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Sample records for mass proportional heating

  1. Proportionally off-mass-shell equation for unequal mass systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maung Maung, Khin; Norbury, John W.; Kahana, David E.

    1996-03-01

    A new two-body relativistic equation is presented. The major advantage of the proposed equation over existing equations in the literature is that this equation automatically adjusts itself for different mass systems. Besides unitarity and covariance, this equation gives a physically meaningful prescription of how the particles go off-mass-shell in the intermediate states. It allows the particles to go off-mass-shell proportionally to their masses so that when one of the masses becomes infinite, it automatically becomes a one-body equation for the lighter particle and for equal mass systems, it reduces to the Todorov equation. Because of the off-mass-shell prescription for the intermediate states, it will be useful for systems with a wide variety of masses such as mesons, positronium, muonium, pionium, the deuteron and light hadronic atoms.

  2. Heat and mass exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Lowenstein, Andrew; Sibilia, Marc J.; Miller, Jeffrey A.; Tonon, Thomas

    2007-09-18

    A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

  3. Interactive effects of mass proportions and coupling properties on external loading in simulated forefoot impact landings.

    PubMed

    Gittoes, Marianne J R; Kerwin, David G

    2009-08-01

    This study aimed to gain insight into the individual and interactive effects of segmental mass proportions and coupling properties on external loading in simulated forefoot landings. An evaluated four-segment wobbling mass model replicated forefoot drop landings (height: 0.46 m) performed by two subjects. A comparison of the peak impact forces (GFzmax) produced during the evaluated landing and further simulated landings performed using modified (+/-5% perturbation) mass proportions and coupling properties was made. Independent segmental mass proportion changes, particularly in the upper body, produced a prominent change in GFzmax of up to 0.32 bodyweight (BW) whereas independent mass coupling stiffness and damping alterations had less effect on GFzmax (change in GFzmax of up to 0.18 BW). When combining rigid mass proportion reductions with damping modifications, an additional GFzmax attenuation of up to 0.13 BW was produced. An individual may be predisposed to high loading and traumatic and overuse injury during forefoot landings owing to their inherent inertia profile. Subject-specific neuromuscular modifications to mass coupling properties may not be beneficial in overriding the increased forces associated with larger rigid mass proportions. PMID:19827473

  4. Scale effects and morphological diversification in hindlimb segment mass proportions in neognath birds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In spite of considerable work on the linear proportions of limbs in amniotes, it remains unknown whether differences in scale effects between proximal and distal limb segments has the potential to influence locomotor costs in amniote lineages and how changes in the mass proportions of limbs have factored into amniote diversification. To broaden our understanding of how the mass proportions of limbs vary within amniote lineages, I collected data on hindlimb segment masses – thigh, shank, pes, tarsometatarsal segment, and digits – from 38 species of neognath birds, one of the most speciose amniote clades. I scaled each of these traits against measures of body size (body mass) and hindlimb size (hindlimb length) to test for departures from isometry. Additionally, I applied two parameters of trait evolution (Pagel’s λ and δ) to understand patterns of diversification in hindlimb segment mass in neognaths. Results All segment masses are positively allometric with body mass. Segment masses are isometric with hindlimb length. When examining scale effects in the neognath subclade Land Birds, segment masses were again positively allometric with body mass; however, shank, pedal, and tarsometatarsal segment masses were also positively allometric with hindlimb length. Methods of branch length scaling to detect phylogenetic signal (i.e., Pagel’s λ) and increasing or decreasing rates of trait change over time (i.e., Pagel’s δ) suffer from wide confidence intervals, likely due to small sample size and deep divergence times. Conclusions The scaling of segment masses appears to be more strongly related to the scaling of limb bone mass as opposed to length, and the scaling of hindlimb mass distribution is more a function of scale effects in limb posture than proximo-distal differences in the scaling of limb segment mass. Though negative allometry of segment masses appears to be precluded by the need for mechanically sound limbs, the positive allometry of

  5. Allergenicity of Artemisia contained in bee pollen is proportional to its mass.

    PubMed

    Nonotte-Varly, C

    2015-11-01

    Bee product mugwort is identified as being at the origin of allergic accidents but the biological potency of Artemisia contained in bee pollen is not well known. In this experiment, Artemisia mass was identified in bee pollen mass and after having calculated the proportion of Artemisia using the bee pollen melissopalynology spectrum. Skin reactivity to Artemisia was assessed by measuring wheal diameters (W) from skin prick tests using three serial dilutions of bee pollen on 11 allergic patients to Artemisia, in order to calculate the relationship between Artemisia mass (Massartemisia) in bee pollen and skin reactivity. The dose-response power regression curve (Wartemisia)=3.328 (Massartemisia)0.297 (R2=0.9947) and the linear function Log10 (Wartemisia)=0.297 (Log10 (Massartemisia)+0.520 (R=0.9974)) were established using a bee pollen sample with 0.246 mg of Artemisia pollen per mg. Mugwort allergens seem to be little or not altered by bee secretions and bee pollen retains its allergenic capacity. To our knowledge this is the first time it has been shown that skin reactivity of patients allergic to mugwort is proportional to the absolute mugwort mass contained in the bee pollen.

  6. Proportional and Integral Thermal Control System for Large Scale Heating Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) Flight Loads Laboratory is a unique national laboratory that supports thermal, mechanical, thermal/mechanical, and structural dynamics research and testing. A Proportional Integral thermal control system was designed and implemented to support thermal tests. A thermal control algorithm supporting a quartz lamp heater was developed based on the Proportional Integral control concept and a linearized heating process. The thermal control equations were derived and expressed in terms of power levels, integral gain, proportional gain, and differences between thermal setpoints and skin temperatures. Besides the derived equations, user's predefined thermal test information generated in the form of thermal maps was used to implement the thermal control system capabilities. Graphite heater closed-loop thermal control and graphite heater open-loop power level were added later to fulfill the demand for higher temperature tests. Verification and validation tests were performed to ensure that the thermal control system requirements were achieved. This thermal control system has successfully supported many milestone thermal and thermal/mechanical tests for almost a decade with temperatures ranging from 50 F to 3000 F and temperature rise rates from -10 F/s to 70 F/s for a variety of test articles having unique thermal profiles and test setups.

  7. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  8. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  9. Heat and mass transfer in an explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharova, I.G.

    1982-06-01

    The filtration of gaseous detonation products of high explosives from an underground chamber is investigated. The retention of gas in the pores by absorption is considered. The sorption process is determined to have three stages: outer diffusion (transfer of molecules of sorbed material to the outer surfaces of particles) an inner diffusion, and absorption per se. Equations are derived for diffusion flux, outer mass-transfer coefficient, mass balance in primary pores, motion of the gas, heat transfer, and so on. Within this framework, following assumptions of gas ideality, disregarding vaccum expansion, porosity variation, and heat transfer through wall, the filtration leakage of gaseous products of underground detonation of high explosives from an underground cavity is studied. Pressure in the cavity is measured as a function of filtration without heat and mass transfer; and with heat transfer; with heat and mass and limited sorption; and with heat and mass and infinite sorption capability. It is determined that heat-mass transfer significantly influences explosion efficiency. Thus, an increase in sorption capacities can increase the entrapment of gases.

  10. Partial Reductions in Mechanical Loading Yield Proportional Changes in Bone Density, Bone Architecture, and Muscle Mass

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Rachel; Spatz, Jordan; Cloutier, Alison; Palme, Rupert; Christiansen, Blaine A; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2014-01-01

    Although the musculoskeletal system is known to be sensitive to changes in its mechanical environment, the relationship between functional adaptation and below-normal mechanical stimuli is not well defined. We investigated bone and muscle adaptation to a range of reduced loading using the partial weight suspension (PWS) system, in which a two-point harness is used to offload a tunable amount of body weight while maintaining quadrupedal locomotion. Skeletally mature female C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to partial weight bearing at 20%, 40%, 70%, or 100% of body weight for 21 days. A hindlimb unloaded (HLU) group was included for comparison in addition to age-matched controls in normal housing. Gait kinematics was measured across the full range of weight bearing, and some minor alterations in gait from PWS were identified. With PWS, bone and muscle changes were generally proportional to the degree of unloading. Specifically, total body and hindlimb bone mineral density, calf muscle mass, trabecular bone volume of the distal femur, and cortical area of the femur midshaft were all linearly related to the degree of unloading. Even a load reduction to 70% of normal weight bearing was associated with significant bone deterioration and muscle atrophy. Weight bearing at 20% did not lead to better bone outcomes than HLU despite less muscle atrophy and presumably greater mechanical stimulus, requiring further investigation. These data confirm that the PWS model is highly effective in applying controllable, reduced, long-term loading that produces predictable, discrete adaptive changes in muscle and bone of the hindlimb. PMID:23165526

  11. Heat Sponge: A Concept for Mass-Efficient Heat Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Blosser, Max L.; Gifford, Andrew R.

    2008-01-01

    The heat sponge is a device for mass-efficient storage of heat. It was developed to be incorporated in the substructure of a re-entry vehicle to reduce thermal- protection-system requirements. The heat sponge consists of a liquid/vapor mixture contained within a number of miniature pressure vessels that can be embedded within a variety of different types of structures. As temperature is increased, pressure in the miniature pressure vessels also increases so that heat absorbed through vaporization of the liquid is spread over a relatively large temperature range. Using water as a working fluid, the heat-storage capacity of the liquid/vapor mixture is many times higher than that of typical structural materials and is well above that of common phase change materials over a temperature range of 200 F to 700 F. The use of pure ammonia as the working fluid provides a range of application between 432 deg R and 730 deg R, or the use of the more practical water-ammonia solution provides a range of application between 432 deg R and 1160 deg R or in between that of water and pure ammonia. Prototype heat sponges were fabricated and characterized. These heat sponges consisted of 1.0-inch-diameter, hollow, stainless-steel spheres with a wall thickness of 0.020 inches which had varying percentages of their interior volumes filled with water and a water-ammonia solution. An apparatus to measure the heat stored in these prototype heat sponges was designed, fabricated, and verified. The heat-storage capacity calculated from measured temperature histories is compared to numerical predictions.

  12. Mutations in Known Monogenic High Bone Mass Loci Only Explain a Small Proportion of High Bone Mass Cases

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Lawrie; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Appleton, Louise H; Addison, Kathryn A; Brugmans, Marieke; Clark, Graeme R; Ward, Kate A; Paggiosi, Margaret; Stone, Mike; Thomas, Joegi; Agarwal, Rohan; Poole, Kenneth ES; McCloskey, Eugene; Fraser, William D; Williams, Eleanor; Bullock, Alex N; Davey Smith, George; Brown, Matthew A; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma L

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High bone mass (HBM) can be an incidental clinical finding; however, monogenic HBM disorders (eg, LRP5 or SOST mutations) are rare. We aimed to determine to what extent HBM is explained by mutations in known HBM genes. A total of 258 unrelated HBM cases were identified from a review of 335,115 DXA scans from 13 UK centers. Cases were assessed clinically and underwent sequencing of known anabolic HBM loci: LRP5 (exons 2, 3, 4), LRP4 (exons 25, 26), SOST (exons 1, 2, and the van Buchem's disease [VBD] 52‐kb intronic deletion 3′). Family members were assessed for HBM segregation with identified variants. Three‐dimensional protein models were constructed for identified variants. Two novel missense LRP5 HBM mutations ([c.518C>T; p.Thr173Met], [c.796C>T; p.Arg266Cys]) were identified, plus three previously reported missense LRP5 mutations ([c.593A>G; p.Asn198Ser], [c.724G>A; p.Ala242Thr], [c.266A>G; p.Gln89Arg]), associated with HBM in 11 adults from seven families. Individuals with LRP5 HBM (∼prevalence 5/100,000) displayed a variable phenotype of skeletal dysplasia with increased trabecular BMD and cortical thickness on HRpQCT, and gynoid fat mass accumulation on DXA, compared with both non‐LRP5 HBM and controls. One mostly asymptomatic woman carried a novel heterozygous nonsense SOST mutation (c.530C>A; p.Ser177X) predicted to prematurely truncate sclerostin. Protein modeling suggests the severity of the LRP5‐HBM phenotype corresponds to the degree of protein disruption and the consequent effect on SOST‐LRP5 binding. We predict p.Asn198Ser and p.Ala242Thr directly disrupt SOST binding; both correspond to severe HBM phenotypes (BMD Z‐scores +3.1 to +12.2, inability to float). Less disruptive structural alterations predicted from p.Arg266Cys, p.Thr173Met, and p.Gln89Arg were associated with less severe phenotypes (Z‐scores +2.4 to +6.2, ability to float). In conclusion, although mutations in known HBM loci may be asymptomatic, they only

  13. Mutations in Known Monogenic High Bone Mass Loci Only Explain a Small Proportion of High Bone Mass Cases.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Celia L; Wheeler, Lawrie; Hardcastle, Sarah A; Appleton, Louise H; Addison, Kathryn A; Brugmans, Marieke; Clark, Graeme R; Ward, Kate A; Paggiosi, Margaret; Stone, Mike; Thomas, Joegi; Agarwal, Rohan; Poole, Kenneth E S; McCloskey, Eugene; Fraser, William D; Williams, Eleanor; Bullock, Alex N; Davey Smith, George; Brown, Matthew A; Tobias, Jon H; Duncan, Emma L

    2016-03-01

    High bone mass (HBM) can be an incidental clinical finding; however, monogenic HBM disorders (eg, LRP5 or SOST mutations) are rare. We aimed to determine to what extent HBM is explained by mutations in known HBM genes. A total of 258 unrelated HBM cases were identified from a review of 335,115 DXA scans from 13 UK centers. Cases were assessed clinically and underwent sequencing of known anabolic HBM loci: LRP5 (exons 2, 3, 4), LRP4 (exons 25, 26), SOST (exons 1, 2, and the van Buchem's disease [VBD] 52-kb intronic deletion 3'). Family members were assessed for HBM segregation with identified variants. Three-dimensional protein models were constructed for identified variants. Two novel missense LRP5 HBM mutations ([c.518C>T; p.Thr173Met], [c.796C>T; p.Arg266Cys]) were identified, plus three previously reported missense LRP5 mutations ([c.593A>G; p.Asn198Ser], [c.724G>A; p.Ala242Thr], [c.266A>G; p.Gln89Arg]), associated with HBM in 11 adults from seven families. Individuals with LRP5 HBM (∼prevalence 5/100,000) displayed a variable phenotype of skeletal dysplasia with increased trabecular BMD and cortical thickness on HRpQCT, and gynoid fat mass accumulation on DXA, compared with both non-LRP5 HBM and controls. One mostly asymptomatic woman carried a novel heterozygous nonsense SOST mutation (c.530C>A; p.Ser177X) predicted to prematurely truncate sclerostin. Protein modeling suggests the severity of the LRP5-HBM phenotype corresponds to the degree of protein disruption and the consequent effect on SOST-LRP5 binding. We predict p.Asn198Ser and p.Ala242Thr directly disrupt SOST binding; both correspond to severe HBM phenotypes (BMD Z-scores +3.1 to +12.2, inability to float). Less disruptive structural alterations predicted from p.Arg266Cys, p.Thr173Met, and p.Gln89Arg were associated with less severe phenotypes (Z-scores +2.4 to +6.2, ability to float). In conclusion, although mutations in known HBM loci may be asymptomatic, they only account for a very small

  14. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  15. USINT. Heat and Mass Transfer In Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Eyberger, L.R.

    1989-12-01

    USINT was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as water and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.

  16. USINT. Heat and Mass Transfer in Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, J.V.; Knight, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    USINT was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as water and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.

  17. The proportion of genes in a functional category is linked to mass-specific metabolic rate and lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Kawakami, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rate and lifespan are important biological parameters that are studied in a wide range of research fields. They are known to correlate with body mass, but their association with gene (protein) functions is poorly understood. In this study, we collected data on the metabolic rate and lifespan of various organisms and investigated the relationship of these parameters with their genomes. We showed that the proportion of genes in a functional category, but not genome size, was correlated with mass-specific metabolic rate and maximal lifespan. In particular, the proportion of genes in oxic reactions (which occur in the presence of oxygen) was significantly associated with these two biological parameters. Additionally, we found that temperature, taxonomy, and mode-of-life traits had little effect on the observed associations. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering the biological functions of genes when investigating the relationships between genome, metabolic rate, and lifespan. Moreover, this provides further insights into these relationships, and may be useful for estimating metabolic rate and lifespan in individuals and the ecosystem using a combination of body mass measurements and genomic data. PMID:25943793

  18. The proportion of genes in a functional category is linked to mass-specific metabolic rate and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Kawakami, Yuko

    2015-05-06

    Metabolic rate and lifespan are important biological parameters that are studied in a wide range of research fields. They are known to correlate with body mass, but their association with gene (protein) functions is poorly understood. In this study, we collected data on the metabolic rate and lifespan of various organisms and investigated the relationship of these parameters with their genomes. We showed that the proportion of genes in a functional category, but not genome size, was correlated with mass-specific metabolic rate and maximal lifespan. In particular, the proportion of genes in oxic reactions (which occur in the presence of oxygen) was significantly associated with these two biological parameters. Additionally, we found that temperature, taxonomy, and mode-of-life traits had little effect on the observed associations. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering the biological functions of genes when investigating the relationships between genome, metabolic rate, and lifespan. Moreover, this provides further insights into these relationships, and may be useful for estimating metabolic rate and lifespan in individuals and the ecosystem using a combination of body mass measurements and genomic data.

  19. The proportion of genes in a functional category is linked to mass-specific metabolic rate and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Kawakami, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rate and lifespan are important biological parameters that are studied in a wide range of research fields. They are known to correlate with body mass, but their association with gene (protein) functions is poorly understood. In this study, we collected data on the metabolic rate and lifespan of various organisms and investigated the relationship of these parameters with their genomes. We showed that the proportion of genes in a functional category, but not genome size, was correlated with mass-specific metabolic rate and maximal lifespan. In particular, the proportion of genes in oxic reactions (which occur in the presence of oxygen) was significantly associated with these two biological parameters. Additionally, we found that temperature, taxonomy, and mode-of-life traits had little effect on the observed associations. Our findings emphasize the importance of considering the biological functions of genes when investigating the relationships between genome, metabolic rate, and lifespan. Moreover, this provides further insights into these relationships, and may be useful for estimating metabolic rate and lifespan in individuals and the ecosystem using a combination of body mass measurements and genomic data. PMID:25943793

  20. Heat and mass transfer in flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    Heat- and mass-transfer processes in turbulent diffusion flames are discussed, considering turbulent mixing and the structure of single-phase flames, drop processes in spray flames, and nonluminous and luminous flame radiation. Interactions between turbulence and other phenomena are emphasized, concentrating on past work of the author and his associates. The conserved-scalar formalism, along with the laminar-flamelet approximation, is shown to provide reasonable estimates of the structure of gas flames, with modest levels of empiricism. Extending this approach to spray flames has highlighted the importance of drop/turbulence interactions; e.g., turbulent dispersion of drops, modification of turbulence by drops, etc. Stochastic methods being developed to treat these phenomena are yielding encouraging results.

  1. Body fat mass and the proportion of very large adipocytes in pregnant women are associated with gestational insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, H; Wetterling, L; Bosaeus, M; Odén, B; Odén, A; Jennische, E; Edén, S; Holmäng, A; Lönn, M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Pregnancy is accompanied by fat gain and insulin resistance. Changes in adipose tissue morphology and function during pregnancy and factors contributing to gestational insulin resistance are incompletely known. We sought to characterize adipose tissue in trimesters 1 and 3 (T1/T3) in normal weight (NW) and obese pregnant women, and identify adipose tissue-related factors associated with gestational insulin resistance. Subjects/Methods: Twenty-two NW and 11 obese women were recruited early in pregnancy for the Pregnancy Obesity Nutrition and Child Health study. Examinations and sampling of blood and abdominal adipose tissue were performed longitudinally in T1/T3 to determine fat mass (air-displacement plethysmography); insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, HOMA-IR); size, number and lipolytic activity of adipocytes; and adipokine release and density of immune cells and blood vessels in adipose tissue. Results: Fat mass and HOMA-IR increased similarly between T1 and T3 in the groups; all remained normoglycemic. Adipocyte size increased in NW women. Adipocyte number was not influenced, but proportions of small and large adipocytes changed oppositely in the groups. Lipolytic activity and circulating adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein increased in both groups. Adiponectin release was reduced in NW women. Fat mass and the proportion of very large adipocytes were most strongly associated with T3 HOMA-IR by multivariable linear regression (R2=0.751, P<0.001). Conclusions: During pregnancy, adipose tissue morphology and function change comprehensively. NW women accumulated fat in existing adipocytes, accompanied by reduced adiponectin release. In comparison with the NW group, obese women had signs of adipocyte recruitment and maintained adiponectin levels. Body fat and large adipocytes may contribute significantly to gestational insulin resistance. PMID:26563815

  2. Avian eggs: barriers to the exchange of heat and mass.

    PubMed

    Sotherland, P R; Spotila, J R; Paganelli, C V

    1987-01-01

    Measured boundary-layer conductance to heat exchange for bird eggs varies with egg mass to the 0.53 power. Calculations based on the Nusselt-Reynolds relationship for a sphere and the thermal properties of air indicate that the conductance of the boundary layer to heat and to mass at any wind speed other than still air should scale with mass to the 0.53 power. Although the boundary layer contributes little to the total barrier to mass flux between bird eggs and their environment, we show that it is the major barrier to the exchange of heat. From these observations we infer that birds incubating eggs in natural nests can alter only the gradient affecting mass flux between their eggs and the environment while having the capability to change both the gradient and conductance affecting heat flux.

  3. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-06-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme.

  4. Suppressing epileptic activity in a neural mass model using a closed-loop proportional-integral controller

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junsong; Niebur, Ernst; Hu, Jinyu; Li, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Closed-loop control is a promising deep brain stimulation (DBS) strategy that could be used to suppress high-amplitude epileptic activity. However, there are currently no analytical approaches to determine the stimulation parameters for effective and safe treatment protocols. Proportional-integral (PI) control is the most extensively used closed-loop control scheme in the field of control engineering because of its simple implementation and perfect performance. In this study, we took Jansen’s neural mass model (NMM) as a test bed to develop a PI-type closed-loop controller for suppressing epileptic activity. A graphical stability analysis method was employed to determine the stabilizing region of the PI controller in the control parameter space, which provided a theoretical guideline for the choice of the PI control parameters. Furthermore, we established the relationship between the parameters of the PI controller and the parameters of the NMM in the form of a stabilizing region, which provided insights into the mechanisms that may suppress epileptic activity in the NMM. The simulation results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed closed-loop PI control scheme. PMID:27273563

  5. Finite Element Heat & Mass Transfer Code

    1996-10-10

    FEHM is a numerical simulation code for subsurface transport processes. It models 3-D, time-dependent, multiphase, multicomponent, non-isothermal, reactive flow through porous and fractured media. It can accurately represent complex 3-D geologic media and structures and their effects on subsurface flow and transport. Its capabilities include flow of gas, water, and heat; flow of air, water, and heat; multiple chemically reactive and sorbing tracers; finite element/finite volume formulation; coupled stress module; saturated and unsaturated media; andmore » double porosity and double porosity/double permeability capabilities.« less

  6. Intensification of heat and mass transfer by ultrasound: application to heat exchangers and membrane separation processes.

    PubMed

    Gondrexon, N; Cheze, L; Jin, Y; Legay, M; Tissot, Q; Hengl, N; Baup, S; Boldo, P; Pignon, F; Talansier, E

    2015-07-01

    This paper aims to illustrate the interest of ultrasound technology as an efficient technique for both heat and mass transfer intensification. It is demonstrated that the use of ultrasound results in an increase of heat exchanger performances and in a possible fouling monitoring in heat exchangers. Mass transfer intensification was observed in the case of cross-flow ultrafiltration. It is shown that the enhancement of the membrane separation process strongly depends on the physico-chemical properties of the filtered suspensions.

  7. Particle Heating Resulting from Coronal Mass Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Suman; Sundar De, Syam; Guha, Gautam

    2016-07-01

    Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) is a continuous phenomena occurring from the entire solar coronal zone responsible for the outflow of solar masses, viz., protons, electrons, neutrons and solar wind in the form of plasma. These perturb the Earth's atmosphere via magnetopause. Very high temperature plasma generator in the solar atmosphere produces huge magnetic dipoles with intense magnetic field. It traps the energetic charged particles released from the solar corona. These particles gyrate along the magnetic field lines and are gradually elongated outwards from the Sun. Due to this, the field lines get detached at some critical limit thereby enhancing the magnetic reconnection with the interplanetary magnetic field releasing huge energy in the form of X-rays and γ-rays. This perturbs the Earth's atmosphere. In this work, the situation has been investigated by momentum balance equation, energy balance equation along with the equations of continuity and states. From the analyses, the dispersive nature of the thermospheric medium is studied. Variation of normalized electron temperature with dimensionless time has been critically contemplated. The altitude dependent electric field in the medium is also investigated.

  8. Characterization and Evaluation of a Mass Efficient Heat Storage Device.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splinter, Scott C.; Blosser, Max L.; Gifford, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    The heat sponge is a device for mass-efficient storage of heat. It was developed to be incorporated in the substructure of a reentry or hypersonic vehicle to reduce thermal protection system requirements. The heat sponge consists of a liquid-vapor mixture contained within a number of miniature pressure vessels that can be embedded within a variety of different types of structures. As temperature is increased, pressure in the miniature pressure vessels also increases so that heat absorbed through vaporization of the liquid is spread over a relatively large temperature range. Using water as a working fluid, the heat storage capacity of the liquid-vapor mixture is many times higher than that of typical structural materials and is well above that of common phase change materials over the temperature range of 660oR to 1160oR. Prototype heat sponges were fabricated and characterized. These heat sponges consisted of 1.0 inch diameter hollow stainless steel spheres with a wall thickness of 0.020 inches which had varying percentages of their interior volumes filled with water. An apparatus to measure the heat stored in these prototype heat sponges was designed, fabricated, and verified. The heat storage capacity calculated from measured temperature histories is compared to numerical predictions.

  9. Influence of Building Envelope Thermal Mass on Heating Design Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaujena, B.; Borodinecs, A.; Zemitis, J.; Prozuments, A.

    2015-11-01

    The stability of indoor air parameters is a very important factor, essential for such institutions as museums, schools and hospitals. Nowadays the use of renewable energy for space heating became one of the top priorities in modern building design. The active and passive solar energy as well as heat pumps are widely used nowadays. However, such technologies have a limitation in cold climates and often are not able to cover maximal heating loads. This paper is devoted to analysis of influence of building envelope's properties and outdoor air parameters on indoor air thermodynamic parameters stability in winter time. It presents analysis of thermal mass impact on building energy performance and indoor air parameter stability in cold climate. The results show that the thermal mass of building envelope is able to cover extreme winter temperatures as well as in case of emergency heat supply break.

  10. Heat and mass transfer analysis of a desiccant dehumidifier matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    This report documents the SERI Single-Blow Test Facility's design, fabrication, and testing for characterizing desiccant dehumidifiers for solar cooling applications. The first test article, a silica-gel parallel-plate dehumidifier with highly uniform passages, was designed and fabricated. Transient heat and mass transfer data and pressure drop data across the dehumidifier were obtained. Available heat and mass transfer models were extended to the parallel-place geometry, and the experimental data were compared with model predictions. Pressure drop measurements were also compared with model predictions of the fully developed laminar flow theory. The comparisons between the lumped-capacitance model and the experimental data were satisfactory. The pressure drop data compared satisfactorily with the theory (within 15%). A solid-side resistance model that is more detailed and does not assume symmetrical diffusion in particles was recommended for performance. This study has increased our understanding of the heat and mass transfer in silica gel parallel-plate dehumidifiers.

  11. Transport phenomena of crystal growth—heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Selected fundamentals of transport processes and their importance for crystal growth are given. First, principal parameters and equations of heat and mass transfer, like thermal flux, radiation and diffusion are introduced. The heat- and mass- balanced melt-solid and solution-solid interface velocities are derived, respectively. The today's significance of global numeric simulation for analysis of thermo-mechanical stress and related dislocation dynamics within the growing crystal is shown. The relation between diffusion and kinetic regime is discussed. Then, thermal and solutal buoyancy-driven and Marangoni convections are introduced. Their important interplay with the diffusion boundary layer, component and particle incorporation as well as morphological interface stability is demonstrated. Non-steady crystallization phenomena (striations) caused by convective fluctuations are considered. Selected results of global 3D numeric modeling are shown. Finally, advanced methods to control heat and mass transfer by external forces, such as accelerated container rotation, ultrasonic vibration and magnetic fields are discussed.

  12. Ballistic heat conduction and mass disorder in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Zhang, Gang

    2014-08-20

    It is well-known that in the disordered harmonic chain, heat conduction is subballistic and the thermal conductivity (κ) scales asymptotically as lim(L--> ∞) κ ∝ L(0.5) where L is the chain length. However, using the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method and analytical modelling, we show that there exists a critical crossover length scale (LC) below which ballistic heat conduction (κ ∝ L) can coexist with mass disorder. This ballistic-to-subballistic heat conduction crossover is connected to the exponential attenuation of the phonon transmittance function Ξ i.e. Ξ(ω, L) = exp[-L/λ(ω)], where λ is the frequency-dependent attenuation length. The crossover length can be determined from the minimum attenuation length, which depends on the maximum transmitted frequency. We numerically determine the dependence of the transmittance on frequency and mass composition as well as derive a closed form estimate, which agrees closely with the numerical results. For the length-dependent thermal conductance, we also derive a closed form expression which agrees closely with numerical results and reproduces the ballistic to subballistic thermal conduction crossover. This allows us to characterize the crossover in terms of changes in the length, mass composition and temperature dependence, and also to determine the conditions under which heat conduction enters the ballistic regime. We describe how the mass composition can be modified to increase ballistic heat conduction.

  13. Microclimate and Heat Stress of Runners in Mass Participation Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, C. R.; Dawson, N. J.; Young, A. A.; Mackey, W. J.

    1985-02-01

    The largest mass participation fun run in the world took place in Auckland, New Zealand where an estimated 80000 participants ran 10.4 km `Round the Bays' in the early fall of 1982. Even in the relatively mild climate of Auckland, heat stroke and other types of heat illness occur during this annual event. Techniques for thermal assessment of human bioclimate have not been applied to an exercising crowd although it is widely accepted that crowding will reduce the heat loss of individuals. To quantify the possible heat load brought about by running in a large crowd, those components of the microenvironment that affect radiant, evaporative and convective heat exchange were measured, both within the mass of runners and separately from it. These data were used as input for two detailed body-environment heat exchange models which show the effect of the runners themselves on the thermal environment. Since it is assumed that changes longwave radiation exchange and convective losses from the body are likely to be the major causes of differences between solo and group running, these avenues of heat exchange are carefully assessed . The results show that longwave radiative losses can be reduced substantially by running in a lame group compared to solo running, but the absolute size of the increase in net heat load on the individual is small. However, heat loss by convection for group runners is less than half that for sole runners. This may be the result of entertainment of air within an atmospheric envelope below head level in which wind speed and direction are the same as the runner's and direction. For the weather conditions prevailing at the time of the experiment, jogging in the main bunch of runners is estimated to cause, on occasions, more than three times the heat stress on the body compared to that experienced when running solo along the same route at the same time of day during identical weather conditions.

  14. A Course in Advanced Topics in Heat and Mass Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeiwitz, Joseph A.

    1983-01-01

    A three or four semester-hour graduate course was designed to provide basic instruction in heat/mass transfer topics relevant to chemical engineering problems and to train students to develop mathematical descriptions for new situations encountered in problem-solving. Course outline and list of references used in the course are provided. (JM)

  15. Overall Heat and Mass Transfer Coefficient of Water Vapor Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Mori, Hideo; Godo, Masazumi; Miura, Kunio; Watanabe, Yutaka; Ishizawa, Toshihiko; Takatsuka, Takeshi

    A fundamental investigation was performed to develop a compact and simple desiccant ventilation unit which is one of the main components of a novel energy saving air-conditioning system. Water vapor in the air is adsorbed and/or desorbed to be controlled the humidity of supply air through a unit of an adsorbent packed bed. A numerical simulation helps to understand the phenomena of heat and mass transfer in the bed. Overall transfer coefficients of them as properties for the simulation were estimated by performing both experiment and calculation. It was clarified that the transient overall equivalent heat and mass transfer does not strongly depend on the air flow rate through the packed bed, the averaged equivalent mass transfer is governed by surface and pore diffusion in a particle of adsorbent at low flow rate. Moreover, the coefficient during the adsorption process is slightly larger than desorption. An equation of the overall mass transfer coefficient is derived. It shows five times as large as the value estimated by experiment. Therefore, the correlation and fitting parameters are presented for prediction of the overall heat and mass transfer coefficients. The estimation accuracy was improved.

  16. Simultaneous convective heat and mass transfer in impingement ink drying

    SciTech Connect

    Can, M.

    1998-08-01

    Effective and economical drying of thin ink films is essential in the printing, packaging and coating industries. In evaporative drying, high heat and mass transfer rates are commonly achieved by means of high velocity impinging air jets. To provide data for dryer design a program of research has been implemented to study the heat and mass transfer processes which underlie the drying of thin ink films. The heat transfer situation under impinging air jets is outlined and some experimental results are presented. Optimization of nozzle arrays for impinging air jets is analyzed for practical applications. A non-contact infra-red technique for continuously monitoring the ink drying process is described and drying curves for an ink based on a single solvent (4-Methyl-2-pentanol-MIBC) are presented. Heat and mass transfer theory has been used to predict drying times in the constant rate drying period. These predictions have been compared with experimentally determined drying times. This research has served to confirm the fundamental importance of the drying curve as a basis for dryer design.

  17. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  18. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOEpatents

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  19. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1997-12-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix for providing simultaneous heat transfer and mass transfer at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, whereby the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process is significantly improved. The small channel heat exchange matrix is comprised of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 mm. The channels are connected to an inlet header for supplying a two-phase coolant to the channels and an outlet header for receiving the coolant horn the channels. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within a separation column, whereby liquid descends along the exterior surfaces of the cooling channels and vapor ascends between adjacent channels within the matrix. Preferably, a perforated and concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel, such that liquid further descends along the concave surfaces of the sheets and the vapor further ascends through the perforations in the sheets. The size and configuration of the small channel heat exchange matrix allows the heat and mass transfer device to be positioned within the separation column, thereby allowing precise control of the local operating conditions within the column and increasing the energy efficiency of the process.

  20. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in polymer solutions exposed to intermittent infrared radiation heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.; Lin, J.D.

    1998-06-01

    Drying is one of the essential steps in a number of industrial applications, such as the preserving of food and the drying of paint, pulp, and paper. The quality of paper tubes is significantly affected by the heat and mass transfer process. The drying of polymer solution plays a crucial role in the manufacturer of photographic film, synthetic fibers, adhesives, and a variety of other polymeric products. During drying of wet materials, simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs both inside the medium and in the boundary layer of the drying agent. Drying is one of the most energy-consuming processes in the industrial sector and can also be very time consuming as, for example, in conventional convective drying by hot air, while minimum cost and energy consumption and maximum product quality are among the main concerns in industry today. Here, a theoretical study is performed that describes heat transfer and moisture variation while a polymer solution is exposed to high-intensity infrared radiation flux and/or an airflow. While the intermittent heating is considered, the authors investigate the influences of various radiation and convection parameters on the transfer of heat and moisture variation of coated layers on an optically thick substrate. During the tempering stage in the intermittent heating process, the convective mass transfer is included to simulate the ambient air in reality. The effects of radiation and convection parameters on the transfer processes are presented in terms of the rate of water content removal, heat transfer, and moisture distributions. Numerical results show that the rate of water removal from the polymer solution is dominated by both the adsorbed radiative heat energy and the distributions of water mass fraction in the polymer solution.

  1. Mass, heat and freshwater fluxes in the South Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1986-01-01

    Six hydrographic sections were used to examine the circulation and property fluxes in the South Indian Ocean from 10 to 32 deg S. The calculations were made by applying an inverse method to the data. In the interior of the South Indian Ocean, the geostrophic flow is generally northward. At 18 deg S, the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward Ekman mass flux at the surface, whereas at 32 deg S the northward interior mass flux is balanced by the southward mass flux of the Agulhas Current. There is a weak, southward mass flux of 6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s in the Mozambique Channel. The rate of water exchange between the Pacific Ocean and the Indian Ocean is dependent on the choice of the initial reference level used in the inverse calculation. The choice of 1500 m, the depth of the deep oxygen minimum, has led to a flux of water from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean at a rate of 6.6 x 10 to the 9th kg/s. Heat flux calculations indicate that the Indian Ocean is exporting heat to the rest of the world's oceans at a rate of -0.69 x 10 to the 15th W at 18 deg S and -0.25 x 10 to the 15th W at 32 deg S (negative values being southward).

  2. Mass and heat transport in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A.; Kamarudin, S. K.; Daud, W. R. W.; Masdar, S.; Yosfiah, M. R.

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a better alternative to the conventional battery. The DMFC offers several advantages, namely, faster building of potential and longer-lasting fuel, however, there are still several issues that need to be addressed to design a better DMFC system. This article is a wide-ranging review of the most up-to-date studies on mass and heat transfer in the DMFC. The discussion will be focused on the critical problems limiting the performance of DMFCs. In addition, a technique for upgrading the DMFC with an integrated system will be presented, along with existing numerical models for modeling mass and heat transfer as well as cell performance.

  3. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  4. Local Mass and Heat Transfer on a Turbine Blade Tip

    DOE PAGES

    Jin, P.; Goldstein, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Locmore » al mass and heat transfer measurements on a simulated high-pressure turbine blade-tip surface are conducted in a linear cascade with a nonmoving tip endwall, using a naphthalene sublimation technique. The effects of tip clearance (0.86–6.90% of chord) are investigated at various exit Reynolds numbers (4–7 × 10 5 ) and turbulence intensities (0.2 and 12.0%). The mass transfer on the tip surface is significant along its pressure edge at the smallest tip clearance. At the two largest tip clearances, the separation bubble on the tip surface can cover the whole width of the tip on the second half of the tip surface. The average mass-transfer rate is highest at a tip clearance of 1.72% of chord. The average mass-transfer rate on the tip surface is four and six times as high as on the suction and the pressure surface, respectively. A high mainstream turbulence level of 12.0% reduces average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface, while the higher mainstream Reynolds number generates higher local and average mass-transfer rates on the tip surface.« less

  5. Scaling heat and mass flow through porous media during pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Julien; Muggeridge, Ann H.; Jackson, Matthew D.; Quintard, Michel; Lapene, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The modelling of heat and mass flow through porous media in the presence of pyrolysis is complex because various physical and chemical phenomena need to be represented. In addition to the transport of heat by conduction and convection, and the change of properties with varying pressure and temperature, these processes involve transport of mass by convection, evaporation, condensation and pyrolysis chemical reactions. Examples of such processes include pyrolysis of wood, thermal decomposition of polymer composite and in situ upgrading of heavy oil and oil shale. The behaviours of these systems are difficult to predict as relatively small changes in the material composition can significantly change the thermophysical properties. Scaling reduces the number of parameters in the problem statement and quantifies the relative importance of the various dimensional parameters such as permeability, thermal conduction and reaction constants. This paper uses inspectional analysis to determine the minimum number of dimensionless scaling groups that describe the decomposition of a solid porous material into a gas in one dimension. Experimental design is then used to rank these scaling groups in terms of their importance in describing the outcome of two example processes: the thermal decomposition of heat shields formed from polymer composites and the in situ upgrading of heavy oils and oil shales. A sensitivity analysis is used to divide these groups into three sets (primary, secondary and insignificant), thus identifying the combinations of solid and fluid properties that have the most impact on the performance of the different processes.

  6. Heat and mass transfer in unsaturated porous media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, S.W.; Malstaff, G.

    1982-02-01

    A preliminary study of heat and water transport in unsaturated porous media is reported. The project provides background information regarding the feasibility of seasonal thermal energy storage in unconfined aquifers. A parametric analysis of the factors of importance, and an annotated bibliography of research findings pertinent to unconfined aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) are presented. This analysis shows that heat and mass transfer of water vapor assume dominant importance in unsaturated porous media at elevated temperature. Although water vapor fluxes are seldom as large as saturated medium liquid water fluxes, they are important under unsaturated conditions. The major heat transport mechanism for unsaturated porous media at temperatures from 50 to 90/sup 0/C is latent heat flux. The mechanism is nonexistent under saturated conditions but may well control design of unconfined aquifer storage systems. The parametric analysis treats detailed physical phenomena which occur in the flow systems study and demonstrates the temperature and moisture dependence of the transport coefficients of importance. The question of design of an unconfined ATES site is also addressed by considering the effects of aquifer temperature, depth to water table, porous medium flow properties, and surface boundary conditions. Recommendations are made for continuation of this project in its second phase. Both scientific and engineering goals are considered and alternatives are presented.

  7. Modelling the mass migration phenomena in partially frozen heat pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Keddy, M.D.; Merrigan, M.A.; Critchley, E.

    1993-11-01

    Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point and with sink temperatures below the freezing temperature of the working fluid may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and not returning to the evaporator section. Eventually, sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate this phenomena. This paper presents an analytical model developed to describes this phenomena. The model provides for analytic determination of heat pipe temperature profiles, freeze-front locations and mass migration rates.

  8. Code System to Calculate Heat and Mass Transfer In Concrete

    1999-05-26

    Version 00 This version is designated USINTC and was developed to model the thermal response of concrete to very high heating rates such as might occur from sodium spills on concrete surfaces in a breeder reactor. The major phenomena treated are conductive energy transport; chemical decomposition of concrete; and two-phase, three-component heat and mass transfer of the decomposition products: steam, liquid water, and carbon dioxide. The USINT model provides for porosity to increase as watermore » and carbon-dioxide are formed from the concrete. The concrete is treated generally as divided into two basic regions, wet and dry. In the wet region, steam, carbon-dioxide, and liquid water may co-exist, but in the dry region, there is no liquid water. There is also the possibility of a third region in which there is only liquid water and no gases.« less

  9. Experimental heat and mass transfer of the separated and coupled rotating desiccant wheel and heat wheel

    SciTech Connect

    Enteria, Napoleon; Yoshino, Hiroshi; Mochida, Akashi; Takaki, Rie; Satake, Akira; Yoshie, Ryuichiro; Mitamura, Tiruaki; Baba, Seizo

    2010-07-15

    The experimental evaluation of the separated and coupled rotating desiccant wheel and heat wheel is reported. The study aims to investigate the performance of the desiccant wheel and of the heat wheel both when operated separately and jointly. The performance evaluation of the desiccant wheel is based on its moisture removal capacity (MRC), moisture removal regeneration (MRR), and moisture mass balance (MMB). In addition, the study used the total energy balance (TEB), sensible coefficient of performance (COP{sub Sensible}), latent coefficient of performance (COP{sub Latent}) and, total coefficient of performance (COP{sub Total}). The performance of the heat wheel is based on its effectiveness. The COP{sub Sensible}, COP{sub Latent} and, COP{sub Total} are used in the performance evaluation of the coupled desiccant wheel and heat wheel. The general results of the study show that the MRC, MRR and MMB coupled with the TEB, COP{sub Latent}, COP{sub Sensible} and COP{sub Total} predict adequately the performance of the desiccant wheel. In addition, the coupled operation of the desiccant wheel and heat wheel, contributed to the reduction of the external thermal energy requirement for the regeneration of the desiccant wheel. This study can be applied in other researches seeking evaluation of the desiccant wheel, heat wheel, and their combined operation. Moreover, the data presented here are significant for the desiccant wheel benchmarking and for evaluation of the desiccant wheel models. (author)

  10. Gas composition measurements in arc heated flowfields via mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Ronald J.; Blake, David J.

