higher in mass than the same digestion products from the in vivo tRNA that are unmodified, leading to a doublet in the mass spectrum. Singlets, rather than doublets, arise if a sequence variation or a post-transcriptional modification is present that results in a relative mass shift different from 15 Da. Moreover, the use of the in vitro synthesized tRNA transcript allows for quantitative measurement of RNA abundance. Overall, SIL-CARD simplifies data analysis and enhances quantitative RNA modification mapping by mass spectrometry.

  4. Hydrazino-s-triazine based labelling reagents for highly sensitive glycan analysis via liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Zhe; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Yuan, Fang; Deng, Yan; Liu, Jing-Xin; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    Labelling strategy plays an important role in mass spectrometry (MS) based glycan analysis due to the high hydrophilicity and low ionization efficiency of glycans. Ten hydrazino-s-triazine based labelling reagents were synthesized under facile and controllable conditions for highly sensitive liquid chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry glycan analysis in this work. Attached to N-glycans through non-reductive reactions, these new labelling reagents were evaluated in aspect of the differently enhanced glycan response to mass spectrometry. Three of the ten labelling reagents demonstrated to be reliable and remarkable for glycan analysis with satisfactory linearity and lowered limits of detection using maltoheptaose (DP7) as model. Furthermore, the most optimal labelling reagent was taken as an example for highly sensitive profiling of N-linked glycans both cleaved from chicken avidin and glycoproteins in human serum, indicating prospective availability for these labelling reagents in frontier of glycomics researches.

  5. Determination of Phytochelatins in Rice by Stable Isotope Labeling Coupled with Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Cai, Wen-Jing; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-01

    A highly sensitive method was developed for the detection of phytochelatins (PCs) in rice by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis. A pair of isotope-labeling reagents [ω-bromoacetonylquinolinium bromide (BQB) and BQB-d(7)] were used to label PCs in plant sample and standard PCs, respectively, and then combined prior to LC/MS analysis. The heavy labeled standards were used as the internal standards for quantitation to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in MS analysis. In addition, the ionization efficiency of PCs was greatly enhanced through the introduction of a permanent charged moiety of quaternary ammonium of BQB into PCs. The detection sensitivities of PCs upon BQB labeling improved by 14-750-fold, and therefore, PCs can be quantitated using only 5 mg of plant tissue. Furthermore, under cadmium (Cd) stress, we found that the contents of PCs in rice dramatically increased with the increased concentrations and treatment time of Cd. It was worth noting that PC5 was first identified and quantitated in rice tissues under Cd stress in the current study. Taken together, this IL-LC-ESI-MS/MS method demonstrated to be a promising strategy in detection of PCs in plants with high sensitivity and reliability.

  6. Elemental analysis of complex organic aerosol using isotopic labeling and unit-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Raea K; Day, Douglas A; Jimenez, Jose L; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2015-03-03

    Elemental analysis of unit-mass resolution (UMR) mass spectra is limited by the amount of information available to definitively elucidate the molecular formula of a molecule ionized by electron impact. The problem is compounded when a mixture of organic molecules (such as those found in organic aerosols) is analyzed without the benefit of prior separation. For this reason, quadrupole mass spectrometry is not usually suited to the elemental analysis of organic mixtures. Here, we present a mathematical method for the elemental analysis of UMR mass spectra of a complex organic aerosol through the use of isotopic labeling. Quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometry was used to obtain UMR data of (13)C-labeled and unlabeled aerosol generated by far ultraviolet (FUV) photochemistry of gas mixtures containing 0.1% of either CH4 or (13)CH4 in N2. In this method, the differences in the positions of ion groups in the resulting spectra are used to estimate the mass fraction of carbon in the aerosol, and estimation of the remaining elements follows. Analysis of the UMR data yields an elemental composition of 63 ± 7% C, 8 ± 1% H, and 29 ± 7% N by mass. Unlabeled aerosols formed under the same conditions are found by high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry to have an elemental composition of 63 ± 3% C, 8 ± 1% H, 20 ± 4% N, and 9 ± 3% O by mass, in good agreement with the UMR method. This favorable comparison verifies the method, which expands the UMR mass spectrometry toolkit.

  7. Identification of Asp isomerization in proteins by ¹⁸O labeling and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jennifer; Katta, Viswanatham

    2012-01-01

    Isomerization of aspartic acid (Asp) to isoaspartic acid (isoAsp) via succinimide intermediate is a common route of degradation for proteins that can affect their structural integrity. As Asp/isoAsp is isobaric in mass, it is difficult to identify the site of modification by LC-MS/MS peptide mapping. Here, we describe an approach to label the Asp residue involved in isomerization at the protein level by hydrolyzing the succinimide intermediate in H₂¹⁸O. Tryptic digestion of this labeled protein will result in peptides containing the site of isomerization being 2 Da heavier than the ¹⁶O-containing counterparts, due to ¹⁸O incorporation during the hydrolysis process. Comparison of tandem mass spectra of isomerized peptides with and without ¹⁸O incorporation allows easy identification of the Asp residue involved. This method proved to be especially useful in identifying the sites when isomerization occurs in Asp-Asp motifs.

  8. Syntheses of all singly labeled [15N]adenines: Mass spectral fragmentation of adenine

    PubMed Central

    Barrio, Maria Del Carmen G.; Scopes, David I. C.; Holtwick, Joseph B.; Leonard, Nelson J.

    1981-01-01

    Syntheses of all five of the singly labeled [15N]adenines are now provided. The presence or absence of two-bond 15N-1H spin couplings in their 1H NMR spectra confirm the location of the isotope in each case. The fragmentation patterns in their mass spectra are indicative of the sequential losses of HCN units and of CH2N2 from adenine upon electron impact. PMID:16593042

  9. Isobaric protein-level labeling strategy for serum glycoprotein quantification analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; Lo, Andy; Zhu, Jianhui; Wu, Jing; Ruffin, Mack T; Lubman, David M

    2013-06-04

    While peptide-level labeling using isobaric tag reagents has been widely applied for quantitative proteomics experiments, there are comparatively few reports of protein-level labeling. Intact protein labeling could be broadly applied to quantification experiments utilizing protein-level separations or enrichment schemes. Here, protein-level isobaric labeling was explored as an alternative strategy to peptide-level labeling for serum glycoprotein quantification. Labeling and digestion conditions were optimized by comparing different organic solvents and enzymes. Digestions with Asp-N and trypsin were found highly complementary; combining the results enabled quantification of 30% more proteins than either enzyme alone. Three commercial reagents were compared for protein-level labeling. Protein identification rates were highest with iTRAQ 4-plex when compared to TMT 6-plex and iTRAQ 8-plex using higher-energy collisional dissociation on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. The compatibility of isobaric protein-level labeling with lectin-based glycoprotein enrichment was also investigated. More than 74% of lectin-bound labeled proteins were known glycoproteins, which was similar to results from unlabeled and peptide-level labeled serum samples. Finally, protein-level and peptide-level labeling strategies were compared for serum glycoprotein quantification. Isobaric protein-level labeling gave comparable identification levels and quantitative precision to peptide-level labeling.

  10. freeQuant: A Mass Spectrometry Label-Free Quantification Software Tool for Complex Proteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Ning; Li, Zhenye; Pan, Chao; Duan, Huilong

    2015-01-01

    Study of complex proteome brings forward higher request for the quantification method using mass spectrometry technology. In this paper, we present a mass spectrometry label-free quantification tool for complex proteomes, called freeQuant, which integrated quantification with functional analysis effectively. freeQuant consists of two well-integrated modules: label-free quantification and functional analysis with biomedical knowledge. freeQuant supports label-free quantitative analysis which makes full use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) spectral count, protein sequence length, shared peptides, and ion intensity. It adopts spectral count for quantitative analysis and builds a new method for shared peptides to accurately evaluate abundance of isoforms. For proteins with low abundance, MS/MS total ion count coupled with spectral count is included to ensure accurate protein quantification. Furthermore, freeQuant supports the large-scale functional annotations for complex proteomes. Mitochondrial proteomes from the mouse heart, the mouse liver, and the human heart were used to evaluate the usability and performance of freeQuant. The evaluation showed that the quantitative algorithms implemented in freeQuant can improve accuracy of quantification with better dynamic range.

  11. Quantitative Metabolome Analysis Based on Chromatographic Peak Reconstruction in Chemical Isotope Labeling Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Li, Liang

    2015-07-21

    Generating precise and accurate quantitative information on metabolomic changes in comparative samples is important for metabolomics research where technical variations in the metabolomic data should be minimized in order to reveal biological changes. We report a method and software program, IsoMS-Quant, for extracting quantitative information from a metabolomic data set generated by chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Unlike previous work of relying on mass spectral peak ratio of the highest intensity peak pair to measure relative quantity difference of a differentially labeled metabolite, this new program reconstructs the chromatographic peaks of the light- and heavy-labeled metabolite pair and then calculates the ratio of their peak areas to represent the relative concentration difference in two comparative samples. Using chromatographic peaks to perform relative quantification is shown to be more precise and accurate. IsoMS-Quant is integrated with IsoMS for picking peak pairs and Zero-fill for retrieving missing peak pairs in the initial peak pairs table generated by IsoMS to form a complete tool for processing CIL LC-MS data. This program can be freely downloaded from the www.MyCompoundID.org web site for noncommercial use.

  12. Label-Assisted Mass Spectrometry for the Acceleration of Reaction Discovery and Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Pardo, Jaime R.; Chai, David I.; Liu, Song; Mrksich, Milan; Kozmin, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new reactions expands our knowledge of chemical reactivity and enables new synthetic applications. Accelerating the pace of this discovery process remains challenging. We describe a highly effective and simple platform for screening a large number of potential chemical reactions in order to discover and optimize previously unknown catalytic transformations thereby revealing new chemical reactivity. Our strategy is based on labeling one of the reactants with a polyaromatic chemical tag, which selectively undergoes photoionization-desorption process upon laser irradiation without the assistance of an external matrix and enables rapid mass spectrometric detection of any products originating from such labeled reactants in complex reaction mixtures without any chromatographic separation. This method was successfully employed for high-throughput discovery and subsequent optimization of two previously unknown benzannulation reactions. PMID:23609094

  13. Validation of Membrane Protein Topology Models by Oxidative Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yan; Ruan, Xiang; Valvano, Miguel A.; Konermann, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Computer-assisted topology predictions are widely used to build low-resolution structural models of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Experimental validation of these models by traditional methods is labor intensive and requires modifications that might alter the IMP native conformation. This work employs oxidative labeling coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) as a validation tool for computer-generated topology models. ṡOH exposure introduces oxidative modifications in solvent-accessible regions, whereas buried segments (e.g., transmembrane helices) are non-oxidizable. The Escherichia coli protein WaaL (O-antigen ligase) is predicted to have 12 transmembrane helices and a large extramembrane domain (Pérez et al., Mol. Microbiol. 2008, 70, 1424). Tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS were used to map the oxidative labeling behavior of WaaL. Met and Cys exhibit high intrinsic reactivities with ṡOH, making them sensitive probes for solvent accessibility assays. Overall, the oxidation pattern of these residues is consistent with the originally proposed WaaL topology. One residue (M151), however, undergoes partial oxidation despite being predicted to reside within a transmembrane helix. Using an improved computer algorithm, a slightly modified topology model was generated that places M151 closer to the membrane interface. On the basis of the labeling data, it is concluded that the refined model more accurately reflects the actual topology of WaaL. We propose that the combination of oxidative labeling and MS represents a useful strategy for assessing the accuracy of IMP topology predictions, supplementing data obtained in traditional biochemical assays. In the future, it might be possible to incorporate oxidative labeling data directly as constraints in topology prediction algorithms.

  14. Validation of membrane protein topology models by oxidative labeling and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yan; Ruan, Xiang; Valvano, Miguel A; Konermann, Lars

    2012-05-01

    Computer-assisted topology predictions are widely used to build low-resolution structural models of integral membrane proteins (IMPs). Experimental validation of these models by traditional methods is labor intensive and requires modifications that might alter the IMP native conformation. This work employs oxidative labeling coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) as a validation tool for computer-generated topology models. ·OH exposure introduces oxidative modifications in solvent-accessible regions, whereas buried segments (e.g., transmembrane helices) are non-oxidizable. The Escherichia coli protein WaaL (O-antigen ligase) is predicted to have 12 transmembrane helices and a large extramembrane domain (Pérez et al., Mol. Microbiol. 2008, 70, 1424). Tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS were used to map the oxidative labeling behavior of WaaL. Met and Cys exhibit high intrinsic reactivities with ·OH, making them sensitive probes for solvent accessibility assays. Overall, the oxidation pattern of these residues is consistent with the originally proposed WaaL topology. One residue (M151), however, undergoes partial oxidation despite being predicted to reside within a transmembrane helix. Using an improved computer algorithm, a slightly modified topology model was generated that places M151 closer to the membrane interface. On the basis of the labeling data, it is concluded that the refined model more accurately reflects the actual topology of WaaL. We propose that the combination of oxidative labeling and MS represents a useful strategy for assessing the accuracy of IMP topology predictions, supplementing data obtained in traditional biochemical assays. In the future, it might be possible to incorporate oxidative labeling data directly as constraints in topology prediction algorithms.

  15. 13C labeling analysis of sugars by high resolution-mass spectrometry for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Acket, Sébastien; Degournay, Anthony; Merlier, Franck; Thomasset, Brigitte

    2017-02-14

    Metabolic flux analysis is particularly complex in plant cells because of highly compartmented metabolism. Analysis of free sugars is interesting because it provides data to define fluxes around hexose, pentose, and triose phosphate pools in different compartment. In this work, we present a method to analyze the isotopomer distribution of free sugars labeled with carbon 13 using a liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry, without derivatized procedure, adapted for Metabolic flux analysis. Our results showed a good sensitivity, reproducibility and better accuracy to determine isotopic enrichments of free sugars compared to our previous methods [5, 6].

  16. Quantification of peptide m/z distributions from 13C-labeled cultures with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Allen, Doug K; Goldford, Joshua; Gierse, James K; Mandy, Dominic; Diepenbrock, Christine; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-02-04

    Isotopic labeling studies of primary metabolism frequently utilize GC/MS to quantify (13)C in protein-hydrolyzed amino acids. During processing some amino acids are degraded, which reduces the size of the measurement set. The advent of high-resolution mass spectrometers provides a tool to assess molecular masses of peptides with great precision and accuracy and computationally infer information about labeling in amino acids. Amino acids that are isotopically labeled during metabolism result in labeled peptides that contain spatial and temporal information that is associated with the biosynthetic origin of the protein. The quantification of isotopic labeling in peptides can therefore provide an assessment of amino acid metabolism that is specific to subcellular, cellular, or temporal conditions. A high-resolution orbital trap was used to quantify isotope labeling in peptides that were obtained from unlabeled and isotopically labeled soybean embryos and Escherichia coli cultures. Standard deviations were determined by estimating the multinomial variance associated with each element of the m/z distribution. Using the estimated variance, quantification of the m/z distribution across multiple scans was achieved by a nonlinear fitting approach. Observed m/z distributions of uniformly labeled E. coli peptides indicated no significant differences between observed and simulated m/z distributions. Alternatively, amino acid m/z distributions obtained from GC/MS were convolved to simulate peptide m/z distributions but resulted in distinct profiles due to the production of protein prior to isotopic labeling. The results indicate that peptide mass isotopologue measurements faithfully represent mass distributions, are suitable for quantification of isotope-labeling-based studies, and provide additional information over existing methods.

  17. Label free targeted detection and quantification of celiac disease immunogenic epitopes by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van den Broeck, Hetty C; Cordewener, Jan H G; Nessen, Merel A; America, Antoine H P; van der Meer, Ingrid M

    2015-04-24

    Celiac disease (CD) is a food-related disease caused by certain gluten peptides containing T-cell stimulating epitopes from wheat, rye, and barley. CD-patients have to maintain a gluten-free diet and are therefore dependent on reliable testing and labeling of gluten-free products. So far, the R5-ELISA is the approved method to detect if food products can be labeled gluten-free. Because the R5-ELISA detects gluten in general, there is a demand for an improved detection method that quantifies specifically CD-epitopes. Therefore, we developed a new method for detection and quantification of CD-epitopes, based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. This method enables targeted label free comparative analysis of the gluten proteins present in different wheat varieties and species, and in wheat-based food products. We have tested our method by analyzing several wheat varieties that vary in CD-epitope content, as was shown before using immunoblotting and specific monoclonal antibodies. The results showed that a modern bread wheat variety Toronto contained the highest amounts of CD immunogenic peptides compared with the older bread wheat variety Minaret and the tetraploid wheat variety Dibillik Sinde. Our developed method can detect quantitatively and simultaneously multiple specific CD-epitopes in a high throughput manner.

  18. Surface Accessibility and Dynamics of Macromolecular Assemblies Probed by Covalent Labeling Mass Spectrometry and Integrative Modeling

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has become an indispensable tool for investigating the architectures and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies. Here we show that covalent labeling of solvent accessible residues followed by their MS-based identification yields modeling restraints that allow mapping the location and orientation of subunits within protein assemblies. Together with complementary restraints derived from cross-linking and native MS, we built native-like models of four heterocomplexes with known subunit structures and compared them with available X-ray crystal structures. The results demonstrated that covalent labeling followed by MS markedly increased the predictive power of the integrative modeling strategy enabling more accurate protein assembly models. We applied this strategy to the F-type ATP synthase from spinach chloroplasts (cATPase) providing a structural basis for its function as a nanomotor. By subjecting the models generated by our restraint-based strategy to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we revealed the conformational states of the peripheral stalk and assigned flexible regions in the enzyme. Our strategy can readily incorporate complementary chemical labeling strategies and we anticipate that it will be applicable to many other systems providing new insights into the structure and function of protein complexes. PMID:28208298

  19. Identification of multiple folding pathways of monellin using pulsed thiol labeling and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jha, Santosh Kumar; Dasgupta, Amrita; Malhotra, Pooja; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2011-04-19

    Protein folding reactions often display multiexponential kinetics of changes in intrinsic optical signals, as a manifestation of heterogeneity, either on one folding pathway or on multiple folding pathways. Delineating the origin of this heterogeneity is difficult because different coexisting structural forms of a protein cannot be easily distinguished by optical probes. In this study, the complex folding reaction of single-chain monellin has been investigated using a pulsed thiol labeling (SX) methodology in conjunction with mass spectrometry, which measures the kinetics of burial of a cysteine side chain thiol during folding. Because it can directly distinguish between unfolded and folded molecules and can measure the disappearance of the former during folding, the pulsed SX methodology is an ideal method for investigating whether multiple pathways are operative during folding. The kinetics of burial of the C42 thiol of monellin was observed to follow biexponential kinetics. To determine whether this was because the fast phase leads to the partial protection of the thiol group in all the molecules or to complete protection in only a fraction of the molecules, the duration and intensity of the labeling pulse were varied. The observation that the extent of labeling did not vary with the duration of the pulse cannot be explained by a simple sequential folding mechanism. Two parallel folding pathways are shown to be operative, with one leading to the formation of thiol-protective structure more rapidly than the other.

  20. Label-free profiling of skeletal muscle using high-definition mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Burniston, Jatin G.; Connolly, Joanne; Kainulainen, Heikki; Britton, Steven L.; Koch, Lauren G.

    2014-01-01

    We report automated and time efficient (2 h per sample) profiling of muscle using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (LC) coupled directly with high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMSE). Soluble proteins extracted from rat gastrocnemius (n=10) were digested with trypsin and analysed in duplicate using a 90 min RPLC gradient. Protein identification and label-free quantitation were performed from HDMSE spectra analysed using TransOmics Informatics for Proteomics software. In total 1,514 proteins were identified. Of these, 811 had at least 3 unique peptides and were subsequently used to assess the dynamic range and precision of LC-HDMSE label-free profiling. Proteins analysed by LC-HDMSE encompass the entire complement of glycolytic, beta-oxidation and tricarboxylic acid enzymes. In addition, numerous components of the electron transport chain and protein kinases involved in skeletal muscle regulation were detected. The dynamic range of protein abundances spanned 4 orders of magnitude. The correlation between technical replicates of the 10 biological samples was R2 = 0.9961 ± 0.0036 (95 % CI = 0.9940 – 0.9992) and the technical coefficient of variation averaged 7.3 ± 6.7 % (95 % CI = 6.87 – 7.79 %). This represents the most sophisticated label-free profiling of skeletal muscle to date. PMID:25065561

  1. Stable Isotope Labeling Strategy for Curcumin Metabolite Study in Human Liver Microsomes by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dan; Chen, Xiaowu; Yang, Xiaomei; Wu, Qin; Jin, Feng; Wen, Hongliang; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-04-01

    The identification of drug metabolites is very important in drug development. Nowadays, the most widely used methods are isotopes and mass spectrometry. However, the commercial isotopic labeled reagents are usually very expensive, and the rapid and convenient identification of metabolites is still difficult. In this paper, an 18O isotope labeling strategy was developed and the isotopes were used as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. Curcumin was selected as a model drug to evaluate the established method, and the 18O labeled curcumin was successfully synthesized. The non-labeled and 18O labeled curcumin were simultaneously metabolized in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The two groups of chromatograms obtained from metabolic reaction mixture with and without cofactors were compared and analyzed using Metabolynx software (Waters Corp., Milford, MA, USA). The mass spectra of the newly appearing chromatographic peaks in the experimental sample were further analyzed to find the metabolite candidates. Their chemical structures were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. Three metabolites, including two reduction products and a glucuronide conjugate, were successfully detected under their specific HLMs metabolic conditions, which were in accordance with the literature reported results. The results demonstrated that the developed isotope labeling method, together with post-acquisition data processing using Metabolynx software, could be used for fast identification of new drug metabolites.

  2. Stable isotope labeling strategy for curcumin metabolite study in human liver microsomes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gao, Dan; Chen, Xiaowu; Yang, Xiaomei; Wu, Qin; Jin, Feng; Wen, Hongliang; Jiang, Yuyang; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-04-01

    The identification of drug metabolites is very important in drug development. Nowadays, the most widely used methods are isotopes and mass spectrometry. However, the commercial isotopic labeled reagents are usually very expensive, and the rapid and convenient identification of metabolites is still difficult. In this paper, an (18)O isotope labeling strategy was developed and the isotopes were used as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. Curcumin was selected as a model drug to evaluate the established method, and the (18)O labeled curcumin was successfully synthesized. The non-labeled and (18)O labeled curcumin were simultaneously metabolized in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The two groups of chromatograms obtained from metabolic reaction mixture with and without cofactors were compared and analyzed using Metabolynx software (Waters Corp., Milford, MA, USA). The mass spectra of the newly appearing chromatographic peaks in the experimental sample were further analyzed to find the metabolite candidates. Their chemical structures were confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. Three metabolites, including two reduction products and a glucuronide conjugate, were successfully detected under their specific HLMs metabolic conditions, which were in accordance with the literature reported results. The results demonstrated that the developed isotope labeling method, together with post-acquisition data processing using Metabolynx software, could be used for fast identification of new drug metabolites.

  3. Mass spectrometric techniques for label-free high-throughput screening in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Thomas P; Horvath, Christopher R; Stout, Steven J; Kenney, Kristin L; Ho, Pei-I; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Vickers, Chad; Kaushik, Virendar; Hubbard, Brian; Wang, Y Karen

    2007-11-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) is an important tool for finding active compounds to initiate medicinal chemistry programs in pharmaceutical discovery research. Traditional HTS methods rely on fluorescent or radiolabeled reagents and/or coupling assays to permit quantitation of enzymatic target inhibition or activation. Mass spectrometry-based high-throughput screening (MS-HTS) is an alternative that is not susceptible to the limitations imposed by labeling and coupling enzymes. MS-HTS offers a selective and sensitive analytical method for unlabeled substrates and products. Furthermore, method development times are reduced without the need to incorporate labels or coupling assays. MS-HTS also permits screening of targets that are difficult or impossible to screen by other techniques. For example, enzymes that are challenging to purify can lead to the nonspecific detection of structurally similar components of the impure enzyme or matrix of membraneous enzymes. The high selectivity of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) enables these screens to proceed with low levels of background noise to sensitively discover interesting hits even with relatively weak activity. In this article, we describe three techniques that we have adapted for large-scale (approximately 175,000 sample) compound library screening, including four-way parallel multiplexed electrospray liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MUX-LC/MS/MS), four-way parallel staggered gradient liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS), and eight-way staggered flow injection MS/MS following 384-well plate solid-phase extraction (SPE). These methods are capable of analyzing a 384-well plate in 37 min, with typical analysis times of less than 2 h. The quality of the MS-HTS approach is demonstrated herein with screening data from two large-scale screens.

  4. Quantitative cross-linking/mass spectrometry using isotope-labelled cross-linkers☆

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Lutz; Chen, Zhuo Angel; Rappsilber, Juri

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic proteins and multi-protein complexes govern most biological processes. Cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CLMS) is increasingly successful in providing residue-resolution data on static proteinaceous structures. Here we investigate the technical feasibility of recording dynamic processes using isotope-labelling for quantitation. We cross-linked human serum albumin (HSA) with the readily available cross-linker BS3-d0/4 in different heavy/light ratios. We found two limitations. First, isotope labelling reduced the number of identified cross-links. This is in line with similar findings when identifying proteins. Second, standard quantitative proteomics software was not suitable for work with cross-linking. To ameliorate this we wrote a basic open source application, XiQ. Using XiQ we could establish that quantitative CLMS was technically feasible. Biological significance Cross-linking/mass spectrometry (CLMS) has become a powerful tool for providing residue-resolution data on static proteinaceous structures. Adding quantitation to CLMS will extend its ability of recording dynamic processes. Here we introduce a cross-linking specific quantitation strategy by using isotope labelled cross-linkers. Using a model system, we demonstrate the principle and feasibility of quantifying cross-linking data and discuss challenges one may encounter while doing so. We then provide a basic open source application, XiQ, to carry out automated quantitation of CLMS data. Our work lays the foundations of studying the molecular details of biological processes at greater ease than this could be done so far. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: New Horizons and Applications for Proteomics [EuPA 2012]. PMID:23541715

  5. Stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT) to quantify protein production and clearance rates.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Randall J; Munsell, Ling Y; Chen, Xianghong; Holtzman, David M; Yarasheski, Kevin E

    2007-06-01

    In all biological systems, protein amount is a function of the rate of production and clearance. The speed of a response to a disturbance in protein homeostasis is determined by turnover rate. Quantifying alterations in protein synthesis and clearance rates is vital to understanding disease pathogenesis (e.g., aging, inflammation). No methods currently exist for quantifying production and clearance rates of low-abundance (femtomole) proteins in vivo. We describe a novel, mass spectrometry-based method for quantitating low-abundance protein synthesis and clearance rates in vitro and in vivo in animals and humans. The utility of this method is demonstrated with amyloid-beta (Abeta), an important low-abundance protein involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. We used in vivo stable isotope labeling, immunoprecipitation of Abeta from cerebrospinal fluid, and quantitative liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-tandem MS) to quantify human Abeta protein production and clearance rates. The method is sensitive and specific for stable isotope-labeled amino acid incorporation into CNS Abeta (+/-1% accuracy). This in vivo method can be used to identify pathophysiologic changes in protein metabolism and may serve as a biomarker for monitoring disease risk, progression, or response to novel therapeutic agents. The technique is adaptable to other macromolecules, such as carbohydrates or lipids.

  6. Protected amine labels: a versatile molecular scaffold for multiplexed nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue quantitative proteomic reagents.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott B; Biagi, Jessica M; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I; Card, Joseph D; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G; Young, Nicolas L; Gray, Nathanael S; Marto, Jarrod A

    2014-04-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (1) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (2) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (3) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (4) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da, are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition, we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally, we provide exemplar data that extend the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

  7. Measurement of protein synthesis using heavy water labeling and peptide mass spectrometry: Discrimination between major histocompatibility complex allotypes

    PubMed Central

    De Riva, Alessandra; Deery, Michael J.; McDonald, Sarah; Lund, Torben; Busch, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Methodological limitations have hampered the use of heavy water (2H2O), a convenient, universal biosynthetic label, for measuring protein synthesis. Analyses of 2H-labeled amino acids are sensitive to contamination; labeling of peptides has been measured for a few serum proteins, but this approach awaits full validation. Here we describe a method for quantifying protein synthesis by peptide mass spectrometry (MS) after 2H2O labeling, as applied to various proteins of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Human and murine antigen-presenting cells were cultured in medium containing 5% 2H2O; class I and class II MHC proteins were immunoprecipitated, bands were excised, and Ala-/Gly-rich, allele-specific tryptic peptides were identified by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). Mass isotopomer distributions were quantified precisely by LC–MS and shifted markedly on 2H2O labeling. Experimental data agreed closely with models obtained by mass isotopomer distribution analysis (MIDA) and were consistent with contributions from Ala, Gly, and other amino acids to labeling. Estimates of fractional protein synthesis from peptides of the same protein were precise and internally consistent. The method was capable of discriminating between MHC isotypes and alleles, applicable to primary cells, and readily extendable to other proteins. It simplifies measurements of protein synthesis, enabling novel applications in physiology, in genotype/phenotype interactions, and potentially in kinetic proteomics. PMID:20406617

  8. Mass Defect-Based N,N-Dimethyl Leucine Labels for Quantitative Proteomics and Amine Metabolomics of Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ling; Johnson, Jillian; Lietz, Christopher B.; Buchberger, Amanda; Frost, Dustin; Kao, W. John; Li, Lingjun

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based stable isotope labeling has become a key technology for protein and small-molecule analyses. We developed a multiplexed quantification method for simultaneous proteomics and amine metabolomics analyses via nano reversed-phase liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (nanoRPLC–MS/MS), called mass defect-based N,N-dimethyl leucine (mdDiLeu) labeling. The duplex mdDiLeu reagents were custom-synthesized with a mass difference of 20.5 mDa, arising from the subtle variation in nuclear binding energy between the two DiLeu isotopologues. Optimal MS resolving powers were determined to be 240K for labeled peptides and 120K for labeled metabolites on the Orbitrap Fusion Lumos instrument. The mdDiLeu labeling does not suffer from precursor interference and dynamic range compression, providing excellent accuracy for MS1-centric quantification. Quantitative information is only revealed at high MS resolution without increasing spectrum complexity and overlapping isotope distribution. Chromatographic performance of polar metabolites was dramatically improved by mdDiLeu labeling with modified hydrophobicity, enhanced ionization efficiency, and picomole levels of detection limits. Paralleled proteomics and amine metabolomics analyses using mdDiLeu were systematically evaluated and then applied to pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:28194987

  9. Metabolomic and mass isotopomer analysis of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle: II. Heterogeneity of metabolite labeling pattern.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Kasumov, Takhar; Kombu, Rajan S; Zhu, Shu-Han; Cendrowski, Andrea V; David, France; Anderson, Vernon E; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri

    2008-08-08

    In this second of two companion articles, we compare the mass isotopomer distribution of metabolites of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle labeled from NaH(13)CO(3) or dimethyl [1,4-(13)C(2)]succinate. The mass isotopomer distribution of intermediates reveals the reversibility of the isocitrate dehydrogenase + aconitase reactions, even in the absence of a source of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, in many cases, a number of labeling incompatibilities were found as follows: (i) glucose versus triose phosphates and phosphoenolpyruvate; (ii) differences in the labeling ratios C-4/C-3 of glucose versus (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate)/(dihydroxyacetone phosphate); and (iii) labeling of citric acid cycle intermediates in tissue versus effluent perfusate. Overall, our data show that gluconeogenic and citric acid cycle intermediates cannot be considered as sets of homogeneously labeled pools. This probably results from the zonation of hepatic metabolism and, in some cases, from differences in the labeling pattern of mitochondrial versus extramitochondrial metabolites. Our data have implications for the use of labeling patterns for the calculation of metabolic rates or fractional syntheses in liver, as well as for modeling liver intermediary metabolism.

  10. Using mass spectrometry to study the photo-affinity labeling of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leriche, Tammy; Skorey, Kathryn; Roy, Patrick; McKay, Dan; Bateman, Kevin P.

    2004-11-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a potential target for the treatment of Type II diabetes and several companies are developing small molecule inhibitors of this enzyme. Part of the characterization of these compounds as PTP1B inhibitors is the understanding of how they bind in the enzyme active site. The use of photo-activated inhibitors that target the active site can provide such insight. This paper describes the characterization of a photoprobe directed at the active site of PTP1B. Mass spectrometry revealed the specific binding of the probe to the intact protein. Digestion of the labeled protein followed by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS was used to show that the photoprobe binds to a specific active site amino acid. This was confirmed by comparison with the X-ray structure of PTP1B with a PTP1B inhibitor. The probe labels a conserved acidic residue (Asp) that is required for catalytic activity. This photoprobe may prove to be a useful tool for the development of a PTP1B inhibitor or for the study of PTPs in general.

  11. Mass Spectrometric Quantification of Histone Post-translational Modifications by a Hybrid Chemical Labeling Method

    PubMed Central

    Maile, Tobias M.; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Cheung, Tommy; Guler, Gulfem D.; Tindell, Charles; Masselot, Alexandre; Liang, Jun; Zhao, Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Classon, Marie; Arnott, David

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful alternative to antibody-based methods for the analysis of histone post-translational modifications (marks). A key development in this approach was the deliberate propionylation of histones to improve sequence coverage across the lysine-rich and hydrophilic tails that bear most modifications. Several marks continue to be problematic however, particularly di- and tri-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 which we found to be subject to substantial and selective losses during sample preparation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We developed a new method employing a “one-pot” hybrid chemical derivatization of histones, whereby an initial conversion of free lysines to their propionylated forms under mild aqueous conditions is followed by trypsin digestion and labeling of new peptide N termini with phenyl isocyanate. High resolution mass spectrometry was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and a novel web-based software application (Fishtones) was developed for viewing and quantifying histone marks in the resulting data sets. Recoveries of 53 methyl, acetyl, and phosphoryl marks on histone H3.1 were improved by an average of threefold overall, and over 50-fold for H3K4 di- and tri-methyl marks. The power of this workflow for epigenetic research and drug discovery was demonstrated by measuring quantitative changes in H3K4 trimethylation induced by small molecule inhibitors of lysine demethylases and siRNA knockdown of epigenetic modifiers ASH2L and WDR5. PMID:25680960

  12. Minimizing technical variation during sample preparation prior to label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Scheerlinck, E; Dhaenens, M; Van Soom, A; Peelman, L; De Sutter, P; Van Steendam, K; Deforce, D

    2015-12-01

    Sample preparation is the crucial starting point to obtain high-quality mass spectrometry data and can be divided into two main steps in a bottom-up proteomics approach: cell/tissue lysis with or without detergents and a(n) (in-solution) digest comprising denaturation, reduction, alkylation, and digesting of the proteins. Here, some important considerations, among others, are that the reagents used for sample preparation can inhibit the digestion enzyme (e.g., 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 0.5 M guanidine HCl), give rise to ion suppression (e.g., polyethylene glycol [PEG]), be incompatible with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (e.g., SDS), and can induce additional modifications (e.g., urea). Taken together, all of these irreproducible effects are gradually becoming a problem when label-free quantitation of the samples is envisioned such as during the increasingly popular high-definition mass spectrometry (HDMS(E)) and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH) data-independent acquisition strategies. Here, we describe the detailed validation of a reproducible method with sufficient protein yield for sample preparation without any known LC-MS/MS interfering substances by using 1% sodium deoxycholate (SDC) during both cell lysis and in-solution digest. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Peptides Labeled with Pyridinium Salts for Sensitive Detection and Sequencing by Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Waliczek, Mateusz; Kijewska, Monika; Rudowska, Magdalena; Setner, Bartosz; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometric analysis of trace amounts of peptides may be problematic due to the insufficient ionization efficiency resulting in limited sensitivity. One of the possible ways to overcome this problem is the application of ionization enhancers. Herein we developed new ionization markers based on 2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium and 2,4,6-trimethylpyridinium salts. Using of inexpensive and commercially available pyrylium salt allows selective derivatization of primary amino groups, especially those sterically unhindered, such as ε-amino group of lysine. The 2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium modified peptides generate in MS/MS experiments an abundant protonated 2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium ion. This fragment is a promising reporter ion for the multiple reactions monitoring (MRM) analysis. In addition, the fixed positive charge of the pyridinium group enhances the ionization efficiency. Other advantages of the proposed ionization enhancers are the simplicity of derivatization of peptides and the possibility of convenient incorporation of isotopic labels into derivatized peptides. PMID:27892962

  14. In vivo investigation of homocysteine metabolism to polyamines by high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry and stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Ruseva, Silviya; Lozanov, Valentin; Markova, Petia; Girchev, Radoslav; Mitev, Vanio

    2014-07-15

    Polyamines are essential polycations, playing important roles in mammalian physiology. Theoretically, the involvement of homocysteine in polyamine synthesis via S-adenosylmethionine is possible; however, to our knowledge, it has not been established experimentally. Here, we propose an original approach for investigation of homocysteine metabolites in an animal model. The method is based on the combination of isotope-labeled homocysteine supplementation and high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry analysis. Structural identity of the isotope-labeled metabolites was confirmed by accurate mass measurements of molecular and fragment ions and comparison of the retention times and tandem mass spectrometry fragmentation patterns. Isotope-labeled methionine, spermidine, and spermine were detected in all investigated plasma and tissue samples. The induction of moderate hyperhomocysteinemia leads to an alteration in polyamine levels in a different manner. The involvement of homocysteine in polyamine synthesis and modulation of polyamine levels could contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms connected with homocysteine toxicity.

  15. Hybrid Imaging Labels: Providing the Link Between Mass Spectrometry-Based Molecular Pathology and Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Buckle, Tessa; van der Wal, Steffen; van Malderen, Stijn J.M.; Müller, Larissa; Kuil, Joeri; van Unen, Vincent; Peters, Ruud J.B.; van Bemmel, Margaretha E.M.; McDonnell, Liam A.; Velders, Aldrik H.; Koning, Frits; Vanhaeke, Frank; van Leeuwen, Fijs W. B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Development of theranostic concepts that include inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) imaging can be hindered by the lack of a direct comparison to more standardly used methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation; e.g. fluorescence or nuclear medicine. In this study a bimodal (or rather, hybrid) tracer that contains both a fluorescent dye and a chelate was used to evaluate the existence of a direct link between mass spectrometry (MS) and in vitro and in vivo molecular imaging findings using fluorescence and radioisotopes. At the same time, the hybrid label was used to determine whether the use of a single isotope label would allow for MS-based diagnostics. Methods: A hybrid label that contained both a DTPA chelate (that was coordinated with either 165Ho or 111In) and a Cy5 fluorescent dye was coupled to the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) targeting peptide Ac-TZ14011 (hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011). This receptor targeting tracer was used to 1) validate the efficacy of (165Ho-based) mass-cytometry in determining the receptor affinity via comparison with fluorescence-based flow cytometry (Cy5), 2) evaluate the microscopic binding pattern of the tracer in tumor cells using both fluorescence confocal imaging (Cy5) and LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho), 3) compare in vivo biodistribution patterns obtained with ICP-MS (165Ho) and radiodetection (111In) after intravenous administration of hybrid-Cy5-Ac-TZ4011 in tumor-bearing mice. Finally, LA-ICP-MS-imaging (165Ho) was linked to fluorescence-based analysis of excised tissue samples (Cy5). Results: Analysis with both mass-cytometry and flow cytometry revealed a similar receptor affinity, respectively 352 ± 141 nM and 245 ± 65 nM (p = 0.08), but with a much lower detection sensitivity for the first modality. In vitro LA-ICP-MS imaging (165Ho) enabled clear discrimination between CXCR4 positive and negative cells, but fluorescence microscopy was required to determine the

  16. Rapid mass spectrometric analysis of 15N-Leu incorporation fidelity during preparation of specifically labeled NMR samples.

    PubMed

    Truhlar, Stephanie M E; Cervantes, Carla F; Torpey, Justin W; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2008-09-01

    Advances in NMR spectroscopy have enabled the study of larger proteins that typically have significant overlap in their spectra. Specific (15)N-amino acid incorporation is a powerful tool for reducing spectral overlap and attaining reliable sequential assignments. However, scrambling of the label during protein expression is a common problem. We describe a rapid method to evaluate the fidelity of specific (15)N-amino acid incorporation. The selectively labeled protein is proteolyzed, and the resulting peptides are analyzed using MALDI mass spectrometry. The (15)N incorporation is determined by analyzing the isotopic abundance of the peptides in the mass spectra using the program DEX. This analysis determined that expression with a 10-fold excess of unlabeled amino acids relative to the (15)N-amino acid prevents the scrambling of the (15)N label that is observed when equimolar amounts are used. MALDI TOF-TOF MS/MS data provide additional information that shows where the "extra" (15)N labels are incorporated, which can be useful in confirming ambiguous assignments. The described procedure provides a rapid technique to monitor the fidelity of selective labeling that does not require a lot of protein. These advantages make it an ideal way of determining optimal expression conditions for selectively labeled NMR samples.

  17. Label free screening of enzyme inhibitors at femtomole scale using segmented flow electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuwen; Slaney, Thomas R; Kennedy, Robert T

    2012-07-03

    Droplet-based microfluidics is an attractive platform for screening and optimizing chemical reactions. Using this approach, it is possible to reliably manipulate nanoliter volume samples and perform operations such as reagent addition with high precision, automation, and throughput. Most studies using droplet microfluidics have relied on optical techniques to detect the reaction; however, this requires engineering color or fluorescence change into the reaction being studied. In this work, we couple electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) to nanoliter scale segmented flow reactions to enable direct (label-free) analysis of reaction products. The system is applied to a screen of inhibitors for cathepsin B. In this approach, solutions of test compounds (including three known inhibitors) are arranged as an array of nanoliter droplets in a tube segmented by perfluorodecalin. The samples are pumped through a series of tees to add enzyme, substrate (peptides), and quenchant. The resulting reaction mixtures are then infused into a metal-coated, fused silica ESI emitter for MS analysis. The system has potential for high-throughput as reagent addition steps are performed at 0.7 s per sample and ESI-MS at up to 1.2 s per sample. Carryover is inconsequential in the ESI emitter and between 2 and 9% per reagent addition depending on the tee utilized. The assay was reliable with a Z-factor of ~0.8. The method required 0.8 pmol of test compound, 1.6 pmol of substrate, and 5 fmol of enzyme per reaction. Segmented flow ESI-MS allows direct, label free screening of reactions at good throughput and ultralow sample consumption.

  18. Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane

    SciTech Connect

    Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-24

    Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

  19. gamma-Ray-mediated oxidative labeling for detecting protein conformational changes by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Wren, J Clara; Konermann, Lars

    2008-03-15

    Exposure of proteins to hydroxyl radicals induces the incorporation of oxygen atoms into solvent-exposed side chains. Earlier studies have employed this approach for mapping protein-protein interactions in mass spectrometry-based footprinting experiments. This work explores whether the overall level of gamma-ray mediated oxidative labeling can be used for monitoring large-scale conformational changes. According to a recently developed kinetic model (Tong, X.; Wren, J. C.; Konermann, L. Anal. Chem. 2007, 79, 6376-6382), the apparent first-order rate constant for oxidative labeling can be approximated as k(app) = k(RAD)/([P](tot) + C/k(u)), where k(RAD) is the primary rate of *OH formation, [P](tot) is the protein concentration, C reflects the presence of competing radical deactivation channels, and ku is the rate constant at which hydroxyl radicals react with the protein. The current study introduces conformational effects into this model by proposing that k(u) = [see text for formula] , where N is the number of amino acids, alphai is a measure for the solvent exposure of residue i, and k(ch)(i) is the oxidation rate constant that would apply for a completely solvent-exposed side chain. Using myoglobin and cytochrome c as model systems, it is demonstrated that unfolding by addition of H(3)PO(4) increases k(app) by up to 30% and 70%, respectively. Unfolding by other commonly used denaturants such as organic acids or urea results in dramatically lower oxidation levels than for the native state, a behavior that is due to the radical scavenging activity of these substances (corresponding to an increased value of C). Control experiments on model peptides are suitable for identifying such "secondary" effects, i.e., factors that modify oxidation levels without being related to conformational changes. In conclusion, the overall *OH labeling level represents a viable probe of large-scale protein conformational changes only under conditions where secondary effects are known

  20. Determination of formylated DNA and RNA by chemical labeling combined with mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Liu, Ting; Guo, Ning; Yu, Lei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2017-08-15

    Nucleic acids carry diverse chemical modifications that exert critical influences in a variety of cellular processes in living organisms. In addition to methylation, the emerging DNA and RNA formylation has been reported to play functional roles in various physiological processes. However, the amounts of formylated DNA and RNA are extremely low and detection of DNA and RNA formylation is therefore a challenging task. To address this issue, we developed a strategy by chemical labeling combined with in-tube solid-phase microextraction - ultra high performance liquid chromatography - electrospray ionization - tandem mass spectrometry (in-tube SPME-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis for the sensitive determination of DNA and RNA formylation. Using the developed method, we were able to simultaneously measure six formylated nucleosides, including 5-formyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-fodC), 5-formylcytidine (5-forC), 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine (5-fodU), 5-formyluridine (5-forU), 2'-O-methyl-5-formylcytidine (5-forCm) and 2'-O-methyl-5- formyluridine (5-forUm), from DNA and RNA of cultured human cells and multiple mammalian tissues. The detection limits of these formylated nucleosides improved by 307-884 folds using Girard's P (GirP) labeling coupled with in-tube SPME-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis. It was worth noting that 5-forU, 5-forCm and 5-forUm which have not been detected in human sample before, were discovered in cultured human cells and tissues in the current study. In addition, we observed significant increase of 5-forC and 5-forU in RNA (p = 0.027 for 5-forC; p = 0.028 for 5-forU) and 5-fodU in DNA (p = 0.002) in human thyroid carcinoma tissues compared to normal tissues adjacent to the tumor using synthesized stable isotope GirP (d5-GirP)-assisted quantification. Our results indicated that aberrant DNA and RNA formylation may contribute to the tumor formation and development. In addition, monitoring of DNA and RNA formylation may also serve as indicator for cancer diagnostics

  1. Protected Amine Labels: A Versatile Molecular Scaffold for Multiplexed Nominal Mass and Sub-Da Isotopologue Quantitative Proteomic Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Biagi, Jessica M.; Wang, Jinhua; Scotcher, Jenna; Koleva, Rositsa I.; Card, Joseph D.; Adelmant, Guillaume; He, Huan; Askenazi, Manor; Marshall, Alan G.; Young, Nicolas L.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Marto, Jarrod A.

    2014-01-01

    We assemble a versatile molecular scaffold from simple building blocks to create binary and multiplexed stable isotope reagents for quantitative mass spectrometry. Termed Protected Amine Labels (PAL), these reagents offer multiple analytical figures of merit including, (i) robust targeting of peptide N-termini and lysyl side chains, (ii) optimal mass spectrometry ionization efficiency through regeneration of primary amines on labeled peptides, (iii) an amino acid-based mass tag that incorporates heavy isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen to ensure matched physicochemical and MS/MS fragmentation behavior among labeled peptides, and (iv) a molecularly efficient architecture, in which the majority of hetero-atom centers can be used to synthesize a variety of nominal mass and sub-Da isotopologue stable isotope reagents. We demonstrate the performance of these reagents in well-established strategies whereby up to four channels of peptide isotopomers, each separated by 4 Da are quantified in MS-level scans with accuracies comparable to current commercial reagents. In addition we utilize the PAL scaffold to create isotopologue reagents in which labeled peptide analogs differ in mass based on the binding energy in carbon and nitrogen nuclei, thereby allowing quantification based on MS or MS/MS spectra. We demonstrate accurate quantification for reagents that support 6-plex labeling and propose extension of this scheme to 9-channels based on a similar PAL scaffold. Finally we provide exemplar data that extends the application of isotopologe-based quantification reagents to medium resolution, quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers. PMID:24496597

  2. Mass spectrometry–based relative quantification of proteins in precatalytic and catalytically active spliceosomes by metabolic labeling (SILAC), chemical labeling (iTRAQ), and label-free spectral count

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Carla; Grønborg, Mads; Deckert, Jochen; Bessonov, Sergey; Conrad, Thomas; Lührmann, Reinhard; Urlaub, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The spliceosome undergoes major changes in protein and RNA composition during pre-mRNA splicing. Knowing the proteins—and their respective quantities—at each spliceosomal assembly stage is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms and regulation of splicing. Here, we applied three independent mass spectrometry (MS)–based approaches for quantification of these proteins: (1) metabolic labeling by SILAC, (2) chemical labeling by iTRAQ, and (3) label-free spectral count for quantification of the protein composition of the human spliceosomal precatalytic B and catalytic C complexes. In total we were able to quantify 157 proteins by at least two of the three approaches. Our quantification shows that only a very small subset of spliceosomal proteins (the U5 and U2 Sm proteins, a subset of U5 snRNP-specific proteins, and the U2 snRNP-specific proteins U2A′ and U2B′′) remains unaltered upon transition from the B to the C complex. The MS-based quantification approaches classify the majority of proteins as dynamically associated specifically with the B or the C complex. In terms of experimental procedure and the methodical aspect of this work, we show that metabolically labeled spliceosomes are functionally active in terms of their assembly and splicing kinetics and can be utilized for quantitative studies. Moreover, we obtain consistent quantification results from all three methods, including the relatively straightforward and inexpensive label-free spectral count technique. PMID:24448447

  3. Measuring protein synthesis using metabolic ²H labeling, high-resolution mass spectrometry, and an algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kasumov, Takhar; Ilchenko, Serguey; Li, Ling; Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sadygov, Rovshan G; Willard, Belinda; McCullough, Arthur J; Previs, Stephen

    2011-05-01

    We recently developed a method for estimating protein dynamics in vivo with heavy water ((2)H(2)O) using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) [16], and we confirmed that (2)H labeling of many hepatic free amino acids rapidly equilibrated with body water. Although this is a reliable method, it required modest sample purification and necessitated the determination of tissue-specific amino acid labeling. Another approach for quantifying protein kinetics is to measure the (2)H enrichments of body water (precursor) and protein-bound amino acid or proteolytic peptide (product) and to estimate how many copies of deuterium are incorporated into a product. In the current study, we used nanospray linear trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LTQ FT-ICR MS) to simultaneously measure the isotopic enrichment of peptides and protein-bound amino acids. A mathematical algorithm was developed to aid the data processing. The most notable improvement centers on the fact that the precursor/product labeling ratio can be obtained by measuring the labeling of water and a protein (or peptide) of interest, thereby minimizing the need to measure the amino acid labeling. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this approach can detect the effect of nutritional status on albumin synthesis in rats given (2)H(2)O. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Water-soluble phosphines for direct labeling of peptides with technetium and rhenium: insights from electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Greenland, William E P; Blower, Philip J

    2005-01-01

    Direct labeling of salmon calcitonin (sCT) is possible in one step using water-soluble phosphines (sulfonated triphenylphosphines) as the reducing agent both for disulfide and for pertechnetate. Phosphines were the most efficient reducing agent for disulfide bonds among those examined. The phosphines both reduced the pertechnetate to Tc(III), and contributed to the technetium coordination sphere in the labeled product. In contrast, the phosphines did not reduce rhenium below oxidation state V, nor did they participate in the rhenium coordination sphere in the labeled peptide. Instead, the expected oxorhenium(V) moiety was incorporated. Both Tc and Re labeling processes gave rise to dimers with two peptides linked by the metal center, as well as simple monomeric species. Positive mode electrospray mass spectrometry not only revealed the presence of phosphine bound to technetium and oxygen bound to rhenium in the metallopeptides but also revealed the oxidation states of the metals. Electrospray mass spectrometry is proving to be an exceptionally valuable technique for characterizing radiopharmaceuticals. Although the one-step direct labeling method described gives mixed products and poor receptor affinity when applied to the small peptide sCT, it might be readily adapted to monoclonal antibodies.

  5. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Sialylated Glycans Using Solid Phase Labeling of Sialc Acids

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Punit; Yang, Shuang; Sun, Shisheng; Aiyetan, Paul; Yarema, Kevin J.; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of sialylated glycans is critical for understanding the role of sialic acid in normal biological processes as well as in disease. However, the labile nature of sialic acid typically renders routine analysis of this monosaccharide by mass spectrometric methods has been difficult. To overcome this difficulty we pursued derivatization methodologies, extending established acetohydrazide approaches to aniline-based methods, and finally to optimized p-toluidine derivatization. This new quantitative glycoform profiling method using MALDI-TOF in positive ion mode was validated by first comparing N-glycans isolated from fetuin and serum and was then exploited to analyze the effects of increased metabolic flux through the sialic acid pathway in SW1990 pancreatic cancer cells by using a co-labeling strategy with light and heavy toluidine. The latter results established that metabolic flux, in a complementary manner to the more well-known impact of sialyltransferase expression, can critically modulate the sialylation of specific glycans while leaving others virtually unchanged. PMID:23445396

  6. Analysis of liposoluble carboxylic acids metabolome in human serum by stable isotope labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Ping; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Peng, Ke; Deng, Qian-Yun; Zheng, Fang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-08-19

    Fatty acids (FAs) are groups of liposoluble carboxylic acids (LCAs) and play important roles in various physiological processes. Abnormal contents or changes of FAs are associated with a series of diseases. Here we developed a strategy with stable isotope labeling combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (IL-LC-MS) analysis for comprehensive profiling and relative quantitation of LCAs in human serum. In this strategy, a pair of isotope labeling reagents (2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED)) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED) were employed to selectively label carboxyl groups of LCAs. The DMED and d4-DMED labeled products can lose four characteristic neutral fragments of 45 and 49Da or 63 and 67Da in collision-induced dissociation. Therefore, quadruple neutral loss scan (QNLS) mode was established and used for non-targeted profiling of LCAs. The peak pairs of DMED and d4-DMED labeling with the same retention time, intensity and characteristic mass differences were extracted from the two NLS spectra respectively, and assigned as potential LCA candidates. Using this strategy, 241 LCA candidates were discovered in the human serum; 156 carboxylic acid compounds could be determined by searching HMDB and METLIN databases (FAs are over 90%) and 21 of these LCAs were successfully identified by standards. Subsequently, a modified pseudo-targeted method with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) detection mode was developed and used for relative quantification of LCAs in human serum from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and healthy controls. As a result, 81 LCAs were found to have significant difference between T2DM patients and healthy controls. Taken together, the isotope labeling combined with tandem mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated to be a powerful strategy for identification and quantification of LCA compounds in serum samples.

  7. 18O-Labeled Proteome Reference as Global Internal Standards for Targeted Quantification by Selected Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol W.; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-10-11

    Selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry (SRM-MS) is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biological and biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the use of stable isotope labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards is prohibitive for quantitatively screening large numbers of candidate proteins as often required in the pre-verification phase of biomarker discovery. Herein we present the proof-of-concept experiments of using an 18O-labeled 'universal' reference as comprehensive internal standards for quantitative SRM-MS analysis. With an 18O-labeled whole proteome sample as reference, every peptide of interest will have its own corresponding heavy isotope labeled internal standard, thus providing an ideal approach for quantitative screening of a large number of candidates using SRM-MS. Our results showed that the 18O incorporation efficiency using a recently improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated, a level comparable to 13C/15N labeled synthetic peptides in terms of heavy isotope incorporation. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into mouse plasma with an 18O-labeled mouse plasma reference. A dynamic range of four orders of magnitude in relative concentration was obtained with high reproducibility (i.e., coefficient of variance <10%) based on the 16O/18O peak area ratios. Absolute and relative quantification of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen were demonstrated by coupling an 18O-labeled reference with standard additions of protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of 18O-labeled reference provides a convenient and effective strategy for quantitative SRM screening of large number of candidate proteins.