    1991-06-01

    Gas compositions for an arc heated flowfield were determined by mass spectrometry on gas samples drawn from the flowfield through a sample probe. Surveys were made across the freestream flow using sample probes made of copper and quartz. Oxygen atoms reaching the mass spectrometer ranged from 6 to 9.4 percent and was a direct function of arc heater current and resultant stream enthalpy. Likewise, mole percents of nitrogen atoms ranged from 13.5 to 19 for total enthalpies of 7.0 to 18.4 MJ/kg. Species gradients existed in both the radial and axial directions. Atomic concentrations were highest near the centerline and at the nozzle exit. A species survey was completed around a shock that was established by a copper blunt body placed in the flowfield. The results showed strong species gradients following the shock edge, with atom mole fractions highest along the shock edge. Overall, the results provide insight into gas composition by point measurements in arc heated flowfields. The results suggest that nitrogen may begin dissociating before all of the oxygen dissociates, and that past assumptions based on frozen chemistry models may be faulty.

  11. Acoustic Streaming and Heat and Mass Transfer Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Gopinath, A.

    1996-01-01

    A second order effect associated with high intensity sound field, acoustic streaming has been historically investigated to gain a fundamental understanding of its controlling mechanisms and to apply it to practical aspects of heat and mass transfer enhancement. The objectives of this new research project are to utilize a unique experimental technique implementing ultrasonic standing waves in closed cavities to study the details of the generation of the steady-state convective streaming flows and of their interaction with the boundary of ultrasonically levitated near-spherical solid objects. The goals are to further extend the existing theoretical studies of streaming flows and sample interactions to higher streaming Reynolds number values, for larger sample size relative to the wavelength, and for a Prandtl and Nusselt numbers parameter range characteristic of both gaseous and liquid host media. Experimental studies will be conducted in support to the theoretical developments, and the crucial impact of microgravity will be to allow the neglect of natural thermal buoyancy. The direct application to heat and mass transfer in the absence of gravity will be emphasized in order to investigate a space-based experiment, but both existing and novel ground-based scientific and technological relevance will also be pursued.

  12. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  13. Accurate physical laws can permit new standard units: The two laws F→=ma→ and the proportionality of weight to mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-04-01

    Three common approaches to F→=ma→ are: (1) as an exactly true definition of force F→ in terms of measured inertial mass m and measured acceleration a→; (2) as an exactly true axiom relating measured values of a→, F→ and m; and (3) as an imperfect but accurately true physical law relating measured a→ to measured F→, with m an experimentally determined, matter-dependent constant, in the spirit of the resistance R in Ohm's law. In the third case, the natural units are those of a→ and F→, where a→ is normally specified using distance and time as standard units, and F→ from a spring scale as a standard unit; thus mass units are derived from force, distance, and time units such as newtons, meters, and seconds. The present work develops the third approach when one includes a second physical law (again, imperfect but accurate)—that balance-scale weight W is proportional to m—and the fact that balance-scale measurements of relative weight are more accurate than those of absolute force. When distance and time also are more accurately measurable than absolute force, this second physical law permits a shift to standards of mass, distance, and time units, such as kilograms, meters, and seconds, with the unit of force—the newton—a derived unit. However, were force and distance more accurately measurable than time (e.g., time measured with an hourglass), this second physical law would permit a shift to standards of force, mass, and distance units such as newtons, kilograms, and meters, with the unit of time—the second—a derived unit. Therefore, the choice of the most accurate standard units depends both on what is most accurately measurable and on the accuracy of physical law.

  14. A heat & mass integration approach to reduce capital and operating costs of a distillation configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Madenoor Ramapriya, Gautham; Jiang, Zheyu; Tawarmalani, Mohit; Agrawal, Rakesh

    2015-11-11

    We propose a general method to consolidate distillation columns of a distillation configuration using heat and mass integration. The proposed method encompasses all heat and mass integrations known till date, and includes many more. Each heat and mass integration eliminates a distillation column, a condenser, a reboiler and the heat duty associated with a reboiler. Thus, heat and mass integration can potentially offer significant capital and operating cost benefits. In this talk, we will study the various possible heat and mass integrations in detail, and demonstrate their benefits using case studies. This work will lay out a framework to synthesize an entire new class of useful configurations based on heat and mass integration of distillation columns.

  15. On Two-Scale Modelling of Heat and Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vala, J.; Št'astník, S.

    2008-09-01

    Modelling of macroscopic behaviour of materials, consisting of several layers or components, whose microscopic (at least stochastic) analysis is available, as well as (more general) simulation of non-local phenomena, complicated coupled processes, etc., requires both deeper understanding of physical principles and development of mathematical theories and software algorithms. Starting from the (relatively simple) example of phase transformation in substitutional alloys, this paper sketches the general formulation of a nonlinear system of partial differential equations of evolution for the heat and mass transfer (useful in mechanical and civil engineering, etc.), corresponding to conservation principles of thermodynamics, both at the micro- and at the macroscopic level, and suggests an algorithm for scale-bridging, based on the robust finite element techniques. Some existence and convergence questions, namely those based on the construction of sequences of Rothe and on the mathematical theory of two-scale convergence, are discussed together with references to useful generalizations, required by new technologies.

  16. Spicules, mass transfer, oscillations, and the heating of the corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Kozarev, K. A.; Butts, D. L.; Gangestad, J. W.; Seaton, D. B.; de Pontieu, B.; Golub, L.; Deluca, E.; Wilhelm, K.; Dammasch, I.

    2005-05-01

    The mass moving in chromospheric spicules is enough to replace the corona in a brief time, so understanding the dynamics of spicules is important for understanding the support and heating of the solar corona. We have undertaken a program involving simultaneous high-resolution observations in various chromospheric visible lines (H-alpha, Ca II H, and G-band, as well as Dopplergrams) using the Swedish Solar Telescope on La Palma, ultraviolet chromospheric, transition-region, and coronal lines (Fe IX/X 171 A, Lyman-alpha 1216 A, and continuum/C I/C IV 1600 A) using NASA's TRACE, and ultraviolet chromospheric and transition-region lines (Si II 1533, C IV 1548, and Ne VIII 770) using SUMER on SOHO. Our first coordinated observing run, in May 2004, yielded a variety of images that are under study, especially for the morphological statistics and dynamics of spicules. The energy transfer through the chromosphere is relevant to the overlapping investigation of coronal heating through rapid (1Hz range) oscillations of coronal loops as observed at total eclipses by Williams College expeditions. This research is supported by NASA grant number NNG04GK44G to Williams College. TRACE analysis at SAO is supported by a contract from Lockheed Martin. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

  17. Isochoric heating from fast electrons using mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Baton, Sophie; Guillou, Perceval; Audebert, Patrick; Lecherbourg, Ludovic; Barbrel, Benjamin; Bastiani-Ceccotti, Serna; Rousseaux, Christophe; Gremillet, Laurent; Lefevre, Erik; Back, Christina; Patel, Pravesh; Cowan, Tom; Rassuchine, Jenny

    2008-04-01

    Experiments to investigate fast electron transport in thin, mass-limited multilayer targets were performed at the LULI 100 TW laser facility. The targets were composed of V/Cu/Al and varied from 300 to 50 μm in diameter. They were isochorically heated by a 20 J, 300 ps laser pulse that delivered I˜2x10^19 W/cm2 to form a warm dense plasma. X-ray emission from the Cu and Al layers was measured using conical and spherical Bragg crystals. Time-resolved Kα emission spectra were also obtained using an ultra-fast streak camera indicating a total refluxing of the electrons. The data from targets of different size and/or Cu layer thickness are compared and analyzed to better understand the heating of the target and temperature of the plasma. Temperatures up to several hundred eV have been deduced from detailed spectra analysis. Comparison with PIC simulations will be presented.

  18. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/ (kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  19. A Mass Computation Model for Lightweight Brayton Cycle Regenerator Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2010-01-01

    Based on a theoretical analysis of convective heat transfer across large internal surface areas, this paper discusses the design implications for generating lightweight gas-gas heat exchanger designs by packaging such areas into compact three-dimensional shapes. Allowances are made for hot and cold inlet and outlet headers for assembly of completed regenerator (or recuperator) heat exchanger units into closed cycle gas turbine flow ducting. Surface area and resulting volume and mass requirements are computed for a range of heat exchanger effectiveness values and internal heat transfer coefficients. Benefit cost curves show the effect of increasing heat exchanger effectiveness on Brayton cycle thermodynamic efficiency on the plus side, while also illustrating the cost in heat exchanger required surface area, volume, and mass requirements as effectiveness is increased. The equations derived for counterflow and crossflow configurations show that as effectiveness values approach unity, or 100 percent, the required surface area, and hence heat exchanger volume and mass tend toward infinity, since the implication is that heat is transferred at a zero temperature difference. To verify the dimensional accuracy of the regenerator mass computational procedure, calculation of a regenerator specific mass, that is, heat exchanger weight per unit working fluid mass flow, is performed in both English and SI units. Identical numerical values for the specific mass parameter, whether expressed in lb/(lb/sec) or kg/(kg/sec), show the dimensional consistency of overall results.

  20. On the equilibrium of heated self-gravitating masses - Cooling by conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerche, I.; Low, B. C.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation is given of the equilibrium states available to a self-gravitating mass of gas, cooling by conduction, and being heated at a rate proportional to the local gas density. The plane geometry situation is shown to be reducible to quadratures for the pressure, density, temperature, and gravitational potential. For a constant thermal conductivity it is shown that the gas density has either a central maximum or a central minimum, depending on the ratio of the thermal conductivity to a parameter taken to be a measure of the rate of heating. For a thermal conductivity which is a positive power of the temperature, it is shown that the gas density always has a central minimum and a maximum at the outer boundary of the configuration. For cylindrical and spherical geometrical configurations the same general properties are obtained. The physical origin of this behavior is discussed, and it is suggested that these exploratory calculations provide an effect which may not only aid in understanding thin filamentary structure observed in supernova remnants, but also help to assuage the difficulties of producing maser activity in the interior regions of 'cocoon' protostars.

  1. New methods to detect particle velocity and mass flux in arc-heated ablation/erosion facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brayton, D. B.; Bomar, B. W.; Seibel, B. L.; Elrod, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    Arc-heated flow facilities with injected particles are used to simulate the erosive and ablative/erosive environments encountered by spacecraft re-entry through fog, clouds, thermo-nuclear explosions, etc. Two newly developed particle diagnostic techniques used to calibrate these facilities are discussed. One technique measures particle velocity and is based on the detection of thermal radiation and/or chemiluminescence from the hot seed particles in a model ablation/erosion facility. The second technique measures a local particle rate, which is proportional to local particle mass flux, in a dust erosion facility by photodetecting and counting the interruptions of a focused laser beam by individual particles.

  2. 40 CFR 75.83 - Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculation of Hg mass emissions and... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Hg Mass Emission Provisions § 75.83 Calculation of Hg mass emissions and heat input rate. The owner or operator shall calculate Hg mass...

  3. Combined mass and heat transfer during nonisothermal absorption in gas-liquid slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Elperin, T.; Fominykh, A.

    1995-03-01

    A model of combined mass and heat transfer during nonisothermal gas absorption from a slug rising, in a channel filled with liquid is suggested. The expressions for coefficients of heat and mass transfer from a single slug are derived in the approximation of the thin concentration and heat boundary layers in a liquid phase. Under the assumptions of a perfect mixing of the dissolved -as in liquid plugs and uniform temperature distribution in liquid plugs, recurrent relations for the dissolved gas concentration and temperature in the n-th liquid plug and mass and heat fluxes from the n-th gas slug are derived. The total mass and heat fluxes in a gas-liquid slug flow are determined. In the limiting case of absorption without heat release the derived formulas recover the expressions for isothermal absorption in a gas-liquid slug flow.

  4. Optical cell with periodic resistive heating for the measurement of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hartung, M; Köhler, W

    2007-08-01

    A new technique for the measurement of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in liquids has been developed. Similar to laser induced dynamic gratings, a temperature grating is created in the sample. Thermal expansion transforms the temperature into a refractive-index grating, which is read by diffraction of a readout laser beam. In a multicomponent mixture an additional concentration grating is formed by thermal diffusion driven by the temperature gradients of the temperature grating. Differently to laser induced dynamic grating experiments we use Joule heating instead of optical heating. For that purpose we have built cuvettes which have a grating of transparent conducting strips on the inner side of one of their windows. If heated by an electric current a temperature grating will build up in the sample. Both the heat equation and the extended diffusion equation have been solved in two dimensions to allow for quantitative data analysis. Our apparatus and method of analysis have been validated by measurements of heat, mass, and thermal diffusions in pure and binary liquids. Heat diffusion can be correctly determined as was shown for pure toluene, pure dodecane, and the symmetric mixture of isobutylbenzene dodecane. Mass and thermal diffusions were studied in the three symmetric mixtures of dodecane, isobutylbenzene, and tetralin. The obtained diffusion and Soret coefficients agree with the literature values within the experimental errors. Uncompensated transient heating effects limit the resolution of the experimental technique.

  5. Influence of cooling conditions on the local parameters of heat and mass transfer in condensation heat-utilization units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodulya, V. A.; Malevich, V. L.; Sinkevich, A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Based on the earlier developed model of calculation of the local parameters of heat and mass transfer in deep cooling of flue gases (a vapor-gas mixture) in a bundle of tubes of a condensation heat-utilization unit, the distribution of the parameters of a condensing vapor-gas mixture both along the length of the tubes and in the depth of the tube bundle in a crossflow under various cooling conditions corresponding to the working parameters of heat-utilization units at industrial thermoelectric plants (TEP) and in boiler houses has been obtained. A comparison of the calculated values of the heating efficiency of the indicated heat-utilization unit with the results of tests of the condensation heat-utilization unit at the Ul'yanovsk TEP-3 (Russia) has demonstrated their satisfactory agreement.

  6. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer Model for Convective Drying of Building Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Ashwani; Chandramohan, V. P.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of simultaneous heat and moisture transfer is developed for convective drying of building material. A rectangular brick is considered for sample object. Finite-difference method with semi-implicit scheme is used for solving the transient governing heat and mass transfer equation. Convective boundary condition is used, as the product is exposed in hot air. The heat and mass transfer equations are coupled through diffusion coefficient which is assumed as the function of temperature of the product. Set of algebraic equations are generated through space and time discretization. The discretized algebraic equations are solved by Gauss-Siedel method via iteration. Grid and time independent studies are performed for finding the optimum number of nodal points and time steps respectively. A MATLAB computer code is developed to solve the heat and mass transfer equations simultaneously. Transient heat and mass transfer simulations are performed to find the temperature and moisture distribution inside the brick.

  7. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical channel in evaporating a heated falling glycols liquid film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nait Alla, Abderrahman; Feddaoui, M'barek; Meftah, Hicham

    2015-12-01

    The interactive effects of heat and mass transfer in the evaporation of ethylene and propylene glycol flowing as falling films on vertical channel was investigated. The liquid film falls along a left plate which is externally subjected to a uniform heat flux while the right plate is the dry wall and is kept thermally insulated. The model solves the coupled governing equations in both phases together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by Tridiagonal Matrix Algorithm. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied glycols and water in the same conditions is made. The results indicate that water evaporates in more intense way in comparison to glycols and the increase of gas flow rate tends to improve slightly the evaporation.

  8. Combining Heat and Mass Flux Methods for Estimating Real-Time Evaporation from a Water Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, T. J.; Schladow, G.; Hook, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the heat and mass fluxes associated with evaporation from lakes and reservoirs is achallenge for hydrologists and water managers. This is in large part due to a lack of comprehensivemeasurement data for most systems, which is itself related to the inherent difficulties associated withmeasuring turbulent quantities. An alternative to direct measurement is to develop better models for theevaporative flux, based on the mean terms (as opposed to the turbulent terms) that drive evaporation.Algorithms for the evaporative heat and mass flux must reflect changes in heat storage in the system aswell as the other components of a mass balance (inflow, outflow, and precipitation). The energy budget basedapproach requires records of all the other energy fluxes across the air-water interface to separateout the latent heat component. Other approaches utilize the similarity between atmospheric velocity,temperature and humidity profiles. This study seeks to combine these approaches to build and calibrateheat flux models that can be used to accurately recreate a long-term record of mass storage changefrom a sub-set of meteorological data, lake surface temperature data, and hydrologic observations. Highfrequency lake level data are used to check that the mass balance is in fact achieved. Good agreement isshown between the heat flux methods and the mass balance results through comparison with a three-yearrecord of lake level. The results demonstrate that a combination of mass and heat flux approaches canbe used to generate accurate values of evaporation on daily or even sub-daily time-scales.

  9. Heat and Mass Transport from Thermally Degrading Thin Cellulosic Materials in a Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushida, G.; Baum, H. R.; Kashiwagi, T.; Di Blasi, C.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a theoretical model describing the behavior of a thermally thin cellulosic sheet heated by external thermal radiation in a quiescent microgravity environment. This model describes thermal and oxidative degradation of the sheet and the heat and mass transfer of evolved degradation products from the heated cellulosic surface into the gas phase. Two calculations are carried out: heating without thermal degradation, and heating with thermal degradation of the sheet with endothermic pyrolysis, exothermic thermal oxidative degradation, and highly exothermic char oxidation. It is shown that pyrolysis is the main degradation reaction. Self-sustained smoldering is controlled and severely limited by the reduced oxygen supply.

  10. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  11. Effects of Heating on Proportions of Azaspiracids 1-10 in Mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Identification of Carboxylated Precursors for Azaspiracids 5, 10, 13, and 15.

    PubMed

    Kilcoyne, Jane; McCarron, Pearse; Hess, Philipp; Miles, Christopher O

    2015-12-30

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are marine biotoxins that induce human illness following the consumption of contaminated shellfish. European Union regulation stipulates that only raw shellfish are tested, yet shellfish are often cooked prior to consumption. Analysis of raw and heat-treated mussels (Mytilus edulis) naturally contaminated with AZAs revealed significant differences (up to 4.6-fold) in AZA1-3 (1-3) and 6 (6) values due to heat-induced chemical conversions. Consistent with previous studies, high levels of 3 and 6 were detected in some samples that were otherwise below the limit of quantitation before heating. Relative to 1, in heat-treated mussels the average (n = 40) levels of 3 (range, 11-502%) and 6 (range, 3-170%) were 62 and 31%, respectively. AZA4 (4) (range, <1-27%), AZA5 (5) (range, 1-21%), and AZA8 (8) (range, 1-27%) were each ∼5%, whereas AZA7 (7), AZA9 (9), and AZA10 (10) (range, <1-8%) were each under 1.5%. Levels of 5, 10, AZA13 (13), and AZA15 (15) increased after heating, leading to the identification of novel carboxylated AZA precursors in raw shellfish extracts, which were shown by deuterium labeling to be precursors for 5, 10, 13, and 15.

  12. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  13. Transient, compressible heat and mass transfer in porous media using the strongly implicit iteration procedure.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.; Cox, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing heat and mass transfer in a porous matrix are solved in finite difference form with the aid of a new iterative technique (the strongly implicit procedure). Example numerical results demonstrate the characteristics of heat and mass transport in a porous matrix such as a charring ablator. It is emphasized that multidimensional flow must be considered when predicting the thermal response of a porous material subjected to nonuniform boundary conditions.

  14. Mathematical modeling of heat exchange between mine air and rock mass during fire

    SciTech Connect

    A.E. Krasnoshtein; B.P. Kazakov; A.V. Shalimov

    2006-05-15

    Solution of problems on heat exchange between ventilating air and rock mass and on gas admixture propagation in mine workings serve as a base for considering changes in heat-gas-air state at a mine after inflammation. The presented mathematical relations allow calculation of a varied velocity and movement direction of air flows, their temperatures and smoking conditions during fire.

  15. Turbulent heat and mass transfers across a thermally stratified air-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadimitrakis, Y. A.; Hsu, Y.-H. L.; Wu, J.

    1986-01-01

    Rates of heat and mass transfer across an air-water interface were measured in a wind-wave research facility, under various wind and thermal stability conditions (unless otherwise noted, mass refers to water vapor). Heat fluxes were obtained from both the eddy correlation and the profile method, under unstable, neutral, and stable conditions. Mass fluxes were obtained only under unstable stratification from the profile and global method. Under unstable conditions the turbulent Prandtl and Schmidt numbers remain fairly constant and equal to 0.74, whereas the rate of mass transfer varies linearly with bulk Richardson number. Under stable conditions the turbulent Prandtl number rises steadily to a value of 1.4 for a bulk Richardson number of about 0.016. Results of heat and mass transfer, expressed in the form of bulk aerodynamic coefficients with friction velocity as a parameter, are also compared with field data.

  16. Numerical study on heat and mass transfer in hygroscopic rotor during sorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyun-Geun; Park, Il Seouk

    2016-06-01

    Recently, interest in hygroscopic dehumidifiers has rapidly increased in the indoor environment industry because of their potential contribution to the development of hybrid (refrigerating + hygroscopic) dehumidifiers. Heat and mass transport phenomena such as adsorption and desorption, and their complex interactions occur in a desiccant rotor, which comprises many small hygroscopic channels. This study numerically investigated the conjugated heat and mass transfers in a channel modeled with the flow and porous desiccant regions, where only ordinary and surface diffusions (excluding Knudsen diffusion) during the sorption processes were considered. The change in the dehumidification performance depending on operating conditions such as the rotor's rotating speed, air flow rate, and adsorption-desorption ratio, was examined under various working environments. The temporal and spatial variations in the temperature, vapor mass fraction, and liquid water mass fraction in the channel were considered in detail. The closely linked heat and mass transports were clarified for a better understanding of the sorption processes in the desiccant rotor.

  17. Strip Diagrams: Illuminating Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jessica S.

    2013-01-01

    Proportional reasoning is both complex and layered, making it challenging to define. Lamon (1999) identified characteristics of proportional thinkers, such as being able to understand covariance of quantities; distinguish between proportional and nonproportional relationships; use a variety of strategies flexibly, most of which are nonalgorithmic,…

  18. Numerical Simulation of Heat and Mass Transfer in an Ejection Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kologrivov, M. M.; Buzovskii, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in an ejection apparatus during condensation of vapor-gas mixture components on cold brine droplets are presented. The local parameters of working flows were determined by solving a system of differential heat transfer equations with account for the hydrodynamic pattern. Calculations were carried out on the assumption that the liquid spray is directed horizontally. The Stefan formula has been derived with reference to a spherical coordinate system. The results of calculation of heat and mass transfer rates with and without regard for steam condensation jointly with hydrocarbon vapors are compared and analyzed. Estimation of the effect exerted by the apparatus and drip pan walls on the general process of heat and mass transfer was carried out. The results of simulation made it possible to quantitatively estimate the influence of the adopted thickness of the diffusional boundary layer on the vapor-air mixture cooling effect.

  19. Study of target heating induced by fast electrons in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessio, Morace; Alexander, Magunov; Dimitri, Batani; Renato, Redaelli; Claude, Fourment; Jorge, Santos Joao; Gerard, Malka; Alain, Boscheron; Alexis, Casner; Wigen, Nazarov; Tommaso, Vinci; Yasuaki, Okano; Yuichi, Inubushi; Hiroaki, Nishimura; Alessandro, Flacco; Chris, Spindloe; Martin, Tolley

    2010-02-01

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kind of targets: mass limited, foam targets and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alisé laser facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a ˜1-ps pulse with ˜10 J energy at a wavelength of ˜1 μm. Mass limited targets had three layers with thickness 10 μm C8H8, 1 μm C8H7Cl, 10 μm C8H8 with size 100 μm×100 μm. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of X-rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma mass limited targets to a temperature ˜250 eV with density ˜1021 cm-3. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 μm C8H8 overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the pre-pulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  20. Study of target heating induced by fast electrons in mass limited targets

    SciTech Connect

    Alessio, Morace; Dimitri, Batani; Renato, Redaelli; Alexander, Magunov; Claude, Fourment; Jorge, Santos Joao; Gerard, Malka; Alain, Boscheron; Wigen, Nazarov; Tommaso, Vinci; Yasuaki, Okano; Yuichi, Inubushi; Hiroaki, Nishimura; Alessandro, Flacco; Chris, Spindloe; Martin, Tolley

    2010-02-02

    We studied the induced plasma heating in three different kind of targets: mass limited, foam targets and large mass targets. The experiment was performed at Alise laser facility of CEA/CESTA. The laser system emitted a {approx}1-ps pulse with {approx}10 J energy at a wavelength of {approx}1 {mu}m. Mass limited targets had three layers with thickness 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8}, 1 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 7}Cl, 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} with size 100 {mu}mx100 {mu}m. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of X-rays emitted from the Cl tracer showed that it was possible to heat up the plasma mass limited targets to a temperature {approx}250 eV with density {approx}10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. The plasma heating is only produced by fast electron transport in the target, being the 10 {mu}m C{sub 8}H{sub 8} overcoating thick enough to prevent any possible direct irradiation of the tracer layer even taking into account mass-ablation due to the pre-pulse. These results demonstrate that with mass limited targets is possible to generate a plasma heated up to several hundreds eV. It is also very important for research concerning high energy density phenomena and for fast ignition (in particular for the study of fast electrons transport and induced heating).

  1. CFD analysis of the plate heat exchanger - Mathematical modelling of mass and heat transfer in serial connection with tubular heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojko, Marian; Kocich, Radim

    2016-06-01

    Application of numerical simulations based on the CFD calculation when the mass and heat transfer between the fluid flows is essential component of thermal calculation. In this article the mathematical model of the heat exchanger is defined, which is subsequently applied to the plate heat exchanger, which is connected in series with the other heat exchanger (tubular heat exchanger). The present contribution deals with the possibility to use the waste heat of the flue gas produced by small micro turbine. Inlet boundary conditions to the mathematical model of the plate heat exchanger are obtained from the results of numerical simulation of the tubular heat exchanger. Required parameters such for example inlet temperature was evaluated from temperature field, which was subsequently imported to the inlet boundary condition to the simulation of plate heat exchanger. From the results of 3D numerical simulations are evaluated basic flow variables including the evaluation of dimensionless parameters such as Colburn j-factor and friction ft factor. Numerical simulation is realized by software ANSYS Fluent15.0.

  2. Effects of anisotropic conduction and heat pipe interaction on minimum mass space radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Karl W.; Lund, Kurt O.

    1991-01-01

    Equations are formulated for the two dimensional, anisotropic conduction of heat in space radiator fins. The transverse temperature field was obtained by the integral method, and the axial field by numerical integration. A shape factor, defined for the axial boundary condition, simplifies the analysis and renders the results applicable to general heat pipe/conduction fin interface designs. The thermal results are summarized in terms of the fin efficiency, a radiation/axial conductance number, and a transverse conductance surface Biot number. These relations, together with those for mass distribution between fins and heat pipes, were used in predicting the minimum radiator mass for fixed thermal properties and fin efficiency. This mass is found to decrease monotonically with increasing fin conductivity. Sensitivities of the minimum mass designs to the problem parameters are determined.

  3. Numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer during freeze-drying.

    PubMed

    Ku, A C; Furry, R B; Jordan, W K; Dropkin, D

    1976-10-01

    The transient-state external heat and mass-transfer during freeze-drying was investigated. The spaces between the heaters and porous product-surfaces were simulated as semi porous channels, with mass-injection into the channels from the sublimation of ice. The energy, vorticity, concentration, and stream function/vorticity equations were the governing equations used as the mathematical model. These partial differential-equations were solved by finite-difference, numberical methods. The Fromm, Alternating Direction Implicity, and Upwind Difference methods were used in solving the parabolic equations; and the Successive Over Relaxation method was adopted to solve the elliptic equation. Numerical solutions obtained from the digital computer for the external heat and mass-transfer during freeze-drying were computed for Reynolds numbers equal t0 0.1, 1.0, and 4.0 and Grashof numbers equal to 0, +/- 100, and +/- 1000. The Prandtl number selected for water vapor was 1.0. One set of these solutions were compared to a known, analytical solution, and good agreement was obtained. The external heat and mass-transfer mechanism was then combined with the internal-heat-transfer mechanism developed by Dyer and Sunderland (1968), and the equations describing the relation of heater temperatures and product surface-temperatures developed by Massey and Sunderland (1972). A thorough computer-simulation was carried out for the combined heat and mass-transfer mechanism during freeze-drying of food products.

  4. Heat and mass transfer with condensation in capillary porous bodies.

    PubMed

    Larbi, Salah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this present work is related to wetting process analysis caused by condensation phenomena in capillary porous material by using a numerical simulation. Special emphasis is given to the study of the mechanism involved and the evaluation of classical theoretical models used as a predictive tool. A further discussion will be given for the distribution of the liquid phase for both its pendular and its funicular state and its consequence on diffusion coefficients of the mathematical model used. Beyond the complexity of the interaction effects between vaporisation-condensation processes on the gas-liquid interfaces, the comparison between experimental and numerical simulations permits to identify the specific contribution and the relative part of mass and energy transport parameters. This analysis allows us to understand the contribution of each part of the mathematical model used and to simplify the study.

  5. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  6. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  7. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... and for a flow monitoring system and an O2 or CO2 diluent gas monitoring system to measure heat...

  8. Bridge Frost Prediction by Heat and Mass Transfer Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, Tina M.; Takle, Eugene S.

    2006-03-01

    Frost on roadways and bridges can present hazardous conditions to motorists, particularly when it occurs in patches or on bridges when adjacent roadways are clear of frost. To minimize materials costs, vehicle corrosion, and negative environmental impacts, frost-suppression chemicals should be applied only when, where, and in the appropriate amounts needed to maintain roadways in a safe condition for motorists. Accurate forecasts of frost onset times, frost intensity, and frost disappearance (e.g., melting or sublimation) are needed to help roadway maintenance personnel decide when, where, and how much frost-suppression chemical to use. A finite-difference algorithm (BridgeT) has been developed that simulates vertical heat transfer in a bridge based on evolving meteorological conditions at its top and bottom as supplied by a weather forecast model. BridgeT simulates bridge temperatures at numerous points within the bridge (including its upper and lower surface) at each time step of the weather forecast model and calculates volume per unit area (i.e., depth) of deposited, melted, or sublimed frost. This model produces forecasts of bridge surface temperature, frost depth, and bridge condition (i.e., dry, wet, icy/snowy). Bridge frost predictions and bridge surface temperature are compared with observed and measured values to assess BridgeT's skill in forecasting bridge frost and associated conditions.

  9. Atomistic long-term simulation of heat and mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, G.; Wang, K.; Romero, I.; Ariza, M. P.; Ortiz, M.

    2014-12-01

    We formulate a theory of non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics for ensembles of atoms or molecules. The theory is an application of Jaynes' maximum entropy principle, which allows the statistical treatment of systems away from equilibrium. In particular, neither temperature nor atomic fractions are required to be uniform but instead are allowed to take different values from particle to particle. In addition, following the Coleman-Noll method of continuum thermodynamics we derive a dissipation inequality expressed in terms of discrete thermodynamic fluxes and forces. This discrete dissipation inequality effectively sets the structure for discrete kinetic potentials that couple the microscopic field rates to the corresponding driving forces, thus resulting in a closed set of equations governing the evolution of the system. We complement the general theory with a variational meanfield theory that provides a basis for the formulation of computationally tractable approximations. We present several validation cases, concerned with equilibrium properties of alloys, heat conduction in silicon nanowires and hydrogen desorption from palladium thin films, that demonstrate the range and scope of the method and assess its fidelity and predictiveness. These validation cases are characterized by the need or desirability to account for atomic-level properties while simultaneously entailing time scales much longer than those accessible to direct molecular dynamics. The ability of simple meanfield models and discrete kinetic laws to reproduce equilibrium properties and long-term behavior of complex systems is remarkable.

  10. 3D modelling of coupled mass and heat transfer of a convection-oven roasting process.

    PubMed

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Gernaey, Krist V; Adler-Nissen, Jens

    2013-04-01

    A 3D mathematical model of coupled heat and mass transfer describing oven roasting of meat has been developed from first principles. The proposed mechanism for the mass transfer of water is modified and based on a critical literature review of the effect of heat on meat. The model equations are based on a conservation of mass and energy, coupled through Darcy's equations of porous media - the water flow is mainly pressure-driven. The developed model together with theoretical and experimental assessments were used to explain the heat and water transport and the effect of the change in microstructure (permeability, water binding capacity and elastic modulus) that occur during the meat roasting process. The developed coupled partial differential equations were solved by using COMSOL Multiphysics®3.5 and state variables are predicted as functions of both position and time. The proposed mechanism was partially validated by experiments in a convection oven where temperatures were measured online.

  11. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection of... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. (a) Coal-fired units. The owner or operator of a...

  12. Natural convective heat and mass transfer in a porous triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid in presence of heat generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Raju; Parvin, Salma; Khan, Md. Abdul Hakim

    2016-07-01

    The problem of natural convective heat and mass transfer in a triangular enclosure filled with nanofluid saturated porous medium in presence of heat generation has been studied in this paper. The bottom wall of the cavity is heated uniformly, the left inclined wall is heated linearly and the right inclined wall is considered to be cold. The concentration is higher at bottom wall, lower at right inclined wall and linearly concentrated at left inclined wall of the cavity. The governing equations are transformed to the dimensionless form and solved numerically using Galerkin weighted residual technique of finite element method. The results are obtained in terms of streamline, isotherms, isoconcentrations, Nusselt number (Nu) and Sherwood number (Sh) for the parameters thermal Rayleigh number (RaT), Heat generation parameter (λ) and Lewis number (Le) while Prandtl number (Pr), Buoyancy ratio (N) and Darcy number (Da) are considered to be fixed. It is observed that flow pattern, temperature fields and concentration fields are affected by the variation of above considered parameters.

  13. Effect of radiator position and mass flux on the dryer room heat transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmanto, M.; Sulistyowati, E. D.; Okariawan, I. D. K.

    A room radiator as usually used in cold countries, is actually able to be used as a heat source to dry goods, especially in the rainy season where the sun seldom shines due to much rain and cloud. Experiments to investigate effects of radiator position and mass flux on heat transfer rate were performed. This study is to determine the best position of the radiator and the optimum mass flux. The radiator used was a finned radiator made of copper pipes and aluminum fins with an overall dimension of 220 mm × 50 mm × 310 mm. The prototype room was constructed using plywood and wood frame with an overall size of 1000 mm × 1000 mm × 1000 mm. The working fluid was heated water flowing inside the radiator and air circulating naturally inside the prototype room. The nominal mass fluxes employed were 800, 900 and 1000 kg/m2 s. The water was kept at 80 °C at the radiator entrance, while the initial air temperature inside the prototype room was 30 °C. Three positions of the radiator were examined. The results show that the effect of the mass flux on the forced and free convection heat transfer rate is insignificant but the radiator position strongly affects the heat transfer rate for both forced and free convection.

  14. Differential heat stability of amphenicols characterized by structural degradation, mass spectrometry and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Franje, Catherine A; Chang, Shao-Kuang; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Davis, Jennifer L; Lee, Yan-Wen; Lee, Ren-Jye; Chang, Chao-Chin; Chou, Chi-Chung

    2010-12-01

    Heat stability of amphenicols and the relationship between structural degradation and antimicrobial activity after heating has not been well investigated. Florfenicol (FF), thiamphenicol (TAP), and chloramphenicol (CAP) were heated at 100 degrees C in water, salt water, soybean sauce and chicken meat for up to 2h. Degradation and antimicrobial activity of the compounds was evaluated using capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV-DAD spectrometry, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay, and gas chromatography with electron impact ionization mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS). Heat stability of amphenicols in matrices was ranked as water> or =salt water>soybean sauce>meat, suggesting that heat degradation of amphenicols was accelerated in soybean sauce and was not protected in meat. Heat stability by drug and matrices was ranked as FF>TAP=CAP in water, FF=TAP>CAP in salt water, TAP> or =FF=CAP in soybean sauce, and TAP> or =FF=CAP in meat, indicating differential heat stability of amphenicols among the 3 drugs and in different matrices. In accordance with the less than 20% degradation, the MIC against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus did not change after 2h heating in water. A 5-min heating of amphenicols in water by microwave oven generated comparable percentage degradation to boiling in water bath for 30 min to 1h. Both CE and GC-MS analysis showed that heating of FF produced TAP but not FF amine as one of its breakdown products. In conclusion, despite close similarity in structure; amphenicols exhibited differential behavior toward heating degradation in solutions and protein matrices. Although higher degradations of amphenicols were observed in soybean sauce and meat, heating treatment may generate product with antimicrobial activity (FF to TAP), therefore, heating of amphenicol residues in food cannot always be assumed safe.

  15. Mathematical modeling of non-stationary heat and mass transfer in disperse systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermakova, L. A.; Krasnoperov, S. Y.; Kalashnikov, S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The work describes mathematical model of non-stationary heat and mass transfer processes in dispersed environment, taking into account the phase transition; presents the results of numeric modelling for conditions of direct reduction in high-temperature reducing atmosphere, corresponding to the direct reduction in the jet-emulsion unit according to the principles of self-organization. The method was developed for calculation of heat and mass transfer of the aggregate of iron material particles in accordance with the given distribution law.

  16. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  17. Comments on article 'symmetric heat and mass transfer in a rotating spherical layer,' JETP 94 (3), 459 (2002)

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, D. V. Malygin, A. P.

    2012-02-15

    Analytic solutions to the heat and mass transfer equations, which were obtained in [1], are corrected. It is shown that the dependence of the growth rate of the Earth's inner core on heat flux changes in this case.

  18. Comparison of glycation in conventionally and microwave-heated ovalbumin by high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Tu, Zong-Cai; Liu, Guang-Xian; Liu, Cheng-Mei; Huang, Xiao-Qin; Xiao, Hui

    2013-11-15

    The glycation extent of ovalbumin under two heating conditions, conventional and microwave heating was monitored by high resolution mass spectrometry, following pepsin digestion. The sequence coverage of the unglycated and glycated ovalbumin was 100% and 95%, respectively. About 35.2% of the lysines after microwave heating and 40.8% of the lysines after conventional heating were modified by d-glucose. The glycation content increased quickly when ovalbumin-glucose mixture was incubated for 15min, under both processing conditions. These modifications were slowed down after 30min of heating and no obvious advanced stage products were observed. The glycated peptides exhibited varying degrees of glycation, under both conventional and microwave heating, suggesting that glycation is strongly relevant to the protein structure. The fact that some peptides showed a lower level of glycation when heated by microwave indicated that microwave radiation might be a non-thermal process. In addition, the lack of browning after microwave heating emphasised the difference between microwave and conventional heating. PMID:23790877

  19. Computation of the gas mass and heat fluxes in a rectangular channel in the free molecular regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germider, O. V.; Popov, V. N.; Yushkanov, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of heat- and mass transfer in a long rectangular channel of a constant cross section is solved in the free molecular regime. The distributions of the mass flow rate and the heat flux vector over the channel cross section are calculated. The specific gas mass flux and heat flux are calculated. The results are compared with those obtained for nearly free molecular flows.

  20. Coincidence Proportional Counter

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J H

    1950-11-21

    A coincidence proportional counter having a plurality of collecting electrodes so disposed as to measure the range or energy spectrum of an ionizing particle-emitting source such as an alpha source, is disclosed.

  1. Heat and mass transfer through interfaces of nanosized bubbles/droplets: the influence of interface curvature.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2014-06-14

    Heat and mass transfer through interfaces is central in nucleation theory, nanotechnology and many other fields of research. Heat transfer in nanoparticle suspensions and nanoporous materials displays significant and opposite correlations with particle and pore size. We investigate these effects further for transfer of heat and mass across interfaces of bubbles and droplets with radii down to 2 nm. We use square gradient theory at and beyond equilibrium to calculate interfacial resistances in single-component and two-component systems. Interface resistances, as defined by non-equilibrium thermodynamics, vary continuously with the interface curvature, from negative (bubbles) to zero (planar interface) to positive (droplet) values. The interface resistances of 2 nm radii bubbles/droplets are in some cases one order of magnitude different from those of the planar interface. The square gradient model predicts that the thermal interface resistances of droplets decrease with particle size, in accordance with results from the literature, only if the peak in the local resistivity is shifted toward the vapor phase. The curvature will then have an opposite effect on the resistance of bubbles and droplets. The model predicts that the coupling between heat and mass fluxes, when quantified as the heat of transfer of the interface, is of the same order of magnitude as the enthalpy change across the interface, and depends much less on curvature than the interface resistances.

  2. Heat and mass transfer through interfaces of nanosized bubbles/droplets: the influence of interface curvature.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Øivind; Bedeaux, Dick; Kjelstrup, Signe

    2014-06-14

    Heat and mass transfer through interfaces is central in nucleation theory, nanotechnology and many other fields of research. Heat transfer in nanoparticle suspensions and nanoporous materials displays significant and opposite correlations with particle and pore size. We investigate these effects further for transfer of heat and mass across interfaces of bubbles and droplets with radii down to 2 nm. We use square gradient theory at and beyond equilibrium to calculate interfacial resistances in single-component and two-component systems. Interface resistances, as defined by non-equilibrium thermodynamics, vary continuously with the interface curvature, from negative (bubbles) to zero (planar interface) to positive (droplet) values. The interface resistances of 2 nm radii bubbles/droplets are in some cases one order of magnitude different from those of the planar interface. The square gradient model predicts that the thermal interface resistances of droplets decrease with particle size, in accordance with results from the literature, only if the peak in the local resistivity is shifted toward the vapor phase. The curvature will then have an opposite effect on the resistance of bubbles and droplets. The model predicts that the coupling between heat and mass fluxes, when quantified as the heat of transfer of the interface, is of the same order of magnitude as the enthalpy change across the interface, and depends much less on curvature than the interface resistances. PMID:24740009

  3. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer in absorption of gases in laminar liquid films

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G

    1982-09-01

    A theoretical analysis of the combined heat and mass transfer process taking place in the absorption of a gas or vapor into a laminar liquid film is described. This type of process, which occurs in many gas-liquid systems, often releases only a small amount of heat, making the process almost isothermal. In some cases, however, the heat of absorption is significant and temperature variations cannot be ignored. One example, from which the present study originated, is in absorption heat pumps where mass transfer is produced specifically to generate a temperature change. The model analyzed describes a liquid film that flows over an inclined plane and has its free surface in contact with stagnant vapor. The absorption process at the surface creates nonuniform temperature and concentration profiles in the film, which develop until equilibrium between the liquid and vapor is achieved. The energy and diffusion equations are solved simultaneously to give the temperature and concentration variations at the interface and the wall. Two cases of interest are considered: constant-temperature and adiabatic walls. The Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are expressed in terms of the operating parameters, from which heat and mass transfer coefficients can be determined. The Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are found to depend on the Peclet and Lewis numbers as well as on the equilibrium characteristics of the working materials.

  4. Combined chromatographic and mass spectrometric toolbox for fingerprinting migration from PET tray during microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Alin, Jonas; Hakkarainen, Minna

    2013-02-13

    A combined chromatographic and mass spectrometric toolbox was utilized to determine the interactions between poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) food packaging and different food simulants during microwave heating. Overall and specific migration was determined by combining weight loss measurements with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). This allowed mapping of low molecular weight migrants in the molecular range up to 2000 g/mol. Microwave heating caused significantly faster migration of cyclic oligomers into ethanol and isooctane as compared to migration during conventional heating at the same temperature. This effect was more significant at lower temperature at which diffusion rates are generally lower. It was also shown that transesterification took place between PET and ethanol during microwave heating, leading to formation of diethyl terephthalate. The detected migrants included cyclic oligomers from dimer to hexamer, in most cases containing extra ethylene glycol units, and oxidized Irgafos 168. ESI-MS combined with CID MS-MS was an excellent tool for structural interpretation of the nonvolatile compounds migrating to the food simulants. The overall migration was below the overall migration limit of 10 mg/dm(2) set by the European commission after 4 h of microwave heating at 100 °C in all studied food simulants.