  8. Structural analysis of chromophore-labeled disaccharides and oligosaccharides by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, D T; Her, G R

    1998-07-01

    Disaccharides and linear oligosaccharides were labeled with p-aminobenzoic ethyl ester (ABEE) chromophore and analyzed by negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS). The formation of glycosylamines rather than reductive amination in the labeling reaction produced many characteristic fragment ions under in source collision-induced dissociation (CID). These ions provided unambiguous assignment of the position of the glycosidic linkages. This approach was extended to the analysis of linkages and the sequence of the linkages of several linear oligosaccharides. Additionally, the anomeric configuration of ABEE-labeled 1-3-, 1-4- and 1-6-linked glucose disaccharides could be differentiated according to the relative abundance of characteristic ions. Disaccharides with the same linkage but different monosaccharide compositions could be analyzed by on-line coupling of high-performance liquid chromatography with ESIMS.

  9. Combining combing and secondary ion mass spectrometry to study DNA on chips using 13C and 15N labeling

    PubMed Central

    Cabin-Flaman, Armelle; Monnier, Anne-Francoise; Coffinier, Yannick; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas; Gibouin, David; Wirtz, Tom; Boukherroub, Rabah; Migeon, Henri-Noël; Bensimon, Aaron; Jannière, Laurent; Ripoll, Camille; Norris, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry ( D-SIMS) imaging of combed DNA – the combing, imaging by SIMS or CIS method – has been developed previously using a standard NanoSIMS 50 to reveal, on the 50 nm scale, individual DNA fibers labeled with different, non-radioactive isotopes in vivo and to quantify these isotopes. This makes CIS especially suitable for determining the times, places and rates of DNA synthesis as well as the detection of the fine-scale re-arrangements of DNA and of molecules associated with combed DNA fibers. Here, we show how CIS may be extended to 13C-labeling via the detection and quantification of the 13C 14N - recombinant ion and the use of the 13C: 12C ratio, we discuss how CIS might permit three successive labels, and we suggest ideas that might be explored using CIS. PMID:27429742

  10. Using power spectrum analysis to evaluate (18)O-water labeling data acquired from low resolution mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Sadygov, Rovshan G; Zhao, Yingxin; Haidacher, Sigmund J; Starkey, Jonathan M; Tilton, Ronald G; Denner, Larry

    2010-08-06

    We describe a method for ratio estimations in (18)O-water labeling experiments acquired from low resolution isotopically resolved data. The method is implemented in a software package specifically designed for use in experiments making use of zoom-scan mode data acquisition. Zoom-scan mode data allow commonly used ion trap mass spectrometers to attain isotopic resolution, which makes them amenable to use in labeling schemes such as (18)O-water labeling, but algorithms and software developed for high resolution instruments may not be appropriate for the lower resolution data acquired in zoom-scan mode. The use of power spectrum analysis is proposed as a general approach that may be uniquely suited to these data types. The software implementation uses a power spectrum to remove high-frequency noise and band-filter contributions from coeluting species of differing charge states. From the elemental composition of a peptide sequence, we generate theoretical isotope envelopes of heavy-light peptide pairs in five different ratios; these theoretical envelopes are correlated with the filtered experimental zoom scans. To automate peptide quantification in high-throughput experiments, we have implemented our approach in a computer program, MassXplorer. We demonstrate the application of MassXplorer to two model mixtures of known proteins and to a complex mixture of mouse kidney cortical extract. Comparison with another algorithm for ratio estimations demonstrates the increased precision and automation of MassXplorer.

  11. Using Power Spectrum Analysis to Evaluate 18O-Water Labeling Data Acquired from Low Resolution Mass Spectrometers

    PubMed Central

    Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Zhao, Yingxin; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; Starkey, Jonathan M.; Tilton, Ronald G.; Denner, Larry

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for ratio estimations in 18O-water labeling experiments acquired from low resolution isotopically resolved data. The method is implemented in a software package specifically designed for use in experiments making use of zoom-scan mode data acquisition. Zoom-scan mode data allows commonly used ion trap mass spectrometers to attain isotopic resolution, which make them amenable to use in labeling schemes such as 18O-water labeling, but algorithms and software developed for high resolution instruments may not be appropriate for the lower resolution data acquired in zoom-scan mode. The use of power spectrum analysis is proposed as a general approach which may be uniquely suited to these data types. The software implementation uses power spectrum to remove high-frequency noise, and band-filter contributions from co-eluting species of differing charge states. From the elemental composition of a peptide sequence we generate theoretical isotope envelopes of heavy-light peptide pairs in five different ratios; these theoretical envelopes are correlated with the filtered experimental zoom scans. To automate peptide quantification in high-throughput experiments, we have implemented our approach in a computer program, MassXplorer. We demonstrate the application of MassXplorer to two model mixtures of known proteins, and to a complex mixture of mouse kidney cortical extract. Comparison with another algorithm for ratio estimations demonstrates the increased precision and automation of MassXplorer. PMID:20568695

  12. Isotope Label-Aided Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Influence of Environmental Factors on Metabolism in Single Eggs of Fruit Fly

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Te-Wei; Wu, June-Tai; Chen, Yu-Chie; Urban, Pawel L.

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of light/dark cycle on the biosynthesis of metabolites during oogenesis, here we demonstrate a simple experimental protocol which combines in-vivo isotopic labeling of primary metabolites with mass spectrometric analysis of single eggs of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). First, fruit flies were adapted to light/dark cycle using artificial white light. Second, female flies were incubated with an isotopically labeled sugar (13C6-glucose) for 12 h – either during the circadian day or the circadian night, at light or at dark. Third, eggs were obtained from the incubated female flies, and analyzed individually by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS): this yielded information about the extent of labeling with carbon-13. Since the incorporation of carbon-13 to uridine diphosphate glucose (UDP-glucose) in fruit fly eggs is very fast, the labeling of this metabolite was used as an indicator of the biosynthesis of metabolites flies/eggs during 12-h periods, which correspond to circadian day or circadian night. The results reveal that once the flies adapted to the 12-h-light/12-h-dark cycle, the incorporation of carbon-13 to UDP-glucose present in fruit fly eggs was not markedly altered by an acute perturbation to this cycle. This effect may be due to a relationship between biosynthesis of primary metabolites in developing eggs and an alteration to the intake of the labeled substrate – possibly related to the change of the feeding habit. Overall, the study shows the possibility of using MALDI-MS in conjunction with isotopic labeling of small metazoans to unravel the influence of environmental cues on primary metabolism. PMID:23185587

  13. MEASURING OF PROTEIN SYNTHESIS USING METABOLIC 2H-LABELING, HIGH-RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY AND AN ALGORITHM

    PubMed Central

    Kasumov, Takhar; Ilchenko, Sergey; Li, Ling; Rachdaoui, Nadia; Sadigov, Rovshan; Willard, Belinda; McCullough, Arthur J.; Previs, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    We recently developed a method for estimating protin dynamics in vivo with 2H2O using MALDI-TOF MS (Rachdaoui N. et al., MCP, 8, 2653-2662, 2009) and we confirmed that 2H-labeling of many hepatic free amino acids rapidly equilibrated with body water. Although this is a reliable method, it required modest sample purification and necessitated the determination of tissue-specific amino acid labeling. Another approach for quantifying protein kinetics is to measure the 2H-enrichments of body water (precursor) and protein-bound amino acid or proteolytic peptide (product) and to estimate how many copies of deuterium are incorporated into a product. In this study we have used nanospray LTQ-FTICR mass spectrometry to simultaneously measure the isotopic enrichment of peptides and protein-bound amino acids. A mathematical algorithm was developed to aid the data processing. The most notable improvement centers on the fact that the precursor:product labeling ratio can be obtained by measuring the labeling of water and a protein(s) (or peptides) of interest, therein minimizing the need to measure the amino acid labeling. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that this approach can detect the effect of nutritional status on albumin synthesis in rats given 2H2O. PMID:21256107

  14. SVM model for quality assessment of medium resolution mass spectra from 18O-water labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Nefedov, Alexey V; Gilski, Miroslaw J; Sadygov, Rovshan G

    2011-04-01

    We describe a method for assessing the quality of mass spectra and improving reliability of relative ratio estimations from (18)O-water labeling experiments acquired from low resolution mass spectrometers. The mass profiles of heavy and light peptide pairs are often affected by artifacts, including coeluting contaminant species, noise signal, instrumental fluctuations in measuring ion position and abundance levels. Such artifacts distort the profiles, leading to erroneous ratio estimations, thus reducing the reliability of ratio estimations in high throughput quantification experiments. We used support vector machines (SVMs) to filter out mass spectra that deviated significantly from expected theoretical isotope distributions. We built an SVM classifier with a decision function that assigns a score to every mass profile based on such spectral features as mass accuracy, signal-to-noise ratio, and differences between experimental and theoretical isotopic distributions. The classifier was trained using a data set obtained from samples of mouse renal cortex. We then tested it on protein samples (bovine serum albumin) mixed in five different ratios of labeled and unlabeled species. We demonstrated that filtering the data using our SVM classifier results in as much as a 9-fold reduction in the coefficient of variance of peptide ratios, thus significantly improving the reliability of ratio estimations.

  15. Elemental labelling combined with liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for quantification of biomolecules: A review

    PubMed Central

    Kretschy, Daniela; Koellensperger, Gunda; Hann, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews novel quantification concepts where elemental labelling is combined with flow injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FI-ICP-MS) or liquid chromatography inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC–ICP-MS), and employed for quantification of biomolecules such as proteins, peptides and related molecules in challenging sample matrices. In the first sections an overview on general aspects of biomolecule quantification, as well as of labelling will be presented emphasizing the potential, which lies in such methodological approaches. In this context, ICP-MS as detector provides high sensitivity, selectivity and robustness in biological samples and offers the capability for multiplexing and isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). Fundamental methodology of elemental labelling will be highlighted and analytical, as well as biomedical applications will be presented. A special focus will lie on established applications underlining benefits and bottlenecks of such approaches for the implementation in real life analysis. Key research made in this field will be summarized and a perspective for future developments including sophisticated and innovative applications will given. PMID:23062431

  16. Arterial Spin-labeling MR Imaging of Renal Masses: Correlation with Histopathologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    Lanzman, Rotem S.; Robson, Phil M.; Sun, Maryellen R.; Patel, Amish D.; Mentore, Kimiknu; Wagner, Andrew A.; Genega, Elizabeth M.; Rofsky, Neil M.; Alsop, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of arterial spin-labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the characterization of solid renal masses by using histopathologic findings as the standard of reference. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was compliant with HIPAA and approved by the institutional review board. Informed consent was obtained from all patients before imaging. Forty-two consecutive patients suspected of having renal masses underwent ASL MR imaging before their routine 1.5-T clinical MR examination. Mean and peak tumor perfusion levels were obtained by one radiologist, who was blinded to the final histologic diagnosis, by using region of interest analysis. Perfusion values were correlated with histopathologic findings by using analysis of variance. A linear correlation model was used to evaluate the relationship between tumor size and perfusion in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). P < .05 was considered indicative of a statistically significant difference. Results: Histopathologic findings were available in 34 patients (28 men, six women; mean age ± standard deviation, 60.4 years ± 11.7). The mean perfusion of papillary RCC (27.0 mL/min/100 g ± 15.1) was lower than that of clear cell RCC (171.6 mL/min/100 g ± 61.2, P = .001), chromophobe RCC (152.9 mL/min/100 g ± 80.7, P = .04), unclassified RCC (208.0 mL/min/100 g ± 41.1, P = .001), and oncocytoma (373.9 mL/min/100 g ± 99.2, P < .001). The mean and peak perfusion levels of oncocytoma (373.9 mL/min/100 g ± 99.2 and 512.3 mL/min/100 g ± 146.0, respectively) were higher than those of papillary RCC (27.0 mL/min/100 g ± 15.1 and 78.2 mL/min/100 g ± 39.7, P < .001 for both), chromophobe RCC (152.9 mL/min/100 g ± 80.7 and 260.9 mL/min/100 g ± 61.9; P < .001 and P = .02, respectively), and unclassified RCC (208.0 mL/min/100 g ± 41.1 and 273.3 mL/min/100 g ± 83.4; P = .01 and P = .03, respectively). The mean tumor perfusion of oncocytoma was higher than that of clear cell

  17. Labeled oxazaphosphorines for applications in mass spectrometry studies. 2. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled 2-dechloroethylcyclophosphamides and 2- and 3-dechloroethylifosfamides.

    PubMed

    Springer, James B; Colvin, O Michael; Ludeman, Susan M

    2014-02-01

    The prodrugs cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) each metabolize to an active alkylating agent through a cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation at the C-4 position. Competing with this activation pathway are enzymatic oxidations at the exocyclic α and α' carbons, which result in dechloroethylation of CP and IF. The incidence of oxidation at one position relative to another is believed to be at least one factor underlying the high degree of interpatient variability in both CP and IF pharmacokinetics. As standards for the mass spectrometry quantification of dechloroethylation, the following were synthesized: (1) [4,4,5,5-(2) H4 ]-2-dechloroethylcyclophosphamide (equivalent to [4,4,5,5-(2) H4 ]-3-dechloroethylifosfamide); (2) [α,α,4,4,5,5-(2) H6 ]-2-dechloroethylcyclophosphamide (equivalent to [α,α,4,4,5,5-(2) H6 ]-3-dechloroethylifosfamide); and (3) [α,α,4,4,5,5-(2) H6 ]-2-dechloroethylifosfamide. The common precursor to all of the target compounds was [2,2,3,3-(2) H4 ]-3-aminopropanol. A one-pot reaction of this compound with POCl3 and unlabeled or labeled 2-chloroethylamine hydrochloride gave the d4 and d6 labeled 2-dechloroethylcyclophosphamides. The construction of the 2-dechloroethylifosfamide from the aminopropanol required five discreet steps. Optimization of the synthetic pathways and stability studies are discussed.

  18. Kinetics of labelling of organic and amino acids in potato tubers by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry following incubation in (13)C labelled isotopes.

    PubMed

    Roessner-Tunali, Ute; Liu, JunLi; Leisse, Andrea; Balbo, Ilse; Perez-Melis, Alicia; Willmitzer, Lothar; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2004-08-01

    Metabolic pathways of primary metabolism of discs isolated from potato tubers were evaluated by the use of a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method generated specifically for this purpose. After testing several possible methods including chemical ionization, it was decided for reasons of sensitivity, reproducibility and speed to use electron impact ionization-based GC-MS analysis. The specific labelling and label accumulation of over 30 metabolites including a broad number of sugars, organic and amino acids was analysed following the incubation of tuber discs in [U-(13)C]glucose. The reproducibility of this method was similar to that found for other GC-MS-based analyses and comparison of flux estimates from this method with those obtained from parallel, yet less comprehensive, radiolabel experiments revealed close agreement. Therefore, the novel method allows quantitatively evaluation of a broad range of metabolic pathways without the need for laborious (and potentially inaccurate), chemical fractionation procedures commonly used in the estimation of fluxes following incubation in radiolabelled substrates. As a first experiment the GC-MS method has been applied to compare the metabolism of wild type and well-characterized transgenic potato tubers exhibiting an enhanced sucrose mobilization. The fact that this method is able to rapidly yield further comprehensive information into primary metabolism illustrates its power as a further phenotyping tool for the analysis of plant metabolism.

  19. Identification of reactive cysteines in a protein using arsenic labeling and collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meiling; Wang, Hailin; Wang, Zhongwen; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2008-08-01

    Trivalent arsenicals have high affinity for thiols (such as free cysteines) in proteins. We describe here the use of this property to develop a collision-induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) technique for the identification of reactive cysteines in proteins. A trivalent arsenic species, dimethylarsinous acid (DMA (III)), with a residue mass (103.9607) and mass defect distinct from the normal 20 amino acids, was used to selectively label reactive cysteine residues in proteins. The CID fragment ions of the arsenic-labeled sequences shifted away from the more abundant normal fragments that would otherwise overlap with the ions of interest. Along with the internal and immonium ions, the arsenic-labeled fragment ions served as MS/MS signatures for identification of the binding sites and for assessment of the relative reactivity of individual cysteine residues in a protein. Using this method, we have identified two highly reactive binding sites in rat hemoglobin (Hb): Cys-13alpha and Cys-125beta. Cys-13alpha was bound to DMA (III) in the Hb of rats fed with arsenic, and this binding was responsible for arsenic accumulation in rat blood, while Cys-125beta was found to bind to glutathione in rat blood. This study revealed the relative reactivity of the cysteines in rat Hb in the following decreasing order: Cys-13alpha > Cys-111alpha > Cys-104alpha and Cys-13alpha > Cys-125beta > Cys-93beta. Arsenic-labeling is easy and fast for identification of active binding sites without enzymatic digestion and acid hydrolysis, and useful for characterization and identification of metal binding sites in other proteins.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Protein Turnover by Metabolic Whole Rodent Pulse-Chase Isotopic Labeling and Shotgun Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of protein half-life and degradation dynamics has proven critically important to our understanding of a broad and diverse set of biological conditions ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration. Historically these protein turnover measures have been performed in cells by monitoring protein levels after "pulse" labeling of newly synthesized proteins and subsequent chase periods. Comparing the level of labeled protein remaining as a function of time to the initial level reveals the protein's half-life. In this method we provide a detailed description of the workflow required for the determination of protein turnover rates on a whole proteome scale in vivo. Our approach starts with the metabolic labeling of whole rodents by restricting all the nitrogen in their diet to exclusively nitrogen-15 in the form of spirulina algae. After near complete organismal labeling with nitrogen-15, the rodents are then switched to a normal nitrogen-14 rich diet for time periods of days to years. Tissues are harvested, the extracts are fractionated, and the proteins are digested to peptides. Peptides are separated by multidimensional liquid chromatography and analyzed by high resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS). The nitrogen-15 containing proteins are then identified and measured by the bioinformatic proteome analysis tools Sequest, DTASelect2, and Census. In this way, our metabolic pulse-chase approach reveals in vivo protein decay rates proteome-wide.

  1. Stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT): integration with peptide identification and extension to data-dependent scans.

    PubMed

    Elbert, Donald L; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G; Scott, Evan A; Wildsmith, Kristin R; Bateman, Randall J

    2008-10-01

    Quantitation of relative or absolute amounts of proteins by mass spectrometry can be prone to large errors. The use of MS/MS ion intensities and stable isotope labeling, which we term stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT), decreases the effects of contamination from unrelated compounds. We present a software package (SILTmass) that automates protein identification and quantification by the SILT method. SILTmass has the ability to analyze the kinetics of protein turnover, in addition to relative and absolute protein quantitation. Instead of extracting chromatograms to find elution peaks, SILTmass uses only scans in which a peptide is identified and that meet an ion intensity threshold. Using only scans with identified peptides, the accuracy and precision of SILT is shown to be superior to precursor ion intensities, particularly at high or low dilutions of the isotope labeled compounds or with low amounts of protein. Using example scans, we demonstrate likely reasons for the improvements in quantitation by SILT. The appropriate use of variable modifications in peptide identification is described for measurement of protein turnover kinetics. The combination of identification with SILT facilitates quantitation without peak detection and helps to ensure the appropriate use of variable modifications for kinetics experiments.

  2. Stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT): Integration with peptide identification and extension to data-dependent scans

    PubMed Central

    Elbert, Donald L.; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G.; Scott, Evan A.; Wildsmith, Kristin R.; Bateman, Randall J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitation of relative or absolute amounts of proteins by mass spectrometry can be prone to large errors. The use of MS/MS ion intensities and stable isotope labeling, which we term stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT), decreases the effects of contamination from unrelated compounds. We present a software package (SILTmass) that automates protein identification and quantification by the SILT method. SILTmass has the ability to analyze the kinetics of protein turnover, in addition to relative and absolute protein quantitation. Instead of extracting chromatograms to find elution peaks, SILTmass uses only scans in which a peptide is identified and that meet an ion intensity threshold. Using only scans with identified peptides, the accuracy and precision of SILT is shown to be superior to precursor ion intensities, particularly at high or low dilutions of the isotope labeled compounds or with low amounts of protein. Using example scans, we demonstrate likely reasons for the improvements in quantitation by SILT. The appropriate use of variable modifications in peptide identification is described for measurement of protein turnover kinetics. The combination of identification with SILT facilitates quantitation without peak detection and helps to ensure the appropriate use of variable modifications for kinetics experiments. PMID:18774841

  3. Preprocessing Significantly Improves the Peptide/Protein Identification Sensitivity of High-resolution Isobarically Labeled Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data*

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Quanhu; Li, Rongxia; Dai, Jie; Li, Qingrun; Su, Zhiduan; Guo, Yan; Li, Chen; Shyr, Yu; Zeng, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Isobaric labeling techniques coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry have been widely employed in proteomic workflows requiring relative quantification. For each high-resolution tandem mass spectrum (MS/MS), isobaric labeling techniques can be used not only to quantify the peptide from different samples by reporter ions, but also to identify the peptide it is derived from. Because the ions related to isobaric labeling may act as noise in database searching, the MS/MS spectrum should be preprocessed before peptide or protein identification. In this article, we demonstrate that there are a lot of high-frequency, high-abundance isobaric related ions in the MS/MS spectrum, and removing isobaric related ions combined with deisotoping and deconvolution in MS/MS preprocessing procedures significantly improves the peptide/protein identification sensitivity. The user-friendly software package TurboRaw2MGF (v2.0) has been implemented for converting raw TIC data files to mascot generic format files and can be downloaded for free from https://github.com/shengqh/RCPA.Tools/releases as part of the software suite ProteomicsTools. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000994. PMID:25435543

  4. High-throughput quantification of the levels and labeling abundance of free amino acids by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; Tsogtbaatar, Enkhtuul; Alonso, Ana P

    2017-03-24

    Accurate assessment of mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs) of intracellular metabolites, such as free amino acids (AAs), is crucial for quantifying in vivo fluxes. To date, the majority of studies that measured AA MIDs have relied on the analysis of proteinogenic rather than free AAs by: i) GC-MS, which involved cumbersome process of derivatization, or ii) NMR, which requires large quantities of biological sample. In this work, the development and validation of a high-throughput LC-MS/MS method allowing the quantification of the levels and labeling of free AAs is described. Sensitivity in the order of the femtomol was achieved using multiple reaction monitoring mode (MRM). The MIDs of all free AAs were assessed without the need of derivatization, and were validated (except for Trp) on a mixture of unlabeled AA standards. Finally, this method was applied to the determination of the (13)C-labeling abundance in free AAs extracted from maize embryos cultured with (13)C-glutamine or (13)C-glucose. Although Cys was below the limit of detection in these biological samples, the MIDs of a total of 18 free AAs were successfully determined. Due to the increased application of tandem mass spectrometry for (13)C-Metabolic Flux Analysis, this novel method will enable the assessment of more complete and accurate labeling information of intracellular AAs, and therefore a better definition of the fluxes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Stable isotope-labeled vitamin D, metabolites and chemical analogs: Synthesis and use in mass spectrometric studies

    SciTech Connect

    Coldwell, R.D.; Trafford, D.J.; Varley, M.J.; Kirk, D.N.; Makin, H.L. )

    1990-10-01

    Methods for the measurement of vitamin D and its metabolites using stable isotope-labeled internal standards and mass spectrometry are reviewed. The synthesis of both labeled and unlabeled standards is illustrated, and details of the synthesis of (26,26,27,27,27(-2)H5)-25,26-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and (28,28,28(-2)H3)-24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 are given. The use of in vitro biologic systems for the production of further metabolites of deuterated 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is discussed. Use of deuterated 25-hydroxydihydrotachysterol3 as a substrate in the isolated perfused rat kidney has provided valuable data for the assignment of structure to a number of metabolites of 25-hydroxydihydrotachysterol3 formed in this system. 51 refs.

  6. Statistical analysis of relative labeled mass spectrometry data from complex samples using ANOVA

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Ann L.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Malone, Christopher J.; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Cooper, Leslie T.; Onuma, Oyere K.; Spiro, Craig; Therneau, Terry M.; Bergen, H. Robert

    2008-01-01

    Statistical tools enable unified analysis of data from multiple global proteomic experiments, producing unbiased estimates of normalization terms despite the missing data problem inherent in these studies. The modeling approach, implementation and useful visualization tools are demonstrated via case study of complex biological samples assessed using the iTRAQ™ relative labeling protocol. PMID:18173221

  7. Production and application of high quality stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Phillip, Amsler; Thierry, Wolf; Christian, Lanshoeft; Anja, Bettighofer; Jochen, Eisfeld; Thomas, Moenius; Claudia, Probst; Coralie, Etter; Olivier, Heudi

    2017-03-01

    Here, we describe the production of stable isotope-labeled human immunoglobulin G1 ([(13) C]-hIgG1) using [(13) C]-L-lysine/arginine-labeled hIgG1. The fermentation process was run in shake flasks containing labeled arginine and lysinethat were incorporated into the produced recombinant hIgG1. The [(13) C]-hIgG1 was purified, and label incorporation was determined to be >99% at all lysine and arginine moieties. Sequence coverage was confirmed by peptide mapping. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was then used as an internal standard (IS) for the development of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method applicable to the quantitative analysis of all human types of hIgG1 in rat serum. Four conserved peptides, namely, GPSVFPLAPSSK, TTPPVLDSDGSFFLYSK, VVSVLTVLHQDWLNGK, and FNWYVDGVEVHNAK, originating from different parts of the fraction crystallizable region of hIgG1, were used for quantitation of hIgG1 in rat serum. The calibration curves with a coefficient of determination (r(2) ) between 0.9950 and 0.9962 resulting from the peak area ratio of each peptide to its respective labeled IS were reproducible. A mean bias within ±20.0% of the nominal values and a precision of ≤20.0 % were obtained for the calibration standards and quality control samples for each peptide. [(13) C]-hIgG1 was shown as a suitable IS for quantitative hIgG1 analysis in preclinical species by LC-MS/MS. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Selective mass labeling for linking the optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter to structure and composition via ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baluha, Daniel R; Blough, Neil V; Del Vecchio, Rossana

    2013-09-03

    The mass spectra acquired by ESI FT-ICR MS of untreated, borohydride-reduced, and borodeuteride-reduced samples of Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) and a C18 extract from the upper Delaware Bay were compared to one another. Treatment of these samples with sodium borodeuteride was shown to produce unique mass labels for species which contain one or two ketone/aldehyde moieties. Approximately 30% of all identified peaks in the two samples were shown to comprise ketone/aldehyde-containing species. The molecular formulas of the majority of these species had O/C and H/C molar ratios typically attributed to lignin-derived compounds and/or carboxylic rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM). However, the significant loss of UV-vis absorption following reduction supports a lignin-based origin for the optical (and photochemical) properties of these samples. The mass-labeling method described and tested herein shows great promise as a means to further characterize the structure and composition of complex natural samples, especially in terms of identifying specific subsets of chemical species that contribute significantly to the optical and photochemical properties of such samples.

  9. An algorithm for the deconvolution of mass spectroscopic patterns in isotope labeling studies. Evaluation for the hydrogen-deuterium exchange reaction in ketones.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Christian C; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Voss, Constance V; Kremsner, Jennifer M; Kappe, C Oliver; Kroutil, Wolfgang

    2007-07-20

    An easy to use computerized algorithm for the determination of the amount of each labeled species differing in the number of incorporated isotope labels based on mass spectroscopic data is described and evaluated. Employing this algorithm, the microwave-assisted synthesis of various alpha-labeled deuterium ketones via hydrogen-deuterium exchange with deuterium oxide was optimized with respect to time, temperature, and degree of labeling. For thermally stable ketones the exchange of alpha-protons was achieved at 180 degrees C within 40-200 min. Compared to reflux conditions, the microwave-assisted protocol led to a reduction of the required reaction time from 75-94 h to 40-200 min. The alpha-labeled deuterium ketones were reduced by biocatalytic hydrogen transfer to the corresponding enantiopure chiral alcohols and the deconvolution algorithm validated by regression analysis of a mixture of labeled and unlabeled ketones/alcohols.

  10. Label-free high-throughput screening via mass spectrometry: a single cystathionine quantitative method for multiple applications.

    PubMed

    Holt, Tom G; Choi, Bernard K; Geoghagen, Neil S; Jensen, Kristian K; Luo, Qi; LaMarr, William A; Makara, Gergely M; Malkowitz, Lorraine; Ozbal, Can C; Xiong, Yusheng; Dufresne, Claude; Luo, Ming-Juan

    2009-10-01

    Label-free mass spectrometric (MS) technologies are particularly useful for enzyme assay design for drug discovery screens. MS permits the selective detection of enzyme substrates or products in a wide range of biological matrices without need for derivatization, labeling, or capture technologies. As part of a cardiovascular drug discovery effort aimed at finding modulators of cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS), we used the RapidFire((R)) label-free high-throughput MS (HTMS) technology to develop a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for CBS activity. The in vitro assay used HTMS to quantify the unlabeled product of the CBS reaction, cystathionine. Cystathionine HTMS analyses were carried out with a throughput of 7 s per sample and quantitation over a linear range of 80-10,000 nM. A compound library of 25,559 samples (or 80 384-well plates) was screened as singlets using the HTMS assay in a period of 8 days. With a hit rate of 0.32%, the actives showed a 90% confirmation rate. The in vitro assay was applied to secondary screens in more complex matrices with no additional analytical development. Our results show that the HTMS method was useful for screening samples containing serum, for cell-based assays, and for liver explants. The novel extension of the in vitro analytical method, without modification, to secondary assays resulted in a significant and advantageous economy of development time for the drug discovery project.

  11. Structural insights into the pre-amyloid tetramer of β-2-microglobulin from covalent labeling and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Vanessa Leah; Barón-Rodríguez, Mario A; Blanco, Cristian; Vachet, Richard W

    2011-08-09

    The main pathogenic process underlying dialysis-related amyloidosis is the accumulation of β-2-microglobulin (β2m) as amyloid fibrils in the musculoskeletal system, and some evidence suggests that Cu(II) may play a role in β2m amyloid formation. Cu(II)-induced β2m fibril formation is preceded by the formation of discrete, oligomeric intermediates, including dimers, tetramers, and hexamers. In this work, we use selective covalent labeling reactions combined with mass spectrometry to investigate the amino acids responsible for mediating tetramer formation in wild-type β2m. By comparing the labeling patterns of the monomer, dimer, and tetramer, we find evidence that the tetramer interface is formed by the interaction of D strands from one dimer unit and G strands from another dimer unit. These covalent labeling data along with molecular dynamics calculations allow the construction of a tetramer model that indicates how the protein might proceed to form even higher-order oligomers.

  12. Highly abundant defense proteins in human sweat as revealed by targeted proteomics and label free quantification mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Csősz, Éva; Emri, Gabriella; Kalló, Gergő; Tsaprailis, George; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The healthy human skin with its effective antimicrobial defense system forms an efficient barrier against invading pathogens. There is evidence suggesting that the composition of this chemical barrier varies between diseases, making the easily-collected sweat an ideal candidate for biomarker discoveries. OBJECTIVE Our aim was to provide information about the normal composition of the sweat, and to study the chemical barrier found at the surface of skin. METHODS Sweat samples from healthy individuals were collected during sauna bathing, and the global protein panel was analyzed by label-free mass spectrometry. SRM-based targeted proteomic methods were designed and stable isotope labeled reference peptides were used for method validation. RESULTS 95 sweat proteins were identified, 20 of them were novel proteins. It was shown that dermcidin is the most abundant sweat protein, and along with apolipoprotein D, clusterin, prolactin inducible protein and serum albumin, they make up 91% of secreted sweat proteins. The roles of these highly abundant proteins were reviewed; all of which have protective functions, highlighting the importance of sweat glands in composing the first line of innate immune defense system, and maintaining the epidermal barrier integrity. CONCLUSION Our findings in regards to the proteins forming the chemical barrier of the skin as determined by label free quantification and targeted proteomics methods are in accordance with previous studies, and can be further used as a starting point for non-invasive sweat biomarker research. PMID:26307449

  13. Histone H4 acetylation dynamics determined by stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaodan; Zhang, Liwen; Lucas, David M; Davis, Melanie E; Knapp, Amy R; Green-Church, Kari B; Marcucci, Guido; Parthun, Mark R; Byrd, John C; Freitas, Michael A

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes an integrated approach that couples stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to acetic acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (AU-PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for the quantitation and dynamics of histone H4 acetylation. The 697 acute lymphoblastic cell lines were grown in regular medium and in medium in which lysine was substituted with deuterium-labeled lysine. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity was inhibited by addition of the HDAC inhibitor depsipeptide to the culture medium for different exposure times. Histones were extracted from cells pooled from unlabeled, untreated cells and from labeled, treated cells, followed by AU-PAGE separation. Gel bands corresponding to different acetylation states of H4 were excised, in-gel digested with trypsin, and analyzed by MALDI-TOF MS. Detailed information was obtained for both the change of histone H4 acetylation specific to the N terminus and the global transformation of H4 from one acetylation state to another following treatment with the HDAC inhibitor depsipeptide. The kinetics of H4 acetylation was also assessed. This study provides a quantitative basis for developing potential therapies by using epigenetic regulation and the developed methodology can be applied to quantitation of change for other histone modifications induced by external stimuli.

  14. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    SciTech Connect

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J; Buchholz, B A; Miller, J W; Green, R; Hammock, B D; Roth, J R; Anderson, P J

    2006-01-26

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B{sub 12}. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B{sub 12} is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B{sub 12} in the range of normal dietary intake. The B{sub 12} used was quantitatively labeled with {sup 14}C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B{sub 12} or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with {sup 14}C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B{sub 12} assimilation.

  15. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca(2+) on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  16. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  17. Determination of thiol metabolites in human urine by stable isotope labeling in combination with pseudo-targeted mass spectrometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Zhu, Quan-Fei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Precursor ion scan and multiple reaction monitoring scan (MRM) are two typical scan modes in mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we developed a strategy by combining stable isotope labeling (IL) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) under double precursor ion scan (DPI) and MRM for analysis of thiols in 5 types of human cancer urine. Firstly, the IL-LC-DPI-MS method was applied for non-targeted profiling of thiols from cancer samples. Compared to traditional full scan mode, the DPI method significantly improved identification selectivity and accuracy. 103 thiol candidates were discovered in all cancers and 6 thiols were identified by their standards. It is worth noting that pantetheine, for the first time, was identified in human urine. Secondly, the IL-LC-MRM-MS method was developed for relative quantification of thiols in cancers compared to healthy controls. All the MRM transitions of light and heavy labeled thiols were acquired from urines by using DPI method. Compared to DPI method, the sensitivity of MRM improved by 2.1–11.3 folds. In addition, the concentration of homocysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine and pantetheine enhanced more than two folds in cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Taken together, the method demonstrated to be a promising strategy for identification and comprehensive quantification of thiols in human urines. PMID:26888486

  18. Conformational changes of recombinant monoclonal antibodies by limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Nowak, Christine; Kita, Adriana; Cheng, Guilong; Kori, Yekaterina; Liu, Hongcheng

    2016-03-15

    Limited proteolytic digestion is a method with a long history that has been used to study protein domain structures and conformational changes. A method of combining limited proteolytic digestion, stable isotope labeling, and mass spectrometry was established in the current study to investigate protein conformational changes. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies with or without the conserved oligosaccharides, and with or without oxidation of the conserved methionine residues, were used to test the newly proposed method. All of the samples were digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in normal water. The oxidized deglycosylated sample was also digested in ammonium bicarbonate buffer prepared in (18)O-labeled water. The sample from the digestion in (18)O-water was spiked into each sample digested in normal water. Each mixed sample was subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The molecular weight differences between the peptides digested in normal water versus (18)O-water were used to differentiate peaks from the samples. The relative peak intensities of peptides with or without the C-terminal incorporation of (18)O atoms were used to determine susceptibility of different samples to trypsin and chymotrypsin. The results demonstrated that the method was capable of detecting local conformational changes of the recombinant monoclonal antibodies caused by deglycosylation and oxidation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Determination of thiol metabolites in human urine by stable isotope labeling in combination with pseudo-targeted mass spectrometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Zhu, Quan-Fei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-02-01

    Precursor ion scan and multiple reaction monitoring scan (MRM) are two typical scan modes in mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we developed a strategy by combining stable isotope labeling (IL) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) under double precursor ion scan (DPI) and MRM for analysis of thiols in 5 types of human cancer urine. Firstly, the IL-LC-DPI-MS method was applied for non-targeted profiling of thiols from cancer samples. Compared to traditional full scan mode, the DPI method significantly improved identification selectivity and accuracy. 103 thiol candidates were discovered in all cancers and 6 thiols were identified by their standards. It is worth noting that pantetheine, for the first time, was identified in human urine. Secondly, the IL-LC-MRM-MS method was developed for relative quantification of thiols in cancers compared to healthy controls. All the MRM transitions of light and heavy labeled thiols were acquired from urines by using DPI method. Compared to DPI method, the sensitivity of MRM improved by 2.1–11.3 folds. In addition, the concentration of homocysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine and pantetheine enhanced more than two folds in cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Taken together, the method demonstrated to be a promising strategy for identification and comprehensive quantification of thiols in human urines.

  20. Discovery of histone modification crosstalk networks by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture mass spectrometry (SILAC MS).

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaoyan; Rastogi, Neha; Parthun, Mark R; Freitas, Michael A

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we describe an approach that combines stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cells culture, high mass accuracy liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and a novel data analysis approach to accurately determine relative peptide post-translational modification levels. This paper describes the application of this approach to the discovery of novel histone modification crosstalk networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast histone mutants were generated to mimic the presence/absence of 44 well-known modifications on core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In each mutant strain the relative change in H3 K79 methylation and H3 K56 acetylation were determined using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cells culture. This approach showed relative changes in H3 K79 methylation and H3 K56 acetylation that are consistent with known histone crosstalk networks. More importantly, this study revealed additional histone modification sites that affect H3 K79 methylation and H3 K56 acetylation.

  1. Metabolomics relative quantitation with mass spectrometry using chemical derivatization and isotope labeling

    DOE PAGES

    O'Maille, Grace; Go, Eden P.; Hoang, Linh; ...

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive detection and quantitation of metabolites from a biological source constitute the major challenges of current metabolomics research. Two chemical derivatization methodologies, butylation and amination, were applied to human serum for ionization enhancement of a broad spectrum of metabolite classes, including steroids and amino acids. LC-ESI-MS analysis of the derivatized serum samples provided a significant signal elevation across the total ion chromatogram to over a 100-fold increase in ionization efficiency. It was also demonstrated that derivatization combined with isotopically labeled reagents facilitated the relative quantitation of derivatized metabolites from individual as well as pooled samples.

  2. Analysis of carbon and nitrogen co-metabolism in yeast by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry applying 13C- and 15N-labeled substrates simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Blank, Lars M; Desphande, Rahul R; Schmid, Andreas; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-06-01

    Alternative metabolic pathways inside a cell can be deduced using stable isotopically labeled substrates. One prerequisite is accurate measurement of the labeling pattern of targeted metabolites. Experiments are generally limited to the use of single-element isotopes, mainly (13)C. Here, we demonstrate the application of direct infusion nanospray, ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) for metabolic studies using differently labeled elemental isotopes simultaneously--i.e., (13)C and (15)N--in amino acids of a total protein hydrolysate. The optimized strategy for the analysis of metabolism by a hybrid linear ion trap-FTICR-MS comprises the collection of multiple adjacent selected ion monitoring scans. By limiting both the width of the mass range and the number of ions entering the ICR cell with automated gain control, sensitive measurements of isotopologue distribution were possible without compromising mass accuracy and isotope intensity mapping. The required mass-resolving power of more than 60,000 is only achievable on a routine basis by FTICR and Orbitrap mass spectrometers. Evaluation of the method was carried out by comparison of the experimental data to the natural isotope abundances of selected amino acids and by comparison to GC/MS results obtained from a labeling experiment with (13)C-labeled glucose. The developed method was used to shed light on the complexity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae carbon-nitrogen co-metabolism by administering both (13)C-labeled glucose and (15)N-labeled alanine. The results indicate that not only glutamate but also alanine acts as an amino donor during alanine and valine synthesis. Metabolic studies using FTICR-MS can exploit new possibilities by the use of multiple-labeled elemental isotopes.

  3. Mass spectrometry-based, label-free quantitative proteomics of round spermatids in mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAILONG; LI, YAN; YANG, LIJUAN; YU, BAOFENG; YAN, PING; PANG, MIN; LI, XIAOBING; YANG, HONG; ZHENG, GUOPING; XIE, JUN; GUO, RUI

    2014-01-01

    Round haploid spermatids are formed at the completion of meiosis. These spermatids then undergo morphological and cytological changes during spermiogenesis. Although sperm proteomes have been extensively studied, relatively few studies have specifically investigated the proteome of round spermatids. We developed a label-free quantitative method in combination with 2D-nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS to investigate the proteome of round spermatids in mice. Analysis of the proteomic data identified 2,331 proteins in the round spermatids. Functional classification of the proteins based on Gene Ontology terms and enrichment analysis further revealed the following: 504 of the identified proteins are predicted to be involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy; 343 proteins in translation and protein targeting; 298 proteins in nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism; 275 and 289 proteins in transport and cellular component organization, respectively. A number of the identified proteins were associated with cytoskeleton organization (183), protein degradation (116) and response to stimulus (115). KEGG pathway analysis identified 68 proteins that are annotated as components of the ribosomal pathway and 17 proteins were related to aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis. The round spermatids also contained 28 proteins involved in the proteasome pathway and 40 proteins in the lysosome pathway. A total of 60 proteins were annotated as parts of the spliceosome pathway, in which heterogeneous nuclear RNA is converted to mRNA. Approximately 94 proteins were identified as actin-binding proteins, involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. In conclusion, using a label-free shotgun proteomic approach, we identified numerous proteins associated with spermiogenesis in round spermatids. PMID:25109358

  4. Mass spectrometry-based, label-free quantitative proteomics of round spermatids in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailong; Li, Yan; Yang, Lijuan; Yu, Baofeng; Yan, Ping; Pang, Min; Li, Xiaobing; Yang, Hong; Zheng, Guoping; Xie, Jun; Guo, Rui

    2014-10-01

    Round haploid spermatids are formed at the completion of meiosis. These spermatids then undergo morphological and cytological changes during spermiogenesis. Although sperm proteomes have been extensively studied, relatively few studies have specifically investigated the proteome of round spermatids. We developed a label-free quantitative method in combination with 2D-nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS to investigate the proteome of round spermatids in mice. Analysis of the proteomic data identified 2,331 proteins in the round spermatids. Functional classification of the proteins based on Gene Ontology terms and enrichment analysis further revealed the following: 504 of the identified proteins are predicted to be involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy; 343 proteins in translation and protein targeting; 298 proteins in nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism; 275 and 289 proteins in transport and cellular component organization, respectively. A number of the identified proteins were associated with cytoskeleton organization (183), protein degradation (116) and response to stimulus (115). KEGG pathway analysis identified 68 proteins that are annotated as components of the ribosomal pathway and 17 proteins were related to aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis. The round spermatids also contained 28 proteins involved in the proteasome pathway and 40 proteins in the lysosome pathway. A total of 60 proteins were annotated as parts of the spliceosome pathway, in which heterogeneous nuclear RNA is converted to mRNA. Approximately 94 proteins were identified as actin‑binding proteins, involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. In conclusion, using a label-free shotgun proteomic approach, we identified numerous proteins associated with spermiogenesis in round spermatids.

  5. 76 FR 82129 - Medical Devices; Ovarian Adnexal Mass Assessment Score Test System; Labeling; Black Box Restrictions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ..., or as a test to determine whether or not to proceed with surgery. DATES: Effective Date: January 30... likelihood that an adnexal pelvic mass in a woman for whom surgery is planned, is malignant. The test is for... identification of patients whose gynecologic surgery requires oncology expertise and resources. B....

  6. Tumor Vascularity in Renal Masses: Correlation of Arterial Spin-Labeled and Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MR Imaging Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Kapur, Payal; Yuan, Qing; Xi, Yin; Carvo, Ingrid; Signoretti, Sabina; Dimitrov, Ivan; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Margulis, Vitaly; Muradyan, Naira; Brugarolas, James; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate potential correlations between perfusion by arterial spin-labeled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI derived quantitative measures of vascularity in renal masses >2 cm and to correlate these with microvessel density (MVD) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Methods Informed written consent was obtained from all patients before imaging in this HIPAA-compliant, IRB-approved, prospective study. 36 consecutive patients scheduled for surgery of a known renal mass >2 cm underwent 3T ASL and DCE MRI. ASL measures (PASL) of mean, peak, and low perfusion areas within the mass were correlated to DCE-derived Ktrans, Kep, and Ve in the same locations using a region of interest analysis. MRI data were correlated to MVD measures in the same tumor regions in ccRCC. Spearman correlation was used to evaluate the correlation between PASL and DCE-derived measurements, and MVD. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 36 patients (25 men; mean age 58 ±12 years). PASL correlated with Ktrans (ρ=0.48, P=0.0091 for the entire tumor and ρ=0.43, P=0.03 for the high flow area, respectively) and Kep (ρ=0.46, P=0.01 for the entire tumor and ρ=0.52, P=0.008 for the high flow area, respectively). PASL (ρ=0.66, P=0.0002), Ktrans (ρ=0.61, P=0.001), and Kep (ρ=0.64, P=0.0006) also correlated with MVD in high and low perfusion areas in ccRCC. Conclusions PASL correlate with the DCE-derived measures of vascular permeability and flow, Ktrans and Kep, in renal masses >2cm in size. Both measures correlate to MVD in clear cell histology. MICROABSTRACT Arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been proposed to quantitatively assess vascularity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However there are intrinsic differences between these two imaging methods, such as the relative contribution of vascular permeability

  7. Tumor Vascularity in Renal Masses: Correlation of Arterial Spin-Labeled and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Kapur, Payal; Yuan, Qing; Xi, Yin; Carvo, Ingrid; Signoretti, Sabina; Dimitrov, Ivan; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Margulis, Vitaly; Muradyan, Naira; Brugarolas, James; Madhuranthakam, Ananth J; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-02-01

    Arterial spin-labeled (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been proposed to quantitatively assess vascularity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there are intrinsic differences between these 2 imaging methods, such as the relative contribution of vascular permeability and blood flow to signal intensity for DCE MRI. We found a correlation between ASL perfusion and the DCE-derived volume transfer constant and rate constant parameters in renal masses > 2 cm in size and these measures correlated with microvessel density in clear cell RCC. The objective of this study was to investigate potential correlations between perfusion using arterial spin-labeled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI-derived quantitative measures of vascularity in renal masses > 2 cm and to correlate these with microvessel density (MVD) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Informed written consent was obtained from all patients before imaging in this Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, institutional review board-approved, prospective study. Thirty-six consecutive patients scheduled for surgery of a known renal mass > 2 cm underwent 3T ASL and DCE MRI. ASL perfusion measures (PASL) of mean, peak, and low perfusion areas within the mass were correlated to DCE-derived volume transfer constant (K(trans)), rate constant (Kep), and fractional volume of the extravascular extracellular space (Ve) in the same locations using a region of interest analysis. MRI data were correlated to MVD measures in the same tumor regions in ccRCC. Spearman correlation was used to evaluate the correlation between PASL and DCE-derived measurements, and MVD. P < .05 was considered statistically significant. Histopathologic diagnosis was obtained in 36 patients (25 men; mean age 58 ± 12 years). PASL correlated with K(trans) (ρ = 0.48 and P = .0091 for the entire tumor and ρ = 0.43 and P = .03 for the

  8. Stoichiometry of chromatin-associated protein complexes revealed by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smits, Arne H; Jansen, Pascal W T C; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2013-01-07

    Many cellular proteins assemble into macromolecular protein complexes. The identification of protein-protein interactions and quantification of their stoichiometry is therefore crucial to understand the molecular function of protein complexes. Determining the stoichiometry of protein complexes is usually achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that rely on introducing stable isotope-labeled reference peptides into the sample of interest. However, these approaches are laborious and not suitable for high-throughput screenings. Here, we describe a robust and easy to implement label-free relative quantification approach that combines the detection of high-confidence protein-protein interactions with an accurate determination of the stoichiometry of the identified protein-protein interactions in a single experiment. We applied this method to two chromatin-associated protein complexes for which the stoichiometry thus far remained elusive: the MBD3/NuRD and PRC2 complex. For each of these complexes, we accurately determined the stoichiometry of the core subunits while at the same time identifying novel interactors and their stoichiometry.

  9. Metabolic characterization of cultured mammalian cells by mass balance analysis, tracer labeling experiments and computer-aided simulations.

    PubMed

    Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Kohno, Susumu; Kitajima, Shunsuke; Matsuda, Fumio; Takahashi, Chiaki; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Studying metabolic directions and flow rates in cultured mammalian cells can provide key information for understanding metabolic function in the fields of cancer research, drug discovery, stem cell biology, and antibody production. In this work, metabolic engineering methodologies including medium component analysis, (13)C-labeling experiments, and computer-aided simulation analysis were applied to characterize the metabolic phenotype of soft tissue sarcoma cells derived from p53-null mice. Cells were cultured in medium containing [1-(13)C] glutamine to assess the level of reductive glutamine metabolism via the reverse reaction of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). The specific uptake and production rates of glucose, organic acids, and the 20 amino acids were determined by time-course analysis of cultured media. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the (13)C-labeling of citrate, succinate, fumarate, malate, and aspartate confirmed an isotopically steady state of the cultured cells. After removing the effect of naturally occurring isotopes, the direction of the IDH reaction was determined by computer-aided analysis. The results validated that metabolic engineering methodologies are applicable to soft tissue sarcoma cells derived from p53-null mice, and also demonstrated that reductive glutamine metabolism is active in p53-null soft tissue sarcoma cells under normoxia.

  10. Stoichiometry of chromatin-associated protein complexes revealed by label-free quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Arne H.; Jansen, Pascal W. T. C.; Poser, Ina; Hyman, Anthony A.; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    Many cellular proteins assemble into macromolecular protein complexes. The identification of protein–protein interactions and quantification of their stoichiometry is therefore crucial to understand the molecular function of protein complexes. Determining the stoichiometry of protein complexes is usually achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that rely on introducing stable isotope-labeled reference peptides into the sample of interest. However, these approaches are laborious and not suitable for high-throughput screenings. Here, we describe a robust and easy to implement label-free relative quantification approach that combines the detection of high-confidence protein–protein interactions with an accurate determination of the stoichiometry of the identified protein–protein interactions in a single experiment. We applied this method to two chromatin-associated protein complexes for which the stoichiometry thus far remained elusive: the MBD3/NuRD and PRC2 complex. For each of these complexes, we accurately determined the stoichiometry of the core subunits while at the same time identifying novel interactors and their stoichiometry. PMID:23066101

  11. Differential isotope dansylation labeling combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for quantification of intact and N-terminal truncated proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanan; Li, Liang

    2013-08-20

    The N-terminal amino acids of proteins are important structure units for maintaining the biological function, localization, and interaction networks of proteins. Under different biological conditions, one or several N-terminal amino acids could be cleaved from an intact protein due to processes, such as proteolysis, resulting in the change of protein properties. Thus, the ability to quantify the N-terminal truncated forms of proteins is of great importance, particularly in the area of development and production of protein-based drugs where the relative quantity of the intact protein and its truncated form needs to be monitored. In this work, we describe a rapid method for absolute quantification of protein mixtures containing intact and N-terminal truncated proteins. This method is based on dansylation labeling of the N-terminal amino acids of proteins, followed by microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis of the proteins into amino acids. It is shown that dansyl labeled amino acids are stable in acidic conditions and can be quantified by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) with the use of isotope analog standards.

  12. Label-free quantitative mass spectrometry for analysis of protein antigens in a meningococcal group B outer membrane vesicle vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dick, Lawrence W; Mehl, John T; Loughney, John W; Mach, Anna; Rustandi, Richard R; Ha, Sha; Zhang, Lan; Przysiecki, Craig T; Dieter, Lance; Hoang, Van M

    2015-01-01

    The development of a multivalent outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccine where each strain contributes multiple key protein antigens presents numerous analytical challenges. One major difficulty is the ability to accurately and specifically quantitate each antigen, especially during early development and process optimization when immunoreagents are limited or unavailable. To overcome this problem, quantitative mass spectrometry methods can be used. In place of traditional mass assays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), quantitative LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) can be used during early-phase process development to measure key protein components in complex vaccines in the absence of specific immunoreagents. Multiplexed, label-free quantitative mass spectrometry methods using protein extraction by either detergent or 2-phase solvent were developed to quantitate levels of several meningococcal serogroup B protein antigens in an OMV vaccine candidate. Precision was demonstrated to be less than 15% RSD for the 2-phase extraction and less than 10% RSD for the detergent extraction method. Accuracy was 70 to 130% for the method using a 2-phase extraction and 90-110% for detergent extraction. The viability of MS-based protein quantification as a vaccine characterization method was demonstrated and advantages over traditional quantitative methods were evaluated. Implementation of these MS-based quantification methods can help to decrease the development time for complex vaccines and can provide orthogonal confirmation of results from existing antigen quantification techniques.

  13. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  14. Automated monitoring of phosphatidylcholine biosyntheses in Plasmodium falciparum by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry through stable isotope labeling experiments.

    PubMed

    Enjalbal, Christine; Roggero, Rodolphe; Cerdan, Rachel; Martinez, Jean; Vial, Henri; Aubagnac, Jean-Louis

    2004-08-01

    The metabolic pathways contributing to phosphatidylcholine biosyntheses in Plasmodium falciparum, the malaria-causing parasite, was explored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Phosphatidylcholine produced by the CDP-choline pathway and by the methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine was identified and quantified through isotopic labeling experiments. A straightforward method based on cone voltage directed in-source fragmentations and relative abundance measurement of endogenous versus deuterated specific fragment ions was developed for simple and rapid automated data acquisition. Such high-throughput analytical protocol allowed us to measure the relative contribution of two different metabolic pathways leading to phosphatidylcholine without performing technically more demanding and time-consuming MS/MS or LC/MS experiments.

  15. Phosphonium labeling for increasing metabolomic coverage of neutral lipids using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hin-Koon; Go, Eden P.; Hoang, Linh; Trauger, Sunia A.; Bowen, Benjamin; Siuzdak, Gary; Northen, Trent R.

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become an indispensable tool for the global study of metabolites (metabolomics), primarily using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). However, many important classes of molecules such as neutral lipids do not ionize well by ESI and go undetected. Chemical derivatization of metabolites can enhance ionization for increased sensitivity and metabolomic coverage. Here we describe the use of tris(2,4,6,-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphonium acetic acid (TMPP-AA) to improve liquid chromatography (LC)/ESI-MS detection of hydroxylated metabolites (i.e. lipids) from serum extracts. Cholesterol which is not normally detected from serum using ESI is observed with attomole sensitivity. This approach was applied to identify four endogenous lipids (hexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol, dihydrotachysterol, octadecanol, and alpha-tocopherol) from human serum. Overall, this approach extends the types of metabolites which can be detected using standard ESI-MS instrumentation and demonstrates the potential for targeted metabolomics analysis. PMID:19449318

  16. Stable isotope labeling of entire Bacillus atrophaeus spores and vegetative cells using bioaerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Czerwieniec, Gregg A; Russell, Scott C; Tobias, Herbert J; Pitesky, Maurice E; Fergenson, David P; Steele, Paul; Srivastava, Abneesh; Horn, Joanne M; Frank, Matthias; Gard, Eric E; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2005-02-15

    Single vegetative cells and spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, formerly Bacillus subtilis var. niger, were analyzed using bioaerosol mass spectrometry. Key biomarkers were identified from organisms grown in 13C and 15N isotopically enriched media. Spore spectra contain peaks from dicipolinate and amino acids. The results indicate that compounds observed in the spectra correspond to material from the spore's core and not the exosporium. Standard compounds and mixtures were analyzed for comparison. The biomarkers for vegetative cells were clearly different from those of the spores, consisting mainly of phosphate clusters and amino acid fragments.

  17. Label free biochemical 2D and 3D imaging using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John S; Vickerman, John C; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-10-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides a method for the detection of native and exogenous compounds in biological samples on a cellular scale. Through the development of novel ion beams the amount of molecular signal available from the sample surface has been increased. Through the introduction of polyatomic ion beams, particularly C(60), ToF-SIMS can now be used to monitor molecular signals as a function of depth as the sample is eroded thus proving the ability to generate 3D molecular images. Here we describe how this new capability has led to the development of novel instrumentation for 3D molecular imaging while also highlighting the importance of sample preparation and discuss the challenges that still need to be overcome to maximise the impact of the technique.

  18. A New Approach for the Comparative Analysis of Multiprotein Complexes Based on 15N Metabolic Labeling and Quantitative Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Trompelt, Kerstin; Steinbeck, Janina; Terashima, Mia; Hippler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The introduced protocol provides a tool for the analysis of multiprotein complexes in the thylakoid membrane, by revealing insights into complex composition under different conditions. In this protocol the approach is demonstrated by comparing the composition of the protein complex responsible for cyclic electron flow (CEF) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, isolated from genetically different strains. The procedure comprises the isolation of thylakoid membranes, followed by their separation into multiprotein complexes by sucrose density gradient centrifugation, SDS-PAGE, immunodetection and comparative, quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) based on differential metabolic labeling (14N/15N) of the analyzed strains. Detergent solubilized thylakoid membranes are loaded on sucrose density gradients at equal chlorophyll concentration. After ultracentrifugation, the gradients are separated into fractions, which are analyzed by mass-spectrometry based on equal volume. This approach allows the investigation of the composition within the gradient fractions and moreover to analyze the migration behavior of different proteins, especially focusing on ANR1, CAS, and PGRL1. Furthermore, this method is demonstrated by confirming the results with immunoblotting and additionally by supporting the findings from previous studies (the identification and PSI-dependent migration of proteins that were previously described to be part of the CEF-supercomplex such as PGRL1, FNR, and cyt f). Notably, this approach is applicable to address a broad range of questions for which this protocol can be adopted and e.g. used for comparative analyses of multiprotein complex composition isolated from distinct environmental conditions. PMID:24686495

  19. Morpheus Spectral Counter: A computational tool for label-free quantitative mass spectrometry using the Morpheus search engine.

    PubMed

    Gemperline, David C; Scalf, Mark; Smith, Lloyd M; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Label-free quantitative MS based on the Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor (NSAF) has emerged as a straightforward and robust method to determine the relative abundance of individual proteins within complex mixtures. Here, we present Morpheus Spectral Counter (MSpC) as the first computational tool that directly calculates NSAF values from output obtained from Morpheus, a fast, open-source, peptide-MS/MS matching engine compatible with high-resolution accurate-mass instruments. NSAF has distinct advantages over other MS-based quantification methods, including a greater dynamic range as compared to isobaric tags, no requirement to align and re-extract MS1 peaks, and increased speed. MSpC features an easy-to-use graphic user interface that additionally calculates both distributed and unique NSAF values to permit analyses of both protein families and isoforms/proteoforms. MSpC determinations of protein concentration were linear over several orders of magnitude based on the analysis of several high-mass accuracy datasets either obtained from PRIDE or generated with total cell extracts spiked with purified Arabidopsis 20S proteasomes. The MSpC software was developed in C# and is open sourced under a permissive license with the code made available at http://dcgemperline.github.io/Morpheus_SpC/.

  20. Morpheus Spectral Counter: A Computational Tool for Label-Free Quantitative Mass Spectrometry using the Morpheus Search Engine

    PubMed Central

    Gemperline, David C.; Scalf, Mark; Smith, Lloyd M.; Vierstra, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Label-free quantitative MS based on the Normalized Spectral Abundance Factor (NSAF) has emerged as a straightforward and robust method to determine the relative abundance of individual proteins within complex mixtures. Here, we present Morpheus Spectral Counter (MSpC) as the first computational tool that directly calculates NSAF values from output obtained from Morpheus, a fast, open-source, peptide-MS/MS matching engine compatible with high-resolution accurate-mass instruments. NSAF has distinct advantages over other MS-based quantification methods, including a higher dynamic range as compared to isobaric tags, no requirement to align and re-extract MS1 peaks, and increased speed. MSpC features an easy to use graphic user interface that additionally calculates both distributed and unique NSAF values to permit analyses of both protein families and isoforms/proteoforms. MSpC determinations of protein concentration were linear over several orders of magnitude based on the analysis of several high-mass accuracy datasets either obtained from PRIDE or generated with total cell extracts spiked with purified Arabidopsis 20S proteasomes. The MSpC software was developed in C# and is open sourced under a permissive license with the code made available at http://dcgemperline.github.io/Morpheus_SpC/. PMID:26791624

  1. Constructing Proteome Reference Map of the Porcine Jejunal Cell Line (IPEC-J2) by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Pajarillo, Edward Alain B; Balolong, Marilen P; Lee, Ji Yoon; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-06-28

    In this study, the global proteome of the IPEC-J2 cell line was evaluated using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole Q Exactive™ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Proteins were isolated from highly confluent IPEC-J2 cells in biological replicates and analyzed by label-free mass spectrometry prior to matching against a porcine genomic dataset. The results identified 1,517 proteins, accounting for 7.35% of all genes in the porcine genome. The highly abundant proteins detected, such as actin, annexin A2, and AHNAK nucleoprotein, are involved in structural integrity, signaling mechanisms, and cellular homeostasis. The high abundance of heat shock proteins indicated their significance in cellular defenses, barrier function, and gut homeostasis. Pathway analysis and annotation using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database resulted in a putative protein network map of the regulation of immunological responses and structural integrity in the cell line. The comprehensive proteome analysis of IPEC-J2 cells provides fundamental insights into overall protein expression and pathway dynamics that might be useful in cell adhesion studies and immunological applications.

  2. Use of an intravenous microdose of 14C-labeled drug and accelerator mass spectrometry to measure absolute oral bioavailability in dogs; cross-comparison of assay methods by accelerator mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Yoshihiro; Ishizuka, Tomoko; Kawai, Kenji; Hamabe, Yoshimi; Miyaoka, Teiji; Oh-hara, Toshinari; Ikeda, Toshihiko; Kurihara, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    A technique utilizing simultaneous intravenous microdosing of (14)C-labeled drug with oral dosing of non-labeled drug for measurement of absolute bioavailability was evaluated using R-142086 in male dogs. Plasma concentrations of R-142086 were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and those of (14)C-R-142086 were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). The absence of metabolites in the plasma and urine was confirmed by a single radioactive peak of the parent compound in the chromatogram after intravenous microdosing of (14)C-R-142086 (1.5 microg/kg). Although plasma concentrations of R-142086 determined by LC-MS/MS were approximately 20% higher than those of (14)C-R-142086 as determined by AMS, there was excellent correlation (r=0.994) between both concentrations after intravenous dosing of (14)C-R-142086 (0.3 mg/kg). The oral bioavailability of R-142086 at 1 mg/kg obtained by simultaneous intravenous microdosing of (14)C-R-142086 was 16.1%, this being slightly higher than the value (12.5%) obtained by separate intravenous dosing of R-142086 (0.3 mg/kg). In conclusion, on utilizing simultaneous intravenous microdosing of (14)C-labeled drug in conjunction with AMS analysis, absolute bioavailability could be approximately measured in dogs, but without total accuracy. Bioavailability in humans may possibly be approximately measured at an earlier stage and at a lower cost.

  3. Probing pyruvate metabolism in normal and mutant fibroblast cell lines using 13C-labeled mass isotopomer analysis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riazi, Roya; Khairallah, Maya; Cameron, Jessie M; Pencharz, Paul B; Des Rosiers, Christine; Robinson, Brian H

    2009-12-01

    Fibroblast cell lines are frequently used to diagnose genetic mitochondrial defects in children. The effect of enzyme deficiency on overall flux rate through metabolic pathways is, however, not generally considered. We have transposed an experimental paradigm that was developed for isolated perfused organs using (13)C-labeled substrates and (13)C-isotopomer analysis to probe pyruvate mitochondrial metabolism in cultured human fibroblast cell lines with normal or genetically mutant pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) or carboxylation (PC) activity. Cells were incubated with 1mM [U-(13)C]pyruvate, and the (13)C-molar percent enrichment (MPE) of intracellular pyruvate, citrate, malate (as a surrogate of oxaloacetate) and aspartate was assessed by mass spectrometry. We estimated various flux ratios relevant to metabolic pathways involved in energy production, namely pyruvate formation, PDC, PC, and citrate recycling in the citric acid cycle (CAC). In all cell lines, exogenous pyruvate was predominately decarboxylated (PC/PDC ratios 0.01-0.3). PC-deficient cell lines displayed an expected negligible contribution of PC flux to oxaloacetate formation for citrate synthesis (PC/CS), which was associated with a greater contribution of PDC to acetyl-CoA formation (PDC/CS), and greater recycling of (13)C-labeled citrate into the CAC. In PDH-deficient cell lines, metabolic flux alterations were most apparent in cells with more than 50% reduction in enzyme activity. This led to an unexpected lower PC/CS flux ratio, while the PDC/CS flux ratio was unchanged. These data illustrate the usefulness of this approach in identifying unexpected metabolic consequences of genetic defects related to pyruvate metabolism.

  4. Identification of human serum protein targets of Qianggu Decoction () in primary type I osteoporosis based on tandem mass tag labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry technology.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo-Cheng; Shi, Xiao-Lin; Li, Chun-Wen; Shi, Zhen-Yu; He, Wei-Tao; Yao, Jian-Liang; Kong, Ling-Cheng; Li, Xu-Yun

    2016-07-07

    To investigate the serum protein targets of Qianggu Decoction (, QGD) on treating osteoporosis by the proteomics analysis using tandem mass tag (TMT) and liquid chromatographytandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Twenty serum protein samples were recruited (10 patients with primary type I osteoporosis before and after QGD treatment) and the high abundance ratios protein was removed, two serum samples were extracted and labeled with TMT reagent. Then, mass spectrometric detection, identifification of differentially expressed proteins and bioinformatics analysis of differentially expressed proteins were carried out. A total of 60 proteins were identified, within a 99% confidence interval, to be differentially regulated of which, 34 proteins were up-regulated and 26 proteins were down-regulated. Differentially expressed proteins analyzed by Gene Ontology (GO) annotation mainly get involved in 12 different biological processes, 7 types of cellular components, and 6 kinds of molecular functions. Angiotensinogen (AGT), stromelysin-1 (MMP3), heparanase (HPSE) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were screened as candidate protein targets of QGD treatment, which were related to metabolic mechanism of bone remodeling and/or bone collagen of osteoporosis. By the utilization of the protein-protein interaction network analysis tool named STRING10.0, it can be confifirmed that AGT, MMP3, HPSE and GAPDH were located in the key node of the protein-protein interactions network. Furthermore, AGT, MMP3, HPSE and GAPDH were found to be directly related to BMP, MAPK, Wnt, SMAD and tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 11 (TNFSF11) families. The proteomics analysis by using TMT combined with LC-MS/MS was a feasible method for screening the potential therapeutic targets associated with QGD treatment. It suggests that AGT, MMP3, HPSE and GAPDH may be candidate protein targets of QGD treatment which can be used as therapeutic effect monitor and early diagnosis of

  5. Mass spectrometric analysis of the cell surface N-glycoproteome by combining metabolic labeling and click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Smeekens, Johanna M; Chen, Weixuan; Wu, Ronghu

    2015-04-01

    Cell surface N-glycoproteins play extraordinarily important roles in cell-cell communication, cell-matrix interactions, and cellular response to environmental cues. Global analysis is exceptionally challenging because many N-glycoproteins are present at low abundances and effective separation is difficult to achieve. Here, we have developed a novel strategy integrating metabolic labeling, copper-free click chemistry, and mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics methods to analyze cell surface N-glycoproteins comprehensively and site-specifically. A sugar analog containing an azido group, N-azidoacetylgalactosamine, was fed to cells to label glycoproteins. Glycoproteins with the functional group on the cell surface were then bound to dibenzocyclooctyne-sulfo-biotin via copper-free click chemistry under physiological conditions. After protein extraction and digestion, glycopeptides with the biotin tag were enriched by NeutrAvidin conjugated beads. Enriched glycopeptides were deglycosylated with peptide-N-glycosidase F in heavy-oxygen water, and in the process of glycan removal, asparagine was converted to aspartic acid and tagged with 18O for MS analysis. With this strategy, 144 unique N-glycopeptides containing 152 N-glycosylation sites were identified in 110 proteins in HEK293T cells. As expected, 95% of identified glycoproteins were membrane proteins, which were highly enriched. Many sites were located on important receptors, transporters, and cluster of differentiation proteins. The experimental results demonstrated that the current method is very effective for the comprehensive and site-specific identification of the cell surface N-glycoproteome and can be extensively applied to other cell surface protein studies.

  6. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of the Cell Surface N-Glycoproteome by Combining Metabolic Labeling and Click Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeekens, Johanna M.; Chen, Weixuan; Wu, Ronghu

    2015-04-01

    Cell surface N-glycoproteins play extraordinarily important roles in cell-cell communication, cell-matrix interactions, and cellular response to environmental cues. Global analysis is exceptionally challenging because many N-glycoproteins are present at low abundances and effective separation is difficult to achieve. Here, we have developed a novel strategy integrating metabolic labeling, copper-free click chemistry, and mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics methods to analyze cell surface N-glycoproteins comprehensively and site-specifically. A sugar analog containing an azido group, N-azidoacetylgalactosamine, was fed to cells to label glycoproteins. Glycoproteins with the functional group on the cell surface were then bound to dibenzocyclooctyne-sulfo-biotin via copper-free click chemistry under physiological conditions. After protein extraction and digestion, glycopeptides with the biotin tag were enriched by NeutrAvidin conjugated beads. Enriched glycopeptides were deglycosylated with peptide- N-glycosidase F in heavy-oxygen water, and in the process of glycan removal, asparagine was converted to aspartic acid and tagged with 18O for MS analysis. With this strategy, 144 unique N-glycopeptides containing 152 N-glycosylation sites were identified in 110 proteins in HEK293T cells. As expected, 95% of identified glycoproteins were membrane proteins, which were highly enriched. Many sites were located on important receptors, transporters, and cluster of differentiation proteins. The experimental results demonstrated that the current method is very effective for the comprehensive and site-specific identification of the cell surface N-glycoproteome and can be extensively applied to other cell surface protein studies.

  7. Epsilon-Q: An Automated Analyzer Interface for Mass Spectral Library Search and Label-Free Protein Quantification.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Young; Lee, Hyoung-Joo; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Paik, Young-Ki

    2017-04-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a widely used proteome analysis tool for biomedical science. In an MS-based bottom-up proteomic approach to protein identification, sequence database (DB) searching has been routinely used because of its simplicity and convenience. However, searching a sequence DB with multiple variable modification options can increase processing time, false-positive errors in large and complicated MS data sets. Spectral library searching is an alternative solution, avoiding the limitations of sequence DB searching and allowing the detection of more peptides with high sensitivity. Unfortunately, this technique has less proteome coverage, resulting in limitations in the detection of novel and whole peptide sequences in biological samples. To solve these problems, we previously developed the "Combo-Spec Search" method, which uses manually multiple references and simulated spectral library searching to analyze whole proteomes in a biological sample. In this study, we have developed a new analytical interface tool called "Epsilon-Q" to enhance the functions of both the Combo-Spec Search method and label-free protein quantification. Epsilon-Q performs automatically multiple spectral library searching, class-specific false-discovery rate control, and result integration. It has a user-friendly graphical interface and demonstrates good performance in identifying and quantifying proteins by supporting standard MS data formats and spectrum-to-spectrum matching powered by SpectraST. Furthermore, when the Epsilon-Q interface is combined with the Combo-Spec search method, called the Epsilon-Q system, it shows a synergistic function by outperforming other sequence DB search engines for identifying and quantifying low-abundance proteins in biological samples. The Epsilon-Q system can be a versatile tool for comparative proteome analysis based on multiple spectral libraries and label-free quantification.

  8. Comparative analysis of statistical methods used for detecting differential expression in label-free mass spectrometry proteomics.

    PubMed

    Langley, Sarah R; Mayr, Manuel

    2015-11-03

    Label-free LC-MS/MS proteomics has proven itself to be a powerful method for evaluating protein identification and quantification from complex samples. For comparative proteomics, several methods have been used to detect the differential expression of proteins from such data. We have assessed seven methods used across the literature for detecting differential expression from spectral count quantification: Student's t-test, significance analysis of microarrays (SAM), normalised spectral abundance factor (NSAF), normalised spectral abundance factor-power law global error model (NSAF-PLGEM), spectral index (SpI), DESeq and QSpec. We used 2000 simulated datasets as well as publicly available data from a proteomic standards study to assess the ability of these methods to detect differential expression in varying effect sizes and proportions of differentially expressed proteins. At two false discovery rate (FDR) levels, we find that several of the methods detect differential expression within the data with reasonable precision, others detect differential expression at the expense of low precision, and finally, others which fail to identify any differentially expressed proteins. The inability of these seven methods to fully capture the differential landscape, even at the largest effect size, illustrates some of the limitations of the existing technologies and the statistical methodologies. In label-free mass spectrometry experiments, protein identification and quantification have always been important, but there is now a growing focus on comparative proteomics. Detecting differential expression in protein levels can inform on important biological mechanisms and provide direction for further study. Given the high cost and labour intensive nature of validation experiments, statistical methods are important for prioritising proteins of interest. Here, we have performed a comparative analysis to investigate the statistical methodologies for detecting differential expression

  9. Normalization Approaches for Removing Systematic Biases Associated with Mass Spectrometry and Label-Free Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Barry, Richard C.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Johnson, Ethan T.; Qian, Weijun; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-02-01

    Central tendency, linear regression, locally weighted regression, and quantile techniques were investigated for normalization of peptide abundance measurements obtained from high-throughput liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR MS). Arbitrary abundances of peptides were obtained from three sample sets, including a standard protein sample, two Deinococcus radiodurans samples taken from different growth phases, and two mouse striatum samples from control and methamphetamine-stressed mice (strain C57BL/6). The selected normalization techniques were evaluated in both the absence and presence of biological variability by estimating extraneous variability prior to and following normalization. Prior to normalization, replicate runs from each sample set were observed to be statistically different, while following normalization replicate runs were no longer statistically different. Although all techniques reduced systematic bias, assigned ranks among the techniques revealed significant trends. For most LC-FTICR MS analyses, linear regression normalization ranked either first or second among the four techniques, suggesting that this technique was more generally suitable for reducing systematic biases.

  10. Deletion of Genes Encoding Arginase Improves Use of “Heavy” Isotope-Labeled Arginine for Mass Spectrometry in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Borek, Weronika E.; Zou, Juan; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    The use of “heavy” isotope-labeled arginine for stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) mass spectrometry in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is hindered by the fact that under normal conditions, arginine is extensively catabolized in vivo, resulting in the appearance of “heavy”-isotope label in several other amino acids, most notably proline, but also glutamate, glutamine and lysine. This “arginine conversion problem” significantly impairs quantification of mass spectra. Previously, we developed a method to prevent arginine conversion in fission yeast SILAC, based on deletion of genes involved in arginine catabolism. Here we show that although this method is indeed successful when 13C6-arginine (Arg-6) is used for labeling, it is less successful when 13C615N4-arginine (Arg-10), a theoretically preferable label, is used. In particular, we find that with this method, “heavy”-isotope label derived from Arg-10 is observed in amino acids other than arginine, indicating metabolic conversion of Arg-10. Arg-10 conversion, which severely complicates both MS and MS/MS analysis, is further confirmed by the presence of 13C515N2-arginine (Arg-7) in arginine-containing peptides from Arg-10-labeled cells. We describe how all of the problems associated with the use of Arg-10 can be overcome by a simple modification of our original method. We show that simultaneous deletion of the fission yeast arginase genes car1+ and aru1+ prevents virtually all of the arginine conversion that would otherwise result from the use of Arg-10. This solution should enable a wider use of heavy isotope-labeled amino acids in fission yeast SILAC. PMID:26075619

  11. MASS LOSS AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS DURING THE DECOMPOSITION OF A N-LABELED N2-FIXING EPOPHYTIC LICHEN, LOBARIA OREGANA (TUCK.) MULL. ARG.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied mass loss and nitrogen dynamics during fall and spring initiated decomposition of an N2-fixing epiphytic lichen, Lobaria oregana (Tuck.) Mull. Arg. using 15N. We developed a method of labeling lichens with 15N that involved spraying lichen material with a nutrient sol...

  12. MASS LOSS AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS DURING THE DECOMPOSITION OF A N-LABELED N2-FIXING EPOPHYTIC LICHEN, LOBARIA OREGANA (TUCK.) MULL. ARG.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We studied mass loss and nitrogen dynamics during fall and spring initiated decomposition of an N2-fixing epiphytic lichen, Lobaria oregana (Tuck.) Mull. Arg. using 15N. We developed a method of labeling lichens with 15N that involved spraying lichen material with a nutrient sol...

  13. Rapid 'de novo' peptide sequencing by a combination of nanoelectrospray, isotopic labeling and a quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, A; Chernushevich, I; Ens, W; Standing, K G; Thomson, B; Wilm, M; Mann, M

    1997-01-01

    Protein microanalysis usually involves the sequencing of gel-separated proteins available in very small amounts. While mass spectrometry has become the method of choice for identifying proteins in databases, in almost all laboratories 'de novo' protein sequencing is still performed by Edman degradation. Here we show that a combination of the nanoelectrospray ion source, isotopic end labeling of peptides and a quadrupole/ time-of-flight instrument allows facile read-out of the sequences of tryptic peptides. Isotopic labeling was performed by enzymatic digestion of proteins in 1:1 16O/18O water, eliminating the need for peptide derivatization. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer was constructed from a triple quadrupole and an electrospray time-of-flight instrument. Tandem mass spectra of peptides were obtained with better than 50 ppm mass accuracy and resolution routinely in excess of 5000. Unique and error tolerant identification of yeast proteins as well as the sequencing of a novel protein illustrate the potential of the approach. The high data quality in tandem mass spectra and the additional information provided by the isotopic end labeling of peptides enabled automated interpretation of the spectra via simple software algorithms. The technique demonstrated here removes one of the last obstacles to routine and high throughput protein sequencing by mass spectrometry.

  14. Label-free mass spectrometry exploits dozens of detected peptides to quantify lamins in wildtype and knockdown cells.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joe; Harada, Takamasa; Buxboim, Amnon; Shin, Jae-Won; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, David W; Discher, Dennis E

    2013-01-01

    Label-free quantitation and characterization of proteins by mass spectrometry (MS) is now feasible, especially for moderately expressed structural proteins such as lamins that typically yield dozens of tryptic peptides from tissue cells. Using standard cell culture samples, we describe general algorithms for quantitative analysis of peptides identified in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The algorithms were foundational to the discovery that the absolute stoichiometry of A-type to B-type lamins scales with tissue stiffness (Swift et al., Science 2013). Isoform dominance helps make sense of why mutations and changes with age of mechanosensitive lamin-A,C only affect "stiff" tissues such as heart, muscle, bone, or even fat, but not brain. A Peak Ratio Fingerprinting (PRF) algorithm is elaborated here through its application to lamin-A,C knockdown. After demonstrating the large dynamic range of PRF using calibrated mixtures of human and mouse lysates, we validate measurements of partial knockdown with standard cell biology analyses using quantitative immunofluorescence and immunoblotting. Optimal sets of MS-detected peptides as determined by PRF demonstrate that the strongest peptide signals are not necessarily the most reliable for quantitation. After lamin-A,C knockdown, PRF computes an invariant set of "housekeeping" proteins as part of a broader proteomic analysis that also shows the proteome of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is more broadly perturbed than that of a human epithelial cancer line (A549s), with particular variation in nuclear and cytoskeletal proteins. These methods offer exciting prospects for basic and clinical studies of lamin-A,C as well as other MS-detectable proteins.

  15. Tracing nitrogenous disinfection byproducts after medium pressure UV water treatment by stable isotope labeling and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Annemieke; Martijn, Bram J; Vughs, Dennis; Baken, Kirsten A; van Wezel, Annemarie P

    2015-04-07

    Advanced oxidation processes are important barriers for organic micropollutants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides) in (drinking) water treatment. Studies indicate that medium pressure (MP) UV/H2O2 treatment leads to a positive response in Ames mutagenicity tests, which is then removed after granulated activated carbon (GAC) filtration. The formed potentially mutagenic substances were hitherto not identified and may result from the reaction of photolysis products of nitrate with (photolysis products of) natural organic material (NOM). In this study we present an innovative approach to trace the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) of MP UV water treatment, based on stable isotope labeled nitrate combined with high resolution mass spectrometry. It was shown that after MP UV treatment of artificial water containing NOM and nitrate, multiple nitrogen containing substances were formed. In total 84 N-DBPs were detected at individual concentrations between 1 to 135 ng/L bentazon-d6 equivalents, with a summed concentration of 1.2 μg/L bentazon-d6 equivalents. The chemical structures of three byproducts were confirmed. Screening for the 84 N-DBPs in water samples from a full-scale drinking water treatment plant based on MP UV/H2O2 treatment showed that 22 of the N-DBPs found in artificial water were also detected in real water samples.

  16. Chip electrophoresis of active banana ingredients with label-free detection utilizing deep UV native fluorescence and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohla, Stefan; Schulze, Philipp; Fritzsche, Stefanie; Belder, Detlev

    2011-02-01

    In the present work, we report on a rapid and straightforward approach for the determination of biologically active compounds in bananas applying microchip electrophoresis (MCE). For this purpose, we applied label-free detection utilizing deep UV fluorescence detection with excitation at 266 nm. Using this approach, we could identify dopamine and serotonin, their precursors tryptophan and tyrosine and also the isoquinoline alkaloid salsolinol in less than 1 min. In bananas, after 10 days of ripening, we additionally found the compound levodopa which is a metabolite of the tyrosine pathway. Quantitative analysis of extracts by external calibration revealed concentrations of serotonin, tryptophan, and tyrosine from 2.7 to 7.6 μg/mL with relative standard deviations of less than 3.5%. The corresponding calibration plots showed good linearity with correlation coefficients higher than 0.985. For reliable peak assignment, the compounds were also analyzed by coupling chip electrophoresis with mass spectrometry. This paper demonstrates exemplarily the applicability of MCE with native fluorescence detection for rapid analysis of natural compounds in fruits and reveals the potential of chip-based separation systems for the analysis of complex mixtures.

  17. A Quantitative Proteomic Workflow for Characterization of Frozen Clinical Biopsies: Laser Capture Microdissection Coupled with Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, John P.; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Merchant, Anand S.; Satoskar, Anjali; Taslim, Cenny; Lin, Shili; Rovin, Brad H.; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati; Freitas, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a simple, highly efficient and robust proteomic workflow for routine liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Laser Microdissection Pressure Catapulting (LMPC) isolates. Highly efficient protein recovery was achieved by optimization of a “one-pot” protein extraction and digestion allowing for reproducible proteomic analysis on as few as 500 LMPC isolated cells. The method was combined with label-free spectral count quantitation to characterize proteomic differences from 3,000–10,000 LMPC isolated cells. Significance analysis of spectral count data was accomplished using the edgeR tag-count R package combined with hierarchical cluster analysis. To illustrate the capability of this robust workflow, two examples are presented: 1) analysis of keratinocytes from human punch biopsies of normal skin and a chronic diabetic wound and 2) comparison of glomeruli from needle biopsies of patients with kidney disease. Differentially expressed proteins were validated by use of immunohistochemistry. These examples illustrate that tissue proteomics carried out on limited clinical material can obtain informative proteomic signatures for disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the suitability of this approach for biomarker discovery. PMID:23022584

  18. A quantitative proteomic workflow for characterization of frozen clinical biopsies: laser capture microdissection coupled with label-free mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, John P; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Merchant, Anand S; Satoskar, Anjali; Taslim, Cenny; Lin, Shili; Rovin, Brad H; Sen, Chandan K; Roy, Sashwati; Freitas, Michael A

    2012-12-21

    This paper describes a simple, highly efficient and robust proteomic workflow for routine liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Laser Microdissection Pressure Catapulting (LMPC) isolates. Highly efficient protein recovery was achieved by optimization of a "one-pot" protein extraction and digestion allowing for reproducible proteomic analysis on as few as 500 LMPC isolated cells. The method was combined with label-free spectral count quantitation to characterize proteomic differences from 3000-10,000 LMPC isolated cells. Significance analysis of spectral count data was accomplished using the edgeR tag-count R package combined with hierarchical cluster analysis. To illustrate the capability of this robust workflow, two examples are presented: 1) analysis of keratinocytes from human punch biopsies of normal skin and a chronic diabetic wound and 2) comparison of glomeruli from needle biopsies of patients with kidney disease. Differentially expressed proteins were validated by use of immunohistochemistry. These examples illustrate that tissue proteomics carried out on limited clinical material can obtain informative proteomic signatures for disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the suitability of this approach for biomarker discovery.

  19. Coupling liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry detection with microfluidic droplet array for label-free enzyme inhibition assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2014-01-07

    In this work, the combination of droplet-based microfluidics with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was achieved, for providing a fast separation and high-information-content detection method for the analysis of nanoliter-scale droplets with complex compositions. A novel interface method was developed using an oil-covered droplet array chip to couple with an LC/MS system via a capillary sampling probe and a 4 nL injection valve without the need of a droplet extraction device. The present system can perform multistep operations including parallel enzyme inhibition reactions in nanoliter droplets, 4 nL sample injection, fast separation with capillary LC, and label-free detection with ESI-MS, and has significant flexibility in the accurate addressing and sampling of droplets of interest on demand. The system performance was evaluated using angiotensin I and angiotensin II as model samples, and the repeatabilities of peak area for angiotensin I and angiotensin II were 2.7% and 7.5% (RSD, n = 4), respectively. The present system was further applied to the screening for inhibitors of cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2) and measurement of the IC50 value of the inhibitor. The sample consumption for each droplet assay was 100 nL, which is reduced 10-100 times compared with conventional 384-multi-well plate systems usually used in high-throughput drug screening.

  20. Formation and Determination of Endogenous Methylated Nucleotides in Mammals by Chemical Labeling Coupled with Mass Spectrometry Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huan; Qi, Chu-Bo; Liu, Ting; Xiao, Hua-Ming; Cheng, Qing-Yun; Jiang, Han-Peng; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2017-03-17

    5-Methylcytosine (5-mC) is an important epigenetic mark that plays critical roles in a variety of cellular processes. To properly exert physiological functions, the distribution of 5-mC needs to be tightly controlled in both DNA and RNA. In addition to methyltransferase-mediated DNA and RNA methylation, premethylated nucleotides can be potentially incorporated into DNA and RNA during replication and transcription. To exclude the premodified nucleotides into DNA and RNA, endogenous 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine monophosphate (5-Me-dCMP) generated from nucleic acids metabolism can be enzymatically deaminated to thymidine monophosphate (TMP). Therefore, previous studies failed to detect 5-Me-dCMP or 5-methylcytidine monophosphate (5-Me-CMP) in cells. In the current study, we established a method by chemical labeling coupled with liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) for sensitive and simultaneous determination of 10 nucleotides, including 5-Me-dCMP and 5-Me-CMP. As N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DMPA) was utilized for labeling, the detection sensitivities of nucleotides increased by 88-372-fold due to the introduction of a tertiary amino group and a hydrophobic moiety from DMPA. Using this method, we found that endogenous 5-Me-dCMP and 5-Me-CMP widely existed in cultured human cells, human tissues, and human urinary samples. The presence of endogenous 5-Me-dCMP and 5-Me-CMP indicates that deaminases may not fully deaminate these methylated nucleotides. Consequently, the remaining premethylated nucleosides could be converted to nucleoside triphosphates as building blocks for DNA and RNA synthesis. Furthermore, we found that the contents of 5-Me-dCMP and 5-Me-CMP exhibited significant decreases in renal carcinoma tissues and urine samples of lymphoma patients compared to their controls, probably due to more reutilization of methylated nucleotides in DNA and RNA synthesis. This study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first

  1. A New Strategy of Using O18-Labeled Iodoacetic Acid for Mass Spectrometry-Based Protein Quantitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunhai; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2012-07-01

    A new O18 labeling protocol is designed to assist quantitation of cysteine-containing proteins using LC/MS. Unlike other O18 labeling strategies, the labeling is carried out at the intact protein level (prior to its digestion) during reduction/alkylation of cysteine side chains using O18-labeled iodoacetic acid (IAA). The latter can be easily prepared by exchanging carboxylic oxygen atoms of commercially available IAA in O18-enriched water at low pH. Since incorporation of the O18 label in the protein occurs at the whole protein, rather than peptide level, the quantitation results are not peptide-dependent. The excellent stability of the label in mild pH conditions provides flexibility and robustness needed of sample processing steps following the labeling. In contrast to generally costly isotope labeling reagents, this approach uses only two relatively inexpensive commercially available reagents (IAA and H2O18). The feasibility of the new method is demonstrated using an 80 kDa human serum transferrin (hTf) as a model, where linear quantitation is achieved across a dynamic range spanning three orders of magnitude. The new approach can be used in quantitative proteomics applications and is particularly suitable for a variety of tasks in the biopharmaceutical sector, ranging from pharmacokinetic studies to quality control of protein therapeutics.

  2. The use of stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry techniques to simultaneously determine the oral and ophthalmic bioavailability of timolol in dogs.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J D; Olah, T V; Morris, M J; Bortnick, A; Brunner, J

    1998-04-01

    Assays have been established for the quantitation of timolol and its 13C3- and 2H9-stable-isotope-labeled analogs in plasma and urine using liquid chromatography with atmospheric-pressure chemical-ionization tandem mass spectrometry. For the analysis of urine, underivatized timolol and its labeled analogs are monitored while timolol in plasma is assayed down to concentrations of 0.2 ng/mL after derivatization with phosgene. The great power of this technique is illustrated by simultaneously assaying three different species of timolol in plasma and urine obtained from dogs receiving simultaneous ophthalmic, oral, and intravenous doses of unlabeled and [2H9]- and [13C3]-labeled timolol. Thus, the ophthalmic and oral bioavailabilities of timolol are measured in a single experiment rather than as a three-phase crossover experiment. This approach yields accurate and precise analytical data, obviates intrasubject variability, and saves both analytical and animal resources.

  3. Synthesis of deuterium-labeled 17-hydroxyprogesterone suitable as an internal standard for isotope dilution mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, K.; Yamaga, N.; Kohara, H.

    1988-03-01

    A synthesis is reported of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, labeled with four atoms of deuterium at ring C and suitable for use as an internal standard for isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Base-catalyzed equilibration of methyl 3 alpha-acetoxy-12-oxo-cholanate (III) with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O, followed by reduction of the 12-oxo group by the modified Wolff-Kisher method using (/sup 2/H)diethylene glycol and (/sup 2/H)hydrazine hydrate afforded (11,11,12,12,23,23(-2)H)lithocholic acid (V). The Meystre-Miescher degradation of the side chain of V yielded 3 alpha-hydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnan-20-one (X). Oxidation of the 3,20-enol-diacetate of X with perbenzoic acid followed by saponification afforded 3 alpha,17-dihydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnan-20-one (XI). Oxidation of XI with N-bromoacetamide yielded 17-hydroxy-5 beta-(11,11,12,12(-2)H)pregnane-3,20-dione (XII). Bromination of XII followed by dehydrobromination yielded 17-hydroxy-(11,11,12,12(-2)H) progesterone (XIV), consisting of 0.3% /sup 2/H0-, 1.1% /sup 2/H/sub 1/-, 8.6% /sup 2/H/sub 2/-, 37.1% /sup 2/H/sub 3/-, 52.1% /sup 2/H/sub 4/-, and 0.8% /sup 2/H/sub 5/-species.

  4. Discovery of Mouse Spleen Signaling Responses to Anthrax using Label-Free Quantitative Phosphoproteomics via Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Nathan P.; Dong, Li; Zhou, Weidong; Du, Xiuxia; Reghu, Nikitha; Kool, Arjan C.; Choi, Dahan; Bailey, Charles L.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2011-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by spores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), and is an extremely dangerous disease that can kill unvaccinated victims within 2 weeks. Modern antibiotic-based therapy can increase the survival rate to ∼50%, but only if administered presymptomatically (within 24–48 h of exposure). To discover host signaling responses to presymptomatic anthrax, label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to compare spleens from uninfected and spore-challenged mice over a 72 h time-course. Spleen proteins were denatured using urea, reduced using dithiothreitol, alkylated using iodoacetamide, and digested into peptides using trypsin, and the resulting phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide solid-phase extraction and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography-Linear Trap Quadrupole-Orbitrap-MS(/MS). The fragment ion spectra were processed using DeconMSn and searched using both Mascot and SEQUEST resulting in 252,626 confident identifications of 6248 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 5782 phosphorylation sites). The precursor ion spectra were deisotoped using Decon2LS and aligned using MultiAlign resulting in the confident quantitation of 3265 of the identified phosphopeptides. ANOVAs were used to produce a q-value ranked list of host signaling responses. Late-stage (48–72 h postchallenge) Sterne strain (lethal) infections resulted in global alterations to the spleen phosphoproteome. In contrast, ΔSterne strain (asymptomatic; missing the anthrax toxin) infections resulted in 188 (5.8%) significantly altered (q<0.05) phosphopeptides. Twenty-six highly tentative phosphorylation responses to early-stage (24 h postchallenge) anthrax were discovered (q<0.5), and ten of these originated from eight proteins that have known roles in the host immune response. These tentative early-anthrax host response signaling events within mouse spleens may translate into presymptomatic

  5. Nitrogen removal in Myriophyllum aquaticum wetland microcosms for swine wastewater treatment: (15) N-labelled nitrogen mass balance analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shunan; Liu, Feng; Xiao, Runlin; He, Yang; Wu, Jinshui

    2017-01-01

    Ecological treatments are effective for treating agricultural wastewater. In this study, wetland microcosms vegetated with Myriophyllum aquaticum were designed for nitrogen (N) removal from two strengths of swine wastewater, and (15) N-labelled ammonium (NH4(+) -N) was added to evaluate the dominant NH4(+) -N removal pathway. The results showed that 98.8% of NH4(+) -N and 88.3% of TN (TN: 248.6 mg L(-1) ) were removed from low-strength swine wastewater (SW1) after an incubation of 21 days, with corresponding values for high-strength swine wastewater (SW2) being 99.2% of NH4(+) -N and 87.8% of TN (TN: 494.9 mg L(-1) ). Plant uptake and soil adsorption respectively accounted for 24.0% and 15.6% of the added (15) N. Meanwhile, above-ground tissues of M. aquaticum had significantly higher biomass and TN content than below-ground (P < 0.05). (15) N mass balance analysis indicated that gas losses contributed 52.0% to the added (15) N, but the N2 O flux constituted only 7.5% of total gas losses. The dynamics of NO3(-) -N and N2 O flux revealed that strong nitrification and denitrification occurred in M. aquaticum microcosms, which was a dominant N removal pathway. These findings demonstrated that M. aquaticum could feasibly be used to construct wetlands for high N-loaded animal wastewater treatment. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Discovery of mouse spleen signaling responses to anthrax using label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Dong, Li; Zhou, Weidong; Du, Xiuxia; Reghu, Nikitha; Kool, Arjan C; Choi, Dahan; Bailey, Charles L; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Popov, Serguei G

    2011-03-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by spores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), and is an extremely dangerous disease that can kill unvaccinated victims within 2 weeks. Modern antibiotic-based therapy can increase the survival rate to ∼50%, but only if administered presymptomatically (within 24-48 h of exposure). To discover host signaling responses to presymptomatic anthrax, label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to compare spleens from uninfected and spore-challenged mice over a 72 h time-course. Spleen proteins were denatured using urea, reduced using dithiothreitol, alkylated using iodoacetamide, and digested into peptides using trypsin, and the resulting phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide solid-phase extraction and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography-Linear Trap Quadrupole-Orbitrap-MS(/MS). The fragment ion spectra were processed using DeconMSn and searched using both Mascot and SEQUEST resulting in 252,626 confident identifications of 6248 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 5782 phosphorylation sites). The precursor ion spectra were deisotoped using Decon2LS and aligned using MultiAlign resulting in the confident quantitation of 3265 of the identified phosphopeptides. ANOVAs were used to produce a q-value ranked list of host signaling responses. Late-stage (48-72 h postchallenge) Sterne strain (lethal) infections resulted in global alterations to the spleen phosphoproteome. In contrast, ΔSterne strain (asymptomatic; missing the anthrax toxin) infections resulted in 188 (5.8%) significantly altered (q<0.05) phosphopeptides. Twenty-six highly tentative phosphorylation responses to early-stage (24 h postchallenge) anthrax were discovered (q<0.5), and ten of these originated from eight proteins that have known roles in the host immune response. These tentative early-anthrax host response signaling events within mouse spleens may translate into presymptomatic

  7. Validation of the doubly labeled water method using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy and isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Swibas, Tracy; Kohrt, Wendy M; Catenacci, Vicki A; Creasy, Seth A; Plasqui, Guy; Wouters, Loek; Speakman, John R; Berman, Elena S F

    2017-10-03

    When the doubly-labeled water (DLW) method is used to measure total daily energy expenditure (TDEE), isotope measurements are typically performed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). New technologies, such as off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) provide comparable isotopic measurements of standard waters and human urine samples, but the accuracy of carbon dioxide production (VCO2) determined with OA-ICOS has not been demonstrated. We compared simultaneous measurement of VCO2 obtained using whole-room indirect calorimetry (IC) with DLW-based measurements from IRMS and OA-ICOS. 17 subjects (10 female; 22 to 63 yrs.) were studied for 7 consecutive days in the IC. Subjects consumed a dose of 0.25 g H2(18)O (95% APE) and 0.14 g (2)H2O (99.8% APE) per kg of total body water, and urine samples were obtained on days 1 and 8 to measure average daily VCO2 using OA-ICOS and IRMS. VCO2 was calculated using both the plateau and intercept methods. There were no differences in VCO2 or TDEE measured by OA-ICOS or IRMS compared with IC when the plateau method was used. When the intercept method was used, VCO2 measured using OA-ICOS did not differ from IC, but VCO2 measured using IRMS was significantly lower than IC. Accuracy (~1-5%), precision (~8%), intraclass correlation coefficients (R=0.87-90), and root mean squared error (30-40 L/day) of VCO22 measured by OA-ICOS and IRMS were similar. Both OA-ICOS and IRMS produced measurements of VCO2 with comparable accuracy and precision when compared to IC. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism.

  8. Discovering the infectome of human endothelial cells challenged with Aspergillus fumigatus applying a mass spectrometry label-free approach.

    PubMed

    Curty, N; Kubitschek-Barreira, P H; Neves, G W; Gomes, D; Pizzatti, L; Abdelhay, E; Souza, G H M F; Lopes-Bezerra, L M

    2014-01-31

    Blood vessel invasion is a key feature of invasive aspergillosis. This angioinvasion process contributes to tissue thrombosis, which can impair the access of leukocytes and antifungal drugs to the site of infection. It has been demonstrated that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are activated and assume a prothrombotic phenotype following contact with Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae or germlings, a process that is independent of fungus viability. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this pathogen can activate endothelial cells, together with the endothelial pathways that are involved in this process, remain unknown. Using a label-free approach by High Definition Mass Spectrometry (HDMS(E)), differentially expressed proteins were identified during HUVEC-A. fumigatus interaction. Among these, 89 proteins were determined to be up- or down-regulated, and another 409 proteins were exclusive to one experimental condition: the HUVEC control or HUVEC:AF interaction. The in silico predictions provided a general view of which biological processes and/or pathways were regulated during HUVEC:AF interaction, and they mainly included cell signaling, immune response and hemostasis pathways. This work describes the first global proteomic analysis of HUVECs following interaction with A. fumigatus germlings, the fungus morphotype that represents the first step of invasion and dissemination within the host. A. fumigatus causes the main opportunistic invasive fungal infection related to neutropenic hematologic patients. One of the key steps during the establishment of invasive aspergillosis is angioinvasion but the mechanism associated with the interaction of A. fumigatus with the vascular endothelium remains unknown. The identification of up- and down-regulated proteins expressed by human endothelial cells in response to the fungus infection can contribute to reveal the mechanism of endothelial response and, to understand the physiopathology of this high mortality

  9. Elemental formula annotation of polar and lipophilic metabolites using (13) C, (15) N and (34) S isotope labelling, in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Giavalisco, Patrick; Li, Yan; Matthes, Annemarie; Eckhardt, Aenne; Hubberten, Hans-Michael; Hesse, Holger; Segu, Shruthi; Hummel, Jan; Köhl, Karin; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2011-10-01

    The unbiased and comprehensive analysis of metabolites in any organism presents a major challenge if proper peak annotation and unambiguous assignment of the biological origin of the peaks are required. Here we provide a comprehensive multi-isotope labelling-based strategy using fully labelled (13) C, (15) N and (34) S plant tissues, in combination with a fractionated metabolite extraction protocol. The extraction procedure allows for the simultaneous extraction of polar, semi-polar and hydrophobic metabolites, as well as for the extraction of proteins and starch. After labelling and extraction, the metabolites and lipids were analysed using a high-resolution mass spectrometer providing accurate MS and all-ion fragmentation data, providing an unambiguous readout for every detectable isotope-labelled peak. The isotope labelling assisted peak annotation process employed can be applied in either an automated database-dependent or a database-independent analysis of the plant polar metabolome and lipidome. As a proof of concept, the developed methods and technologies were applied and validated using Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root extracts. Along with a large repository of assigned elemental compositions, which is provided, we show, using selected examples, the accuracy and reliability of the developed workflow.

  10. [Metal-tag labeling coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry for absolute quantitation of proteins].

    PubMed

    Li, Jiabin; Zhou, Lianqi; Yan, Hui; Li, Nannan; Hao, Feiran; Tian, Fang; Zhang, Yangjun

    2014-04-01

    A novel method has been established based on metal element chelated tags coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-selected ion monitoring mass spectrometry (HPLC-SIM/MS). The labeling efficiency and stability of metal element chelated tags, the chromatographic retention behavior and MS behavior of the labeled peptides, the linear range and accuracy of this method were examined. The results showed that the metal element chelated tag method has high labeling efficiency and high labeling stability, and the labeled peptides with different kinds of metal tags have consistent chromatographic retention behavior. The method of metal tags coupled with HPLC-SIM/MS has high sensitivity with the limit of quantification (LOQ) up to 1 fmol. The linear range for the method was between 1 fmol to 500 fmol with R2 > 0.99, which means the method has a good linearity. Moreover, this method had an average recovery of 117.01%. The method was used in the absolute quantitation of a protein enolase in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (TTE) with a relative standard deviation of 5.74%, which means high precision. All the results showed that this method is accurate and reliable for the absolute quantitation of proteins. This gives us an alternative for the quantitative determination of proteins in relatively simple biological samples.

  11. Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry assay to measure microtubule dynamics in neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Polson, Craig; Cantone, Joseph L; Wei, Cong; Drexler, Dieter M; Meredith, Jere E

    2014-12-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are highly dynamic polymers composed of α- and β-tubulin heterodimers. Dysregulation of MT dynamics in neurons may be a contributing factor in the progression of various neurodegenerative diseases. We developed a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method to measure the fraction of [(13)C6]leucine-labeled α-tubulin-derived surrogate peptides. Using this approach, we measured the time course of incorporation of [(13)C6]leucine label into the MT and dimer pools isolated from cycling cells and rat primary hippocampal neurons. We found that the MT pool is in rapid equilibrium with the dimer pool in the cycling cells, consistent with rapid MT polymerization/depolymerization during cell proliferation. Conversely, in neurons, we found that labeling of the MT pool was rapid, whereas the dimer pool was delayed. These results suggest that newly synthesized α-tubulin is first incorporated into MTs or complexes that co-sediment with MTs and that appearance of labeled α-tubulin in the dimer pool may be a consequence of MT depolymerization or breakdown. Our results demonstrate that a SILAC-based approach can be used to measure MT dynamics and may have utility for exploring MT dysregulation in various models of neurodegenerative disease.

  12. Characterization of uniformly and atom-specifically 13C-labeled heparin and heparan sulfate polysaccharide precursors using 13C NMR spectroscopy and ESI mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thao K. N.; Tran, Vy M.; Victor, Xylophone V.; Skalicky, Jack J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2010-01-01

    The biological actions of heparin and heparan sulfate, two structurally related glycosaminoglycans, depend on the organization of the complex heparanome. Due to the structural complexity of the heparanome, the sequence of variably sulfonated uronic acid and glucosamine residues is usually characterized by the analysis of smaller oligosaccharide and disaccharide fragments. Even characterization of smaller heparin/heparan sulfate oligosaccharide or disaccharide fragments using simple 1D 1H NMR spectroscopy is often complicated by the extensive signal overlap. 13C NMR signals, on the other hand, overlap less and therefore, 13C NMR spectroscopy can greatly facilitate the structural elucidation of the complex heparanome and provide finer insights into the structural basis for biological functions. This is the first report of the preparation of anomeric carbon-specific 13C-labeled heparin/heparan sulfate precursors from the Escherichia coli K5 strain. Uniformly 13C- and 15N-labeled precursors were also produced and characterized by 13C NMR spectroscopy. Mass spectrometric analysis of enzymatically fragmented disaccharides revealed that anomeric carbon-specific labeling efforts resulted in a minor loss/scrambling of 13C in the precursor backbone, whereas uniform labeling efforts resulted in greater than 95% 13C isotope enrichment in the precursor backbone. These labeled precursors provided high-resolution NMR signals with great sensitivity and set the stage for studying the heparanome–proteome interactions. PMID:20832774

  13. Identification of metabolites of honokiol in rat urine using 13C stable isotope labeling and liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Tang, Minghai; Lai, Huijun; Dong, Yinfeng; Xie, Caifeng; Ye, Haoyu; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Neng; Li, Yanfang; Cai, Lulu; Chen, Lijuan

    2013-06-21

    A general approach based on stable isotope labeling and UPLC/Q-TOF-MS analysis of in vivo novel metabolites of honokiol has been developed in our study. In this method, urine samples were collected after intravenous administration of mixture of regular and [(13)C6]-labeled honokiol at 1:1 ratio to healthy rats. The metabolites could be easily recognized by the determination of a chromatographically co-eluted pair of isotopomers (MS doublet peaks) with similar peak intensities and mass difference corresponding to that between isotope-labeled and non-isotope-labeled honokiol. A total of 51 metabolites were detected, 37 of which were tentatively identified based on mass accuracy (<5 ppm). Among them, 33 of honokiol metabolites were first reported with 5 metabolites belonging to phase I and other 32 metabolites belonging to phase II metabolites. Our results highlighted that the main phase I metabolic pathways of honokiol in rats were oxidation, and the phase II metabolic pathways were sulfation, glucuronidation, acetylation as well as amino acids conjugation. This was the first research focused on the biotransformation of honokiol in rats, and the identification of these metabolites might provide us essential information for further pharmacological and clinical studies of honokiol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Altered Retinoic Acid Metabolism in Diabetic Mouse Kidney Identified by 18O Isotopic Labeling and 2D Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Jonathan M.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; LeJeune, Wanda S.; Dey, Nilay; Luxon, Bruce A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Napoli, Joseph L.; Denner, Larry; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous metabolic pathways have been implicated in diabetes-induced renal injury, yet few studies have utilized unbiased systems biology approaches for mapping the interconnectivity of diabetes-dysregulated proteins that are involved. We utilized a global, quantitative, differential proteomic approach to identify a novel retinoic acid hub in renal cortical protein networks dysregulated by type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Total proteins were extracted from renal cortex of control and db/db mice at 20 weeks of age (after 12 weeks of hyperglycemia in the diabetic mice). Following trypsinization, 18O- and 16O-labeled control and diabetic peptides, respectively, were pooled and separated by two dimensional liquid chromatography (strong cation exchange creating 60 fractions further separated by nano-HPLC), followed by peptide identification and quantification using mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis identified 53 proteins with fold change ≥1.5 and p≤0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment (out of 1,806 proteins identified), including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH1/ALDH1A1). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified altered retinoic acid as a key signaling hub that was altered in the diabetic renal cortical proteome. Western blotting and real-time PCR confirmed diabetes-induced upregulation of RALDH1, which was localized by immunofluorescence predominantly to the proximal tubule in the diabetic renal cortex, while PCR confirmed the downregulation of ADH identified with mass spectrometry. Despite increased renal cortical tissue levels of retinol and RALDH1 in db/db versus control mice, all-trans-retinoic acid was significantly decreased in association with a significant decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that retinoic acid metabolism is significantly dysregulated in diabetic kidneys, and suggest that a shift in all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism is a novel feature in

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Wheat Seeds during Artificial Ageing and Priming Using the Isobaric Tandem Mass Tag Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yangyong; Zhang, Shuaibing; Wang, Jinshui; Hu, Yuansen

    2016-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important crop worldwide. The physiological deterioration of seeds during storage and seed priming is closely associated with germination, and thus contributes to plant growth and subsequent grain yields. In this study, wheat seeds during different stages of artificial ageing (45°C; 50% relative humidity; 98%, 50%, 20%, and 1% Germination rates) and priming (hydro-priming treatment) were subjected to proteomics analysis through a proteomic approach based on the isobaric tandem mass tag labeling. A total of 162 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) mainly involved in metabolism, energy supply, and defense/stress responses, were identified during artificial ageing and thus validated previous physiological and biochemical studies. These DEPs indicated that the inability to protect against ageing leads to the incremental decomposition of the stored substance, impairment of metabolism and energy supply, and ultimately resulted in seed deterioration. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis revealed that the up-regulated proteins involved in seed ageing were mainly enriched in ribosome, whereas the down-regulated proteins were mainly accumulated in energy supply (starch and sucrose metabolism) and stress defense (ascorbate and aldarate metabolism). Proteins, including hemoglobin 1, oleosin, agglutinin, and non-specific lipid-transfer proteins, were first identified in aged seeds and might be regarded as new markers of seed deterioration. Of the identified proteins, 531 DEPs were recognized during seed priming compared with unprimed seeds. In contrast to the up-regulated DEPs in seed ageing, several up-regulated DEPs in priming were involved in energy supply (tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolysis, and fatty acid oxidation), anabolism (amino acids, and fatty acid synthesis), and cell growth/division. KEGG and protein-protein interaction analysis indicated that the up-regulated proteins in seed priming were mainly

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Wheat Seeds during Artificial Ageing and Priming Using the Isobaric Tandem Mass Tag Labeling.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yangyong; Zhang, Shuaibing; Wang, Jinshui; Hu, Yuansen

    2016-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important crop worldwide. The physiological deterioration of seeds during storage and seed priming is closely associated with germination, and thus contributes to plant growth and subsequent grain yields. In this study, wheat seeds during different stages of artificial ageing (45°C; 50% relative humidity; 98%, 50%, 20%, and 1% Germination rates) and priming (hydro-priming treatment) were subjected to proteomics analysis through a proteomic approach based on the isobaric tandem mass tag labeling. A total of 162 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) mainly involved in metabolism, energy supply, and defense/stress responses, were identified during artificial ageing and thus validated previous physiological and biochemical studies. These DEPs indicated that the inability to protect against ageing leads to the incremental decomposition of the stored substance, impairment of metabolism and energy supply, and ultimately resulted in seed deterioration. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis revealed that the up-regulated proteins involved in seed ageing were mainly enriched in ribosome, whereas the down-regulated proteins were mainly accumulated in energy supply (starch and sucrose metabolism) and stress defense (ascorbate and aldarate metabolism). Proteins, including hemoglobin 1, oleosin, agglutinin, and non-specific lipid-transfer proteins, were first identified in aged seeds and might be regarded as new markers of seed deterioration. Of the identified proteins, 531 DEPs were recognized during seed priming compared with unprimed seeds. In contrast to the up-regulated DEPs in seed ageing, several up-regulated DEPs in priming were involved in energy supply (tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolysis, and fatty acid oxidation), anabolism (amino acids, and fatty acid synthesis), and cell growth/division. KEGG and protein-protein interaction analysis indicated that the up-regulated proteins in seed priming were mainly

  17. 18O-labeled proteome reference as global internal standards for targeted quantification by selected reaction monitoring-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L; Moore, Ronald J; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2011-12-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the application of stable isotope-labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards can be prohibitive for screening a large number of candidate proteins as often required in the preverification phase of discovery studies. Herein we present a proof of concept study using an (18)O-labeled proteome reference as global internal standards (GIS) for SRM-based relative quantification. The (18)O-labeled proteome reference (or GIS) can be readily prepared and contains a heavy isotope ((18)O)-labeled internal standard for every possible tryptic peptide. Our results showed that the percentage of heavy isotope ((18)O) incorporation applying an improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into the labeled mouse plasma reference. Reliable quantification was observed with high reproducibility (i.e. coefficient of variance <10%) for analyte concentrations that were set at 100-fold higher or lower than those of the GIS based on the light ((16)O)/heavy ((18)O) peak area ratios. The utility of (18)O-labeled GIS was further illustrated by accurate relative quantification of 45 major human plasma proteins. Moreover, quantification of the concentrations of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen was illustrated by coupling the GIS with standard additions of purified protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of (18)O-labeled proteome reference as GIS provides a convenient, low cost, and effective strategy for relative quantification of a large number of candidate proteins in biological or clinical samples using SRM.