  5. Measurements of Combined Axial Mass and Heat Transport in He II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Warren W.; Jones, Michael C.

    An experiment was performed that allowed measurements of both axial mass and heat transport of He-II (the superfluid phase of helium 4) in a long tube. The apparatus allowed the pressure difference and the temperature difference across the flow tube to each be independently adjusted, and the resulting steady-state values of net fluid velocity and…

  6. Model Scramjet Inlet Unstart Induced by Mass Addition and Heat Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Baccarella, Damiano; McGann, Brendan; Liu, Qili; Wermer, Lydiy; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-11-01

    The inlet unstart phenomena in a model scramjet are investigated at an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. The unstart induced by nitrogen or ethylene jets at low or high enthalpy Mach 4.5 freestream flow conditions are compared. The jet injection pressurizes the downstream flow by mass addition and flow blockage. In case of the ethylene jet injection, heat release from combustion increases the backpressure further. Time-resolved schlieren imaging is performed at the jet and the lip of the model inlet to visualize the flow features during unstart. High frequency pressure measurements are used to provide information on pressure fluctuation at the scramjet wall. In both of the mass and heat release driven unstart cases, it is observed that there are similar flow transient and quasi-steady behaviors of unstart shockwave system during the unstart processes. Combustion driven unstart induces severe oscillatory flow motions of the jet and the unstart shock at the lip of the scramjet inlet after the completion of the unstart process, while the unstarted flow induced by solely mass addition remains relatively steady. The discrepancies between the processes of mass and heat release driven unstart are explained by flow choking mechanism.

  7. Mass Spectrometry of 3D-printed plastic parts under plasma and radiative heat environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, W. F.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Bates, E. M.; Birmingham, W.; Takeno, J.; Knop, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present the design and preliminary results of a mass spectrometry system used to assess vacuum compatibility of 3D-printed parts, developed at the Dusty Plasma Laboratory of the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). A decrease in outgassing was observed when electroplated parts were inserted in the test chamber vs. non electroplated ones. Outgassing will also be tested under different environments such as plasma and radiative heat. Heat will be generated by a titanium getter pump placed inside a 90 degree elbow, such that titanium does not coat the part. A mirror inside the elbow will be used to throttle the heat arriving at the part. Plasma exposure of 3D printed parts will be achieved by placing the parts in a separate chamber connected to the spectrometer by a vacuum line that is differentially pumped. The signals from the mass spectrometer will be analyzed to see how the vacuum conditions fluctuate under different plasma discharges.

  8. Charge-to-mass-ratio-dependent ion heating during magnetic reconnection in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Almagri, A. F.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W.; Craig, D.

    2013-05-15

    Temperature evolution during magnetic reconnection has been spectroscopically measured for various ion species in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Measurements are made predominantly in the direction parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field. It is found that the increase in parallel ion temperature during magnetic reconnection events increases with the charge-to-mass ratio of the ion species. This trend can be understood if the heating mechanism is anisotropic, favoring heating in the perpendicular degree of freedom, with collisional relaxation of multiple ion species. The charge-to-mass ratio trend for the parallel temperature derives from collisional isotropization. This result emphasizes that collisional isotropization and energy transfer must be carefully modeled when analyzing ion heating measurements and comparing to theoretical predictions.

  9. Heat and mass transfer at adiabatic evaporation of binary zeotropic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, M. S.; Makarova, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    Results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in a laminar flow of three-component gas at adiabatic evaporation of binary solutions from a flat plate are presented. The studies were carried out for the perfect solution of ethanol/methanol and zeotrope solutions of water/acetone, benzene/acetone, and ethanol/acetone. The liquid-vapor equilibrium is described by the Raoult law for the ideal solution and Carlson-Colburn model for real solutions. The effect of gas temperature and liquid composition on the heat and diffusion flows, and temperature of vapor-gas mixture at the interface is analyzed. The formula for calculating the temperature of the evaporation surface for the binary liquid mixtures using the similarity of heat and mass transfer was proposed. Data of numerical simulations are in a good agreement with the results of calculations based on the proposed dependence for all examined liquid mixtures in the considered range of temperatures and pressures.

  10. Thermal treatments of foods: a predictive general-purpose code for heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, Anna Angela

    2005-05-01

    Thermal treatments of foods required accurate processing protocols. In this context, mathematical modeling of heat and mass transfer can play an important role in the control and definition of the process parameters as well as to design processing systems. In this work a code able to simulate heat and mass transfer phenomena within solid bodies has been developed. The code has been written with the ability of describing different geometries and it can account for any kind of different initial/boundary conditions. Transport phenomena within multi-layer bodies can be described, and time/position dependent material parameters can be implemented. Finally, the code has been validated by comparison with a problem for which the analytical solution is known, and by comparison with a differential scanning calorimetry signal that described the heating treatment of a raw potato (Solanum tuberosum).

  11. Adaptation through proportion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Liyang; Shi, Wenjia; Tang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Adaptation is a ubiquitous feature in biological sensory and signaling networks. It has been suggested that adaptive systems may follow certain simple design principles across diverse organisms, cells and pathways. One class of networks that can achieve adaptation utilizes an incoherent feedforward control, in which two parallel signaling branches exert opposite but proportional effects on the output at steady state. In this paper, we generalize this adaptation mechanism by establishing a steady-state proportionality relationship among a subset of nodes in a network. Adaptation can be achieved by using any two nodes in the sub-network to respectively regulate the output node positively and negatively. We focus on enzyme networks and first identify basic regulation motifs consisting of two and three nodes that can be used to build small networks with proportional relationships. Larger proportional networks can then be constructed modularly similar to LEGOs. Our method provides a general framework to construct and analyze a class of proportional and/or adaptation networks with arbitrary size, flexibility and versatile functional features.

  12. Thermal conductivity of highly asymmetric binary mixtures: how important are heat/mass coupling effects?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jeff; Bresme, Fernando

    2014-06-28

    The coupling of mass and heat fluxes is responsible for the Soret effect in fluid mixtures containing particles of dissimilar mass and/or size. We investigate using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations the relevance of these coupling effects in determining the thermal transport in fluids consisting of binary mixtures where the individual components feature significant mass, 1 : 8, or size, 1 : 3, asymmetries. We quantify the thermal transport by using both boundary driven molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) and the equilibrium Green-Kubo (GK) approach and investigate the impact of different heat flux definitions, relevant in kinetic theory and experiments, in the quantification of the thermal conductivity. We find that the thermal conductivities obtained from the different definitions agree within numerical accuracy, suggesting that the Soret coefficient does not lead to significant changes in the thermal conduction, even for the large asymmetries considered here, which lead to significant Soret coefficients (∼10(-2) K(-1)). The asymmetry in size and mass introduces large differences in the specific enthalpy of the individual components that must be carefully considered to compute accurate thermal conductivities using the GK approach. Neglecting the enthalpic contributions, results in large overestimations of the thermal conductivity, typically between 20% and 50%. Further, we quantify the time dependent behavior of the internal energy and mass flux correlation functions and propose a microscopic mechanism for the heat transport in these asymmetric mixtures.

  13. Calculation of Mass Transfer Coefficients in a Crystal Growth Chamber through Heat Transfer Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J H; Hand, L A

    2005-04-21

    The growth rate of a crystal in a supersaturated solution is limited by both reaction kinetics and the local concentration of solute. If the local mass transfer coefficient is too low, concentration of solute at the crystal-solution interface will drop below saturation, leading to a defect in the growing crystal. Here, mass transfer coefficients are calculated for a rotating crystal growing in a supersaturated solution of potassium diphosphate (KDP) in water. Since mass transfer is difficult to measure directly, the heat transfer coefficient of a scale model crystal in water is measured using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP). To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of TSP to measure temperatures in water. The corresponding mass transfer coefficient is then calculated using the Chilton- Colburn analogy. Measurements were made for three crystal sizes at two running conditions each. Running conditions include periodic reversals of rotation direction. Heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly both across the crystal faces and over the course of a rotation cycle, but not from one face to another. Mean heat transfer coefficients increased with both crystal size and rotation rate. Computed mass transfer coefficients were broadly in line with expectations from the full-scale crystal growth experiments. Additional experiments show that continuous rotation of the crystal results in about a 30% lower heat transfer compared to rotation with periodic reversals. The continuous rotation case also shows a periodic variation in heat transfer coefficient of about 15%, with a period about 1/20th of the rotation rate.

  14. On the optimum fields and bounds for heat and mass transport in two turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitanov, Nikolay

    2011-12-01

    The optimum theory of turbulence is one of the few tools for obtaining analytical results for transport of heat, mass or momentum by turbulent flows. This is achieved by asymptotic theory which is valid for large values of the characteristic numbers of the investigated fluid system. For small and intermediate values of the Reynolds, Rayleigh or Taylor numbers we have to solve numerically the Euler-Lagrange equations of the corresponding variational problems. Below we discuss numerical results from the application of the Howard-Busse method of the optimum theory of turbulence to two problems: convective heat transport in non-rotating and rotating fluid layer and mass transport in pipe flow. We obtain profiles of the optimum fields and discuss the evolution of the thickness of the boundary layers as well as present our first results about the lower bound on the mass transport in a pipe flow.

  15. Thermal Performance of a Multi-Evaporator Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Masses and Thermoelectric Coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jen-Tung; Ottenstein, Laura; Birur, Gajanana

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes thermal performance of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with two evaporators and two condensers in ambient testing. Each evaporator has an outer diameter of 15mm and a length of 76mm, and has an integral compensation chamber (CC). An aluminum mass of 500 grams is attached to each evaporator to simulate the instrument mass. A thermoelectric cooler (TEC) is installed on each CC to provide heating as well as cooling for CC temperature control. A flow regulator is installed in the condenser section to prevent vapor from going back to the evaporators in the event that one of the condensers is fully utilized. Ammonia was used as the working fluid. Tests conducted included start-up, power cycle, heat load sharing, sink temperature cycle, operating temperature control with TECs, and capillary limit tests. Experimental data showed that the loop could start with a heat load of less than 10W even with added thermal masses. The loop operated stably with even and uneven evaporator heat loads, and even and uneven condenser sink temperatures. The operating temperature could be controlled within +/- 0.5K of the set point temperature using either or both TECs, and the required TEC control heater power was less than 2W under most test conditions. Heat load sharing between the two evaporators was also successfully demonstrated. The loop had a heat transport capability of 120W to 140W, and could recover from a dry-out when the heat load was reduced. The 500-gram aluminum mass on each evaporator had a negligible effect on the loop operation. Existing LHPs servicing orbiting spacecraft have a single evaporator with an outer diameter of about 25mm. Important performance characteristics demonstrated by this LHP included: 1) Operation of an LHP with 15mm diameter evaporators; 2) Robustness and reliability of an LHP with multiple evaporators and multiple condensers under various test conditions; 3) Heat load sharing among LHP evaporators; 4) Effectiveness of TECs in controlling

  16. Heat and mass transfer in deep-frying of pumpkin, sweet potato and taro.

    PubMed

    Ahromrit, Araya; Nema, Prabhat K

    2010-12-01

    Heat and mass transfer parameters, effective thermal diffusivity, heat transfer coefficient, effective moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient-for pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) under deep-frying conditions were determined by fitting experimental data on transient values of temperature and moisture content to the solution of the standard diffusion equation in cylindrical coordinates as modified by Dincer (Heat Mass Transfer 32:109-113, 1996). A case of Biot number in the range of 0< B i <100 was considered in this study. Remarkably good agreement was found between estimated and calculated values as the root mean square error between the measured and calculated temperature and moisture content values were only 5.0% and 1.3%, respectively. The model can be easily and effectively used to determine effective diffusion coefficients as well as transfer coefficients for heat and mass transfer. The oil uptake values for the above vegetables were lower than the values reported for other deep fried products. PMID:23572697

  17. Keep It in Proportion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Richard G.

    1985-01-01

    The ratio factors approach involves recognizing a given fraction, then multiplying so that units cancel. This approach, which is grounded in concrete operational thinking patterns, provides a standard for science ratio and proportion problems. Examples are included for unit conversions, mole problems, molarity, speed/density problems, and…

  18. Upward and downward heat and mass transfer with miniature periodically operating loop thermosyphons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantozzi, Fabio; Filippeschi, Sauro; Latrofa, Enrico Maria

    2004-03-01

    Upward and downward two-phase heat and mass transfer has been considered in the present paper. The heat and mass transfer with the condenser located below the evaporator has been obtained by inserting an accumulator tank in the liquid line of a loop thermosyphon and enforcing a pressure pulsation. In previous papers these heat transfer devices have been called pulsated two phase thermosyphons (PTPT). A mini PTPT has been experimentally investigated. It has shown a stable periodic heat transfer regime weakly influenced by the position of the condenser with respect to the evaporator. In contrast a classical loop mini thermosyphon (diameter of connecting pipes 4 mm) did not achieve a stable functioning for the investigated level differences between evaporator and condenser lower than 0.37 m. The present study shows that the functioning of a PTPT device does not directly depend on the level difference or the presence of noncondensable gas. In order to obtain a natural circulation in mini or micro loops, a periodically operating heat transfer regime should therefore be considered.

  19. Modeling of Paleo Heat-and-Mass Trasport for Prognosys of Mineral Deposits Using GIS

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkasov, Sergei; Vishnevskaya, Natalia; Cassard, Daniel; Sterligov, Boris; Arbuzova, Ekaterina

    2008-05-07

    The heat-and-mass flow from the mantle to the surface can be characterized by the three basic models. The first one represents just a convective heating of the crust by the hot mantle. Two other kinds of the heat-and-mass flow system are rather anomalous and sometimes serve as an engine for launching ore-forming processes. The second model describes a pipe-like conductive heat-and-flow system reasoning appearance of mafic-ultramafic intrusions coming to the surface directly from the upper mantle. The third model corresponds with a complicated convective-conductive process involving melting of crustal rocks, and forming magmatic chambers inside the crust. Analysis of gravimetric and seismic data using geographic informational systems allows us to locate elements of the anomalous heat-and-flow systems. Some of the elements (their projection on the surface) correlate with position of the known deposits of gold, silver, tungsten, tin, sometimes--molybdenum and base metals. The results of studies conducted by the Russian-French Metallogenic Laboratory in the frames of crystalline shields of Russia demonstrate location of 87% of the known gold-bearing deposits inside the zones defined by such analysis.

  20. 40 CFR 75.71 - Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MONITORING NOX Mass Emissions Provisions § 75.71 Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specific provisions for monitoring NOX and heat input for the purpose of calculating NOX mass emissions. 75.71 Section 75.71 Protection...

  1. Heat and mass transfer for turbulent flow of chemically reacting gas in eccentric annular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Besedina, T.V.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Udot, A.V.; Yakushev, A.P.

    1988-02-01

    Because of the possibility of using dissociating gases as coolants and working bodies of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to develop computational algorithms for calculating heat and mass transfer processes under conditions of nonequilibrium flow of chemically reacting gases not only in axisymmetric channels, but also in channels with a complex transverse cross section (including also in eccentric annular channels). An algorithm is proposed for calculating the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields under conditions of cooling of a cylindrical heat-releasing rod, placed off-center in a circular casing pipe, by a longitudinal flow of chemically reacting gas (N/sub 2/O/sub 4/).

  2. Conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method.

    PubMed

    Li, Like; Chen, Chen; Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James F

    2014-04-01

    An interface treatment for conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method is proposed based on our previously proposed second-order accurate Dirichlet and Neumann boundary schemes. The continuity of temperature (concentration) and its flux at the interface for heat (mass) transfer is intrinsically satisfied without iterative computations, and the interfacial temperature (concentration) and their fluxes are conveniently obtained from the microscopic distribution functions without finite-difference calculations. The present treatment takes into account the local geometry of the interface so that it can be directly applied to curved interface problems such as conjugate heat and mass transfer in porous media. For straight interfaces or curved interfaces with no tangential gradient, the coupling between the interfacial fluxes along the discrete lattice velocity directions is eliminated and thus the proposed interface schemes can be greatly simplified. Several numerical tests are conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of the proposed conjugate interface treatment, including (i) steady convection-diffusion in a channel containing two different fluids, (ii) unsteady convection-diffusion in the channel, (iii) steady heat conduction inside a circular domain with two different solid materials, and (iv) unsteady mass transfer from a spherical droplet in an extensional creeping flow. The accuracy and order of convergence of the simulated interior temperature (concentration) field, the interfacial temperature (concentration), and heat (mass) flux are examined in detail and compared with those obtained from the "half-lattice division" treatment in the literature. The present analysis and numerical results show that the half-lattice division scheme is second-order accurate only when the interface is fixed at the center of the lattice links, while the present treatment preserves second-order accuracy for arbitrary link fractions. For curved

  3. Conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method

    SciTech Connect

    Li, LK; Chen, C; Mei, RW; Klausner, JF

    2014-04-22

    An interface treatment for conjugate heat and mass transfer in the lattice Boltzmann equation method is proposed based on our previously proposed second-order accurate Dirichlet and Neumann boundary schemes. The continuity of temperature (concentration) and its flux at the interface for heat (mass) transfer is intrinsically satisfied without iterative computations, and the interfacial temperature (concentration) and their fluxes are conveniently obtained from the microscopic distribution functions without finite-difference calculations. The present treatment takes into account the local geometry of the interface so that it can be directly applied to curved interface problems such as conjugate heat and mass transfer in porous media. For straight interfaces or curved interfaces with no tangential gradient, the coupling between the interfacial fluxes along the discrete lattice velocity directions is eliminated and thus the proposed interface schemes can be greatly simplified. Several numerical tests are conducted to verify the applicability and accuracy of the proposed conjugate interface treatment, including (i) steady convection-diffusion in a channel containing two different fluids, (ii) unsteady convection-diffusion in the channel, (iii) steady heat conduction inside a circular domain with two different solid materials, and (iv) unsteady mass transfer from a spherical droplet in an extensional creeping flow. The accuracy and order of convergence of the simulated interior temperature (concentration) field, the interfacial temperature (concentration), and heat (mass) flux are examined in detail and compared with those obtained from the "half-lattice division" treatment in the literature. The present analysis and numerical results show that the half-lattice division scheme is second-order accurate only when the interface is fixed at the center of the lattice links, while the present treatment preserves second-order accuracy for arbitrary link fractions. For curved

  4. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  5. Monitor proportional counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.

    1979-01-01

    An Uhuru class Ar-CO2 gas filled proportional counter sealed with a 1.5 mil beryllium window and sensitive to X-rays in the energy bandwidth from 1.5 to 22 keV is presented. This device is coaligned with the X-ray telescope aboard the Einstein Observatory and takes data as a normal part of the Observatory operations.

  6. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  7. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs.

  8. Probe Heating Method for the Analysis of Solid Samples Using a Portable Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Kumano, Shun; Sugiyama, Masuyuki; Yamada, Masuyoshi; Nishimura, Kazushige; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morokuma, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on the development of a portable mass spectrometer for the onsite screening of illicit drugs, but our previous sampling system could only be used for liquid samples. In this study, we report on an attempt to develop a probe heating method that also permits solid samples to be analyzed using a portable mass spectrometer. An aluminum rod is used as the sampling probe. The powdered sample is affixed to the sampling probe or a droplet of sample solution is placed on the tip of the probe and dried. The probe is then placed on a heater to vaporize the sample. The vapor is then introduced into the portable mass spectrometer and analyzed. With the heater temperature set to 130°C, the developed system detected 1 ng of methamphetamine, 1 ng of amphetamine, 3 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, 1 ng of 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, and 0.3 ng of cocaine. Even from mixtures consisting of clove powder and methamphetamine powder, methamphetamine ions were detected by tandem mass spectrometry. The developed probe heating method provides a simple method for the analysis of solid samples. A portable mass spectrometer incorporating this method would thus be useful for the onsite screening of illicit drugs. PMID:26819909

  9. Heat and mass transfer processes during the pyrolysis of antrim oil shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccirelli, R. A.

    1980-07-01

    A model of simultaneous heat and mass transfer processes during the pyrolysis of slabs of consolidated Michigan oil shale is presented. The manner in which the transport processes control the yield of pyrolysis product is emphasized; the model parameters are selected to reflect the conditions expected during in situ retorting. A single reaction describes the generation of gaseous pyrolysis product; numerical solution of the model mass transport equations indicates that the pressure and velocity profiles within the shale due to generation of gaseous reaction products can be assumed to be in a quasi-steady state. It is concluded that while the bulk convective transport is not essential to the energy equation, it is important for product yield calculations; the solution also suggests that the heat transfer through the surface convective layer and into the shale slab is the rate limiting process.

  10. Analysis of heat and mass transfer during condensation over a porous substrate.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, R; Nayagam, V; Hasan, M M; Khan, L

    2006-09-01

    Condensing heat exchangers are important in many space applications for thermal and humidity control systems. The International Space Station uses a cooled fin surface to condense moisture from humid air that is blown over it. The condensate and the air are "slurped" into a system that separates air and water by centrifugal forces. The use of a cooled porous substrate is an attractive alternative to the fin where condensation and liquid/gas separation can be achieved in a single step. We analyze the heat and mass transfer during condensation of moisture from flowing air over such a cooled, flat, porous substrate. A fully developed regime is investigated for coupled mass, momentum and energy transport in the gas phase, and momentum and energy transport in the condensate layer on the porous substrate and through the porous medium. PMID:17124141

  11. Numerical Analysis of Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer in Cork Lightweight Concretes Used in Building Envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotehi, Nassima; Chaker, Abla

    A numerical study was carried out in order to investigate the behaviour of building envelopes made of lightweight concretes. In this work, we are particularly interested to the building envelopes which are consist of cement paste with incorporation of cork aggregates in order to obtain small thermal conductivity and low-density materials. The mathematical formulation of coupled heat and mass transfer in wet porous materials has been made using Luikov's model, the system describing temperature and moisture transfer processes within building walls is solved numerically with the finite elements method. The obtained results illustrate the temporal evolutions of the temperature and the moisture content, and the distributions of the temperature and moisture content inside the wall for several periods of time. They allow us to specify the effect of the nature and dosage of fibre on the heat and mass transfer.

  12. Hollow fiber apparatus and use thereof for fluids separations and heat and mass transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Bikson, Benjamin; Etter, Stephen; Ching, Nathaniel

    2014-06-10

    A hollow fiber device includes a hollow fiber bundle, comprising a plurality of hollow fibers, a first tubesheet and a second tubesheet encapsulating respective distal ends of the hollow fiber bundle. The tubesheets have boreholes in fluid communication with bores of the hollow fibers. In at least one of the tubesheets, the boreholes are formed radially. The hollow fiber device can be utilized in heat exchange, in gas/gas, liquid/liquid and gas/liquid heat transfer, in combined heat and mass transfer and in fluid separation assemblies and processes. The design disclosed herein is light weight and compact and is particularly advantageous when the pressure of a first fluid introduced into the bores of hollow fibers is higher than the pressure on the shell side of the device.

  13. Reciprocal theorem for convective heat and mass transfer from a particle in Stokes and potential flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandadi, Vahid; Jafari Kang, Saeed; Masoud, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    In the study of convective heat and mass transfer from a particle, key quantities of interest are usually the average rate of transfer and the mean distribution of the scalar (i.e., temperature or concentration) at the particle surface. Calculating these quantities using conventional equations requires detailed knowledge of the scalar field, which is available predominantly for problems involving uniform scalar and flux boundary conditions. Here we derive a reciprocal relation between two diffusing scalars that are advected by oppositely driven Stokes or potential flows whose streamline configurations are identical. This relation leads to alternative expressions for the aforementioned average quantities based on the solution of the scalar field for uniform surface conditions. We exemplify our results via two applications: (i) heat transfer from a sphere with nonuniform boundary conditions in Stokes flow at small Péclet numbers and (ii) extension of Brenner's theorem for the invariance of heat transfer rate to flow reversal.

  14. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in a TEC-Driven Lyophilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday; Litwiller, Eric; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John

    2006-01-01

    Dewatering of wet waste during space exploration missions is important for crew safety as it stabilizes the waste. It may also be used to recover water and serve as a preconditioning step for waste compaction. A thermoelectric cooler (TEC)-driven lyophilizer is under development at NASA Ames Research Center for this purpose. It has three major components: (i) an evaporator section where water vapor sublimes from the frozen waste, (ii) a condenser section where this water vapor deposits as ice, and (iii) a TEC section which serves as a heat pump to transfer heat from the condenser to the evaporator. This paper analyses the heat and mass transfer processes in the lyophilizer in an effort to understand the ice formation behavior in the condenser. The analysis is supported by experimental observations of ice formation patterns in two different condenser units.

  15. Study on Electrohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Heat and Mass Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Srivastava, Vineet K.

    2014-01-01

    The linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the interface between two viscous and dielectric fluids in the presence of a tangential electric field has been carried out when there is heat and mass transfer across the interface. In our earlier work, the viscous potential flow analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in presence of tangential electric field was studied. Here, we use another irrotational theory in which the discontinuities in the irrotational tangential velocity and shear stress are eliminated in the global energy balance. Stability criterion is given by critical value of applied electric field as well as critical wave number. Various graphs have been drawn to show the effect of various physical parameters such as electric field, heat transfer coefficient, and vapour fraction on the stability of the system. It has been observed that heat transfer and electric field both have stabilizing effect on the stability of the system. PMID:24526897

  16. Mass transport, corrosion, plugging, and their reduction in solar dish/Stirling heat pipe receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Goods, S.H.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

    1996-07-01

    Solar dish/Stirling systems using sodium heat pipe receivers are being developed by industry and government laboratories here and abroad. The unique demands of this application lead to heat pipe wicks with very large surface areas and complex three-dimensional flow patterns. These characteristics can enhance the mass transport and concentration of constituents of the wick material, resulting in wick corrosion and plugging. As the test times for heat pipe receivers lengthen, we are beginning to see these effects both indirectly, as they affect performance, and directly in post-test examinations. We are also beginning to develop corrective measures. In this paper, we report on our test experiences, our post-test examinations, and on our initial effort to ameliorate various problems.

  17. Bibliography on augmentation of convective heat and mass transfer-II

    SciTech Connect

    Bergles, A.E.; Nirmalan, V.; Junkhan, G.H.; Webb, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    Heat transfer augmentation has developed into a major specialty area in heat transfer research and development. This report presents and updated bibliography of world literature on augmentation. The literature is classified into passive augmentation techniques, which require no external power, and active techniques, which do require external power. The fifteen techniques are grouped in terms of their applications to the various modes of heat transfer. Mass transfer is included for completeness. Key words are included with each citation for technique/mode identification. The total number of publications cited is 3045, including 135 surveys of various techniques and 86 papers on performance evaluation of passive techniques. Patents are not included, as they are the subject of a separate bibliographic report.

  18. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, Kevin; Jovanovic, Goran; Paul, Brian

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  19. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-10-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties.

  20. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances.

    PubMed

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  1. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties. PMID:26423519

  2. Origin of Self-preservation Effect for Hydrate Decomposition: Coupling of Mass and Heat Transfer Resistances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Dongsheng; Zhang, Diwei; Zhang, Xianren; Chen, Guangjin

    2015-10-01

    Gas hydrates could show an unexpected high stability at conditions out of thermodynamic equilibrium, which is called the self-preservation effect. The mechanism of the effect for methane hydrates is here investigated via molecular dynamics simulations, in which an NVT/E method is introduced to represent different levels of heat transfer resistance. Our simulations suggest a coupling between the mass transfer resistance and heat transfer resistance as the driving mechanism for self-preservation effect. We found that the hydrate is initially melted from the interface, and then a solid-like water layer with temperature-dependent structures is formed next to the hydrate interface that exhibits fractal feature, followed by an increase of mass transfer resistance for the diffusion of methane from hydrate region. Furthermore, our results indicate that heat transfer resistance is a more fundamental factor, since it facilitates the formation of the solid-like layer and hence inhibits the further dissociation of the hydrates. The self-preservation effect is found to be enhanced with the increase of pressure and particularly the decrease of temperature. Kinetic equations based on heat balance calculations is also developed to describe the self-preservation effect, which reproduces our simulation results well and provides an association between microscopic and macroscopic properties.

  3. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Nabil, M; Decuzzi, P; Zunino, P

    2015-10-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively.

  4. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Nabil, M; Decuzzi, P; Zunino, P

    2015-10-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively. PMID:26587251

  5. Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, A. Vahab

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

  6. Modelling mass and heat transfer in nano-based cancer hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Nabil, M.; Decuzzi, P.; Zunino, P.

    2015-01-01

    We derive a sophisticated mathematical model for coupled heat and mass transport in the tumour microenvironment and we apply it to study nanoparticle delivery and hyperthermic treatment of cancer. The model has the unique ability of combining the following features: (i) realistic vasculature; (ii) coupled capillary and interstitial flow; (iii) coupled capillary and interstitial mass transfer applied to nanoparticles; and (iv) coupled capillary and interstitial heat transfer, which are the fundamental mechanisms governing nano-based hyperthermic treatment. This is an improvement with respect to previous modelling approaches, where the effect of blood perfusion on heat transfer is modelled in a spatially averaged form. We analyse the time evolution and the spatial distribution of particles and temperature in a tumour mass treated with superparamagnetic nanoparticles excited by an alternating magnetic field. By means of numerical experiments, we synthesize scaling laws that illustrate how nano-based hyperthermia depends on tumour size and vascularity. In particular, we identify two distinct mechanisms that regulate the distribution of particle and temperature, which are characterized by perfusion and diffusion, respectively. PMID:26587251

  7. Behavioural Responses to Thermal Conditions Affect Seasonal Mass Change in a Heat-Sensitive Northern Ungulate

    PubMed Central

    van Beest, Floris M.; Milner, Jos M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection) to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces) are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. Methodology/Principal Findings Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer). We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat) at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter) during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. Conclusions/Significance This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in thermal tolerance

  8. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  9. Counter-extrapolation method for conjugate interfaces in computational heat and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Le, Guigao; Oulaid, Othmane; Zhang, Junfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper a conjugate interface method is developed by performing extrapolations along the normal direction. Compared to other existing conjugate models, our method has several technical advantages, including the simple and straightforward algorithm, accurate representation of the interface geometry, applicability to any interface-lattice relative orientation, and availability of the normal gradient. The model is validated by simulating the steady and unsteady convection-diffusion system with a flat interface and the steady diffusion system with a circular interface, and good agreement is observed when comparing the lattice Boltzmann results with respective analytical solutions. A more general system with unsteady convection-diffusion process and a curved interface, i.e., the cooling process of a hot cylinder in a cold flow, is also simulated as an example to illustrate the practical usefulness of our model, and the effects of the cylinder heat capacity and thermal diffusivity on the cooling process are examined. Results show that the cylinder with a larger heat capacity can release more heat energy into the fluid and the cylinder temperature cools down slower, while the enhanced heat conduction inside the cylinder can facilitate the cooling process of the system. Although these findings appear obvious from physical principles, the confirming results demonstrates the application potential of our method in more complex systems. In addition, the basic idea and algorithm of the counter-extrapolation procedure presented here can be readily extended to other lattice Boltzmann models and even other computational technologies for heat and mass transfer systems.

  10. Proportional counter radiation camera

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, C.J.; Kopp, M.K.

    1974-01-15

    A gas-filled proportional counter camera that images photon emitting sources is described. A two-dimensional, positionsensitive proportional multiwire counter is provided as the detector. The counter consists of a high- voltage anode screen sandwiched between orthogonally disposed planar arrays of multiple parallel strung, resistively coupled cathode wires. Two terminals from each of the cathode arrays are connected to separate timing circuitry to obtain separate X and Y coordinate signal values from pulse shape measurements to define the position of an event within the counter arrays which may be recorded by various means for data display. The counter is further provided with a linear drift field which effectively enlarges the active gas volume of the counter and constrains the recoil electrons produced from ionizing radiation entering the counter to drift perpendicularly toward the planar detection arrays. A collimator is interposed between a subject to be imaged and the counter to transmit only the radiation from the subject which has a perpendicular trajectory with respect to the planar cathode arrays of the detector. (Official Gazette)

  11. Masked Proportional Routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David

    2004-01-01

    Masked proportional routing is an improved procedure for choosing links between adjacent nodes of a network for the purpose of transporting an entity from a source node ("A") to a destination node ("B"). The entity could be, for example, a physical object to be shipped, in which case the nodes would represent waypoints and the links would represent roads or other paths between waypoints. For another example, the entity could be a message or packet of data to be transmitted from A to B, in which case the nodes could be computer-controlled switching stations and the links could be communication channels between the stations. In yet another example, an entity could represent a workpiece while links and nodes could represent, respectively, manufacturing processes and stages in the progress of the workpiece towards a finished product. More generally, the nodes could represent states of an entity and the links could represent allowed transitions of the entity. The purpose of masked proportional routing and of related prior routing procedures is to schedule transitions of entities from their initial states ("A") to their final states ("B") in such a manner as to minimize a cost or to attain some other measure of optimality or efficiency. Masked proportional routing follows a distributed (in the sense of decentralized) approach to probabilistically or deterministically choosing the links. It was developed to satisfy a need for a routing procedure that 1. Does not always choose the same link(s), even for two instances characterized by identical estimated values of associated cost functions; 2. Enables a graceful transition from one set of links to another set of links as the circumstances of operation of the network change over time; 3. Is preferably amenable to separate optimization of different portions of the network; 4. Is preferably usable in a network in which some of the routing decisions are made by one or more other procedure(s); 5. Preferably does not cause an

  12. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Idzorek, George C.; Atencio, Leroy G.

    1987-01-01

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10.sup.6. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  13. Gated strip proportional detector

    DOEpatents

    Morris, C.L.; Idzorek, G.C.; Atencio, L.G.

    1985-02-19

    A gated strip proportional detector includes a gas tight chamber which encloses a solid ground plane, a wire anode plane, a wire gating plane, and a multiconductor cathode plane. The anode plane amplifies the amount of charge deposited in the chamber by a factor of up to 10/sup 6/. The gating plane allows only charge within a narrow strip to reach the cathode. The cathode plane collects the charge allowed to pass through the gating plane on a set of conductors perpendicular to the open-gated region. By scanning the open-gated region across the chamber and reading out the charge collected on the cathode conductors after a suitable integration time for each location of the gate, a two-dimensional image of the intensity of the ionizing radiation incident on the detector can be made.

  14. A Model of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Porous Cometary Nucleus Based on a Kinetic Treatment of Mass Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skorov, Yu. V.; Kömle, N. I.; Keller, H. U.; Kargl, G.; Markiewicz, W. J.

    2001-09-01

    The main aspect of this paper is to provide a synthesis between two major lines of development in the understanding of mass and heat transfer in a volatile porous medium. The first one is a macroscopic approach, where the medium is considered as a continuum, and heat and mass transfer equations are solved under appropriate boundary conditions for temperature and gas pressure (G. Steiner and N. I. Kömle 1991, Planet. Space Sci.39, 507-513; Y. Mekler et al. 1990, Astrophys. J.356, 682-686; S. J. Espinasse et al. 1991, Icarus92, 350-365), while the second one is a kinetic model, calculating gas flow in tubes under the assumption of a known temperature distribution (N. I. Kömle and G. Dettleff 1991, Icarus89, 73-84; Yu. V. Skorov et al. 1999, Icarus140, 173-188). We review briefly the main aspects of this previous work, and subsequently present a combined consistent model, which uses a macroscopic heat transfer equation, but kinetic solutions for the gas flow. This new model was implemented as a numerical code and its performance is demonstrated by a couple of example calculations. The main advantage of the new model in comparison to the macroscopic approach is the fact that it avoids specifying a boundary condition for gas pressure at the surface, because the emitted gas flux is found at any time with the aid of the kinetic calculation. The local balance of sublimation and condensation in the interior of the porous ice can be calculated more consistently than is possible by macroscopic models only, because surface pressure and density develop in a "natural" way and no external boundary condition for the pressure must be imposed. We consider the development of temperature distribution and gas flux in ice samples in response to surface irradiation. Both pure ice and ice covered by a dust mantle are studied. The results are compared with corresponding solutions obtained on the basis of a macroscopic model, and differences are discussed in detail. Finally, experimental

  15. An overview of challenges in modeling heat and mass transfer for living on Mars.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Yoji; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Goto, Eiji; Arai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Hirafuji, Masayuki; Omori, Katsunori; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Tani, Akira; Toki, Kyoichiro; Yokota, Hiroki; Fujita, Osamu

    2006-09-01

    Engineering a life-support system for living on Mars requires the modeling of heat and mass transfer. This report describes the analysis of heat and mass transfer phenomena in a greenhouse dome, which is being designed as a pressurized life-support system for agricultural production on Mars. In this Martian greenhouse, solar energy will be converted into chemical energy in plant biomass. Agricultural products will be harvested for food and plant cultivation, and waste materials will be processed in a composting microbial ecosystem. Transpired water from plants will be condensed and recycled. In our thermal design and analysis for the Martian greenhouse, we addressed the question of whether temperature and pressure would be maintained in the appropriate range for humans as well as plants. Energy flow and material circulation should be controlled to provide an artificial ecological system on Mars. In our analysis, we assumed that the greenhouse would be maintained at a subatmospheric pressure under 1/3-G gravitational force with 1/2 solar light intensity on Earth. Convection of atmospheric gases will be induced inside the greenhouse, primarily by heating from sunlight. Microclimate (thermal and gas species structure) could be generated locally around plant bodies, which would affect gas transport. Potential effects of those environmental factors are discussed on the phenomena including plant growth and plant physiology and focusing on transport processes. Fire safety is a crucial issue and we evaluate its impact on the total gas pressure in the greenhouse dome.

  16. An overview of challenges in modeling heat and mass transfer for living on Mars.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Yoji; Kitaya, Yoshiaki; Goto, Eiji; Arai, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Hirafuji, Masayuki; Omori, Katsunori; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Tani, Akira; Toki, Kyoichiro; Yokota, Hiroki; Fujita, Osamu

    2006-09-01

    Engineering a life-support system for living on Mars requires the modeling of heat and mass transfer. This report describes the analysis of heat and mass transfer phenomena in a greenhouse dome, which is being designed as a pressurized life-support system for agricultural production on Mars. In this Martian greenhouse, solar energy will be converted into chemical energy in plant biomass. Agricultural products will be harvested for food and plant cultivation, and waste materials will be processed in a composting microbial ecosystem. Transpired water from plants will be condensed and recycled. In our thermal design and analysis for the Martian greenhouse, we addressed the question of whether temperature and pressure would be maintained in the appropriate range for humans as well as plants. Energy flow and material circulation should be controlled to provide an artificial ecological system on Mars. In our analysis, we assumed that the greenhouse would be maintained at a subatmospheric pressure under 1/3-G gravitational force with 1/2 solar light intensity on Earth. Convection of atmospheric gases will be induced inside the greenhouse, primarily by heating from sunlight. Microclimate (thermal and gas species structure) could be generated locally around plant bodies, which would affect gas transport. Potential effects of those environmental factors are discussed on the phenomena including plant growth and plant physiology and focusing on transport processes. Fire safety is a crucial issue and we evaluate its impact on the total gas pressure in the greenhouse dome. PMID:17124127

  17. Transformed Fourier and Fick equations for the control of heat and mass diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Guenneau, S.; Petiteau, D.; Zerrad, M.; Amra, C.; Puvirajesinghe, T.

    2015-05-15

    We review recent advances in the control of diffusion processes in thermodynamics and life sciences through geometric transforms in the Fourier and Fick equations, which govern heat and mass diffusion, respectively. We propose to further encompass transport properties in the transformed equations, whereby the temperature is governed by a three-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous convection-diffusion equation, which is a parabolic partial differential equation combining the diffusion equation and the advection equation. We perform two dimensional finite element computations for cloaks, concentrators and rotators of a complex shape in the transient regime. We precise that in contrast to invisibility cloaks for waves, the temperature (or mass concentration) inside a diffusion cloak crucially depends upon time, its distance from the source, and the diffusivity of the invisibility region. However, heat (or mass) diffusion outside cloaks, concentrators and rotators is unaffected by their presence, whatever their shape or position. Finally, we propose simplified designs of layered cylindrical and spherical diffusion cloaks that might foster experimental efforts in thermal and biochemical metamaterials.

  18. Transformed Fourier and Fick equations for the control of heat and mass diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenneau, S.; Petiteau, D.; Zerrad, M.; Amra, C.; Puvirajesinghe, T.

    2015-05-01

    We review recent advances in the control of diffusion processes in thermodynamics and life sciences through geometric transforms in the Fourier and Fick equations, which govern heat and mass diffusion, respectively. We propose to further encompass transport properties in the transformed equations, whereby the temperature is governed by a three-dimensional, time-dependent, anisotropic heterogeneous convection-diffusion equation, which is a parabolic partial differential equation combining the diffusion equation and the advection equation. We perform two dimensional finite element computations for cloaks, concentrators and rotators of a complex shape in the transient regime. We precise that in contrast to invisibility cloaks for waves, the temperature (or mass concentration) inside a diffusion cloak crucially depends upon time, its distance from the source, and the diffusivity of the invisibility region. However, heat (or mass) diffusion outside cloaks, concentrators and rotators is unaffected by their presence, whatever their shape or position. Finally, we propose simplified designs of layered cylindrical and spherical diffusion cloaks that might foster experimental efforts in thermal and biochemical metamaterials.

  19. Thermodynamic Structure of Collision-Dominated Expanding Plasma: Heating of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Injections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Y.; Richardson, J. D.; Belcher, J. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Elliott, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using combined surveys of the ejecta between 0.3 and 20 AU. ICMEs are shown to have a moderate expansion in the solar wind compared with theoretical predictions. The expansion seems to be governed by a polytrope with gamma approx. 1.3 in this distance range. We find that Coulomb collisions are important contributors to the ion-ion equilibration process in the ICME plasma. The alpha-proton differential speed quickly drops to below 10 km/s due to strong Coulomb collisions. However, the two species of particles are far from thermal equilibrium with a temperature ratio T(sub alpha/T(sub p) = 4-6, suggestive of a preferential heating of alpha particles. The plasma heating rate as a function of heliocentric &stance required for the temperature profile is deduced by taking into account the expansion and energy transfer between protons and alphas via Coulomb collisions. The turbulence dissipation rate is also inferred from the inertial range power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations within ICMEs. Comparison of the turbulence dissipation rate with the required heating rate shows that turbulence dissipation seems sufficient to explain the ICME heating. Sources powering the turbulence are also investigated by examining the instabilities induced by temperature anisotropies and energy deposition by pickup ions.

  20. Study of mass and heat transport of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using models and altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merle, Jacques; Arnault, S.; Morliere, A.; Verstraete, J. M.; Menard, Yves; Gourdeau, L.

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives of this proposal are: (1) to assess the quality of the TOPEX/POSEIDON surface altimeter data in regard to its use for a large, low-frequency monitoring of the surface topography of the tropical Atlantic Ocean; (2) to develop a method, on a demonstration basis, to derive from the tropical Atlantic the depth of the thermocline and the heat content changes from the surface altimeter data field; (3) to develop a method of assimilation of altimeter data into Oceanic General Circulation Models (OGCM's) for the purpose of preparing an operational, permanent, three-dimensional now casting of the tropical Atlantic Ocean (a TOGA objective); and (4) to derive from these models global circulation fields and a time series of mass and meridional heat transports across the tropical Atlantic region (a WOCE objective).

  1. Heat and mass transfer in nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasim, M.; Khan, Z. H.; Lopez, R. J.; Khan, W. A.

    2016-01-01

    The heat and mass transport of a nanofluid thin film over an unsteady stretching sheet has been investigated. This is the first paper on nanofluid thin film flow caused by unsteady stretching sheet using Buongiorno's model. The model used for the nanofluid film incorporates the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The self-similar non-linear ordinary differential equations are solved using Maple's built-in BVP solver. The results for pure fluid are found to be in good agreement with the literature. Present analysis shows that free surface temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction increase with both unsteadiness and magnetic parameters. The results reveal that effect of both nanofluid parameters and viscous dissipation is to reduce the heat transfer rate.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of heat and mass transfer processes during wood pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Won Chan; Atreya, Arvind; Baum, Howard R.

    2010-03-15

    Thermal decomposition of 25.4 mm diameter dry wood spheres is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Wood spheres were pyrolyzed in a vertical tube furnace at temperatures ranging from 638 K to 879 K. Mass loss and temperatures of the sample were measured during pyrolysis. Center temperature measurements showed two distinct thermal events consisting of sequential endothermic and exothermic reactions. A numerical investigation of these endo/exothermic reactions using various pyrolysis kinetics models was conducted to determine the pyrolysis mechanism and the heats of the pyrolysis reactions. A comparison of the experimental and numerical results showed that (i) Contrary to the suggestions in the literature, the contributions of the secondary tar decomposition and lignin decomposition to the center temperature exothermic peak are small. (ii) Exothermic decomposition of the intermediate solid is responsible for the center temperature peak. (iii) The center temperature plateau is caused by the endothermic decomposition of cellulose. (iv) Internal pressure generation was found to be quite important because it controls the pyrolyzate mass transfer and thus affects both the heat transfer and the residence time of the pyrolysis gases for secondary decomposition. Based on the experimental and numerical results, a new wood pyrolysis model is proposed. The model consists of three endothermic parallel reactions producing tar, gas and intermediate solid and subsequent exothermic decomposition of the intermediate solid to char and exothermic decomposition of tar to char and gas. The proposed pyrolysis model shows good agreement with the experiments. Pressure calculations based on the new pyrolysis model revealed that high pressure is generated inside the biomass particle during pyrolysis and sample splitting was observed during the experiments. The splitting is due to both weakening of the structure and internal pressure generation during pyrolysis. At low heating rates

  3. A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream

    SciTech Connect

    E.A. Boiko; S.V. Pachkovskii

    2008-12-15

    A diffusion-kinetic model for pulverized-coal combustion and heat-and-mass transfer in a gas stream is proposed, and the results of numerical simulation of the burnout dynamics of Kansk-Achinsk coals in the pulverized state at different treatment conditions and different model parameters are presented. The mathematical model describes the dynamics of thermochemical conversion of solid organic fuels with allowance for complex physicochemical phenomena of heat-and-mass exchange between coal particles and the gaseous environment.

  4. Heat and mass transfer in unsteady rotating fluid flow with binary chemical reaction and activation energy.

    PubMed

    Awad, Faiz G; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  5. Heat and Mass Transfer in Unsteady Rotating Fluid Flow with Binary Chemical Reaction and Activation Energy

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Faiz G.; Motsa, Sandile; Khumalo, Melusi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM) is used to solve the coupled highly nonlinear system of partial differential equations due to an unsteady flow over a stretching surface in an incompressible rotating viscous fluid in presence of binary chemical reaction and Arrhenius activation energy. The velocity, temperature and concentration distributions as well as the skin-friction, heat and mass transfer coefficients have been obtained and discussed for various physical parametric values. The numerical results obtained by (SRM) are then presented graphically and discussed to highlight the physical implications of the simulations. PMID:25250830

  6. On the calculation of turbulent heat and mass transport downstream from an abrupt pipe expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical study is reported of heat/mass transfer in the separated flow region created by an abrupt pipe expansion. Computations have employed a hybrid method of central and upwind finite differencing to solve the full Navier-Stokes equations with turbulent model (k approximately equal to epsilon). The study has given its main attention to the simulation of the region in the immediate vicinity of the wall, by formulating near-wall model for the evaluation of the mean generation and destruction rate of the epsilon equation. The computed results were compared with the experimental data and they showed generally encouraging agreement with the measurements.

  7. Mathematical modeling of heat and mass transfer in a passive autocatalytic recombiner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anpilov, S. V.; Grigoruk, D. G.; Kondratenko, P. S.; Khristenko, E. B.; Chizhov, M. E.

    2013-11-01

    A mathematical model of heat and mass transfer in a passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR) is developed. Three-dimensional calculations of convection of a hydrogen-containing medium in a hydrogen recombiner of the RVK-315 model series are performed using the ANSYS Fluent commercial code. Due to the periodic structure of the catalytic block, calculations were performed for one rod arranged in its middle. The results of calculations are correlated with the experimental data acquired using the OAO VTI stand. The mismatch between the calculated and experimental data does not exceed 30% in the range of bulk hydrogen concentrations of 1.5-6.5%.

  8. Heat and mass transfer through a thick bed of cocoa beans during drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganhou, J.

    This article relates to the establishment of macroscopic equations of thick and fixed hygroscopical porous medium allowing an analysis of couply phenomena of heat and mass transfers in drying operation. The drying is done through forced convection by imposing a circulation of hot air across the layer. The authors then make their study particular to the case of thick layer of cocoa beans grown in the region of Yaounde in cameroon. A study realized on a prototype constructed and tested in the laboratory enables the validation of the proposed model.

  9. Three-dimensional flow of Powell–Eyring nanofluid with heat and mass flux boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasawar, Hayat; Ikram, Ullah; Taseer, Muhammad; Ahmed, Alsaedi; Sabir, Ali Shehzad

    2016-07-01

    This article investigates the three-dimensional flow of Powell–Eyring nanofluid with thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects. The energy equation is considered in the presence of thermal radiation. The heat and mass flux conditions are taken into account. Mathematical formulation is carried out through the boundary layer approach. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into the nonlinear ordinary differential equations through suitable variables. The resulting nonlinear ordinary differential equations have been solved for the series solutions. Effects of emerging physical parameters on the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are plotted and discussed. Numerical values of local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are computed and examined.

  10. Heat and mass transport resistances in vacuum membrane distillation per drop

    SciTech Connect

    Bandini, S.; Sarti, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) is a separation process based on the use of microporous hydrophobic membranes. The membrane is located between an aqueous phase and a permeate, which is kept under vacuum at pressure values below the equilibrium vapor pressure of the feed. The liquid stream vaporizes at one side of the membrane, and the vapors diffuse through the gas phase inside the membrane pores. The process rate and performance are affected highly by the transport phenomena both in the liquid phase and through the membrane. Heat- and mass-transfer resistance in the liquid phase, as well as mass-transfer resistance through the membrane, play an important role in determining the process performance. Based on VMD experimental data for several binary aqueous mixtures containing volatile organic compounds, a simple criterion to investigate the role of each transport resistance on the separation efficiency is discussed.

  11. Convective heat and mass transfer on MHD peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid with the effect of inclined magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discussed the peristaltic MHD flow of an incompressible and electrically conducting Williamson fluid in a symmetric planar channel with heat and mass transfer under the effect of inclined magnetic field. Viscous dissipation and Joule heating are also taken into consideration. Mathematical model is presented by using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The differential equations governing the flow are highly nonlinear and thus perturbation solution for small Weissenberg number (We < 1) is presented. Effects of the heat and mass transfer on the longitudinal velocity, temperature and concentration are studied in detail. Main observations are presented in the concluding section. The streamlines pattern is also given due attention.

  12. FEHMN 1.0: Finite element heat and mass transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.; Dash, Z.; Kelkar, S.

    1991-04-01

    A computer code is described which can simulate non-isothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. It is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and ground-water flow. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved using the finite element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat and mass transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. A summary of the equations in the model and the numerical solution procedure are provided in this report. A user`s guide and sample problems are also included. The main use of FEHMN will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields in the saturated zone below the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. 33 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Heat and Mass Transfer Measurements for Tray-Fermented Fungal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jou, R.-Y.; Lo, C.-T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, heat and mass transfer in static tray fermentation, which is widely used in solid-state fermentation (SSF) to produce fungal products, such as enzymes or koji, is investigated. Specifically, kinetic models of transport phenomena in the whole-tray chamber are emphasized. The effects of temperature, moisture, and humidity on microbial growth in large-scale static tray fermentation are essential to scale-up SSF and achieve uniform fermentation. In addition, heat and mass transfer of static tray fermentation of Trichoderma fungi with two tray setups—traditional linen coverings and stacks in a temperature-humidity chamber is examined. In both these setups, the following factors of fermentation were measured: air velocity, air temperature, illumination, pH, carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, and substrate temperature, and the effects of bed height, moisture of substrate, and relative humidity of air are studied. A thin (1 cm) bed at 28 °C and 95 % relative humidity is found to be optimum. Furthermore, mixing was essential for achieving uniform fermentation of Trichoderma fungi. This study has important applications in large-scale static tray fermentation of fungi.

  14. Heat and Mass Transfer Within an Evaporating Solution Droplet in a Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Yanguang; Hu, Yuan

    2012-06-01

    Solution precursors have been injected into the plasma gases to produce finely structured ceramic coatings with nano- and sub-micrometric features. The trajectory history and heat and mass transfer within individual solution droplets play a very important role in determining the coating microstructure. A mathematical model is developed to analyse the thermal behavior of individual precursor droplets travelling in the high temperature plasma jet. This model involves the motion and evaporation of the precursor droplet in a DC plasma jet and the heat and mass transfer within the evaporating droplet. The influence of Stefan flow, as well as the variable thermo-physical properties of the solution and the plasma gas, is considered. The internal circulation due to the relative velocity between the droplet and the plasma jet, which may be approximated by the Hill vortex, is considered as well. The trajectory, temporal droplet surface temperature, and radius variation are predicted. The temporal temperature and concentration distributions within the evaporating droplet are presented for different injection parameters.

  15. The development of a lower heat concrete mixture for mass concrete placement conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Aaron Martin

    The hydration process of portland cement (PC) is exothermic; therefore, the thermal behavior of concrete has to be taken into consideration when placed in a large mass. The research presented involves a Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) Class S (seal) portland cement concrete (PCC) which is used as a foundation seal during construction of bridge abutments and piers. A Class S PCC mixture meeting the 2006 TDOT specifications has the potential to generate excessive amounts of heat and induce thermal cracking in structural elements. The purpose of the study is to reduce the heat generation of a Class S PCC while maintaining adequate values of other engineering properties. Due to the possibility of underwater placement of a Class S PCC, reduction in the total cementing materials content were not considered in this study. Five candidate mixtures were used to compare against a typical TDOT Class S mixture. The five candidate Class S-LH (lower heat) mixtures were 45, 60, 70% Grade 120 slag substitutions for PC as well as two ternary mixtures containing Grade 120 slag and Class F fly ash. Ten batches of each mixture were produced. All plastic and hardened properties met TDOT 604.03 Class S requirements for analytical comparison. The 70% Grade 120 slag Class S-LH mixture was analytically superior for all hardened properties and at reducing heat generation. Since the 70% Grade 120 slag Class S-LH mixture proved to be superior in laboratory conditions; it was selected for further evaluation in the field testing portion of the research. The 70% Grade 120 slag mixture produced a significantly lower maximum temperature as well as a significantly lower maximum differential temperature than a TDOT Class S mixture with 20% Class C fly ash in side-by-side 18 cubic yard cube field placements. Research results and literature recommend that engineers should decide when mass concrete conditions are appropriate during construction practices. When mass concrete conditions are

  16. OBSERVATION OF HEATING BY FLARE-ACCELERATED ELECTRONS IN A SOLAR CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Glesener, Lindsay; Bain, Hazel M.; Krucker, Säm; Lin, Robert P.

    2013-12-20

    We report a Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observation of flare-accelerated electrons in the core of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and examine their role in heating the CME. Previous CME observations have revealed remarkably high thermal energies that can far surpass the CME's kinetic energy. A joint observation by RHESSI and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of a partly occulted flare on 2010 November 3 allows us to test the hypothesis that this excess energy is collisionally deposited by flare-accelerated electrons. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images show an ejection forming the CME core and sheath, with isothermal multifilter analysis revealing temperatures of ∼11 MK in the core. RHESSI images reveal a large (∼100 × 50 arcsec{sup 2}) hard X-ray (HXR) source matching the location, shape, and evolution of the EUV plasma, indicating that the emerging CME is filled with flare-accelerated electrons. The time derivative of the EUV emission matches the HXR light curve (similar to the Neupert effect observed in soft and HXR time profiles), directly linking the CME temperature increase with the nonthermal electron energy loss, while HXR spectroscopy demonstrates that the nonthermal electrons contain enough energy to heat the CME. This is the most direct observation to date of flare-accelerated electrons heating a CME, emphasizing the close relationship of the two in solar eruptive events.

  17. MHD thermosolutal marangoni convection heat and mass transport of power law fluid driven by temperature and concentration gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Chengru; Zheng, Liancun; Ma, Lianxi

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) thermosolutal Marangoni convection heat and mass transfer of power-law fluids driven by a power law temperature and a power law concentration which is assumed that the surface tension varies linearly with both the temperature and concentration. Heat and mass transfer constitutive equation is proposed based on N-diffusion proposed by Philip and the abnormal convection-diffusion model proposed by Pascal in which we assume that the heat diffusion depends non-linearly on both the temperature and the temperature gradient and the mass diffusion depends non-linearly on both the concentration and the concentration gradient with modified Fourier heat conduction for power law fluid. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using suitable similarity transformations. Approximate analytical solution is obtained using homotopy analytical method (HAM). The transport characteristics of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are analyzed in detail.

  18. The Correlation of Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer Experimental Data for Vertical Falling Film Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Keyhani, M; Miller, W A

    1999-11-14

    Absorption chillers are gaining global acceptance as quality comfort cooling systems. These machines are the central chilling plants and the supply for cotnfort cooling for many large commercial buildings. Virtually all absorption chillers use lithium bromide (LiBr) and water as the absorption fluids. Water is the refrigerant. Research has shown LiBr to he one of the best absorption working fluids because it has a high affinity for water, releases water vapor at relatively low temperatures, and has a boiling point much higher than that of water. The heart of the chiller is the absorber, where a process of simultaneous heat and mass transfer occurs as the refrigerant water vapor is absorbed into a falling film of aqueous LiBr. The more water vapor absorbed into the falling film, the larger the chiller's capacity for supporting comfort cooling. Improving the performance of the absorber leads directly to efficiency gains for the chiller. The design of an absorber is very empirical and requires experimental data. Yet design data and correlations are sparse in the open literature. The experimental data available to date have been derived at LiBr concentrations ranging from 0.30 to 0.60 mass fraction. No literature data are readily available for the design operating conditions of 0.62 and 0.64 mass fraction of LiBr and absorber pressures of 0.7 and 1.0 kPa.

  19. Visual Manipulatives for Proportional Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Joyce L.; Schwartz, Daniel L.

    The use of a visual representation in learning about proportional relations was studied, examining students' understandings of the invariance of a multiplicative relation on both sides of a proportion equation and the invariance of the structural relations that exist in different semantic types of proportion problems. Subjects were 49 high-ability…

  20. Heat and mass transfer analysis for paraffin/nitrous oxide burning rate in hybrid propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Basat (Sisi), Shani; Gany, Alon

    2016-03-01

    This research presents a physical-mathematical model for the combustion of liquefying fuels in hybrid combustors, accounting for blowing effect on the heat transfer. A particular attention is given to a paraffin/nitrous oxide hybrid system. The use of a paraffin fuel in hybrid propulsion has been considered because of its much higher regression rate enabling significantly higher thrust compared to that of common polymeric fuels. The model predicts the overall regression rate (melting rate) of the fuel and the different mechanisms involved, including evaporation, entrainment of droplets of molten material, and mass loss due to melt flow on the condensed fuel surface. Prediction of the thickness and velocity of the liquid (melt) layer formed at the surface during combustion was done as well. Applying the model for an oxidizer mass flux of 45 kg/(s m2) as an example representing experimental range, it was found that 21% of the molten liquid undergoes evaporation, 30% enters the gas flow by the entrainment mechanism, and 49% reaches the end of the combustion chamber as a flowing liquid layer. When increasing the oxidizer mass flux in the port, the effect of entrainment increases while that of the flowing liquid layer along the surface shows a relatively lower contribution. Yet, the latter is predicted to have a significant contribution to the overall mass loss. In practical applications it may cause reduced combustion efficiency and should be taken into account in the motor design, e.g., by reinforcing the paraffin fuel with different additives. The model predictions have been compared to experimental results revealing good agreement.

  1. Some Biological Hints on the Control of Heat and Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagiwara, Yoshimichi

    This review paper explores the possibilities of the control of heat and mass transfer associated with drought tolerance and freeze tolerance. The accumulation of some metabolites, such as proline and trehalose, are effective for drought tolerance. The special microstructures on the surfaces of some plants and insects in deserts are effective for collecting moisture in the air. Methods of preserving crops will be improved by the mimetic of the drought tolerance. Calcium ions and a protein are effective for the retrieval of damaged cell membrane due to ice formation. Ice crystal growth is inhibited by some substances such as antifreeze proteins. The cryopreservation of foods and organs will be improved by the mimetic of the freeze tolerance.

  2. Processes of heat and mass transfer in straw bales using flue gasses as a drying medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryl, Wojciech; Szubel, Mateusz; Filipowicz, Mariusz

    2016-03-01

    Moisture content is a main problem of using straw in form of bales for energy production. The paper presents possibility of straw drying in dedicated, innovative and patented in Poland straw dryers which using flue gasses as a drying medium. Paper presents an improved way of drying which proved to be very sufficient. Temperature and humidity of straw during the process of drying were measured. The measurements helped understand and perform numerical model of heat and mass transfer inside the straw bale. By using CFD codes it was possible to perform analysis of phenomenon occurring inside the dried straw bale. Based on the CFD model, proposals of the optimization and improvement process of drying have been discussed. Experimental and computational data have been compared in terms of convergence. A satisfying degree of agreement has been achieved. Applying improved drying method, homogenous field of moisture content and temperature in the straw bale is achieved in a very cost effective way.

  3. Heat and Mass Transfer Analysis of Dehumidifiers Using Adiabatic Transient Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Maclaine-Cross, I. L.; Pesaran, A. A.

    1986-04-01

    Adiabatic step transient data were obtained for two dehumidifier test matrices, using parallel plates with crushed silica gel and staggered parallel strips coated with microbead silica gel. The data were analyzed using the statistical moments method and combined heat and mass transfer analogy theory. The analysis showed that the average overall Nusselt number in both matrices was about 40% to 50% lower than laminar flow predictions. The average overall Nusselt number for the microbead staggered matrix was about 85% larger than that of the crushed silica-gel parallel-plate matrix. The Nusselt number/friction factor Reynolds number ratio (Nu/fRe) of the microbead, staggered parallel-strip matrix was about 28% larger than that of the crushed silica-gel parallel-plate matrix. These results were explained by the presence of a stagnant gas film. The results showed that compact, high-performance, rotary dehumidifiers for desiccant cooling systems are possible and economical.

  4. A numerical study of transient heat and mass transfer in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Samuel Bang-Moo

    1987-01-01

    A numerical analysis of transient heat and solute transport across a rectangular cavity is performed. Five nonlinear partial differential equations which govern the conservation of mass, momentum, energy and solute concentration related to crystal growth in solution, are simultaneously integrated by a numerical method based on the SIMPLE algorithm. Numerical results showed that the flow, temperature and solute fields are dependent on thermal and solutal Grashoff number, Prandtl number, Schmidt number and aspect ratio. The average Nusselt and Sherwood numbers evaluated at the center of the cavity decrease markedly when the solutal buoyancy force acts in the opposite direction to the thermal buoyancy force. When the solutal and thermal buoyancy forces act in the same direction, however, Sherwood number increases significantly and yet Nusselt number decreases. Overall effects of convection on the crystal growth are seen to be an enhancement of growth rate as expected but with highly nonuniform spatial growth variations.

  5. On the vertical exchange of heat, mass and momentum over complex, mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotach, Mathias; Gohm, Alexander; Lang, Moritz; Leukauf, Daniel; Stiperski, Ivana; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The role of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the atmosphere-climate system is the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between 'the earth's surface' and the atmosphere. Traditionally, it is understood that turbulent transport is responsible for this exchange and hence the understanding and physical description of the turbulence structure of the boundary layer is key to assess the effectiveness of earth-atmosphere exchange. This understanding is rooted in the (implicit) assumption of a scale separation or spectral gap between turbulence and mean atmospheric motions, which in turn leads to the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surface as a reference, for which both physical understanding and model parameterizations have successfully been developed over the years. Over mountainous terrain, however, the ABL is generically inhomogeneous due to both thermal (radiative) and dynamic forcing. This inhomogeneity leads to meso-scale and even sub-meso-scale flows such as slope and valley winds or wake effects. It is argued here that these (sub)meso-scale motions can significantly contribute to the vertical structure of the boundary layer and hence vertical exchange of heat and mass between the surface and the atmosphere. If model grid resolution is not high enough the latter will have to be parameterized (in a similar fashion as gravity wave drag parameterizations take into account the momentum transport due to gravity waves in large-scale models). In this contribution we summarize the available evidence of the contribution of (sub)meso-scale motions to vertical exchange in mountainous terrain from observational and numerical modeling studies. In particular, a number of recent simulation studies using idealized topography will be summarized and put into perspective – so as to identify possible limitations and areas of necessary future research.

  6. Laser absorption, mass ablation rate, and shock heating in direct-drive inertial confinement fusiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Li, D.; Radha, P. B.; Sawada, H.; Seka, W.; Boehly, T. R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Gotchev, O. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R. C.

    2007-05-01

    Direct-drive laser absorption, mass ablation rate, and shock heating are experimentally studied on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to validate hydrodynamics simulations. High-gain, direct-drive inertial confinement fusion target implosions require accurate predictions of the shell adiabat α (entropy), defined as the pressure in the main fuel layer to the Fermi-degenerate pressure, and the implosion velocity of the shell. The laser pulse shape determines the shell adiabat and the hydrodynamic efficiency determines the implosion velocity. A comprehensive set of measurements tracking the flow of energy from the laser to the target was conducted. Time-resolved measurements of laser absorption in the corona are performed on spherical implosion experiments. The mass ablation rate is inferred from time-resolved Ti K-shell spectroscopic measurements of nonaccelerating, solid CH spherical targets with a buried tracer layer of Ti. Shock heating is diagnosed in planar-CH-foil targets using time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy and noncollective spectrally resolved x-ray scattering. The highly reproducible experimental results achieved with a high level of laser drive uniformity [S. P. Regan et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 22, 998 (2005)] constrain the modeling of direct-drive energy coupling. A detailed comparison of the experimental results and the simulations reveals that a single-value flux limiter in the thermal transport model cannot explain all of the experimental observables. Simulations of laser absorption measurements need a time-dependent flux limiter to match the data. Modeling of both resonance absorption and nonlocal effects in the electron thermal conduction from the critical density to the ablation front are underway to resolve the observed discrepancies.

  7. A Comprehensive Flow, Heat and Mass Transport Uncertainty Quantification in Discrete Fracture Network Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzedine, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures and fracture networks are the principle pathways for migration of water, heat and mass in enhanced geothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, CO2 leakage from saline aquifers, and radioactive and toxic industrial wastes from underground storage repositories. A major issue to overcome when characterizing a fractured reservoir is that of data limitation due to accessibility and affordability. Moreover, the ability to map discontinuities in the rock with available geological and geophysical tools tends to decrease particularly as the scale of the discontinuity goes down. Geological characterization data include measurements of fracture density, orientation, extent, and aperture, and are based on analysis of outcrops, borehole optical and acoustic televiewer logs, aerial photographs, and core samples among others. All of these measurements are taken at the field scale through a very sparse limited number of deep boreholes. These types of data are often reduced to probability distributions function for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic framework such as stochastic discrete fracture network. Stochastic discrete fracture network models enable, through Monte Carlo realizations and simulations, for probabilistic assessment of flow and transport phenomena that are not adequately captured using continuum models. Despite the fundamental uncertainties inherited within the probabilistic reduction of the sparse data collected, very little work has been conducted on quantifying uncertainty on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. In the current study, using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we present the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions that characterize discrete fracture networks on the flow, heat and mass transport. Numerical results of first, second and third moments, normalized to a base case scenario, are presented and compared to theoretical results extended from percolation theory.

  8. What is the role of wind pumping on heat and mass transfer rates at the air-snow interface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgason, W.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate prediction of the turbulent exchange of sensible heat and water vapour between the atmosphere and snowpack remains a challenging task under all but the most ideal conditions. Heat and mass transfer coefficients that recognize the unique properties of the snow surface are warranted. A particular area requiring improvement concerns the role of the porous nature of snow which provides a large surface area for heat and mass exchange with the atmosphere. Wind-pumping has long been considered as a viable mechanism for incorporating aerosols into snowpacks; however these processes are not considered in parameterization schemes for heat and mass transfer near the surface. This study attempts to determine the degree to which wind pumping can increase the rates of heat and mass transfer to snow, and to ascertain which structural properties of the snowpack are needed for inclusion in heat and mass transfer coefficients that reflect wind pumping processes. Based upon a review of recent geophysical and engineering literature where porous surfaces are exploited for their ability to augment heat and mass transfer rates, a technical analysis was conducted. Numerous conceptual mechanisms of wind pumping were considered: topographically-induced flow; barometric pressure changes; high frequency pressure fluctuations at the surface; and steady flow in the interfacial region. A sensitivity analysis was performed, subjecting each conceptual model to varying thermal and hydraulic conditions at the air-snow interface, as well as variable micro-structural properties of snow. It is shown that the rate of heat and mass exchange is most sensitive to the interfacial thermal conditions and factors controlling the energy balance of the uppermost snow grains. The effect upon the thermal regime of the snowpack was found to be most significant for mechanisms of wind pumping that result in shorter flow paths near the surface, rather than those caused by low frequency pressure changes. In

  9. HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN A FAULT-CONTROLLED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR CHARGED AT CONSTANT PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, K. P.; Narasimhan, T. N.

    1981-12-01

    A two-dimensional mathematical model of a fault controlled geothermal reservoir has been developed. Heated lighter water, rising in the fault, is assumed to charge a reservoir which, in turn, is overlain by a thin impermeable, thermally conducting cap rock. The mass flow rate or the pressure associated with the charging process at the fault inlet is unknown and can only be estimated. Thus, in this paper, the pressure in the fault at the bottom of the reservoir is assumed to be prescribed. Quasi-analytic solutions for the velocity, pressure, and temperature are obtained in the fault-reservoir system for a high Rayleigh number flow. In this approximation, the upwelling fluid does not cool off appreciably until it reaches the cold upper boundary of the reservoir and encounters conductive heat loss. This thermal boundary layer, which is thin at the top of the fault, grows outward laterally and occupies the full thickness of the aquifer far away from the fault. The mathematical model is based on the flow of liquid water in a saturated porous medium. The solution techniques involve the combination of perturbation methods, boundary layer theory and numerical methods. The analysis of this generic model can be applied to liquid dominated geothermal systems where the thickness of the impermeable caprock is very small compared to the depth of the reservoir.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann modeling for fluid flow and heat and mass transport applied to geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Sussumu Komori, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Recently, Lattice Boltzmann Modelling (LBM) techniques attract many scientists in various fields of research. This work shows the capability for LBM to simulate the fluid flow and solute transport in porous and fracture media, additionally, how to study behavior of nanofluids submitted to a temperature gradient, which it is an important process in natural aquatic environments, water treatment, and other water related technologies. LBSim is used in this work as Lattice Boltzmann Model simulator software. In this article, a series of cases using the lattice Boltzmann method are presented, showing the capability of the method in simulating phenomena with fluid flow and heat transfer in porous media. Results show that the lattice Boltzmann method delivers reliable and helpful simulations for the analyses of processes in water related technologies. Thus, LBSim is a recommended tool for simulating fluid flow at laminar and turbulent condition, and heat and mass transport under complex geometry and boundary condition. parameter values. Keywords: Lattice Boltzmann Model, LBSim, Fractures Media, Porous Media, nanofluids

  11. Plasma Heating Inside Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections by Alfvénic Fluctuations Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Chi; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lingqian; Richardson, John D.; Belcher, John W.; Tu, Cui

    2016-11-01

    Nonlinear cascade of low-frequency Alfvénic fluctuations (AFs) is regarded as one of the candidate energy sources that heat plasma during the non-adiabatic expansion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). However, AFs inside ICMEs were seldom reported in the literature. In this study, we investigate AFs inside ICMEs using observations from Voyager 2 between 1 and 6 au. It has been found that AFs with a high degree of Alfvénicity frequently occurred inside ICMEs for almost all of the identified ICMEs (30 out of 33 ICMEs) and for 12.6% of the ICME time interval. As ICMEs expand and move outward, the percentage of AF duration decays linearly in general. The occurrence rate of AFs inside ICMEs is much less than that in ambient solar wind, especially within 4.75 au. AFs inside ICMEs are more frequently presented in the center and at the boundaries of ICMEs. In addition, the proton temperature inside ICME has a similar “W”-shaped distribution. These findings suggest significant contribution of AFs on local plasma heating inside ICMEs.

  12. 3D coupled heat and mass transfer processes at the scale of sedimentary basisn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacace, M.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Kaiser, B. O.

    2014-12-01

    suggest that hydrogeological windows act as preferential domains of hydraulic interconnectivity between the different aquifers at depth, and enable vigorous heat and mass transport which causes a mixing of warm and saline groundwater with cold and less saline groundwater within both aquifers.

  13. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  14. Laser mass spectrometric detection of extraterrestrial aromatic molecules: Mini-review and examination of pulsed heating effects

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Maegan K.; Hammond, Matthew R.; Zare, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    Laser mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for the sensitive, selective, and spatially resolved analysis of organic compounds in extraterrestrial materials. Using microprobe two-step laser mass spectrometry (μL2MS), we have explored the organic composition of many different exogenous materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and interstellar ice analogs, gaining significant insight into the nature of extraterrestrial materials. Recently, we applied μL2MS to analyze the effect of heating caused by hypervelocity particle capture in aerogel, which was used on the NASA Stardust Mission to capture comet particles. We show that this material exhibits complex organic molecules upon sudden heating. Similar pulsed heating of carbonaceous materials is shown to produce an artifactual fullerene signal. We review the use of μL2MS to investigate extraterrestrial materials, and we discuss its recent application to characterize the effect of pulsed heating on samples of interest. PMID:18687897

  15. Laser mass spectrometric detection of extraterrestrial aromatic molecules: mini-review and examination of pulsed heating effects.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Maegan K; Hammond, Matthew R; Zare, Richard N

    2008-11-25

    Laser mass spectrometry is a powerful tool for the sensitive, selective, and spatially resolved analysis of organic compounds in extraterrestrial materials. Using microprobe two-step laser mass spectrometry (muL(2)MS), we have explored the organic composition of many different exogenous materials, including meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and interstellar ice analogs, gaining significant insight into the nature of extraterrestrial materials. Recently, we applied muL(2)MS to analyze the effect of heating caused by hypervelocity particle capture in aerogel, which was used on the NASA Stardust Mission to capture comet particles. We show that this material exhibits complex organic molecules upon sudden heating. Similar pulsed heating of carbonaceous materials is shown to produce an artifactual fullerene signal. We review the use of muL(2)MS to investigate extraterrestrial materials, and we discuss its recent application to characterize the effect of pulsed heating on samples of interest.

  16. Heat and mass transfer analysis of unsteady MHD nanofluid flow through a channel with moving porous walls and medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair Akbar, Muhammad; Ashraf, Muhammad; Farooq Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Kashif

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the numerical study of heat and mass transfer analysis in a viscous unsteady MHD nanofluid flow through a channel with porous walls and medium in the presence of metallic nanoparticles. The two cases for effective thermal conductivity are discussed in the analysis through H-C model. The impacts of the governing parameters on the flow, heat and mass transfer aspects of the issue are talked about. Under the patronage of small values of permeable Reynolds number and relaxation/contraction parameter, we locate that, when wall contraction is together with suction, flow turning is encouraged close to the wall where the boundary layer is shaped. On the other hand, when the wall relaxation is coupled with injection, the flow adjacent to the porous walls decreased. The outcome of the exploration may be beneficial for applications of biotechnology. Numerical solutions for the velocity, heat and mass transfer rate at the boundary are obtained and analyzed.

  17. Tidal heating and mass loss in neutron star binaries - Implications for gamma-ray burst models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Rees, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    A neutron star in a close binary orbit around another neutron star (or stellar-mass black hole) spirals inward owing to gravitational radiation. We discuss the effects of tidal dissipation during this process. Tidal energy dissipated in the neutron star's core escapes mainly as neutrinos, but heating of the crust, and outward diffusion of photons, blows off the outer layers of the star. This photon-driven mass loss precedes the final coalescence. The presence of this eject material impedes the escape of gamma-rays created via neutrino interactions. If an e(+) - e(-) fireball, created in the late stages of coalescence, were loaded with (or surrounded by) material with the mean column density of the ejecta, it could not be an efficient source of gamma-rays. Models for cosmologically distant gamma-rays burst that involve neutron stars must therefore be anisotropic, so that the fireball expands preferentially in directions where the column density of previously blown-off material is far below the spherically averaged value which we have calculated. Some possible 'scenarios' along these lines are briefly discussed.

  18. Multiphase Model of Heat and Mass Transport during Laser Alloying of Iron with Electrodeposited Chromium Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, T.; Kusinski, J.; Kusinski, G.

    2008-02-15

    The aim of this research was to study the laser alloying process of iron with chromium. In the paper, a multiphase model of mass and heat transfer for the laser alloying is presented. Laser melting of the chromium layer and the substrate was performed using a continuous laser source operated with a TEM{sub 10} mode, with constant beam diameter ({phi}), scanning velocity (V) and varied output beam power. The partial differential equations of the conservation of mass, momentum and energy in the melted pool for multiphase system were solved. The distribution of chromium in iron after laser alloying was obtained by including the Volume of Fluid algorithm in the model. The results of the computations were compared with the experimental evaluation of the microstructure and the chromium concentration, which were based on scanning electron microscopy and x-ray microanalysis (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) of the laser alloyed layers. The comparison of computational calculations and experimental results is presented and a good accuracy of the proposed model is shown.

  19. Two-demensional analysis of heat and mass transfer in porous media using the strongly implicit procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, D. M.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical results of the heat and mass transfer in a porous matrix are presented. The coupled, nonlinear partial differential equations describing this physical phenomenon are solved in finite difference form for two dimensions, using a new iterative technique (the strongly implicit procedure). The influence of the external environment conditions (heating and pressure) is shown to produce two-dimensional flow in the porous matrix. Typical fluid and solid temperature distributions in the porous matrix and internal pressure distributions are presented.

  20. Dust Heating By Low-mass Stars in Massive Galaxies at z< 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajisawa, M.; Morishita, T.; Taniguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Ichikawa, T.; Fukui, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging data and multi-wavelength photometric catalog, we investigated the dust temperature of passively evolving and star-forming galaxies at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.0 in the CANDELS fields. We estimated the stellar radiation field by low-mass stars from the stellar mass and surface brightness profile of these galaxies and then calculated their steady-state dust temperature. At first, we tested our method using nearby early-type galaxies with the deep far-IR data by the Herschel Virgo cluster survey and confirmed that the estimated dust temperatures are consistent with the observed temperatures within the uncertainty. We then applied the method to galaxies at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.0, and found that most passively evolving galaxies with {{M}star}\\gt {{10}10} {{M}⊙ } have relatively high dust temperatures of {{T}dust}\\gt 20 K, for which the formation efficiency of molecular hydrogen on the surface of dust grains in the diffuse ISM is expected to be very low from the laboratory experiments. The fraction of passively evolving galaxies strongly depends on the expected dust temperature at all redshifts and increases rapidly increasing temperature around {{T}dust}˜ 20 K. These results suggest that the dust heating by low-mass stars in massive galaxies plays an important role in the continuation of their passive evolution because the lack of the shielding effect of the molecular hydrogen on the UV radiation can prevent the gas cooling and formation of new stars.

  1. Heating from free-free absorption and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Björnsson, C.-I.; Lundqvist, P. E-mail: peter@astro.su.se

    2014-06-01

    An accurate determination of the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to core-collapse supernovae is often limited by uncertainties pertaining to various model assumptions. It is shown that under conditions when the temperature of the circumstellar medium is set by heating due to free-free absorption, observations of the accompanying free-free optical depth allow a direct determination of the mass-loss rate from observed quantities in a rather model-independent way. The temperature is determined self-consistently, which results in a characteristic time dependence of the free-free optical depth. This can be used to distinguish free-free heating from other heating mechanisms. Since the importance of free-free heating is quite model dependent, this also makes possible several consistency checks of the deduced mass-loss rate. It is argued that the free-free absorption observed in SN 1993J is consistent with heating from free-free absorption. The deduced mass-loss rate of the progenitor star is, approximately, 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for a wind velocity of 10 km s{sup –1}.

  2. Heat and mass transfer of a low-pressure Mars greenhouse: Simulation and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hublitz, Inka

    Biological life support systems based on plant growth offer the advantage of producing fresh food for the crew during a long surface stay on Mars. Greenhouses on Mars are also used for air and water regeneration and waste treatment. A major challenge in developing a Mars greenhouse is its interaction with the thin and cold Mars environment. Operating a Mars greenhouse at low interior pressure reduces the pressure differential across the structure and therefore saves structural mass as well as reduces leakage. Experiments were conducted to analyze the heating requirements as well as the temperature and humidity distribution within a small-scale greenhouse that was placed in a chamber simulating the temperatures, pressure and light conditions on Mars. Lettuce plants were successfully grown inside of the Mars greenhouse for up to seven days. The greenhouse atmosphere parameters, including temperature, total pressure, oxygen and carbon dioxide concentration were controlled tightly; radiation level, relative humidity and plant evapo-transpiration rates were measured. A vertical stratification of temperature and humidity across the greenhouse atmosphere was observed. Condensation formed on the inside of the greenhouse when the shell temperature dropped below the dew-point. During the night cycles frost built up on the greenhouse base plate and the lower part of the shell. Heat loss increased significantly during the night cycle. Due to the placement of the heating system and the fan blowing warm air directly on the upper greenhouse shell, condensation above the plants was avoided and therefore the photosynthetically active radiation at plant level was kept constant. Plant growth was not affected by the temperature stratification due to the tight temperature control of the warmer upper section of the greenhouse, where the lettuce plants were placed. A steady state and a transient heat transfer model of the low pressure greenhouse were developed for the day and the night

  3. Effect of heating strategies on whey protein denaturation--Revisited by liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Akkerman, M; Rauh, V M; Christensen, M; Johansen, L B; Hammershøj, M; Larsen, L B

    2016-01-01

    Previous standards in the area of effect of heat treatment processes on milk protein denaturation were based primarily on laboratory-scale analysis and determination of denaturation degrees by, for example, electrophoresis. In this study, whey protein denaturation was revisited by pilot-scale heating strategies and liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC/MC Q-TOF) analysis. Skim milk was heat treated by the use of 3 heating strategies, namely plate heat exchanger (PHE), tubular heat exchanger (THE), and direct steam injection (DSI), under various heating temperatures (T) and holding times. The effect of heating strategy on the degree of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin was determined using LC/MC Q-TOF of pH 4.5-soluble whey proteins. Furthermore, effect of heating strategy on the rennet-induced coagulation properties was studied by oscillatory rheometry. In addition, rennet-induced coagulation of heat-treated micellar casein concentrate subjected to PHE was studied. For skim milk, the whey protein denaturation increased significantly as T and holding time increased, regardless of heating method. High denaturation degrees were obtained for T >100°C using PHE and THE, whereas DSI resulted in significantly lower denaturation degrees, compared with PHE and THE. Rennet coagulation properties were impaired by increased T and holding time regardless of heating method, although DSI resulted in less impairment compared with PHE and THE. No significant difference was found between THE and PHE for effect on rennet coagulation time, whereas the curd firming rate was significantly larger for THE compared with PHE. Micellar casein concentrate possessed improved rennet coagulation properties compared with skim milk receiving equal heat treatment.

  4. MHD flow of a micropolar fluid over a stretchable disk in a porous medium with heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, A.; Ashraf, M.; Batool, K.; Hussain, M.; Meraj, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    This article studies the simultaneous impacts of heat and mass transfer of an incompressible electrically conducting micropolar fluid generated by the stretchable disk in presence of porous medium. The thermal radiation effect is accounted via Rosseland's approximation. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into dimensionless form by employing the suitable similarity transformations. A finite difference base algorithm is utilized to obtain the solution expressions. The impacts of physical parameters on dimensionless axial velocity, radial velocity, micro-rotation, temperature and concentrations profiles are presented and examined carefully. Numerical computation is performed to compute shear stress, couple stress, heat and mass rate at the disk.

  5. MHD flow of a micropolar fluid over a stretchable disk in a porous medium with heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, A. Meraj, M. A.; Ashraf, M.; Batool, K.; Hussain, M.

    2015-07-15

    This article studies the simultaneous impacts of heat and mass transfer of an incompressible electrically conducting micropolar fluid generated by the stretchable disk in presence of porous medium. The thermal radiation effect is accounted via Rosseland’s approximation. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced into dimensionless form by employing the suitable similarity transformations. A finite difference base algorithm is utilized to obtain the solution expressions. The impacts of physical parameters on dimensionless axial velocity, radial velocity, micro-rotation, temperature and concentrations profiles are presented and examined carefully. Numerical computation is performed to compute shear stress, couple stress, heat and mass rate at the disk.

  6. Low effective activation energies for oxygen release from metal oxides: evidence for mass-transfer limits at high heating rates.

    PubMed

    Jian, Guoqiang; Zhou, Lei; Piekiel, Nicholas W; Zachariah, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Oxygen release from metal oxides at high temperatures is relevant to many thermally activated chemical processes, including chemical-looping combustion, solar thermochemical cycles and energetic thermite reactions. In this study, we evaluated the thermal decomposition of nanosized metal oxides under rapid heating (~10(5) K s(-1)) with time-resolved mass spectrometry. We found that the effective activation-energy values that were obtained using the Flynn-Wall-Ozawa isoconversional method are much lower than the values found at low heating rates, indicating that oxygen transport might be rate-determining at a high heating rate.

  7. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  8. Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer in Mechanically Contstrained Ultra Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Drost; Jim Liburdy; Brian Paul; Richard Peterson

    2005-01-01

    Oregon State University (OSU) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct research focused on resolving the key technical issues that limited the deployment of efficient and extremely compact microtechnology based heat actuated absorption heat pumps and gas absorbers. Success in demonstrating these technologies will reduce the main barriers to the deployment of a technology that can significantly reduce energy consumption in the building, automotive and industrial sectors while providing a technology that can improve our ability to sequester CO{sub 2}. The proposed research cost $939,477. $539,477 of the proposed amount funded research conducted at OSU while the balance ($400,000) was used at PNNL. The project lasted 42 months and started in April 2001. Recent developments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oregon State University suggest that the performance of absorption and desorption systems can be significantly enhanced by the use of an ultra-thin film gas/liquid contactor. This device employs microtechnology-based structures to mechanically constrain the gas/liquid interface. This technology can be used to form very thin liquid films with a film thickness less then 100 microns while still allowing gas/liquid contact. When the resistance to mass transfer in gas desorption and absorption is dominated by diffusion in the liquid phase the use of extremely thin films (<100 microns) for desorption and absorption can radically reduce the size of a gas desorber or absorber. The development of compact absorbers and desorbers enables the deployment of small heat-actuated absorption heat pumps for distributed space heating and cooling applications, heat-actuated automotive air conditioning, manportable cooling, gas absorption units for the chemical process industry and the development of high capacity CO{sub 2} absorption devices for CO{sub 2} collection and sequestration. The energy

  9. Specific features of external heat and mass transfer in the vibration apparatuses used for regenerating spent fuel from nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapozhnikov, B. G.; Gorbunova, A. M.; Zelenkova, Yu. O.; Sapozhnikov, G. B.; Shiryaeva, N. P.