  18. 18O-Labeled Proteome Reference as Global Internal Standards for Targeted Quantification by Selected Reaction Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Seo; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Liu, Tao; Robinson, Errol; Hossain, Mahmud; Champion, Boyd L.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-MS is an emerging technology for high throughput targeted protein quantification and verification in biomarker discovery studies; however, the cost associated with the application of stable isotope-labeled synthetic peptides as internal standards can be prohibitive for screening a large number of candidate proteins as often required in the preverification phase of discovery studies. Herein we present a proof of concept study using an 18O-labeled proteome reference as global internal standards (GIS) for SRM-based relative quantification. The 18O-labeled proteome reference (or GIS) can be readily prepared and contains a heavy isotope (18O)-labeled internal standard for every possible tryptic peptide. Our results showed that the percentage of heavy isotope (18O) incorporation applying an improved protocol was >99.5% for most peptides investigated. The accuracy, reproducibility, and linear dynamic range of quantification were further assessed based on known ratios of standard proteins spiked into the labeled mouse plasma reference. Reliable quantification was observed with high reproducibility (i.e. coefficient of variance <10%) for analyte concentrations that were set at 100-fold higher or lower than those of the GIS based on the light (16O)/heavy (18O) peak area ratios. The utility of 18O-labeled GIS was further illustrated by accurate relative quantification of 45 major human plasma proteins. Moreover, quantification of the concentrations of C-reactive protein and prostate-specific antigen was illustrated by coupling the GIS with standard additions of purified protein standards. Collectively, our results demonstrated that the use of 18O-labeled proteome reference as GIS provides a convenient, low cost, and effective strategy for relative quantification of a large number of candidate proteins in biological or clinical samples using SRM. PMID:21988777

  19. Multi-Isotope Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Combining Heavy Water 2H with 15N Labeling As Complementary Tracers for Metabolic Heterogeneity at the Single-Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopf, S.; McGlynn, S.; Cowley, E.; Green, A.; Newman, D. K.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic rates of microbial communities constitute a key physiological parameter for understanding the in situ growth constraints for life in any environment. Isotope labeling techniques provide a powerful approach for measuring such biological activity, due to the use of isotopically enriched substrate tracers whose incorporation into biological materials can be detected with high sensitivity by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry. Nano-meter scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) combined with stable isotope labeling provides a unique tool for studying the spatiometabolic activity of microbial populations at the single cell level in order to assess both community structure and population diversity. However, assessing the distribution and range of microbial activity in complex environmental systems with slow-growing organisms, diverse carbon and nitrogen sources, or heterotrophic subpopulations poses a tremendous technical challenge because the introduction of isotopically labeled substrates frequently changes the nutrient availability and can inflate or bias measures of activity. Here, we present the use of hydrogen isotope labeling with deuterated water as an important new addition to the isotopic toolkit and apply it for the determination of single cell microbial activities by NanoSIMS imaging. This tool provides a labeling technique that minimally alters any aquatic chemical environment, can be administered with strong labels even in minimal addition (natural background is very low), is an equally universal substrate for all forms of life even in complex, carbon and nitrogen saturated systems, and can be combined with other isotopic tracers. The combination of heavy water labeling with the most commonly used NanoSIMS tracer, 15N, is technically challenging but opens up a powerful new set of multi-tracer experiments for the study of microbial activity in complex communities. We present the first truly simultaneous single cell triple isotope system

  20. A phase I, open-label, single-dose, mass balance study of 14C-labeled abiraterone acetate in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Milin; Gonzalez, Martha; Mannens, Geert; De Vries, Ronald; Lopez, Christian; Griffin, Thomas; Tran, NamPhuong

    2013-04-01

    1. Metabolic disposition of (14)C-abiraterone acetate (AA), a prodrug of abiraterone was assessed in a phase I, open-label, single-dose (1000 mg, approximately 100 μCi) study in healthy males (18-55 years, N = 8). Blood, urine, and faecal samples were obtained at specified timepoints for determination of abiraterone concentrations in the plasma, total radioactivity (TR), and the metabolite profile. 2. Most plasma AA concentrations were below the limit of quantification. The mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of abiraterone was 10.4 ng/mL, mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from 0 to the last measurable plasma concentration (AUC0-last) was 74.8 ng·h/mL. The exposures for TR in plasma (Cmax = 3429 ng·eq/mL; AUC0-last = 26,683 ng eq·h/mL) and whole blood (Cmax = 1836 ng·eq/mL; AUC0-last = 12,162 ng·eq·h/mL) were >300-fold higher than abiraterone exposure in plasma. The majority of TR resided in the plasma compartment of blood. 3. Main circulating metabolites were abiraterone sulfate and N-oxide abiraterone sulfate. The main metabolite excreted in urine was N-oxide abiraterone sulfate (4.22% of TR). Major components of TR in faeces were unchanged AA (55.3% of TR) and abiraterone (22.3% of TR). Mean recovery of TR in faeces was 87.9%, indicating faeces as primary route of excretion.

  1. Multiplexed Analysis of Cage and Cage Free Chicken Egg Fatty Acids Using Stable Isotope Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Torde, Richard G.; Therrien, Andrew J.; Shortreed, Michael R.; Smith, Lloyd M.; Lamos, Shane M.

    2014-01-01

    Binary stable isotope labeling couple with LC-ESI-MS has been used as a powerful non-targeted approach for the relative quantification of lipids, amino acids, and many other important metabolite classes. A multiplexed approach using three or more isotopic labeling reagents greatly reduces analytical run-time while maintaining excellent sensitivity and reproducibility. Three isotopic cholamine labeling reagents have been developed to take advantage of the pre-ionized character of cholamine, for ESI, and the ease by which stable isotopes can be incorporated into the cholamine structure. These three cholamine labeling reagents have been used to relatively quantify three fatty acid samples simultaneously. The quantification resulted in the observation of 12 fatty acids that had an average absolute error of 0.9% and an average coefficient of variation of 6.1%. Caged versus cage-free isotope labeling experiments showed that cage-free eggs have an increased level of omega-3 fatty acids as compared to caged eggs. This multiplexed fatty acid analysis provides an inexpensive and expedited tool for broad-based lipid profiling that will further aid discoveries in the mechanisms of fatty acid action in cells. PMID:24317525

  2. Combining Capillary Electrophoresis Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Stable Isotopic Labeling Techniques for Comparative Crustacean Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Xiang, Feng; Zhang, Zichuan; Li, Lingjun

    2010-01-01

    Herein we describe a sensitive and straightforward off-line capillary electrophoresis (CE) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) interface in conjunction with stable isotopic labeling (SIL) technique for comparative neuropeptidomic analysis in crustacean model organisms. Two SIL schemes, including a binary H/D formaldehyde labeling technique and novel, laboratory-developed multiplexed dimethylated leucine-based isobaric tagging reagents, have been evaluated in these proof-of-concept experiments. We employ these isotopic labeling techniques in conjunction with CE-MALDI MS for quantitative peptidomic analyses of the pericardial organs isolated from two crustacean species, the European green crab Carcinus maenas and the blue crab Callinectes sapidus. Isotopically labeled peptide pairs are found to co-migrate in CE fractions and quantitative changes in relative abundances of peptide pairs are obtained by comparing peak intensities of respective peptide pairs. Several neuropeptide families exhibit changes in response to salinity stress, suggesting potential physiological functions of these signaling peptides. PMID:20334868

  3. The use of label-free mass spectrometry for relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Concepción Aristoy, M; Toldrá, Fidel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify changes in the abundance of the major sarcoplasmic proteins throughout the ham dry-curing process by using a label-free mass spectrometry methodology based on the measurement of mass spectral peak intensities obtained from the extracted ion chromatogram. For this purpose, extraction of sarcoplasmic proteins was followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (Q/TOF) for the identification and relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins through individual quantification of trypsinised peptides. In total, 20 proteins, including 12 glycolytic enzymes, were identified and quantified. The accuracy of the protocol was based on MS/MS replicates, and beta-lactoglobulin protein was used to normalise data and correct possible variations during sample preparation or LC-MS/MS analysis. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides precise identification and quantification of proteins in comparison with traditional methodologies based on gel electrophoresis, especially in the case of overlapping proteins. Moreover, the label-free approach used in this study proved to be a simple, fast, reliable method for evaluating proteolytic degradation of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

  4. High-resolution direct infusion-based mass spectrometry in combination with whole 13C metabolome isotope labeling allows unambiguous assignment of chemical sum formulas.

    PubMed

    Giavalisco, Patrick; Hummel, Jan; Lisec, Jan; Inostroza, Alvaro Cuadros; Catchpole, Gareth; Willmitzer, Lothar

    2008-12-15

    A new strategy for direct infusion-based metabolite analysis employing a combination of high-resolution mass spectrometry and (13)C-isotope labeling of entire metabolomes is described. Differentially isotope labeled metabolite extracts from otherwise identically grown reference plants were prepared and infused into a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The derived accurate mass lists from each extract were searched, using an in-house-developed database search tool, against a number of comprehensive metabolite databases. Comparison of the retrieved chemical formulas from both, the (12)C and (13)C samples, leads to two major advantages compared to nonisotope-based metabolite fingerprinting: first, removal of background contaminations from the result list, due to the (12)C/(13)C peak pairing principle and therefore positive identification of compounds of true biological origin; second, elimination of ambiguity in chemical formula assignment due to the same principle, leading to the clear association of one measured mass to only one chemical formula. Applying this combination of strategies to metabolite extracts of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana therefore resulted in the reproducible identification of more than 1000 unambiguous chemical sum formulas of biological origin of which more than 80% have not been associated to Arabidopsis before.

  5. Gas Purge Microextraction Coupled with Stable Isotope Labeling-Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Bromophenols in Aquatic Products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shijuan; Yu, Qiuhui; Sheng, Cuncun; You, Jinmao

    2016-12-14

    A green, sensitive, and accurate method was developed for the extraction and determination of bromophenols (BPs) from aquatic products by using organic solvent-free gas purge microsyringe extraction (GP-MSE) technique in combination with stable isotope labeling (SIL) strategy. BPs were extracted by NaHCO3 buffer solution, with recoveries varying from 92.0% to 98.5%. The extracted solution was analyzed by SIL strategy, during which analytes and standards were labeled by 10-methyl-acridone-2-sulfonyl chloride (d0-MASC) and its deuterated counterpart d3-MASC, respectively. The labeling reaction was finished within 10 min with good stability. The liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) sensitivity of BPs was greatly enhanced due to the mass-enhancing property of MASC, while the matrix effect was effectively minimized by the SIL strategy. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0.10-0.30 μg/kg, while the limits of quantitations (LOQs) were in the range of 0.32-1.0 μg/kg. The proposed method also showed great potential in the qualitative analysis of other bromophenols in the absence of standard.

  6. Extensive Peptide Fractionation and y1 Ion-Based Interference Detection Method for Enabling Accurate Quantification by Isobaric Labeling and Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niu, Mingming; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Kodali, Kiran; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; High, Anthony A; Wang, Hong; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Bi, Wenjian; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xusheng; Zou, Wei; Peng, Junmin

    2017-02-22

    Isobaric labeling quantification by mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful technology for multiplexed large-scale protein profiling, but measurement accuracy in complex mixtures is confounded by the interference from coisolated ions, resulting in ratio compression. Here we report that the ratio compression can be essentially resolved by the combination of pre-MS peptide fractionation, MS2-based interference detection, and post-MS computational interference correction. To recapitulate the complexity of biological samples, we pooled tandem mass tag (TMT)-labeled Escherichia coli peptides at 1:3:10 ratios and added in ∼20-fold more rat peptides as background, followed by the analysis of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS. Systematic investigation shows that quantitative interference was impacted by LC fractionation depth, MS isolation window, and peptide loading amount. Exhaustive fractionation (320 × 4 h) can nearly eliminate the interference and achieve results comparable to the MS3-based method. Importantly, the interference in MS2 scans can be estimated by the intensity of contaminated y1 product ions, and we thus developed an algorithm to correct reporter ion ratios of tryptic peptides. Our data indicate that intermediate fractionation (40 × 2 h) and y1 ion-based correction allow accurate and deep TMT profiling of more than 10 000 proteins, which represents a straightforward and affordable strategy in isobaric labeling proteomics.

  7. Exemplifying the Screening Power of Mass Spectrometry Imaging over Label-Based Technologies for Simultaneous Monitoring of Drug and Metabolite Distributions in Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Richard J A; Nilsson, Anna; Mackay, C Logan; Swales, John G; Johansson, Maria K; Billger, Martin; Andrén, Per E; Iverson, Suzanne L

    2016-02-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) provides pharmaceutical researchers with a suite of technologies to screen and assess compound distributions and relative abundances directly from tissue sections and offer insight into drug discovery-applicable queries such as blood-brain barrier access, tumor penetration/retention, and compound toxicity related to drug retention in specific organs/cell types. Label-free MSI offers advantages over label-based assays, such as quantitative whole-body autoradiography (QWBA), in the ability to simultaneously differentiate and monitor both drug and drug metabolites. Such discrimination is not possible by label-based assays if a drug metabolite still contains the radiolabel. Here, we present data exemplifying the advantages of MSI analysis. Data of the distribution of AZD2820, a therapeutic cyclic peptide, are related to corresponding QWBA data. Distribution of AZD2820 and two metabolites is achieved by MSI, which [(14)C]AZD2820 QWBA fails to differentiate. Furthermore, the high mass-resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance MS is used to separate closely associated ions.

  8. Mass spectrometric measurements of norepinephrine synthesis in man from infusion of stable isotope-labelled L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Sakoda, S.; Ueji, M.; Kishimoto, S.

    1985-02-04

    The kinetics of stable isotope-labelled L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (L-threo-DOPS), an immediate precursor of (-)-norepinephrine, was studied to investigate the pharmacologic mechanism of its therapeutic effect on orthostatic hypotension in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) and on akinesia and freezing in parkinsonism. (/sup 13/C,D)-L-threo-DOPS was synthesized, and 100 mg of the compound was infused for 2 h into two normal subjects, two FAP patients and two patients with the degenerative diseases of the central nervous system. Labelled and endogenous norepinephrine in urine and plasma was assayed simultaneously by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The results indicate that the increase in norepinephrine in biological fluids after administration of L-threo-DOPS is attributable mostly to norepinephrine derived from L-threo-DOPS, not to pre-formed endogenous norepinephrine released by L-threo-DOPS.

  9. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  10. Measurement of deuterium-labeled phylloquinone in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phylloquinone (vitamin K1) is a lipophilic compound present in plasma at low concentrations, which presents technical challenges for determining its bioavailability or metabolic fate using stable isotopes. We developed a method to simultaneously measure unlabeled and deuterium-labeled phylloquinone ...

  11. Direct infusion electrospray ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry for comparative profiling of fatty acids based on stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jiapeng; Guan, Qing; Sun, Tuanqi; Wang, Haoyang; Cui, Jianlan; Liu, Qinghao; Zhang, Zhixu; Zhang, Manyu; Guo, Yinlong

    2015-08-05

    A rapid method for fatty acids (FAs) comparative profiling based on carboxyl-specific stable isotope labeling (SIL) and direct infusion electrospray ionization-ion mobility-mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) is established. The design of the method takes advantage of the three-dimensional characteristics of IM-MS including drift time, m/z and ion intensity, for comparison of d0-/d6-2,4-dimethoxy-6-piperazin-1-yl pyrimidine (DMPP)-labeled FAs. In particular, without chromatographic separation, the method allowed direct FAs profiling in complex samples due to the advantageous priority of DMPP in signal enhancement as well as the extra resolution that IM-MS offered. Additionally, the d0-/d6-DMPP-labeled FAs showed expected features, including very similar drift times, 6 Da mass deviations, specific reporter ions, similar MS responses, and adherence to the drift time rule regarding the influence of carbon chain length and unsaturation on relative drift times. Therefore, the introduction of isotope analogs minimized the matrix effect and variations in quantification and ensured accurate identification of non-targeted FAs by those typical features. Peak intensity ratios between d0-/d6-DMPP-labeled ions were subsequently used in relative quantification for the detected FAs. The established strategy has been applied successfully in the rapid profiling of trace free FAs between normal and cancerous human thyroid tissues. Sixteen free FAs were found with the increased level with a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) compared to the normal tissue samples. The integrated SIL technique and ESI-IM-MS are expected to serve as an alternative tool for high-throughput analysis of FAs in complex samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of the evanescent field profile and bound mass sensitivity of a label-free silicon photonic microring resonator biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Luchansky, Matthew S; Washburn, Adam L; Martin, Teresa A; Iqbal, Muzammil; Gunn, L Cary; Bailey, Ryan C

    2010-12-15

    Silicon photonic microring resonators have emerged as a sensitive and highly multiplexed platform for real-time biomolecule detection. Herein, we profile the evanescent decay of device sensitivity towards molecular binding as a function of distance from the microring surface. By growing multilayers of electrostatically bound polymers extending from the sensor surface, we are able to empirically determine that the evanescent field intensity is characterized by a 1/e response decay distance of 63 nm. We then applied this knowledge to study the growth of biomolecular assemblies consisting of alternating layers of biotinylated antibody and streptavidin, which follow a more complex growth pattern. Additionally, by monitoring the shift in microring resonance wavelength upon the deposition of a radioactively labeled protein, the mass sensitivity of the ring resonator platform was determined to be 14.7±6.7 [pg/mm(2)]/Δpm. By extrapolating to the instrument noise baseline, the mass/area limit of detection is found to be 1.5±0.7 pg/mm(2). Taking the small surface area of the microring sensor into consideration, this value corresponds to an absolute mass detection limit of 125 ag (i.e. 0.8 zmol of IgG), demonstrating the remarkable sensitivity of this promising label-free biomolecular sensing platform.

  13. Label-free measurement of histone lysine methyltransferases activity by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guitot, Karine; Scarabelli, Silvia; Drujon, Thierry; Bolbach, Gérard; Amoura, Mehdi; Burlina, Fabienne; Jeltsch, Albert; Sagan, Sandrine; Guianvarc'h, Dominique

    2014-07-01

    Histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) are enzymes that play an essential role in epigenetic regulation. Thus, identification of inhibitors specifically targeting these enzymes represents a challenge for the development of new antitumor therapeutics. Several methods for measuring HKMT activity are already available. Most of them use indirect measurement of the enzymatic reaction through radioactive labeling or antibody-recognized products or coupled enzymatic assays. Mass spectrometry (MS) represents an interesting alternative approach because it allows direct detection and quantification of enzymatic reactions and can be used to determine kinetics and to screen small molecules as potential inhibitors. Application of mass spectrometry to the study of HKMTs has not been fully explored yet. We describe here the development of a simple reliable label-free MALDI-TOF MS-based assay for the detection and quantification of peptide methylation, using SET7/9 as a model enzyme. Importantly, the use of expensive internal standard often required in mass spectrometry quantitative analysis is not necessary in this assay. This MS assay allowed us to determine enzyme kinetic parameters as well as IC50 for a known inhibitor of this enzyme. Furthermore, a comparative study with an antibody-based immunosorbent assay showed that the MS assay is more reliable and suitable for the screening of inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of deuterium labeling by high-temperature solid-state hydrogen-exchange reaction for mass spectrometric analysis of bradykinin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Kopylov, Arthur T; Myasoedov, Nikolay F; Dadayan, Alexander K; Zgoda, Victor G; Medvedev, Alexei E; Zolotarev, Yurii A

    2016-06-15

    Studies of molecular biodegradation by mass spectrometry often require synthetic compounds labeled with stable isotopes as internal standards. However, labeling is very expensive especially when a large number of compounds are needed for analysis of biotransformation. Here we describe an approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis using bradykinin (BK) and its in vitro degradation metabolites as an example. Its novelty lies in the use of deuterated peptides which are obtained by a high-temperature solid-state exchange (HSCIE) reaction. Deuterated and native BK were analyzed by positive electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) using an Orbitrap Fusion mass spectrometer. High-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) experiments were performed on [M+H](+) and [M+2H](2+) ions in targeted-MS(2) mode with adjusted normalized HCD value. After the HSCIE reaction, each amino acid residue of the deuterated peptide contained deuterium atoms and the average degree of substitution was 5.5 atoms per the peptide molecule. The deuterated peptide demonstrated the same chromatographic mobility as the unlabeled counterpart, and lack of racemization during substitution with deuterium. Deuterium-labeled and unlabeled BKs were incubated with human plasma and their corresponding fragments BK(1-5) and BK(1-7), well known as the major metabolites, were detected. Quantitative assays demonstrated applicability of the heavy peptide for both sequencing and quantification of generated fragments. Applicability of the HSCIE deuterated peptide for analysis of routes of its degradation has been shown in in vitro experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Quantifying the Labeling and the Levels of Plant Cell Wall Precursors Using Ion Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ana P.; Piasecki, Rebecca J.; Wang, Yan; LaClair, Russell W.; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2010-01-01

    The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers involves enormous fluxes through central metabolism that are not fully delineated and whose regulation is poorly understood. We have established and validated a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method using multiple reaction monitoring mode to separate and quantify the levels of plant cell wall precursors. Target analytes were identified by their parent/daughter ions and retention times. The method allows the quantification of precursors at low picomole quantities with linear responses up to the nanomole quantity range. When applying the technique to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) T87 cell cultures, 16 hexose-phosphates (hexose-Ps) and nucleotide-sugars (NDP-sugars) involved in cell wall biosynthesis were separately quantified. Using hexose-P and NDP-sugar standards, we have shown that hot water extraction allows good recovery of the target metabolites (over 86%). This method is applicable to quantifying the levels of hexose-Ps and NDP-sugars in different plant tissues, such as Arabidopsis T87 cells in culture and fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) endosperm tissue, showing higher levels of galacto-mannan precursors in fenugreek endosperm. In Arabidopsis cells incubated with [U-13CFru]sucrose, the method was used to track the labeling pattern in cell wall precursors. As the fragmentation of hexose-Ps and NDP-sugars results in high yields of [PO3]−/or [H2PO4]− ions, mass isotopomers can be quantified directly from the intensity of selected tandem mass spectrometry transitions. The ability to directly measure 13C labeling in cell wall precursors makes possible metabolic flux analysis of cell wall biosynthesis based on dynamic labeling experiments. PMID:20442274

  16. Novel mass spectrometry imaging software assisting labeled normalization and quantitation of drugs and neuropeptides directly in tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Källback, Patrik; Shariatgorji, Mohammadreza; Nilsson, Anna; Andrén, Per E

    2012-08-30

    MALDI MS imaging has been extensively used to produce qualitative distribution maps of proteins, peptides, lipids, small molecule pharmaceuticals and their metabolites directly in biological tissue sections. There is growing demand to quantify the amount of target compounds in the tissue sections of different organs. We present a novel MS imaging software including protocol for the quantitation of drugs, and for the first time, an endogenous neuropeptide directly in tissue sections. After selecting regions of interest on the tissue section, data is read and processed by the software using several available methods for baseline corrections, subtractions, denoising, smoothing, recalibration and normalization. The concentrations of in vivo administered drugs or endogenous compounds are then determined semi-automatically using either external standard curves, or by using labeled compounds, i.e., isotope labeled analogs as standards. As model systems, we have quantified the distribution of imipramine and tiotropium in the brain and lung of dosed rats. Substance P was quantified in different mouse brain structures, which correlated well with previously reported peptide levels. Our approach facilitates quantitative data processing and labeled standards provide better reproducibility and may be considered as an efficient tool to quantify drugs and endogenous compounds in tissue regions of interest.

  17. Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells for the measurement of red cell mass in newborn infants: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Linderkamp, O.; Betke, K.; Fendel, H.; Klemm, J.; Lorenzen, K.; Riegel, K.P.

    1980-07-01

    In vitro and in vivo investigations were performed to examine the binding of Tc-99m to neonatal red blood cells (RBC). Labeling efficiency was about 90%, and unbound Tc-99m less than 3% after one washing, in premature and full-term newborns and in children. Thus presence of high percentages of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) did not influence the labeling of RBCs with Tc-99m. RBCs of 11 newborns were hemolysed and the distribution of Tc-99m on RBC components was analyzed. Although Hb F percentage averaged (60.0 +- 8.10)% (s.d.), only (11.9 +- 3.7)% of Tc-99m was bound by Hb F, whereas (45.0 +- 6.1)% was associated with Hb A. RBC membranes bound (13.7 +- 4.3)% and (29.3 +- 4.0)% were found unbound in hemolysates. These results indicate that Tc-99m preferentially binds to beta chains. In vivo equilibration of Tc-99m RBCs and of albumin labeled with Evans blue was investigated in five newborn infants. Tc-99m RBCs were stable in each case during the first hour after injection. Elution of Tc-99m from RBCs was (3.4 +- 1.5)% per h. Body-to-venous hematocrit ratio averaged 0.86 +- 0.03.

  18. Differential quantitative proteomics of Porphyromonas gingivalis by linear ion trap mass spectrometry: Non-label methods comparison, q-values and LOWESS curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qiangwei; Wang, Tiansong; Park, Yoonsuk; Lamont, Richard J.; Hackett, Murray

    2007-01-01

    Differential analysis of whole cell proteomes by mass spectrometry has largely been applied using various forms of stable isotope labeling. While metabolic stable isotope labeling has been the method of choice, it is often not possible to apply such an approach. Four different label free ways of calculating expression ratios in a classic "two-state" experiment are compared: signal intensity at the peptide level, signal intensity at the protein level, spectral counting at the peptide level, and spectral counting at the protein level. The quantitative data were mined from a dataset of 1245 qualitatively identified proteins, about 56% of the protein encoding open reading frames from Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative intracellular pathogen being studied under extracellular and intracellular conditions. Two different control populations were compared against P. gingivalis internalized within a model human target cell line. The q-value statistic, a measure of false discovery rate previously applied to transcription microarrays, was applied to proteomics data. For spectral counting, the most logically consistent estimate of random error came from applying the locally weighted scatter plot smoothing procedure (LOWESS) to the most extreme ratios generated from a control technical replicate, thus setting upper and lower bounds for the region of experimentally observed random error.

  19. Structural Analysis of Guanylyl Cyclase-Activating Protein-2 (GCAP-2) Homodimer by Stable Isotope-Labeling, Chemical Cross-Linking, and Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettelkau, Jens; Thondorf, Iris; Theisgen, Stephan; Lilie, Hauke; Schröder, Thomas; Arlt, Christian; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The topology of the GCAP-2 homodimer was investigated by chemical cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry. Complementary conducted size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicated that GCAP-2 forms a homodimer both in the absence and in the presence of Ca2+. In-depth MS and MS/MS analysis of the cross-linked products was aided by 15 N-labeled GCAP-2. The use of isotope-labeled protein delivered reliable structural information on the GCAP-2 homodimer, enabling an unambiguous discrimination between cross-links within one monomer (intramolecular) or between two subunits (intermolecular). The limited number of cross-links obtained in the Ca2+-bound state allowed us to deduce a defined homodimeric GCAP-2 structure by a docking and molecular dynamics approach. In the Ca2+-free state, GCAP-2 is more flexible as indicated by the higher number of cross-links. We consider stable isotope-labeling to be indispensable for deriving reliable structural information from chemical cross-linking data of multi-subunit protein assemblies.

  20. Analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid by stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Quan-Fei; Hao, Yan-Hong; Liu, Ming-Zhou; Yue, Jiang; Ni, Jian; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-09-04

    Cytochrome P450 metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) belong to eicosanoids and are potent lipid mediators of inflammation. It is well-known that eicosanoids play an important role in numerous pathophysiological processes. Therefore, quantitative analysis of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA, including hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), epoxyeicosatreinoic acids (EETs), and dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) can provide crucial information to uncover underlying mechanisms of cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA related diseases. Herein, we developed a highly sensitive method to identify and quantify HETEs, EETs, and DHETs in lipid extracts of biological samples based on stable isotope probe labeling coupled with ultra high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. To this end, a pair of stable isotope probes, 2-dimethylaminoethylamine (DMED) and d4-2-dimethylaminoethylamine (d4-DMED), were utilized to facilely label eicosanoids. The heavy labeled eicosanoid standards were prepared and used as internal standards for quantification to minimize the matrix and ion suppression effects in mass spectrometry analysis. In addition, the detection sensitivities of DMED labeled eicosanoids improved by 3-104 folds in standard solution and 5-138 folds in serum matrix compared with unlabeled analytes. Moreover, a good separation of eicosanoids isomers was achieved upon DMED labeling. The established method provided substantial sensitivity (limit of quantification at sub-picogram), high specificity, and broad linear dynamics range (3 orders of magnitude). We further quantified cytochrome P450 metabolites of AA in rat liver, heart, brain tissues and human serum using the developed method. The results showed that 19 eicosanoids could be distinctly detected and the contents of 11-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 5,6-EET, and 14,15-EET in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 5-, 11-, 12-, 15-, 16-, 20-HETE, 8,9-EET, and 5,6-DHET in myeloid leukemia patients had significant changes

  1. Development of isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for mouse urine metabolomics: quantitative metabolomic study of transgenic mice related to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jun; Guo, Kevin; Xia, Jianguo; Zhou, Jianjun; Yang, Jing; Westaway, David; Wishart, David S; Li, Liang

    2014-10-03

    Because of a limited volume of urine that can be collected from a mouse, it is very difficult to apply the common strategy of using multiple analytical techniques to analyze the metabolites to increase the metabolome coverage for mouse urine metabolomics. We report an enabling method based on differential isotope labeling liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for relative quantification of over 950 putative metabolites using 20 μL of urine as the starting material. The workflow involves aliquoting 10 μL of an individual urine sample for ¹²C-dansylation labeling that target amines and phenols. Another 10 μL of aliquot was taken from each sample to generate a pooled sample that was subjected to ¹³C-dansylation labeling. The ¹²C-labeled individual sample was mixed with an equal volume of the ¹³C-labeled pooled sample. The mixture was then analyzed by LC-MS to generate information on metabolite concentration differences among different individual samples. The interday repeatability for the LC-MS runs was assessed, and the median relative standard deviation over 4 days was 5.0%. This workflow was then applied to a metabolomic biomarker discovery study using urine samples obtained from the TgCRND8 mouse model of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) throughout the course of their pathological deposition of beta amyloid (Aβ). It was showed that there was a distinct metabolomic separation between the AD prone mice and the wild type (control) group. As early as 15-17 weeks of age (presymptomatic), metabolomic differences were observed between the two groups, and after the age of 25 weeks the metabolomic alterations became more pronounced. The metabolomic changes at different ages corroborated well with the phenotype changes in this transgenic mice model. Several useful candidate biomarkers including methionine, desaminotyrosine, taurine, N1-acetylspermidine, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were identified. Some of them were found in previous

  2. Application of isotopic labeling, and gas chromatography mass spectrometry, to understanding degradation products and pathways in the thermal-oxidative aging of Nylon 6.6

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gregory Von; Clough, Roger L.; Hochrein, James M.; Bernstein, Robert

    2013-12-01

    Nylon 6.6 containing 13C isotopic labels at specific positions along the macromolecular backbone has been subjected to extensive thermal-oxidative aging at 138 °C for time periods up to 243 days. In complementary experiments, unlabeled Nylon 6.6 was subjected to the same aging conditions under an atmosphere of 18O2. Volatile organic degradation products were analyzed by cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS) to identify the isotopic labeling. The labeling results, combined with basic considerations of free radical reaction chemistry, provided insights to the origin of degradation species, with respect to the macromolecular structure. A number of inferences on chemical mechanisms were drawn, based on 1) the presence (or absence) of the isotopic labels in the various products, 2) the location of the isotope within the product molecule, and 3) the relative abundance of products as indicated by large differences in peak intensities in the gas chromatogram. The overall degradation results can be understood in terms of free radical pathways originating from initial attacks on three different positions along the nylon chain which include hydrogen abstraction from: the (CH2) group adjacent to the nitrogen atom, at the (CH2) adjacent the carbonyl group, and direct radical attack on the carbonyl. Understanding the pathways which lead to Nylon 6.6 degradation ultimately provides new insight into changes that can be leveraged to detect and reduce early aging and minimize problems associated with material degradation.

  3. Streamlined pentafluorophenylpropyl column liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry and global (13)C-labeled internal standards improve performance for quantitative metabolomics in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song; Sadilek, Martin; Lidstrom, Mary E

    2010-11-19

    Streamlined quantitative metabolomics in central metabolism of bacteria would be greatly facilitated by a high-efficiency liquid chromatography (LC) method in conjunction with accurate quantitation. To achieve this goal, a methodology for LC-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) involving a pentafluorophenylpropyl (PFPP) column and culture-derived global (13)C-labeled internal standards (I.Ss.) has been developed and compared to hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-MS/MS and published combined two-dimensional gas chromatography and LC methods. All 50 tested metabolite standards from 5 classes (amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleotides, acyl-CoAs and sugar phosphates) displayed good chromatographic separation and sensitivity on the PFPP column. In addition, many important critical pairs such as isomers/isobars (e.g. isoleucine/leucine, methylsuccinic acid/ethylmalonic acid and malonyl-CoA/3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA) and metabolites of similar structure (e.g. malate/fumarate) were resolved better on the PFPP than on the HILIC column. Compared to only one (13)C-labeled I.S., the addition of global (13)C-labeled I.Ss. improved quantitative linearity and accuracy. PFPP-MS/MS with global (13)C-labeled I.Ss. allowed the absolute quantitation of 42 metabolite pool sizes in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. A comparison of metabolite level changes published previously for ethylamine (C2) versus succinate (C4) cultures of M. extorquens AM1 indicated a good consistency with the data obtained by PFPP-MS/MS, suggesting this single approach has the capability of providing comprehensive metabolite profiling similar to the combination of methods. The more accurate quantification obtained by this method forms a fundamental basis for flux measurements and can be used for metabolism modeling in bacteria in future studies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Thermal rearrangement of 1,4-dinitroimidazole to 2,4-dinitroimidazole. Characterization and investigation of the mechanism by mass spectrometry and isotope labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bulusu, S.; Damavarapu, R.; Autera, J.R.; Behrens, R. Jr.; Minier, L.M.; Villanueva, J.; Jayasuriya, K.; Axenrod, T.

    1995-04-06

    The thermal rearrangement of 1,4-dinitroimidazole to 2,4-dinitroimidazole has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and mass spectrometry techniques. When mixtures of independently prepared deuterium-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples of the 1,4-isomer were subjected to thermal rearrangement, the resulting 2,4-dinitroimidazole failed to show isotope-scrambled molecular ions in its mass spectrum, suggesting that the reaction was intramolecular in nature. This was interpreted to mean that the mechanism was of the (1,5)-sigmatropic type rearrangement. Extensive NMR measurements were used to obtain unequivocal evidence for the identity of the assumed structures of the isomeric dinitroimidazoles. Two byproducts (4-nitroimidazole and a trinitroimidazole), formed during the rearrangement reaction, have also been identified. Plausible mechanisms for their formation are discussed. 15 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Quantification of peptide m/z distributions from 13C-labeled cultures with high resolution mass spectrometry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the introduction of orbital trap mass spectrometers molecular masses can be determined with great precision and accuracy. In addition, orbital trap spectrometers (Orbitraps) are sensitive and possess a linear dynamic range of multiple orders of magnitude. These qualities make the Orbitrap well-...

  6. Dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of microbial populations utilizing 13C-labeled substrates in pure culture and in soil

    PubMed Central

    Pumphrey, Graham M.; Hanson, Buck T.; Chandra, Subhash; Madsen, Eugene L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We demonstrate that dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)-based ion microscopy can provide a means of measuring 13C assimilation into individual bacterial cells grown on 13C-labeled organic compounds in the laboratory and in field soil. We grew pure cultures of Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4 in minimal media with known mixtures of 12C- and 13C-glucose and analyzed individual cells via SIMS imaging. Individual cells yielded signals of masses 12, 13, 24, 25, 26, and 27 as negative secondary ions indicating the presence of 12C−, 13C−, 24(12C2)−, 25(12C13C)−, 26(12C14N)−, and 27(13C14N)− ions, respectively. We verified that ratios of signals taken from the same cells only changed minimally during a ∼4.5-min period of primary O2+ beam sputtering by the dynamic SIMS instrument in microscope detection mode. There was a clear relationship between mass 27 and 26 signals in Psuedomonas putida cells grown in media containing varying proportions of 12C- to 13C-glucose: a standard curve was generated to predict 13C-enrichment in unknown samples. We then used two strains of Pseudomonas putida able to grow on either all or only a part of a mixture of 13C-labeled and unlabeled carbon sources to verify that differential 13C signals measured by SIMS were due to 13C assimilation into cell biomass. Finally, we made three key observations after applying SIMS ion microscopy to soil samples from a field experiment receiving 12C- or 13C-phenol: (i) cells enriched in 13C were heterogeneously distributed among soil populations; (ii) 13C-labeled cells were detected in soil that was dosed a single time with 13C-phenol; and (iii) in soil that received 12 doses of 13C-phenol, 27% of the cells in the total community were more than 90% 13C-labeled. PMID:18811644

  7. Balancing the (carbon) budget: Using linear inverse models to estimate carbon flows and mass-balance 13C:15N labelling experiments in low oxygen sediments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, William Ross; Van Oevelen, Dick; Witte, Ursula

    2013-04-01

    Over 1 million km2 of seafloor experience permanent low-oxygen conditions within oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). OMZs are predicted to grow as a consequence of climate change, potentially affecting oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The Arabian Sea OMZ impinges upon the western Indian continental margin at bathyal depths (150 - 1500m) producing a strong depth dependent oxygen gradient at the sea floor. The influence of the OMZ upon the short term processing of organic matter by sediment ecosystems was investigated using in situ stable isotope pulse chase experiments. These deployed doses of 13C:15N labeled organic matter onto the sediment surface at four stations from across the OMZ (water depth 540 - 1100 m; [O2] = 0.35 - 15 μM). In order to prevent experimentally anoxia, the mesocosms were not sealed. 13C and 15N labels were traced into sediment, bacteria, fauna and 13C into sediment porewater DIC and DOC. However, the DIC and DOC flux to the water column could not be measured, limiting our capacity to obtain mass-balance for C in each experimental mesocosm. Linear Inverse Modeling (LIM) provides a method to obtain a mass-balanced model of carbon flow that integrates stable-isotope tracer data with community biomass and biogeochemical flux data from a range of sources. Here we present an adaptation of the LIM methodology used to investigate how ecosystem structure influenced carbon flow across the Indian margin OMZ. We demonstrate how oxygen conditions affect food-web complexity, affecting the linkages between the bacteria, foraminifera and metazoan fauna, and their contributions to benthic respiration. The food-web models demonstrate how changes in ecosystem complexity are associated with oxygen availability across the OMZ and allow us to obtain a complete carbon budget for the stationa where stable-isotope labelling experiments were conducted.

  8. Simultaneous determination of diphenhydramine, its N-oxide metabolite and their deuterium-labeled analogues in ovine plasma and urine using liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Rurak, D W; Riggs, K W

    1998-12-01

    Our studies on drug disposition in chronically instrumented pregnant sheep involve simultaneous administration of the antihistamine diphenhydramine (DPHM), its deuterated analogue ([2H10]DPHM) and their metabolites to the mother or the fetus via various routes. Such studies require sensitive and selective mass spectrometric methods for quantitation of these labeled and unlabeled compounds in order to assess comparative maternal and fetal drug metabolism. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) method for the simultaneous quantitation of DPHM, its N-oxide metabolite and their deuterium-labeled analogues in ovine plasma and urine. Samples spiked with the analytes and the internal standard, orphenadrine, were processed using liquid-liquid extraction. The extract was chromatographed on a propylamino LC column and MS/MS detection was performed in the positive ion electrospray mode using multiple reaction monitoring. The linear concentration ranges of the calibration curves for the N-oxides and the parent amines were 0.4-100.0 and 0.2-250.0 ng ml-1, respectively. In validation tests, the assay exhibited acceptable variability (< or = 15% at analyte concentrations below 2.0 ng ml-1 and < 10% at all other concentrations) and bias (< 15% at all concentrations), and the analytes were stable under a variety of sample handling conditions. Using this method, the labeled and unlabeled N-oxide metabolite was identified in fetal plasma after DPHM and [2H10]DPHM administration. This method will be used further to examine the comparative metabolism of diphenhydramine to its N-oxide metabolite in the mother and the fetus.

  9. Quantitative twoplex glycan analysis using (12)C6 and (13)C6 stable isotope 2-aminobenzoic acid labelling and capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Váradi, Csaba; Mittermayr, Stefan; Millán-Martín, Silvia; Bones, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) offers excellent efficiency and orthogonality to liquid chromatographic (LC) separations for oligosaccharide structural analysis. Combination of CE with high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) for glycan analysis remains a challenging task due to the MS incompatibility of background electrolyte buffers and additives commonly used in offline CE separations. Here, a novel method is presented for the analysis of 2-aminobenzoic acid (2-AA) labelled glycans by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry (CE-MS). To ensure maximum resolution and excellent precision without the requirement for excessive analysis times, CE separation conditions including the concentration and pH of the background electrolyte, the effect of applied pressure on the capillary inlet and the capillary length were evaluated. Using readily available (12/13)C6 stable isotopologues of 2-AA, the developed method can be applied for quantitative glycan profiling in a twoplex manner based on the generation of extracted ion electropherograms (EIE) for (12)C6 'light' and (13)C6 'heavy' 2-AA labelled glycan isotope clusters. The twoplex quantitative CE-MS glycan analysis platform is ideally suited for comparability assessment of biopharmaceuticals, such as monoclonal antibodies, for differential glycomic analysis of clinical material for potential biomarker discovery or for quantitative microheterogeneity analysis of different glycosylation sites within a glycoprotein. Additionally, due to the low injection volume requirements of CE, subsequent LC-MS analysis of the same sample can be performed facilitating the use of orthogonal separation techniques for structural elucidation or verification of quantitative performance.

  10. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus using 15N-labeled bacteriophage amplification coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Carrie L; Rees, Jon C; Fernández, Facundo M; Barr, John R

    2011-03-15

    A novel approach to rapid bacterial detection using an isotopically labeled (15)N bacteriophage and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is introduced. Current phage amplification detection (PAD) via mass spectrometric analysis is limited because host bacteria must be inoculated with low phage titers in such a way that initial infecting phage concentrations must be below the detection limit of the instrument, thus lengthening incubation times. Additionally, PAD techniques cannot distinguish inoculate input phage from output phage which can increase the possibility of false positive results. Here, we report a rapid and accurate PAD approach for identification of Staphylococcus aureus via detection of bacteriophage capsid proteins. This approach uses both a wild-type (14)N and a (15)N-isotopically labeled S. aureus-specific bacteriophage. High (15)N phage titers, above our instrument's detection limits, were used to inoculate S. aureus. MALDI-TOF MS detection of the (14)N progeny capsid proteins in the phage-amplified culture indicated the presence of the host bacteria. Successful phage amplification was observed after 90 min of incubation. The amplification was observed by both MALDI-TOF MS analysis and by standard plaque assay measurements. This method overcomes current limitations by improving analysis times while increasing selectivity when compared to previously reported PAD methodologies.

  11. Chemo-Enzymatic Synthesis of (13)C Labeled Complex N-Glycans As Internal Standards for the Absolute Glycan Quantification by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Begoña; Etxebarria, Juan; Ruiz, Nerea; Hernandez, Álvaro; Calvo, Javier; Haberger, Markus; Reusch, Dietmar; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-11-17

    Methods for the absolute quantification of glycans are needed in glycoproteomics, during development and production of biopharmaceuticals and for the clinical analysis of glycan disease markers. Here we present a strategy for the chemo-enzymatic synthesis of (13)C labeled N-glycan libraries and provide an example for their use as internal standards in the profiling and absolute quantification of mAb glycans by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. A synthetic biantennary glycan precursor was (13)C-labeled on all four amino sugar residues and enzymatically derivatized to produce a library of 15 glycan isotopologues with a mass increment of 8 Da over the natural products. Asymmetrically elongated glycans were accessible by performing enzymatic reactions on partially protected UV-absorbing intermediates, subsequent fractionation by preparative HPLC, and final hydrogenation. Using a preformulated mixture of eight internal standards, we quantified the glycans in a monoclonal therapeutic antibody with excellent precision and speed.

  12. Determination of sup 13 C labeling pattern of citric acid cycle intermediates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, L.; Montgomery, J.A.; Des Rosiers, C.; David, F.; Garneau, M.; Brunengraber, H. )

    1990-02-26

    Investigations of the regulation of the citric acid cycle require determination of labeling patterns of cycle intermediates. These were assayed to date, using infusion of: (i) ({sup 14}C)tracer followed by chemical degradation of intermediates and (ii) ({sup 13}C)tracer followed by NMR analysis of intermediates. The authors developed a strategy to analyze by GC-MS the ({sup 13}C) labeling pattern of {mu}mole samples of citrate (CIT), isocitrate (ICIT), 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG), glutamate (GLU) and glutamine (GLN). These are enzymatically or chemically converted to 2-KG, ICIT, 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-OHG). GC-MS analyses of TMS or TBDMS derivatives of these compounds yield the enrichment of each carbon. The authors confirmed the identity of each fragment using the spectra of (1-{sup 13}C), (5-{sup 13}C), (2,3,3,4,4-{sup 2}H{sub 5})glutamate and (1-{sup 13}C), (1,4-{sup 13}C)GABA.

  13. Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum proteasome using Blue Native PAGE and label-free quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sessler, Nicole; Krug, Karsten; Nordheim, Alfred; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Macek, Boris

    2012-09-01

    Detailed knowledge of the composition of protein complexes is crucial for the understanding of their structure and function; however, appropriate techniques for compositional analyses of complexes largely rely on elaborate tagging, immunoprecipitation, cross-linking and purification strategies. The proteasome is a prototypical protein complex and therefore an excellent model to assess new methods for protein complex characterisation. Here we evaluated the applicability of Blue Native (BN) PAGE in combination with label-free protein quantification and protein correlation profiling (PCP) for the investigation of proteasome complexes directly from biological samples. Using the purified human 20S proteasome we showed that the approach can accurately detect members of a complex by clustering their gel migration profiles. We applied the approach to address proteasome composition in the schizont stage of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The analysis, performed in the background of the whole protein extract, revealed that all subunits comigrated and formed a tight cluster with a single maximum, demonstrating presence of a single form of the 20S proteasome. This study shows that BN PAGE in combination with label-free quantification and PCP is applicable to the analysis of multiprotein complexes directly from complex protein mixtures.

  14. Food Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Food Labels KidsHealth > For Teens > Food Labels Print A ... have at least 95% organic ingredients. continue Making Food Labels Work for You The first step in ...

  15. Non-targeted determination of (13)C-labeling in the Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 metabolome using the two-dimensional mass cluster method and principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Reaser, Brooke C; Yang, Song; Fitz, Brian D; Parsons, Brendon A; Lidstrom, Mary E; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-02-05

    A novel analytical workflow is presented for the analysis of time-dependent (13)C-labeling of the metabolites in the methylotrophic bacterium Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS). Using (13)C-methanol as the substrate in a time course experiment, the method provides an accurate determination of the number of carbons converted to the stable isotope. The method also extracts a quantitative isotopic dilution time course profile for (13)C uptake of each metabolite labeled that could in principle be used to obtain metabolic flux rates. The analytical challenges encountered require novel analytical platforms and chemometric techniques. GC-TOFMS offers advanced separation of mixtures, identification of individual components, and high data density for the application of advanced chemometrics. This workflow combines both novel and traditional chemometric techniques, including the recently reported two-dimensional mass cluster plot method (2D m/z cluster plot method) as well as principal component analysis (PCA). The 2D m/z cluster plot method effectively indexed all metabolites present in the sample and deconvoluted metabolites at ultra-low chromatographic resolution (RS≈0.04). Using the pure mass spectra extracted, two PCA models were created. Firstly, PCA was used on the first and last time points of the time course experiment to determine and quantify the extent of (13)C uptake. Secondly, PCA modeled the full time course in order to quantitatively extract the time course profile for each metabolite. The 2D m/z cluster plot method found 152 analytes (metabolites and reagent peaks), with 54 pure analytes, and 98 were convoluted, with 65 of the 98 requiring mathematical deconvolution. Of the 152 analytes surveyed, 83 were metabolites determined by the PCA model to have incorporated (13)C while 69 were determined to be either metabolites or reagent peaks that remained unlabeled.

  16. Use of stable isotope labeled probes to facilitate liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry based high-throughput screening of time-dependent CYP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Malini; Tang, Weimin; Caldwell, Gary W; Yan, Zhengyin

    2010-08-15

    Inhibition curve shift is a commonly used approach for screening of time-dependent CYP inhibitors which requires parallel paired incubations to obtain two inhibition curves for comparison. For the control incubation, a test compound is co-incubated with a probe substrate in human liver microsomes (HLM) fortified with NADPH; for the time-dependent incubation (TDI), the test compound is pre-incubated with NADPH-fortified HLM followed by a secondary incubation with a probe substrate. For both incubations, enzyme activity is measured respectively by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis of the CYP-specific metabolite, and a TDI inhibitor can be readily identified by inhibition curve shifting as a result of CYP inactivation by the test compound during the pre-incubation. In the present study, we describe an alternative approach to facilitate TDI screening in which stable isotope labeled CYP-specific probes are used for the TDI, and non-labeled substrates are included in the control incubation. Because CYP-specific metabolites produced in the TDI are stable isotope labeled, two sets of incubation samples can be combined and then simultaneously analyzed by LC/MS/MS in the same batch run to reduce the run time. This new method has been extensively validated using both a number of known competitive and TDI inhibitors specific to five most common CYPs such as 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The assay is performed in a 96-well format and can be fully automated. Compared to the traditional method, this approach in combination with sample pooling and a short LC/MS/MS gradient significantly enhances the throughput of TDI screening and thus can be easily implemented in drug discovery to evaluate a large number of compounds without adding additional resource.

  17. Interfacing droplet microfluidics with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry: label-free content analysis of single droplets.

    PubMed

    Küster, Simon K; Fagerer, Stephan R; Verboket, Pascal E; Eyer, Klaus; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Zenobi, Renato; Dittrich, Petra S

    2013-02-05

    Droplet-based microfluidic systems have become a very powerful tool to miniaturize chemical and biological reactions. However, droplet content analysis remains challenging and relies almost exclusively on optical methods such as fluorescence spectroscopy. Hence, labeling of the analyte is typically required which impedes a more universal applicability of microdroplets. Here we present a novel interface coupling droplet microfluidics and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry for label-free content analysis of single droplets. Nanoliter aqueous droplets immersed in perfluorinated oil are created in a microfluidic T-junction, transferred into a capillary, and deposited on a high-density microarray MALDI plate mounted on a motorized xy-stage. The fully automated system is robust and reliable due to two unique features. First, a simple optical droplet detection system is used to synchronize stage movement and exit of droplets from the capillary. Second, the microarray plate contains an array of over 26,000 hydrophilic spots within a hydrophobic coating, each spot acting as a recipient to confine the droplets and to prevent cross-contamination. The MALDI matrix can also be applied using our system by spotting matrix droplets on the microarray in a separate run. To demonstrate the potential of our system, we studied the enzymatic cleavage of angiotensin I by angiotensin converting enzyme and monitored the increasing concentration of the product angiotensin II over time. The interface provides a robust and fully automated method for rapid label-free and information-rich content analysis of single droplets. With the high number of droplets per plate, this method is particularly suitable for high-throughput screening applications.

  18. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, James J.; Doll, Charles G.; Bernstein, Hans C.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Cory, Alexandra B.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2014-08-25

    This is a manuscript we would like to submit for publication in Environmental Microbiology Reports. This manuscript contains a description of a laser ablation isotope ratio mass spectrometry methodology developed at PNNL and applied to a microbial system at a PNNL project location – Hot Lake, Washington. I will submit a word document containing the entire manuscript with this Erica input request form.

  19. Measurement of endogenous versus exogenous formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein crosslinks in animal tissues by stable isotope labeling and ultrasensitive mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yongquan; Yu, Rui; Hartwell, Hadley J.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Swenberg, James A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) arise from a wide range of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and formaldehyde. Importantly, recent identification of aldehydes as endogenous genotoxins in Fanconi anemia has provided new insight into disease causation. Due to their bulky nature, DPCs pose severe threats to genome stability, but previous methods to measure formaldehyde-induced DPCs were incapable of discriminating between endogenous and exogenous sources of chemical. In this study, we developed methods that provide accurate and distinct measurements of both exogenous and endogenous DPCs in a structurally-specific manner. We exposed experimental animals to stable isotope-labeled formaldehyde ([13CD2]-formaldehyde) by inhalation and performed ultrasensitive mass spectrometry to measure endogenous (unlabeled) and exogenous (13CD2-labeled) DPCs. We found that exogenous DPCs readily accumulated in nasal respiratory tissues, but were absent in tissues distant to the site of contact. This observation together with the finding that endogenous formaldehyde-induced DPCs were present in all tissues examined suggests that endogenous DPCs may be responsible for increased risks of bone marrow toxicity and leukemia. Furthermore, the slow rate of DPC repair provided evidence for persistence of DPCs. In conclusion, our method for measuring endogenous and exogenous DPCs presents a new perspective for the potential health risks inflicted by endogenous formaldehyde, and may inform improved disease prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:26984759

  20. Measurement of Endogenous versus Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA-Protein Crosslinks in Animal Tissues by Stable Isotope Labeling and Ultrasensitive Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yongquan; Yu, Rui; Hartwell, Hadley J; Moeller, Benjamin C; Bodnar, Wanda M; Swenberg, James A

    2016-05-01

    DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) arise from a wide range of endogenous and exogenous chemicals, such as chemotherapeutic drugs and formaldehyde. Importantly, recent identification of aldehydes as endogenous genotoxins in Fanconi anemia has provided new insight into disease causation. Because of their bulky nature, DPCs pose severe threats to genome stability, but previous methods to measure formaldehyde-induced DPCs were incapable of discriminating between endogenous and exogenous sources of chemical. In this study, we developed methods that provide accurate and distinct measurements of both exogenous and endogenous DPCs in a structurally specific manner. We exposed experimental animals to stable isotope-labeled formaldehyde ([(13)CD2]-formaldehyde) by inhalation and performed ultrasensitive mass spectrometry to measure endogenous (unlabeled) and exogenous ((13)CD2-labeled) DPCs. We found that exogenous DPCs readily accumulated in nasal respiratory tissues but were absent in tissues distant to the site of contact. This observation, together with the finding that endogenous formaldehyde-induced DPCs were present in all tissues examined, suggests that endogenous DPCs may be responsible for increased risks of bone marrow toxicity and leukemia. Furthermore, the slow rate of DPC repair provided evidence for the persistence of DPCs. In conclusion, our method for measuring endogenous and exogenous DPCs presents a new perspective for the potential health risks inflicted by endogenous formaldehyde and may inform improved disease prevention and treatment strategies. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2652-61. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Innovative method for carbon dioxide determination in human postmortem cardiac gas samples using headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and stable labeled isotope as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; de Froidmont, S; Dominguez, A; Rinaldi, A; Augsburger, M; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2013-06-19

    A novel approach to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) in gaseous samples, based on a precise and accurate quantification by (13)CO2 internal standard generated in situ is presented. The main goal of this study was to provide an innovative headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method applicable in the routine determination of CO2. The main drawback of the GC methods discussed in the literature for CO2 measurement is the lack of a specific internal standard necessary to perform quantification. CO2 measurement is still quantified by external calibration without taking into account analytical problems which can often occur considering gaseous samples. To avoid the manipulation of a stable isotope-labeled gas, we have chosen to generate in situ an internal labeled standard gas ((13)CO2) on the basis of the stoichiometric formation of CO2 by the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaH(13)CO3). This method allows a precise measurement of CO2 concentration and was validated on various human postmortem gas samples in order to study its efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Elucidation of the in vitro metabolic profile of stable isotope labeled BAL19403 by accurate mass capillary liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Wind, Mathias; Gebhardt, Klaus; Grunwald, Helge; Spickermann, Jochen; Donzelli, Massimiliano; Kellenberger, Laurenz; Muller, Marc; Fullhardt, Pascal; Schmitt-Hoffmann, Anne; Schleimer, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The in vitro metabolic pattern of BAL19403, a novel macrolide antibiotic, was investigated by capillary liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/QTOF-MS) in incubations with human microsomes. For the elucidation of the metabolic pathway, BAL19403 labeled with four deuterium atoms (D4) was used, and detection of metabolites performed using mixtures of the unlabeled (H4) BAL19403 and its D4 analogue (1:1) as substrate. All metabolites appeared with similar chromatographic behavior. MS/MS spectra of BAL19403 and its metabolites are dominated by non-informative fragment ions. Therefore, the structure of the metabolites was elucidated mainly by accurate mass measurements with subsequent proposals of elemental compositions. Main biotransformations were N-demethylation, lactone ring hydrolysis, and oxidation. Additionally, N-dealkylation of the aromatic moiety was identified. This dealkylation results not only in formation of an aldehyde, according to the classical pathway, but also in formation of the corresponding alcohol and carboxylic acid. Final elucidation of their structures was possible, since this dealkylation takes place vicinal to the deuterium-labeled part of BAL19403 and interferes with D/H exchange. The degree of D/H exchange, determined by analysis of the metabolite isotopic pattern, was used to elucidate the adjacent functional group. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Global disulfide bond profiling for crude snake venom using dimethyl labeling coupled with mass spectrometry and RADAR algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng Yu; Chen, Sung Fang; Chen, Chun Hao; Huang, Hsuan Wei; Wu, Wen Guey; Sung, Wang Chou

    2014-09-02

    Snake venom consists of toxin proteins with multiple disulfide linkages to generate unique structures and biological functions. Determination of these cysteine connections usually requires the purification of each protein followed by structural analysis. In this study, dimethyl labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS and RADAR algorithm was developed to identify the disulfide bonds in crude snake venom. Without any protein separation, the disulfide linkages of several cytotoxins and PLA2 could be solved, including more than 20 disulfide bonds. The results show that this method is capable of analyzing protein mixture. In addition, the approach was also used to compare native cytotoxin 3 (CTX III) and its scrambled isomer, another category of protein mixture, for unknown disulfide bonds. Two disulfide-linked peptides were observed in the native CTX III, and 10 in its scrambled form, X-CTX III. This is the first study that reports a platform for the global cysteine connection analysis on a protein mixture. The proposed method is simple and automatic, offering an efficient tool for structural and functional studies of venom proteins.