    2014-06-01

    We present experimental data on the coefficients of heat and mass transfer for freely floating bodies simulating fragments of cladding and large conglomerates of fuel, as well as on the local coefficients of heat and mass transfer over the bed height, which point to high intensity of heat and mass transfer processes that take place in the elements of vibration apparatuses intended for subjecting spent fuel from nuclear power plants to oxidative recrystallization.

  10. Effects of microscale inertia on heat or mass transfer from a drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2012-11-01

    Heat or mass transport from suspensions of solid particles or drops is ubiquitous in many industrial processes. In the zero inertia limit the transport is diffusion limited owing to the presence of closed streamlines around each particle. A small but finite amount of inertia though, results in a vastly different picture, greatly enhancing transport by destroying the closed streamline configuration. We develop a theoretical formulation to study the effects of weak inertia on transport from a density-matched drop in a 2D linear flow. It is shown that, unlike a solid particle, the near-surface streamlines are closed only when the viscosity ratio (λ) exceeds a critical value λc = 2 α / (1- α) , where α is the linear flow parameter measuring relative magnitudes of extension and vorticity. The velocity field on the drop surface can be characterized using a complex-valued analogue of the (C, τ) coordinate system used to describe Jeffrey orbits of an axisymmetric particle. In the open-streamline case (λ < λ c) , convective transport occurs even with zero inertia, and for large Peclet number (Pe) (the relative magnitude of convective to diffusive transport), the Nusselt number (dimensionless rate of heat transfer) is expected to scale as F(α, λ) Pe1/2 and is determined via a boundary layer analysis in the (C, τ) coordinate system. In the closed streamline case (λ > λ c) , similar to the solid particle, inertia plays a crucial role, and the Nusselt number must scale as G(α, λ)Re1/2Pe1/2. A methodology is developed to analyze the convection along spiraling streamlines using a physically motivated choice of coordinate system on the drop surface.

  11. Heat and mass transfer at a free surface with diabatic boundaries in a single-species system under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Eckart; Dreyer, Michael E.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the heat and mass transfer at a free surface under microgravity conditions. The SOURCE-II (Sounding Rocket COMPERE Experiment) experiment was performed on a suborbital flight in February 2012 from Esrange in North Sweden. It provided representative data with respect to solid, liquid, and vapor temperatures as well as the visible surface position. The objectives were to quantify the deformation of the free liquid surface and to correlate the apparent contact angle to a characteristic temperature difference between subcooled liquid and superheated wall. Furthermore, the influence of evaporation and condensation at the liquid/vapor interface and at the superheated wall must be taken into account to analyze heat and mass fluxes due to a characteristic temperature difference. In the following, we show evidently that the magnitude of the apparent contact angle depends on the exerted specific pressurizations of the vapor phase during the experiment and hence on the change in the saturation temperature at the free surface. The characteristic temperature difference is defined with respect to the wall temperature in the vicinity of the contact line and the saturation temperature. Therefore, apparent contact angle and temperature difference can be correlated and indicate a specific characteristic. Concerning the heat and mass transfer at the free liquid surface and the contact line, two different methods are presented to evaluate the net mass due to phase change within a certain time interval. In the first approach, the mass flow rate is calculated by means of the ideal gas law and its derivatives with respect to temperature and pressure. The second approach calculates the heat flux as well as the mass flux at the wall and in the region of the free liquid surface. In these cases, a specific heat transfer coefficient and a thermal boundary layer thickness are used.

  12. Multiple Ways to Solve Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercole, Leslie K.; Frantz, Marny; Ashline, George

    2011-01-01

    When solving problems involving proportions, students may intuitively draw on strategies that connect to their understanding of fractions, decimals, and percents. These two statements--"Instruction in solving proportions should include methods that have a strong intuitive basis" and "Teachers should begin instruction with more intuitive…

  13. Mathematical Model of the Processes of Heat and Mass Transfer and Diffusion of the Magnetic Field in an Induction Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perminov, A. V.; Nikulin, I. L.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mathematical model describing the motion of a metal melt in a variable inhomogeneous magnetic field of a short solenoid. In formulating the problem, we made estimates and showed the possibility of splitting the complete magnetohydrodynamical problem into two subproblems: a magnetic field diffusion problem where the distributions of the external and induced magnetic fields and currents are determined, and a heat and mass transfer problem with known distributions of volume sources of heat and forces. The dimensionless form of the heat and mass transfer equation was obtained with the use of averaging and multiscale methods, which permitted writing and solving separately the equations for averaged flows and temperature fields and their oscillations. For the heat and mass transfer problem, the boundary conditions for a real technological facility are discussed. The dimensionless form of the magnetic field diffusion equation is presented, and the experimental computational procedure and results of the numerical simulation of the magnetic field structure in the melt for various magnetic Reynolds numbers are described. The extreme dependence of heat release on the magnetic Reynolds number has been interpreted.

  14. Numerical simulation of heat and mass transport during space crystal growth with MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Minwu; Raman, Raghu; Degroh, Henry C., III

    1995-01-01

    The MEPHISTO space experiments are collaborative United States and French investigations aimed at understanding the fundamentals of crystal growth. Microgravity experiments were conducted aboard the USMP-1 and -2 missions on STS-52 and 62 in October 1992 and March 1994 respectively. MEPHISTO is a French designed and built Bridgman type furnace which uses the Seebeck technique to monitor the solid/liquid interface temperature and Peltier pulsing to mark the location and shape of the solid/liquid interface. In this paper the Bridgman growth of Sn-Bi and Bi-Sn under terrestrial and microgravity conditions is modeled using the finite element code, FIDAP*. The numerical model considers fully coupled heat and mass transport, fluid motion and solid/liquid phase changes in the crystal growth process. The primary goals of this work are: to provide a quantitative study of the thermal buoyancy-induced convection in the melt for the two flight experiments; to compare the vertical and horizontal growth configurations and systematically evaluate the effects of various gravity levels on the solute segregation. Numerical results of the vertical and horizontal Bridgman growth configurations are presented.

  15. Frontal Regime of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Geothermal Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhasov, A. B.; Ramazanov, M. M.; Alkhasova, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Based on an earlier proposed mathematical model, the conditions for the existence of a frontal regime of steam extraction from a high-temperature bed have been derived. It is shown that unlike the familiar one-dimensional case, in the radial-symmetrical model considered the radius of the region occupied by steam tends to a limiting value, that is, the front of boiling that separates the regions of water and steam practically comes to a stop after a time. A formula has been derived pointing clearly to the dependence of the indicated limiting value of the front radius on the water and steam parameters as well as on the characteristics of the geothermal bed. It is shown that for the steam to occupy a considerable region around the well when the bed is in service, it is necessary that the initial state of water be close to that of steam generation. Otherwise the front of boiling in the considered regime of heat and mass transfer extends from the well only a little.

  16. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model.

    PubMed

    Bridge, L J; Franklin, K A; Homer, M E

    2013-08-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity.

  17. Impact of plant shoot architecture on leaf cooling: a coupled heat and mass transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, L. J.; Franklin, K. A.; Homer, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Plants display a range of striking architectural adaptations when grown at elevated temperatures. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, these include elongation of petioles, and increased petiole and leaf angles from the soil surface. The potential physiological significance of these architectural changes remains speculative. We address this issue computationally by formulating a mathematical model and performing numerical simulations, testing the hypothesis that elongated and elevated plant configurations may reflect a leaf-cooling strategy. This sets in place a new basic model of plant water use and interaction with the surrounding air, which couples heat and mass transfer within a plant to water vapour diffusion in the air, using a transpiration term that depends on saturation, temperature and vapour concentration. A two-dimensional, multi-petiole shoot geometry is considered, with added leaf-blade shape detail. Our simulations show that increased petiole length and angle generally result in enhanced transpiration rates and reduced leaf temperatures in well-watered conditions. Furthermore, our computations also reveal plant configurations for which elongation may result in decreased transpiration rate owing to decreased leaf liquid saturation. We offer further qualitative and quantitative insights into the role of architectural parameters as key determinants of leaf-cooling capacity. PMID:23720538

  18. Application of Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy to Heat and Mass Transport Modeling in Porous Microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Jochen; Milos, Frank; Fredrich, Joanne; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy (LSCM) has been used to obtain digital images of the complicated 3-D (three-dimensional) microstructures of rigid, fibrous thermal protection system (TPS) materials. These orthotropic materials are comprised of refractory ceramic fibers with diameters in the range of 1 to 10 microns and have open porosities of 0.8 or more. Algorithms are being constructed to extract quantitative microstructural information from the digital data so that it may be applied to specific heat and mass transport modeling efforts; such information includes, for example, the solid and pore volume fractions, the internal surface area per volume, fiber diameter distributions, and fiber orientation distributions. This type of information is difficult to obtain in general, yet it is directly relevant to many computational efforts which seek to model macroscopic thermophysical phenomena in terms of microscopic mechanisms or interactions. Two such computational efforts for fibrous TPS materials are: i) the calculation of radiative transport properties; ii) the modeling of gas permeabilities.

  19. Thermal performance of a multi-evaporator loop heat pipe with thermal masses and thermal electrical coolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jentung; Ottenstein, Laura; Birur, Gajanana

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes thermal performance of a loop heat pipe (LHP) with two evaporators and two condensers in ambient testing. Each evaporator has an outer diameter of 15mm and a length of 76mm, and has an integral compensation chamber (CC). An aluminum mass of 500 grams is attached to each evaporator to simulate the instrument mass. A thermal electric cooler (TEC) is installed on each CC to provide heating as well as cooling for CC temperature control. A flow regulator is installed in the condenser section to prevent vapor from going back to the evaporators in the event that one of condenser is fully utilized. Ammonia was used ad the working fluid. Tests conducted included start-up, power cycle, heat load sharing, sink temperature cycle, operating temperature control with TECs, and capillary limit tests. Experimental data showed that the loop could start with a heat load of less than 1OW even with added thermal masses. The loop operated stably with even and uneven evaporator heat loads, and even and uneven condenser sink temperatures. The operating temperature could be controlled within +/-0.5K of the set point temperature using either or both TECs, and the required TEC control heater power was less than 2W under most test conditions. Heat load sharing between the two evaporators was also successfully demonstrated. The loop had a heat transport capability of 120W to 140W, and could recover from a dry-out when the heat load was reduced. The 500-gram aluminum mass on each evaporator had a negligible effect on the loop operation. Existing LHPs servicing the orbiting spacecraft have a single evaporator with an outer diameter of about 25mm. Important performance characteristics demonstrated by this LHP included: 1) Operation of an LHP with 15mm diameter evaporators; 2) Robustness and reliability of an LHP with multiple evaporators and multiple condensers under various test conditions; 3) Heat load sharing among LHP evaporators; 4) Effectiveness of TECs in controlling

  20. Novel models on fluid's variable thermo-physical properties for extensive study on convection heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, De-Yi; Zhong, Liang-Cai

    2016-04-01

    Our novel models for fluid's variable physical properties are improved and reported systematically in this work for enhancement of theoretical and practical value on study of convection heat and mass transfer. It consists of three models, namely (1) temperature parameter model, (2) polynomial model, and (3) weighted-sum model, respectively for treatment of temperature-dependent physical properties of gases, temperature-dependent physical properties of liquids, and concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. Two related components are proposed, and involved in each model for fluid's variable physical properties. They are basic physic property equations and theoretical similarity equations on physical property factors. The former, as the foundation of the latter, is based on the typical experimental data and physical analysis. The latter is built up by similarity analysis and mathematical derivation based on the former basic physical properties equations. These models are available for smooth simulation and treatment of fluid's variable physical properties for assurance of theoretical and practical value of study on convection of heat and mass transfer. Especially, so far, there has been lack of available study on heat and mass transfer of film condensation convection of vapour-gas mixture, and the wrong heat transfer results existed in widespread studies on the related research topics, due to ignorance of proper consideration of the concentration- and temperature-dependent physical properties of vapour-gas mixture. For resolving such difficult issues, the present novel physical property models have their special advantages.

  1. CFD model of ITER CICC. Part VI: Heat and mass transfer between cable region and central channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanino, R.; Giors, S.; Richard, L. Savoldi

    2010-03-01

    Dual-channel cable-in-conduit conductors (CICC) are used in the superconducting magnets for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). As the CICC axial/transverse size ratio is typically ˜1000, 1D axial models are customarily used for the CICC, but they require constitutive relations for the transverse fluxes. A novel approach, based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), was recently proposed by these authors to understand the complex transverse thermal-hydraulic processes in an ITER CICC from first principles. Multidimensional (2D, 3D) Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes models implemented in the commercial CFD code FLUENT were validated against compact heat exchanger and ITER-relevant experimental data, and applied to compute the friction factor and the heat transfer coefficient in fully turbulent spiral rib-roughened pipes, mimicking the central channel of an ITER CICC. That analysis is extended here to the problem of heat and mass transfer through the perforated spiral separating the central channel from the cable bundle region, by combining the previously developed central channel model with a porous medium model for the cable region. The resulting 2D model is used to analyze several key features of the transport processes occurring between the two regions including the relation between transverse mass transfer and transverse pressure drop, the influence of transverse mass transfer on axial pressure drop, and the heat transfer coefficient between central channel and annular cable bundle region.

  2. Proportional smile design using the recurring esthetic dental (red) proportion.

    PubMed

    Ward, D H

    2001-01-01

    Dentists have needed an objective way in which to evaluate a smile. A method for determining the ideal size and position of the anterior teeth has been presented here. Use of the FIVE to evaluate the RED proportion and the width-to-height ratio, tempered with sound clinical judgment, gives pleasing and consistent results. With the diversity that exists in nature, rarely does the final result follow all the mathematical rules of proportional smile design. This approach may serve as a foundation on which to base initial smile design, however. When one begins to understand the relationship between beauty, mathematics, and the surrounding world, one begins to appreciate their interdependence.

  3. Assessment of the Coupled Heat and Mass Transfer Through Protective Garments Using Manikins and Other Advanced Measurement Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, René M.; Psikuta, Agnes

    The assessment of the coupled heat and mass transfer in protective clothing is very complex as the layers of the system are a combination of fabric and air layers that constantly change with the movements of the wearer. The methods to measure these mechanisms become more and more sophisticated which increases the precision of models to predict the impact of heat and moisture fluxes on the human thermal physiology. The simulation of the human thermoregulatory mechanisms requires the combination of physical models representing the body (manikins) with physiological (mathematical) models. This chapter gives different examples of advanced measurement methods to characterize the thermal properties of fabrics and garments.

  4. Modeling heat and mass transport phenomena at higher temperatures in solar distillation systems - The Chilton-Colburn analogy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsilingiris, P.T.

    2010-02-15

    In the present investigation efforts have been devoted towards developing an analysis suitable for heat and mass transfer processes modeling in solar distillation systems, when they are operating at higher temperatures. For this purpose the use of Lewis relation is not new although its validity is based on the assumptions of identical boundary layer concentration and temperature distributions, as well as low mass flux conditions, which are not usually met in solar distillation systems operating at higher temperatures associated with considerable mass transfer rates. The present analysis, taking into consideration these conditions and the temperature dependence of all pertinent thermophysical properties of the saturated binary mixture of water vapor and dry air, leads to the development of an improved predictive accuracy model. This model, having undergone successful first order validation against earlier reported measurements from the literature, appears to offer more accurate predictions of the transport processes and mass flow rate yield of solar stills when operated at elevated temperatures. (author)

  5. [A simple preparation method of an electric heating apparatus for heating capillary chromatographic columns and its application in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry system].

    PubMed

    Jin, Zuyao; Lü, Yayao; Zhou, Shanshan; Hao, Feiran; Fu, Bin; Ying, Wantao; Qian, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yangjun

    2015-06-01

    For deep coverage of proteome, especially in performing qualitative identification and quantitative analysis of low-abundance proteins, the most commonly used method is the application of a longer capillary chromatographic column or a capillary column packed with smaller particle sizes. However, this causes another problem, the very high back pressure which results in liquid leaks in some connection parts in a liquid chromatograph. To solve this problem, an electric heating apparatus was developed to raise the temperature of a capillary column for reducing its back pressure, which was further applied in a capillary high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system (cHPLC-MS/MS), and evaluated in the terms of chromatographic column back pressure and chromatographic column efficiency using bovine serum albumin (BSA) tryptic digests and yeast tryptic digests, separately. The results showed that at the optimum current, our electric heating apparatus could reduce the column pressure of a capillary column packed with 3 µm packing materials by at least 50% during the separation of BSA tryptic digestion and yeast tryptic digestion, compared with that without electric heating. The column efficiency was also increased slightly. This suggested that the electric heating apparatus can significantly reduce the column pressure, which provides an efficient way to use capillary chromatographic columns packed with smaller sizes of particles at a lower pressure.

  6. The analysis of heat and mass transfer during frying of food using a moving boundary solution procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, M. M.; Chen, X. D.

    Heat and mass transfer during frying of food was analysed using the heat conduction equation. The model developed assumes the presence of two regions, the fried and the unfried regions. The heat convected from the oil to the surface of the food is transferred by conduction through the fried region to an evaporating interface. Most of the transferred heat is utilised to vaporise the water at the interface, while the remaining smaller amount is used for sensible heating. The generated water vapour at the interface was assumed to flow in the fried region with minimum resistance, exchanging heat with the solid. The model was tested against some experimental results available for frying of thick and thin potato chips. The agreement between the predicted and measured temperature distribution was reasonable except at the end of the frying period at which the bounded water may vaporise with a different mechanism and oil may penetrate deep into the potato chips. In all the experiments, the centre temperature of the potato chips remained constant at almost 100∘C for a long period which gave a good support to the model developed.

  7. Bayesian inference on proportional elections.

    PubMed

    Brunello, Gabriel Hideki Vatanabe; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Polls for majoritarian voting systems usually show estimates of the percentage of votes for each candidate. However, proportional vote systems do not necessarily guarantee the candidate with the most percentage of votes will be elected. Thus, traditional methods used in majoritarian elections cannot be applied on proportional elections. In this context, the purpose of this paper was to perform a Bayesian inference on proportional elections considering the Brazilian system of seats distribution. More specifically, a methodology to answer the probability that a given party will have representation on the chamber of deputies was developed. Inferences were made on a Bayesian scenario using the Monte Carlo simulation technique, and the developed methodology was applied on data from the Brazilian elections for Members of the Legislative Assembly and Federal Chamber of Deputies in 2010. A performance rate was also presented to evaluate the efficiency of the methodology. Calculations and simulations were carried out using the free R statistical software.

  8. Bayesian Inference on Proportional Elections

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Gabriel Hideki Vatanabe; Nakano, Eduardo Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Polls for majoritarian voting systems usually show estimates of the percentage of votes for each candidate. However, proportional vote systems do not necessarily guarantee the candidate with the most percentage of votes will be elected. Thus, traditional methods used in majoritarian elections cannot be applied on proportional elections. In this context, the purpose of this paper was to perform a Bayesian inference on proportional elections considering the Brazilian system of seats distribution. More specifically, a methodology to answer the probability that a given party will have representation on the chamber of deputies was developed. Inferences were made on a Bayesian scenario using the Monte Carlo simulation technique, and the developed methodology was applied on data from the Brazilian elections for Members of the Legislative Assembly and Federal Chamber of Deputies in 2010. A performance rate was also presented to evaluate the efficiency of the methodology. Calculations and simulations were carried out using the free R statistical software. PMID:25786259

  9. Indices of body proportionality in neonates.

    PubMed

    Tsou Yau, K I; Chang, M H

    1993-01-01

    The inadequacy of using body weight alone to evaluate fetal skeletal and soft-tissue growth has long been recognized. Body proportionality indices could identify symptomatic newborn infants better than size-for-date classification. Lack of normative data precludes its being used, practically, in Chinese newborns. Thus body weight, body length, head circumference and mid-arm circumference were measured in 240 neonates appropriate for gestational age, 27-42 weeks, 960-3918 g, to construct reference indices of body proportionality: ponderal index (PI), body mass index (BMI), weight/length ratio (W/L), head circumference/body length ratio (HC/L) and mid-arm circumference/head circumference ratio (MAC/HC). All the five indices of body proportionality but HC/L were statistically correlated with gestational age (GA). For full-term newborns, PI did not correlate with GA. Furthers, the MAC/HC ratio decreased after 40 weeks' gestation. Therefore, when these indices of body proportionality are used to evaluate intrauterine nutritional status of a newborn, the appropriate standard for GA should be considered. PMID:8372678

  10. Thermophoresis on boundary layer heat and mass transfer flow of Walters-B fluid past a radiate plate with heat sink/source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, B.; Gorla, Rama Subba Reddy; Murthy, P. V. S. N.

    2016-09-01

    The Walters-B liquid model is employed to simulate medical creams and other rheological liquids encountered in biotechnology and chemical engineering. This rheological model introduces supplementary terms into the momentum conservation equation. The combined effects of thermal radiation and heat sink/source on transient free convective, laminar flow and mass transfer in a viscoelastic fluid past a vertical plate are presented by taking thermophoresis effect into account. The transformed conservation equations are solved using a stable, robust finite difference method. A parametric study illustrating the influence of viscoelasticity parameter (Γ), thermophoretic parameter (τ), thermal radiation parameter (F), heat sink/source (ϕ), Prandtl number (Pr), Schmidt number (Sc), thermal Grashof number (Gr), solutal Grashof number (Gm), temperature and concentration profiles as well as local skin-friction, Nusselt and Sherwood number is conducted. The results of this parametric study are shown graphically and inform of table. The study has applications in polymer materials processing.

  11. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  12. Influence of Heat and Mass Transfer on the Peristaltic Transport of a Phan-Thien-Tanner Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Noreen, Saima; Qasim, Muhammad

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the effects of heat and mass transfer on the peristaltic flow in the presence of an induced magnetic field. Constitutive equations of a Phan-Thien-Tanner fluid are utilized in the mathematical description. Mathematical modelling is based upon the laws of mass, linear momentum, energy, and concentration. Relevant equations are simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. A series solution is presented for small Weissenberg number. Variations of emerging parameters embedded in the flow system are discussed.

  13. Source Distribution Method for Unsteady One-Dimensional Flows With Small Mass, Momentum, and Heat Addition and Small Area Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    A source distribution method is presented for obtaining flow perturbations due to small unsteady area variations, mass, momentum, and heat additions in a basic uniform (or piecewise uniform) one-dimensional flow. First, the perturbations due to an elemental area variation, mass, momentum, and heat addition are found. The general solution is then represented by a spatial and temporal distribution of these elemental (source) solutions. Emphasis is placed on discussing the physical nature of the flow phenomena. The method is illustrated by several examples. These include the determination of perturbations in basic flows consisting of (1) a shock propagating through a nonuniform tube, (2) a constant-velocity piston driving a shock, (3) ideal shock-tube flows, and (4) deflagrations initiated at a closed end. The method is particularly applicable for finding the perturbations due to relatively thin wall boundary layers.

  14. Analysis and application of Luikov`s heat, mass, and pressure transfer model to a capillary porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Irudayaraj, J.; Wu, Y.

    1996-05-01

    Luikov`s system of partial differential equations for heat, mass and pressure transfer was applied to describe the drying process in a capillary porous body. A two dimensional finite element model were formulated to solve the system of equations. The simulated results agreed very well with the exact solutions. The finite element model was then used to study the sensitivity of the parameters in Luikov`s heat, mass and pressure transfer system, and to estimate the key parameters identified (the coefficient of moisture conductivity, k{sub m}, and the ratio of vapor diffusion to total diffusion, {epsilon}) for Norway spruce. The finite element model was further used for the prediction of temperature, moisture and pressure variation during drying of Norway spruce. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the temperature and moisture content of a Norway spruce sample during drying. The predicted results showed good agreement with the experimental results.

  15. An inexact Newton method for fully-coupled solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Tuminaro, R.S.; Walker, H.F.

    1997-02-01

    The solution of the governing steady transport equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in flowing fluids can be very difficult. These difficulties arise from the nonlinear, coupled, nonsymmetric nature of the system of algebraic equations that results from spatial discretization of the PDEs. In this manuscript the authors focus on evaluating a proposed nonlinear solution method based on an inexact Newton method with backtracking. In this context they use a particular spatial discretization based on a pressure stabilized Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the low Mach number Navier-Stokes equations with heat and mass transport. The discussion considers computational efficiency, robustness and some implementation issues related to the proposed nonlinear solution scheme. Computational results are presented for several challenging CFD benchmark problems as well as two large scale 3D flow simulations.

  16. Governing equations for multiphase heat and mass transfer in hygroscopic porous media with applications to clothing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Phillip

    1994-11-01

    Whitaker's theory of coupled heat and mass transfer through porous media was modified to include hygroscopic porous materials which can absorb liquid into the solid matrix. The system of equations described in this report should make it possible to evaluate the time-dependent transport properties of hygroscopic and non-hygroscopic clothing materials by including many important factors which are usually ignored in the analysis of heat and mass transfer through textile materials. The set of equations allows for the unsteady capillary wicking of sweat through fabric structure, condensation and evaporation of sweat within various layers of the clothing system, forced gas phase convection through the porous structure of a textile layer, and the swelling and shrinkage of fibers and yarns as they absorb/desorb liquid water and water vapor.

  17. Two-dimensional CFD modeling of the heat and mass transfer process during sewage sludge drying in a solar dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Piotr; Badyda, Krzysztof

    2011-12-01

    The paper presents key assumptions of the mathematical model which describes heat and mass transfer phenomena in a solar sewage drying process, as well as techniques used for solving this model with the Fluent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Special attention was paid to implementation of boundary conditions on the sludge surface, which is a physical boundary between the gaseous phase - air, and solid phase - dried matter. Those conditions allow to model heat and mass transfer between the media during first and second drying stages. Selection of the computational geometry is also discussed - it is a fragment of the entire drying facility. Selected modelling results are presented in the final part of the paper.

  18. Torrefaction of invasive alien plants: Influence of heating rate and other conversion parameters on mass yield and higher heating value.

    PubMed

    Mundike, Jhonnah; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of controlling their proliferation, two invasive alien plants, Lantana camara (LC) and Mimosa pigra (MP), both widespread in Africa, were considered for torrefaction for renewable energy applications. Using thermogravimetric analysis, the influence of heating rate (HR: 2.18-19.82°Cmin(-1)) together with variable temperature and hold time on char yield and HHV (in a bomb calorimeter) were determined. Statistically significant effects of HR on HHV with optima at 10.5°Cmin(-1) for LC and 20°Cmin(-1) for MP were obtained. Increases of HHV up to 0.8MJkg(-1) or energy yield greater than 10%, together with a 3-fold reduction in torrefaction conversion time could be achieved by optimisation of HR. Analysis of the torrefaction volatiles by TG-MS showed that not only hemicelluloses, but also lignin conversion, could influence the optimum HR value. PMID:26954309

  19. Torrefaction of invasive alien plants: Influence of heating rate and other conversion parameters on mass yield and higher heating value.

    PubMed

    Mundike, Jhonnah; Collard, François-Xavier; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-06-01

    With the aim of controlling their proliferation, two invasive alien plants, Lantana camara (LC) and Mimosa pigra (MP), both widespread in Africa, were considered for torrefaction for renewable energy applications. Using thermogravimetric analysis, the influence of heating rate (HR: 2.18-19.82°Cmin(-1)) together with variable temperature and hold time on char yield and HHV (in a bomb calorimeter) were determined. Statistically significant effects of HR on HHV with optima at 10.5°Cmin(-1) for LC and 20°Cmin(-1) for MP were obtained. Increases of HHV up to 0.8MJkg(-1) or energy yield greater than 10%, together with a 3-fold reduction in torrefaction conversion time could be achieved by optimisation of HR. Analysis of the torrefaction volatiles by TG-MS showed that not only hemicelluloses, but also lignin conversion, could influence the optimum HR value.

  20. Global whole-cell FTICR mass spectrometric proteomics analysis of the heat shock response in the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, Amy K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2005-05-01

    Despite intense interest in the response to radiation in D. radiodurans, little is known about how the organism responds to other stress factors. Our previous studies indicated that D. radiodurans mounts a regulated protective response to heat shock, and that expression of the groESL and dnaKJ operons are induced in response to elevated temperature. In order to gain greater insight into the heat shock response of D. radiodurans on a more global scale, we undertook the study reported here. Using whole-cell semiquantitative mass spectrometric proteomics integrated with global transcriptome microarray analyses, we have determined a core set of highly induced heat shock genes whose expression correlates well at the transcriptional and translational levels. In addition, we observed that the higher the absolute expression of a given gene at physiological conditions, the better the quantitative correlation between RNA and protein expression levels.

  1. Second All-Union Seminar on Hydromechanics and Heat-Mass Transfer in Weightlessness. Abstracts of reports: Table of contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershuni, G. Z.; Zhukhovitskiy, Y. M.

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of reports are given which were presented at the Second All Union Seminar on Hydromechanics and Heat-Mass Transfer in Weightlessness. Topics inlcude: (1) features of crystallization of semiconductor materials under conditions of microacceleration; (2) experimental results of crystallization of solid solutions of CDTE-HGTE under conditions of weightlessness; (3) impurities in crystals cultivated under conditions of weightlessness; and (4) a numerical investigation of the distribution of impurities during guided crystallization of a melt.

  2. Second All-Union Seminar on Hydromechanics and Heat and Mass Exchange in Weightlessness, summaries of reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gershuni, G. Z. (Editor); Zhukhovitskiy, Y. M. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Abstracts of reports are given which were presented at the Second All Union Seminar on Hydromechanics and Heat-Mass Transfer in Weightlessness. Topics include: (1) features of crystallization of semiconductor materials under conditions of microacceleration; (2) experimental results of crystallization of solid solutions of CDTE-HGTE under conditions of weightlessness; (3) impurities in crystals cultivated under conditions of weightlessness; and (4) a numerical investigation of the distribution of impurities during guided crystallization of a melt.

  3. Measurement of condensed water mass during mechanical ventilation with heated wire humidifiers: experiments with and without pre-warming.

    PubMed

    Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Giorgino, M; Silvestri, S

    2014-01-01

    Heated wire humidifiers (HWHs) are employed in mechanical ventilation with the objective of heating and humidifying the gases delivered to the mechanical ventilator. They use a control based on the adjustment of gas temperature at the chamber outlet. The condensation occurring within the breathing circuit is one of the most important concerns related to this control strategy. In the present study we focused on the measurement of the condensation amount within the breathing circuit during the employment of a commercial HWH (MR850, Fisher & Paykel). The measurement of the condensed vapor mass, performed during 7 h of ventilation, provides more objective information than the visual-based scale used in literature. Moreover, two solutions were proposed to minimize the condensation in the breathing circuit tract downward the heated chamber: i) a flexible insulating pipe was used to cover the mentioned breathing circuit tract, and ii) the air delivered by ventilator was heated before it passes through the chamber at different inlet temperature Ti obtained by employing pre-warming. To assess the improvement obtained by these two solutions, experiments have been carried out with and without their employment at two minute volumes. Results show that: i) insulation and pre-warming allows minimizing the condensation (e.g., at 8 L·min(-1) the mass of condensation after 7 h of ventilation decreases from 9.3 g to 2.5 g by using insulation and T(i)=27 °C); ii) the condensation mass decreases with T(i) (e.g., at 8 L·min(-1) the mass condensation was 2.5 g at T(i)= 27 °C and 1.1 g at T(i)= 30 °C); and iii) the amount of condensation linearly increases with time of ventilation.

  4. Study of dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer using CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriaa, Wassim; Bejaoui, Salma; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges; Bournot, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we developed a two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to simulate dynamic structure and heat and mass transfer of a vertical ceramic tiles dryer (EVA 702). The carrier's motion imposed the choice of a dynamic mesh based on two methods: "spring based smoothing" and "local remeshing". The dryer airflow is considered as turbulent ( Re = 1.09 × 105 at the dryer inlet), therefore the Re-Normalization Group model with Enhanced Wall Treatment was used as a turbulence model. The resolution of the governing equation was performed with Fluent 6.3 whose capacities do not allow the direct resolution of drying problems. Thus, a user defined scalar equation was inserted in the CFD code to model moisture content diffusion into tiles. User-defined functions were implemented to define carriers' motion, thermo-physical properties… etc. We adopted also a "two-step" simulation method: in the first step, we follow the heat transfer coefficient evolution (Hc). In the second step, we determine the mass transfer coefficient (Hm) and the features fields of drying air and ceramic tiles. The found results in mixed convection mode (Fr = 5.39 at the dryer inlet) were used to describe dynamic and thermal fields of airflow and heat and mass transfer close to the ceramic tiles. The response of ceramic tiles to heat and mass transfer was studied based on Biot numbers. The evolutions of averages temperature and moisture content of ceramic tiles were analyzed. Lastly, comparison between experimental and numerical results showed a good agreement.

  5. Prediction of Heat and Mass Transfer in a Rotating Ribbed Coolant Passage With a 180 Degree Turn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Numerical results are presented for flow in a rotating internal passage with a 180 degree turn and ribbed walls. Reynolds numbers ranging from 5200 to 7900, and Rotation numbers of 0.0 and 0.24 were considered. The straight sections of the channel have a square cross section, with square ribs spaced one hydraulic diameter (D) apart on two opposite sides. The ribs have a height of 0.1D and are not staggered from one side to the other. The full three dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved combined with the Wilcox k-omega turbulence model. By solving an additional equation for mass transfer, it is possible to isolate the effect of buoyancy in the presence of rotation. That is, heat transfer induced buoyancy effects can be eliminated as in naphthalene sublimation experiments. Heat transfer, mass transfer and flow field results are presented with favorable agreement with available experimental data. It is shown that numerically predicting the reattachment between ribs is essential to achieving an accurate prediction of heat/mass transfer. For the low Reynolds numbers considered, the standard turbulence model did not produce reattachment between ribs. By modifying the wall boundary condition on omega, the turbulent specific dissipation rate, much better agreement with the flow structure and heat/ mass transfer was achieved. It is beyond the scope of the present work to make a general recommendation on the omega wall boundary condition. However, the present results suggest that the omega boundary condition should take into account the proximity to abrupt changes in geometry.

  6. Bibliography of US patents on augmentation of convective heat and mass transfer-II

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.L.; Bergles, A.E.; Junkhan, G.H.

    1983-12-01

    Patents are an important source of information on the potential commercialization of augmented heat transfer technology. This report presents a bibliography of US patents pertinent to that technology. The total number of patents cited is 454. They are presented in three separate lists: by patent number, alphabetically by first inventor, and by augmentation technique (with secondary arrangement according to mode of heat transfer).

  7. Proportional Reasoning with a Pyramid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamolo, Ami; Sinclair, Margaret; Whiteley, Walter J.

    2011-01-01

    Proportional reasoning pops up in math class in a variety of places, such as while making scaled drawings; finding equivalent fractions; converting units of measurement; comparing speeds, prices, and rates; and comparing lengths, areas, and volume. Students need to be exposed to a variety of representations to develop a sound understanding of this…

  8. Proportional Hazards Models of Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chimka, Justin R.; Reed-Rhoads, Teri; Barker, Kash

    2008-01-01

    Survival analysis is a statistical tool used to describe the duration between events. Many processes in medical research, engineering, and economics can be described using survival analysis techniques. This research involves studying engineering college student graduation using Cox proportional hazards models. Among male students with American…

  9. Social Justice and Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simic-Muller, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Ratio and proportional reasoning tasks abound that have connections to real-world situations. Examples in this article demonstrate how textbook tasks can easily be transformed into authentic real-world problems that shed light on issues of equity and fairness, such as population growth and crime rates. A few ideas are presented on how teachers can…

  10. Saving Money Using Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Cruz, Jessica A.; Garney, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    It is beneficial for students to discover intuitive strategies, as opposed to the teacher presenting strategies to them. Certain proportional reasoning tasks are more likely to elicit intuitive strategies than other tasks. The strategies that students are apt to use when approaching a task, as well as the likelihood of a student's success or…

  11. Transient heat and mass transfer analysis in a porous ceria structure of a novel solar redox reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chandran, RB; Bader, R; Lipinski, W

    2015-06-01

    Thermal transport processes are numerically analyzed for a porous ceria structure undergoing reduction in a novel redox reactor for solar thermochemical fuel production. The cylindrical reactor cavity is formed by an array of annular reactive elements comprising the porous ceria monolith integrated with gas inlet and outlet channels. Two configurations are considered, with the reactor cavity consisting of 10 and 20 reactive elements, respectively. Temperature dependent boundary heat fluxes are obtained on the irradiated cavity wall by solving for the surface radiative exchange using the net radiation method coupled to the heat and mass transfer model of the reactive element. Predicted oxygen production rates are in the range 40-60 mu mol s(-1) for the geometries considered. After an initial rise, the average temperature of the reactive element levels off at 1660 and 1680 K for the two geometries, respectively. For the chosen reduction reaction rate model, oxygen release continues after the temperature has leveled off which indicates that the oxygen release reaction is limited by chemical kinetics and/or mass transfer rather than by the heating rate. For a fixed total mass of ceria, the peak oxygen release rate is doubled for the cavity with 20 reactive elements due to lower local oxygen partial pressure. (C) 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of heat and mass transfer during the transport of nitrogen in coal porous media on coal mine fires.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bobo; Zhou, Fubao

    2014-01-01

    The application of liquid nitrogen injection is an important technique in the field of coal mine fire prevention. However, the mechanism of heat and mass transfer of cryogenic nitrogen in the goaf porous medium has not been well accessed. Hence, the implementation of fire prevention engineering of liquid nitrogen roughly relied on an empirical view. According to the research gap in this respect, an experimental study on the heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in coal porous media was proposed. Overall, the main mechanism of liquid nitrogen fire prevention technology in the coal mine is the creation of an inert and cryogenic atmosphere. Cryogenic nitrogen gas vapor cloud, heavier than the air, would cause the phenomenon of "gravity settling" in porous media firstly. The cryogen could be applicable to diverse types of fires, both in the openings and in the enclosures. Implementation of liquid nitrogen open-injection technique in Yangchangwan colliery achieved the goals of fire prevention and air-cooling. Meanwhile, this study can also provide an essential reference for the research on heat and mass transfer in porous media in the field of thermal physics and engineering.

  13. Effect of body mass and melanism on heat balance in Liolaemus lizards of the goetschi clade.

    PubMed

    Moreno Azócar, Débora Lina; Bonino, Marcelo Fabián; Perotti, María Gabriela; Schulte, James A; Abdala, Cristian Simón; Cruz, Félix Benjamín

    2016-04-15

    The body temperature of ectotherms depends on the environmental temperatures and behavioral adjustments, but morphology may also have an effect. For example, in colder environments, animals tend to be larger and to show higher thermal inertia, as proposed by Bergmann's rule and the heat balance hypothesis (HBH). Additionally, dark coloration increases solar radiation absorption and should accelerate heat gain (thermal melanism hypothesis, TMH). We tested Bergmann's rule, the HBH and the TMH within the ITALIC! Liolaemus goetschilizard clade, which shows variability in body size and melanic coloration. We measured heating and cooling rates of live and euthanized animals, and tested how morphology and color affect these rates. Live organisms show less variable and faster heating rates compared with cooling rates, suggesting behavioral and/or physiological adjustments. Our results support Bergmann's rule and the HBH, as larger species show slower heating and cooling rates. However, we did not find a clear pattern to support the TMH. The influence of dorsal melanism on heating by radiation was masked by the body size effect in live animals, and results from euthanized individuals also showed no clear effects of melanism on heating rates. Comparison among three groups of live individuals with different degrees of melanism did not clarify the influence of melanism on heating rates. However, when euthanized animals from the same three groups were compared, we observed that darker euthanized animals actually heat faster than lighter ones, favoring the TMH. Although unresolved aspects remain, body size and coloration influenced heat exchange, suggesting complex thermoregulatory strategies in these lizards, probably regulated through physiology and behavior, which may allow these small lizards to inhabit harsh weather environments.

  14. Effect of body mass and melanism on heat balance in Liolaemus lizards of the goetschi clade.

    PubMed

    Moreno Azócar, Débora Lina; Bonino, Marcelo Fabián; Perotti, María Gabriela; Schulte, James A; Abdala, Cristian Simón; Cruz, Félix Benjamín

    2016-04-15

    The body temperature of ectotherms depends on the environmental temperatures and behavioral adjustments, but morphology may also have an effect. For example, in colder environments, animals tend to be larger and to show higher thermal inertia, as proposed by Bergmann's rule and the heat balance hypothesis (HBH). Additionally, dark coloration increases solar radiation absorption and should accelerate heat gain (thermal melanism hypothesis, TMH). We tested Bergmann's rule, the HBH and the TMH within the ITALIC! Liolaemus goetschilizard clade, which shows variability in body size and melanic coloration. We measured heating and cooling rates of live and euthanized animals, and tested how morphology and color affect these rates. Live organisms show less variable and faster heating rates compared with cooling rates, suggesting behavioral and/or physiological adjustments. Our results support Bergmann's rule and the HBH, as larger species show slower heating and cooling rates. However, we did not find a clear pattern to support the TMH. The influence of dorsal melanism on heating by radiation was masked by the body size effect in live animals, and results from euthanized individuals also showed no clear effects of melanism on heating rates. Comparison among three groups of live individuals with different degrees of melanism did not clarify the influence of melanism on heating rates. However, when euthanized animals from the same three groups were compared, we observed that darker euthanized animals actually heat faster than lighter ones, favoring the TMH. Although unresolved aspects remain, body size and coloration influenced heat exchange, suggesting complex thermoregulatory strategies in these lizards, probably regulated through physiology and behavior, which may allow these small lizards to inhabit harsh weather environments. PMID:26896550

  15. Modeling of turbulence effects on the heat and mass transfer of evaporating sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhanabharatam, Balasubramanyam

    A large diversity of two-phase gas-liquid flows of both scientific and practical interest involves the evaporation of near spherical liquid droplets in high temperature turbulent environments. Current numerical modeling approaches are predominantly focused towards the effects of continuous phase (gas phase) turbulence on the evaporation rates of liquid fuel sprays during the evaporation process, failing to account for the inherent turbulence present in the dispersed phase (liquid phase), due to the injection of sprays at high velocities. Existing models accounting for internal turbulence effects use Direct Numerical Simulations and Large Eddy Simulations that are computationally intensive. This research provides an alternative phenomenological approach of modeling droplet internal turbulence effects through the mass and heat transfer between the droplet surface and the external gas phase within a thin film inside the droplet. This finite conductivity (F-C) model was based on the two-temperature film theory, where the turbulence characteristics of the droplet are used to estimate the effective thermal diffusivity (alphaeff) within the droplet phase. The alphaeff is estimated from the physical properties of the flow within the droplet rather than from a 'curve-fit' as done conventionally. The results of the one-way coupled study indicated that the equilibrium drop temperature predictions were higher than calculations by the infinite conductivity (I-C) model. The liquid internal turbulence has a considerable effect on the diffusivity in the primary atomization regime. The thermal boundary layer was found to be substantially thick initially, decreasing quickly to a small value, exhibiting a reasonable physical trend. The two-way coupled studies (CFD) indicated that the F-C model, slowed down the evaporation process, produced larger droplets and longer tip penetration lengths during the initial stages of injection. For a jet in a supersonic cross-flow, results indicated

  16. Flash Desorption/Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Less- and Nonvolatile Samples Using a Linearly Driven Heated Metal Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T.; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the important issue of the desorption of less- and nonvolatile compounds with minimal sample decomposition in ambient mass spectrometry is approached using ambient flash desorption mass spectrometry. The preheated stainless steel filament was driven down and up along the vertical axis in 0.3 s. At the lowest position, it touched the surface of the sample with an invasion depth of 0.1 mm in 50 ms (flash heating) and was removed from the surface (fast cooling). The heating rate corresponds to ~104 °C/s at the filament temperature of 500 °C. The desorbed gaseous molecules were ionized by using a dielectric barrier discharge ion source, and the produced ions were detected by a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Less-volatile samples, such as pharmaceutical tablets, narcotics, explosives, and C60 gave molecular and protonated molecule ions as major ions with thermal decomposition minimally suppressed. For synthetic polymers (PMMA, PLA, and PS), the mass spectra reflected their backbone structures because of the suppression of the sequential thermal decompositions of the primary products. The present technique appears to be suitable for high-throughput qualitative analyses of many types of solid samples in the range from a few ng to 10 μg with minimal sample consumption. Some contribution from tribodesorption in addition to thermal desorption was suggested for the desorption processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. User's Manual for the FEHM Application-A Finite-Element Heat- and Mass-Transfer Code

    SciTech Connect

    George A. Zyvoloski; Bruce A. Robinson; Zora V. Dash; Lynn L. Trease

    1997-07-07

    This document is a manual for the use of the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media. The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. The code is also capable of incorporating the various adsorption mechanisms, ranging from simple linear relations to nonlinear isotherms, needed to describe the very complex transport processes at Yucca Mountain. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data

  18. Estimating the Heat and Mass Flux at the ASHES Hydrothermal Vent Field with the Sentry Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsey, J. C.; Crone, T. J.; Mittelstaedt, E. L.; Medagoda, L.; Fourie, D.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal venting influences ocean chemistry, the thermal and chemical structure of the oceanic crust, the style of accretion at mid-ocean ridges, and the evolution of unique and diverse chemosynthetic ecosystems. Surprisingly, only a few studies have attempted to constrain the volume and heat flux of entire hydrothermal vent fields given that axially-hosted hydrothermal systems are estimated to be responsible for ~20-25% of the total heat flux out of the Earth's interior, as well as potentially playing a large role in global and local biogeochemical cycles. However, same-site estimates can vary greatly, such as at the Lucky Strike Field where estimates range from 100 MW to 3800 MW. We report a July 2014 field program with the Sentry AUV that obtains the water velocity and heat measurements necessary to estimate the total heat and mass flux emanating from the ASHES hydrothermal vent field. We equipped Sentry with a Nortek acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) with an inertial measurement unit attached, two acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), and two SBE3 temperature probes, to measure the temperature and water velocity. This sensing suite provided more accurate measurements than previous AUV based studies. A control volume approach was employed in which Sentry was pre-programmed to survey a 150m by 150m box centered over the vent field flying a "mowing the lawn" pattern at 5m trackline spacing followed by a survey of the perimeter. During a 40 hour survey, the pattern was repeated 9 times allowing us to obtain observations over multiple tidal cycles. Concurrent lowered ADCP (LADCP) measurements were also obtained. Water velocity data obtained with Sentry was corrected for platform motion and then combined with the temperature measurements to estimate heat flux. Analysis of this data is on-going, however these experiments permit us to quantify the heat and mass exiting the control volume, and potentially provide the most accurate and highest resolution heat

  19. Mass, heat and nutrient fluxes in the Atlantic Ocean determined by inverse methods. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rintoul, Stephen Rich

    1988-01-01

    Inverse methods are applied to historical hydrographic data to address two aspects of the general circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. The method allows conservation statements for mass and other properties, along with a variety of other constraints, to be combined in a dynamically consistent way to estimate the absolute velocity field and associated property transports. The method was first used to examine the exchange of mass and heat between the South Atlantic and the neighboring ocean basins. The second problem addressed concerns the circulation and property fluxes across the 24 and 36 deg N in the subtropical North Atlantic. Conservation statements are considered for the nutrients as well as mass, and the nutrients are found to contribute significant information independent of temperature and salinity.

  20. What is proportional reasoning, anyway?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subero, Keron; Kanim, Stephen

    2007-10-01

    There appears to be a correlation between some measures of scientific reasoning skills and gain on conceptual measures of student understanding of introductory physics such as the Force Concept Inventory. At NMSU, we have established a correlation between pretest scores on proportional reasoning tasks and student performance on conceptual post-tests in the introductory lab. Proponents of a Piagetian model of cognitive development would call these scientific reasoning skills `operational capacities'' that signal the last transition in human intellectual growth from ``Concrete Operational'' to ``Formal'' reasoning. Seen in this light, the correlations described above suggest a cognitive ``deficit'' associated with development. We are exploring the possibility that proportional reasoning may in fact be a blanket term to describe many smaller elements of skills which students often seem to lack. In this talk, I will present some initial results from our investigation.

  1. Compact heat and mass exchangers of the plate fin type in thermal sorption systems: Application in an absorption heat pump with the working pair CH3OH-LiBr/ZnBr2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Harry

    The possible application of Compact Heat and Mass Exchangers (CHME) in a gas fired Absorption Heat Pump (AHP) for domestic heating is studied. The above mentioned heat and mass exchangers are of the plate type. The space between the parallel and plain plates is filled up with corrugated plates of a certain height. The plain and finned plates are stacked and welded together. This gives a heat and mass exchanger which is very compact, expressed by a high area density (m2/m3). This leads to heat and mass transfer processes with small temperature and concentration differences. For testing purposes a pilot plant was built using the above type of components in order to test their heat and/or mass transfer performance. Only the generator is of the Shell And Tube (SAT) type. As the working pair, CH3OH - LiBr/ ZnBr2 was chosen, with the alcohol as the solvent and the salt mixture as the absorbent. This leads to sub atmospheric working pressures with only solvent in the vapor phase. Three series of experiments have been carried out, during which the input parameters were varied over a certain range. It is concluded that the plate fin CHMES are very suitable for application in an AHP for domestic heating purposes.

  2. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budny, R. V.; contributors, JET

    2016-03-01

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass  <  A  >  weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher  <  A  >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with  <  A  >  were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion-electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  3. Heat transport and phonon localization in mass-disordered harmonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Kundu, Anupam; Roy, Dibyendu; Dhar, Abhishek; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Spohn, Herbert

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the steady-state heat current in two- and three-dimensional disordered harmonic crystals in a slab geometry connected at the boundaries to stochastic white-noise heat baths at different temperatures. The disorder causes short-wavelength phonon modes to be localized so the heat current in this system is carried by the extended phonon modes which can be either diffusive or ballistic. Using ideas both from localization theory and from kinetic theory we estimate the contribution of various modes to the heat current and from this we obtain the asymptotic system size dependence of the current. These estimates are compared with results obtained from a numerical evaluation of an exact formula for the current, given in terms of a frequency-transmission function, as well as from direct nonequilibrium simulations. These yield a strong dependence of the heat flux on boundary conditions. Our analytical arguments show that for realistic boundary conditions the conductivity is finite in three dimensions but we are not able to verify this numerically, except in the case where the system is subjected to an external pinning potential. This case is closely related to the problem of localization of electrons in a random potential and here we numerically verify that the pinned three-dimensional system satisfies Fourier’s law while the two-dimensional system is a heat insulator. We also investigate the inverse participation ratio of different normal modes.

  4. User`s manual for the FEHM application -- A finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Dash, Z.V.; Trease, L.L.

    1997-07-01

    The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The equations of heat and mass transfer for multiphase flow in porous and permeable media are solved in the FEHM application by using the finite-element method. The permeability and porosity of the medium are allowed to depend on pressure and temperature. The code also has provisions for movable air and water phases and noncoupled tracers; that is, tracer solutions that do not affect the heat- and mass-transfer solutions. The tracers can be passive or reactive. The code can simulate two-dimensional, two-dimensional radial, or three-dimensional geometries. In fact, FEHM is capable of describing flow that is dominated in many areas by fracture and fault flow, including the inherently three-dimensional flow that results from permeation to and from faults and fractures. The code can handle coupled heat and mass-transfer effects, such as boiling, dryout, and condensation that can occur in the near-field region surrounding the potential repository and the natural convection that occurs through Yucca Mountain due to seasonal temperature changes. This report outlines the uses and capabilities of the FEHM application, initialization of code variables, restart procedures, and error processing. The report describes all the data files, the input data, including individual input records or parameters, and the various output files. The system interface is described, including the software environment and installation instructions.

  5. Critical Heat Flux Phenomena at HighPressure & Low Mass Fluxes: NEUP Final Report Part I: Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Wu, Qiao

    2015-04-30

    This report is a preliminary document presenting an overview of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomenon, the High Pressure Critical Heat Flux facility (HPCHF), preliminary CHF data acquired, and the future direction of the research. The HPCHF facility has been designed and built to study CHF at high pressure and low mass flux ranges in a rod bundle prototypical of conceptual Small Modular Reactor (SMR) designs. The rod bundle is comprised of four electrically heated rods in a 2x2 square rod bundle with a prototypic chopped-cosine axial power profile and equipped with thermocouples at various axial and circumferential positions embedded in each rod for CHF detection. Experimental test parameters for CHF detection range from pressures of ~80 – 160 bar, mass fluxes of ~400 – 1500 kg/m2s, and inlet water subcooling from ~30 – 70°C. The preliminary data base established will be further extended in the future along with comparisons to existing CHF correlations, models, etc. whose application ranges may be applicable to the conditions of SMRs.

  6. The simplicity of fractal-like flow networks for effective heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, Deborah

    2010-05-15

    A variety of applications using disk-shaped fractal-like flow networks and the status of one and two-dimensional predictive models for these applications are summarized. Applications discussed include single-phase and two-phase heat sinks and heat exchangers, two-phase flow separators, desorbers, and passive micromixers. Advantages of using these fractal-like flow networks versus parallel-flow networks include lower pressure drop, lower maximum wall temperature, inlet plenum symmetry, alternate flow paths, and pressure recovery at the bifurcation. The compact nature of microscale fractal-like branching heat exchangers makes them ideal for modularity. Differences between fractal-like and constructal approaches applied to disk-shaped heat sink designs are highlighted, and the importance of including geometric constraints, including fabrication constraints, in flow network design optimization is discussed. Finally, a simple pencil and paper procedure for designing single-phase heat sinks with fractal-like flow networks based solely on geometric constraints is outlined. Benefit-to-cost ratios resulting from geometric-based designs are compared with those from flow networks determined using multivariable optimization. Results from the two network designs are within 11%. (author)

  7. Heat and mass transport during a groundwater replenishment trial in a highly heterogeneous aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, Simone; Prommer, Henning; Siade, Adam; Harris, Brett; Trefry, Mike; Martin, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Changes in subsurface temperature distribution resulting from the injection of fluids into aquifers may impact physiochemical and microbial processes as well as basin resource management strategies. We have completed a 2 year field trial in a hydrogeologically and geochemically heterogeneous aquifer below Perth, Western Australia in which highly treated wastewater was injected for large-scale groundwater replenishment. During the trial, chloride and temperature data were collected from conventional monitoring wells and by time-lapse temperature logging. We used a joint inversion of these solute tracer and temperature data to parameterize a numerical flow and multispecies transport model and to analyze the solute and heat propagation characteristics that prevailed during the trial. The simulation results illustrate that while solute transport is largely confined to the most permeable lithological units, heat transport was also affected by heat exchange with lithological units that have a much lower hydraulic conductivity. Heat transfer by heat conduction was found to significantly influence the complex temporal and spatial temperature distribution, especially with growing radial distance and in aquifer sequences with a heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution. We attempted to estimate spatially varying thermal transport parameters during the data inversion to illustrate the anticipated correlations of these parameters with lithological heterogeneities, but estimates could not be uniquely determined on the basis of the collected data.

  8. Ultra-trace analysis of plutonium by thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a continuous heating technique without chemical separation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Gyu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Song, Kyuseok

    2015-08-15

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) with a continuous heating technique is known as an effective method for measuring the isotope ratio in trace amounts of uranium. In this study, the analytical performance of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a continuous heating technique was investigated using a standard plutonium solution (SRM 947). The influence of the heating rate of the evaporation filament on the precision and accuracy of the isotope ratios was examined using a plutonium solution sample at the fg level. Changing the heating rate of the evaporation filament on samples ranging from 0.1fg to 1000fg revealed that the influence of the heating rate on the precision and accuracy of the isotope ratios was slight around the heating rate range of 100-250mA/min. All of the isotope ratios of plutonium (SRM 947), (238)Pu/(239)Pu, (240)Pu/(239)Pu, (241)Pu/(239)Pu and (242)Pu/(239)Pu, were measured down to sample amounts of 70fg. The ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu was measured down to a sample amount of 0.1fg, which corresponds to a PuO2 particle with a diameter of 0.2μm. Moreover, the signals of (239)Pu could be detected with a sample amount of 0.03fg, which corresponds to the detection limit of (239)Pu of 0.006fg as estimated by the 3-sigma criterion. (238)Pu and (238)U were clearly distinguished owing to the difference in the evaporation temperature between (238)Pu and (238)U. In addition, (241)Pu and (241)Am formed by the decay of (241)Pu can be discriminated owing to the difference in the evaporation temperature. As a result, the ratios of (238)Pu/(239)Pu and (241)Pu/(239)Pu as well as (240)Pu/(239)Pu and (242)Pu/(239)Pu in plutonium samples could be measured by TIMS with a continuous heating technique and without any chemical separation processes.

  9. Ultra-trace analysis of plutonium by thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a continuous heating technique without chemical separation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Gyu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki; Song, Kyuseok

    2015-08-15

    Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) with a continuous heating technique is known as an effective method for measuring the isotope ratio in trace amounts of uranium. In this study, the analytical performance of thermal ionization mass spectrometry with a continuous heating technique was investigated using a standard plutonium solution (SRM 947). The influence of the heating rate of the evaporation filament on the precision and accuracy of the isotope ratios was examined using a plutonium solution sample at the fg level. Changing the heating rate of the evaporation filament on samples ranging from 0.1fg to 1000fg revealed that the influence of the heating rate on the precision and accuracy of the isotope ratios was slight around the heating rate range of 100-250mA/min. All of the isotope ratios of plutonium (SRM 947), (238)Pu/(239)Pu, (240)Pu/(239)Pu, (241)Pu/(239)Pu and (242)Pu/(239)Pu, were measured down to sample amounts of 70fg. The ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu was measured down to a sample amount of 0.1fg, which corresponds to a PuO2 particle with a diameter of 0.2μm. Moreover, the signals of (239)Pu could be detected with a sample amount of 0.03fg, which corresponds to the detection limit of (239)Pu of 0.006fg as estimated by the 3-sigma criterion. (238)Pu and (238)U were clearly distinguished owing to the difference in the evaporation temperature between (238)Pu and (238)U. In addition, (241)Pu and (241)Am formed by the decay of (241)Pu can be discriminated owing to the difference in the evaporation temperature. As a result, the ratios of (238)Pu/(239)Pu and (241)Pu/(239)Pu as well as (240)Pu/(239)Pu and (242)Pu/(239)Pu in plutonium samples could be measured by TIMS with a continuous heating technique and without any chemical separation processes. PMID:25966386

  10. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in dry snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.; Foslien, W. E.

    2015-09-01

    The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10-20 K m-1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation) and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the effective thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for effective thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  11. A macroscale mixture theory analysis of deposition and sublimation rates during heat and mass transfer in snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. C.; Foslien, W. E.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructure of a dry alpine snowpack is a dynamic environment where microstructural evolution is driven by seasonal density profiles and weather conditions. Notably, temperature gradients on the order of 10-20 K m-1, or larger, are known to produce a faceted snow microstructure exhibiting little strength. However, while strong temperature gradients are widely accepted as the primary driver for kinetic growth, they do not fully account for the range of experimental observations. An additional factor influencing snow metamorphism is believed to be the rate of mass transfer at the macroscale. We develop a mixture theory capable of predicting macroscale deposition and/or sublimation in a snow cover under temperature gradient conditions. Temperature gradients and mass exchange are tracked over periods ranging from 1 to 10 days. Interesting heat and mass transfer behavior is observed near the ground, near the surface, as well as immediately above and below dense ice crusts. Information about deposition (condensation) and sublimation rates may help explain snow metamorphism phenomena that cannot be accounted for by temperature gradients alone. The macroscale heat and mass transfer analysis requires accurate representations of the thermal conductivity and the effective mass diffusion coefficient for snow. We develop analytical models for these parameters based on first principles at the microscale. The expressions derived contain no empirical adjustments, and further, provide self consistent values for thermal conductivity and the effective diffusion coefficient for the limiting cases of air and solid ice. The predicted values for these macroscale material parameters are also in excellent agreement with numerical results based on microscale finite element analyses of representative volume elements generated from X-ray tomography.

  12. Ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junction formation in silicon by excimer laser doping -- A heat and mass transfer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Ho, J.R.; Grigoropoulos, C.P.

    1995-12-31

    A new technique is developed to fabricate the ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junctions with the depth from 30 nm to 400 nm. The ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junction is successfully made by the excimer laser doping of crystalline silicon with a solid spin-on-glass (SOG) dopant. High boron concentration of 10{sup 20} atoms/cc and the box-like junction profile are achieved through the nanosecond pulsed laser heating, melting, and boron mass diffusion in the 100 nm thin silicon layer close to the surface. The key mechanism determining the box-like junction shape is found to be the melt-solid interface limited diffusion. The optimal laser fluence condition for SOG doping is found about 0.6--0.8 J/cm{sup 2} by studying the ultra-shallow p{sup +}-junction boron profiles measured by the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) versus the laser fluence and the pulse number. Heat and mass transfer are studied at the nanosecond time scale and the nanometer length scale. The ID numerical analysis agrees reasonably with the experiment, within the available physical picture. Possible mechanisms such as boron diffusivity dependence on the dopant concentration in the molten silicon are proposed.

  13. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  14. Heat transfer with nucleate boiling of liquids under weak mass force field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirichenko, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    The motion is examined of a vapor bubble growing and rising from a flat horizontal heater in the ideal fluid approximation and taking drag into account. Estimates are given of bubble lifetime, bubble radius at detachment, bubble detachment frequency, and time for the bubble to attain a constant rate of rise. The relations obtained for the microcharacteristics of the boiling process are used to determine the coefficients of heat transfer in developed nucleate boiling. A new form of the equations for describing heat transfer in nucleate boiling in dimensionless parameters is proposed.

  15. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2016-03-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  16. Incisors’ proportions in smile esthetics

    PubMed Central

    Alsulaimani, Fahad F; Batwa, Waeil

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To determine whether alteration of the maxillary central and lateral incisors’ length and width, respectively, would affect perceived smile esthetics and to validate the most esthetic length and width, respectively, for the central and lateral incisors. Materials and Methods: Photographic manipulation was undertaken to produce two sets of photographs, each set of four photographs showing the altered width of the lateral incisor and length of the central length. The eight produced photographs were assessed by laypeople, dentists and orthodontists. Results: Alteration in the incisors’ proportion affected the relative smile attractiveness for laypeople (n=124), dentists (n=115) and orthodontists (n=68); dentists and orthodontists did not accept lateral width reduction of more than 0.5 mm (P<0.01), which suggests that the lateral to central incisor width ratio ranges from 54% to 62%. However, laypeople did not accept lateral width reduction of more than 1 mm (P<0.01), widening the range to be from 48% to 62%. All groups had zero tolerance for changes in central crown length (P<0.01). Conclusion: All participants recognized that the central incisors’ length changes. For lateral incisors, laypeople were more tolerant than dentists and orthodontists. This suggests that changing incisors’ proportions affects the relative smile attractiveness. PMID:24987650

  17. Influence of body mass loss on changes in heart rate during exercise in the heat: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Adams, William M; Ferraro, Elizabeth M; Huggins, Robert A; Casa, Douglas J

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review was to compare the changes in heart rate (HR) for every 1% change in body mass loss (ΔBML) in individuals while exercising in the heat. PubMed, SPORTDiscus, ERIC, CINAHL, and Scopus were searched from the earliest entry to February 2013 using the search terms dehydration, heart rate, and exercise in various combinations. Original research articles that met the following criteria were included: (a) valid measure of HR, (b) exercise in the heat (>26.5° C [79.7 °F]), (c) the level of dehydration reached at least 2%, (d) a between-group comparison (a euhydrated group or a graded dehydration protocol) was evident, and (e) for rehydration protocols, only oral rehydration was considered for inclusion. Twenty articles were included in the final analysis. Mean values and SDs for HR and percentage of body mass loss immediately after exercise were used for this review. The mean change in HR for every 1% ΔBML was 3 b·min-1. In trials where subjects arrived euhydrated and hypohydrated, the mean change in HR for every 1% ΔBML was 3 and 3 b·min-1, respectively. Fixed intensity and variable intensity trials exhibited a mean HR change of 4 and 1 b·min-1, respectively. Exercising in the heat while hypohydrated (≥2%) resulted in an increased HR after exercise. This increase in HR for every 1% ΔBML exacerbates cardiovascular strain in exercising individuals, thus causing decrements in performance. It should be encouraged that individuals should maintain an adequate level of hydration to maximize performance, especially in the heat.

  18. Determination of exposed sulfhydryl groups in heated beta-lactoglobulin A using IAEDANS and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Joseph J; Brodkorb, André; Mollé, Daniel; Yokoyama, Emilie; Famelart, Marie-Héléne; Bouhallab, Saíd; Morris, Edwin R; Croguennec, Thomas

    2007-08-22

    This paper takes a new approach to determining which sulfhydryl groups are exposed during the heat denaturation of bovine beta-lactoglobulin A. The sulfhydryl groups exposed after heating were blocked with 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS). The results show that IAEDANS is a suitable blocking agent, and its absorbance at 336 nm enabled the quantification of exposed sulfhydryl groups in a mixture of protein species by gel permeation chromatography. Combined with the specific fragmentation of bound IAEDANS by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) MS/MS in negative ionization mode, this facilitated the identification of peptides that contained blocked cysteines after enzymatic digestion of the protein. During MALDI MS/MS of the peptides, in positive ionization mode, the IAEDANS molecule remained bound to the cysteines, making it possible to identify exactly which cysteine had been exposed after heating. In beta-lactoglobulin A it was found that cysteine 66 and cysteine 160 were predominantly exposed regardless of the length of exposure to heat.

  19. Software requirements, design, and verification and validation for the FEHM application - a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, Z.V.; Robinson, B.A.; Zyvoloski, G.A.

    1997-07-01

    The requirements, design, and verification and validation of the software used in the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multicomponent flow in porous media, are described. The test of the DOE Code Comparison Project, Problem Five, Case A, which verifies that FEHM has correctly implemented heat and mass transfer and phase partitioning, is also covered.

  20. Effects of Convective Heat and Mass Transfer in Flow of Powell-Eyring Fluid Past an Exponentially Stretching Sheet

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Saeed, Yusra; Alsaedi, A.; Asad, Sadia

    2015-01-01

    The aim here is to investigate the effects of convective heat and mass transfer in the flow of Eyring-Powell fluid past an inclined exponential stretching surface. Mathematical formulation and analysis have been performed in the presence of Soret, Dufour and thermal radiation effects. The governing partial differential equations corresponding to the momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to a set of non-linear ordinary differential equations. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the series solutions. Interval of convergence is determined. Physical interpretation is seen for the embedded parameters of interest. Skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are numerically computed and examined. PMID:26327398

  1. Mechanism of heat-and-mass transfer caused by irradiation of a free melt surface by laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Antonova, L I; Glova, A F; Drobyazko, S V; Senatorov, Yu M

    2002-11-30

    The conditions for the onset and evolution dynamics of flooded jets, which were discovered for the first time upon irradiation of the free surface of melted paraffin by laser pulses, are studied experimentally. Their maximum speed and penetration depth are measured. It is shown that the initiation of flooded jets has a threshold nature and strongly affects the heat-and-mass transfer. A pattern of flows is presented, which displays the evolution dynamics of flooded jets and thermocapillary vortexes in a bounded volume under repetitively pulsed irradiation of the melt surface. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  2. Interaction of magnetic field with heat and mass transfer in free convection flow of a Walters'-B fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ilyas; Ali, Farhad; Ali Shah, Nehad

    2016-04-01

    The heat and mass transfer phenomenon is studied in the unsteady free convection flow of a Walters'-B fluid in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The problem is modelled in terms of partial differential equations with some physical conditions. Exact solutions for velocity, temperature and concentration are obtained via Laplace transform method. They satisfy imposed initial and boundary conditions. As a special case for Γ → 0, these solutions can be be reduced to the similar solutions for Newtonian fluids. The shear stress at the boundary is evaluated from the velocity solution. Numerical results of velocity and shear stress are portrayed through graphs and discussed for various embedded parameters.

  3. Exact triple integrals of beam functions. [in application of Galerkin method to heat and mass transfer problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jhaveri, B. S.; Rosenberger, F.

    1982-01-01

    Definite triple integrals encountered in applying the Galerkin method to the problem of heat and mass transfer across rectangular enclosures are discussed. Rather than evaluating them numerically, the technique described by Reid and Harris (1958) was extended to obtain the exact solution of the integrals. In the process, four linear simultaneous equations with triple integrals as unknowns were obtained. These equations were then solved exactly to obtain the closed form solution. Since closed form representations of this type have been shown to be useful in solving nonlinear hydrodynamic problems by series expansion, the integrals are presented here in general form.

  4. Combined effect of couple stresses and heat and mass transfer on peristaltic flow with slip conditions in a tube.

    PubMed

    Sobh, Ayman M

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the influence of heat and mass transfer on peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid in a uniform tube with slip conditions on the wall is studied. The problem can model the blood flow in living creatures. Under long wavelength approximation and zero Reynolds number, exact solutions for the axial velocity component, pressure gradient, and both temperature and concentration fields are derived. The pressure rise is computed numerically and explained graphically. Moreover, effects of various physical parameters of the problem on temperature distribution, concentration field, and trapping are studied and discussed graphically.

  5. Effects of Convective Heat and Mass Transfer in Flow of Powell-Eyring Fluid Past an Exponentially Stretching Sheet.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Saeed, Yusra; Alsaedi, A; Asad, Sadia

    2015-01-01

    The aim here is to investigate the effects of convective heat and mass transfer in the flow of Eyring-Powell fluid past an inclined exponential stretching surface. Mathematical formulation and analysis have been performed in the presence of Soret, Dufour and thermal radiation effects. The governing partial differential equations corresponding to the momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to a set of non-linear ordinary differential equations. Resulting nonlinear system is computed for the series solutions. Interval of convergence is determined. Physical interpretation is seen for the embedded parameters of interest. Skin friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are numerically computed and examined.

  6. A proportional temperature controller with automatic shutoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucich, G. M.; Holland, P. W.

    1980-08-01

    A sensitive, proportional temperature controller useful in the temperature range from 40 to 400 C with an accuracy of plus or minus 0.1 C is described. It is potentially useful for regulating temperatures in air chambers, liquid baths, furnaces and reaction vessels and for other applications. This instrument was developed to control the duration and temperature of the heating cycle of a charcoal filled adsorber that is part of a special helium analyzer. The controller was made from commercially available parts and can be easily modified to provide continuous temperature control. The circuit is solid state and employs no electromechanical devices. Over a 2 year period of use as a component of the special helium analyzer, this temperature controller performed successfully and required no maintenance.

  7. [Energy and mass exchange and the productivity of the main ecosystems of Siberia (from eddy covariance measurements). 1. Heat balance structure in the vegetation season].

    PubMed

    Chebakova, N M; Vygodskaia, N N; Arnet, A; Belelli Markezini, L; Kolle, O; Kurbatova, Iu A; Parfenova, E I; Valentini, R; Vaganov, E A; Shul'tse, E D

    2013-01-01

    Direct measurements of heat balance (turbulent heat transfer and evaporation heat consumption) by the method of turbulent pulsations in 1998-2000 and 2002-2004 were used to obtain information on the daily, seasonal, and annual dynamics of energy fluxes and mass transfer between the atmosphere and the typical ecosystems of Siberia (middle-taiga pine forest and raised bog, true four-grass steppe, with the use of data for typical tundra) along the Yenisei meridian (90 degrees E).

  8. [Energy and mass exchange and the productivity of the main ecosystems of Siberia (from eddy covariance measurements). 1. Heat balance structure in the vegetation season].

    PubMed

    Chebakova, N M; Vygodskaia, N N; Arnet, A; Belelli Markezini, L; Kolle, O; Kurbatova, Iu A; Parfenova, E I; Valentini, R; Vaganov, E A; Shul'tse, E D

    2013-01-01

    Direct measurements of heat balance (turbulent heat transfer and evaporation heat consumption) by the method of turbulent pulsations in 1998-2000 and 2002-2004 were used to obtain information on the daily, seasonal, and annual dynamics of energy fluxes and mass transfer between the atmosphere and the typical ecosystems of Siberia (middle-taiga pine forest and raised bog, true four-grass steppe, with the use of data for typical tundra) along the Yenisei meridian (90 degrees E). PMID:25518559

  9. Numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in unsteady nanofluid between two orthogonally moving porous coaxial disks

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Kashif; Iqbal, Muhammad Farooq; Ashraf, Muhammad; Akbar, Muhammad Zubair

    2014-10-15

    The paper deals with the study of heat and mass transfer in an unsteady viscous incompressible water-based nanofluid (containing Titanium dioxide nanoparticles) between two orthogonally moving porous coaxial disks with suction. A combination of iterative (successive over relaxation) and a direct method is employed for solving the sparse systems of linear algebraic equations arising from the FD discretization of the linearized self similar ODEs. It has been noticed that the rate of mass transfer at the disks decreases with the permeability Reynolds number whether the disks are approaching or receding. The findings of the present investigation may be beneficial for the electronic industry in maintaining the electronic components under effective and safe operational conditions.

  10. Numerical investigation of heat-mass transfer of calcium phosphates at crystal growth for normal and microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedyushkin, A. I.; Suvorova, E. I.

    Numerical modeling of heat and mass transfer at growth of crystals octacalcium phosphate Ca8H2(PO4)6 and hydroxyapatite Ca10(OH)2(PO4)6 from mixture CaCl2 and KH2PO4+ K2HPO4 in a solution KCl for terrestrial conditions and microgravity environment is devoted. Mathematical modeling is performed on the basis of a solution of nonstationary Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid flows and heat/mass transfer equations. The results of mathematical modeling, showing possible convective mechanisms of transfer the components are submitted. The influence thermal convection and two mechanisms of concentration convection (separately and jointly) on carry a component and formation of calcium phosphates is considered. The results of parametric calculations for various values of thermal and solutes Grashof numbers are presented. The influences of gravitation on character of transfer the component of reaction and formation calcium phosphates are investigated. The influence of gravitational conditions on dynamics and character of formation of calcium phosphates for conditions of experiments before spent on the Earth and in space under the program EURECA (crystallization of octacalcium phosphate from solution is shown. Also the possible reasons of formation of different sizes of ground and space crystals are discussed.

  11. Metabolic heat production and thermal conductance are mass-independent adaptations to thermal environment in birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Fristoe, Trevor S.; Burger, Joseph R.; Balk, Meghan A.; Khaliq, Imran; Hof, Christian; Brown, James H.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which different kinds of organisms have adapted to environmental temperature regimes is central to understanding how they respond to climate change. The Scholander–Irving (S-I) model of heat transfer lays the foundation for explaining how endothermic birds and mammals maintain their high, relatively constant body temperatures in the face of wide variation in environmental temperature. The S-I model shows how body temperature is regulated by balancing the rates of heat production and heat loss. Both rates scale with body size, suggesting that larger animals should be better adapted to cold environments than smaller animals, and vice versa. However, the global distributions of ∼9,000 species of terrestrial birds and mammals show that the entire range of body sizes occurs in nearly all climatic regimes. Using physiological and environmental temperature data for 211 bird and 178 mammal species, we test for mass-independent adaptive changes in two key parameters of the S-I model: basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermal conductance. We derive an axis of thermal adaptation that is independent of body size, extends the S-I model, and highlights interactions among physiological and morphological traits that allow endotherms to persist in a wide range of temperatures. Our macrophysiological and macroecological analyses support our predictions that shifts in BMR and thermal conductance confer important adaptations to environmental temperature in both birds and mammals. PMID:26668359

  12. Metabolic heat production and thermal conductance are mass-independent adaptations to thermal environment in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Fristoe, Trevor S; Burger, Joseph R; Balk, Meghan A; Khaliq, Imran; Hof, Christian; Brown, James H

    2015-12-29

    The extent to which different kinds of organisms have adapted to environmental temperature regimes is central to understanding how they respond to climate change. The Scholander-Irving (S-I) model of heat transfer lays the foundation for explaining how endothermic birds and mammals maintain their high, relatively constant body temperatures in the face of wide variation in environmental temperature. The S-I model shows how body temperature is regulated by balancing the rates of heat production and heat loss. Both rates scale with body size, suggesting that larger animals should be better adapted to cold environments than smaller animals, and vice versa. However, the global distributions of ∼9,000 species of terrestrial birds and mammals show that the entire range of body sizes occurs in nearly all climatic regimes. Using physiological and environmental temperature data for 211 bird and 178 mammal species, we test for mass-independent adaptive changes in two key parameters of the S-I model: basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermal conductance. We derive an axis of thermal adaptation that is independent of body size, extends the S-I model, and highlights interactions among physiological and morphological traits that allow endotherms to persist in a wide range of temperatures. Our macrophysiological and macroecological analyses support our predictions that shifts in BMR and thermal conductance confer important adaptations to environmental temperature in both birds and mammals.

  13. Metabolic heat production and thermal conductance are mass-independent adaptations to thermal environment in birds and mammals.

    PubMed

    Fristoe, Trevor S; Burger, Joseph R; Balk, Meghan A; Khaliq, Imran; Hof, Christian; Brown, James H

    2015-12-29

    The extent to which different kinds of organisms have adapted to environmental temperature regimes is central to understanding how they respond to climate change. The Scholander-Irving (S-I) model of heat transfer lays the foundation for explaining how endothermic birds and mammals maintain their high, relatively constant body temperatures in the face of wide variation in environmental temperature. The S-I model shows how body temperature is regulated by balancing the rates of heat production and heat loss. Both rates scale with body size, suggesting that larger animals should be better adapted to cold environments than smaller animals, and vice versa. However, the global distributions of ∼9,000 species of terrestrial birds and mammals show that the entire range of body sizes occurs in nearly all climatic regimes. Using physiological and environmental temperature data for 211 bird and 178 mammal species, we test for mass-independent adaptive changes in two key parameters of the S-I model: basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermal conductance. We derive an axis of thermal adaptation that is independent of body size, extends the S-I model, and highlights interactions among physiological and morphological traits that allow endotherms to persist in a wide range of temperatures. Our macrophysiological and macroecological analyses support our predictions that shifts in BMR and thermal conductance confer important adaptations to environmental temperature in both birds and mammals. PMID:26668359

  14. Optimization of heat and mass transfers in counterflow corrugated-plate liquid-gas exchangers used in a greenhouse dehumidifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentounes, N.; Jaffrin, A.

    1998-09-01

    Heat and mass transfers occuring in a counterflow direct contact liquid-gas exchanger determine the performance of a new greenhouse air dehumidifier designed at INRA. This prototype uses triethylene glycol (TEG) as the desiccant fluid which extracts water vapor from the air. The regeneration of the TEG desiccant fluid is then performed by direct contact with combustion gas from a high efficiency boiler equipped with a condensor. The heat and mass transfers between the thin film of diluted TEG and the hot gas were simulated by a model which uses correlation formula from the literature specifically relevant to the present cross-corrugated plates geometry. A simple set of analytical solutions is first derived, which explains why some possible processes can clearly be far from optimal. Then, more exact numerical calculations confirm that some undesirable water recondensations on the upper part of the exchanger were limiting the performance of this prototype. More suitable conditions were defined for the process, which lead to a new design of the apparatus. In this second prototype, a gas-gas exchanger provides dryer and cooler gas to the basis of the regenerators, while a warmer TEG is fed on the top. A whole range of operating conditions was experimented and measured parameters were compared with numerical simulations of this new configuration: recondensation did not occur any more. As a consequence, this second prototype was able to concentrate the desiccant fluid at the desired rate of 20 kg H_{2O}/hour, under temperature and humidity conditions which correspond to the dehumidification of a 1000 m2 greenhouse heated at night during the winter season.

  15. Numerical Simulation for Heat and Mass Transfer During Selective Laser Melting of Titanium alloys Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Jui; Tsai, Tsung-Wen; Tseng, Chien-Chou

    The purpose of this research is to analyse the complex phase change and the heat transfer behavior of the Ti-6Al-4 V powder particle during the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) process. In this study, the rapid melting and solidification process is presented by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach under the framework of the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. The interaction between the laser velocity and power to the solidification shape and defects of the metal components will be studied numerically as a guideline to improve quality and reduce costs.

  16. Influence of heat and mass flux conditions in hydromagnetic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, F. M.; Shehzad, S. A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.; Obid, Mustafa A.

    2015-03-15

    This article explores the hydromagnetic steady flow of Jeffrey fluid in the presence of thermal radiation. The chosen nanofluid model takes into account the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Flow and heat transfer characteristics are determined by a stretching surface with flux conditions. The nonlinear boundary layer flow through partial differential systems is converted into the ordinary differential systems. The resulting reduced systems are computed for the convergent solutions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration. Graphs of dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles are presented for different values of emerging parameters. Skin-friction coefficient are computed and analyzed in both hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow situations.

  17. Challenging the principle of proportionality.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Anna-Karin Margareta

    2016-04-01

    The first objective of this article is to examine one aspect of the principle of proportionality (PP) as advanced by Alan Gewirth in his 1978 bookReason and Morality Gewirth claims that being capable of exercising agency to some minimal degree is a property that justifies having at least prima facie rights not to get killed. However, according to the PP, before the being possesses the capacity for exercising agency to that minimal degree, the extent of her rights depends on to what extent she approaches possession of agential capacities. One interpretation of PP holds that variations in degree of possession of the physical constitution necessary to exercise agency are morally relevant. The other interpretation holds that only variations in degree of actual mental capacity are morally relevant. The first of these interpretations is vastly more problematic than the other. The second objective is to argue that according to the most plausible interpretation of the PP, the fetus' level of development before at least the 20th week of pregnancy does not affect the fetus' moral rights status. I then suggest that my argument is not restricted to such fetuses, although extending my argument to more developed fetuses requires caution. PMID:26839114

  18. Mass and heat transfer modeling of bio-substrates during packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, Maria Valeria; Cefola, Maria; Pace, Bernardo; Ruocco, Gianpaolo

    2013-06-01

    Perishable bio-substrate behavior can be modeled during packaged storage. Local mass and heattransfer have been coupled to respiration rate and microbial growth. Validating measurements have also been performed, and a multi-objective optimization was employed to tune the model. The model is able to simulate gas composition history and local bacteria spoilage in storage modes commonly adopted by the food industry, depending on product features and temperature. Exploitation of this mathematical tool would allow for informed technical and management decisions.

  19. Vertical Mass, Momentum, Moisture, and Heat Fluxes in Hurricanes above 10 km during CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Paul; Herman, Robert; Dean-Day, Jon; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The third and fourth NASA Convection and Moisture Experiments (CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4) during the Atlantic hurricane seasons of 1998 and 2001, respectively, have yielded comprehensive multi-aircraft datasets using, both remote and in-situ instrumentation. Among these are high-frequency in-situ measurements of vertical wind, horizontal wind, temperature, and water vapor, made from NASA's DC-8 aircraft in the upper portions of the hurricane (typically above 10 km). Wind and temperature measurements were made at 20 hz by the NASA/Ames Meteorological Measurement System, while water vapor was measured at 1 hz by the NASA/JPL Laser Hygrometer. Fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture at these levels are important, since modeling studies have shown that ice processes, which are dominant at temperatures below -40C (where the DC-8 flies) are important for hurricane intensification. Also, there are indications from satellite studies that latent heat release at DC-8 levels is significant, perhaps a third of those in the mid-troposphere. Preliminary results show that typical updrafts in the eyewall region are comparable to or higher than previous observations of tropical convection, with several instances of updraft magnitudes of 15 meters per second (the maximum observed was 21 meters per second). They also show significant supersaturations (10-20% or more) in the updrafts, which would enhance the latent heat release at the upper levels of the hurricane. This paper will examine the magnitude and distribution of small and mesoscale vertical fluxes of mass, momentum, moisture, and heat. The goal is to examine the role of these fluxes in the overall budgets of the respective quantities in the upper portions of the hurricane.

  20. MHD heat and mass transfer flow over a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat Yasin, Mohd Hafizi; Ishak, Anuar; Pop, Ioan

    2016-06-01

    The steady two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow past a permeable stretching/shrinking sheet with radiation effects is investigated. The similarity transformation is introduced to transform the governing partial differential equations into a system of ordinary differential equations before being solved numerically using a shooting method. The results are obtained for the skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number as well as the velocity, temperature and the concentration profiles for some values of the governing parameters, namely, suction/injection parameter S, stretching/shrinking parameter λ, magnetic parameter M, radiation parameter R, heat source/sink Q and chemical rate parameter K. For the shrinking case, there exist two solutions for a certain range of parameters, but the solution is unique for the stretching case. The stability analysis verified that the upper branch solution is linearly stable and physically reliable while the lower branch solution is not. For the reliable solution, the skin friction coefficient increases in the present of magnetic field. The heat transfer rate at the surface decreases in the present of radiation.

  1. The effect of transpiration on coupled heat and mass transfer in mixed convection over a vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Yih, K.A.

    1997-03-01

    Effect of transpiration velocity on the heat and mass transfer characteristics of mixed convection about a permeable vertical plate embedded in a saturated porous medium under the coupled effects of thermal and mass diffusion is numerically analyzed. The plate is maintained at a uniform temperature and species concentration with constant transpiration velocity. The transformed governing equations are solved by Keller box method. Numerical results for the local Nusselt number and local Sherwood number are presented. In general, it has been found for thermally assisted flow that the local surface heat and mass transfer rates increase owing to suction of fluid. This trend reversed for blowing of fluid. It is apparent that the Lewis number has a pronounced effect on the local Sherwood number than it does on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the Lewis number decreases (increases) the local heat (mass) transfer rate.

  2. Determination of heat purgeable and ambient purgeable volatile organic compounds in water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Donna L.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Murtagh, Lucinda K.

    2016-09-08

    Two new analytical methods have been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) that allow the determination of 37 heat purgeable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (USGS Method O-4437-16 [NWQL Laboratory Schedule (LS) 4437]) and 49 ambient purgeable VOCs (USGS Method O-4436-16 [NWQL LS 4436]) in unfiltered water. This report documents the procedures and initial performance of both methods. The compounds chosen for inclusion in the methods were determined as having high priority by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Both methods use a purge-and-trap technique with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The compounds are extracted from the sample by bubbling helium through a 25-milliliter sample. For the polar and less volatile compounds, the sample is heated at 60 degrees Celsius, whereas the less polar and more volatile compounds are purged using a separate analytical procedure at ambient temperature. The compounds are trapped on a sorbent trap, desorbed into a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer for separation, and then identified and quantified. Sample preservation is recommended for both methods by adding a 1:1 solution of hydrochloric acid (HCl [1:1]) to water samples to adjust the pH to 2. Analysis within 14 days from sampling is recommended.The heat purgeable method (USGS Method O-4437-16) operates with the mass spectrometer in the simultaneous full scan/selected ion monitoring mode. This method supersedes USGS Method O-4024-03 (NWQL LS 4024). Method detection limits (MDLs) for fumigant compounds 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, chloropicrin, and 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane range from 0.002 to 0.010 microgram per liter (µg/L). The MDLs for all remaining heat purgeable VOCs range from 0.006 µg/L for tert-butyl methyl ether to 3 µg/L for alpha-terpineol. Calculated holding times indicate that 36 of the 37 heat purgeable VOCs are stable for a minimum of 14 days

  3. Determination of heat purgeable and ambient purgeable volatile organic compounds in water by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Donna L.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Murtagh, Lucinda K.