  4. Characterization of metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and (13)C stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yinfeng; Tang, Minghai; Song, Hang; Li, Rong; Wang, Chunyu; Ye, Haoyu; Qiu, Neng; Zhang, Yongkui; Chen, Lijuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2014-03-15

    As fecal excretion is one of important routes of elimination of drugs and their metabolites, it is indispensable to investigate the metabolites in feces for more comprehensive information on biotransformation in vivo. In this study, a sensitive and reliable approach based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS) was applied to characterize the metabolic profile of honokiol in rat feces after the administration of an equimolar mixture of honokiol and [(13)C6]-labeled honokiol. Totally 42 metabolites were discovered and tentatively identified in rat feces samples, 26 metabolites were first reported, including two novel classes of metabolites, methylated and dimeric metabolites of honokiol. Moreover, this study provided basic comparative data on the metabolites in rat plasma, feces and urine, which gave better understanding of the metabolic fate of honokiol in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry-tandem diode-array detector screening method for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Luo, Liping; Ma, Zhongjun

    2011-07-01

    Because electrophiles regulate many signalling pathways in cells, by modifying cysteine residues in proteins, they have a wide range of biological activity. In this study, a deuterium-labelling mass spectrometry-tandem diode-array detector (MS-DAD) screening method was established for rapid discovery of naturally occurring electrophiles. Glutathione (GSH) was used as a probe and incubated with natural product extracts. To distinguish different types of electrophile, incubation was performed in two reaction solvents, H(2)O and D(2)O. Ten types of naturally occurring electrophile were chosen, on the basis of their properties, to undergo the screening assay. By using this screening method, we successfully discovered the bioactive electrophile 4-hydroxyderricin in an ethanol extract of Angelica keiskei. This electrophile had potent NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-inducing activity at a concentration of 20 μmol L(-1).

  6. Using ProtMAX to create high-mass-accuracy precursor alignments from label-free quantitative mass spectrometry data generated in shotgun proteomics experiments.

    PubMed

    Egelhofer, Volker; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Wienkoop, Stefanie

    2013-03-01

    Recently, new software tools have been developed for improved protein quantification using mass spectrometry (MS) data. However, there are still limitations especially in high-sample-throughput quantification methods, and most of these relate to extensive computational calculations. The mass accuracy precursor alignment (MAPA) strategy has been shown to be a robust method for relative protein quantification. Its major advantages are high resolution, sensitivity and sample throughput. Its accuracy is data dependent and thus best suited for precursor mass-to-charge precision of ∼1 p.p.m. This protocol describes how to use a software tool (ProtMAX) that allows for the automated alignment of precursors from up to several hundred MS runs within minutes without computational restrictions. It comprises features for 'ion intensity count' and 'target search' of a distinct set of peptides. This procedure also includes the recommended MS settings for complex quantitative MAPA analysis using ProtMAX (http://www.univie.ac.at/mosys/software.html).

  7. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for ex vivo metabolic studies of a rhenium-labeled radiopharmaceutical for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsi; Liao, Chen-Wei; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Chang, Yu; Men, Lee-Chung; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The radio-isotope rhenium-labeled N-[2-(triphenylmethyl)thioethyl]-3-aza-19-ethyloxycarbonyl-3-[2-(triphenylmethyl)thioethyl] octadecanoate) ligand (188Re-MN-16ET) is a novel therapeutic agent under preclinical evaluation for hepatoma. A reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled with a tandem mass spectrometric analysis method and diode array detector (DAD) involving a T type splitter was developed to characterize this pharmaceutical in rat liver tissue solution and determine its biotransformation rate. The separation was accomplished on a C18 column (chromolith silica, 4.6 mm x 100 mm) using an acetonitrile-ammonium acetate buffer gradient as the mobile phase. The detection was achieved by DAD set at 250nm and tandem mass spectrometry using electrospray ionization in the positive ion mode. Re-MN-16ET displayed a retention time of 23.2 min and a transition ion pair corresponding to m/z677 --> 631 for multiple reaction monitoring. Its biotransformation reaction in rat liver homogenate proceeded for 90 min in a 37°C water bath. The characterization was conducted using aliquots that were extracted and concentrated from the reaction mixture for various incubation times. Re-MN-16ET exhibited a biotransformation half-life (t1/2) of 8-9 min in liver tissue solution and was almost completely exhausted after 90 min. Two of its metabolites, consisting of the Re-labeled carboxylic acid derivative, predominately, and its corresponding demetallized disulfide ligand were found in the liver homogenate, providing a metabolism pathway for the radio-pharmaceutical.

  8. Characterization of TATP gas phase product ion chemistry via isotope labeling experiments using ion mobility spectrometry interfaced with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Wooten, Alfred; Kozole, Joseph; Deline, James; Beresford, Pamela; Stairs, Jason

    2014-09-01

    Identification of the fragment ion species associated with the ion reaction mechanism of triacetone triperoxide (TATP), a homemade peroxide-based explosive, is presented. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has proven to be a key analytical technique in the detection of trace explosive material. Unfortunately, IMS alone does not provide chemical identification of the ions detected; therefore, it is unknown what ion species are actually formed and separated by the IMS. In IMS, ions are primarily characterized by their drift time, which is dependent on the ion׳s mass and molecular cross-section; thus, IMS as a standalone technique does not provide structural signatures, which is in sharp contrast to the chemical and molecular information that is generally obtained from other customary analytical techniques, such as NMR, Raman and IR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. To help study the ion chemistry that gives rise to the peaks observed in IMS, the hardware of two different commercial IMS instruments has been directly coupled to triple quadrupole (QQQ) mass spectrometers, in order to ascertain each ion׳s corresponding mass/charge (m/z) ratios with different dopants at two temperatures. Isotope labeling was then used to help identify and confirm the molecular identity of the explosive fragment and adduct ions of TATP. The m/z values and isotope labeling experiments were used to help propose probable molecular formulas for the ion fragments. In this report, the fragment and adduct ions m/z 58 and 240 of TATP have been confirmed to be [C3H6NH·H](+) and [TATP·NH4](+), respectively; while the fragment ions m/z 73 and 89 of TATP are identified as having the molecular formulas [C4H9NH2](+) and [C4H9O2](+), respectively. It is anticipated that the work in this area will not only help to facilitate improvements in mobility-based detection (IMS and MS), but also aid in the development and optimization of MS-based detection algorithms for TATP.

  9. Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson, Jan; Bergman, Ann-Charlotte; Adamson, Ulf; Blombaeck, Margareta; Wallen, Hakan; Joerneskog, Gun

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent - a phenomenon called 'aspirin resistance'. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to 'aspirin resistance' in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5-10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the {alpha}-chain: {alpha}K191, {alpha}K208, {alpha}K224, {alpha}K429, {alpha}K457, {alpha}K539, {alpha}K562, in the {beta}-chain: {beta}K233, and in the {gamma}-chain: {gamma}K170 and {gamma}K273. Glycations were found at {beta}K133 and {gamma}K75, alternatively {gamma}K85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [{sup 14}C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [{sup 14}C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013-0.084 and 0.12-0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9-100 {mu}M aspirin) and physiologically (2-8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of fibrinogen. This may

  10. Quantitative determination of free and total bisphenol A in human urine using labeled BPA glucuronide and isotope dilution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubwabo, Cariton; Kosarac, Ivana; Lalonde, Kaela; Foster, Warren G

    2014-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial chemical in the manufacturing of polycarbonate plastic bottles, food and beverage can linings, thermal receipts, and dental sealants. Animal and human studies suggest that BPA may disrupt normal hormonal function and hence, potentially, have negative effects on the human health. While total BPA is frequently reported, it is recognized that free BPA is the biologically active form and is rarely reported in the literature. The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and improved method for the measurement of free and total BPA in human urine. Use of a labeled conjugated BPA (bisphenol A-d6 β-D-glucuronide) allowed for the optimization of the enzymatic reaction and permitted an accurate determination of the conjugated BPA concentration in urine samples. In addition, a (13)C12-BPA internal standard was used to account for the analytical recoveries and performance of the isotope dilution method. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with derivatization and analysis using a triple quadrupole GC-EI/MS/MS system achieved very low method detection limit of 0.027 ng/mL. BPA concentrations were measured in urine samples collected during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy in 36 Canadian women. Total maternal BPA concentrations in urine samples ranged from not detected to 9.40 ng/mL (median, 1.21 ng/mL), and free BPA concentrations ranged from not detected to 0.950 ng/mL (median, 0.185 ng/mL). Eighty-six percent of the women had detectable levels of conjugated BPA, whereas only 22 % had detectable levels of free BPA in their urine. BPA levels measured in this study agreed well with data reported internationally.

  11. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  12. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Quigg

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  13. Mass spectrometric fragmentation pathways of isotope labeled 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazoles and thiadiazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franski, Rafal; Gierczyk, Blazej; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2004-01-01

    The mass spectrometric decomposition of protonated, lithiated and methylated (quaternary derivatives) 2-(4'-methoxy)phenyl-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazoles, containing 13C atom at 5 position of oxadiazole ring as well as its thia correspondent is discussed. The electron-donor properties of C-4' substituent favor cationization of N(3) atom and as a consequence, the losses of HNC(2)O, LiNC(2)O, CH3NC(2)O molecules are favored over HNC(5)O, LiNC(5)O, CH3NC(5)O molecules. Analogous results have been obtained for HNCS and CH3NCS elimination from thiadiazole.

  14. Variation in airborne 137Cs peak levels with altitude from high-altitude locations across Europe after the arrival of Fukushima-labeled air masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Olivier; Bieringer, Jacqueline; Dalheimer, Axel; Estier, Sybille; Evrard, Olivier; Penev, Ilia; Ringer, Wolfgang; Schlosser, Clemens; Steinkopff, Thomas; Tositti, Laura; de Vismes-Ott, Anne

    2015-04-01

    During the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident, a dozen of high-altitude aerosol sampling stations, located between 850 and 3,454 m above sea level (a.s.l.), provided airborne activity levels across Europe (Fig. 1). This represents at most 5% of the total number of aerosol sampling locations that delivered airborne activity levels (at least one result) in Europe, in connection with this nuclear accident. High altitude stations are typically equipped with a high volume sampler that collects aerosols on filters. The Fukushima-labeled air mass arrival and the peak of airborne cesium-137 (137Cs) activity levels were registered in Europe at different dates depending on the location, with differences up to a factor of six on a regional scale. Besides this statement related to lowland areas, we have compared the maximum airborne levels registered at high-altitude European locations (850 m < altitudes < 3450 m) with what was observed at the closest lowland location. The vertical distribution of 137Cs peak level was not uniform even after a long travel time/distance from Japan. This being true at least in the atmospheric boundary layer and in the lower free troposphere. Moreover the relation '137Csmax vs. altitude' shows a decreasing trend (Fig. 2). Results and discussion : Comparison of 137Cs and 7Be levels shows simultaneous increases at least when the 137Cs airborne level rose for the first time (Fig. 3). Zugspitze and Jungfraujoch stations attest of a time shift between 7Be and 137Cs peak that can be due to the particular dynamic of air movements at such high altitudes. After the 137Cs peak value, the plume concentration decreased whatever the 7Be level. Due to the cosmogenic origin of 7Be, its increase in the ground-level air is usually associated with downwind air movements, i.e. stratospheric air intrusions or at least air from high-tropospheric levels, into lower atmospheric layers. This means that Fukushima-labeled air masses registered at ground

  15. Determining the isotopic abundance of a labeled compound by mass spectrometry and how correcting for natural abundance distribution using analogous data from the unlabeled compound leads to a systematic error.

    PubMed

    Schenk, David J; Lockley, William J S; Elmore, Charles S; Hesk, Dave; Roberts, Drew

    2016-04-01

    When the isotopic abundance or specific activity of a labeled compound is determined by mass spectrometry (MS), it is necessary to correct the raw MS data to eliminate ion intensity contributions, which arise from the presence of heavy isotopes at natural abundance (e.g., a typical carbon compound contains ~1.1% (13) C per carbon atom). The most common approach is to employ a correction in which the mass-to-charge distribution of the corresponding unlabeled compound is used to subtract the natural abundance contributions from the raw mass-to-charge distribution pattern of the labeled compound. Following this correction, the residual intensities should be due to the presence of the newly introduced labeled atoms only. However, this will only be the case when the natural abundance mass isotopomer distribution of the unlabeled compound is the same as that of the labeled species. Although this may be a good approximation, it cannot be accurate in all cases. The implications of this approximation for the determination of isotopic abundance and specific activity have been examined in practice. Isotopically mixed stable-atom labeled valine batches were produced, and both these and [(14) C6 ]carbamazepine were analyzed by MS to determine the extent of the error introduced by the approach. Our studies revealed that significant errors are possible for small highly-labeled compounds, such as valine, under some circumstances. In the case with [(14) C6 ]carbamazepine, the errors introduced were minor but could be significant for (14) C-labeled compounds with particular isotopic distributions. This source of systematic error can be minimized, although not eliminated, by the selection of an appropriate isotopic correction pattern or by the use of a program that varies the natural abundance distribution throughout the correction.

  16. Characterization of Breast Cancer Interstitial Fluids by TmT Labeling, LTQ-Orbitrap Velos Mass Spectrometry and Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cinzia, Raso; Carlo, Cosentino; Marco, Gaspari; Natalia, Malara; Xuemei, Han; Daniel, McClatchy; Kyu, Park Sung; Maria, Renne; Nuria, Vadalà; Ubaldo, Prati; Giovanni, Cuda; Vincenzo, Mollace; Francesco, Amato; Yates, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is currently considered as the end point of numerous genomic and epigenomic mutations and as the result of the interaction of transformed cells within the stromal microenvironment. The present work focuses on breast cancer, one of the most common malignancies affecting the female population in industrialized countries. In this study we perform a proteomic analysis of bioptic samples from human breast cancer, namely interstitial fluids and primary cells, normal vs disease tissues, using Tandem mass Tags (TmT) quantitative mass spectrometry combined with the MudPIT technique. To the best of our knowledge this work, with over 1700 proteins identified, represents the most comprehensive characterization of the breast cancer interstitial fluid proteome to date. Network analysis was used to identify functionally active networks in the breast cancer associated samples. From the list of differentially expressed genes we have retrieved the associated functional interaction networks. Many different signaling pathways were found activated, strongly linked to invasion, metastasis development, proliferation and with a significant cross-talking rate. This pilot study presents evidence that the proposed quantitative proteomic approach can be applied to discriminate between normal and tumoral samples and for the discovery of yet unknown carcinogenesis mechanisms and therapeutic strategies. PMID:22563702

  17. Concurrent Label-Free Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Dystrophin Isoform Dp427 and the Myofibrosis Marker Collagen in Crude Extracts from mdx-4cv Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sandra; Zweyer, Margit; Mundegar, Rustam R.; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Swandulla, Dieter; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-01-01

    The full-length dystrophin protein isoform of 427 kDa (Dp427), the absence of which represents the principal abnormality in X-linked muscular dystrophy, is difficult to identify and characterize by routine proteomic screening approaches of crude tissue extracts. This is probably related to its large molecular size, its close association with the sarcolemmal membrane, and its existence within a heterogeneous glycoprotein complex. Here, we used a careful extraction procedure to isolate the total protein repertoire from normal versus dystrophic mdx-4cv skeletal muscles, in conjunction with label-free mass spectrometry, and successfully identified Dp427 by proteomic means. In contrast to a considerable number of previous comparative studies of the total skeletal muscle proteome, using whole tissue proteomics we show here for the first time that the reduced expression of this membrane cytoskeletal protein is the most significant alteration in dystrophinopathy. This agrees with the pathobiochemical concept that the almost complete absence of dystrophin is the main defect in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and that the mdx-4cv mouse model of dystrophinopathy exhibits only very few revertant fibers. Significant increases in collagens and associated fibrotic marker proteins, such as fibronectin, biglycan, asporin, decorin, prolargin, mimecan, and lumican were identified in dystrophin-deficient muscles. The up-regulation of collagen in mdx-4cv muscles was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting. Thus, this is the first mass spectrometric study of crude tissue extracts that puts the proteomic identification of dystrophin in its proper pathophysiological context. PMID:28248273

  18. Selective Analysis of Sulfur-Containing Species in a Heavy Crude Oil by Deuterium Labeling Reactions and Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuxiao; Schrader, Wolfgang

    2015-12-17

    A heavy crude oil has been treated with deuterated alkylating reagents (CD₃I and C₂D₅I) and directly analyzed without any prior fractionation and chromatographic separation by high-field Orbitrap Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (FTMS) and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) using electrospray ionization (ESI). The reaction of a polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) dibenzothiophene (DBT), in the presence of silver tetrafluoroborate (AgBF₄) with ethyl iodide (C₂H₅I) in anhydrous dichloroethane (DCE) was optimized as a sample reaction to study heavy crude oil mixtures, and the reaction yield was monitored and determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-NMR). The obtained conditions were then applied to a mixture of standard aromatic CH-, N-, O- and S-containing compounds and then a heavy crude oil, and only sulfur-containing compounds were selectively alkylated. The deuterium labeled alkylating reagents, iodomethane-d₃ (CD₃I) and iodoethane-d₅ (C₂D₅I), were employed to the alkylation of heavy crude oil to selectively differentiate the tagged sulfur species from the original crude oil.

  19. Characterization and quantification of histidine degradation in therapeutic protein formulations by size exclusion-hydrophilic interaction two dimensional-liquid chromatography with stable-isotope labeling mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlei; Chen, Sike; Brailsford, John A; Yamniuk, Aaron P; Tymiak, Adrienne A; Zhang, Yingru

    2015-12-24

    Two dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) coupling size exclusion (SEC) and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) is demonstrated as a useful tool to study polar excipients, such as histidine and its degradant, in protein formulation samples. The SEC-HILIC setup successfully removed interferences from complex sample matrices and enabled accurate mass measurement of the histidine degradation product, which was then determined to be trans-urocanic acid. Because the SEC effluent is a strong solvent for the second dimension HILIC, experimental parameters needed to be carefully chosen, i.e., small transferring loop, fast gradient at high flow rates for the second dimension gradient, in order to mitigate the solvent mismatch and to ensure good peak shapes for HILIC separations. In addition, the generation of trans-urocanic acid was quantified by single heart-cutting SEC-HILIC 2D-LC combined with stable-isotope labeling mass spectrometry. Compared with existing 2D quantification methods, the proposed approach is fast, insensitive to solvent mismatch between dimensions, and tolerant of small retention time shifts in the first dimension. Finally, the first dimension diode array detector was found to be a potential degradation source for photolabile analytes such as trans-urocanic acid.

  20. Selective Analysis of Sulfur-Containing Species in a Heavy Crude Oil by Deuterium Labeling Reactions and Ultrahigh Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuxiao; Schrader, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    A heavy crude oil has been treated with deuterated alkylating reagents (CD3I and C2D5I) and directly analyzed without any prior fractionation and chromatographic separation by high-field Orbitrap Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry (FTMS) and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) using electrospray ionization (ESI). The reaction of a polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs) dibenzothiophene (DBT), in the presence of silver tetrafluoroborate (AgBF4) with ethyl iodide (C2H5I) in anhydrous dichloroethane (DCE) was optimized as a sample reaction to study heavy crude oil mixtures, and the reaction yield was monitored and determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR). The obtained conditions were then applied to a mixture of standard aromatic CH-, N-, O- and S-containing compounds and then a heavy crude oil, and only sulfur-containing compounds were selectively alkylated. The deuterium labeled alkylating reagents, iodomethane-d3 (CD3I) and iodoethane-d5 (C2D5I), were employed to the alkylation of heavy crude oil to selectively differentiate the tagged sulfur species from the original crude oil. PMID:26694374

  1. Quantitative Proteome Analysis of Breast Cancer Cell Lines using 18O-Labeling and an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Patwardhan, Anil J.; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Pallavicini, Maria

    2006-05-01

    Proteome comparison of cell lines derived from breast cancer and normal breast epithelium provide opportunities to identify differentially expressed proteins and pathways associated with specific phenotypes. We employed trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O peptide labeling, FTI-CR mass spectrometry, and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy to calculate compare the relative protein abundances of hundreds of proteins simultaneously in non-cancer and cancer cell lines derived from breast tissue. A reference panel of cell lines was created to facilitate comparisons of relative protein abundance amongst multiple cell lines and across multiple experiments. A peptide database generated from multidimensional LC separations and MS/MS analysis was used to facilitate subsequent AMT tag-based peptide identifications. This peptide database represented a total of 2,299 proteins, including 514 that were quantified using the AMT tag and 16O/18O strategies. Eighty-six proteins showed at least a 3-fold protein abundance change between cancer and non-cancer cell lines. A comparison of protein expression profiles with previously published gene expression data revealed that 21 of these proteins also had >3-fold differences between the non-cancer and cancer cell lines at the transcriptional level. Clustering of protein abundance ratios revealed that several groups of proteins were differentially expressed between the cancer cell lines

  2. Measurement of gross photosynthesis, respiration in the light and mesophyll conductance in leaves using H218O labeling and high precision isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, K. L.; Gauthier, P. P.; Battle, M. O.; Bender, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    A fundamental challenge in plant physiology is independently determining the rates of gross O2 production by photosynthesis and O2 consumption by respiration, photorespiration, and other processes. Previous studies on isolated chloroplasts or leaves have separately constrained net and gross O2 production (NOP and GOP, respectively) by labeling ambient O2 with 18O while leaf water was unlabeled. Here, we introduce a new method to accurately measure GOP and NOP of whole detached leaves in a cuvette as a routine gas exchange measurement. The petiole is immersed in water enriched to a δ18O of 10,000‰, and the leaf is labeled through the transpiration stream. GOP is calculated from the increase in δ18O of O2 as air passes through the cuvette. NOP is determined from the increase in O2/N2. Both terms are measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. CO2 assimilation and other standard gas exchange parameters are also measured. Reproducible measurements are made on a single leaf for up to 15 hours. By investigating the light response curve of NOP and GOP in Phaseolus vulgaris, we found that respiration is inhibited in the light (Kok effect) when [O2]=21% but not when [O2]=2%. The ratio of NOP to net CO2 assimilation was 1.03 ± 0.01 for all leaves studied. Additionally, using GOP as a constraint, we determined chloroplastic [CO2], and we found that mesophyll conductance increases with light intensity. An extensive list of gas exchange properties is measured with this O2 method, making it a unique tool to study and understand leaf physiological traits and the biogeochemistry of carbon cycling.

  3. Nanoparticle labelling-based magnetic immunoassay on chip combined with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin; Jiang, Ping; He, Man; Peng, Hanyong; Zhang, Xing

    2011-10-07

    A sensitive and selective on chip magnetic immunoassay method, based on a sandwich-type immunoreaction with PbS nanoparticle (NPs) labels in combination with electrothermal vaporization-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ETV-ICP-MS), was proposed for the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). We designed and fabricated a microfluidic chip for magnetic immunoassay, and the prepared iminodiacetic acid modified silica coated magnetic nanoparticles (IDA-SCMNPs) were packed into the central microchannel to form a solid phase column by self-assembly under the magnetic field. After completion of the immunoreaction involving a primary antibody, CEA and a secondary antibody labeled with PbS NPs on a magnetic solid phase packed-column, ETV-ICP-MS was used to determine the concentration of Pb that was released from the captured PbS NPs using an acid-dissolution step. The concentrations of CEA can be correlated with that of Pb. The established method demonstrated a limit of detection of 0.058 μg L(-1) for CEA, with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 6.7% (c = 10 μg L(-1), n = 7). A linearity ranging from 0.2 μg L(-1) to 50 μg L(-1) and a 2-fold enrichment factor (from 60 μL sample solution to 30 μL eluent) were achieved. The proposed method was further validated by analyzing CEA in human serum. The results were in good agreement with those obtained by chemiluminescent immunoassay, which is currently used as a clinical method. Overall, this method offers the advantages of high speed, high sensitivity, high selectivity, low sample/reagents consumption, high integrity and versatility. Moreover, it can be easily applied to other biological and medical assays.

  4. Simultaneous quantification of labeled (2)H5-glycerol, (13)C6-glucose, and endogenous D-glucose in mouse plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jahouh, Farid; Wang, Rong

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring the level of glucose and glycerol or their labeled derivatives in biological fluid for kinetic studies has always been challenging, especially in mice, because of the limited volume in addition to the complexity of plasma. For such application, we developed a simple, fast, and sensitive method for the simultaneous measurement of absolute concentrations of labeled (2)H5-glycerol and (13)C6-glucose as well as endogenous D-glucose using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In our study, 15.0 μL of mouse plasma was processed by a one-step protein precipitation, followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. The quantification of the analytes was carried out by monitoring the product ion scan of their corresponding deprotonated molecular ions and constructing the extracted ion fragmentogram by choosing a specific product ion for each analyte (equivalent to precursor ion to product ion transitions). The limit of detection (LOD) was evaluated to be 1.0 μM for both (2)H5-glycerol and (13)C6-glucose, and the limit of quantitation (LOQ) was observed to be 5.0 μM for both (2)H5-glycerol and (13)C6-glucose in diluted mice plasma that corresponds to 50 μM in plasma or 4.60 and 9.01 mg/dL of glycerol and glucose in plasma, respectively. The extraction recoveries are 81.9 % (CV = 8.1 %) for (2)H5-glycerol and 26.2 % (CV = 13.6 %) for (13)C6-glucose.

  5. Proteome turnover in the green alga Ostreococcus tauri by time course 15N metabolic labeling mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah F; Munagapati, Vijaya S; Salvo-Chirnside, Eliane; Kerr, Lorraine E; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Protein synthesis and degradation determine the cellular levels of proteins, and their control hence enables organisms to respond to environmental change. Experimentally, these are little known proteome parameters; however, recently, SILAC-based mass spectrometry studies have begun to quantify turnover in the proteomes of cell lines, yeast, and animals. Here, we present a proteome-scale method to quantify turnover and calculate synthesis and degradation rate constants of individual proteins in autotrophic organisms such as algae and plants. The workflow is based on the automated analysis of partial stable isotope incorporation with (15)N. We applied it in a study of the unicellular pico-alga Ostreococcus tauri and observed high relative turnover in chloroplast-encoded ATPases (0.42-0.58% h(-1)), core photosystem II proteins (0.34-0.51% h(-1)), and RbcL (0.47% h(-1)), while nuclear-encoded RbcS2 is more stable (0.23% h(-1)). Mitochondrial targeted ATPases (0.14-0.16% h(-1)), photosystem antennae (0.09-0.14% h(-1)), and histones (0.07-0.1% h(-1)) were comparatively stable. The calculation of degradation and synthesis rate constants k(deg) and k(syn) confirms RbcL as the bulk contributor to overall protein turnover. This study performed over 144 h of incorporation reveals dynamics of protein complex subunits as well as isoforms targeted to different organelles.

  6. Screening for lysine-specific demethylase-1 inhibitors using a label-free high-throughput mass spectrometry assay.

    PubMed

    Plant, Matthew; Dineen, Tom; Cheng, Alan; Long, Alexander M; Chen, Hao; Morgenstern, Kurt A

    2011-12-15

    Posttranslational modifications on the N terminus of histone H3 act in a combinatorial fashion to control epigenetic responses to extracellular stimuli. Lysine-specific demethylase-1 (LSD1) represents an emerging epigenetic target class for the discovery of novel antitumor therapies. In this study, a high-throughput mass spectrometry (HTMS) assay was developed to measure LSD1-catalyzed demethylation of lysine-4 on several H3 substrates. The assay leverages RapidFire chromatography in line with a triple stage quadrupole detection method to measure multiple LSD1 substrate and product reactions from an assay well. This approach minimizes artifacts from fluorescence interference and eliminates the need for antibody specificity to methylated lysines. The assay was robust in a high-throughput screen of a focused library consisting of more than 56,000 unique chemical scaffolds with a median Z' of 0.76. Validated hits from the primary screen were followed up by successive rounds of virtual and HTMS screening to mine for related structures in a parent library consisting of millions of compounds. The screen resulted in the rapid discovery of multiple chemical classes amenable to medicinal chemistry optimization. This assay was further developed into a generic platform capable of rapidly screening epigenetic targets that use the N-terminal tail of histone H3 as a substrate.

  7. 13C- and 15N-Labeling Strategies Combined with Mass Spectrometry Comprehensively Quantify Phospholipid Dynamics in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Robin; Gafken, Philip R.; Olsen, Carissa Perez

    2015-01-01

    Membranes define cellular and organelle boundaries, a function that is critical to all living systems. Like other biomolecules, membrane lipids are dynamically maintained, but current methods are extremely limited for monitoring lipid dynamics in living animals. We developed novel strategies in C. elegans combining 13C and 15N stable isotopes with mass spectrometry to directly quantify the replenishment rates of the individual fatty acids and intact phospholipids of the membrane. Using multiple measurements of phospholipid dynamics, we found that the phospholipid pools are replaced rapidly and at rates nearly double the turnover measured for neutral lipid populations. In fact, our analysis shows that the majority of membrane lipids are replaced each day. Furthermore, we found that stearoyl-CoA desaturases (SCDs), critical enzymes in polyunsaturated fatty acid production, play an unexpected role in influencing the overall rates of membrane maintenance as SCD depletion affected the turnover of nearly all membrane lipids. Additionally, the compromised membrane maintenance as defined by LC-MS/MS with SCD RNAi resulted in active phospholipid remodeling that we predict is critical to alleviate the impact of reduced membrane maintenance in these animals. Not only have these combined methodologies identified new facets of the impact of SCDs on the membrane, but they also have great potential to reveal many undiscovered regulators of phospholipid metabolism. PMID:26528916

  8. Mass-Tag Labeling Using Acyl-PEG Exchange for the Determination of Endogenous Protein S-Fatty Acylation.

    PubMed

    Percher, Avital; Thinon, Emmanuelle; Hang, Howard

    2017-08-01

    The covalent coupling of fatty acids to proteins provides an important mechanism of regulation in cells. In eukaryotes, cysteine fatty acylation (S-fatty acylation) has been shown to be critical for protein function in a variety of cellular pathways as well as microbial pathogenesis. While methods developed over the past decade have improved the detection and profiling of S-fatty acylation, these are hampered in their ability to characterize endogenous protein S-fatty acylation levels under physiological conditions. Furthermore, understanding the contribution of specific sites and levels of S-fatty acylation remains a major challenge. To evaluate S-fatty acylation of endogenous proteins as well as to determine the number of S-fatty acylation events, we developed the acyl-PEG exchange (APE) that utilizes cysteine-specific chemistry to exchange S-fatty acylation sites with mass-tags of defined size, which can be readily observed by western blotting. APE provides a readily accessible approach to investigate endogenous S-fatty acylation from any sample source, with high sensitivity and broad applicability that complements the current toolbox of methods for thioester-based post-translational modifications. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Point-of-Purchase Calorie Labeling Has Little Influence on Calories Ordered Regardless of Body Mass Index.

    PubMed

    Rendell, Sarah Litman; Swencionis, Charles

    2014-09-01

    The obesity epidemic has incited legislation aimed to inform consumers of the nutritional value of food items available in restaurants and fast food establishments, with the presumption that knowing the caloric content in a meal might enable patrons to make healthier choices when ordering. However, available research shows mixed results regarding consumers' use of calorie information to promote healthier purchases. The aim of this study was to determine whether menu type, specifically having viewed a menu with calorie disclosures or not, would have an impact on how many calories were in a lunch meal ordered by a patron. Additionally, we sought to identify body mass index (BMI) as a moderator of the relationship between viewing a menu with or without calorie information and the number of calories an individual orders for lunch. Two hundred forty-five adults participated in the study and completed the questionnaire. Results indicated neither menu type, nor reporting having seen calorie information, was significantly related to the number of calories in the foods that participants ordered, even after controlling demographic variables age, sex, income, education, race/ethnicity, and BMI. BMI did not serve as a moderator in the relationship between menu type and food calories ordered. Implications for policy change and clinical work with overweight and obese patients are discussed.

  10. Analysis of the differentially expressed low molecular weight peptides in human serum via an N-terminal isotope labeling technique combining nano-liquid chromatography/matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jiapeng; Zhu, Dong; Wu, Duojiao; Zhu, Tongyu; Zhao, Ningwei; Guo, Yinlong

    2012-11-15

    Peptidomics analysis of human serum is challenging due to the low abundance of serum peptides and interference from the complex matrix. This study analyzed the differentially expressed (DE) low molecular weight peptides in human serum integrating a DMPITC-based N-terminal isotope labeling technique with nano-liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MALDI-MS). The workflow introduced a [d(6)]-4,6-dimethoxypyrimidine-2-isothiocyanate (DMPITC)-labeled mixture of aliquots from test samples as the internal standard. The spiked [d(0)]-DMPITC-labeled samples were separated by nano-LC then spotted on the MALDI target. Both quantitative and qualitative studies for serum peptides were achieved based on the isotope-labeled peaks. The DMPITC labeling technique combined with nano-LC/MALDI-MS not only minimized the errors in peptide quantitation, but also allowed convenient recognition of the labeled peptides due to the 6 Da mass difference. The data showed that the entire research procedure as well as the subsequent data analysis method were effective, reproducible, and sensitive for the analysis of DE serum peptides. This study successfully established a research model for DE serum peptides using DMPITC-based N-terminal isotope labeling and nano-LC/MALDI-MS. Application of the DMPITC-based N-terminal labeling technique is expected to provide a promising tool for the investigation of peptides in vivo, especially for the analysis of DE peptides under different biological conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. HCD-only fragmentation method balances peptide identification and quantitation of TMT-labeled samples in hybrid linear ion trap/orbitrap mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Chiva, Cristina; Sabidó, Eduard

    2014-01-16

    Protein quantitation based on the generation of reporter ions from chemical labels is a widely used quantitative proteomics approach that enables measuring changes in protein abundance in response to biological perturbations. Isobaric labeling strategies at the MS2 level allow simultaneous measurements of different samples but it requires a fine-tuning of the collision energy used in HCD fragmentation to simultaneously obtain confident peptide identifications and highly sensitive and accurate quantitation. Although the recent development of dual CID/HCD fragmentation methods to circumvent these limitations, the fact is that many laboratories still use HCD-only methods for routine TMT protein quantitation experiments. Here, we have explored the effect of the collision energy on peptide identification and quantitation using HCD-only fragmentation methods on a linear ion trap/orbitrap mass spectrometer bearing an axial field HCD fragmentation cell. Our results using the HCD-only method show that a balance between the increase in the number of peptide identifications and the decrease in the precision of peptide quantitation is attained at a normalized collision energy of 40%. The HCD-only method at 40% does not only yield better results than those obtained using a higher collision energies, but it also outperforms the results obtained using the available CID/HCD dual method. In this work we have explored the effect of the collision energy on peptide identification and quantitation using HCD-only fragmentation methods on an Orbitrap Velos Pro mass spectrometer. Our results show that when using a HCD-only method, a balance between the number of peptide identifications and the precision of peptide quantitation is attained at a normalized collision energy (NCE) of 40%. This contrast with the parameters routinely used in many laboratories, which are set at NCE 45%. The single HCD method at 40% does not only yield better results than those obtained using a collision energy

  12. Principles of protein labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Obermaier, Christian; Griebel, Anja; Westermeier, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Protein labeling methods prior to separation and analysis have become indispensable approaches for proteomic profiling. Basically, three different types of tags are employed: stable isotopes, mass tags, and fluorophores. While proteins labeled with stable isotopes and mass tags are measured and differentiated by mass spectrometry, fluorescent labels are detected with fluorescence imagers. The major purposes for protein labeling are monitoring of biological processes, reliable quantification of compounds and specific detection of protein modifications and isoforms in multiplexed samples, enhancement of detection sensitivity, and simplification of detection workflows. Proteins can be labeled during cell growth by incorporation of amino acids containing different isotopes, or in biological fluids, cells or tissue samples by attaching specific groups to the ε-amino group of lysine, the N-terminus, or the cysteine residues. The principles and the modifications of the different labeling approaches on the protein level are described; benefits and shortcomings of the methods are discussed.

  13. CVD Prevention Through Policy: a Review of Mass Media, Food/Menu Labeling, Taxation/Subsidies, Built Environment, School Procurement, Worksite Wellness, and Marketing Standards to Improve Diet.

    PubMed

    Afshin, Ashkan; Penalvo, Jose; Del Gobbo, Liana; Kashaf, Michael; Micha, Renata; Morrish, Kurtis; Pearson-Stuttard, Jonathan; Rehm, Colin; Shangguan, Siyi; Smith, Jessica D; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2015-11-01

    Poor diet is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease in the USA and globally. Evidence-based policies are crucial to improve diet and population health. We reviewed the effectiveness for a range of policy levers to alter diet and diet-related risk factors. We identified evidence to support benefits of focused mass media campaigns (especially for fruits, vegetables, salt), food pricing strategies (both subsidies and taxation, with stronger effects at lower income levels), school procurement policies (for increasing healthful or reducing unhealthful choices), and worksite wellness programs (especially when comprehensive and multicomponent). Evidence was inconclusive for food and menu labeling (for consumer or industry behavior) and changes in local built environment (e.g., availability or accessibility of supermarkets, fast food outlets). We found little empiric evidence evaluating marketing restrictions, although broad principles and large resources spent on marketing suggest utility. Widespread implementation and evaluation of evidence-based policy strategies, with further research on other strategies with mixed/limited evidence, are essential "population medicine" to reduce health and economic burdens and inequities of diet-related illness worldwide.

  14. De facto molecular weight distributions of glucans by size-exclusion chromatography combined with mass/molar-detection of fluorescence labeled terminal hemiacetals.

    PubMed

    Praznik, Werner; Huber, Anton

    2005-09-25

    A major capability of polysaccharides in aqueous media is their tendency for aggregation and dynamic formation of supermolecular structures. Even extended dissolution processes will not eliminate these structures which dominate many analytical approaches, in particular absolute molecular weight determinations referring to light scattering data. An alternative approach for determination of de facto molecular weight for glucans with free terminal hemiacetal functionality (reducing end group) has been adjusted from carbohydrates for midrange and high-dp glucans: quantitative and stabilized labeling as aminopyridyl-derivatives (AP-glucans) and subsequent analysis of SEC-separated elution profiles based on simultaneously monitored mass and molar fractions by refractive index and fluorescence detection. SEC-DRI/FL of AP-glucans proved as an appropriate approach for determination of de facto molecular weight of constituting glucan molecules even in the presence of supermolecular structures for non-branched (pullulan), branched (dextran), narrow distributed and broad distributed and for mixes of compact and loose packed polymer coils (starch glucan hydrolizate).

  15. Studies on DNA adduction with heterocyclic amines by accelerator mass spectrometry: a new technique for tracing isotope-labelled DNA adduction.

    PubMed

    Turteltaub, K W; Vogel, J S; Frantz, C E; Fultz, E

    1993-01-01

    DNA adduction in rodents at doses equivalent to human dietary exposure (10(4)-10(6)-fold lower than laboratory studies) is being studied using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). AMS is a nuclear physics technique for detection of cosmogenic isotopes and has been used for specifically selecting and counting 14C. Using AMS, DNA adducts are detectable at levels of 1-10 adducts/10(12) nucleotides following acute and chronic dosing regimes with 14C-labelled carcinogens. The adduct detection limit has been imposed by the natural abundance of 14C in the samples and animal-to-animal variation. AMS is also being coupled to HPLC, multidimensional TLC and radio-immunoassay. In addition, AMS's great sensitivity makes it useful for demonstrating that drugs and chemicals do not bind to DNA. The use of AMS, however, is limited to situations where radiolabelled agents can be used. The data suggest that AMS is extremely useful in obtaining quantitative data on the effects of carcinogens on DNA at the low doses common for actual human exposures and may be useful in human studies.

  16. Comparison of copper labeling followed by liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and immunochemical assays for serum hepcidin-25 determination.

    PubMed

    Konz, Tobias; Alonso-García, Javier; Montes-Bayón, María; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2013-10-17

    Hepcidin-25 has been defined as the key biomarker in iron metabolism. This peptide binds to the iron transporter ferroportin to cause its degradation. Therefore, the need for specific, accurate and precise methods for the quantification of hepcidin-25 in biological fluids is dramatically increasing. In this regard, the use of rapid immunochemical methods that provide low limit of quantification is desired for routine clinical use. However, such fast methodologies should be first analytically evaluated and compared with alternative strategies to check for their advantages and limitations. Here we compare the use of a commercial immunochemical assay for hepcidin determination with a novel analytical approach based on Cu-labeling of the peptide followed by Cu determination using liquid chromatography (HPLC) and plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The figures of merit of both systems reveal similar analytical characteristics and both seem to be adequate for the determination of the peptide at biologically relevant concentrations in human serum samples. The analysis of a larger number of samples (n=50) by both techniques showed a good agreement in the concentrations found. Such finding permits to address the hepcidin recovery in the sample preparation procedure necessary for the HPLC-ICP-MS analysis in human serum that turn out to be 76-85%. Additionally, limitations due to cross-reactivity issues of the ELISA method could be addressed in some of the samples by using LC-ICP-MS and were confirmed by LC-Electrospray-MS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Multiplexed quantification of plant thylakoid proteins on Western blots using lanthanide-labeled antibodies and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    de Bang, Thomas Christian; Pedas, Pai; Schjoerring, Jan Kofod; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2013-05-21

    We have developed a novel calibration method that allows concurrent quantification of multiple proteins by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) after Western blotting. Calibrants were made of nitrocellulose membranes doped with lanthanide standards. Excellent linearity was obtained in the interval from 0 to 24 ng lanthanide cm(-2). Cerium-labeled lysozyme was introduced as an internal reference protein, enabling correction for up to 50% difference in transfer efficiency during the blotting of membranes. The sensitivity of the LA-ICP-MS method was comparable to state-of-the-art chemiluminescence detection and was further improved by a factor of 20, using a polymer tag. Our method allowed reproducible and multiplexed quantification of five thylakoid proteins extracted from chloroplasts of the plant species Arabidopsis thaliana (relative standard deviation (RSD) of ≤ 5% in three independent analytical series). The method was capable of measuring the L subunit in photosystem I of an Arabidopsis mutant containing <5% of this particular protein, relative to the wild type. We conclude that the developed calibration method is highly suited for multiplexed and comparative protein studies, allowing for intermembrane comparisons with high sensitivity and reproducibility.

  18. Review, evaluation, and discussion of the challenges of missing value imputation for mass spectrometry-based label-free global proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wiberg, Holli K.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Wang, Jing; McDermott, Jason E.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Pounds, Joel G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2015-04-09

    In this review, we apply selected imputation strategies to label-free liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) proteomics datasets to evaluate the accuracy with respect to metrics of variance and classification. We evaluate several commonly used imputation approaches for individual merits and discuss the caveats of each approach with respect to the example LC–MS proteomics data. In general, local similarity-based approaches, such as the regularized expectation maximization and least-squares adaptive algorithms, yield the best overall performances with respect to metrics of accuracy and robustness. However, no single algorithm consistently outperforms the remaining approaches, and in some cases, performing classification without imputation sometimes yielded the most accurate classification. Thus, because of the complex mechanisms of missing data in proteomics, which also vary from peptide to protein, no individual method is a single solution for imputation. In summary, on the basis of the observations in this review, the goal for imputation in the field of computational proteomics should be to develop new approaches that work generically for this data type and new strategies to guide users in the selection of the best imputation for their dataset and analysis objectives.

  19. Review, evaluation, and discussion of the challenges of missing value imputation for mass spectrometry-based label-free global proteomics

    DOE PAGES

    Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Wiberg, Holli K.; Matzke, Melissa M.; ...

    2015-04-09

    In this review, we apply selected imputation strategies to label-free liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) proteomics datasets to evaluate the accuracy with respect to metrics of variance and classification. We evaluate several commonly used imputation approaches for individual merits and discuss the caveats of each approach with respect to the example LC–MS proteomics data. In general, local similarity-based approaches, such as the regularized expectation maximization and least-squares adaptive algorithms, yield the best overall performances with respect to metrics of accuracy and robustness. However, no single algorithm consistently outperforms the remaining approaches, and in some cases, performing classification without imputation sometimes yieldedmore » the most accurate classification. Thus, because of the complex mechanisms of missing data in proteomics, which also vary from peptide to protein, no individual method is a single solution for imputation. In summary, on the basis of the observations in this review, the goal for imputation in the field of computational proteomics should be to develop new approaches that work generically for this data type and new strategies to guide users in the selection of the best imputation for their dataset and analysis objectives.« less

  20. Comparative Label-Free Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Mildly versus Severely Affected mdx Mouse Skeletal Muscles Identifies Annexin, Lamin, and Vimentin as Universal Dystrophic Markers.

    PubMed

    Holland, Ashling; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Winkler, Claudia K; Krautwald, Mirjam; Brinkmeier, Heinrich; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2015-06-19

    The primary deficiency in the membrane cytoskeletal protein dystrophin results in complex changes in dystrophic muscles. In order to compare the degree of secondary alterations in differently affected subtypes of skeletal muscles, we have conducted a global analysis of proteome-wide changes in various dystrophin-deficient muscles. In contrast to the highly degenerative mdx diaphragm muscle, which showed considerable alterations in 35 distinct proteins, the spectrum of mildly to moderately dystrophic skeletal muscles, including interosseus, flexor digitorum brevis, soleus, and extensor digitorum longus muscle, exhibited a smaller number of changed proteins. Compensatory mechanisms and/or cellular variances may be responsible for differing secondary changes in individual mdx muscles. Label-free mass spectrometry established altered expression levels for diaphragm proteins associated with contraction, energy metabolism, the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix and the cellular stress response. Comparative immunoblotting verified the differences in the degree of secondary changes in dystrophin-deficient muscles and showed that the up-regulation of molecular chaperones, the compensatory increase in proteins of the intermediate filaments, the fibrosis-related increase in collagen levels and the pathophysiological decrease in calcium binding proteins is more pronounced in mdx diaphragm as compared to the less severely affected mdx leg muscles. Annexin, lamin, and vimentin were identified as universal dystrophic markers.

  1. Absolute quantification of Pru av 2 in sweet cherry fruit by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry with the use of a stable isotope-labelled peptide.

    PubMed

    Ippoushi, Katsunari; Sasanuma, Motoe; Oike, Hideaki; Kobori, Masuko; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari

    2016-08-01

    Pru av 2, a pathogenesis-related (PR) protein present in the sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruit, is the principal allergen of cherry and one of the chief causes of pollen food syndrome (oral allergy syndrome). In this study, a quantitative assay for this protein was developed with the use of the protein absolute quantification (AQUA) method, which consists of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) employing TGC[CAM]STDASGK[(13)C6,(15)N2], a stable isotope-labelled internal standard (SIIS) peptide. This assay gave a linear relationship (r(2)>0.99) in a concentration range (2.3-600fmol/μL), and the overall coefficient of variation (CV) for multiple tests was 14.6%. Thus, the contents of this allergenic protein in sweet cherry products could be determined using this assay. This assay should be valuable for allergological investigations of Pru av 2 in sweet cherry and detection of protein contamination in foods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tandem mass spectrometry of isomeric aniline-labeled N-glycans separated on porous graphitic carbon: Revealing the attachment position of terminal sialic acids and structures of neutral glycans.

    PubMed

    Michael, Claudia; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2015-07-15

    Quantitative monitoring of changes in the N-glycome upon disease has gained significance in the context of biomarker discovery. Separation and quantification of isobaric glycan isomers can be attained by using high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS). Collision-induced dissociation (CID)-based fragmentation of separated isobaric glycans is evaluated in respect to its potential of providing fragment ions specific for the linkage positions of terminal sialic acids and the presence of intersecting GlcNAc moieties, respectively. N-Glycans were labeled via reductive amination using (12)C6-aniline and (13)C6-aniline as isotope-coded labeling reagents. The differently labeled glycans were merged and separated into various species using a porous graphitic carbon (PGC) stationary phase. Identification of structural features of separated isobaric isomers was performed by CID-based tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) carried out in a quadrupole time-of-flight (QqTOF) or a quadrupole ion-trap (IT) mass spectrometer. Working in the negative ion mode, new diagnostic CID fragment ions could be found that are indicative for the α2,6-type linkage of sialic acids. Other diagnostic ions, identified before as being indicative for the substitution of the 6-antenna, could be confirmed as being of relevance also in the case of aniline labeling. In the positive ion mode, CID fragment ions indicative for the structure of short neutral N-glycans were identified. One new diagnostic ion specific for the linkage position of the terminal sialic acids and one for the presence of bisecting GlcNAc in N-glycans were identified. The aniline label introduced for improved relative quantitation in MS(1) was found not to significantly alter the CID fragmentation patterns that were reported previously by other authors for unlabeled/reduced glycans or for glycans with more polar labels. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of ¹³C- and ²H-labeled internal standards for the determination of amphetamines in biological samples, by reversed-phase ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Berg, Thomas; Karlsen, Morten; Oiestad, Ase Marit Leere; Johansen, Jon Eigill; Liu, Huiling; Strand, Dag Helge

    2014-05-30

    Stable isotope-labeled internal standards (SIL-ISs) are often used when applying liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze for legal and illegal drugs. ISs labeled with (13)C, (15)N, and (18)O are expected to behave more closely to their corresponding unlabeled analytes, compared with that of the more classically used (2)H-labeled ISs. This study has investigated the behavior of amphetamine, (2)H3-, (2)H5, (2)H6-, (2)H8-, (2)H11-, and (13)C6-labeled amphetamine, during sample preparation by liquid-liquid extraction and LC-MS/MS analyses. None or only minor differences in liquid-liquid extraction recoveries of amphetamine and the SIL-ISs were observed. The chromatographic resolution between amphetamine and the (2)H-labeled amphetamines increased with the number of (2)H-substitutes. For chromatographic studies we also included seven additional (13)C6-amphetamines and their analytes. All the (13)C6-labeled ISs were co-eluting with their analytes, both when a basic and when an acidic mobile phase were used. MS/MS analyses of amphetamine and its SIL-ISs showed that the ISs with the highest number of (2)H-substitutes required more energy for fragmentation in the collision cell compared with that of the ISs with a lower number. The findings, in this study, support those of previous studies, showing that (13)C-labeled ISs are superior to (2)H-labeled ISs, for analytical purposes.

  4. Quantitative analysis of 15N labeled positional isomers of glutamine and citrulline via electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of their dansyl derivatives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The enteral metabolism of glutamine and citrulline are intertwined because, while glutamine is one of the main fuel sources for the enterocyte, citrulline is one of its products. It has been shown that the administration of 15N labeled glutamine results in the incorporation of the 15N label into cit...

  5. Nutrition Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

  6. Label Structured Cell Proliferation Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    variable as a mass-like quantity. The specific model for the dynamics of life and death processes of a population of cells labeled with CFSE is proposed in... variables = + where < 0 is label degradation velocity. Because we really don’t understand completely the degradation process (there appears to be...little agreement as to what variables on which this velocity might depend) and to allow for generality (other labels that might be used may well

  7. Hair analysis of histamine after fluorescence labeling by column-switching reversed-phase liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and application to human hair.

    PubMed

    Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Suzuki, Ayako; Fukushima, Takeshi; Kato, Masaru

    2004-10-15

    Sensitive determination of histamine (HA) in hair was carried out by column-switching reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS). HA was labeled with excess amounts of 4-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-7-fluoro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (DBD-F) at 60 degrees C for 30 min in a mixture of 0.1 M borax (pH 9.3) and acetonitrile (CH(3)CN). The resulting DBD-HA derivative was roughly separated by a Mightysil RP-18 GP (100 x 2mm i.d., 3 microm) with an acidic mobile phase containing 0.1% trifluoroacetic acid. DBD-HA in the fraction flowing due to a position change in the six-port column-switching valve was then completely separated by a Wakopak Navi C30 (150 x 2mm i.d., 5 microm) with 20 mM AcONH(4)-CH(3)CN (8:2). The mass spectrometer was operated in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode for the product ion (m/z 292) obtained from MS-MS measurement using the protonated molecular ion [M+H](+) (m/z 337) as the precursor ion. Good linearity was achieved from the calibration curve obtained by plotting peak area ratios of the internal standard (HA-d(4)) against the injected amounts of HA (1.66-16.6 pmol, r(2)=0.999). The coefficients of variation, at 1.66- and 16.6-pmol injections, were 5.6 and 3.7%, respectively (n=6). Furthermore, the detection limit was 0.167 pmol. The efficiency of the recommended procedure was identified from the determination in the rat hair root after intraperitoneal administration of HA. The proposed method was applied to HA determination in the hair shaft of Dark Agouti rats and healthy volunteers. The variations in the concentrations in 1mg of hair shaft were 0.80-1.84 pmol (mean+/-SD=1.33+/-0.33, n=12) in rats and 0.94-72.3 pmol (17.2+/-21.5, n=16) in humans. The determination of HA in the plasma of rats and humans was also performed successfully by this method. Because the proposed method provides good precision and trace detection of HA in hair, the analytical technique

  8. Development of a hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometric imaging platform for N-glycan relative quantitation using stable-isotope labeled hydrazide reagents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengwei; Zhong, Xuefei; Tie, Cai; Chen, Bingming; Zhang, Xinxiang; Li, Lingjun

    2017-07-01

    In this work, the capability of newly developed hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) platform for quantitative analysis of N-glycans has been demonstrated. As a proof-of-principle experiment, heavy and light stable-isotope labeled hydrazide reagents labeled maltodextrin ladder were used to demonstrate the feasibility of the HILIC-MALDI-MSI platform for reliable quantitative analysis of N-glycans. MALDI-MSI analysis by an Orbitrap mass spectrometer enabled high-resolution and high-sensitivity detection of N-glycans eluted from HILIC column, allowing the re-construction of LC chromatograms as well as accurate mass measurements for structural inference. MALDI-MSI analysis of the collected LC traces showed that the chromatographic resolution was preserved. The N-glycans released from human serum was used to demonstrate the utility of this novel platform in quantitative analysis of N-glycans from a complex sample. Benefiting from the minimized ion suppression provided by HILIC separation, comparison between MALDI-MS and the newly developed platform HILIC-MALDI-MSI revealed that HILIC-MALDI-MSI provided higher N-glycan coverage as well as better quantitation accuracy in the quantitative analysis of N-glycans released from human serum. Graphical abstract Reconstructed chromatograms based on HILIC-MALDI-MSI results of heavy and light labeled maltodextrin enabling quantitative glycan analysis.