    2016-01-01

    Two new analytical methods have been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) that allow the determination of 37 heat purgeable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (USGS Method O-4437-16 [NWQL Laboratory Schedule (LS) 4437]) and 49 ambient purgeable VOCs (USGS Method O-4436-16 [NWQL LS 4436]) in unfiltered water. This report documents the procedures and initial performance of both methods. The compounds chosen for inclusion in the methods were determined as having high priority by the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. Both methods use a purge-and-trap technique with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The compounds are extracted from the sample by bubbling helium through a 25-milliliter sample. For the polar and less volatile compounds, the sample is heated at 60 degrees Celsius, whereas the less polar and more volatile compounds are purged using a separate analytical procedure at ambient temperature. The compounds are trapped on a sorbent trap, desorbed into a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer for separation, and then identified and quantified. Sample preservation is recommended for both methods by adding a 1:1 solution of hydrochloric acid (HCl [1:1]) to water samples to adjust the pH to 2. Analysis within 14 days from sampling is recommended.The heat purgeable method (USGS Method O-4437-16) operates with the mass spectrometer in the simultaneous full scan/selected ion monitoring mode. This method supersedes USGS Method O-4024-03 (NWQL LS 4024). Method detection limits (MDLs) for fumigant compounds 1,2-dibromoethane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, chloropicrin, and 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane range from 0.002 to 0.010 microgram per liter (µg/L). The MDLs for all remaining heat purgeable VOCs range from 0.006 µg/L for tert-butyl methyl ether to 3 µg/L for alpha-terpineol. Calculated holding times indicate that 36 of the 37 heat purgeable VOCs are stable for a minimum of 14 days

  4. Isochoric heating of reduced-mass targets in short pulse laser experiments at 0.53 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baton, Sophie; Audebert, Patrick; Koenig, Michel; Perez, Frederic; Chahid, Makhlad; Rousseaux, Christophe; Gremillet, Laurent; Lefebvre, Erik; Rassuchine, Jenny; Cowan, Tom; Gaillard, Sandrine; Shepperd, Ronnie; Flippo, Kirk

    2008-11-01

    Recent works have shown the possibility to heat isochorically mass limited targets by using the electron refluxing. We report on experiment performed at the 100 TW LULI laser facility dedicated to the study of fast electron transport in multilayer reduced mass targets. The targets were composed of 0.2V/5Cu/5Al μm and varied from 300 to 50 μm in diameter. They were irradiated by a 300 ps laser pulse at 1.057 μm and 0.53 μm that delivered I˜2x10^19 W/cm^2 and I˜10^19 W/cm^2 respectively to form a warm dense plasma. Emission from the rear side was observed using K-alpha spectroscopy and imaging diagnostics. Spectra including the Al and Cu-K-alpha, and Al He-like emissions show changes as a function of total mass. The data obtained from all diagnostics (K-alpha spectroscopy and imagers on the rear side and the transverse side) show a different behavior depending on the incident wavelength.

  5. Oceanic Fluxes of Mass, Heat and Freshwater: A Global Estimate and Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDonald, Alison Marguerite

    1995-01-01

    Data from fifteen globally distributed, modern, high resolution, hydrographic oceanic transects are combined in an inverse calculation using large scale box models. The models provide estimates of the global meridional heat and freshwater budgets and are used to examine the sensitivity of the global circulation, both inter and intra-basin exchange rates, to a variety of external constraints provided by estimates of Ekman, boundary current and throughflow transports. A solution is found which is consistent with both the model physics and the global data set, despite a twenty five year time span and a lack of seasonal consistency among the data. The overall pattern of the global circulation suggested by the models is similar to that proposed in previously published local studies and regional reviews. However, significant qualitative and quantitative differences exist. These differences are due both to the model definition and to the global nature of the data set.

  6. Heat and mass transfer models to understand the drying mechanisms of a porous substrate.

    PubMed

    Songok, Joel; Bousfield, Douglas W; Gane, Patrick A C; Toivakka, Martti

    2016-02-01

    While drying of paper and paper coatings is expensive, with significant energy requirements, the rate controlling mechanisms are not currently fully understood. Two two-dimensional models are used as a first approximation to predict the heat transfer during hot air drying and to evaluate the role of various parameters on the drying rates of porous coatings. The models help determine the structural limiting factors during the drying process, while applying for the first time the recently known values of coating thermal diffusivity. The results indicate that the thermal conductivity of the coating structure is not the controlling factor, but the drying rate is rather determined by the thermal transfer process at the structure surface. This underlines the need for ensuring an efficient thermal transfer from hot air to coating surface during drying, before considering further measures to increase the thermal conductivity of porous coatings. PMID:26920528

  7. Evolution of organic aerosol mass spectra upon heating: implications for OA phase and partitioning behavior

    SciTech Connect

    UC Davis; Cappa, Christopher D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-10-28

    Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure the evolution of chemical composition for two distinct organic aerosol types as they are passed through a thermodenuder at different temperatures. The two organic aerosol types considered are primary lubricating oil (LO) aerosol and secondary aerosol from the alpha-pinene + O3 reaction (alphaP). The evolution of the VUV mass spectra for the two aerosol types with temperature are observed to differ dramatically. For LO particles, the spectra exhibit distinct changes with temperature in which the lower m/z peaks, corresponding to compounds with higher vapor pressures, disappear more rapidly than the high m/z peaks. In contrast, the alphaP aerosol spectrum is essentially unchanged by temperature even though the particles experience significant mass loss due to evaporation. The variations in the LO spectra are found to be quantitatively in agreement with expectations from absorptive partitioning theory whereas the alphaP spectra suggest that the evaporation of alphaP derived aerosol appears to not be governed by partitioning theory. We postulate that this difference arises from the alphaP particles existing as in a glassy state instead of having the expected liquid-like behavior. To reconcile these observations with decades of aerosol growth measurements, which indicate that OA formation is described by equilibrium partitioning, we present a conceptual model wherein the secondary OA is formed and then rapidly converted from an absorbing form to a non-absorbing form. The results suggest that although OA growth may be describable by equilibrium partitioning theory, the properties of organic aerosol once formed may differ significantly from the properties determined in the equilibrium framework.

  8. Heat and mass transfer analysis of convective drying of chickpea (Cicer arietinum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Flores, J.; Chávez, S.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the modelling and simulation of the dehydration of chickpea in a complex drying system process, using COMSOL Multiphysics Program. A model, based on mass and energy balances, was developed for the simulation of unsteady convective drying with air (3.0 m/s and 60 °C). The program predicted an 8 hours-dehydration time, with an effective moisture diffusivity of 3.1 *10- 10 which was experimentally obtained. The empirical model that best represented the process was the exponential one.

  9. Multiple artificial geothermal cracks in a hot dry rock mass for extraction of heat

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Y.; Abe, H.; Sekine, H.; Takahashi, Y.

    1985-06-01

    Theoretical analysis is made for multiple geothermal cracks. A periodic array of two-dimensional cracks is considered as a model of the multiple geothermal cracks, and is analyzed on the basis of the two-dimensional theory of quasi-static thermoelasticity. The singular integral equations are derived from the boundary conditions, and they are solved by applying the combination of inversion formula and collocation method. Numerical results for the fluid temperature at an outlet, the rock mass temperature, the shape of the geothermal cracks and the stress distribution around the geothermal cracks are shown in graphs.

  10. Modeling the heat and mass transfers in temperature-swing adsorption of volatile organic compounds onto activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvain Giraudet; Pascaline Pre; Pierre Le Cloirec

    2009-02-15

    A theoretical model was built to simulate the adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto activated carbons in a fixed bed. This model was validated on a set of experimental data obtained for the adsorption of acetone, ethyl formate, and dichloromethane onto five commercial activated carbons. The influence of operating conditions was modeled with various VOC contents at the inlet of the adsorber and superficial velocities of the gas-phase from 0.14 to 0.28 m.s{sup -1}. Breakthrough times and maximum temperature rises were computed with a coefficient of determination of 0.988 and 0.901, respectively. The simulation was then extended to the adsorption of mixtures of VOCs. From the comparison of simulation and experimental results, the advantage of accounting for dispersions of heat and mass is shown and the importance in taking into account the temperature effect on the equilibrium data is demonstrated. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Unsteady Heat and Mass Transfer of Chemically Reacting Micropolar Fluid in a Porous Channel with Hall and Ion Slip Currents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an incompressible two-dimensional heat and mass transfer of an electrically conducting micropolar fluid flow in a porous medium between two parallel plates with chemical reaction, Hall and ion slip effects. Let there be periodic injection or suction at the lower and upper plates and the nonuniform temperature and concentration at the plates are varying periodically with time. The flow field equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations and then solved numerically by quasilinearization technique. The profiles of velocity components, microrotation, temperature distribution and concentration are studied for different values of fluid and geometric parameters such as Hartmann number, Hall and ion slip parameters, inverse Darcy parameter, Prandtl number, Schmidt number, and chemical reaction rate and shown in the form of graphs. PMID:27419211

  12. Quasi One-Dimensional Model of Natural Draft Wet-Cooling Tower Flow, Heat and Mass Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyhlík, Tomáš

    2015-05-01

    The article deals with the development of CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) model of natural draft wet-cooling tower flow, heat and mass transfer. The moist air flow is described by the system of conservation laws along with additional equations. Moist air is assumed to be homogeneous mixture of dry air and water vapour. Liquid phase in the fill zone is described by the system of ordinary differential equations. Boundary value problem for the system of conservation laws is discretized in space using Kurganov-Tadmor central scheme and in time using strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta scheme. Initial value problems in the fill zone is solved by using standard fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme. The interaction between liquid water and moist air is done by source terms in governing equations.

  13. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3.6H2O, ZrOCl2.8H2O, AlCl3.6H2O and YCl3.6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts.

  14. Mass spectrometric identification of SUMO substrates provides insights into heat stress-induced SUMOylation in plants

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marcus J

    2011-01-01

    The covalent addition of Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier (SUMO) to various intracellular proteins is an essential regulatory step in most eukaryotes. Due to its necessity and the large number of putative targets, SUMO is thought to be second only to ubiquitin (Ub) among Ub-fold proteins in terms of regulatory influence. Whereas, ubiquitylation (i.e., the attachment of Ub) is generally associated with protein degradation, SUMOylation appears to have more diverse consequences, including the regulation of transcription, chromatin structure/accessibility, nuclear import and various protein-protein interactions, and even appears to block the action of Ub by competing for the same binding sites on targets.1–3 Paramount to understanding SUMO function(s) is knowing the complete catalog of SUMO targets. In the following addendum we review our recent publication4 describing the proteomic identification of SUMO substrates in the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, and expand our analyses with regard to the changes in SUMOylation patterns that are induced by heat stress. Collectively, our data indicate that SUMOylation is highly dynamic with evidence that SUMO addition globally modifies transcription and chromatin accessibility, especially during stress. PMID:21270536

  15. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3·6H2O, ZrOCl2·8H2O, AlCl3·6H2O and YCl3·6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts. PMID:27610589

  16. Mass production of two-dimensional oxides by rapid heating of hydrous chlorides

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunsong; Zhang, Haitian; Si, Wenjie; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanoscale oxides have attracted research interest owing to their electronic, magnetic optical and catalytic properties. If they could be manufactured on a large scale, 2D oxides would be attractive for applications ranging from electronics to energy conversion and storage. Herein, we report facile fabrication of oxide nanosheets by rapid thermal annealing of corresponding hydrous-chloride compounds. By heating CrCl3·6H2O, ZrOCl2·8H2O, AlCl3·6H2O and YCl3·6H2O crystals as precursors, we immediately collect large quantities of ultrathin Cr2O3, ZrO2, Al2O3 and Y2O3 nanosheets, respectively. The formation of layered nanosheets relies on exfoliation driven by rapid evaporation of water and/or other gas molecules generated under annealing. Our route allows simple, efficient and inexpensive production of 2D oxides. As a demonstration, we evaluate Cr2O3 nanosheets prepared by our method as anodes in lithium-ion batteries and find superior performance in comparison with their microcrystalline counterparts. PMID:27610589

  17. Heat and mass transfer in the Klamath Falls, Oregon, geothermal system

    SciTech Connect

    Prucha, R.H.

    1987-05-01

    Over the last 50 years significant amounts of data have been obtained from the Klamath Falls geothermal resource. To date, the complexity of the system has perplexed researchers, leading to the development of only very generalized hydrogeologic and geothermal models of the area. Based on reevaluation of all available data, a detailed conceptual model for the Klamath Falls geothermal resource is proposed. A comprehensive 3-dimensional numerical model, based on the proposed conceptual model is also presented. This numerical model incorporates all of the main reservoir characteristics. Hot water recharge flows from depth, along a large normal fault, and flows into near surface permeable strata where it loses heat to surrounding beds and to mixing with cold regional groundwaters introduced from the north. By matching calculated and measured temperatures and pressures, hot and cold water recharge rates and the permeability distribution for the geothermal system are estimated. A semi-analytic solution and simple lumped parameter methods are also compared to the numerical analysis. Results suggest that the flow patterns within the geothermal system at Klamath Falls are complex and intimately associated with the permeability distribution and the pressures and temperatures at depth, within the faults.

  18. Mass and heat flux balance of La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe) from aerial infrared thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, Damien; Beauducel, François; Coutant, Olivier; Delacourt, Christophe; Richon, Patrick; de Chabalier, Jean-Bernard; Hammouya, Gilbert

    2016-06-01

    La Soufrière of Guadeloupe is an active volcano of Lesser Antilles that is closely monitored due to a high eruptive hazard potential. Since 1992 it exhibits a medium-level but sustained background hydrothermal activity with low-energy and shallow seismicity, hot springs temperature increase and high flux acidic gas fumaroles at the summit. The problem of estimating the heat balance and quantifying the evolution of hydrothermal activity has become a key challenge for surveillance. This work is the first attempt of a global mapping and quantification of La Soufrière thermal activity performed in February 2010 using aerial thermal infrared imagery. After instrument calibration and data processing, we present a global map of thermal anomalies allowing to spot the main active sites: the summit area (including the fumaroles of Tarissan Pit and South Crater), the Ty Fault fumarolic zone, and the hot springs located at the vicinity of the dome. In a second step, we deduce the mass and the energy fluxes released by the volcano. In particular, we propose a simple model of energy balance to estimate the mass flux of the summit fumaroles from their brightness temperature and size. In February 2010, Tarissan Pit had a 22.8 ± 8.1 kg s -1 flux (1970 ± 704 tons day -1), while South Crater vents had a total of 19.5 ± 4.0 kg s -1 (1687 ± 348 tons day -1). Once converted into energy flux, summit fumaroles represent 98% of the 106 ± 30 MW released by the volcano, the 2% remaining being split between the hot springs and the thermal anomalies at the summit and at the Ty Fault fumarolic zone. These values are in the high range of the previous estimations, highlighting the short-term variability of the expelled fluxes. Such a heat flux requires the cooling of 1500 m 3 of magma per day, in good agreement with previous geochemical studies.

  19. Mechanical ventilation with heated humidifiers: measurements of condensed water mass within the breathing circuit according to ventilatory settings.

    PubMed

    Schena, E; Saccomandi, P; Cappelli, S; Silvestri, S

    2013-07-01

    Heated wire humidifiers (HWHs) are widely used to heat and humidify gases during mechanical ventilation. The control strategy implemented on commercial HWHs, based on maintaining constant gas temperature at the chamber outlet, shows weaknesses: humidifying performances depend on environmental temperature and ventilatory settings, and often condensation occurs. Herein, we analyzed in vitro HWH performances focusing on the condensation amount according to ventilatory settings. We used a physical model to define the parameters which mainly influence the HWH performances. In order to investigate the influence of minute volume (MV) and frequency rate (fr) on condensation, the other influencing parameters were kept constant during experiments, and we introduced a novel approach to estimate the condensation. The method, based on measuring the condensed vapor mass (Δm), provided more objective information than the visual-based scale used in previous studies. Thanks to both the control of other influencing factors and the accurate Δm measures, the investigation showed the Δm increase with MV and fr. Substantial condensation after 7 h of ventilation and the influence of MV and fr on Δm (i.e., Δm = 3 g at MV = 1.5 L min(-1) and fr = 8 bpm and Δm = 9.4 g at MV = 8 L min(-1) and fr = 20 bpm) confirm the weaknesses of `single-point temperature' control strategies.

  20. Multi-layer onion drying: Study of mass and heat transfer mechanism and quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiah, N.; Djaeni, M.

    2015-12-01

    Drying is one of methods to prolong storage life of onion. The outer layer of onion has kept dry around 12% of moisture content or below to retain the freshness of its inside part. The model of multi layers onion drying is very important to predict the water and temperature transport during dying process. In this case, one dimensional partial equation was used for predicting moisture distribution in the onion layer. To support the study, the onion drying was performed at various temperatures ranging of 40-50 °C. Then the attribute quality (quercetin content) of dried onion was analysed. The experimental data was to validate the value of water diffusivity and mass transfer coefficient used in the model. Results showed that the model can predict moisture distribution in each layer of onion. Moreover, based on the average moisture content during the drying, the model result closed to experiment data with accuracy of R2 0.970-0.999. The model was useful to estimate the drying time of outer layer to the desired level. Besides that, the quality evaluation showed that after 2 hours drying process, quercetin content can be retained.

  1. On the theory of heat and mass exchange between contacting spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Yakonov, S. N.; Ryumshin, B. V.; Kotlyarova, L. V.

    2011-10-01

    The steady-state mass transfer of a chemically active impurity to the surface of a stationary dumbbell-shaped particle consisting of two solid contacting reacting spheres of different sizes is analyzed theoretically. The surrounding medium is at rest, and the numerical concentration of the reagent at a large distance from the aggregate of the spheres is maintained constant. The first-order chemical heterogeneous reaction occurs at a high finite rate and is assumed to be isothermal. The solution to the boundary-value diffusion problem is described by a Laplace axisymmetric equation in the system of tangential-spherical coordinates of revolution. A system of two second-order linear perturbed ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients are obtained using the zero-order integral Hankel transformation and its properties from the boundary conditions for transformed functions. Partial integrals and the mean auxiliary Sherwood numbers are obtained approximately. The solution to the formulated problem is used in various technological applications associated with combustion or chemical reactions at the interface between the continuous and discrete phases in the dispersed system, in meteorology, in analysis of problems associated with environmental pollution, etc.

  2. Integral measurements of mass transport and heat content in the Strait of Gibraltar from acoustic transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Send, Uwe; Worcester, Peter F.; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Tiemann, Christopher O.; Baschek, Burkard

    those derived from current-meter data. The fractional uncertainty variance for the lower layer tidal transport from a single tomographic path was estimated to be 0.017 (i.e. 98% of the a priori tidal transport variance was resolved). The spatial scales of the sub-tidal flow are thought to be significantly shorter than those of the tidal flow, however, which means that a more elaborate monitoring network is required to achieve the same performance for sub-tidal variability. Finally, sum travel times from the reciprocal transmissions were found to provide good measurements of the temperature and heat content in the lower layer.

  3. Modeling highly transient flow, mass, and heat transport in the Chattahoochee River near Atlanta, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    A coupled flow-temperature model has been developed and verified for a 27.9-km reach of the Chattahoochee River between Buford Dam and Norcross, Ga. Flow in this reach of the Chattahoochee is continuous but highly regulated by Buford Dam, a flood-control and hydroelectric facility located near Buford, Ga. Calibration and verification utilized two sets of data collected under highly unsteady discharge conditions. Existing solution techniques, with certain minor improvements, were applied to verify the existing technology of flow and transport modeling. The linear, implicit finite-difference flow model was calibrated by use of a depth profile obtained at steady low flow and unsteady flow data obtained in March 1976. During the calibration period, the model was generally able to reproduce observed stages to within 0.15 m and discharges at less than 100 m 3 /s, to within 5 percent. Peak discharges of about 200 m 3 /s were under-estimated by about 20 percent. During the verification period, October 1975, the flow model reproduced observed stage changes to within about 0.15 m, and its timing and over-all performance was considered to be very good. Dye was added to the upstream end of the river reach at a constant rate while the river flow was highly unsteady. The numerical solution of either the conservative or nonconservative form of the mass-transport equation did an excellent job of simulating the observed concentrations of dye in the river. The temperature model was capable of predicting temperature changes through this reach of as large as 5.8?C with a RMS (root-mean-square) error of 0.32?C in October 1975 and 0.20?C in March 1976. Hydropulsation has a significant effect on the water temperature below Buford Dam. These effects are very complicated because they are quite dependent on the timing of the release with respect to both the time of day and past releases.

  4. Flow pattern-based mass and heat transfer and frictional drag of gas-non-Newtonian liquid flow in helical coil: two- and three-phase systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thandlam, Anil Kumar; Das, Chiranjib; Majumder, Subrata Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of wall-liquid mass transfer and heat transfer phenomena with gas-Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids in vertically helical coil reactor have been reported in this article. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of various dynamic and geometric parameters on mass and heat transfer coefficients in the helical coil reactor. The flow pattern-based heat and mass transfer phenomena in the helical coil reactor are highlighted at different operating conditions. The study covered a wide range of geometric parameters such as diameter of the tube (d t ), diameter of the coil (D c ), diameter of the particle (d p ), pitch difference (p/D c ) and concentrations of non-Newtonian liquid. The correlation models for the heat and mass transfer coefficient based on the flow pattern are developed which may be useful in process scale-up of the helical coil reactor for industrial application. The frictional drag coefficient was also estimated and analyzed by mass transfer phenomena based on the electrochemical method.

  5. Simulation of dynamics of hydraulic system with proportional control valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureček, Adam; Hružík, Lumír; Vašina, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Dynamics of a hydraulic system is influenced by several parameters, in this case mainly by proportional control valve, oil bulk modulus, oil viscosity, mass load etc. This paper will be focused on experimental measurement and mathematical simulation of dynamics of a hydraulic system with proportional control valve, linear hydraulic cylinder and mass load. The measurement is performed on experimental equipment that enables realization of dynamic processes of the hydraulic system. Linear hydraulic cylinder with mass load is equipped with position sensor of piston. The movement control of piston rod is ensured by the proportional control valve. The equipment enables to test an influence of parameter settings of regulator of the proportional control valve on position and pressure system responses. The piston position is recorded by magnetostrictive sensor that is located in drilled piston rod side of the linear hydraulic cylinder. Pressures are measured by piezoresistive sensors on the piston side and the piston rod side of the hydraulic cylinder. The measurement is performed during movement of the piston rod with mass load to the required position. There is realized and verified a mathematical model using Matlab SimHydraulics software for this hydraulic system.

  6. Proportional reasoning in the learning of chemistry: levels of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramful, Ajay; Narod, Fawzia Bibi

    2014-03-01

    This interdisciplinary study sketches the ways in which proportional reasoning is involved in the solution of chemistry problems, more specifically, problems involving quantities in chemical reactions (commonly referred to as stoichiometry problems). By building on the expertise of both mathematics and chemistry education research, the present paper shows how the theoretical constructs in proportional reasoning in mathematics education offer rich explanatory accounts of the complexities involved in solving stoichiometry problems. Using Vergnaud's concept of measure spaces, the theoretical analysis shows that proportionality situations are relatively more intricate, involving various layers of complexity in chemistry as compared to those in the mathematics curriculum. Knowledge of proportionality and chemistry are simultaneously required to provide solutions to chemical reactions. Our analysis of a range of stoichiometry situations led us to propose a problem analysis framework involving five levels of difficulty. Further, the specificity of proportionality in stoichiometry is that it can only be established when quantities are interpreted in the unit "mole," a unit which does not have any physical embodiment in terms of a measure of quantity unlike mass and volume. Our analysis of student-teachers' solution to the stoichiometry problems, shows that they tend to incorrectly (probably intuitively) set proportional relationships when two quantities in a reaction are expressed in non-molar quantities such as mass. The data also bring to the fore the primarily formulaic approach that student-teachers use in setting inherent proportionality relationships. An important finding is the interpretation of a chemical equation as a mathematical equation, rather than a statement of proportionality.

  7. Characterization of simultaneous heat and mass transfer phenomena for water vapour condensation on a solid surface in an abiotic environment--application to bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Akhilesh; Kondjoyan, Alain; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of heat and mass transfer by condensation of water vapour from humid air involves several key concepts in aerobic bioreactors. The high performance of bioreactors results from optimised interactions between biological processes and multiphase heat and mass transfer. Indeed in various processes such as submerged fermenters and solid-state fermenters, gas/liquid transfer need to be well controlled, as it is involved at the microorganism interface and for the control of the global process. For the theoretical prediction of such phenomena, mathematical models require heat and mass transfer coefficients. To date, very few data have been validated concerning mass transfer coefficients from humid air inflows relevant to those bioprocesses. Our study focussed on the condensation process of water vapour and developed an experimental set-up and protocol to study the velocity profiles and the mass flux on a small size horizontal flat plate in controlled environmental conditions. A closed circuit wind tunnel facility was used to control the temperature, hygrometry and hydrodynamics of the flow. The temperature of the active surface was controlled and kept isothermal below the dew point to induce condensation, by the use of thermoelectricity. The experiments were performed at ambient temperature for a relative humidity between 35-65% and for a velocity of 1.0 ms⁻¹. The obtained data are analysed and compared to available theoretical calculations on condensation mass flux. PMID:22367641

  8. Characterization of simultaneous heat and mass transfer phenomena for water vapour condensation on a solid surface in an abiotic environment--application to bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Akhilesh; Kondjoyan, Alain; Fontaine, Jean-Pierre

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of heat and mass transfer by condensation of water vapour from humid air involves several key concepts in aerobic bioreactors. The high performance of bioreactors results from optimised interactions between biological processes and multiphase heat and mass transfer. Indeed in various processes such as submerged fermenters and solid-state fermenters, gas/liquid transfer need to be well controlled, as it is involved at the microorganism interface and for the control of the global process. For the theoretical prediction of such phenomena, mathematical models require heat and mass transfer coefficients. To date, very few data have been validated concerning mass transfer coefficients from humid air inflows relevant to those bioprocesses. Our study focussed on the condensation process of water vapour and developed an experimental set-up and protocol to study the velocity profiles and the mass flux on a small size horizontal flat plate in controlled environmental conditions. A closed circuit wind tunnel facility was used to control the temperature, hygrometry and hydrodynamics of the flow. The temperature of the active surface was controlled and kept isothermal below the dew point to induce condensation, by the use of thermoelectricity. The experiments were performed at ambient temperature for a relative humidity between 35-65% and for a velocity of 1.0 ms⁻¹. The obtained data are analysed and compared to available theoretical calculations on condensation mass flux.

  9. Water mass transformation in the deep basins of the Nordic Seas: Analyses of heat and freshwater budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latarius, K.; Quadfasel, D.

    2016-08-01

    In the Arctic Mediterranean a transformation of Atlantic Water, flowing in near the surface, into overflow water, which leaves the area at depth, takes place. For this transformation the Nordic Seas are of particular importance, as they are largely ice-free and thus heat loss to the atmosphere during winter is strong. Since 2001 Argo-type profiling float measurements have been carried out in the region and enable the observation of hydrography during the whole year. The measurements concentrate on the deep basins, the Norwegian Basin, Lofoten Basin, Greenland Sea and Icelandic Plateau. They are analysed with special emphasis on the seasonal cycle in hydrography. Based on the mean seasonal cycle of temperature and salinity and atmospheric fluxes from reanalysis products for the first decade of this century heat and freshwater budgets are calculated. The residuum in the budgets gives the lateral exchange of water between the inner basins and the boundary current, circumnavigating the whole area. This lateral exchange is identified with the contribution of the deep basins to the water mass transformation within the Nordic Seas. Budget calculations, using atmospheric flux data from NCEP with corrections for high latitudes, yield a contribution of 18% to the total temperature decrease and 6% to the total salinity decrease in the Arctic Mediterranean, although the basins account for only 4% of the total area. The density increase nearly exclusively takes place in the eastern basins, whereas the Greenland Sea plays an important role in matching the temperature and salinity characteristic of the overflow water. An increasing amount of freshwater in the surface layer will have only minor effects on the strength of the overflows across the Greenland-Iceland-Scotland Ridge.

  10. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  11. Simultaneous detection of nonpolar and polar compounds by heat-assisted laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Nazarian, Javad; Kostiainen, Risto; Vertes, Akos; Kauppila, Tiina J

    2013-01-01

    A heat-assisted laser ablation electrospray ionization (HA-LAESI) method for the simultaneous mass spectrometric analysis of nonpolar and polar analytes was developed. The sample was introduced using mid-infrared laser ablation of a water-rich target. The ablated analytes were ionized with an electrospray plume, which was intercepted by a heated nitrogen gas jet that enhanced the ionization of analytes of low polarity. The feasibility of HA-LAESI was tested by analyzing, e.g., naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene, cholesterol, tricaprylin, 1,1',2,2'-tetramyristoyl cardiolipin, bradykinin fragment 1-8, and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol. HA-LAESI was found better suited for low polarity compounds than conventional LAESI, whereas polar compounds were observed with both techniques. The sensitivity of HA-LAESI for the polar bradykinin fragment 1-8 was slightly lower than observed for LAESI. HA-LAESI showed a linear response for 500 nM to 1.0 mM solutions (n = 11) of verapamil with R(2) = 0.988. HA-LAESI was applied for the direct analysis of tissue samples, e.g., avocado (Persea americana) mesocarp and mouse brain tissue sections. Spectra of the avocado showed abundant triglyceride ion peaks, and the results for the mouse brain sections showed cholesterol as the main species. Conventional LAESI shows significantly lower ionization efficiency for these neutral lipids. HA-LAESI can be applied to the analysis of nonpolar and polar analytes, and it extends the capabilities of conventional LAESI to nonpolar and neutral compounds. PMID:23199051

  12. Heat and mass transfer effects during displacement of deepwater methane hydrate to the surface of Lake Baikal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Alexander V.; Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Rozhkov, Aleksey N.

    2016-06-01

    The present paper focuses on heat and mass exchange processes in methane hydrate fragments during in situ displacement from the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) to the water surface of Lake Baikal. After being extracted from the methane hydrate deposit at the lakebed, hydrate fragments were placed into a container with transparent walls and a bottom grid. There were no changes in the hydrate fragments during ascent within the GHSZ. The water temperature in the container remained the same as that of the ambient water (~3.5 °C). However, as soon as the container crossed the upper border of the GHSZ, first signs of hydrate decomposition and transformation into free methane gas were observed. The gas filled the container and displaced water from it. At 300 m depth, the upper and lower thermometers in the container simultaneously recorded noticeable decreases of temperature. The temperature in the upper part of the container decreased to -0.25 °C at about 200 m depth, after which the temperature remained constant until the water surface was reached. The temperature at the bottom of the container reached -0.25 °C at about 100 m depth, after which it did not vary during further ascent. These observed effects could be explained by the formation of a gas phase in the container and an ice layer on the hydrate surface caused by heat consumption during hydrate decomposition (self-preservation effect). However, steady-state simulations suggest that the forming ice layer is too thin to sustain the hydrate internal pressure required to protect the hydrate from decomposition. Thus, the mechanism of self-preservation remains unclear.

  13. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Lewis, Patrick R.

    2007-01-30

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  14. Crustal structure, heat flux and mass transfer within a continental back-arc basin: Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, T. A.; Benson, A.; Greve, A.

    2012-12-01

    New seismic crustal structure data combined with gravity analysis provide constraints on mass and heat transfer processes in a continental back-arc basin. A recent high resolution seismic refraction, wide-angle experiment across the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, shows the lower crust is dominated by a ~ 10 km thick, lozenge-shaped body with seismic P-wave velocities of 6.8-7.1 km/s. Seismic reflections define the top and bottom surface of the body at depths of ~ 15 and 25 km, respectively. This "rift-pillow" we interpret as a mafic under-plate that will be in various stages of cooling. Heat fluxes from the TVZ at a rate of about 4GW, and the area is extending at a rate of 10-16 mm/y. To sustain 4GW in steady state for this extension rate requires the continuous intrusion, then cooling, of a molten -layer about 10-15 km thick. Thus the rift pillow is likely to be the main source of heat and rhyolite volcanism that dominates the surface processes within the TVZ. On the southeastern margin of the TVZ lies the active volcanic arc of andesite and dacitic volcanoes. Directly beneath the arc at a depth of ~ 32 km we detect a bright seismic reflection of limited lateral extent (~ 18 km wide). The relative amplitude and negative phase of this reflection suggests a melt body of unknown thickness. We relate this melt body to corner of an upwelling of the mantle asthenosphere, which feeds the primary melts into the active volcanic arc, and also may supply melt to rift pillow structure in the central TVZ. Gravity anomalies across the central North Island are dominated by a long wavelength signal related to subduction. We remove this regional effect with 2-way, third-order polynomial to leave a residual that is largely due to the rifting process in the back arc basin. The residual signal has a classical rift signature of a central low of -55 mgals and gravity highs of about +10 mgals over the flanks of the TVZ. Using the detailed seismic data as a constraint we account

  15. Heat and mass transfer scale-up issues during freeze-drying, III: control and characterization of dryer differences via operational qualification tests.

    PubMed

    Rambhatla, S; Tchessalov, S; Pikal, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research was to estimate differences in heat and mass transfer between freeze dryers due to inherent design characteristics using data obtained from sublimation tests. This study also aimed to provide guidelines for convenient scale-up of the freeze-drying process. Data obtained from sublimation tests performed on laboratory-scale, pilot, and production freeze dryers were used to evaluate various heat and mass transfer parameters: nonuniformity in shelf surface temperatures, resistance of pipe, refrigeration system, and condenser. Emissivity measurements of relevant surfaces such as the chamber wall and the freeze dryer door were taken to evaluate the impact of atypical radiation heat transfer during scale-up. "Hot" and "cold" spots were identified on the shelf surface of different freeze dryers, and the impact of variation in shelf surface temperatures on the primary drying time and the product temperature during primary drying was studied. Calculations performed using emissivity measurements on different freeze dryers suggest that a front vial in the laboratory lyophilizer received 1.8 times more heat than a front vial in a manufacturing freeze dryer operating at a shelf temperature of -25 degrees C and a chamber pressure of 150 mTorr during primary drying. Therefore, front vials in the laboratory are much more atypical than front vials in manufacturing. Steady-state heat and mass transfer equations were used to study a combination of different scale-up issues pertinent during lyophilization cycles commonly used for the freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals. PMID:16796357

  16. Product screening of fast reactions in IR-laser-heated liquid water filaments in a vacuum by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Charvat, A; Stasicki, B; Abel, B

    2006-03-01

    In the present article a novel approach for rapid product screening of fast reactions in IR-laser-heated liquid microbeams in a vacuum is highlighted. From absorbed energies, a shock wave analysis, high-speed laser stroboscopy, and thermodynamic data of high-temperature water the enthalpy, temperature, density, pressure, and the reaction time window for the hot water filament could be characterized. The experimental conditions (30 kbar, 1750 K, density approximately 1 g/cm3) present during the lifetime of the filament (20-30 ns) were extreme and provided a unique environment for high-temperature water chemistry. For the probe of the reaction products liquid beam desorption mass spectrometry was employed. A decisive feature of the technique is that ionic species, as well as neutral products and intermediates may be detected (neutrals as protonated aggregates) via time-of-flight mass spectrometry without any additional ionization laser. After the explosive disintegration of the superheated beam, high-temperature water reactions are efficiently quenched via expansion and evaporative cooling. For first exploratory experiments for chemistry in ultrahigh-temperature, -pressure and -density water, we have chosen resorcinol as a benchmark system, simple enough and well studied in high-temperature water environments much below 1000 K. Contrary to oxidation reactions usually present under less extreme and dense supercritical conditions, we have observed hydration and little H-atom abstraction during the narrow time window of the experiment. Small amounts of radicals but no ionic intermediates other than simple proton adducts were detected. The experimental findings are discussed in terms of the energetic and dense environment and the small time window for reaction, and they provide firm evidence for additional thermal reaction channels in extreme molecular environments.

  17. Steady Boundary Layer Slip Flow along with Heat and Mass Transfer over a Flat Porous Plate Embedded in a Porous Medium

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Asim; Siddique, J. I.; Aziz, Taha

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a simplified model of an incompressible fluid flow along with heat and mass transfer past a porous flat plate embedded in a Darcy type porous medium is investigated. The velocity, thermal and mass slip conditions are utilized that has not been discussed in the literature before. The similarity transformations are used to transform the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) into a nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The resulting system of ODEs is then reduced to a system of first order differential equations which was solved numerically by using Matlab bvp4c code. The effects of permeability, suction/injection parameter, velocity parameter and slip parameter on the structure of velocity, temperature and mass transfer rates are examined with the aid of several graphs. Moreover, observations based on Schmidt number and Soret number are also presented. The result shows, the increase in permeability of the porous medium increase the velocity and decrease the temperature profile. This happens due to a decrease in drag of the fluid flow. In the case of heat transfer, the increase in permeability and slip parameter causes an increase in heat transfer. However for the case of increase in thermal slip parameter there is a decrease in heat transfer. An increase in the mass slip parameter causes a decrease in the concentration field. The suction and injection parameter has similar effect on concentration profile as for the case of velocity profile. PMID:25531301

  18. Steady boundary layer slip flow along with heat and mass transfer over a flat porous plate embedded in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Asim; Siddique, J I; Aziz, Taha

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a simplified model of an incompressible fluid flow along with heat and mass transfer past a porous flat plate embedded in a Darcy type porous medium is investigated. The velocity, thermal and mass slip conditions are utilized that has not been discussed in the literature before. The similarity transformations are used to transform the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) into a nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The resulting system of ODEs is then reduced to a system of first order differential equations which was solved numerically by using Matlab bvp4c code. The effects of permeability, suction/injection parameter, velocity parameter and slip parameter on the structure of velocity, temperature and mass transfer rates are examined with the aid of several graphs. Moreover, observations based on Schmidt number and Soret number are also presented. The result shows, the increase in permeability of the porous medium increase the velocity and decrease the temperature profile. This happens due to a decrease in drag of the fluid flow. In the case of heat transfer, the increase in permeability and slip parameter causes an increase in heat transfer. However for the case of increase in thermal slip parameter there is a decrease in heat transfer. An increase in the mass slip parameter causes a decrease in the concentration field. The suction and injection parameter has similar effect on concentration profile as for the case of velocity profile.

  19. Class and Home Problems. Identify-Solve-Broadcast Your Own Transport Phenomenon: Student-Created YouTube Videos to Foster Active Learning in Mass and Heat Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Fei; Khera, Eshita

    2016-01-01

    Despite the instinctive perception of mass and heat transfer principles in daily life, productive learning in this course continues to be one of the greatest challenges for undergraduate students in chemical engineering. In an effort to enhance student learning in classroom, we initiated an innovative active-learning method titled…

  20. Local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators of limb tissue hyperemia in the heat-stressed human at rest and during small muscle mass exercise.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Scott T; Trangmar, Steven J; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Rakobowchuk, Mark; Banker, Devendar S; Lotlikar, Makrand D; Ali, Leena; González-Alonso, José

    2015-07-15

    Limb tissue and systemic blood flow increases with heat stress, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that heat stress-induced increases in limb tissue perfusion are primarily mediated by local temperature-sensitive mechanisms. Leg and systemic temperatures and hemodynamics were measured at rest and during incremental single-legged knee extensor exercise in 15 males exposed to 1 h of either systemic passive heat-stress with simultaneous cooling of a single leg (n = 8) or isolated leg heating or cooling (n = 7). Systemic heat stress increased core, skin and heated leg blood temperatures (Tb), cardiac output, and heated leg blood flow (LBF; 0.6 ± 0.1 l/min; P < 0.05). In the cooled leg, however, LBF remained unchanged throughout (P > 0.05). Increased heated leg deep tissue blood flow was closely related to Tb (R(2) = 0.50; P < 0.01), which is partly attributed to increases in tissue V̇O2 (R(2) = 0.55; P < 0.01) accompanying elevations in total leg glucose uptake (P < 0.05). During isolated limb heating and cooling, LBFs were equivalent to those found during systemic heat stress (P > 0.05), despite unchanged systemic temperatures and hemodynamics. During incremental exercise, heated LBF was consistently maintained ∼ 0.6 l/min higher than that in the cooled leg (P < 0.01), with LBF and vascular conductance in both legs showing a strong correlation with their respective local Tb (R(2) = 0.85 and 0.95, P < 0.05). We conclude that local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators in limb tissue perfusion regulation both at rest and during small-muscle mass exercise in hyperthermic humans.

  1. Local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators of limb tissue hyperemia in the heat-stressed human at rest and during small muscle mass exercise

    PubMed Central

    Chiesa, Scott T.; Trangmar, Steven J.; Kalsi, Kameljit K.; Rakobowchuk, Mark; Banker, Devendar S.; Lotlikar, Makrand D.; Ali, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Limb tissue and systemic blood flow increases with heat stress, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that heat stress-induced increases in limb tissue perfusion are primarily mediated by local temperature-sensitive mechanisms. Leg and systemic temperatures and hemodynamics were measured at rest and during incremental single-legged knee extensor exercise in 15 males exposed to 1 h of either systemic passive heat-stress with simultaneous cooling of a single leg (n = 8) or isolated leg heating or cooling (n = 7). Systemic heat stress increased core, skin and heated leg blood temperatures (Tb), cardiac output, and heated leg blood flow (LBF; 0.6 ± 0.1 l/min; P < 0.05). In the cooled leg, however, LBF remained unchanged throughout (P > 0.05). Increased heated leg deep tissue blood flow was closely related to Tb (R2 = 0.50; P < 0.01), which is partly attributed to increases in tissue V̇O2 (R2 = 0.55; P < 0.01) accompanying elevations in total leg glucose uptake (P < 0.05). During isolated limb heating and cooling, LBFs were equivalent to those found during systemic heat stress (P > 0.05), despite unchanged systemic temperatures and hemodynamics. During incremental exercise, heated LBF was consistently maintained ∼0.6 l/min higher than that in the cooled leg (P < 0.01), with LBF and vascular conductance in both legs showing a strong correlation with their respective local Tb (R2 = 0.85 and 0.95, P < 0.05). We conclude that local temperature-sensitive mechanisms are important mediators in limb tissue perfusion regulation both at rest and during small-muscle mass exercise in hyperthermic humans. PMID:25934093

  2. Energy transport and isochoric heating of a low-Z, reduced-mass target irradiated with a high intensity laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, H.; Nakamura, H.; Tanabe, M.; Fujiwara, T.; Yamamoto, N.; Fujioka, S.; Mima, K.; Mishra, R.; Sentoku, Y.; Mancini, R.; Hakel, P.; Ohshima, S.; Batani, D.; Veltcheva, M.; Desai, T.; Jafer, R.; Kawamura, T.; Koike, F.