  9. Quantitation of anacetrapib, stable-isotope labeled-anacetrapib (microdose), and four metabolites in human plasma using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chavez-Eng, C M; Lutz, R W; Li, H; Goykhman, D; Bateman, K P; Woolf, E

    2016-02-01

    An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of (4S,5R)-5-[3,5-bis (trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-3-{[4'-fluoro-5'-isopropyl-2'-methoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-2-yl] methyl}-4-methyl-1,3-oxazolidin-2-one (anacetrapib, I) and [(13)C5(15)N]-anacetrapib, II in human plasma has been developed to support a clinical study to determine the absolute bioavailability of I. The analytes and the stable-isotope labeled internal standard ([(13)C7(15)N(2)H7]-anacetrapib, III) were extracted from 100μL of human plasma by liquid-liquid extraction using 20/80 isopropyl alcohol/hexane (v/v). The chromatographic separation of the analytes was achieved using Waters BEH Shield RP 18 (50×2.1mm×1.7μm) column and mobile phase gradient of 0.1% formic acid in water (Solvent A) and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile (Solvent B) at 0.6mL/min flow rate. The MS/MS detection was performed on AB Sciex 5000 or AB 5500 in positive electrospray ionization mode, operated in selected reaction monitoring mode. The assay was validated in the concentration range 1-2000ng/mL for I; and a lower curve range, 0.025-50ng/mL for II. In addition to the absolute bioavailability determination, it was desired to better elucidate the pharmacokinetic behavior of several hydroxylated metabolites of I. Toward this end, two exploratory assays for the hydroxy metabolites of I were qualified in the concentration range 0.5-500ng/mL. All metabolites were separated on a Supelco Ascentis Express Phenyl-Hexyl (50×2.1mm, 2.7μm) column. Metabolite M4 was analyzed in the negative mode with a mobile phase consisting of a gradient mixture of water (A) and acetonitrile (B). The other three metabolites, M1-M3 were analyzed in the positive mode using a mobile phase gradient of water with 0.1% formic acid (A) and acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid (B). The assays were utilized to support a clinical study in which a microdosing approach was used to

  10. Determination of fluorescence-labeled asparaginyl-oligosaccharide in glycoprotein by reversed-phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Takamasa; Min, Jun Zhe; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Fukushima, Takeshi; Inagaki, Shinsuke

    2007-11-15

    Eight fluorescence reagents, i.e., DBD-F, NBD-F, DNS-Cl, NDA, PSC, FITC, Fmoc-Cl, and DMEQ-COCl, which are reactive to an amino functional group, were tested for the labeling of asparaginyl-oligosaccharides in a glycoprotein. Although the optimal reaction conditions and the fluorescence maximal wavelengths were different for each reagent, the highly sensitive fluorescence detection at the femtomole level of Disialo-Asn (a representative asparaginyl-oligosaccharide) was obtained from the labeling utilizing these reagents. Among them, PSC was the most reliable reagent in terms of detection sensitivity (approximately 3 fmol, signal-to-noise ratio of 5 (S/N = 5) on the chromatogram). However, the structural information could not be obtained from the fluorescence detection. Thus, the on-line determination of a real sample was carried out by UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS. The detection limit of the PSC-labeled Disialo-Asn by selected-ion chromatography was 58 fmol (S/N = 5). When the proposed procedure was applied to the determination of oligosaccharides in ovalbumin, 15 species of PSC-labeled oligosaccharides possessing Man, GlcNAc, and Gal units were identified from the UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS. The number of identified oligosaccharides was relatively greater than the method using Fmoc-Cl. Based on the ovalbumin results, the proposed labeling with PSC followed by UPLC-ESI-TOF-MS detection seems to be useful for the on-line asparaginyl-oligosaccharide analysis.

  11. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry as a tool for identification of volatile migrants from autoadhesive labels used for direct food contact.

    PubMed

    Canellas, Elena; Vera, Paula; Nerín, Cristina

    2014-11-01

    Pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSA) are used to manufacture labels that are applied directly on the food. These adhesives could contain not only intentionally added compounds (IAS) to the adhesive formula but also non-intentionally added substances (NIAS), due to the impurities from the raw materials used, decomposition of the initial components or from chemical interactions between them. These compounds could migrate to the food and contaminate it. In this study, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS/Q) and atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to a quadrupole hyphenated to a time of flight mass spectrometer (APGC-MS/Q-TOF) have been used for identification of unknown compounds and NIAS coming from a PSA. Seven compounds were identified by GC-MS/Q, and other eight compounds remained initially unknown. The structure of these eight new compounds was elucidated by working with the spectra obtained by APGC-MS/Q-TOF. Finally, two different migration studies were carried out. The first one with Tenax as solid food simulant in contact with the paper label containing the adhesive and the second one with isooctane filled in a natural pork intestine where the label containing the adhesive was applied on the external side. The results are shown and discussed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Data set of the protein expression profiles of Luminal A, Claudin-low and overexpressing HER2(+) breast cancer cell lines by iTRAQ labelling and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Calderón-González, Karla Grisel; Valero Rustarazo, Ma Luz; Labra-Barrios, Maria Luisa; Bazán-Méndez, César Isaac; Tavera-Tapia, Alejandra; Herrera-Aguirre, Marí aEsther; Sánchez Del Pino, Manuel M; Gallegos-Pérez, José Luis; González-Márquez, Humberto; Hernández-Hernández, Jose Manuel; León-Ávila, Gloria; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Guisa-Hohenstein, Fernando; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. There is a dire necessity of the identification of novel molecules useful in diagnosis and prognosis. In this work we determined the differentially expression profiles of four breast cancer cell lines compared to a control cell line. We identified 1020 polypeptides labelled with iTRAQ with more than 95% in confidence. We analysed the common proteins in all breast cancer cell lines through IPA software (IPA core and Biomarkers). In addition, we selected the specific overexpressed and subexpressed proteins of the different molecular classes of breast cancer cell lines, and classified them according to protein class and biological process. Data in this article is related to the research article "Determination of the protein expression profiles of breast cancer cell lines by Quantitative Proteomics using iTRAQ Labelling and Tandem Mass Spectrometry" (Calderón-González et al. [1] in press).

  13. Characterization of a benzyladenine binding-site peptide isolated from a wheat cytokinin-binding protein: Sequence analysis and identification of a single affinity-labeled histidine residue by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Brinegar, A.C.; Cooper, G.; Stevens, A.; Hauer, C.R.; Shabanowitz, J.; Hunt, D.F.; Fox, J.E. )

    1988-08-01

    A wheat embryo cytokinin-binding protein was covalently modified with the radiolabeled photoaffinity ligand 2-azido-N{sup 6}-({sup 14}C)benzyladenine. A single labeled peptide was obtained after proteolytic digestion and isolation by reversed-phase and anion-exchange HPLC. Sequencing by classical Edman degradation identified 11 of the 12 residues but failed to identify the labeled amino acid. Analysis by laser photodissociation Fourier-transform mass spectrometry of 10 pmol of the peptide independently confirmed the Edman data and also demonstrated that the histidine residue nearest the C terminus (underlined) was modified by the reagent in the sequence Ala-Phe-Leu-Gln-Pro-Ser-His-His{und His}-Asp-Ala-Asp-Glu.

  14. Method for evaluating the potential of 14C labeled plant polyphenols to cross the blood-brain barrier using accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janle, Elsa M.; Lila, Mary Ann; Grannan, Michael; Wood, Lauren; Higgins, Aine; Yousef, Gad G.; Rogers, Randy B.; Kim, Helen; Jackson, George S.; Weaver, Connie M.

    2010-04-01

    Bioactive compounds in botanicals may be beneficial in preventing age-related neurodegenerative diseases, but for many compounds conventional methods may be inadequate to detect if these compounds cross the blood-brain barrier or to track the pharmacokinetics in the brain. By combining a number of unique technologies it has been possible to utilize the power of AMS to study the pharmacokinetics of bioactive compounds in the brain at very low concentrations. 14C labeled compounds can be biosynthesized by plant cell suspension cultures co-incubated with radioisotopically-labeled sucrose and isolated and separated into a series of bioactive fractions. To study the pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of 14C labeled plant polyphenols, rats were implanted with jugular catheters, subcutaneous ultrafiltration probes and brain microdialysis probes. Labeled fractions were dosed orally. Interstitial fluid (ISF) and brain microdialysate samples were taken in tandem with blood samples. It was often possible to determine 14C in blood and ISF with a β-counter. However, brain microdialysate samples 14C levels on the order of 10 7 atoms/sample required AMS technology. The Brain Microdialysate AUC/Serum AUC ranged from .021- to .029, with the higher values for the glycoside fractions. By using AMS in combination with traditional methods, it is possible to study uptake by blood, distribution to ISF and determine the amount of a dose which can reach the brain and follow the pharmacokinetics in the brain.

  15. Food labeling

    MedlinePlus

    ... States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed making changes to the food labels that may correct these problems. AMOUNTS PER SERVING The total calories and the calories from fat are listed. These numbers help consumers make decisions about fat intake. The list of nutrients includes ...

  16. Whole proteome analysis of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cirovic, Olivera; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    The single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei spp. is the causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis and nagana in cattle. Quantitative proteomics for the first time has allowed for the characterization of the proteome from several different life stages of the parasite (Butter et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 12:172-179, 2013; Gunasekera et al., BMC Genomics 13:556, 2012; Urbaniak et al., PloS One 7(5):e36619, 2012). To achieve this, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) (Ong et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 1:376-386, 2002) was adapted to T. brucei spp. cultures. T. brucei cells grown in standard media with dialyzed fetal calf serum containing heavy isotope-labeled amino acids (arginine and lysine) show efficient incorporation of the labeled amino acids into the whole cell proteome (8-12 divisions) and no detectable amino acid conversions. The method can be applied to both of the major life stages of the parasite and in combination with RNAi or gene knockout approaches.

  17. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry studies of carbon metabolism in the actinomycin D producer Streptomyces parvulus by use of 13C-labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Inbar, L; Lapidot, A

    1991-12-01

    enrichment and isotopomer population, measured by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, of the actinomycin D peptide ring enabled us to specify the origins of the five amino acids of actinomycin D. Threonine and proline exhibited isotopomer populations similar to that of the extracellular L-[13C]glutamate, indicating that protein catabolism is the origin of their 13C label, whereas the isotopomer populations of sarcosine and N-methylvaline were similar to those of the new intracellular pool of S. parvulus that originated from D-[U-13C]fructose during the production of actinomycin D.

  18. Mechanism of error caused by isotope-labeled internal standard: accurate method for simultaneous measurement of vitamin D and pre-vitamin D by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Cadwallader, Amy B; Heltsley, Rebecca

    2014-10-15

    Bias of up to 25% has been observed for vitamin D3 and D2 samples exposed to heating during sample preparation, even when isotope-labeled internal standards are used. The goals of this study were to identify the mechanism of the positive bias observed in measuring vitamin D3 and D2 by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and determine a way to eliminate the error source. Several internal standards with varying locations of labeling were used for comparison in this study. Additionally, different temperatures (25, 37, 55, and 75 °C) and different treatment times were investigated for sample preparation and a LC/MS/MS method capable of simultaneously measuring vitamin D and pre-vitamin D was developed. It was demonstrated that the different conversion behaviors of the analyte and the internal standard were the cause of the positive bias. This bias was eliminated when internal standards with labeling remote from the double-bond area of the molecules were used. Additionally, sample preparation was shortened from overnight saponification at room temperature to 0.5 h at 75 °C. The use of an internal standard with labeling remote from the conjugated area eliminated the error source and gave accurate correction at all of the temperatures investigated. Heating may be used for rapid sample preparation as an alternative to overnight saponification at room temperature. This work not only describes the mechanism of an inaccurate internal standard correction, but also establishes a rapid LC/MS/MS method for simultaneous measurement of vitamin D and pre-vitamin D. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Quantitative O-glycomics based on improvement of the one-pot method for nonreductive O-glycan release and simultaneous stable isotope labeling with 1-(d0/d5)phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone followed by mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengjian; Zhang, Ping; Jin, Wanjun; Li, Lingmei; Qiang, Shan; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Linjuan; Wang, Zhongfu

    2017-01-06

    Rapid, simple and versatile methods for quantitative analysis of glycoprotein O-glycans are urgently required for current studies on protein O-glycosylation patterns and the search for disease O-glycan biomarkers. Relative quantitation of O-glycans using stable isotope labeling followed by mass spectrometric analysis represents an ideal and promising technique. However, it is hindered by the shortage of reliable nonreductive O-glycan release methods as well as the too large or too small inconstant mass difference between the light and heavy isotope form derivatives of O-glycans, which results in difficulties during the recognition and quantitative analysis of O-glycans by mass spectrometry. Herein we report a facile and versatile O-glycan relative quantification strategy, based on an improved one-pot method that can quantitatively achieve nonreductive release and in situ chromophoric labeling of intact mucin-type O-glycans in one step. In this study, the one-pot method is optimized and applied for quantitative O-glycan release and tagging with either non-deuterated (d0-) or deuterated (d5-) 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP). The obtained O-glycan derivatives feature a permanent 10-Da mass difference between the d0- and d5-PMP forms, allowing complete discrimination and comparative quantification of these isotopically labeled O-glycans by mass spectrometric techniques. Moreover, the d0- and d5-PMP derivatives of O-glycans also have a relatively high hydrophobicity as well as a strong UV adsorption, especially suitable for high-resolution separation and high-sensitivity detection by RP-HPLC-UV. We have refined the conditions for the one-pot reaction as well as the corresponding sample purification approach. The good quantitation feasibility, reliability and linearity of this strategy have been verified using bovine fetuin and porcine stomach mucin as model O-glycoproteins. Additionally, we have also successfully applied this method to the quantitative O

  20. Identification of the two essential groups in the family 3 beta-glucosidase from Flavobacterium meningosepticum by labelling and tandem mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Chir, Jiunly; Withers, Stephen; Wan, Chin-Feng; Li, Yaw-Kuen

    2002-01-01

    beta-Glucosidase from Flavobacterium meningosepticum (Fbgl) catalyses the hydrolysis of beta-1,4-glucosidic bonds via a two-step double-displacement mechanism in which two amino acid residues act as nucleophile and acid/base catalyst. Definitive identification of these two residues is provided by the two active-site-directed inactivators, 2',4'-dinitrophenyl-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-beta-d-glucoside (2FDNPG) and N-bromoacetyl-beta-d-glucosylamine (NBGN), which stoichiometrically label the nucleophile and the acid/base catalyst of Fbgl, respectively. Pseudo-first-order inactivation rate constants (k(i)) of 0.25+/-0.01 and 0.05+/-0.01 min(-1) and dissociation constants (K(i)) of 90+/-15 and 4.4+/-0.2 mM are determined for 2FDNPG and NBGN, respectively. Proteolytic digestion of the labelled proteins, followed by peptide mapping and tandem MS analysis identify Asp-247 and Glu-473 as the catalytic nucleophile and acid/base residues, respectively, of Fbgl. This study confirms that the catalytic nucleophile of family 3 glycohydrolase is conserved across sub-families. However, different sub-families may have unique general acid/base catalysts. PMID:11978178

  1. Validated Method for Strigolactone Quantification by Ultra High-Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionisation Tandem Mass Spectrometry Using Novel Deuterium Labelled Standards.

    PubMed

    Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Perreau, François; Roux, Amélie; Clavé, Guillaume; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Touboul, David; Mouille, Grégory; Rameau, Catherine; Boyer, François-Didier

    2017-08-29

    Strigolactones (SLs) are important plant hormones. They are difficult to analyse because they occur in very small concentrations especially in comparison with other plant hormones and other substances can interfere with their detection. To develop a procedure for the extraction, purification and quantification of SLs from plant roots. Samples were prepared by extraction of plant root tissues with ethyl acetate. Then the extracts were further purified with silica column chromatography. The natural SLs in the final extracts were quantified using novel deuterium labelled SLs. The results of the methodology were compared with those of the procedure of Yoneyama and coworkers. This procedure required about 1-g root samples to detect and quantify simultaneously the SLs (orobanchyl acetate and fabacyl acetate) concentration with high reliability. A method was developed for determining endogenous fabacyl acetate and orobanchyl acetate in plant tissue based on novel deuterium labelled standards. A method of orobanchol quantification using a synthetic SL GR24 as internal standard was proposed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Studies of peptide a- and b-type fragment ions using stable isotope labeling and integrated ion mobility/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Riba Garcia, Isabel; Giles, Kevin; Bateman, Robert H; Gaskell, Simon J

    2008-12-01

    The structures of peptide a- and b-type fragment ions were studied using synthetic peptides including a set of isomeric peptides, differing in the sequence location of an alanine residue labeled with (15)N and uniformly with (13)C. The pattern of isotope labeling of second-generation fragment ions derived via a(n) and b(n) ions (where n = 4 or 5) suggested that these intermediates existed in part as macrocyclic structures, where alternative sites of ring opening gave rise to different linear forms whose simple cleavage might give rise to the observed final products. Similar conclusions were derived from combined ion mobility/tandem MS analyses where different fragmentation patterns were observed for isomeric a- or b-type ions that display different ion mobilities. These analyses were facilitated by a new approach to the processing of ion mobility/tandem MS data, from which distinct and separate product ion spectra are derived from ions that are incompletely separated by ion mobility. Finally, an example is provided of evidence for a macrocyclic structure for b(n) ions where n = 8 or 9.

  3. Quantitative proteomics by 2-DE, 16O/18O labelling and linear ion trap mass spectrometry analysis of lymph nodes from piglets inoculated by porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Boo, María; Núnez, Estefania; Jorge, Inmaculada; Navarro, Pedro; Fernandes, Lana T; Segalés, Joaquim; Garrido, Juan J; Vázquez, Jesús; Moreno, Angela

    2011-09-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) has been identified as the essential causal agent of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. However, little is known regarding the mechanism(s) underlying the pathogenesis of PCV2-induced disease and the interaction of the virus with the host immune system. Here, we present a proteomics study on inguinal lymph nodes of piglets inoculated with PCV2, in order to better understand the pathogenesis of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome and the pathways might be affected after infection. We used two proteomics strategies, 2-DE and 1-DE followed by (16)O/(18)O peptide labelling and peptide identification and quantification by MS. More than 100 proteins were found to be differentially regulated and the results obtained by the two strategies were fairly concordant but also complementary, the (18)O labelling approach being a more robust alternative. Analysis of these proteins by systems biology tools revealed the implication of acute phase response and NrF2-mediated oxidative stress, suggesting a putative role for these pathways in the pig immune response. Besides, CD81 was found to be up-regulated, suggesting a possible role in the internalization of the virus. The use of proteomics technologies together with biology analysis systems opens up the way to gain more exhaustive and systematic knowledge of virus-pathogen interactions.

  4. Introduction to Pesticide Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely and legally handle and use pesticide products. Unlike most other types of product labels, pesticide labels are legally enforceable. Learn about pesticide product labels.

  5. Detection of reactive metabolites using isotope-labeled glutathione trapping and simultaneous neutral loss and precursor ion scanning with ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Huang, Lingyi; van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-04-07

    Metabolic activation of drugs to electrophilic species is responsible for over 60% of black box warnings and drug withdrawals from the market place in the United States. Reactive metabolite trapping using glutathione (GSH) and analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) or HPLC with high resolution mass spectrometry (mass defect filtering) have enabled screening for metabolic activation to become routine during drug development. However, current MS-based approaches cannot detect all GSH conjugates present in complex mixtures, especially those present in extracts of botanical dietary supplements. To overcome these limitations, a fast triple quadrupole mass spectrometer-based approach was developed that can detect positively and negatively charged GSH conjugates in a single analysis without the need for advanced knowledge of the elemental compositions of potential conjugates and while avoiding false positives. This approach utilized UHPLC instead of HPLC to shorten separation time and enhance sensitivity, incorporated stable-isotope labeled GSH to avoid false positives, and used fast polarity switching electrospray MS/MS to detect GSH conjugates that form positive and/or negative ions. The general new method was then used to test the licorice dietary supplement Glycyrrhiza glabra, which was found to form multiple GSH conjugates upon metabolic activation. Among the GSH conjugates found in the licorice assay were conjugates with isoliquiritigenin and glabridin, which is an irreversible inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes.

  6. Spatial and temporal distribution of 13C labelled plant residues in soil aggregates and Lumbricus terrestris surface casts: A combination of Transmission Electron Microscopy and Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alix; Remusat, Laurent; Watteau, Françoise; Derenne, Sylvie; Quenea, Katell

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms play a central role in litter decomposition, soil structuration and carbon cycling. They ingest both organic and mineral compounds which are mixed, complexed with mucus and dejected in form of casts at the soil surface and along burrows. Bulk isotopic or biochemical technics have often been used to study the incorporation of litter in soil and casts, but they could not reflect the complex interaction between soil, plant and microorganisms at the microscale. However, the heterogeneous distribution of organic carbon in soil structures induces contrasted microbial activity areas. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS), which is a high spatial resolution method providing elemental and isotopic maps of organic and mineral materials, has recently been applied in soil science (Herrmann et al., 2007; Vogel et al., 2014). The combination of Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has proven its potential to investigate labelled residues incorporation in earthworm casts (Vidal et al., 2016). In line of this work, we studied the spatial and temporal distribution of plant residues in soil aggregates and earthworm surface casts. This study aimed to (1) identify the decomposition states of labelled plant residues incorporated at different time steps, in casts and soil, (2) identify the microorganisms implied in this decomposition (3) relate the organic matter states of decomposition with their 13C signature. A one year mesocosm experiment was set up to follow the incorporation of 13C labelled Ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) litter in a soil in the presence of anecic earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris). Soil and surface cast samples were collected after 8 and 54 weeks, embedded in epoxy resin and cut into ultra-thin sections. Soil was fractionated and all and analyzed with TEM and NanoSIMS, obtaining secondary ion images of 12C, 16O, 12C14N, 13C14N and 28Si. The δ13C maps were obtained using the 13C14

  7. Differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of Shewanella oneidensis cultured under aerobic and suboxic conditions by accurate mass and time tag approach.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A; Monroe, Matthew E; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D; Callister, Stephen J; Moore, Ronald J; Gorby, Yuri A; Adkins, Joshua N; Fredrickson, Jim K; Lipton, Mary S; Smith, Richard D

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of LC-MS without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomic analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and suboxic conditions. LC-MS/MS was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC-FTICR was used to confirm these identifications as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as statistical analysis of microarrays, whereas another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis was transitioned from aerobic to suboxic conditions.

  8. Mass spectral studies on 1-n-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole (JWH-018), three deuterium-labeled analogues and the inverse isomer 1-naphthoyl-3-n-pentylindole.

    PubMed

    Thaxton, Amber; Belal, Tarek S; Smith, Forrest; DeRuiter, Jack; Abdel-Hay, Karim M; Clark, C Randall

    2015-05-15

    A number of synthetic cannabinoids such as the 1-alkyl-3-acylindoles are the target of significant designer drug activity. One of the first waves of these compounds identified in clandestine samples was 1-n-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole, JWH-018. These totally synthetic molecules can be prepared in a number of regioisomeric forms. The electron ionization mass spectrometric (EI-MS) fragmentation of the 1-n-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole is compared to its inverse isomer 1-naphthoyl-3-n-pentylindole. These two substances are directly available from indole using identical precursor reagents and similar reaction conditions. Stable isotope deuterium labeling of the three major regions of the JWH-018 molecule allows confirmation of the structures of the major fragment ions. The spectra for the 1-n-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)-d(5) -indole, 1-n-pentyl-3-(1-d(7) -naphthoyl)indole and 1-d(11) -n-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole provide significant assistance in elucidating the structures for the major fragment ions in JWH-018. The EI mass spectra for these isomers show a number of unique ions which allow for the differentiation of the 1-alkyl-3-acylindole compounds from the inverse regioisomeric 1-acyl-3-alkylindoles. The fragment ion [M-17](+) at m/z 324 for JWH-018 was formed by the elimination of a hydroxyl radical and the spectra of the three deuterium-labeled derivatives indicated the loss of hydrogen from the naphthalene ring. Further structural analogues suggest the hydrogen to come from the 8-position of the naphthalene ring. The three deuterium-labeled analogues provide significant assistance in confirming the structures for the major fragment ions in the mass spectrum of the traditional synthetic cannabinoid compound, 1-n-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole, JWH-018. The 1-naphthoyl-3-n-pentylindole inverse regioisomer can be easily differentiated from the traditional synthetic cannabinoid compound. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Development of C60-based labeling reagents for the determination of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass (I): Determination of amino acids in microliter biofluids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pin; Xiao, Hua-Ming; Ding, Jun; Deng, Qian-Yun; Zheng, Fang; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2017-04-01

    Quantification of low molecular weight compounds (<800 Da) using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is challenging due to the matrix signal interference at low m/z region and poor reproducibility of MS responses. In this study, a C60 labeling-MALDI MS strategy was proposed for the fast, sensitive and reliable determination of amino acids (AAs) in biofluids. An N-hydroxysuccinimide functionalized C60 was synthesized as the labeling reagent and added as an 880 Da tag to AAs; a carboxyl acid containing C60 was employed as the internal standards to normalize MS variations. This solved the inherent problems of MALDI MS for small molecule analysis. The entire analytical procedure-which consisted of simple protein precipitation and 10 min of derivatization in a microwave prior to the MALDI MS analysis-could be accomplished within 20 min with high throughput and great sample matrix tolerance. AA quantification showed good linearity from 0.7 to 70.0 μM with correlation coefficients (R) larger than 0.9954. The limits of detection were 70.0-300.0 fmol. Good reproducibility and reliability of the method were demonstrated by intra-day and inter-day precision with relative standard deviations less than 13.8%, and the recovery in biofluid ranged from 80.4% to 106.8%. This approach could be used in 1 μL of urine, serum, plasma, whole blood, and cerebrospinal fluid. Most importantly, the C60 labeling strategy is a universal approach for MALDI MS analysis of various LMW compounds because functionalized C60 is now available on demand.

  10. Simultaneous multiple mycotoxin quantification in feed samples using three isotopically labeled internal standards applied for isotopic dilution and data normalization through ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Lewis C; Kudupoje, Manoj B; Yiannikouris, Alexandros

    2012-12-15

    Mycotoxins are typically present in grain and are also concentrated in distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), common feed ingredients for food animals. The diversity of mycotoxins and feed matrices has made the routine detection and quantification of mycotoxins in feed both complex and prohibitively expensive. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization triple quadrupole detection (UPLC/ESI-TQD) (tandem mass spectrometry, MS/MS) with (13) C-labeled isotopic dilution was used to analyze internal standard isotopologues of three mycotoxin molecules, as well as 29 other structurally differing mycotoxin molecules from four common feed matrices: corn, wheat, barley, or DDGS. Mycotoxins were extracted via a single-step procedure using a mixture of acetonitrile/water/formic acid. Labeled isotopologues were used as a surrogate to account for extraction quality and as internal standards for the evaluation of the feed matrix signal suppression/enhancement (SSE) contributed by each mycotoxin and by each matrix. The SSE was corrected by matrix-matched calibration with blank certified reference feed material. The limits of detection for individual mycotoxins in buffer ranged from 0.01 to 206.7 µg/mL but could increase by up to four times depending on the matrix effect. The accuracy and precision were enhanced by the use of isotopically labeled standards. The recoveries were somewhat negatively affected by the SSE contributed by each matrix. Each mycotoxin was successfully detected and assigned to one of four SSE categories: high (-66%), intermediate (-48%), low (-19%) signal suppression and signal enhancement (> +300%). An improved LC/MS method was validated, which offers a practical and economical means for large-scale detection and quantification of multiple mycotoxins in common animal-feed matrices, including DDGS. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Analysis of M1G-dR in DNA by aldehyde reactive probe labeling and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yo-Chan; Sangaiah, Ramiah; Nakamura, Jun; Pachkowski, Brian F; Ranasinghe, Asoka; Gold, Avram; Ball, Louise M; Swenberg, James A

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for the measurement of pyrimido[1,2-a]purin-10(3H)one (M1G) has been developed. Previous methods for analysis of M1G have been confounded by the fact that this lesion exists in equilibrium between a ring-closed form and a ring-opened aldehyde form. Poor detection sensitivity of the aldehydic form can result from loss of the adduct during analysis by its reaction with amines or proteins. We utilized the aldehyde reactive probe (ARP) to produce a stable ARP-M1G-deoxyribose (ARP-M1G-dR) conjugate to minimize adduct loss. This conjugate has increased the hydrophobicity that enhances separation of ARP-M1G-dR from unmodified DNA nucleosides by using solid phase extraction. In addition, measuring ARP-M1G-dR by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) of the [ARP-M1G-dR + H]+ (635) --> [M1G + H]+ (188) transition increases the detection sensitivity by nearly an order of magnitude relative to the measurement of M1G-dR by SRM. For accurate measurement, analytical standard (AS) DNA and internal standard (IS) DNA were used. High purity 15N-labeled DNA was isolated from Escherichia coli that had been grown in minimum salt medium containing (15NH4)2SO4. The 15N-DNA and calf thymus DNA were treated with malondialdehyde to induce a high number of M1G adducts to prepare the IS and AS DNA, respectively. A consistent calibration curve was established from the analysis of 200 microg of blank DNA, 23 ng of IS DNA (400 fmol of 15N5-M1G-dR), and AS DNA containing 0-810 fmol of M1G-dR. With the use of this novel IS DNA and selective labeling, this assay is a useful tool for monitoring oxidative stress-induced DNA damage from small amounts of DNA without the need of a specific antibody or laborious procedures. By this assay, two M1G adducts/10(8) guanines can readily be detected. Furthermore, this approach should be applicable to the analysis of other aldehydic DNA adducts as well as the measurement of an array of DNA lesions.

  12. Kinetic study of the rearrangement of deuterium-labeled 4'-O-methylnorbelladine in Leucojum aestivum shoot cultures by mass spectrometry. Influence of precursor feeding on amaryllidaceae alkaloid accumulation.

    PubMed

    El Tahchy, Anna; Ptak, Agata; Boisbrun, Michel; Barre, Elvina; Guillou, Catherine; Dupire, François; Chrétien, Françoise; Henry, Max; Chapleur, Yves; Laurain-Mattar, Dominique

    2011-11-28

    Alkaloids from plants of the family Amaryllidaceae have important pharmacological properties and can be regarded as derivatives of the common precursor 4'-O-methylnorbelladine (6) via intramolecular oxidative phenol coupling. Their biosynthetic pathway, particularly in Leucojum aestivum, has not yet been totally elucidated. Therefore, shoot cultures of this plant were subcultured in medium containing the labeled precursor 4'-O-methyl-d(3)-norbelladine (3) at various concentrations (0.05, 0.10, and 0.20 g/L) and were incubated for various periods of time (15, 30, and 40 days). The aim of this work was to study the influence of this precursor on both labeled and native alkaloid accumulation. Biotransformation into galanthamine (1) and lycorine (2) in shoot cultures was demonstrated using HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. A maximal amount of 0.16% of 1 referred to the dry weight was obtained at day 15 in shoots fed with 0.10 g/L of precursor. In addition, a 20.5% dry weight of 2 was reached after 40 days of feeding with 0.20 g/L of precursor.

  13. [Separation and identification of oligosaccharides labeled with 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole using high performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Mou, Qing; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Linjuan; Wang, Zhongfu

    2009-01-01

    A pre-column derivatization method for the determination of oligosaccharides based ion a labeling reagent 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC) was proposed. The enamines were generated by the reaction of the reducing ends of oligosaccharides and the primary amines of AEC, and then reduced to secondary amines by NaBH3CN, making oligosaccharides labeled by AEC. The derivatives were separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), and then directly analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The HPLC separation was carried out on a Waters Symmetry C18 column (3.9 mm x 150 mm, 5 microm) with a gradient elution (acetonitrile and ammonium acetate as mobile phases at a flow rate of 1 mL/min) and ultraviolet detection at 254 nm. Under the optimized derivatization and HPLC conditions, the derivatized oligosaccharides were separated, and the derivatization with AEC increased the sensitivity of MS detection. The developed method for the analysis of oligosaccharides is satisfactory.

  14. Data set of the protein expression profiles of Luminal A, Claudin-low and overexpressing HER2+ breast cancer cell lines by iTRAQ labelling and tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-González, Karla Grisel; Valero Rustarazo, Ma Luz; Labra-Barrios, Maria Luisa; Bazán-Méndez, César Isaac; Tavera-Tapia, Alejandra; Herrera-Aguirre, Marí;aEsther; Sánchez del Pino, Manuel M.; Gallegos-Pérez, José Luis; González-Márquez, Humberto; Hernández-Hernández, Jose Manuel; León-Ávila, Gloria; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Guisa-Hohenstein, Fernando; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and the leading cause of mortality in women worldwide. There is a dire necessity of the identification of novel molecules useful in diagnosis and prognosis. In this work we determined the differentially expression profiles of four breast cancer cell lines compared to a control cell line. We identified 1020 polypeptides labelled with iTRAQ with more than 95% in confidence. We analysed the common proteins in all breast cancer cell lines through IPA software (IPA core and Biomarkers). In addition, we selected the specific overexpressed and subexpressed proteins of the different molecular classes of breast cancer cell lines, and classified them according to protein class and biological process. Data in this article is related to the research article “Determination of the protein expression profiles of breast cancer cell lines by Quantitative Proteomics using iTRAQ Labelling and Tandem Mass Spectrometry” (Calderón-González et al. [1] in press). PMID:26217805

  15. On-line derivatization for resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: detection of aliphatic aldehydes and amines via reactive coupling of aromatic photo ionization labels.

    PubMed

    Fernandes-Whaley, Maria; Mühlberger, Fabian; Whaley, Alexander; Adam, Thomas; Zimmermann, Ralf; Rohwer, Egmont; Walte, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) is a powerful technique for the on-line analysis of aromatic compounds with unique features regarding selectivity and sensitivity. Aliphatic compounds, however, are difficult to address by REMPI due to their unfavorable photo ionization properties. This paper describes the proof of concept for an on-line derivatization approach for converting nonaromatic target analytes into specific, photoionizable aromatic derivatives that are readily detectable by REMPI-TOFMS. A multichannel silicone trap or poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) open tubular capillary was used as a reaction medium for the derivatization of volatile alkyl aldehydes and alkylamines with aromatic "photoionization labels"and to concentrate the resulting aromatic derivatives. The aldehydes formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and crotonal, which when underivatized are poorly detectable by REMPI, were converted into their easily photoionizable phenylhydrazone derivatives by the on-line reaction with phenylhydrazine as reagent. Similarly, the methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, and butylamines were converted into their REMPI-ionizable benzaldehyde alkylimine derivatives by the on-line reaction with benzaldehyde as reagent. The derivatives were thermally desorbed from the PDMS matrix and transferred into the REMPI-TOFMS for detection. The REMPI-TOFMS detection limits obtained for acetaldehyde; acrolein; crotonal; and methyl-, ethyl-, propyl-, and butylamine using this photo ionization labeling method were in the sub-parts-per-million range and, thus, readily below the permissible exposure limits set by OSHA.

  16. Application of exogenous mixture of glutathione and stable isotope labeled glutathione for trapping reactive metabolites in cryopreserved human hepatocytes. Detection of the glutathione conjugates using high resolution accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mezine, Igor; Bode, Chris; Raughley, Bethany; Bhoopathy, Sid; Roberts, Kenneth J; Owen, Albert J; Hidalgo, Ismael J

    2013-08-25

    Metabolites (including reactive metabolites) of troglitazone were generated by incubation with cryopreserved human hepatocytes and trapped in the presence of an exogenous mixture of unlabeled and stable isotope labeled (SIL: [1,2-(13)C, (15)N]-glycine) glutathione (GSH/SIL-GSH). The incubation samples were analyzed using liquid chromatography-high resolution accurate mass spectrometry (LC-HRAMS) implemented on a LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The GSH conjugates of the reactive metabolites were detected via a characteristic mono-isotopic pattern (peaks separated by 3.0037u). Analysis of the incubation samples led to detection of a number of previously described GSH conjugates, as well as two novel methylated GSH conjugates, which were partially characterized based on accurate mass measurements and MS/MS data. The addition of exogenous GSH led to an increase in the apparent level of detected GSH conjugates. Kinetic isotopic measurements showed that the rates of incorporation of exogenous GSH are conjugate-specific. In conclusion, this approach, based on the use of a mixture of GSH/SIL-GSH, allows facile capture and detection of reactive metabolites in human hepatocytes. Moreover, the data suggest that routine addition of glutathione to the assay medium may be advisable for experiments with cryopreserved hepatocytes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid detection and characterization of reactive drug metabolites in vitro using several isotope-labeled trapping agents and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rousu, Timo; Pelkonen, Olavi; Tolonen, Ari

    2009-03-01

    Reactive metabolites are believed to be one of the main reasons for unexpected drug-induced toxicity issues, by forming covalent adducts with cell proteins or DNA. Due to their high reactivity and short lifespan they are not directly detected by traditional analytical methods, but are most traditionally analyzed by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) after chemical trapping with nucleophilic agents such as glutathione. Here, a simple but very efficient assay was built up for screening reactive drug metabolites, utilizing stable isotope labeled glutathione, potassium cyanide and semicarbazide as trapping agents and highly sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/TOFMS) as an analytical tool. A group of twelve structurally different compounds was used as a test set, and a large number of trapped metabolites were detected for most of them, including many conjugates not reported previously. Glutathione-trapped metabolites were detected for nine of the twelve test compounds, whereas cyanide-trapped metabolites were found for eight and semicarbazide-trapped for three test compounds. The high mass accuracy of TOFMS provided unambiguous identification of change in molecular formula by formation of a reactive metabolite. In addition, use of a mass defect filter was found to be a usable tool when mining the trapped conjugates from the acquired data. The approach was shown to provide superior detection sensitivity in comparison to traditional methods based on neutral loss or precursor ion scanning with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and clearly more efficient detection and characterization of reactive drug metabolites with a simpler test setup. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Discovery of novel candidate urinary protein biomarkers for prostate cancer in a multiethnic cohort of South African patients via label-free mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Adeola, Henry A; Soares, Nelson C; Paccez, Juliano D; Kaestner, Lisa; Blackburn, Jonathan M; Zerbini, Luiz F

    2015-06-01

    Improvement in diagnostic accuracy of prostate cancer (PCa) progression using MS-based methods to analyze biomarkers in our African, Caucasian, and Mixed Ancestry patients can advance early detection and treatment monitoring. MS-based proteomic analysis of pooled (N = 36) and individual samples (N = 45) of PCa, benign prostatic hyperplasia, normal healthy controls, and patients with other uropathies was used to identify differences in proteomics profile. Samples were analyzed for potential biomarkers and proteome coverage in African, Caucasian, and Mixed Ancestry PCa patients. A total of 1102 and 5595 protein groups and nonredundant peptides, respectively, were identified in the pooling experiments (FDR = 0.01). Twenty potential biomarkers in PCa were identified and fold differences ± 2SD were observed in 17 proteins using intensity-based absolute quantification. Analysis of 45 individual samples yielded 1545 and 9991 protein groups and nonredundant peptides, respectively. Seventy-three (73) proteins groups, including existing putative PCa biomarkers, were found to be potential biomarkers of PCa by label-free quantification and demonstrated ethnic trends within our PCa cohort. Urinary proteomics is a promising route to PCa biomarker discovery and may serve as source of ethnic-related biomarkers of PCa. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Intricate effects of primary motor neuronopathy on contractile proteins and metabolic muscle enzymes as revealed by label-free mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Ashling; Schmitt-John, Thomas; Dowling, Paul; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2014-01-01

    While the long-term physiological adaptation of the neuromuscular system to changed functional demands is usually reflected by unilateral skeletal muscle transitions, the progressive degeneration of distinct motor neuron populations is often associated with more complex changes in the abundance and/or isoform expression pattern of contractile proteins and metabolic enzymes. In order to evaluate these intricate effects of primary motor neuronopathy on the skeletal muscle proteome, label-free MS was employed to study global alterations in the WR (wobbler) mouse model of progressive neurodegeneration. In motor neuron disease, fibre-type specification and the metabolic weighting of bioenergetic pathways appear to be strongly influenced by both a differing degree of a subtype-specific vulnerability of neuromuscular synapses and compensatory mechanisms of fibre-type shifting. Proteomic profiling confirmed this pathobiochemical complexity of disease-induced changes and showed distinct alterations in 72 protein species, including a variety of fibre-type-specific isoforms of contractile proteins, metabolic enzymes, metabolite transporters and ion-regulatory proteins, as well as changes in molecular chaperones and various structural proteins. Increases in slow myosin light chains and the troponin complex and a decrease in fast MBP (myosin-binding protein) probably reflect the initial preferential loss of the fast type of neuromuscular synapses in motor neuron disease. PMID:24895011

  20. Generation of High-Quality SWATH(®) Acquisition Data for Label-free Quantitative Proteomics Studies Using TripleTOF(®) Mass Spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Birgit; Gibson, Bradford W; Hunter, Christie L

    2017-01-01

    Data-independent acquisition is a powerful mass spectrometry technique that enables comprehensive MS and MS/MS analysis of all detectable species, providing an information rich data file that can be mined deeply. Here, we describe how to acquire high-quality SWATH(®) Acquisition data to be used for large quantitative proteomic studies. We specifically focus on using variable sized Q1 windows for acquisition of MS/MS data for generating higher specificity quantitative data.

  1. Linking mass media campaigns to pictorial warning labels on cigarette packages: a cross-sectional study to evaluate effects among Mexican smokers.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, James F; Murukutla, Nandita; Pérez-Hernández, Rosaura; Alday, Jorge; Arillo-Santillán, Edna; Cedillo, Claudia; Gutierrez, Juan Pablo

    2013-05-01

    This study assessed the effects of pictorial health warning labels (HWLs) and a linked media campaign in Mexico. Cross-sectional data were collected from a population-based sample of 1756 adult smokers, aged 18-55 years, during the initial implementation of pictorial HWLs, which some smokers had seen on cigarette packages while others had seen only the text-based HWLs. Exposure to the campaign and pictorial HWLs was assessed with aided recall methods, and other questions addressed attention and cognitive impact of HWLs, knowledge related to HWL and campaign content, and quit-related thoughts and behaviours. Logistic and linear regression models were estimated to determine associations between key outcomes and intervention exposure. In bivariate and multivariate adjusted models, recall of pictorial HWLs and of the campaign were positively associated with greater attention to and cognitive impact of HWLs, whereas only pictorial HWL exposure was associated with having refrained from smoking due to HWLs. Both recall of pictorial HWLs and of the campaign were independently associated with greater knowledge of secondhand smoke harms and toxic tobacco constituents. Smokers who recalled only the pictorial HWLs were more likely to try to quit than smokers who recalled neither the pictorial HWLs nor the campaign (17% vs 6%, p<0.001). Consistent with other studies, adult smokers' exposure to new pictorial HWLs in Mexico was associated with psychosocial and behavioural responses related to quit behaviour. Exposure to the complementary media campaign was associated with independent additive effects on campaign-related knowledge, and it enhanced psychosocial responses to pictorial HWLs.

  2. A randomized, multicenter, open-label, blinded end point trial comparing the effects of spironolactone to chlorthalidone on left ventricular mass in patients with early-stage chronic kidney disease: Rationale and design of the SPIRO-CKD trial.

    PubMed

    Hayer, Manvir K; Edwards, Nicola C; Slinn, Gemma; Moody, William E; Steeds, Rick P; Ferro, Charles J; Price, Anna M; Andujar, Cecilio; Dutton, Mary; Webster, Rachel; Webb, David J; Semple, Scott; MacIntyre, Iain; Melville, Vanessa; Wilkinson, Ian B; Hiemstra, Thomas F; Wheeler, David C; Herrey, Anna; Grant, Margaret; Mehta, Samir; Ives, Natalie; Townend, Jonathan N

    2017-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased left ventricular (LV) mass and arterial stiffness. In a previous trial, spironolactone improved these end points compared with placebo in subjects with early-stage CKD, but it is not known whether these effects were specific to the drug or secondary to blood pressure lowering. The aim was to investigate the hypothesis that spironolactone is superior to chlorthalidone in the reduction of LV mass while exerting similar effects on blood pressure. This is a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded end point clinical trial initially designed to compare the effects of 40weeks of treatment with spironolactone 25mg once daily to chlorthalidone 25mg once daily on the co-primary end points of change in pulse wave velocity and change in LV mass in 350 patients with stages 2 and 3 CKD on established treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or an angiotensin receptor blocker. Because of slow recruitment rates, it became apparent that it would not be possible to recruit this sample size within the funded time period. The study design was therefore changed to one with a single primary end point of LV mass requiring 150 patients. Recruitment was completed on 31 December 2016, at which time 154 patients had been recruited. Investigations included cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, applanation tonometry, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and laboratory tests. Subjects are assessed before and after 40weeks of randomly allocated drug therapy and at 46weeks after discontinuation of the study drug. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quaternized chitosan particles as ion exchange supports for label-free DNA detection using PNA probe and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Meebungpraw, Jittima; Wiarachai, Oraphan; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Kiatkamjornwong, Suda; Hoven, Voravee P

    2015-10-20

    Quaternized chitosan particles are introduced as anion-exchanged captures to be used with a conformationally constrained pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry for DNA sequence analysis. Methylated chitosan (MC) and methylated N-benzyl chitosan (MBzC) particles were obtained by heterogeneous chemical modification of ionically cross-linked chitosan particles via direct methylation and reductive benzylation/methylation, respectively. N,N,N-trimethylchitosan (TMC) and N-[(2-hydroxyl-3-trimethylammonium)propyl]chitosan chloride (HTACC) particles were prepared by ionic cross-linking of quaternized chitosan derivatives, homogeneously modified from chitosan, namely TMC and HTACC, respectively. The particles formed had a size in a sub-micrometer range and possessed positive charge. Investigation by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry suggested that some quaternized particles in combination with acpcPNA were capable of detecting a single mismatched base out of 9-14 base DNA sequences. Potential application of this technique for the detection of wild-type and mutant K-ras DNA, a gene that mutation is associated with certain cancers, has also been demonstrated.

  4. Pesticide Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This training will help ensure that reviewers evaluate labels according to four core principles. It also will help pesticide registrants developing labels understand what EPA expects of pesticide labels, and what the Agency generally finds acceptable.

  5. Popular computational methods to assess multiprotein complexes derived from label-free affinity purification and mass spectrometry (AP-MS) experiments.

    PubMed

    Armean, Irina M; Lilley, Kathryn S; Trotter, Matthew W B

    2013-01-01

    Advances in sensitivity, resolution, mass accuracy, and throughput have considerably increased the number of protein identifications made via mass spectrometry. Despite these advances, state-of-the-art experimental methods for the study of protein-protein interactions yield more candidate interactions than may be expected biologically owing to biases and limitations in the experimental methodology. In silico methods, which distinguish between true and false interactions, have been developed and applied successfully to reduce the number of false positive results yielded by physical interaction assays. Such methods may be grouped according to: (1) the type of data used: methods based on experiment-specific measurements (e.g., spectral counts or identification scores) versus methods that extract knowledge encoded in external annotations (e.g., public interaction and functional categorisation databases); (2) the type of algorithm applied: the statistical description and estimation of physical protein properties versus predictive supervised machine learning or text-mining algorithms; (3) the type of protein relation evaluated: direct (binary) interaction of two proteins in a cocomplex versus probability of any functional relationship between two proteins (e.g., co-occurrence in a pathway, sub cellular compartment); and (4) initial motivation: elucidation of experimental data by evaluation versus prediction of novel protein-protein interaction, to be experimentally validated a posteriori. This work reviews several popular computational scoring methods and software platforms for protein-protein interactions evaluation according to their methodology, comparative strengths and weaknesses, data representation, accessibility, and availability. The scoring methods and platforms described include: CompPASS, SAINT, Decontaminator, MINT, IntAct, STRING, and FunCoup. References to related work are provided throughout in order to provide a concise but thorough introduction to a

  6. Nutrition Label Viewing during a Food-Selection Task: Front-of-Package Labels vs Nutrition Facts Labels.

    PubMed

    Graham, Dan J; Heidrick, Charles; Hodgin, Katie

    2015-10-01

    Earlier research has identified consumer characteristics associated with viewing Nutrition Facts labels; however, little is known about those who view front-of-package nutrition labels. Front-of-package nutrition labels might appeal to more consumers than do Nutrition Facts labels, but it might be necessary to provide consumers with information about how to locate and use these labels. This study quantifies Nutrition Facts and front-of-package nutrition label viewing among American adult consumers. Attention to nutrition information was measured during a food-selection task. One hundred and twenty-three parents (mean age=38 years, mean body mass index [calculated as kg/m(2)]=28) and one of their children (aged 6 to 9 years) selected six foods from a university laboratory-turned-grocery aisle. Participants were randomized to conditions in which front-of-package nutrition labels were present or absent, and signage explaining front-of-package nutrition labels was present or absent. Adults' visual attention to Nutrition Facts labels and front-of-package nutrition labels was objectively measured via eye-tracking glasses. To examine whether there were significant differences in the percentages of participants who viewed Nutrition Facts labels vs front-of-package nutrition labels, McNemar's tests were conducted across all participants, as well as within various sociodemographic categories. To determine whether hypothesized factors, such as health literacy and education, had stronger relationships with front-of-package nutrition label vs Nutrition Facts label viewing, linear regression assessed the magnitude of relationships between theoretically and empirically derived factors and each type of label viewing. Overall, front-of-package nutrition labels were more likely to be viewed than Nutrition Facts labels; however, for all subgroups, higher rates of front-of-package nutrition label viewership occurred only when signage was present drawing attention to the presence and

  7. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  8. Mass spectrometry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Johanson, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state of mass spectrometry, indicating its unique importance for advanced scientific research. Mass spectrometry applications in computer techniques, gas chromatography, ion cyclotron resonance, molecular fragmentation and ionization, and isotope labeling are covered. Details are given on mass spectrometry applications in bio-organic chemistry and biomedical research. As the subjects of these applications are indicated alkaloids, carbohydrates, lipids, terpenes, quinones, nucleic acid components, peptides, antibiotics, and human and animal metabolisms. Particular attention is given to the mass spectra of organo-inorganic compounds, inorganic mass spectrometry, surface phenomena such as secondary ion and electron emission, and elemental and isotope analysis. Further topics include mass spectrometry in organic geochemistry, applications in geochronology and cosmochemistry, and organic mass spectrometry.

  9. An automated GCxGC-TOF-MS protocol for batch-wise extraction and alignment of mass isotopomer matrixes from differential 13C-labelling experiments: a case study for photoautotrophic-mixotrophic grown Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells.

    PubMed

    Kempa, Stefan; Hummel, Jan; Schwemmer, Thorsten; Pietzke, Matthias; Strehmel, Nadine; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Kopka, Joachim; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2009-02-01

    Two dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOF-MS) is a promising technique to overcome limits of complex metabolome analysis using one dimensional GC-TOF-MS. Especially at the stage of data export and data mining, however, convenient procedures to cope with the complexity of GCxGC-TOF-MS data are still in development. Here, we present a high sample throughput protocol exploiting first and second retention index for spectral library search and subsequent construction of a high dimensional data matrix useful for statistical analysis. The method was applied to the analysis of (13)C-labelling experiments in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We developed a rapid sampling and extraction procedure for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii laboratory strain (CC503), a cell wall deficient mutant. By testing all published quenching protocols we observed dramatic metabolite leakage rates for certain metabolites. To circumvent metabolite leakage, samples were directly quenched and analyzed without separation of the medium. The growth medium was adapted to this rapid sampling protocol to avoid interference with GCxGC-TOF-MS analysis. To analyse batches of samples a new software tool, MetMax, was implemented which extracts the isotopomer matrix from stable isotope labelling experiments together with the first and second retention index (RI1 and RI2). To exploit RI1 and RI2 for metabolite identification we used the Golm metabolome database (GMD [1] with RI1/RI2-reference spectra and new search algorithms. Using those techniques we analysed the dynamics of (13)CO(2) and (13)C-acetate uptake in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells in two different steady states namely photoautotroph and mixotroph growth conditions.

  10. Quantitative label-free mass spectrometry analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue representing the invasive cutaneous malignant melanoma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Paul; Moran, Benvon; McAuley, Edel; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Clynes, Martin; McMenamin, Mairin; Leonard, Niamh; Monks, Mary; Wynne, Bairbre; Ormond, Patrick; Larkin, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the events at a protein level that govern the progression from melanoma in situ to invasive melanoma are important areas of current research to be developed. Recent advances in the analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue by proteomics, particularly using the filter-aided sample preparation protocol, has opened up the possibility of studying vast archives of clinical material and associated medical records. In the present study, quantitative protein profiling was performed using tandem mass spectrometry, and the proteome differences between melanoma in situ and invasive melanoma were compared. Biological pathway analyses revealed several signalling pathways differing between melanoma in situ and invasive melanoma, including metabolic pathways and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt signalling pathway. Selected proteins of interest (14–3-3ε and fatty acid synthase) were subsequently investigated using immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays. Identifying the key proteins that play significant roles in the establishment of a more invasive phenotype in melanoma may ultimately aid diagnosis and treatment decisions. PMID:27899996

  11. Gas chromatographic mass spectrometric determination of 1,2,3-propanetrioltrinitrate (nitroglycerin) in human plasma using the nitrogen-15 labelled compound as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Gerardin, A; Gaudry, D; Wantiez, D

    1982-08-01

    A method for the quantitative determinatio of 1,2,3-propanetrioltrinitrate (nitroglycerin) in human plasma by gas chromatography mass spectrometry has been developed. After addition of 1,2,3 and methyl acetate (90 : 10). The extracts are purified by partition between, first, the extraction solvent and a mixture of acetonitrile and water (60 : 40) and, secondly, the resultant aqueous phase and benzene. THe solvent is evaporated to a small volume before injection. The fragment ions at m/z 46 and 47 are monitored for the measurement of the [NO2]+ and [15NO2]+ ions using electron impact ionization. The mean recovery (%) +/- SD in blind plasma samples spiked with amounts in the concentration range 0.35-3.52 nmol 1(-1), was 97.4 +/- 9.0 (n = 58). Within a day, recovery experiments gave rise to coefficients of variation of 9.6, 6.4 and 2.7% at the levels 0.44, 0.88 and 11 nmol 1(-1), respectively. Concentrations in plasma down to about 0.2 nmol 1(-1) (50 pg ml-1) could be estimated. Percent recovery of duplicate determinations in the range 0.5-1.96 nmol 1(-1) +/- SD was 99.4 +/- 6.0 (n = 80).

  12. Deep Label Distribution Learning With Label Ambiguity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bin-Bin; Xing, Chao; Xie, Chen-Wei; Wu, Jianxin; Geng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets) have achieved excellent recognition performance in various visual recognition tasks. A large labeled training set is one of the most important factors for its success. However, it is difficult to collect sufficient training images with precise labels in some domains such as apparent age estimation, head pose estimation, multi-label classification and semantic segmentation. Fortunately, there is ambiguous information among labels, which makes these tasks different from traditional classification. Based on this observation, we convert the label of each image into a discrete label distribution, and learn the label distribution by minimizing a Kullback-Leibler divergence between the predicted and ground-truth label distributions using deep ConvNets. The proposed DLDL (Deep Label Distribution Learning) method effectively utilizes the label ambiguity in both feature learning and classifier learning, which help prevent the network from over-fitting even when the training set is small. Experimental results show that the proposed approach produces significantly better results than state-of-the-art methods for age estimation and head pose estimation. At the same time, it also improves recognition performance for multi-label classification and semantic segmentation tasks.

  13. Mass spectrometry-based microassay of 2H and 13C plasma glucose labeling to quantify liver metabolic fluxes in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hasenour, Clinton M.; Wall, Martha L.; Ridley, D. Emerson; Hughey, Curtis C.; James, Freyja D.; Wasserman, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models designed to examine hepatic metabolism are critical to diabetes and obesity research. Thus, a microscale method to quantitatively assess hepatic glucose and intermediary metabolism in conscious, unrestrained mice was developed. [13C3]propionate, [2H2]water, and [6,6-2H2]glucose isotopes were delivered intravenously in short- (9 h) and long-term-fasted (19 h) C57BL/6J mice. GC-MS and mass isotopomer distribution (MID) analysis were performed on three 40-μl arterial plasma glucose samples obtained during the euglycemic isotopic steady state. Model-based regression of hepatic glucose and citric acid cycle (CAC)-related fluxes was performed using a comprehensive isotopomer model to track carbon and hydrogen atom transitions through the network and thereby simulate the MIDs of measured fragment ions. Glucose-6-phosphate production from glycogen diminished, and endogenous glucose production was exclusively gluconeogenic with prolonged fasting. Gluconeogenic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) remained stable, whereas that from glycerol modestly increased from short- to long-term fasting. CAC flux [i.e., citrate synthase (VCS)] was reduced with long-term fasting. Interestingly, anaplerosis and cataplerosis increased with fast duration; accordingly, pyruvate carboxylation and the conversion of oxaloacetate to PEP were severalfold higher than VCS in long-term fasted mice. This method utilizes state-of-the-art in vivo methodology and comprehensive isotopomer modeling to quantify hepatic glucose and intermediary fluxes during physiological stress in mice. The small plasma requirements permit serial sampling without stress and the affirmation of steady-state glucose kinetics. Furthermore, the approach can accommodate a broad range of modeling assumptions, isotope tracers, and measurement inputs without the need to introduce ad hoc mathematical approximations. PMID:25991647

  14. A combined accelerator mass spectrometry-positron emission tomography human microdose study with 14C- and 11C-labelled verapamil

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Claudia C; Simpson, Marie; Zeitlinger, Markus; Bauer, Martin; Karch, Rudolf; Abrahim, Aiman; Feurstein, Thomas; Schütz, Matthias; Kletter, Kurt; Müller, Markus; Lappin, Graham; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective In microdose studies, the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of a drug in blood after administration of a dose up to 100 μg is measured with sensitive analytical techniques, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). As most drugs exert their effect in tissue rather than blood, methodology is needed for extending PK analysis to different tissue compartments. In the present study, we combined, for the first time, AMS analysis with positron emission tomography (PET) in order to determine the PK profile of the model drug verapamil in plasma and brain of humans. In order to assess PK dose-linearity of verapamil, data were acquired and compared after administration of an intravenous (iv) microdose and an iv microdose dosed concomitantly with an oral therapeutic dose. Methods Six healthy male volunteers received an iv microdose (0.05 mg) (period 1) and an iv microdose dosed concomitantly with an oral therapeutic dose (80 mg) of verapamil (period 2) in a randomized, cross-over, two-period study design. The iv dose was a mixture of (R/S)-[14C]verapamil and (R)-[11C]verapamil and the oral dose was unlabelled racemic verapamil. Brain distribution of radioactivity was measured with PET whereas plasma PK of (R)- and (S)-verapamil was determined with AMS. PET data were analyzed by kinetic modeling to estimate the rate constants for transfer of radioactivity across the blood-brain barrier. Results Most PK parameters of (R)- and (S)-verapamil as well as parameters describing exchange of radioactivity between plasma and brain (K1=0.030±0.003 and 0.031±0.005 mL·mL−1·min−1 and k2=0.099±0.006 and 0.095±0.008 min−1 for period 1 and 2, respectively) were not statistically different between the two periods although there was a trend for non-linear kinetics for the (R)-enantiomer. On the other hand, all PK parameters (except for t1/2) differed significantly between the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers for both periods. Cmax, AUC(0-24) and AUC(0-inf) were higher

  15. Synthesis of internal labeled standards of melatonin and its metabolite N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine for their quantification using an on-line liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry system.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Eduardo A; Klitzke, Clécio F; Martinez, Glaucia R; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is implicated in physiologic changes related to light-dark cycles and has been recently found to display antioxidant properties. It is known that the reaction of melatonin with certain reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, such as hydrogen peroxide and singlet oxygen, produces N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK). We report herein on the development of a new liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS-MS) assay to quantitatively determine melatonin and AFMK. The stable isotopic internal standard of melatonin-D3 was synthesized by the reaction of 5-methoxytryptamine with deuterated acetyl chloride (CD3COCl). Labeled AFMK (AFMK-D3) was obtained after photooxidation of melatonin-D3. The predominant ion [M + H]+ in the full scan mass spectra of melatonin, melatonin-D3, AFMK and AFMK-D3 were located, respectively, at m/z = 233, 236, 265 and 268. The collision-induced dissociation of the molecules revealed a predominant fragment at m/z = 174 for melatonin and melatonin-D3 (loss of the N-acetyl group), and at m/z = 178 for AFMK and AFMK-D3 (loss of both the N-acetyl and the N-formyl groups). The m/z transitions from 233 to 174 (melatonin), from 236 to 174 (melatonin-D3), from 265 to 178 (AFMK), and from 268 to 178 (AFMK-D3) were therefore chosen for the multiple reaction monitoring detection experiments, ensuring a high specificity and an accurate quantification of melatonin and AFMK in human plasma.

  16. Safety and efficacy of canagliflozin in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: post hoc subgroup analyses according to body mass index in a 52-week open-label study.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Nobuya; Goda, Maki; Yokota, Shoko; Maruyama, Nobuko; Iijima, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors in non-obese compared with obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is unknown. We conducted post hoc analyses of the results of a 52-week open-label study of Japanese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients treated with 100 or 200 mg canagliflozin. Patients were divided into four subgroups according to their baseline body mass index (BMI): group I, BMI < 22 kg/m(2); group II, BMI ≥ 22 to < 25 kg/m(2); group III, BMI ≥ 25 to < 30 kg/m(2) and group IV, BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2). The overall safety was similar among the four BMI subgroups, although there were slight differences in terms of the incidences of hypoglycemia, asymptomatic hypoglycemia, female genital infections and proportions of patients with total ketone body levels exceeding 1000 μmol/l at any time for both canagliflozin doses. Hemoglobin A1c, fasting plasma glucose and body weight decreased significantly from baseline to week 52 at both canagliflozin doses. The changes in hemoglobin A1c, and fasting plasma glucose were not significantly different among the four BMI subgroups for either dose. Canagliflozin was tolerated in patients irrespective of their BMI at the start of treatment, although some caution may be needed.

  17. To tag or not to tag: A comparative evaluation of immunoaffinity-labeling and tandem mass spectrometry for the identification and localization of posttranslational protein carbonylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, an end-product of lipid peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Prokai, Laszlo

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational carbonylation of proteins by the covalent attachment of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is a biomarker of oxidative stress. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has become an essential tool for characterization of this modification. Chemical tagging methods have been used to facilitate the immunoaffinity-based enrichment or even quantification of HNE-modified peptides and proteins. With MS/MS spectra of the untagged modified peptides considered as references, a comparative evaluation is presented focusing on the impact of affinity-tagging with four carbonyl-specific reagents (2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine, biotin hydrazide, biotinamidohexanoic acid hydrazide and N’-aminooxymethylcarbonylhydrazino D-biotin) on collision-induced dissociation of the tagged HNE-carbonylated peptides. Our study has shown that chemical labeling may not be carried out successfully for all the peptides and with all the reagents. The attachment of a tag usually cannot circumvent the occurrence of strong neutral losses observed with untagged species and, in addition, fragmentation of the introduced tag may also be introduced. Chemical tagging of certain peptides may, nevertheless, afford more sequence ions upon MS/MS than the untagged carbonylated peptide, especially when Michael addition of the lipid peroxidation product occurs on cysteine residues. Therefore, tagging may increase the confidence of identifications of HNE-modified peptides by database searches. PMID:21835276

  18. Variation in airborne (134)Cs, (137)Cs, particulate (131)I and (7)Be maximum activities at high-altitude European locations after the arrival of Fukushima-labeled air masses.

    PubMed

    Masson, Olivier; Bieringer, Jacqueline; Brattich, Erika; Dalheimer, Axel; Estier, Sybille; Penev, Ilia; Ringer, Wolfgang; Schlosser, Clemens; Steinkopff, Thomas; Steinmann, Philipp; Tositti, Laura; Van Beek, Pieter; Vismes-Ott, Anne de

    2016-10-01

    The Fukushima-labeled air mass arrival, and later the cesium-134 ((134)Cs), cesium-137 ((137)Cs) and particulate iodine-131 (hereafter noted (131)Ip) maximum levels were registered in Europe at different dates depending on the location. Most of those data were obtained at low-altitude sampling areas. Here, we compare the airborne levels registered at different high-altitude European locations (from 850 m to about 3500 m). The integrated (137)Cs activity concentration was not uniform with regard to the altitude even after a long travel time/distance from Japan. Moreover, the relation of integrated (137)Cs vs. altitude showed a linear decrease up to an altitude of about 3000 m. A similar trend was noticed for (131)Ip (particulate fraction) while it increased above 3000 m. Comparison with (7)Be activity concentration showed that, as far as the high altitude location is concerned, the (137)Cs and (134)Cs maximum concentrations corresponded to the (7)Be maximum, suggesting downdraft movements from high tropospheric or stratospheric layers to be responsible for (137,134)Cs increase and peak values. This was also confirmed by high potential vorticity and low relative humidity registered during the peak values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evidence of the chemical reaction of (18)O-labelled nitrite with CO2 in aqueous buffer of neutral pH and the formation of (18)OCO by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic nitrite (NO2(-), ON-O(-) ←→ (-)O-NO) is the autoxidation product of nitric oxide (NO). Nitrite can also be formed from inorganic nitrate (ONO2(-)), the major oxidation product of NO in erythrocytes, by the catalytic action of bacterial nitrate reductase in gut and oral microflora. Nitrite can be reduced to NO by certain cellular proteins and enzymes, as well as in the gastric juice under acidic conditions. Hemoglobin, xanthine oxidoreductase and carbonic anhydrase (CA) have been reported to convert nitrite to NO. Renal CA isoforms are involved in the reabsorption of nitrite and may, therefore, play an important role in NO homeostasis. Yet, the mechanisms underlying the action of CA on nitrite are incompletely understood. The nitrate/nitrite system is regarded as a reservoir of NO. We have recently shown that nitrite reacts chemically with carbon dioxide (CO2), the regular substrate of CA. The present communication reports a stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) study on the reaction of NO2(-) and CO2 performed in 50 mM HEPES buffer of pH 7.4 at 37 °C. By using (18)O-labelled nitrite ((18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO) and CO2 we observed formation of (18)O-labelled CO2. This finding is an unequivocal evidence of the chemical reaction of (18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO with CO2. The reaction is rapid and involves nucleophilic attack of the negatively charged nitrite via one of its oxygen atoms on the partially positively charged CO2 molecule to form the putative intermediate (18)ON-O-CO2(-)/(-)O2C-(18)O-NO. The by far largest fraction of this intermediate decomposes back to (18)ON-O(-)/(-18)O-NO and CO2. A very small fraction of the intermediate, however, rearranges and finally decomposes to form (18)OCO and nitrite. This reaction is slower in the presence of an isolated erythrocytic CA isoform II. In summary, NO2(-), CO2 and CA are ubiquitous. The chemical reaction of NO2(-) with CO2 and its modulation by CA isoforms may play important roles in the transport of

  20. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  1. Pesticide Labeling Questions & Answers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide manufacturers, applicators, state regulatory agencies, and other stakeholders raise questions or issues about pesticide labels. The questions on this page are those that apply to multiple products or address inconsistencies among product labels.

  2. Soil Fumigant Labels - Chloropicrin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company name, and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details on each fumigant. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  3. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dazomet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find information from the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for products such as Basamid G, manufactured by Amvac.

  4. Mental Labels and Tattoos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, I. Ralph

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the ease with which mental labels become imprinted in our system, six basic axioms for maintaining negative mental tattoos, and psychological processes for eliminating mental tattoos and labels. (RK)

  5. Soil Fumigant Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The 2012 updated pesticide labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures. Find labels for each different type of fumigant: chloropicrin, dazomet, dimethyl disulfide, metam sodium/potassium, and methyl bromide.

  6. Electronic Submission of Labels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide registrants can provide draft and final labels to EPA electronically for our review as part of the pesticide registration process. The electronic submission of labels by registrants is voluntary but strongly encouraged.

  7. The Labelling of Chemicals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes the impact on chemistry laboratories and teachers in the United Kingdom of the Packaging and Labelling of Dangerous Substances Regulations 1978. These regulations require suppliers to label containers in particular ways. (HM)

  8. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nossum, R.T.

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  9. Chronic Alcohol Exposure Disturbs Lipid Homeostasis at the Adipose Tissue-Liver Axis in Mice: Analysis of Triacylglycerols Using High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Combination with In Vivo Metabolite Deuterium Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei; Zhao, Yantao; Tang, Yunan; Sun, Wenlong; Yin, Xinmin; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Kim, Seongho; McClain, Craig; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zhang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    A method of employing high-resolution mass spectrometry in combination with in vivo metabolite deuterium labeling was developed in this study to investigate the effects of alcohol exposure on lipid homeostasis at the white adipose tissue (WAT)-liver axis in a mouse model of alcoholic fatty liver. In order to differentiate the liver lipids synthesized from the fatty acids that were transported back from adipose tissue and the lipids synthesized from other sources of fatty acids, a two-stage mouse feeding experiment was performed to incorporate deuterium into metabolites. Hepatic lipids extracted from mouse liver, epididymal white adipose tissue (eWAT) and subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) were analyzed. It was found that 13 and 10 triacylglycerols (TGs) incorporated with a certain number of deuterium were significantly increased in alcohol induced fatty liver at two and four weeks of alcohol feeding periods, respectively. The concentration changes of these TGs ranged from 1.7 to 6.3-fold increase. A total of 14 deuterated TGs were significantly decreased in both eWAT and sWAT at the two and four weeks and the fold-change ranged from 0.19 to 0.77. The increase of deuterium incorporated TGs in alcohol-induced fatty liver and their decrease in both eWAT and sWAT indicate that alcohol exposure induces hepatic influx of fatty acids which are released from WATs. The results of time course analysis further indicate a mechanistic link between adipose fat loss and hepatic fat gain in alcoholic fatty liver. PMID:23405143

  10. A high-resolution tungstate membrane label

    SciTech Connect

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Quaite, F.E. ); Lipka, J.J. )

    1990-01-01

    A new class of membrane labels was synthesized which contain a tungstate cluster (having 11 tungsten atoms) and an aliphatic organo-tin moiety with various chain lengths (C{sub 4}, C{sub 8}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 18}, C{sub 22}). These molecules were found to insert into synthetic phospholipid vesicles and biological membranes (human red blood cell membranes). The tungstate clusters can be individually visualized in the high resolution STEM or seen en mass in thin-sectioned labeled membranes in the CTEM. These new labels should provide a means for direct high-resolution imaging of lipid-phase systems.

  11. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 16

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the importance of labels and the role in enforcement.

  12. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 14

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about positive effects from proper labeling.

  13. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 15

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about the consequences of improper labeling.

  14. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 21

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about types of labels.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 19

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section covers supplemental distributor labeling.

  16. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 17

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See an overview of the importance of labels.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 22

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about what labels require review.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 27

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. See examples of mandatory and advisory label statements.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 26

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Learn about mandatory and advisory label statements.

  20. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 24

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is about which labels require review.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 18

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This section discusses the types of labels.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 23

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. Lists types of labels that do not require review.

  3. Binding of β4γ5 by Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors Determined by Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture and Mass Spectrometry†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dora Bigler; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Shannon, John D.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Mayeenuddin, Linnia H.; Yeager, Mark; McIntire, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of G protein βγ dimer isoform expression in different cellular contexts has been impeded by low levels of protein expression, broad isoform heterogeneity, and antibodies of limited specificity, sensitivity or availability. As a new approach, we used quantitative mass spectrometry to characterize native βγ dimers associated with adenosine A1:αi1 and adenosine A2A:αS receptor fusion proteins expressed in HEK-293 cells. Cells expressing A1:αi1 were cultured in media containing [13C6] Arg and [13C6] Lys, and βγ labeled with heavy isotopes purified. Heavy βγ was combined with either recombinant βγ purified from Sf9 cells, βγ purified from the A2A:αS expressed in HEK-293 cells cultured in standard media, or an enriched βγ fraction from HEK-293 cells. Samples were separated by SDS-PAGE, and protein bands containing β and γ were excised, digested with trypsin, separated by HPLC and isotope ratios analyzed by mass spectrometry. Three β isoforms, β1, β2 and β4, and seven γ isoforms, γ2, γ4, γ5, γ7, γ10, γ11 and γ12 were identified in the analysis. β1 and γ5 were most abundant in the enriched βγ fraction, and this βγ profile was generally mirrored in the fusion proteins. However, both A2A:αS and A1:αi1 bound more β4 and γ5 compared to the enriched βγ fraction; also, more β4 was associated with A2A:αS than A1:αi1. Both fusion proteins also contained less γ2, γ10 and γ12 than the enriched βγ fraction. These results suggest that preferences for particular βγ isoforms may be driven in part by structural motifs common to adenosine receptor family members. PMID:21128647

  4. Biodistribution, Pharmacokinetics, and Dosimetry of (177)Lu-, (90)Y-, and (111)In-Labeled Somatostatin Receptor Antagonist OPS201 in Comparison to the Agonist (177)Lu-DOTATATE: The Mass Effect.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Guillaume P; Mansi, Rosalba; McDougall, Lisa; Kaufmann, Jens; Bouterfa, Hakim; Wild, Damian; Fani, Melpomeni

    2017-09-01

    Radiolabeled somatostatin receptor (SSTR) antagonists have shown in vivo higher uptake in SSTR-expressing tumors than agonists. In this preclinical study, the SSTR2 antagonist OPS201 (DOTA-JR11; DOTA-[Cpa-c(DCys-Aph(Hor)-DAph(Cbm)-Lys-Thr-Cys)-DTyr-NH2]) labeled with (177)Lu, (90)Y, and (111)In was compared with the SSTR2 agonist (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Methods: Biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, SPECT/CT, and dosimetry studies were performed to assess the bioequivalence of all radiotracers. Use of escalated peptide mass and nephroprotective agents were systematically investigated. Results: The tumor residence time was 15.6 h (13.4-17.7) for (177)Lu-OPS201 (10 pmol) and 6.4 h (5.4-7.3) for (177)Lu-DOTATATE, resulting in a 2.5-times-higher tumor dose for the antagonist than for the agonist (0.854 vs. 0.333 mGy/MBq for a 4-cm tumor). The overall tumor-to-kidney dose ratio was approximately 24% and 32% higher for (177)Lu-OPS201 than for (90)Y-OPS201 and (177)Lu-DOTATATE, respectively. (111)In-OPS201 had a biodistribution significantly different from (90)Y-OPS201 and is therefore not a surrogate for (90)Y-OPS201 dosimetry studies. Importantly, and in contrast to (177)Lu-DOTATATE, injection of 10, 200, and 2,000 pmol of (177)Lu-OPS201 did not cause any relevant tumor saturation, with tumor uptake 4 h after injection: 23.9, 24.9, and 18.8 percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue (%IA/g), respectively, for the antagonist (P > 0.05), as compared with 17.8, 12.0, and 9.9 %IA/g for the agonist (P < 0.05). Increasing the peptide mass of (177)Lu-OPS201 from 10 to 200 pmol drastically decreased the effective dose from 0.0908 to 0.0184 mSv/MBq and decreased the uptake in the liver, bone marrow, and all SSTR2-expressing organs; thus, the therapeutic index improved considerably. Lysine and succinylated gelatine, alone or in combination, significantly reduced the renal dose of (177)Lu-OPS201 compared with the control group, by 45%, 25%, and 40%, respectively (P < 0.05). The

  5. Sample Pesticide Label for Label Review Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  6. Trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling for quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Petritis, Brianne O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling based on relative peptide/protein abundance measurements is commonly applied for quantitative proteomics. Recently, trypsin-catalyzed oxygen-18 labeling has grown in popularity due to its simplicity, cost-effectiveness, and its ability to universally label peptides with high sample recovery. In (18)O labeling, both C-terminal carboxyl group atoms of tryptic peptides can be enzymatically exchanged with (18)O, thus providing the labeled peptide with a 4 Da mass shift from the (16)O-labeled sample. Peptide (18)O labeling is ideally suited for generating a labeled "universal" reference sample used for obtaining accurate and reproducible quantitative measurements across large number of samples in quantitative discovery proteomics.

  7. Pesticide Product Label System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) provides a collection of pesticide product labels (Adobe PDF format) that have been approved by EPA under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA). New labels were added to PPLS on November 21, 2014. Pesticide product labels provide critical information about how to safely handle and use registered pesticide products. An approved pesticide product label represents the full content of EPAs registration decision regarding that product. Pesticide labels contain detailed information on the use, storage, and handling of a product. This information will be found on EPA stamped-approved labels and, in some cases, in subsequent related correspondence, which is also included in PPLS. You may need to review several PDF files for a single product to determine the complete current terms of registration.

  8. Labeling of Patient Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-26

    printers in each clinic to print labels .JDI Capt Cutter Research compatible printer, Cost, Time Frame Develop standard training for all clinics...Standardize label content, automate with inkless printers once process is proven c . Place visual reminders for providers and support staff 2. Event

  9. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  10. Labeling and Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Mike S.; Robertson, Craig T.; Gray-Ray, Phyllis; Ray, Melvin C.

    2003-01-01

    Index comprised of six contrasting descriptive adjectives was used to measure incarcerated youths' perceived negative labeling from the perspective of parents, teachers, and peers. Results provided partial support for hypothesis that juveniles who choose a greater number of negative labels will report more frequent delinquent involvement. Labeling…

  11. Government perspective: food labeling.

    PubMed

    Philipson, Tomas

    2005-07-01

    The Food and Drug Administration acknowledges the severity of the obesity epidemic. The Food and Drug Administration recognizes the importance of food labeling as a vehicle for dietary messages and, thus, enforces stringent guidelines to maintain the integrity of the food label. As food labels await another upgrade to make them more effective and easier to understand, the Food and Drug Administration considers what information will be most useful for consumers to make healthy choices. The causal relationship between food labels and subsequent diet choice is not well understood; more research in this area is needed. The Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration has recently appointed an Obesity Working Group to develop proposals on pertinent topics of obesity, including the role of food labeling as a dietary guide.

  12. 10 CFR 20.1904 - Labeling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... activity is estimated, radiation levels, kinds of materials, and mass enrichment) to permit individuals... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Precautionary Procedures § 20... a durable, clearly visible label bearing the radiation symbol and the words “CAUTION,...

  13. 10 CFR 20.1904 - Labeling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... activity is estimated, radiation levels, kinds of materials, and mass enrichment) to permit individuals... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Precautionary Procedures § 20... a durable, clearly visible label bearing the radiation symbol and the words “CAUTION,...

  14. 10 CFR 20.1904 - Labeling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... activity is estimated, radiation levels, kinds of materials, and mass enrichment) to permit individuals... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Precautionary Procedures § 20... a durable, clearly visible label bearing the radiation symbol and the words “CAUTION,...

  15. 10 CFR 20.1904 - Labeling containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... activity is estimated, radiation levels, kinds of materials, and mass enrichment) to permit individuals... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Precautionary Procedures § 20... a durable, clearly visible label bearing the radiation symbol and the words “CAUTION,...

  16. Mining Multi-label Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumakas, Grigorios; Katakis, Ioannis; Vlahavas, Ioannis

    A large body of research in supervised learning deals with the analysis of single-label data, where training examples are associated with a single label λ from a set of disjoint labels L. However, training examples in several application domains are often associated with a set of labels Y ⊆ L. Such data are called multi-label.

  17. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review. This page is a quiz on Module 1.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 25

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This module of the pesticide label review training provides basic information about pesticides, their labeling and regulation, and the core principles of pesticide label review: clarity, accuracy, consistency with EPA policy, and enforceability.

  19. Soil Fumigant Labels - Methyl Bromide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search soil fumigant pesticide labels by EPA registration number, product name, or company, and follow the link to The Pesticide Product Label System (PPLS) for details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  20. Off-Label Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drugs for off-label uses. Off-label marketing is very different from off-label use. Why ... Employment Become a Supplier Report Fraud or Abuse Global Health ACS CAN Sign Up for Email Policies ...

  1. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1983-07-15

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  2. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H.D.

    1985-11-12

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label. 5 figs.

  3. Capacitive label reader

    DOEpatents

    Arlowe, H. Duane

    1985-01-01

    A capacitive label reader includes an outer ring transmitting portion, an inner ring transmitting portion, and a plurality of insulated receiving portions. A label is the mirror-image of the reader except that identifying portions corresponding to the receiving portions are insulated from only one of two coupling elements. Positive and negative pulses applied, respectively, to the two transmitting rings biased a CMOS shift register positively to either a 1 or 0 condition. The output of the CMOS may be read as an indication of the label.

  4. Production of isotopically labeled standards from a uniformly labeled precursor for quantitative volatile metabolomic studies.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Brenna, J Thomas; Sacks, Gavin L

    2012-06-19

    Optimal accuracy and precision in small-molecule profiling by mass spectrometry generally requires isotopically labeled standards chemically representative of all compounds of interest. However, preparation of mixed standards from commercially available pure compounds is often prohibitively expensive and time-consuming, and many labeled compounds are not available in pure form. We used a single-prototype uniformly labeled [U-(13)C]compound to generate [U-(13)C]-labeled volatile standards for use in subsequent experimental profiling studies. [U-(13)C]-α-Linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) was thermally oxidized to produce labeled lipid degradation volatiles which were subsequently characterized qualitatively and quantitatively. Twenty-five [U-(13)C]-labeled volatiles were identified by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/TOF-MS) by comparison of spectra with unlabeled volatiles. Labeled volatiles were quantified by a reverse isotope dilution procedure. Using the [U-(13)C]-labeled standards, limits of detection comparable to or better than those of previous HS-SPME reports were achieved, 0.010-1.04 ng/g. The performance of the [U-(13)C]-labeled volatile standards was evaluated using a commodity soybean oil (CSO) oxidized at 60 °C from 0 to 15 d. Relative responses of n-decane, an unlabeled internal standard otherwise absent from the mixture, and [U-(13)C]-labeled oxidation products changed by up to 8-fold as the CSO matrix was oxidized, demonstrating that reliance on a single standard in volatile profiling studies yields inaccurate results due to changing matrix effects. The [U-(13)C]-labeled standard mixture was used to quantify 25 volatiles in oxidized CSO and low-ALA soybean oil with an average relative standard deviation of 8.5%. Extension of this approach to other labeled substrates, e.g., [U-(13)C]-labeled sugars and amino acids, for profiling studies should be feasible and can dramatically improve

  5. Like your labels?

    PubMed

    Field, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The descriptive “conventions” used on food labels are always evolving. Today, however, the changes are so complicated (partly driven by legislation requiring disclosures about environmental impacts, health issues, and geographical provenance) that these labels more often baffle buyers than enlighten them. In a light-handed manner, the article points to how sometimes reading label language can be like deciphering runes—and how if we are familiar with the technical terms, we can find a literal meaning, but still not see the implications. The article could be ten times longer because food labels vary according to cultures—but all food-exporting cultures now take advantage of our short attention-span when faced with these texts. The question is whether less is more—and if so, in this contest for our attention, what “contestant” is voted off.

  6. Label Review Training - Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  7. 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate as a fluorescence-labeling reagent for derivatization of carboxylic acid moiety of sodium valproate using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry for binding characterization: a human pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Bahareh; Majnooni, Mohammad Bagher; Khatabi, Pyman Malek; Jalili, Ronak; Bahrami, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    In High Performance Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC) determination of chemicals with acidic functions, different labeling agents are used to improve sensitivity of the assay. 9-Fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC-Cl), on the other hand, is a suitable labeling agent, which reacts with both primary and secondary amines and less readily with hydroxyl groups in alkaline conditions. However, the reagent has not been applied in labeling of chemicals with acidic function yet. In this study which is the first report on application of FMOC-Cl in derivatization and analysis of a drug with acidic function, valproic acid (VPA), one of a series of fatty carboxylic acids with anticonvulsant activity, was derivatized using the reagent and quantified in serum samples by HPLC with fluorescence detection. In addition, to document the reaction between the labeling agent and carboxylic acid moiety of the drug, we developed a liquid chromatography-tandem MS/MS (LC-MS/MS) method. Following liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization of the drug and an internal standard was achieved in alkaline medium. The elute was monitored by a fluorescence detector with respective excitation and emission wavelengths of 265 and 315 nm. The present method is more sensitive comparing with other published HPLC procedures for analysis of VPA. The assay is sensitive enough to measure drug levels obtained in human single dose studies with a limit of quantification of 0.01 μg/mL. Also the method is linear over the concentrations range of 0.01-32 μg/mL of VPA in human serum using 100 μL serum sample and 5 μL injection. The coefficient variation values of both inter and intra day analysis were less than 12% and the percentage error was less than 4%. The method performance was studied and the validated procedure applied in a randomized cross-over bioequivalence study of two different VPA preparations in 24 healthy volunteers.

  8. Synthesis of the isotope-labeled derivatization reagent for carboxylic acids, 7-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-4-(aminoethyl)piperazino-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (d6) [DBD-PZ-NH2 (D)], and its application to the quantification and the determination of relative amount of fatty acids in rat plasma samples by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yuhki; Santa, Tomofumi; Yoshida, Hiroo; Miyano, Hiroshi; Fukushima, Takeshi; Hirayama, Kazuo; Imai, Kazuhiro; Funatsu, Takashi

    2006-04-01

    The isotope-labeled benzofurazan derivatization reagent for carboxylic acids, 7-(N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl)-4-(aminoethyl)piperazino-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (d6) [DBD-PZ-NH2 (D)] was synthesized. DBD-PZ-NH2 (D) was used for the accurate quantification of fatty acids by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). The standard fatty acids were derivatized with DBD-PZ-NH2 (D) to the stable isotope-labeled compounds for the fatty acids derivatives of DBD-PZ-NH2 and used for the internal standards. The obtained calibration curves for fatty acids were linear over the range 0.1-200 microM (r2 > 0.999). Fatty acids in plasma samples were determined after derivatization with DBD-PZ-NH2 and analyzed by LC/MS using standard fatty acid DBD-PZ-NH2 (D) derivatives as internal standards. Furthermore, the relative amounts of fatty acids in two plasma samples were determined after derivatization with DBD-PZ-NH2 and DBD-PZ-NH2) (D). The isotope-labeled derivatization reagent was useful for accurate quantification and the determination of relative amounts of the metabolites in biological samples having the target functional group.

  9. To label or not to label: applications of quantitative proteomics in neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Michaela D; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Guest, Paul C; Bahn, Sabine; Turck, Christoph W

    2012-02-01

    Proteomics has provided researchers with a sophisticated toolbox of labeling-based and label-free quantitative methods. These are now being applied in neuroscience research where they have already contributed to the elucidation of fundamental mechanisms and the discovery of candidate biomarkers. In this review, we evaluate and compare labeling-based and label-free quantitative proteomic techniques for applications in neuroscience research. We discuss the considerations required for the analysis of brain and central nervous system specimens, the experimental design of quantitative proteomic workflows as well as the feasibility, advantages, and disadvantages of the available techniques for neuroscience-oriented questions. Furthermore, we assess the use of labeled standards as internal controls for comparative studies in humans and review applications of labeling-based and label-free mass spectrometry approaches in relevant model organisms and human subjects. Providing a comprehensive guide of feasible and meaningful quantitative proteomic methodologies for neuroscience research is crucial not only for overcoming current limitations but also for gaining useful insights into brain function and translating proteomics from bench to bedside. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Routing and Label Space Reduction in Label Switching Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano, Fernando; Caro, Luis Fernando; Stidsen, Thomas; Papadimitriou, Dimitri

    This chapter is devoted to the analysis and modeling of some problems related to the optimal usage of the label space in label switching networks. Label space problems concerning three different technologies and architectures - namely Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS), Ethernet VLAN-Label Switching (ELS) and All-Optical Label Switching (AOLS) - are discussed in this chapter. Each of these cases yields to different constraints of the general label space reduction problem. We propose a generic optimization model and, then, we describe some adaptations aiming at modeling each particular case. Simulation results are briefly discussed at the end of this chapter.

  11. Nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Kricka, Larry J; Fortina, Paolo; Park, Jason Y

    2017-03-01

    Important and emerging trends at the interface of luminescence, nucleic acids and nanotechnology are: (i) the conventional luminescence labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. DNA tetrahedron); (ii) the labeling of bulk nucleic acids (e.g. single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. copper nanoclusters); and (iii) the labeling of nucleic acid nanostructures (e.g. origami DNA) with nanostructured luminescent labels (e.g. silver nanoclusters). This review surveys recent advances in these three different approaches to the generation of nanostructured luminescently labeled nucleic acids, and includes both direct and indirect labeling methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. 21 CFR 820.120 - Device labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... QUALITY SYSTEM REGULATION Labeling and Packaging Control § 820.120 Device labeling. Each manufacturer shall establish and maintain procedures to control labeling activities. (a) Label integrity. Labels... accuracy including, where applicable, the correct expiration date, control number, storage instructions...

  13. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  14. A Deceiving Label?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The author reports on the growing debate among educators on whether the umbrella Asian Pacific Islander label conceals disparities among Asian American students or provides political power in numbers. Nationally, experts say that support services aimed at not only Southeast Asians, but all Asian Pacific Islander students, remain scarce in higher…

  15. From Labels to Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    The author argues that to truly help young students who struggle with reading and writing--including those with identified disabilities or conditions that effect building literacy--teachers should avoid the approach of focusing on a student's deficits and creating labels for him or her (dyslexic, English language learner, and so on). A rush to…

  16. Photoaffinity-labeled Cytokinins

    PubMed Central

    Theiler, Jane B.; Leonard, Nelson J.; Schmitz, Ruth Y.; Skoog, Folke

    1976-01-01

    Two new azidopurine derivatives, 2-azido-N6-(Δ2-isopentenyl)adenine and 2-azido-N6-benzyladenine, have been synthesized as potential photoaffinity labels for probing cytokinin-binding sites. The preparation and the biological activity of these compounds are described. PMID:16659772

  17. Quantitative Proteomics Using Reductive Dimethylation for Stable Isotope Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Tolonen, Andrew C.; Haas, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Stable isotope labeling of peptides by reductive dimethylation (ReDi labeling) is a method to accurately quantify protein expression differences between samples using mass spectrometry. ReDi labeling is performed using either regular (light) or deuterated (heavy) forms of formaldehyde and sodium cyanoborohydride to add two methyl groups to each free amine. Here we demonstrate a robust protocol for ReDi labeling and quantitative comparison of complex protein mixtures. Protein samples for comparison are digested into peptides, labeled to carry either light or heavy methyl tags, mixed, and co-analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Relative protein abundances are quantified by comparing the ion chromatogram peak areas of heavy and light labeled versions of the constituent peptide extracted from the full MS spectra. The method described here includes sample preparation by reversed-phase solid phase extraction, on-column ReDi labeling of peptides, peptide fractionation by basic pH reversed-phase (BPRP) chromatography, and StageTip peptide purification. We discuss advantages and limitations of ReDi labeling with respect to other methods for stable isotope incorporation. We highlight novel applications using ReDi labeling as a fast, inexpensive, and accurate method to compare protein abundances in nearly any type of sample. PMID:25045933

  18. Quantitative proteomics using reductive dimethylation for stable isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Haas, Wilhelm

    2014-07-01

    Stable isotope labeling of peptides by reductive dimethylation (ReDi labeling) is a method to accurately quantify protein expression differences between samples using mass spectrometry. ReDi labeling is performed using either regular (light) or deuterated (heavy) forms of formaldehyde and sodium cyanoborohydride to add two methyl groups to each free amine. Here we demonstrate a robust protocol for ReDi labeling and quantitative comparison of complex protein mixtures. Protein samples for comparison are digested into peptides, labeled to carry either light or heavy methyl tags, mixed, and co-analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Relative protein abundances are quantified by comparing the ion chromatogram peak areas of heavy and light labeled versions of the constituent peptide extracted from the full MS spectra. The method described here includes sample preparation by reversed-phase solid phase extraction, on-column ReDi labeling of peptides, peptide fractionation by basic pH reversed-phase (BPRP) chromatography, and StageTip peptide purification. We discuss advantages and limitations of ReDi labeling with respect to other methods for stable isotope incorporation. We highlight novel applications using ReDi labeling as a fast, inexpensive, and accurate method to compare protein abundances in nearly any type of sample.

  19. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 7

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 7, Label Training, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  20. Use the Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Spokespeople News Archive eNewsletters Calendar Use the Nutrition Facts Label You can help your family eat ... to some of their favorite foods. Use the Nutrition Facts label found on food packages to make ...

  1. Decode the Sodium Label Lingo

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Preschooler For Gradeschooler For Teen Decode the Sodium Label Lingo Published January 24, 2013 Print Email Reading food labels can help you slash sodium. Here's how to decipher them. "Sodium free" or " ...

  2. Labeling lake water with tritium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederick, B.J.

    1963-01-01

    A method of packaging tritiated water in a manner that facilitates safe handling in environmental labeling operations, and procedures followed in labeling a large body of water with a small volume of tritiated water are described. ?? 1963.

  3. Collective Multi-Label Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    there is one output random variable . We begin by de- scribing this traditional classifier, then we describe its common ex- tension to the multi- label ...dependencies among the output variables . In addition to having feature for each label -term pair, CML main- tains features accounting for label co...over all possible multi- labelings — that is, over all subsets of Y . This method is intuitively appealing: it is easy to explain, and it is informative

  4. Microgravity Science Glovebox - Labels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Labels are overlaid on a photo (0003837) of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG). The MSG is being developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and NASA are developing the MSG for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Scientists will use the MSG to carry out multidisciplinary studies in combustion science, fluid physics and materials science. The MSG is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Photo Credit: NASA/MSFC

  5. Food Labels Tell the Story!

    MedlinePlus

    ... My World From the Label to the Table! Food Labels Tell the Story! What is in food? Food provides your body with all of the ... your food choices. Nutrition Facts—the Labels on Food Products Beginning in 1994, the US government began ...

  6. Benchmarking stable isotope labeling based quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Altelaar, A F Maarten; Frese, Christian K; Preisinger, Christian; Hennrich, Marco L; Schram, Andree W; Timmers, H Th Marc; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2013-08-02

    Several quantitative mass spectrometry based technologies have recently evolved to interrogate the complexity, interconnectivity and dynamic nature of proteomes. Currently, the most popular methods use either metabolic or chemical isotope labeling with MS based quantification or chemical labeling using isobaric tags with MS/MS based quantification. Here, we assess the performance of three of the most popular approaches through systematic independent large scale quantitative proteomics experiments, comparing SILAC, dimethyl and TMT labeling strategies. Although all three methods have their strengths and weaknesses, our data indicate that all three can reach a similar depth in number of identified proteins using a classical (MS2 based) shotgun approach. TMT quantification using only MS2 is heavily affected by co-isolation leading to compromised precision and accuracy. This issue may be partly resolved by using an MS3 based acquisition; however, at the cost of a significant reduction in number of proteins quantified. Interestingly, SILAC and chemical labeling with MS based quantification produce almost indistinguishable results, independent of which database search algorithm used. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential protein labeling based on electrochemically generated reactive intermediates.

    PubMed

    Büter, Lars; Faber, Helene; Wigger, Tina; Vogel, Martin; Karst, Uwe

    2015-10-06

    A specific labeling method for cysteine moieties in proteins was developed. Electrochemical oxidation of phenolic compounds such as phenol or acetaminophen leads to the generation of the reactive intermediates benzoquinone and N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, which can subsequently react with nucleophilic thiol functions in peptides or proteins. Differential labeling of cysteine residues was successfully demonstrated with native as well as heavy-isotope labeled forms of the corresponding labeling compounds. The specific mass differences on the peptide level were successfully analyzed by mass spectrometry for the tripeptide glutathione. Free cysteines in various proteins such as β-lactoglobulin A, human serum albumin, hemoglobin, and human carbonic anhydrase I were successfully labeled. Tryptic digestion of differentially labeled carbonic anhydrase I and hemoglobin allowed the identification of the binding site in the proteins. The obtained mass difference allowed an easy identification of the cysteine containing peptides. With these experiments, it was successfully demonstrated that the developed method can serve as a tool for counting cysteine moieties in proteins and, thus, be used as an additional technique in protein identification experiments.

  8. Matching isotopic distributions from metabolically labeled samples.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean; Page, David; Huttlin, Edward L; Sussman, Michael R

    2008-07-01

    In recent years stable isotopic labeling has become a standard approach for quantitative proteomic analyses. Among the many available isotopic labeling strategies, metabolic labeling is attractive for the excellent internal control it provides. However, analysis of data from metabolic labeling experiments can be complicated because the spacing between labeled and unlabeled forms of each peptide depends on its sequence, and is thus variable from analyte to analyte. As a result, one generally needs to know the sequence of a peptide to identify its matching isotopic distributions in an automated fashion. In some experimental situations it would be necessary or desirable to match pairs of labeled and unlabeled peaks from peptides of unknown sequence. This article addresses this largely overlooked problem in the analysis of quantitative mass spectrometry data by presenting an algorithm that not only identifies isotopic distributions within a mass spectrum, but also annotates matches between natural abundance light isotopic distributions and their metabolically labeled counterparts. This algorithm is designed in two stages: first we annotate the isotopic peaks using a modified version of the IDM algorithm described last year; then we use a probabilistic classifier that is supplemented by dynamic programming to find the metabolically labeled matched isotopic pairs. Such a method is needed for high-throughput quantitative proteomic metabolomic experiments measured via mass spectrometry. The primary result of this article is that the dynamic programming approach performs well given perfect isotopic distribution annotations. Our algorithm achieves a true positive rate of 99% and a false positive rate of 1% using perfect isotopic distribution annotations. When the isotopic distributions are annotated given 'expert' selected peaks, the same algorithm gets a true positive rate of 77% and a false positive rate of 1%. Finally, when annotating using machine selected peaks, which

  9. Matching isotopic distributions from metabolically labeled samples

    PubMed Central

    McIlwain, Sean; Page, David; Huttlin, Edward L.; Sussman, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: In recent years stable isotopic labeling has become a standard approach for quantitative proteomic analyses. Among the many available isotopic labeling strategies, metabolic labeling is attractive for the excellent internal control it provides. However, analysis of data from metabolic labeling experiments can be complicated because the spacing between labeled and unlabeled forms of each peptide depends on its sequence, and is thus variable from analyte to analyte. As a result, one generally needs to know the sequence of a peptide to identify its matching isotopic distributions in an automated fashion. In some experimental situations it would be necessary or desirable to match pairs of labeled and unlabeled peaks from peptides of unknown sequence. This article addresses this largely overlooked problem in the analysis of quantitative mass spectrometry data by presenting an algorithm that not only identifies isotopic distributions within a mass spectrum, but also annotates matches between natural abundance light isotopic distributions and their metabolically labeled counterparts. This algorithm is designed in two stages: first we annotate the isotopic peaks using a modified version of the IDM algorithm described last year; then we use a probabilistic classifier that is supplemented by dynamic programming to find the metabolically labeled matched isotopic pairs. Such a method is needed for high-throughput quantitative proteomic metabolomic experiments measured via mass spectrometry. Results: The primary result of this article is that the dynamic programming approach performs well given perfect isotopic distribution annotations. Our algorithm achieves a true positive rate of 99% and a false positive rate of 1% using perfect isotopic distribution annotations. When the isotopic distributions are annotated given ‘expert’ selected peaks, the same algorithm gets a true positive rate of 77% and a false positive rate of 1%. Finally, when annotating using

  10. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  11. Variability of 13C-labeling in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Tu, Thanh Thuy; Biron, Philippe; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Richard, Patricia; Zeller, Bernd; Quénéa, Katell; Alexis, Marie; Bardoux, Gérard; Vaury, Véronique; Girardin, Cyril; Pouteau, Valérie; Billiou, Daniel; Bariac, Thierry

    2013-09-15

    Plant tissues artificially labeled with (13)C are increasingly used in environmental studies to unravel biogeochemical and ecophysiological processes. However, the variability of (13)C-content in labeled tissues has never been carefully investigated. Hence, this study aimed at documenting the variability of (13)C-content in artificially labeled leaves. European beech and Italian ryegrass were subjected to long-term (13)C-labeling in a controlled-environment growth chamber. The (13)C-content of the leaves obtained after several months labeling was determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The (13)C-content of the labeled leaves exhibited inter- and intra-leaf variability much higher than those naturally occurring in unlabeled plants, which do not exceed a few per mil. This variability was correlated with labeling intensity: the isotope composition of leaves varied in ranges of ca 60‰ and 90‰ for experiments that led to average leaf (13)C-content of ca +15‰ and +450‰, respectively. The reported variability of isotope composition in (13)C-enriched leaves is critical, and should be taken into account in subsequent experimental investigations of environmental processes using (13)C-labeled plant tissues. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Review of nutrition labeling formats.

    PubMed

    Geiger, C J; Wyse, B W; Parent, C R; Hansen, R G

    1991-07-01

    This article examines nutrition labeling history as well as the findings of nine research studies of nutrition labeling formats. Nutrition labeling regulations were announced in 1973 and have been periodically amended since then. In response to requests from consumers and health care professionals for revision of the labeling system, the Food and Drug Administration initiated a three-phase plan for reform of nutrition labeling in 1990. President Bush signed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act in November 1990. Literature analysis revealed that only nine studies with an experimental design have focused on nutrition labeling since 1971. Four were conducted before 1975, which was the year that nutrition labeling was officially implemented, two were conducted in 1980, and three were conducted after 1986. Only two of the nine studies supported the traditional label format mandated by the Code of Federal Regulations, and one study partially supported it. Four of the nine studies that evaluated graphic presentations of nutrition information found that consumer comprehension of nutrition information was improved with a graphic format for nutrition labeling: three studies supported the use of bar graphs and one study supported the use of a pie chart. Full disclosure (ie, complete nutrient and ingredient labeling) was preferred by consumers in two of the three studies that examined this variable. The third study supported three types of information disclosure dependent upon socioeconomic class. In those studies that tested graphics, a bar graph format was significantly preferred and showed better consumer comprehension than the traditional format.

  13. Map labeling and its generalizations

    SciTech Connect

    Doddi, S. |; Marathe, M.V.; Mirzaian, A.; Moret, B.M.E.; Zhu, B. |

    1997-01-01

    Map labeling is of fundamental importance in cartography and geographical information systems and is one of the areas targeted for research by the ACM Computational Geometry Impact Task Force. Previous work on map labeling has focused on the problem of placing maximal uniform, axis-aligned, disjoint rectangles on the plane so that each point feature to be labeled lies at the corner of one rectangle. Here, we consider a number of variants of the map labeling problem. We obtain three general types of results. First, we devise constant-factor polynomial-time-approximation algorithms for labeling point features by rectangular labels, where the feature may lie anywhere on the boundary of its label region and where labeling rectangles may be placed in any orientation. These results generalize to the case of elliptical labels. Secondly, we consider the problem of labeling a map consisting of disjoint rectilinear fine segments. We obtain constant-factor polynomial-time approximation algorithms for the general problem and an optimal algorithm for the special case where all segments are horizontal. Finally, we formulate a bicriteria version of the map-labeling problem and provide bicriteria polynomial- time approximation schemes for a number of such problems.

  14. Effects of body mass index or dosage on gastrointestinal disorders associated with extended-release metformin in type 2 diabetes: Sub-analysis of a Phase IV open-label trial in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lixin; Guo, Xiaohui; Li, Yan; Hong, Xu; Jiang, Xiaozhen; Su, Qing; Zhao, Dong; Wu, Xiaojing; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability of metformin monotherapy varies according to baseline BMI or at doses >1500mg/day in patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. We performed a sub-analysis of the safety population from a prospective, multicenter, Phase IV open-label study in which 371 Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes received extended-release metformin monotherapy for 16 weeks. The incidence, severity and duration of GI adverse events (AEs) were compared between normal-weight (BMI<25kg/m(2), n=155) and overweight/obese (BMI≥25kg/m(2), n=216) patients. The primary objective was to determine whether baseline BMI affect the incidence, severity and duration of GI AEs, using Fisher's exact test and Student's t-test. Secondary objectives were to compare these factors according to final metformin dose (≤1500mg/day versus 2000mg/day). The proportion of patients who reported ≥1 GI AE did not differ significantly between BMI groups (25.2% of the normal-weight group versus 21.3% of the overweight/obese group; p=0.3840). Patients who reported GI AEs in the two BMI groups experienced similar GI AE severity (p=0.5410), mean duration (p=0.3572) and duration distribution (p=0.1347). There was no significant difference in GI AE severity and duration between metformin dosage groups (≤1500mg/day versus 2000mg/day). Newly-diagnosed Chinese type 2 diabetes patients of normal weight are no more likely than overweight/obese patients to suffer from increased incidence rates, severity or duration of GI AEs when treated with first-line extended-release metformin monotherapy. Doses of 2000mg/day did not increase the severity or duration of GI AEs. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glycan labeling strategies and their use in identification and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. R.; Zauner, G.; Huhn, C.; Bruggink, C.; Deelder, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Most methods for the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological sources require a glycan derivatization step: glycans may be derivatized to introduce a chromophore or fluorophore, facilitating detection after chromatographic or electrophoretic separation. Derivatization can also be applied to link charged or hydrophobic groups at the reducing end to enhance glycan separation and mass-spectrometric detection. Moreover, derivatization steps such as permethylation aim at stabilizing sialic acid residues, enhancing mass-spectrometric sensitivity, and supporting detailed structural characterization by (tandem) mass spectrometry. Finally, many glycan labels serve as a linker for oligosaccharide attachment to surfaces or carrier proteins, thereby allowing interaction studies with carbohydrate-binding proteins. In this review, various aspects of glycan labeling, separation, and detection strategies are discussed. Figure MALDI-FTICR-MS of 2AA-labeled total plasma N-glycans PMID:20225063

  16. Neutron encoded labeling for peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Rose, Christopher M; Merrill, Anna E; Bailey, Derek J; Hebert, Alexander S; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2013-05-21

    Metabolic labeling of cells using heavy amino acids is most commonly used for relative quantitation; however, partner mass shifts also detail the number of heavy amino acids contained within the precursor species. Here, we use a recently developed metabolic labeling technique, NeuCode (neutron encoding) stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), which produces precursor partners spaced ~40 mDa apart to enable amino acid counting. We implement large scale counting of amino acids through a program, "Amino Acid Counter", which determines the most likely combination of amino acids within a precursor based on NeuCode SILAC partner spacing and filters candidate peptide sequences during a database search using this information. Counting the number of lysine residues for precursors selected for MS/MS decreases the median number of candidate sequences from 44 to 14 as compared to an accurate mass search alone (20 ppm). Furthermore, the ability to co-isolate and fragment NeuCode SILAC partners enables counting of lysines in product ions, and when the information is used, the median number of candidates is reduced to 7. We then demonstrate counting leucine in addition to lysine results in a 6-fold decrease in search space, 43 to 7, when compared to an accurate mass search. We use this scheme to analyze a nanoLC-MS/MS experiment and demonstrate that accurate mass plus lysine and leucine counting reduces the number of candidate sequences to one for ~20% of all precursors selected, demonstrating an ability to identify precursors without MS/MS analysis.

  17. Neutron Encoded Labeling for Peptide Identification

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christopher M.; Merrill, Anna E.; Bailey, Derek J.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling of cells using heavy amino acids is most commonly used for relative quantitation; however, partner mass shifts also detail the number of heavy amino acids contained within the precursor species. Here, we use a recently developed metabolic labeling technique, NeuCode (neutron encoding) stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), which produces precursor partners spaced ~40 mDa apart to enable amino acid counting. We implement large scale counting of amino acids through a program, “Amino Acid Counter”, which determines the most likely combination of amino acids within a precursor based on NeuCode SILAC partner spacing and filters candidate peptide sequences during a database search using this information. Counting the number of lysine residues for precursors selected for MS/MS decreases the median number of candidate sequences from 44 to 14 as compared to an accurate mass search alone (20 ppm). Furthermore, the ability to co-isolate and fragment NeuCode SILAC partners enables counting of lysines in product ions, and when the information is used, the median number of candidates is reduced to 7. We then demonstrate counting leucine in addition to lysine results in a 6-fold decrease in search space, 43 to 7, when compared to an accurate mass search. We use this scheme to analyze a nanoLC-MS/MS experiment and demonstrate that accurate mass plus lysine and leucine counting reduces the number of candidate sequences to one for ~20% of all precursors selected, demonstrating an ability to identify precursors without MS/MS analysis. PMID:23638792

  18. Supplementing national menu labeling.

    PubMed

    Hodge, James G; White, Lexi C

    2012-12-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's forthcoming national menu labeling regulations are designed to help curb the national obesity epidemic by requiring calorie counts on restaurants' menus. However, posted calories can be easily ignored or misunderstood by consumers and fail to accurately describe the healthiness of foods. We propose supplemental models that include nutritional information (e.g., fat, salt, sugar) or specific guidance (e.g., "heart-healthy" graphics). The goal is to empower restaurant patrons with better data to make healthier choices, and ultimately to reduce obesity prevalence.

  19. 49 CFR 583.5 - Label requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the fuel economy label required by 15 U.S.C. 2006, or a separate label. A separate label may... case of a label that is included as part of the Monroney price information label or fuel economy label... motor vehicle equipment and that, to the best of the requester's knowledge, the outside supplier is...

  20. Food labels: a critical assessment.

    PubMed

    Temple, Norman J; Fraser, Joy

    2014-03-01

    Foods sold in packages have both front-of-package (FOP) labels and back-of-package (BOP) labels. The aim of this review is to determine the role they play in informing consumers as to the composition of foods in order to help select a healthy diet. Recent literature was evaluated and findings combined with assessments made by the authors of food labels used in the United States and Canada. Research shows that most consumers have difficulty understanding the information provided by both FOP and BOP food labels used in the United States and Canada. Research has evaluated the merits of alternative designs. FOP labels should be based on a clear and simple design. They should present information on key nutrients (total fat, saturated fat, sugar, and sodium or salt) and also energy value. They should have color and words that indicate "high," "medium," and "low" levels. Labels can also state quantity per serving. The traffic light system is the best example of this design. An extra traffic light indicating the overall health value of the food should be added. A clearer BOP label also is needed. Implementation of a new food labeling system will probably be opposed by the food industry. More research is needed into which food label designs are most effective, especially for persuading consumers to select healthier food. Both FOP and BOP food labels used in the United States and Canada need to be redesigned using a traffic light system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Indirect ultrasonication for protein quantification and peptide mass mapping through mass spectrometry-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Carreira, R J; Lodeiro, C; Reboiro-Jato, M; Glez-Peña, D; Fdez-Riverola, F; Capelo, J L

    2010-07-15

    We report in this work a fast protocol for protein quantification and for peptide mass mapping that rely on (18)O isotopic labeling through the decoupling procedure. It is demonstrated that the purity and source of trypsin do not compromise the labeling degree and efficiency of the decoupled labeling reaction, and that the pH of the labeling reaction is a critical factor to obtain a significant (18)O double labeling. We also show that the same calibration curve can be used for MALDI protein quantification during several days maintaining a reasonable accuracy, thus simplifying the handling of the quantification process. In addition we demonstrate that (18)O isotopic labeling through the decoupling procedure can be successfully used to elaborate peptide mass maps. BSA was successfully quantified using the same calibration curve in different days and plasma from a freshwater fish, Cyprinus carpio, was used to elaborate the peptide mass maps. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved collision-induced dissociation analysis of peptides by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry through 3-sulfobenzoic acid succinimidyl ester labeling.

    PubMed

    Alley, William R; Mechref, Yehia; Klouckova, Iveta; Novotny, Milos V

    2007-01-01

    The sulfonation reagent, a succinimidyl ester of 3-sulfobenzoic acid, has been synthesized for effective peptide sequencing. It is capable of incorporating an additional mobile proton into the peptide backbone, thus, facilitating efficient collision-induced dissociation. This reagent is easily and inexpensively prepared in short time. Tandem mass spectra of the guanidinated and reagent-sulfonated peptides consist mainly of the y-ion series with higher intensities than those observed for solely guanidinated peptides. These enhanced tandem MS attributes significantly improved MASCOT total-ion scores, thus, allowing more confident peptide sequencing. This derivatization was also very effective for the analysis of tryptic digest of human blood serum proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. When used in LC-MALDI/MS/MS format, this type of derivatization does not adversely affect chromatographic efficiencies.

  3. Production of isotopically-labeled standards from a uniformly labeled precursor for quantitative volatile metabolomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Brenna, J. Thomas; Sacks, Gavin L.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal accuracy and precision in small molecule profiling by mass spectrometry generally requires isotopically labeled standards chemically representative of all compounds of interest. However, preparation of mixed standards from commercially available pure compounds is often prohibitively expensive and time consuming, and many labeled compounds are not available in pure form. We used a single prototype uniformly labeled [U-13C]-compound to generate [U-13C]-volatile standards for use in subsequent experimental profiling studies. [U-13C]-α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, ALA) was thermally oxidized to produce labeled lipid degradation volatiles which were subsequently characterized qualitatively and quantitatively. Twenty-five [U-13C]-labeled volatiles were identified by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS) by comparison of spectra with unlabeled volatiles. Using 250 μL starting sample, labeled volatiles were quantified by a reverse isotope dilution procedure. Using the [U-13C]-labeled standards, limits of detection comparable to or better than previous HS-SPME reports were achieved, 0.010–1.04 ng/g. The performance of the [U-13C]-volatile standards was evaluated using a commodity soybean oil (CSO) oxidized at 60°C from 0 to 15 d. Relative responses of n-decane, an unlabeled internal standard otherwise absent from the mixture, and [U-13C]-oxidation products changed by up to 8-fold as the CSO matrix was oxidized, demonstrating that reliance on a single standard in volatile profiling studies yields inaccurate results due to changing matrix effects. The [U-13C]-standard mixture was used to quantify 25 volatiles in oxidized CSO and low-ALA soybean oil with an average relative standard deviation of 8.5%. Extension of this approach to other labeled substrates, e.g., [U-13C]-sugars and amino acids, for profiling studies should be feasible and can dramatically improve quantitative results compared to

  4. Optimizing connected component labeling algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-01-16

    This paper presents two new strategies that can be used to greatly improve the speed of connected component labeling algorithms. To assign a label to a new object, most connected component labeling algorithms use a scanning step that examines some of its neighbors. The first strategy exploits the dependencies among them to reduce the number of neighbors examined. When considering 8-connected components in a 2D image, this can reduce the number of neighbors examined from four to one in many cases. The second strategy uses an array to store the equivalence information among the labels. This replaces the pointer based rooted trees used to store the same equivalence information. It reduces the memory required and also produces consecutive final labels. Using an array instead of the pointer based rooted trees speeds up the connected component labeling algorithms by a factor of 5 {approx} 100 in our tests on random binary images.

  5. Optimizing connected component labeling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kesheng; Otoo, Ekow; Shoshani, Arie

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents two new strategies that can be used to greatly improve the speed of connected component labeling algorithms. To assign a label to a new object, most connected component labeling algorithms use a scanning step that examines some of its neighbors. The first strategy exploits the dependencies among them to reduce the number of neighbors examined. When considering 8-connected components in a 2D image, this can reduce the number of neighbors examined from four to one in many cases. The second strategy uses an array to store the equivalence information among the labels. This replaces the pointer based rooted trees used to store the same equivalence information. It reduces the memory required and also produces consecutive final labels. Using an array instead of the pointer based rooted trees speeds up the connected component labeling algorithms by a factor of 5 ~ 100 in our tests on random binary images.

  6. Label Ranking Algorithms: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vembu, Shankar; Gärtner, Thomas

    Label ranking is a complex prediction task where the goal is to map instances to a total order over a finite set of predefined labels. An interesting aspect of this problem is that it subsumes several supervised learning problems, such as multiclass prediction, multilabel classification, and hierarchical classification. Unsurprisingly, there exists a plethora of label ranking algorithms in the literature due, in part, to this versatile nature of the problem. In this paper, we survey these algorithms.

  7. GEO label: The General Framework for Labeling and Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bye, B. L.; McCallum, I.; Maso, J.

    2012-04-01

    The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. As part of a strategy to increase the involvement of the science and technology community in GEOSS, both as users and developers of GEOSS itself, GEO decided to develop a GEO label concept related to the scientific relevance, quality, acceptance and societal needs for services and data sets of GEOSS. The development of a GEO label is included in the GEO work plan and several projects address the challenges of developing a GEO label concept. Within the different projects developing the GEO label, various perspectives and approaches are being applied. In order to arrive at a generally accepted GEO label concept, a common understanding and basic knowledge of labeling is necessary. Assessment of quality of internationally standardized Earth observation data products implies possible certification. A general understanding of the framework for international standards and certification will also contribute to a more coherent discussion and more efficient development of a GEO label. We will describe the general labeling and certification framework emphasizing the relation to the three elements of the GEO label: quality, user acceptance and relevance. Based on a survey of international labels done by the EGIDA project, we have analyzed the legal framework and organization of labels and certification. We will discuss the frameworks for certification, user ratings, registration and analysis of user requirements. Quality assessment is a particular focus of the analysis and is based on the work done by the GeoViQua project. A GEO label will function both as a data distribution strategy and as a general management system for data. Through a label users can compare different data sets and get access to more information about the relevant data, including quality. A label will provide traceability of data both in the interest of users as well as data

  8. Labeling conventions in isoelectronic sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Maniak, S.T.; Curtis, L.J. )

    1990-08-01

    The isoelectronic exposition of atomic structure properties involves labeling ambiguities when more than one level of the same total angular momentum and parity is present, and an energy ordered labeling of these levels can lead to apparent isoelectronic discontinuities. For example, in the recent oscillator strength calculations for S-like ions by Saloman and Kim (Phys. Rev. A 38, 577 (1988)), abrupt changes in the rates were sometimes observed between one isoelectronic element and the next. We suggest an alternative labeling scheme that removes these discontinuities and produces a smooth isoelectronic variation. This alternative labeling offers advantages for data exposition and for semiempirical interpolation and extrapolation.

  9. Determining bacteriophage endopeptidase activity using either fluorophore-quencher labeled peptides combined with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) or Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assays

    PubMed Central

    Molina, Henrik; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2017-01-01

    The necessity of identifying novel methods to combat infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria is increasing each year. Recent advancements in the development of peptidoglycan hydrolases (e.g. lysins) from bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) have revealed the efficiency of this class of enzymes in treating serious bacterial infections. Though promising results have been obtained regarding the lethal action of lysin on bacterial pathogens both in vitro and in vivo, an often-overlooked factor in these studies is precisely identifying their peptidoglycan cleavage site. This knowledge would be useful for following the activity of the enzyme during development, without the need for whole-organism lytic assays. However, more importantly, it would enable the selection of lysins with different cleavage activities that would act synergistically for enhanced efficacy. Here, we have developed two new methods to accurately identify the cleavage site of lysins using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) on peptidoglycan-like fluorophore-quencher modified synthetic peptides, as well as determining the enzymatic action and kinetics of the enzymes on modified peptides in a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay. These methods should facilitate progress within the lysin field, accelerating the development of therapeutic lysins to combat antibiotic resistant bacterial infections. PMID:28296948

  10. Robust method for investigating nitrogen metabolism of 15N labeled amino acids using AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry: application to a parasitic plant-plant interaction.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Zachary; Cerveau, Delphine; Marnet, Nathalie; Bouchereau, Alain; Delavault, Philippe; Simier, Philippe; Pouvreau, Jean-Bernard

    2014-01-21

    An AccQ•Tag ultra performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (AccQ•Tag-UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS) method is presented here for the fast, robust, and sensitive quantification of (15)N isotopologue enrichment of amino acids in biological samples, as for example in the special biotic interaction between the cultivated specie Brassica napus (rapeseed) and the parasitic weed Phelipanche ramosa (broomrape). This method was developed and validated using amino acid standard solutions containing (15)N amino acid isotopologues and/or biological unlabeled extracts. Apparatus optimization, limits of detection and quantification, quantification reproducibility, and calculation method of (15)N isotopologue enrichment are presented. Using this method, we could demonstrate that young parasite tubercles assimilate inorganic nitrogen as (15)N-ammonium when supplied directly through batch incubation but not when supplied by translocation from host root phloem, contrary to (15)N2-glutamine. (15)N2-glutamine mobility from host roots to parasite tubercles followed by its low metabolism in tubercles suggests that the host-derived glutamine acts as an important nitrogen containing storage compound in the young tubercle of Phelipanche ramosa.

  11. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-03-30

    Novel methods for positron emission tomography or single photon emission spectroscopy using tracer compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)napthyl Y in .beta. configuration is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, The compounds bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  12. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Laser labeling of fruits and vegetables is an alternative means to label produce. Low energy CO2 laser beams etch the surface showing the contrasting underlying layer. These etched surfaces can promote water loss and potentially allow for entry of decay organisms. The long-term effects of laser labe...

  13. Laser labeling, a safe technology to label produce

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Labeling of the produce has gained marked attention in recent years. Laser labeling technology involves the etching of required information on the surface using a low energy CO2 laser beam. The etching forms alphanumerical characters by pinhole dot matrix depressions. These openings can lead to wat...

  14. i-RUBY: a novel software for quantitative analysis of highly accurate shotgun-proteomics liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry data obtained without stable-isotope labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kazuya; Ogiwara, Atsushi; Nagasaka, Keiko; Tanaka, Naoki; Komatsu, Yasuhiko

    2011-04-15

    We developed a novel software named i-RUBY (identification-Related qUantification-Based strategY algorithm for liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) data) that enables us to perform fully automatic ion current-based spectral feature analysis of highly accurate data obtained by LC/MS/MS. At the 1st step, this software utilizes accurate peptide/protein identification information for peak detection and peak matching among measurements. Then, at the 2nd step, it picks yet unidentified peaks and matches them to the peaks identified at the 1st step by a linear interpolation algorithm. The analysis of human plasma externally spiked with a known amount of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase 1 showed a good linear relationship between the amount of protein spiked and the quantitative values obtained by i-RUBY analysis. Experiment using human plasma digests spiked with a mixture of known amounts of synthetic peptides derived from two yeast proteins, alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and glucose-6-phospate isomerase, showed the expansion by the 2nd step of i-RUBY of the lower quantification limits to 1/10 to 1/1000 of those reached only by identified peaks at the 1st step. Good correlations between the i-RUBY results and the amount of proteins were confirmed by the analysis of real samples, i.e., sera of normal subjects and cancer patients, by comparing quantitative values of acute-phase proteins obtained by i-RUBY analysis of LC/MS/MS data with those obtained by an immunological method using Bio-Plex. These results taken together show that i-RUBY is a useful tool for obtaining dependable quantitative information from highly accurate shotgun-proteomics LC/MS/MS data. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Dynamic Proteomics: In Vivo Proteome-Wide Measurement of Protein Kinetics Using Metabolic Labeling.

    PubMed

    Holmes, W E; Angel, T E; Li, K W; Hellerstein, M K

    2015-01-01

    Control of biosynthetic and catabolic rates of polymers, including proteins, stands at the center of phenotype, physiologic adaptation, and disease pathogenesis. Advances in stable isotope-labeling concepts and mass spectrometric instrumentation now allow accurate in vivo measurement of protein synthesis and turnover rates, both for targeted proteins and for unbiased screening across the proteome. We describe here the underlying principles and operational protocols for measuring protein dynamics, focusing on metabolic labeling with (2)H2O (heavy water) combined with tandem mass spectrometric analysis of mass isotopomer abundances in trypsin-generated peptides. The core principles of combinatorial analysis (mass isotopomer distribution analysis or MIDA) are reviewed in detail, including practical advantages, limitations, and technical procedures to ensure optimal kinetic results. Technical factors include heavy water labeling protocols, optimal duration of labeling, clean up and simplification of sample matrices, accurate quantitation of mass isotopomer abundances in peptides, criteria for adequacy of mass spectrometric abundance measurements, and calculation algorithms. Some applications are described, including the noninvasive "virtual biopsy" strategy for measuring molecular flux rates in tissues through measurements in body fluids. In addition, application of heavy water labeling to measure flux lipidomics is noted. In summary, the combination of stable isotope labeling, particularly from (2)H2O, with tandem mass spectrometric analysis of mass isotopomer abundances in peptides, provides a powerful approach for characterizing the dynamics of proteins across the global proteome. Many applications in research and clinical medicine have been achieved and many others can be envisioned. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  17. Nutrition Marketing on Food Labels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colby, Sarah E.; Johnson, LuAnn; Scheett, Angela; Hoverson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This research sought to determine how often nutrition marketing is used on labels of foods that are high in saturated fat, sodium, and/or sugar. Design and Setting: All items packaged with food labels (N = 56,900) in all 6 grocery stores in Grand Forks, ND were surveyed. Main Outcome Measure(s): Marketing strategy, nutrient label…

  18. Health claims on food labels.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, L

    1994-03-01

    Food and drug law requires that the ingredients in most foods be disclosed on their labels, but until recently there was no requirement that nutrition information be provided. The Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 (NLEA), passed on November 8, 1990, mandated the Food and Drug Administration to establish regulations requiring most foods to have a uniform nutrition label showing the amount of calories, calories from fat, total fat, saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, total carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, sugars, fiber, protein, and sodium. The Act also establishes the circumstances under which content claims and disease claims may be made about nutrients in food. This paper briefly discusses recent changes in the food label brought about by the NLEA and focuses on health claims on food labels.

  19. Synthesis of deuterium-labelled isotopomer of deferasirox.

    PubMed

    Havaldar, Freddy H; Dabholkar, Bhushan Vasant; Mule, Ganesh Baban; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2015-04-01

    A d4 -labeled isotopomer of deferasirox was synthesized as internal standard for use in a LC/mass spectroscopy (MS)/MS method developed for the simultaneous quantitative determination of deferasirox in human serum. d4 -deferasirox was synthesized from d8 -toluene. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium content...

  1. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium content...

  2. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium content...

  3. 16 CFR 1633.12 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Standard shall bear a permanent, conspicuous, and legible label(s) containing the following... with black text. The label text shall comply with the following format requirements: (1) All... as needed for varying information. The label must be white with black text. The label shall contain...

  4. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of...

  5. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of...

  6. 21 CFR 201.64 - Sodium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... contains sodium bicarbonate, sodium phosphate, or sodium biphosphate as an active ingredient for oral... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium labeling. 201.64 Section 201.64 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.64 Sodium labeling. (a) The labeling of...

  7. 21 CFR 201.72 - Potassium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium labeling. 201.72 Section 201.72 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.72 Potassium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the potassium...

  8. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium content...

  9. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium content...

  10. 21 CFR 201.71 - Magnesium labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Magnesium labeling. 201.71 Section 201.71 Food and... LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Drugs § 201.71 Magnesium labeling. (a) The labeling of over-the-counter (OTC) drug products intended for oral ingestion shall contain the magnesium content...

  11. Isotopic labeling of milk disialogangliosides (GD3).

    PubMed

    Reis, Mariza Gomes; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; McJarrow, Paul; MacGibbon, Alastair; Fong, Bertram; Bassett, Shalome; Roy, Nicole; Dos Reis, Marlon Martins

    2016-10-01

    The most abundant ganglioside group in both human milk and bovine milk during the first postnatal week is ganglioside GD3. This group of disialogangliosides forms up to 80% of the total ganglioside content of colostrum. Although dietary gangliosides have shown biological activity such as improvement of cognitive development, gastrointestinal health, and immune function, there is still a gap in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing its uptake and the metabolic processes affecting its bioavailability. The use of isotopically labeled ganglioside to track the bioavailability, absorption, distribution, and metabolism of gangliosides may provide key information to bridge this gap. However, isotope labeled GD3 is not commercially available and its preparation has not been described. We report for the first time the preparation of labeled GD3 with stable isotopes. Using alkaline hydrolysis, we were able to selectively remove both acetyl groups from the tetrasaccharide portion of GD3 without promoting significant hydrolysis of the ceramide portion of the molecule to generate N-deacetyl-GD3 (Neu5α2-8Neu5-GD3). The N-deacetyl-GD3 was then chemoselectively re-acetylated in aqueous medium using deuterated acetic anhydride in the presence of Triton X 100 to produce (2)H6-GD3 {GD3[(Neu5Ac-11-(2)H3)-(Neu5Ac-11-(2)H3)]}. This method provided (2)H6-GD3 with approximately 60% yield. This compound was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The oral absorption of the (2)H6-GD3 was demonstrated using a Sprague-Dawley weaning rats. Our results indicate that some ingested labeled milk gangliosides are absorbed and transported into the bloodstream without modification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Isotopic Labeling of Red Cabbage Anthocyanins with Atmospheric 13-CO2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Isotopic labeling of plants provides a unique opportunity for understanding metabolic processes. A significant challenge of isotopic labeling during plant growth is that isotopes must be administered without disrupting plant development and at sufficient levels for mass spectral analysis. We describ...

  13. Measurement of deuterium-labeled phylloquinone in plasma by LC-APCI-MS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Deuterium-labeled vegetables were fed to humans for the measurement of both unlabeled and deuterium-labeled phylloquinone in plasma. We developed a technique to determine the quantities of these compounds using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (LC...

  14. Labeled Cocaine Analogs

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Zhi; Keil, Robert N.

    1999-01-26

    Novel compounds having the structure: ##STR1## where X in .beta. configuration is phenyl, naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-iodophenyl; 2,3 or 4-(trimethylsilyl)phenyl; 3,4,5 or 6-iodonaphthyl; 3,4,5 or 6-(trimethylsilyl)naphthyl; 2,3 or 4-(trialkylstannyl)phenyl; or 3,4,5 or 6-(trialkylstannyl)naphthyl Y in .beta. configuration is Y.sub.1 or Y.sub.2, where Y.sub.1 is 2-fluoroethoxy, 3-fluoropropoxy, 4-fluorobutoxy, 2-fluorocyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-fluorocyclobutoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, R 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, S 1'-fluoroisopropoxy, 1',3'-difluoroisopropoxy, R,S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 1'-fluoroisobutoxy, R,S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, R 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, S 4'-fluoroisobutoxy, or 1',1'-di(fluoromethyl)isobutoxy, and Y.sub.2 is 2-methanesulfonyloxy ethoxy, 3-methanesulfonyloxy propoxy, 4-methanesulfonyloxy butoxy, 2-methanesulfonyloxy cyclopropoxy, 2 or 3-methanesulfonyloxy cyclobutoxy, 1'methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-fluoro, 3'-methanesulfonyloxy isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy, 3'-fluoro isopropoxy, 1'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy, or 4'-methanesulfonyloxy isobutoxy bind dopamine transporter protein and can be labeled with .sup.18 F or .sup.123 I for imaging.

  15. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  16. Imaging Mass Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Qing; Ornatsky, Olga I; Siddiqui, Iram; Loboda, Alexander; Baranov, Vladimir I; Hedley, David W

    2017-02-01

    Imaging Mass Cytometry (IMC) is an expansion of mass cytometry, but rather than analyzing single cells in suspension, it uses laser ablation to generate plumes of particles that are carried to the mass cytometer by a stream of inert gas. Images reconstructed from tissue sections scanned by IMC have a resolution comparable to light microscopy, with the high content of mass cytometry enabled through the use of isotopically labeled probes and ICP-MS detection. Importantly, IMC can be performed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections, so can be applied to the retrospective analysis of patient cohorts whose outcome is known, and eventually to personalized medicine. Since the original description in 2014, IMC has evolved rapidly into a commercial instrument of unprecedented power for the analysis of histological sections. In this Review, we discuss the underlying principles of this new technology, and outline emerging applications of IMC in the analysis of normal and pathological tissues. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. Algorithms for Labeling Focus Regions.

    PubMed

    Fink, M; Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Schulz, A; Spoerhase, J; Wolff, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of labeling point sites in focus regions of maps or diagrams. This problem occurs, for example, when the user of a mapping service wants to see the names of restaurants or other POIs in a crowded downtown area but keep the overview over a larger area. Our approach is to place the labels at the boundary of the focus region and connect each site with its label by a linear connection, which is called a leader. In this way, we move labels from the focus region to the less valuable context region surrounding it. In order to make the leader layout well readable, we present algorithms that rule out crossings between leaders and optimize other characteristics such as total leader length and distance between labels. This yields a new variant of the boundary labeling problem, which has been studied in the literature. Other than in traditional boundary labeling, where leaders are usually schematized polylines, we focus on leaders that are either straight-line segments or Bezier curves. Further, we present algorithms that, given the sites, find a position of the focus region that optimizes the above characteristics. We also consider a variant of the problem where we have more sites than space for labels. In this situation, we assume that the sites are prioritized by the user. Alternatively, we take a new facility-location perspective which yields a clustering of the sites. We label one representative of each cluster. If the user wishes, we apply our approach to the sites within a cluster, giving details on demand.

  18. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 5

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  19. 76 FR 75809 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Protection Reference Center was launched as a Web page in February 1999. The Web page includes a PowerPoint presentation titled ``Labeling 101,'' which is used by the Agency as a teaching tool at workshops on meat and...

  20. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 2

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  1. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 9

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  2. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 8

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human he

  3. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 6

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Page 6, Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment

  4. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 4

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  5. Label Review Training: Module 1: Label Basics, Page 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  6. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  7. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  8. 21 CFR 331.80 - Professional labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN USE ANTACID PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER (OTC) HUMAN USE Labeling § 331.80 Professional labeling..., muscle weakness, and osteomalacia. (b) Professional labeling for an antacid-antiflatulent combination...

  9. Mobile Application for Pesticide Label Matching

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The label matching application will give inspectors the ability to instantly compare pesticide product labels against state and federal label databases via their cell phone, tablet or other mobile device.

  10. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  11. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  12. 40 CFR 94.212 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shall be of a color that contrasts with the background of the label: (1) The label heading: Marine...) to be designated as Blue Sky Series engines must contain the statement on the label: “Blue Sky...

  13. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  14. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  15. 49 CFR 172.442 - CORROSIVE label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.442 CORROSIVE label. (a) Except for size and color, the CORROSIVE label...

  16. Soil Fumigant Labels - Dimethyl Disulfide (DMDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Search by EPA registration number, product name, or company and follow the link to the Pesticide Product Labeling System (PPLS) for label details. Updated labels include new safety requirements for buffer zones and related measures.

  17. 21 CFR 1302.04 - Location and size of symbol on label and labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Location and size of symbol on label and labeling... AND PACKAGING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES § 1302.04 Location and size of symbol on label and labeling. The symbol shall be prominently located on the label or the labeling of the commercial...

  18. 78 FR 24211 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Safety Considerations for Container Labels and Carton Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... Container Labels and Carton Labeling Design To Minimize Medication Errors; Availability AGENCY: Food and... Labels and Carton Labeling Design to Minimize Medication Errors.'' The draft guidance focuses on safety aspects of the container label and carton labeling design for prescription drug and biological products...

  19. SU-E-I-14: Comparison of Iodine-Labeled and Indium-Labeled Antibody Biodistributions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is often assumed that animal biodistributions of novel proteins are not dependent upon the radiolabel used in their determination. In units of percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), organ uptake results (u) may be obtained using either iodine or metal as radioactive labels. Iodination is preferred as it is a one-step process whereas metal labeling requires two chemical procedures and therefore more protein material. It is important to test whether the radioactive tag leads to variation in the uptake value. Methods: Uptakes of 3antibodies to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) were evaluated in a nude mouse model bearing 150 to 300 mg LS174T human colon cancer xenografts. Antibodies included diabody (56 kDa), minibody (80kDa) and intact M5A (150 kDa) anti-CEA cognates. Both radioiodine and indium-111 labels were used with uptakes evaluated at 7 time(t) points out to 96 h. Ratios (R) of u(iodine-label)/u(indium-label) were determined for liver, spleen, kidneys, lung and tumor. Results: Hepatic loss was rapid for diabody and minibody; by 24 h their R values were only 2%; i.e., uptake of iodine was 2% of that of indium for these 2 antibodies. By contrast, R for the intact cognate was 50% at that time point. Splenic results were similar. Tumor uptake ratios did not depend upon the antibody type and were 50% at 24 h. Conclusions: Relatively rapid loss of iodine relative to indium in liver and spleen was observed in lower mass antibodies. Tumor ratios were larger and independent of antibody type. Aside from tumor, the R ratio of uptakes depended on the antibody type. R values decreased monotonically with time in all tissues and for all cognates. Using this ratio, one can possibly correct iodine-based u (t) results so that they resemble radiometal-derived biodistributions.

  20. The Murat Labels: A Good Answer to IM Policies - The Example of the French Doctrine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    the real reaction likely to occur during operational life. - concerning the rocket motors, some kind of propellants have led to detonation by a XDT ...MURAT ** label for which only the shaped charge jet impact stimuli produce a detonation . The risk of a mass detonation is excluded. - The MURAT * label...for which the mass detonation by sympathetic reaction is excluded but does not exclude single items detonating following impacts by fragments or

  1. Approximation Algorithms for Free-Label Maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Berg, Mark; Gerrits, Dirk H. P.

    Inspired by air traffic control and other applications where moving objects have to be labeled, we consider the following (static) point labeling problem: given a set P of n points in the plane and labels that are unit squares, place a label with each point in P in such a way that the number of free labels (labels not intersecting any other label) is maximized. We develop efficient constant-factor approximation algorithms for this problem, as well as PTASs, for various label-placement models.

  2. Origin of acetaldehyde during milk fermentation using (13)C-labeled precursors.

    PubMed

    Ott, A; Germond, J E; Chaintreau, A

    2000-05-01

    Acetaldehyde formation by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus during fermentation of cow's milk was investigated using (13)C-labeled glucose, L-threonine, and pyruvate with a recent static-and-trapped-headspace technique that does not require derivatization of acetaldehyde prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Over 90% and almost 100% of acetaldehyde originated from glucose during fermentation by L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, respectively, taking into account both singly and doubly labeled acetaldehyde. As both microorganisms showed threonine aldolase activity and formed labeled acetaldehyde from (13)C-labeled threonine during the fermentation of milk, this amino acid should also contribute to the acetaldehyde produced.

  3. New Labeling for Neonicotinoid Pesticides

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These documents, a graphic of the bee advisory box and letters to pesticide registrants, describe steps by EPA to change pesticide labels to better protect pollinators by being clearer and more precise in their directions for pesticide application.

  4. Locating the Vehicle Emissions Label

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA vehicle emissions label is entitled Vehicle Emission Control Information and contains the name and trademark of the manufacturer and an unconditional statement of compliance with EPA emission regulations.

  5. How to Read Drug Labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Healthy Aging > Drugs and alternative medicine Healthy Aging How to read drug labels Printer-friendly version ... html Connect with other organizations National Institute on Aging, NIH, HHS http://www.nia.nih.gov/ U.S. ...

  6. Meat and Poultry Labeling Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service and the Agriculture Marketing Service have officially evaluated a meat product for ... refer to these factsheets from the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service: Organic Food Standards and Labels: The Facts ...

  7. "Off-Label" Drug Use

    MedlinePlus

    ... for a single ailment. This is simply the nature of both drug devel- opment and clinical medicine. ... off-label use of cancer drugs. Given the nature of cancer and cancer drugs, this approach sounds ...

  8. Relaxation labeling using modular operators

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.S.; Frei, W.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic relaxation labeling has been shown to be useful in image processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. The approaches taken to date have been encumbered with computationally extensive summations which generally prevent real-time operation and/or easy hardware implementation. The authors present a new and unique approach to the relaxation labeling problem using modular, VLSI-oriented hierarchical complex operators. One of the fundamental concepts of this work is the representation of the probability distribution of the possible labels for a given object (pixel) as an ellipse, which may be summed with neighboring object's distribution ellipses, resulting in a new, relaxed label space. The mathematical development of the elliptical approach will be presented and compared to more classical approaches, and a hardware block diagram that shows the implementation of the relaxation scheme using vlsi chips will be presented. Finally, results will be shown which illustrate applications of the modular scheme, iteratively, to both edges and lines. 13 references.

  9. Photonic crystal microring resonator for label-free biosensing.

    PubMed

    Lo, Stanley M; Hu, Shuren; Gaur, Girija; Kostoulas, Yiorgos; Weiss, Sharon M; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2017-03-20

    A label-free optical biosensor based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal microring resonator with enhanced light-matter interaction is demonstrated. More than a 2-fold improvement in volumetric and surface sensing sensitivity is achieved compared to conventional microring sensors. The experimental bulk detection sensitivity is ~248nm/RIU and label-free detection of DNA and proteins is reported at the nanomolar scale. With a minimum feature size greater than 100nm, the photonic crystal microring resonator biosensor can be fabricated with the same standard lithographic techniques used to mass fabricate conventional microring resonators.

  10. Label-Free Receptor Assays

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ye

    2010-01-01

    Label-free biosensors offer integrated, kinetic and multi-parametric measures of receptor biology and ligand pharmacology in whole cells. Being highly sensitive and pathway-unbiased, label-free receptor assays can be used to probe the systems cell biology including pleiotropic signaling of receptors, and to characterize the functional selectivity and phenotypic pharmacology of ligand molecules. These assays provide a new dimension for elucidating receptor biology and for facilitating drug discovery. PMID:21221420

  11. Label-Free Receptor Assays.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    Label-free biosensors offer integrated, kinetic and multi-parametric measures of receptor biology and ligand pharmacology in whole cells. Being highly sensitive and pathway-unbiased, label-free receptor assays can be used to probe the systems cell biology including pleiotropic signaling of receptors, and to characterize the functional selectivity and phenotypic pharmacology of ligand molecules. These assays provide a new dimension for elucidating receptor biology and for facilitating drug discovery.

  12. Electrothermal branding for embryo labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Beebe, D J; Williams, A R; Easley, K D

    1997-11-01

    A novel embryo labeling technique based on electrothermal branding is developed. Two types of micro branding irons are fabricated and tested. One utilizes 25 microns tungsten wire as the heating element. The other utilizes surface micromachining techniques to fabricate polysilicon branding irons. The thermal behavior of the branding irons and the heat distributions in the embryos are analytically modeled. Micron-scale labels on unfertilized bovine embryos are achieved.

  13. Availability of Spanish prescription labels.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Iman; Lo, Sarah; Ozuah, Philip O

    2006-02-01

    The research team conducted a cross-sectional telephone survey of all pharmacies in the Bronx, New York (99.4% participation rate) to determine availability of Spanish prescription labels. One hundred twenty five pharmacies (78%) were small independent pharmacies; 36 (22%) were large-chain pharmacies. Overall, 111 (69%) stated that they could provide prescription labels in Spanish. Overall, for all the pharmacy ZIP codes, the mean proportion of the population that was Spanish-speaking was 46.8% (range 11% to 71.6%). Seventy-eight (48%) pharmacies were located in areas where more than 50% of the population were Spanish-speaking, 48 (30%) were located in areas with 25.1-50% Spanish-speakers, and 35 (22%) were in areas with up to 25% Spanish-speakers. Small independent pharmacies were more likely than large chain pharmacies to provide prescription labels in Spanish (71% vs. 61%, p=0.25). All the pharmacists commented that a patient must specifically request a Spanish prescription label in order to receive one. Pharmacies located in areas with the highest proportion of Spanish speakers were more likely to provide prescription labels in Spanish (82% vs. 62% vs. 49%; p=.001). Of the 111 pharmacies that could provide Spanish labels, 95 (86%) used a computer program to perform the translation and 16(14%) used a lay employee. Of pharmacies using a computer program, only one had a Spanish-speaking pharmacist who could check and correct the computer translations.

  14. Molecular and mass spectroscopic analysis of isotopically labeled organic residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza-Gomez, Celia X.; Greenberg, J. Mayo; Mccain, P.; Ferris, J. P.; Briggs, R.; Degroot, M. S.; Schutte, Willem A.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental studies aimed at understanding the evolution of complex organic molecules on interstellar grains were performed. The photolysis of frozen gas mixtures of various compositions containing H2O, CO, NH3, and CH4 was studied. These species were chosen because of their astrophysical importance as deducted from observational as well as theoretical studies of ice mantles on interstellar grains. These ultraviolet photolyzed ices were warmed up in order to produce refractory organic molecules like the ones formed in molecular clouds when the icy mantles are being irradiated and warmed up either by a nearby stellar source or impulsive heating. The laboratory studies give estimates of the efficiency of production of such organic material under interstellar conditions. It is shown that the gradual carbonization of organic mantles in the diffuse cloud phase leads to higher and higher visual absorptivity - yellow residues become brown in the laboratory. The obtained results can be applied to explaining the organic components of comets and their relevance to the origin of life.

  15. The impact of nutritional labels and socioeconomic status on energy intake. An experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Rachel A; Jebb, Susan A; Hankins, Matthew; Marteau, Theresa M

    2014-10-01

    There is some evidence for paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake particularly amongst restrained eaters and those with a higher body mass index (BMI) resulting in greater consumption of energy from foods with a positive health message (e.g. "low-fat") compared with the same foods, unlabelled. This study aimed to investigate, in a UK general population sample, the likelihood of paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake. Participants (n = 287) attended a London cinema and were offered a large tub of salted or toffee popcorn. Participants were randomised to receive their selected flavour with one of three labels: a green low-fat label, a red high-fat label or no label. Participants watched two film clips while completing measures of demographic characteristics, emotional state and taste of the popcorn. Following the experiment, popcorn consumption was measured. There were no main effects of nutritional labelling on consumption. Contrary to predictions neither BMI nor weight concern moderated the effect of label on consumption. There was a three-way interaction between low-fat label, weight concern and socioeconomic status (SES) such that weight-concerned participants of higher SES who saw a low-fat label consumed more than weight unconcerned participants of similar SES (t = -2.7, P = .04). By contrast, weight-concerned participants of lower SES seeing either type of label, consumed less than those seeing no label (t = -2.04, P = .04). Nutritional labelling may have different effects in different socioeconomic groups. Further studies are required to understand fully the possible contribution of food labelling to health inequalities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parallel Reaction Monitoring: A Targeted Experiment Performed Using High Resolution and High Mass Accuracy Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Rauniyar, Navin

    2015-01-01

    The parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assay has emerged as an alternative method of targeted quantification. The PRM assay is performed in a high resolution and high mass accuracy mode on a mass spectrometer. This review presents the features that make PRM a highly specific and selective method for targeted quantification using quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid instruments. In addition, this review discusses the label-based and label-free methods of quantification that can be performed with the targeted approach. PMID:26633379

  17. Isobaric Labeling-Based Relative Quantification in Shotgun Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays a key role in relative quantitative comparisons of proteins in order to understand their functional role in biological systems upon perturbation. In this review, we review studies that examine different aspects of isobaric labeling-based relative quantification for shotgun proteomic analysis. In particular, we focus on different types of isobaric reagents and their reaction chemistry (e.g., amine-, carbonyl-, and sulfhydryl-reactive). Various factors, such as ratio compression, reporter ion dynamic range, and others, cause an underestimation of changes in relative abundance of proteins across samples, undermining the ability of the isobaric labeling approach to be truly quantitative. These factors that affect quantification and the suggested combinations of experimental design and optimal data acquisition methods to increase the precision and accuracy of the measurements will be discussed. Finally, the extended application of isobaric labeling-based approach in hyperplexing strategy, targeted quantification, and phosphopeptide analysis are also examined. PMID:25337643

  18. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  19. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  20. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  1. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  2. 40 CFR 211.104 - Label content.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Label content. 211.104 Section 211.104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.104 Label content. The following data and information must be on the label of all products for...

  3. 7 CFR 70.45 - Misleading labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Misleading labeling. 70.45 Section 70.45 Agriculture... Misleading labeling. The use of the terms “Government Graded” and “Federal-State Graded” or terms of similar import in the labeling or advertising of any product without stating in the labeling or advertisement the...

  4. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  5. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  6. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  7. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  8. 21 CFR 225.180 - Labeling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling. 225.180 Section 225.180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS Labeling § 225.180 Labeling. Labels shall...

  9. 78 FR 2200 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-10

    ... CFR Part 305 RIN 3084-AB15 Energy Labeling Rule AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission..., clarifying testing requirements and enforcement provisions, improving online energy label disclosures, and.... Appliance Labeling Rule The Commission issued the Appliance Labeling Rule pursuant to the Energy Policy...

  10. How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label

    MedlinePlus

    ... Games, and the Internet How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) KidsHealth > For Parents > How to Read a Nutrition Facts Label (Video) Print A A A en ... nutricionales (video) Most packaged foods come with a Nutrition Facts label. These labels have a lot of ...

  11. 40 CFR 211.108 - Sample label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample label. 211.108 Section 211.108 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS PRODUCT NOISE LABELING General Provisions § 211.108 Sample label. Examples of labels conforming to the requirements...

  12. 21 CFR 610.60 - Container label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Container label. 610.60 Section 610.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Labeling Standards § 610.60 Container label. (a) Full label. The...

  13. Quantification of active infliximab in human serum with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a tumor necrosis factor alpha -based pre-analytical sample purification and a stable isotopic labeled infliximab bio-similar as internal standard: A target-based, sensitive and cost-effective method.

    PubMed

    El Amrani, Mohsin; van den Broek, Marcel P H; Göbel, Camiel; van Maarseveen, Erik M

    2016-07-08

    The therapeutic monoclonal antibody Infliximab (IFX) is a widely used drug for the treatment of several inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, approximately 10% of patients develop anti-infliximab antibodies (ATIs) rendering the treatment ineffective. Early detection of underexposure to unbound IFX would result in a timely switch of therapy which could aid in the treatment of this disease. Streptavidin coated 96 well plates were used to capture biotinylated-tumor necrosis factor -alpha (b-TNF-α), which in turn was used to selectively extract the active form of IFX in human serum. After elution, IFX was digested using trypsin and one signature peptide was selected for subsequent analysis on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The internal standard used was a stable isotopic labeled IFX bio-similar. The assay was successfully validated according to European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines and was found to be linear in a range of 0.5-20μg/mL (r(2)=0.994). Lower limit of quantification for the assay (<20% CV) was 0.5μg/mL, requiring only 2μL of sample. Cross-validation against enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) resulted in a high correlation between methods (r(2)=0.95 with a ρc=0.83) and the accuracy was in line with previously published results. In conclusion, a sensitive, robust and cost-effective method was developed for the bio-analysis of IFX with LC-MS/MS by means of a target-based pre-analytical sample purification. Moreover, low volume and costs of consumables per sample promote its feasibility in (pre)clinical studies and in therapeutic drug monitoring. This method should be considered as first choice due to its accuracy and multiple degree of selectivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Systematic investigation of ion suppression and enhancement effects of fourteen stable-isotope-labeled internal standards by their native analogues using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization and the relevance for multi-analyte liquid chromatographic/mass spectrometric procedures.

    PubMed

    Remane, Daniela; Wissenbach, Dirk K; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2010-04-15

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, multi-analyte procedures are very useful to quantify drugs and poisons of different classes in one run. For liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS) multi-analyte procedures, often only a limited number of stable-isotope-labeled internal standards (SIL-ISs) are available. If an SIL-IS is used for quantification of other analytes, it must be excluded that the co-eluting native analyte influences its ionization. Therefore, the effect of ion suppression and enhancement of fourteen SIL-ISs caused by their native analogues has been studied. It could be shown that the native analyte concentration influenced the extent of ion suppression and enhancement effects leading to more suppression with increasing analyte concentration especially when electrospray ionization (ESI) was used. Using atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI), methanolic solution showed mainly enhancement effects, whereas no ion suppression and enhancement effect, with one exception, occurred when plasma extracts were used under these conditions. Such differences were not observed using ESI. With ESI, eleven SIL-ISs showed relevant suppression effects, but only one analyte showed suppression effects when APCI was used. The presented study showed that ion suppression and enhancement tests using matrix-based samples of different sources are essential for the selection of ISs, particularly if used for several analytes to avoid incorrect quantification. In conclusion, only SIL-ISs should be selected for which no suppression and enhancement effects can be observed. If not enough ISs are free of ionization interferences, a different ionization technique should be considered.

  15. Proteome Analysis using Selective Incorporation of Isotopically Labeled Amino Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Veenstra, Timothy D.; Martinovic, Suzana; Anderson, Gordon A.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Smith, Richard D.

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for identifying intact proteins from genomic databases using a combination of accurate molecular mass measurements and partial amino acid content. An initial demonstration was conducted for proteins isolated from Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a multiple auxotrophic strain of K12. Proteins were extracted from the organism grown in natural isotopic abundance minimal medium and also minimal medium containing isotopically labeled leucine (Leu-D10), were mixed and analyzed by capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR). The incorporation of the isotopically labeled Leu residue has no effect on the CIEF separation of the protein, therefore both versions of the protein are observed within the same FTICR spectrum. The difference in the molecular mass of the natural isotopic abundance and Leu-D10 isotopically labeled proteins is used to determine the number of Leu residues present in that particular protein. Knowledge of the molecular mass and number of Leu residues present can be used to unambiguously identify the intact protein. Preliminary results show the efficacy of using this method to unambiguously identify proteins isolated from E. coli.

  16. Protein Quantitation of the Developing Cochlea Using Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Darville, Lancia N F; Sokolowski, Bernd H A

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics allows for the measurement of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a biological system. Additionally, mass spectrometry can also be used to quantify proteins and peptides. However, observing quantitative differences between biological systems using mass spectrometry-based proteomics can be challenging because it is critical to have a method that is fast, reproducible, and accurate. Therefore, to study differential protein expression in biological samples labeling or label-free quantitative methods can be used. Labeling methods have been widely used in quantitative proteomics, however label-free methods have become equally as popular and more preferred because they produce faster, cleaner, and simpler results. Here, we describe the methods by which proteins are isolated and identified from cochlear sensory epithelia tissues at different ages and quantitatively differentiated using label-free mass spectrometry.

  17. 75 FR 41696 - Appliance Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ...Section 321 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires the Commission to consider the effectiveness of current labeling requirements for lamps (commonly referred to as light bulbs) and alternative labeling approaches. After holding a public meeting, conducting consumer research, issuing proposed changes to existing labeling requirements, and reviewing public comments, the Commission announces final amendments to the lamp labeling requirements in the Appliance Labeling Rule. The Commission also seeks further comment on several issues for consideration in any subsequent rulemaking.

  18. Nutrition Labeling Using a Computer Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Lloyd E.

    The 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act mandated nutritional labeling of most foods. As a result, a large portion of food analysis is performed for nutritional labeling purposes. A food labeling guide and links to the complete nutritional labeling regulations are available online at http://vm.cfsan.fda.gov/˜dms/flg-toc.html. However, interpretation of these regulations and the appropriate usage of rounding rules, available nutrient content claims, reference amounts, and serving size can be difficult.

  19. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  20. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  1. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  2. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  3. 49 CFR 172.430 - POISON label.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false POISON label. 172.430 Section 172.430... SECURITY PLANS Labeling § 172.430 POISON label. (a) Except for size and color, the POISON label must be as follows: EC02MR91.029 (b) In addition to complying with § 172.407, the background on the POISON label...

  4. Label-free functional selectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, Ann M; Goral, Vasiliy; Wang, Chaoming; Fang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of drug targets. Ligand-directed functional selectivity or biased agonism opens new possibility for discovering GPCR drugs with better efficacy and safety profiles. However, quantification of ligand bias is challenging. Herein, we present five different label-free dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) approaches to assess ligand bias acting at the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). Multiparametric analysis of the DMR agonist profiles reveals divergent pharmacology of a panel of β2AR agonists. DMR profiling using catechol as a conformational probe detects the presence of multiple conformations of the β2AR. DMR assays under microfluidics, together with chemical biology tools, discover ligand-directed desensitization of the receptor. DMR antagonist reverse assays manifest biased antagonism. DMR profiling using distinct probe-modulated cells detects the biased agonism in the context of self-referenced pharmacological activity map.

  5. 76 FR 19237 - Food Labeling; Calorie Labeling of Articles of Food in Vending Machines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... 11 and 101 Food Labeling; Calorie Labeling of Articles of Food in Vending Machines; Proposed Rule #0... Labeling; Calorie Labeling of Articles of Food in Vending Machines AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: To implement the vending machine labeling provisions of the...

  6. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  7. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  8. Metrics for Labeled Markov Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desharnais, Josee; Jagadeesan, Radha; Gupta, Vineet; Panangaden, Prakash

    1999-01-01

    Partial Labeled Markov Chains are simultaneously generalizations of process algebra and of traditional Markov chains. They provide a foundation for interacting discrete probabilistic systems, the interaction being synchronization on labels as in process algebra. Existing notions of process equivalence are too sensitive to the exact probabilities of various transitions. This paper addresses contextual reasoning principles for reasoning about more robust notions of "approximate" equivalence between concurrent interacting probabilistic systems. The present results indicate that:We develop a family of metrics between partial labeled Markov chains to formalize the notion of distance between processes. We show that processes at distance zero are bisimilar. We describe a decision procedure to compute the distance between two processes. We show that reasoning about approximate equivalence can be done compositionally by showing that process combinators do not increase distance. We introduce an asymptotic metric to capture asymptotic properties of Markov chains; and show that parallel composition does not increase asymptotic distance.

  9. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  10. Learning With Auxiliary Less-Noisy Labels.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yunyan; Wu, Ou

    2016-04-06

    Obtaining a sufficient number of accurate labels to form a training set for learning a classifier can be difficult due to the limited access to reliable label resources. Instead, in real-world applications, less-accurate labels, such as labels from nonexpert labelers, are often used. However, learning with less-accurate labels can lead to serious performance deterioration because of the high noise rate. Although several learning methods (e.g., noise-tolerant classifiers) have been advanced to increase classification performance in the presence of label noise, only a few of them take the noise rate into account and utilize both noisy but easily accessible labels and less-noisy labels, a small amount of which can be obtained with an acceptable added time cost and expense. In this brief, we propose a learning method, in which not only noisy labels but also auxiliary less-noisy labels, which are available in a small portion of the training data, are taken into account. Based on a flipping probability noise model and a logistic regression classifier, this method estimates the noise rate parameters, infers ground-truth labels, and learns the classifier simultaneously in a maximum likelihood manner. The proposed method yields three learning algorithms, which correspond to three prior knowledge states regarding the less-noisy labels. The experiments show that the proposed method is tolerant to label noise, and outperforms classifiers that do not explicitly consider the auxiliary less-noisy labels.

  11. Labeling Feral Spruce Budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Populations With Rubidium.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Wayne; Eveleigh, Eldon; Silk, Peter; Forbes, Glen

    2016-04-01

    Rubidium (Rb) is a trace element that occurs naturally in low concentrations and is easily absorbed by plants, making it a useful tool for labeling insect defoliators, such as spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens). Balsam fir trees (Abies balsamea (L.) Miller) injected with either 8 or 16 g per tree of rubidium chloride (RbCl) showed quick uptake and distribution throughout the crown, with no negative effects on tree shoot growth or spruce budworm survival and development. Adult spruce budworm that fed as larvae on trees injected with RbCl were clearly labeled, with significantly higher Rb concentrations than the background levels found in adults that fed as larvae on control trees. Rb concentrations in feral spruce budworm adults for both the 8 g (9 µg/g) and 16 g (25 µg/g) per tree treatments were at least five times lower than those in laboratory-reared adults on 1,000 µg/g RbCl diet (125 µg/g); survival, development, pupal weight, sex ratio, and mating status of spruce budworm were not adversely affected by Rb treatment. Egg masses laid by feral females that fed as larvae on Rb-labeled trees were also labeled with Rb. Injecting trees with RbCl is a viable technique for labeling feral spruce budworm populations to help distinguish local populations from immigrants to better evaluate the success of early intervention strategies such as mating disruption. © Crown copyright 2016.

  12. 78 FR 66826 - Prior Label Approval System: Generic Label Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... product as ``organic'' or containing organic ingredients; (3) claims that are undefined in FSIS... labeling errors resulted from production mistakes, such as packaging the product in the wrong box. More... poultry products inspection regulations to expand the circumstances in which FSIS will generically...

  13. Scrotal Masses

    MedlinePlus

    Scrotal masses Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Scrotal masses are abnormalities in the bag of skin hanging behind the ... and transport sperm and male sex hormones. Scrotal masses might be an accumulation of fluids, the growth ...

  14. Food labeling: gluten-free labeling of foods. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-08-05

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule to define the term "gluten-free'' for voluntary use in the labeling of foods. The final rule defines the term "gluten-free'' to mean that the food bearing the claim does not contain an ingredient that is a gluten-containing grain (e.g., spelt wheat); an ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and that has not been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat flour); or an ingredient that is derived from a gluten-containing grain and that has been processed to remove gluten (e.g., wheat starch), if the use of that ingredient results in the presence of 20 parts per million (ppm) or more gluten in the food (i.e., 20 milligrams (mg) or more gluten per kilogram (kg) of food); or inherently does not contain gluten; and that any unavoidable presence of gluten in the food is below 20 ppm gluten (i.e., below 20 mg gluten per kg of food). A food that bears the claim "no gluten,'' "free of gluten,'' or "without gluten'' in its labeling and fails to meet the requirements for a "gluten-free'' claim will be deemed to be misbranded. In addition, a food whose labeling includes the term "wheat'' in the ingredient list or in a separate "Contains wheat'' statement as required by a section of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act) and also bears the claim "gluten-free'' will be deemed to be misbranded unless its labeling also bears additional language clarifying that the wheat has been processed to allow the food to meet FDA requirements for a "gluten-free'' claim. Establishing a definition of the term "gluten-free'' and uniform conditions for its use in food labeling will help ensure that individuals with celiac disease are not misled and are provided with truthful and accurate information with respect to foods so labeled. We are issuing the final rule under the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA).

  15. A New Component Labelling And Merging Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lochovsky, Amelia F.

    1987-10-01

    Component labelling is an important part of region analysis in image processing. Component labelling consists of assigning labels to pixels in the image such that adjacent pixels are given the same labels. There are various approaches to component labelling. Some require random access to the processed image; some assume special structure of the image such as a quad tree. Algorithms based on sequential scan of the image are attractive to hardware implementation. One method of labelling is based on a fixed size local window which includes the previous line. Due to the fixed size window and the sequential fashion of the labelling process, different branches of the same object may be given different labels and later found to be connected to each other. These labels are con-sidered to be equivalent and must later be collected to correctly represent one single object. This approach can be found in [F,FE,R]. Assume an input binary image of size NxM. Using these labelling algorithms, the number of equivalent pair generated is bounded by O(N*M). The number of distinct labels is also bounded by O(N*M). There is no known algorithm that merge the equivalent label pairs in time linear to the number of pairs, that is in time bounded by O(N*M). We propose a new labelling algorithm which interleaves the labelling with the merging process. The labelling and the merging are combined in one algorithm. Merged label information is kept in an equivalent table which is used to guide the labelling. In general , the algorithm produces fewer equivalent label pairs. The combined labelling and merging algorithm is O(N*M), where NxM is the size of the image. Section II describes the algorithm. Section III gives some examples We discuss implementation issues in section IV and further discussion and conclusion are given in Section V.

  16. Absolute peptide quantification by lutetium labeling and nanoHPLC-ICPMS with isotope dilution analysis.

    PubMed

    Rappel, Christina; Schaumlöffel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The need of analytical methods for absolute quantitative protein analysis spurred research on new developments in recent years. In this work, a novel approach was developed for accurate absolute peptide quantification based on metal labeling with lutetium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Lu-DTPA) and nanoflow high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (nanoHPLC-ICP-IDMS). In a two-step procedure peptides were derivatized at amino groups with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic anhydride (DTPAA) followed by chelation of lutetium. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of the reaction product demonstrated highly specific peptide labeling. Under optimized nanoHPLC conditions the labeled peptides were baseline-separated, and the excess labeling reagent did not interfere. A 176Lu-labeled spike was continuously added to the column effluent for quantification by ICP-IDMS. The recovery of a Lu-DTPA-labeled standard peptide was close to 100% indicating high labeling efficiency and accurate absolute quantification. The precision of the entire method was 4.9%. The detection limit for Lu-DTPA-tagged peptides was 179 amol demonstrating that lutetium-specific peptide quantification was by 4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than detection by natural sulfur atoms present in cysteine or methionine residues. Furthermore, the application to peptides in insulin tryptic digest allowed the identification of interfering reagents decreasing the labeling efficiency. An additional advantage of this novel approach is the analysis of peptides, which do not naturally feature ICPMS-detectable elements.

  17. ZoomQuant: an application for the quantitation of stable isotope labeled peptides.

    PubMed

    Halligan, Brian D; Slyper, Ronit Y; Twigger, Simon N; Hicks, Wayne; Olivier, Michael; Greene, Andrew S

    2005-03-01

    The main goal of comparative proteomics is the quantitation of the differences in abundance of many proteins between two different biological samples in a single experiment. By differentially labeling the peptides from the two samples and combining them in a single analysis, relative ratios of protein abundance can be accurately determined. Protease catalyzed (18)O exchange is a simple method to differentially label peptides, but the lack of robust software tools to analyze the data from mass spectra of (18)O labeled peptides generated by common ion trap mass spectrometers has been a limitation. ZoomQuant is a stand-alone computational tool that analyzes the mass spectra of (18)O labeled peptides from ion trap instruments and determines relative abundance ratios between two samples. Starting with a filtered list of candidate peptides that have been successfully identified by Sequest, ZoomQuant analyzes the isotopic forms of the peptides using high-resolution zoom scan spectrum data. The theoretical isotope distribution is determined from the peptide sequence and is used to deconvolute the peak areas associated with the unlabeled, partially labeled, and fully labeled species. The ratio between the labeled and unlabeled peptides is then calculated using several different methods. ZoomQuant's graphical user interface allows the user to view and adjust the parameters for peak calling and quantitation and select which peptides should contribute to the overall abundance ratio calculation. Finally, ZoomQuant generates a summary report of the relative abundance of the peptides identified in the two samples.

  18. The Labelling Approach to Deviance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rains, Prudence M.; Kitsuse, John L.; Duster, Troy; Freidson, Eliot

    2003-01-01

    This reprint of one chapter from the 1975 text, "Issues in the Classification of Children" by Nicholas Hobbs and others, addresses the theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues involved in the "labeling" approach to the sociology of deviance. It examines the social process of classification, the use of classification in social agencies,…

  19. When Diagnostic Labels Mask Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foltz, Robert; Dang, Sidney; Daniels, Brian; Doyle, Hillary; McFee, Scott; Quisenberry, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that many seriously troubled children and adolescents are reacting to adverse life experiences. Yet traditional diagnostic labels are based on checklists of surface symptoms. Distracted by disruptive behavior, the common response is to medicate, punish, or exclude rather than respond to needs of youth who have…

  20. How to read food labels

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 liters) cooked. If you eat 2 cups (0.48 liters) at a meal, you are eating 2 servings. That is 2 times the amount of the calories, fats, and other items listed on the label. Calorie information tells you the number of calories in ...