    2011-02-15

    Heat transport in reduced-mass targets irradiated with a high intensity laser pulse was studied. K{alpha} lines from partially ionized chlorine embedded in the middle of a triple-layered plastic target were measured to evaluate bulk electron temperature in the tracer region inside the target. Two groups of K{alpha} lines, one from Cl{sup +}-Cl{sup 6+} (hereby called ''cold K{alpha}''), and the other from Cl{sup 9+} and Cl{sup 10+} (''shifted K{alpha}'') are observed from different regions within the target. Two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations show two distinct heating mechanisms occurring concurrently: uniform heating by refluxing electrons and local heating by diffusive electrons in the central region. These two heating processes, which made the target temperature distribution nonuniform, are responsible for producing the two groups of K{alpha} lines in the experiment. The blue-shift of cold K{alpha} lines in the experiment is the signature of higher temperatures achieved by the refluxing heating in smaller-mass targets.

  3. Changes in development and heat shock protein expression in two species of flies (Sarcophaga bullata [Diptera: Sarcophagidae] and Protophormia terraenovae [Diptera: Calliphoridae]) reared in different sized maggot masses.

    PubMed

    Rivers, David B; Ciarlo, Timothy; Spelman, Michael; Brogan, Rebecca

    2010-07-01

    Development of two species of necrophagous flies, Sarcophaga bullata Parker (Sarcophagidae) and Protophormia terraenovae (Robineau-Desvoidy) (Calliphoridae), was examined in different size maggot masses generated under laboratory conditions. Larvae from both species induced elevated mass temperatures dependent on the number of individuals per mass. The relationship was more evident for S. bullata, as larvae generated higher temperatures in every size maggot mass than P. terraenovae. Several development events were altered with increasing maggot mass size of flesh flies, and to a lesser extent blow flies, which corresponded with elevated temperatures. Duration of development of all feeding larval stages decreased with increased size of maggot mass. However, the length of development during puparial stages actually increased for these same flies. Puparial weights also declined with maggot mass size, as did the ability to eclose. The altered fly development was attributed to the induction of heat stress conditions, which was evident by the expression of heat shock proteins (23, 60, 70, and 90) in larval brains of both fly types.

  4. A new application of a finite element heat and mass transfer numerical modeling code (FEHM) to heat and fluid circulation in lava domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. L.; Stauffer, P. H.; Calder, E. S.

    2012-12-01

    Lava domes have been well-characterized in terms of their surface structure and activity, but there is much to be learned about their internal structure and geothermal systems. Even when a lava dome is no longer actively erupting, subsurface studies are often difficult to conduct; lava domes are highly complex structures, but their rugged nature often precludes systematic drilling and/or geophysical surveys. Because of this, we know little about the internal geothermal activity that may still contribute to both hazards and opportunities for exploitation of mineral deposits and hot groundwater. Despite the difficulty of studying the interior of lava domes directly, numerical modeling can still provide insights into the behavior of their geothermal systems. Lava domes have the potential to be highly transmissive structures, and the presence of hot springs in the vicinity of lava domes (Santiaguito in Guatemala, La Soufriere on Guadeloupe) suggests that water circulation may be an important process in post-eruptive dome evolution. FEHM, a heat and mass transfer modeling code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (fehm.lanl.gov) is an ideal tool to study fluid and gas circulation in geologic structures. FEHM was developed for subsurface reservoir modeling (originally for the Hot Dry Rock geothermal project) and is capable of dealing with both high- (magmatic) and low-temperature fluids. In this study, FEHM has been used in combination with a LANL-developed grid-generating utility (LaGriT) to create an idealized model of water circulation in a saturated lava dome. Multiple material regions are used to represent the dome core, outer talus layer, conduit, and volcanic substrate. Material properties (such as permeability, porosity, density, etc.) were chosen from a combination of literature review and sensitivity testing using a simplified dome geometry and a continuum modeling approach that accounts for fractures (Equivalent Porous Medium) was used when applying

  5. Design and experimental analysis of counter-flow heat and mass exchanger incorporating (M-cycle) for evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Omar; Butt, Zubair; Tanveer, Waqas; Rao, Hasan Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the functioning of dew-point cooler is improved in terms of its thermal effectiveness. For this reason, a heat and mass exchanger has been designed by using a counter-flow pattern incorporating Maisotsenko cycle (M-cycle) having effective absorbing material called Kraft paper on wet channel side and improved width to height ratio. Experimentation has been performed under various inlet air working parameters such as humidity, velocity and temperature in addition with changing feed water temperature. The results from the experiments specify that the dew-point and the wet-bulb effectiveness is achieved between 67-87 % and 104-120 % respectively. Analysis is performed with temperature variation between 25 and 45 °C at different absolute humidity levels ranging from 14.4 to 18 g/kg, while the inlet air velocity is varied between 0.88 and 1.50 m/s. Thus, the working ability of the improved design has been found 5 % more effective in terms of wet bulb effectiveness as compared to previous counter-flow designs.

  6. Numerical heat and mass transfer analysis of a cross-flow indirect evaporative cooler with plates and flat tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, K. J.; Xu, J.; Cui, X.; Ng, K. C.; Islam, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    In this study the performance of an indirect evaporative cooling system (IECS) of cross-flow configuration is numerically investigated. Considering the variation of water film temperature along the flowing path and the wettability of the wet channel, a two-dimensional theoretical model is developed to comprehensively describe the heat and mass transfer process involved in the system. After comparing the simulation results with available experimental data from literature, the deviation within ±5 % proves the accuracy and reliability of the proposed mathematical model. The simulation results of the plate type IECS indicate that the important parameters, such as dimension of plates, air properties, and surface wettability play a great effect on the cooling performance. The investigation of flow pattern shows that cross-flow configuration of primary air with counter-flow of secondary air and water film has a better cooling performance than that of the parallel-flow pattern. Furthermore, the performance of a novel flat tube working as the separating medium is numerically investigated. Simulation results for this novel geometry indicate that the tube number, tube long axis and short axis length as well as tube length remarkably affect its cooling performance.

  7. Emission lines from X-ray-heated accretion disks in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Kallman, Timothy R.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the structure of accretion disks illuminated by X-rays from a central compact object in a binary system. X-rays can photoionize the upper atmosphere of the disk and form an accretion disk corona (ADC) where emission lines can form. We construct a model to calculate the vertical structure and the emission spectrum of the ADC with parameters appropriate to low-mass X-ray binaries. These models are made by nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of ion and level populations and include a large number of atomic processes for 10 cosmically abundant elements. Transfer of radiation is treated by using the escape probability formalism. The vertical temperature profile of the ADC consists of a Compton-heated region and a mid-T zone where the temperature is approximately 10(exp 6) K. A thermal instability occurs close to the disk photosphere and causes the temperature of the ADC to drop abruptly from 10(exp 6) K to several times 10(exp 4) K. The emission spectrum in the optical, ultraviolet, extreme ultraviolet, and X-ray range is discussed and compared with the observations.

  8. El Chichón crater lake dynamic based on continuous physical data and mass-heat budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiffer, L.; Taran, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The March-April 1982 Plinian eruption of El Chichón volcano destroyed the summit domes system and created a new 200 m deep crater. Since then, a shallow lake (~3 m) with acidic pH (~2.3), and temperature around 30°C appeared in the crater. This lake has never disappeared until now although its volume has suffered important variations from 40,000 m3 to 160,000 m3. Chemical composition of the lake is also highly variable (Cl/SO4 = 0-79 molar ratio), alternating between acid-sulfate and acid-chloride-sulfate composition. These variations can occur very fast within few weeks and are not directly correlated with precipitation. Due to its shallow depth and small volume, El Chichón crater lake is probably one of the most dynamic crater lake on earth. These rapid changes in chemistry and volume reflect the dynamic of one group of geyser-type springs ('Soap Pools springs, SP') located offshore and the input of hydrothermal steam underneath the crater. The SP springs discharge sporadically to the lake neutral waters with Cl content currently around 3000 mg/l, while the condensed steam feeds the lake with Cl-free and SO4-rich acid water. In this study, we present for the first time continuous physical data of the crater lake (temperature, depth, meteoric precipitation, wind velocity, solar radiation, air humidity). These data were registered by a meteorological station and two dataloggers installed inside and outside the lake. Using a mass and heat budget model constrained with these data, we were able to estimate the flux of 'hydrothermal' fluid entering the lake through the sub-lacustrian fumaroles and SP springs. Tracing the variations of the input flux in time can be help to understand the dynamic of the 'crater lake-SP springs-fumaroles' system but also can provide an efficient way of monitoring the volcanic activity. During the observation period, the mean mass flux entering the lake (Min) was respectively of 12 ± 2 kg/s, corresponding to a total heat flux (Ein) of

  9. Proportional Reasoning and the Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Geoff; Hilton, Annette; Dole, Shelley L.; Goos, Merrilyn; O'Brien, Mia

    2012-01-01

    Proportional reasoning is an important aspect of formal thinking that is acquired during the developmental years that approximate the middle years of schooling. Students who fail to acquire sound proportional reasoning often experience difficulties in subjects that require quantitative thinking, such as science, technology, engineering, and…

  10. CCSSM Challenge: Graphing Ratio and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; D'Ambrosio, Beatriz S.; Lynch-Davis, Kathleen; Mintos, Alexia; Krawczyk, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    A renewed emphasis was placed on ratio and proportional reasoning in the middle grades in the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM). The expectation for students includes the ability to not only compute and then compare and interpret the results of computations in context but also interpret ratios and proportions as they are…

  11. Working Memory Mechanism in Proportional Quantifier Verification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajenkowski, Marcin; Szymanik, Jakub; Garraffa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The paper explores the cognitive mechanisms involved in the verification of sentences with proportional quantifiers (e.g. "More than half of the dots are blue"). The first study shows that the verification of proportional sentences is more demanding than the verification of sentences such as: "There are seven blue and eight yellow…

  12. Computational analysis of coupled fluid, heat, and mass transport in ferrocyanide single-shell tanks: FY 1994 interim report. Ferrocyanide Tank Safety Project

    SciTech Connect

    McGrail, B.P.

    1994-11-01

    A computer modeling study was conducted to determine whether natural convection processes in single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes could generate localized precipitation zones that significantly concentrate the major heat-generating radionuclide, {sup 137}Cs. A computer code was developed that simulates coupled fluid, heat, and single-species mass transport on a regular, orthogonal finite-difference grid. The analysis showed that development of a ``hot spot`` is critically dependent on the temperature dependence for the solubility of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} or CsNaNiFe(CN){sub 6}. For the normal case, where solubility increases with increasing temperature, the net effect of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport is to disperse any local zones of high heat generation rate. As a result, hot spots cannot physically develop for this case. However, assuming a retrograde solubility dependence, the simulations indicate the formation of localized deposition zones that concentrate the {sup 137}Cs near the bottom center of the tank where the temperatures are highest. Recent experimental studies suggest that Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}(c) does not exhibit retrograde solubility over the temperature range 25{degree}C to 90{degree}C and NaOH concentrations to 5 M. Assuming these preliminary results are confirmed, no natural mass transport process exists for generating a hot spot in the ferrocyanide single-shell tanks.

  13. Heat-transfer and pressure distributions for laminar separated flows downstream of rearward-facing steps with and without mass suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. D.; Jakubowski, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    Heat-transfer and pressure distributions were measured for laminar separated flows downstream of rearward-facing steps with and without mass suction. The flow conditions were such that the boundary-layer thickness was comparable to or larger than the step height. For both suction and no-suction cases, an increase in the step height resulted in a sharp decrease in the initial heat-transfer rates behind the step. Downstream, however, the heat transfer gradually recovered back to less than or near attached-flow values. Mass suction from the step base area increased the local heat-transfer rates; however, this effect was relatively weak for the laminar flows considered. Even removal of the entire approaching boundary layer raised the post-step heat-transfer rates only about 10 percent above the flatplate values. Post-step pressure distributions were found to depend on the entrainment conditions at separation. In the case of the solid-faced step, a sharp pressure drop behind the step was followed by a very short plateau and relatively fast recompression. For the slotted-step connected to a large plenum but without suction, the pressure drop at the base was much smaller and the downstream recompression more gradual than that for solid-faced step.

  14. The Influence of Static and Rotating Magnetic Fields on Heat and Mass Transfer in Silicon Floating Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Szofran, Frank; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Hear and mass transfer in float-zone processing are strongly influenced by convective flows in the zone. They are caused by buoyancy convection, thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection, or artificial sources such as rotation and radio frequency heating. Flows in conducting melts can be controlled by the use of magnetic fields, either by damping fluid motion with static fields or by generating a def@ned flow with rotating fields. The possibilities of using static and rotating magnetic fields in silicon floating-zone growth have been investigated by experiments in axial static fields up to ST and in transverse rotating magnetic fields up to 7.S mT. Static fields of a few 100 MT already suppress most striations but are detrimental to the radial segregation by introducing a coring effect. A complete suppression of dopant striations caused by time-dependent thermocapillary convection and a reduction of the coring to insignificant values, combined with a shift of the axial segregation profile towards a more diffusion-limited case, is possible with static fields ? 1T. However, under certain conditions the use of high axial magnetic fields can lead to the appearance of a new type of pronounced dopant striations, caused by thermoelec:romagnetic convection. The use of a transverse rotating magnetic field influences the microscopic segregation at quite low inductions, of the order of a few mT. The field shifts time-dependent flows and the resulting striation patterns from a broad range of low frequencies at high amplitudes to a few high frequencies at low amplitudes

  15. Proportion of recovered waterfowl bands reported

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geis, A.D.; Atwood, E.L.

    1961-01-01

    Data from the annual mail survey of waterfowl hunters in the United States were used to estimate the total numbers of banded waterfowl that were shot. These estimates were compared with Banding Office records to estimate the proportion of recovered bands that was reported. On the average, about two banded birds were recovered for each one reported. The proportion reported was higher for some areas and for some species than for others. The proportion reported was higher when more of the reports came through employees of conservation agencies.

  16. The Importance of Physical Models for Deriving Dust Masses and Grain Size Distributions in Supernova Ejecta. I. Radiatively Heated Dust in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 Solar Mass, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 micron. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  17. Integral solutions to transient nonlinear heat (mass) diffusion with a power-law diffusivity: a semi-infinite medium with fixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristov, Jordan

    2016-03-01

    Closed form approximate solutions to nonlinear heat (mass) diffusion equation with power-law nonlinearity of the thermal (mass) diffusivity have been developed by the integral-balance method avoiding the commonly used linearization by the Kirchhoff transformation. The main improvement of the solution is based on the double-integration technique and a new approach to the space derivative. Solutions to Dirichlet and Neumann boundary condition problems have been developed and benchmarked against exact numerical and approximate analytical solutions available in the literature.

  18. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered. PMID:27739466

  19. Detailed heat/mass transfer distributions in a rotating two pass coolant channel with engine-near cross section and smooth walls.

    PubMed

    Rathjen, L; Hennecke, D K; Bock, S; Kleinstück, R

    2001-05-01

    This paper shows results obtained by experimental and numerical investigations concerning flow structure and heat/mass transfer in a rotating two-pass coolant channel with engine-near geometry. The smooth two passes are connected by a 180 degrees U-bend in which a 90 degrees turning vane is mounted. The influence of rotation number, Reynolds number and geometry is investigated. The results show a detailed picture of the flow field and distributions of Sherwood number ratios determined experimentally by the use of the naphthalene sublimation technique as well as Nusselt number ratios obtained from the numerical work. Especially the heat/mass transfer distributions in the bend and in the region after the bend show strong gradients, where several separation zones exist and the flow is forced to follow the turbine airfoil shape. Comparisons of numerical and experimental results show only partly good agreement. PMID:11460658

  20. Detailed heat/mass transfer distributions in a rotating two pass coolant channel with engine-near cross section and smooth walls.

    PubMed

    Rathjen, L; Hennecke, D K; Bock, S; Kleinstück, R

    2001-05-01

    This paper shows results obtained by experimental and numerical investigations concerning flow structure and heat/mass transfer in a rotating two-pass coolant channel with engine-near geometry. The smooth two passes are connected by a 180 degrees U-bend in which a 90 degrees turning vane is mounted. The influence of rotation number, Reynolds number and geometry is investigated. The results show a detailed picture of the flow field and distributions of Sherwood number ratios determined experimentally by the use of the naphthalene sublimation technique as well as Nusselt number ratios obtained from the numerical work. Especially the heat/mass transfer distributions in the bend and in the region after the bend show strong gradients, where several separation zones exist and the flow is forced to follow the turbine airfoil shape. Comparisons of numerical and experimental results show only partly good agreement.

  1. Heat and Mass Transfer of the Droplet Vacuum Freezing Process Based on the Diffusion-controlled Evaporation and Phase Transition Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Gao, Jingxin; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-10-01

    A frozen phase transition model is developed to investigate the heat and mass transfer of a single water droplet during the vacuum freezing process. The model is based on the diffusion-controlled evaporation mechanism and phase transition characteristics. The droplet vacuum freezing process can be divided into three stages according to the droplet states and the time order. It includes the evaporation freezing stage, the isothermal freezing stage and the sublimation freezing stage. A numerical calculation is performed, and the result is analysed. The effects of the vacuum chamber pressure, initial droplet diameter and initial droplet temperature on the heat and mass transfer characteristics at each stage are studied. The droplet experiences supercooling breakdown at the end of the evaporation freezing stage before the isothermal freezing stage begins. The temperature is transiently raised as a result of the supercooling breakdown phenomenon, whose effects on the freezing process and freezing parameters are considered.

  2. Working memory mechanism in proportional quantifier verification.

    PubMed

    Zajenkowski, Marcin; Szymanik, Jakub; Garraffa, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The paper explores the cognitive mechanisms involved in the verification of sentences with proportional quantifiers (e.g., "More than half of the dots are blue"). The first study shows that the verification of proportional sentences is more demanding than the verification of sentences such as: "There are seven blue and eight yellow dots". The second study reveals that both types of sentences are correlated with memory storage, however, only proportional sentences are associated with the cognitive control. This result suggests that the cognitive mechanism underlying the verification of proportional quantifiers is crucially related to the integration process, in which an individual has to compare in memory the cardinalities of two sets. In the third study we find that the numerical distance between two cardinalities that must be compared significantly influences the verification time and accuracy. The results of our studies are discussed in the broader context of processing complex sentences. PMID:24374596

  3. Proportionality, just war theory and weapons innovation.

    PubMed

    Forge, John

    2009-03-01

    Just wars are supposed to be proportional responses to aggression: the costs of war must not greatly exceed the benefits. This proportionality principle raises a corresponding 'interpretation problem': what are the costs and benefits of war, how are they to be determined, and a 'measurement problem': how are costs and benefits to be balanced? And it raises a problem about scope: how far into the future do the states of affairs to be measured stretch? It is argued here that weapons innovation always introduces costs, and that these costs cannot be determined in advance of going to war. Three examples, the atomic bomb, the AK-47 and the ancient Greek catapult, are given as examples. It is therefore argued that the proportionality principle is inapplicable prospectively. Some replies to the argument are discussed and rejected. Some more general defences of the proportionality principle are considered and also rejected. Finally, the significance of the argument for Just War Theory as a whole is discussed.

  4. Using Resampling to Compare Two Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, W. Robert; Froelich, Amy G.; Duckworth, William M.

    2010-01-01

    This article shows that when applying resampling methods to the problem of comparing two proportions, students can discover that whether you resample with or without replacement can make a big difference.

  5. Influence of phase transformations and heat and mass exchange on the course of the processes of pyrolysis of single high-ash-coal particles at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    V.P. Patskov

    2007-03-15

    A comparative analysis of equilibrium and nonequilibrium models for calculation of the rates of phase transitions (evaporation and condensation) of pyrolysis products and the influence of convective heat and mass exchange with inert ash particles and the gas flow in pyrolysis of single particles of high-ash bituminous coals in the operation of technological units with a circulating fluidized bed under pressure is made.

  6. GSFC's Multi-Wire Gas Proportional Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serlemitsos, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    The Goddard X-ray group made its appearance in 1964 as a one person (Elihu Boldt) appendage to the well established cosmic ray group, then headed by Frank MacDonald. This discipline proximity was crucial because it meant superb technical support from the start, which allowed the fledging group to quickly advance toward directions of choice. When I became the 2nd member of the group in 1966, the new discipline still relied on bulky gas counters, stacked to make up a usable detection area. Slim opportunities existed for timing or spectral inferences. Elihu's strong interest in pursuing the reported diffuse cosmic radiation had to be set aside, as improving this situation appeared to be years away. Cosmic ray researchers had long used charged particle timing techniques for cleaning up their data, but those appeared irrelevant for our purposes because of the large, background generating, mass of the gas containment vessels and the slow drift in the counter gas of the charge from photon interaction sites to the counter anode. We had to deal with these realities in whatever choices we made for our future instruments. The multi-wire gas proportional counter emerged from our still small group in the late1960s, demonstrating on several rocket and balloon flights a greatly reduced detector background, improved event timing and adequate resolution for addressing key spectral features. Three of these detectors, flown in 1975 on NASA's 8th orbiting solar observatory, were successfully used for some 3 years to conduct non dispersive, 1-10 keV spectroscopy on many galactic and extragalactic sources, including several clusters of galaxies. In 1977 we flew a set of larger detectors on the first of NASA's High Energy Astrophysical Observatories (HEAO). These were specifically designed for the study of the X-ray background. Finally, the largest instruments of this family were flown in 1995 by our group on NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, RXTE, which observed over a remarkable 16

  7. THE IMPORTANCE OF PHYSICAL MODELS FOR DERIVING DUST MASSES AND GRAIN SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN SUPERNOVA EJECTA. I. RADIATIVELY HEATED DUST IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli

    2013-09-01

    Recent far-infrared (IR) observations of supernova remnants (SNRs) have revealed significantly large amounts of newly condensed dust in their ejecta, comparable to the total mass of available refractory elements. The dust masses derived from these observations assume that all the grains of a given species radiate at the same temperature, regardless of the dust heating mechanism or grain radius. In this paper, we derive the dust mass in the ejecta of the Crab Nebula, using a physical model for the heating and radiation from the dust. We adopt a power-law distribution of grain sizes and two different dust compositions (silicates and amorphous carbon), and calculate the heating rate of each dust grain by the radiation from the pulsar wind nebula. We find that the grains attain a continuous range of temperatures, depending on their size and composition. The total mass derived from the best-fit models to the observed IR spectrum is 0.019-0.13 M{sub Sun }, depending on the assumed grain composition. We find that the power-law size distribution of dust grains is characterized by a power-law index of 3.5-4.0 and a maximum grain size larger than 0.1 {mu}m. The grain sizes and composition are consistent with what is expected for dust grains formed in a Type IIP supernova (SN). Our derived dust mass is at least a factor of two less than the mass reported in previous studies of the Crab Nebula that assumed more simplified two-temperature models. These models also require a larger mass of refractory elements to be locked up in dust than was likely available in the ejecta. The results of this study show that a physical model resulting in a realistic distribution of dust temperatures can constrain the dust properties and affect the derived dust masses. Our study may also have important implications for deriving grain properties and mass estimates in other SNRs and for the ultimate question of whether SNe are major sources of dust in the Galactic interstellar medium and in

  8. Heat transfer, pressure drop, and mass flow rate in pin fin channels with long and short trailing edge ejection holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Han, J. C.; Batten, T.

    1988-06-01

    The turbulent heat transfer and friction characteristics in the pin fin channels with small trailing edge ejection holes found in internally-cooled turbine airfoils have been experimentally investigated. It is found that the overall heat transfer increases when the length of the trailing edge ejection holes is increased and when the trailing edge ejection holes are configured such that much of the cooling air is forced to flow further downstream in the radial flow direction prior to exiting. The increase in the overall heat transfer is shown to be accompanied by an increase in the overall pressure drop.

  9. Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, particle collapse, and photoacoustic heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    lewis, Kristen A.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Chakrabarti, Raj; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Day, Derek E.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Jimenez, Jose L.; Ulbrich, Ingrid M.; Huffman, John A.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Trimborn, Achim; Liu, Li; Mishchenko, M.

    2009-11-27

    Smoke particle emissions from the combustion of biomass fuels typical for the western and southeastern United States were studied and compared under high humidity and ambient conditions in the laboratory. The fuels used are Montana ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), southern California chamise (Adenostoma fasciculatum), and Florida saw palmetto (Serenoa repens). Information on the non-refractory chemical composition of biomass burning aerosol from each fuel was obtained with an aerosol mass spectrometer and through estimation of the black carbon concentration from light absorption measurements at 870 nm. Changes in the optical and physical particle properties under high humidity conditions were observed for hygroscopic smoke particles containing substantial inorganic mass fractions that were emitted from combustion of chamise and palmetto fuels. Light scattering cross sections increased under high humidity for these particles, consistent with the hygroscopic growth measured for 100 nm particles in HTDMA measurements. Photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption coefficients reveal a 20% reduction with increasing relative humidity, contrary to the expectation of light absorption enhancement by the liquid coating taken up by hygroscopic particles. This reduction is hypothesized to arise from two mechanisms: 1. Shielding of inner monomers after particle consolidation or collapse with water uptake; 2. The contribution of mass transfer through evaporation and condensation at high relative humidity to the usual heat transfer pathway for energy release by laser heated particles in the photoacoustic measurement of aerosol light absorption. The mass transfer contribution is used to evaluate the fraction of aerosol surface covered with liquid water solution as a function of RH.

  10. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  11. Local heat/mass transfer and pressure drop in a two-pass rib-roughened channel for turbine airfoil cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J. C.; Chandra, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of turbulent air flow in a multipass channel were studied via the naphthalene sublimation technique. The naphthalene-coated test section, consisting of two straight, square channels joined by a 180 deg turn, resembled the internal cooling passages of gas turbine airfoils. The top and bottom surfaces of the test channel were roughened by rib turbulators. The rib height-to-hydraulic diameter ratio (e/D) were 0.063 and 0.094, and the rib pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) were 10 and 20. The local heat/mass transfer coefficients on the roughened top wall and on the smooth divider and side walls of the test channel were determined for three Reynolds numbers of 15, 30, and 60, thousand, and for three angles of attack (alpha) of 90, 60, and 45 deg. Results showed that the local Sherwood numbers on the ribbed walls were 1.5 to 6.5 times those for a fully developed flow in a smooth square duct. The average ribbed-wall Sherwood numbers were 2.5 to 3.5 times higher than the fully developed values, depending on the rib angle of attack and the Reynolds number. The results also indicated that, before the turn, the heat/mass transfer coefficients in the cases of alpha = 60 and 45 deg were higher than those in the case of alpha=90 deg. However, after the turn, the heat/mass transfer coefficients in the oblique-rib cases were lower than those in the transverse rib case. Correlations for the average Sherwood number ratios for individual channel surfaces and for the overall Sherwood number ratios are reported. Correlations for the fully developed friction factors and for the loss coefficients are also provided.

  12. An insight into the heat and mass transfer mechanisms of eggshells hatching broiler chicks and its effects to the hatcher environment.

    PubMed

    Romanini, C E B; Exadaktylos, V; Hong, S W; Tong, Q; McGonnell, I; Demmers, T G M; Bergoug, H; Guinebretière, M; Eterradossi, N; Roulston, N; Verhelst, R; Bahr, C; Berckmans, D

    2015-02-01

    Thermodynamic study of incubated eggs is an important component in the optimisation of incubation processes. However, research on the interaction of heat and moisture transfer mechanisms in eggs is rather limited and does not focus on the hatching stage of incubation. During hatch, both the recently hatched chick and the broken eggshell add extra heat and moisture contents to the hatcher environment. In this study, we have proposed a novel way to estimate thermodynamically the amount of water evaporated from a broken eggshell during hatch. The hypothesis of this study considers that previously reported drops in eggshell temperature during hatching of chicks is the result remaining water content evaporating from the eggshell, released on the inner membrane by the recently hatched wet chick, just before hatch. To reproduce this process, water was sprayed on eggshells to mimic the water-fluid from the wet body of a chick. For each sample of eggshell, the shell geometry and weight, surface area and eggshell temperature were measured. Water evaporation losses and convection coefficient were calculated using a novel model approach considering the simultaneous heat and mass transfer profiles in an eggshell. The calculated average convective coefficient was 23.9 ± 7.5 W/m(2) °C, similar to previously reported coefficients in literature as a function of 0.5-1m/s air speed range. Comparison between measured and calculated values for the water evaporation showed 68% probability accuracy, associated to the use of an experimentally derived single heat transfer coefficient. The results support our proposed modelling approach of heat and mass transfer mechanisms. Furthermore, by estimating the amount of evaporated water in an eggshell post-hatch, air humidity levels inside the hatcher can be optimised to ensure wet chicks dry properly while not dehydrating early hatching chicks.

  13. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Wall Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project 'Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology' at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube based system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report provides information about how variations in proportional counter radius and gas pressure in a typical coincident counter design might affect the observed signal from boron-lined tubes. A discussion comparing tubes to parallel plate counters is also included.

  14. Proportional hazards models with discrete frailty.

    PubMed

    Caroni, Chrys; Crowder, Martin; Kimber, Alan

    2010-07-01

    We extend proportional hazards frailty models for lifetime data to allow a negative binomial, Poisson, Geometric or other discrete distribution of the frailty variable. This might represent, for example, the unknown number of flaws in an item under test. Zero frailty corresponds to a limited failure model containing a proportion of units that never fail (long-term survivors). Ways of modifying the model to avoid this are discussed. The models are illustrated on a previously published set of data on failures of printed circuit boards and on new data on breaking strengths of samples of cord.

  15. Human body proportions explained on the basis of biomechanical principles.

    PubMed

    Witte, H; Preuschoft, H; Recknagel, S

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of theoretical biomechanics and of experiments, we investigated the mechanical requirements to which the body of a bipedally walking primate is subject, and the possibilities to meet these requirements with a minimum amount of energy. The least energy-consuming adaptation is clearly a body shape favourable for the preferred locomotion. Some characteristics of human body shape, in particular its proportions, could be identified as advantageous for fulfilling obvious biological roles or mechanical necessities. The characteristic length and the extended position of human hindlimbs make walking faster without additional input of energy. Mass distribution on the hindlimbs reduces the energy necessary for accelerating the swing limb after liftoff and for decelerating the swing limb before the heelstrike. Length and mass distribution in the forelimb gives it a pendulum length comparable to that of the hindlimb, so that both extremities swing at the same frequency. This swinging of the forelimbs counters in part the movements exerted by the moved hindlimbs on the trunk. The elongate and slim shape of the trunk provides great mass moments of inertia and that means stability against being flexed ventrally and dorsally by the forward and rearward movements of the heavy and long hindlimbs. Shoulder breadth in combination with the shallow shape of the thorax yield higher mass moments of inertia against the rotation of the trunk about a vertical axis than a cylindrical trunk shape. Further elongation of the hindlimbs is limited by the energy necessary for acceleration and deceleration, as well as for lifting them during the swing phase. In addition, the reaction forces exerted by the hindlimbs would expose the trunk to undue excursions if the proportions trunk length/limb length or trunk mass/limb mass would decrease. The above-noted kinetic requirements are partly in line, partly in conflict with the requirements of statics.

  16. Ratio, Proportion and Scaling. Mathematics Resource Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffer, Shirley Ann, Ed.

    The Mathematics Resource Project has as its goal the production of topical resources for teachers, drawn from the vast amounts of available material. This experimental edition on Ratio, Proportion, and Scaling, contains a teaching emphasis section, a classroom materials section, and teacher commentaries. The teaching emphasis section stresses…

  17. Augmented mixed models for clustered proportion data

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Galvis, Diana M; Lachos, Victor H

    2015-01-01

    Often in biomedical research, we deal with continuous (clustered) proportion responses ranging between zero and one quantifying the disease status of the cluster units. Interestingly, the study population might also consist of relatively disease-free as well as highly diseased subjects, contributing to proportion values in the interval [0, 1]. Regression on a variety of parametric densities with support lying in (0, 1), such as beta regression, can assess important covariate effects. However, they are deemed inappropriate due to the presence of zeros and/or ones. To evade this, we introduce a class of general proportion density, and further augment the probabilities of zero and one to this general proportion density, controlling for the clustering. Our approach is Bayesian and presents a computationally convenient framework amenable to available freeware. Bayesian case-deletion influence diagnostics based on q-divergence measures are automatic from the Markov chain Monte Carlo output. The methodology is illustrated using both simulation studies and application to a real dataset from a clinical periodontology study. PMID:25491718

  18. Golden Proportions for the Generalized Tribonacci Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Devbhadra V.; Mehta, Darshana A.

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the ratios of consecutive terms of Fibonacci and Tribonacci sequences converge to the fixed ratio. In this article, we consider the generalized form of Tribonacci numbers and derive the "golden proportion" for the whole family of this generalized sequence. (Contains 2 tables.)

  19. Canine Conjectures: Using Data for Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westenskow, Arla; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.

    2011-01-01

    No person, place, or thing can capture the attention of a class of sixth graders like "man's best friend." To prompt students' interest in a series of lessons on proportional relationships, the authors brought in a unique teaching aid--a dog. A family dog was used to supply the measurements for scatter plots and variables so that students could…

  20. Kitchen Gardens: Contexts for Developing Proportional Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff; Dole, Shelley; Goos, Merrilyn; O'Brien, Mia

    2013-01-01

    It is great to see how the sharing of ideas sparks new ideas. In 2011 Lyon and Bragg wrote an "Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom" (APMC) article on the mathematics of kitchen gardens. In this article the authors show how the kitchen garden may be used as a starting point for proportional reasoning. The authors highlight different…

  1. Heat and mass transfer scale-up issues during freeze-drying, I: atypical radiation and the edge vial effect.

    PubMed

    Rambhatla, Shailaja; Pikal, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether radiation heat transfer is responsible for the position dependence of heat transfer known as the edge vial effect. Freeze drying was performed on a laboratory-scale freeze dryer using pure water with vials that were fully stoppered but had precision cut metal tubes inserted in them to ensure uniformity in resistance to vapor flow. Sublimation rates were determined gravimetrically. Vials were sputter-coated with gold and placed at selected positions on the shelf. Average sublimation rates were determined for vials located at the front, side, and center of an array of vials. Sublimation rates were also determined with and without the use of aluminum foil as a radiation shield. The effect of the guardrail material and its contribution to the edge vial effect by conduction heat transfer was studied by replacing the stainless steel band with a low-thermal conductivity material (styrofoam). The emissivities (epsilon) of relevant surfaces were measured using an infrared thermometer. Sublimation rate experiments were also conducted with vials suspended off the shelf to study the role of convection heat transfer. It was found that sublimation rates were significantly higher for vials located in the front compared to vials in the center. Additional radiation shields in the form of aluminum foil on the inside door resulted in a decrease in sublimation rates for the front vials and to a lesser extent, the center vials. There was a significant decrease in sublimation rate for gold-coated vials (epsilon approximately 0.4) placed at the front of an array when compared to that of clear vials (epsilon approximately 0.9). In the case of experiments with vials suspended off the shelf, the heat transfer coefficient was found to be independent of chamber pressure, indicating that pure convection plays no significant role in heat transfer. Higher sublimation rates were observed when the steel band was used instead of Styrofoam while the

  2. Endoplasmic reticulium protein profiling of heat-stressed Jurkat cells by one dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiulian; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Ma, Aiguo; Zhang, Hui; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Proteomic study on membrane-integrated proteins in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fractions was performed. In this study, we examined the effects of heat stress on Jurkat cells. The ER fractions were highly purified by differential centrifugation with sodium carbonate washing and acetone methanol precipitations. The ER membrane proteins were separated by one dimensional electrophoresis (1-DE), and some of the protein bands changed their abundance by heat stress, 12 of the 14 bands containing 40 and 60 ribosomal proteins whose expression level were decreased, on the contrary, 2 of the 14 bands containing ubiquitin and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 were increased. Heat treatment of human Jurkat cells led to an increase in the phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α within 30 min of exposure. This was followed by an increase in the expression of the GRP78. Protein ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome are important mechanisms regulating cell cycle, growth and differentiation, the result showed that heat stress enhanced ubiquitination modification of the microsomal proteins. The data of this study strongly suggest that heat treatment led to a significant reduction in protein expression and activated UPR, concomitant with protein hyperubiqutination in ER.

  3. Intermediate Moral Respect and Proportionality Reasoning.

    PubMed

    Finegan, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In a recent article in this journal Jonathan Pugh critiques the idea of intermediate 'moral respect' which some say is owed to embryos. This concept is inherent within the 'principle of proportionality', the principle that destructive research on embryos is permissable only if the research serves an important purpose. Pugh poses two specific questions to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. This article argues that while the questions posed by Pugh are certainly pertinent to the debate, the hypothetical responses he suggests to these questions do not quite get to the core of what is troublesome about the concept. The article suggests alternative responses to Pugh's questions in order to focus attention on more fundamental problems facing the idea of intermediate moral respect, while also pointing to how the intermediate moral respect proponent might best develop these responses. It goes on to argue that these hypothetical responses fail to answer convincingly the questions posed. More specifically, this article challenges two possible justifications for the distinct idea of intermediate moral respect, namely the argument from potentiality (the argument raised by Pugh) and an argument from the proportionality of fundamental moral status (not considered by Pugh). The article also raises a dilemma inherent in the application of the principle of proportionality to cases involving beings to which intermediate moral respect is owed even where it is allowed, ex hypothesi, that both the category of intermediate moral respect and the general proportionality reasoning underpinning the principle of proportionality are basically cogent. This article thus develops and adds to the challenge laid down by Pugh to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. PMID:27212688

  4. Intermediate Moral Respect and Proportionality Reasoning.

    PubMed

    Finegan, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In a recent article in this journal Jonathan Pugh critiques the idea of intermediate 'moral respect' which some say is owed to embryos. This concept is inherent within the 'principle of proportionality', the principle that destructive research on embryos is permissable only if the research serves an important purpose. Pugh poses two specific questions to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. This article argues that while the questions posed by Pugh are certainly pertinent to the debate, the hypothetical responses he suggests to these questions do not quite get to the core of what is troublesome about the concept. The article suggests alternative responses to Pugh's questions in order to focus attention on more fundamental problems facing the idea of intermediate moral respect, while also pointing to how the intermediate moral respect proponent might best develop these responses. It goes on to argue that these hypothetical responses fail to answer convincingly the questions posed. More specifically, this article challenges two possible justifications for the distinct idea of intermediate moral respect, namely the argument from potentiality (the argument raised by Pugh) and an argument from the proportionality of fundamental moral status (not considered by Pugh). The article also raises a dilemma inherent in the application of the principle of proportionality to cases involving beings to which intermediate moral respect is owed even where it is allowed, ex hypothesi, that both the category of intermediate moral respect and the general proportionality reasoning underpinning the principle of proportionality are basically cogent. This article thus develops and adds to the challenge laid down by Pugh to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect.

  5. Extreme ion heating in the dayside ionosphere in response to the arrival of a coronal mass ejection on 12 March 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, H.; Nozawa, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Kataoka, R.; Miyoshi, Y.; Jin, H.; Shinagawa, H.

    2014-07-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the polar ionosphere with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) ultra high frequency (UHF) radar at Tromsø and the EISCAT Svalbard radar (ESR) at Longyearbyen were made during 07:00-12:00 UT on 12 March 2012. During the period, the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft observed changes in the solar wind which were due to the arrival of coronal mass ejection (CME) effects associated with the 10 March M8.4 X-ray event. The solar wind showed two-step variations which caused strong ionospheric heating. First, the arrival of shock structures in the solar wind with enhancements of density and velocity, and a negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF)-Bz component caused strong ionospheric heating around Longyearbyen; the ion temperature at about 300 km increased from about 1100 to 3400 K over Longyearbyen while that over Tromsø increased from about 1050 to 1200 K. After the passage of the shock structures, the IMF-Bz component showed positive values and the solar wind speed and density also decreased. The second strong ionospheric heating occurred after the IMF-Bz component showed negative values again; the negative values lasted for more than 1.5 h. This solar wind variation caused stronger heating of the ionosphere in the lower latitudes than higher latitudes, suggesting expansion of the auroral oval/heating region to the lower latitude region. This study shows an example of the CME-induced dayside ionospheric heating: a short-duration and very large rise in the ion temperature which was closely related to the polar cap size and polar cap potential variations as a result of interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere.

  6. Numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in the nozzle and expansion unit of the separator-steam-generator system in waste-heat utilization complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, V. I.; Minko, K. B.; Yan'kov, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    Homogeneous equilibrium and nonequilibrium (relaxation) models are used to simulate flash boiling flows in nozzles. The simulation were performed using the author's CFD-code ANES. Existing experimental data are used to test the realized mathematical model and the modified algorithms of ANES CFD-code. The results of test calculations are presented, together with data obtained for the nozzle and expansion unit of the steam generator and separator in the waste-heat system at ZAO NPVP Turbokon. The SIMPLE algorithm may be used for the transonic and supersonic flashing liquid flow. The relaxation model yields better agreement with experimental data regarding the distribution of void fraction along the nozzle axis. For the given class of flow, the difference between one- and two-dimensional models is slight.

  7. Heat-Treatment-Responsive Proteins in Different Developmental Stages of Tomato Pollen Detected by Targeted Mass Accuracy Precursor Alignment (tMAPA).

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Palak; Doerfler, Hannes; Jegadeesan, Sridharan; Ghatak, Arindam; Pressman, Etan; Castillejo, Maria Angeles; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Egelhofer, Volker; Firon, Nurit; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2015-11-01

    Recently, we have developed a quantitative shotgun proteomics strategy called mass accuracy precursor alignment (MAPA). The MAPA algorithm uses high mass accuracy to bin mass-to-charge (m/z) ratios of precursor ions from LC-MS analyses, determines their intensities, and extracts a quantitative sample versus m/z ratio data alignment matrix from a multitude of samples. Here, we introduce a novel feature of this algorithm that allows the extraction and alignment of proteotypic peptide precursor ions or any other target peptide from complex shotgun proteomics data for accurate quantification of unique proteins. This strategy circumvents the problem of confusing the quantification of proteins due to indistinguishable protein isoforms by a typical shotgun proteomics approach. We applied this strategy to a comparison of control and heat-treated tomato pollen grains at two developmental stages, post-meiotic and mature. Pollen is a temperature-sensitive tissue involved in the reproductive cycle of plants and plays a major role in fruit setting and yield. By LC-MS-based shotgun proteomics, we identified more than 2000 proteins in total for all different tissues. By applying the targeted MAPA data-processing strategy, 51 unique proteins were identified as heat-treatment-responsive protein candidates. The potential function of the identified candidates in a specific developmental stage is discussed.

  8. Funnel-freezing versus heat-stabilization for the visualization of metabolites by mass spectrometry imaging in a mouse stroke model.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Inge A; Esteve, Clara; Wermer, Marieke J H; Hoehn, Mathias; Tolner, Else A; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; McDonnell, Liam A

    2016-06-01

    Tissue preparation is the key to a successful matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) experiment. Rapid post-mortem changes contribute a significant challenge to the use of MSI approaches for the analysis of peptides and metabolites. In this technical note we aimed to compare the tissue fixation method ex-vivo heat-stabilization with in-situ funnel-freezing in a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) mouse model of stroke, which causes profound alterations in metabolite concentrations. The influence of the duration of the thaw-mounting of the tissue sections on metabolite stability was also determined. We demonstrate improved stability and biomolecule visualization when funnel-freezing was used to sacrifice the mouse compared with heat-stabilization. Results were further improved when funnel-freezing was combined with fast thaw-mounting of the brain sections. PMID:26959721

  9. Near-Horizontal, Two-Phase Flow Patterns of Nitrogen and Hydrogen at Low Mass Heat and Flux (on CD-ROM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanDresar, N. T.; Siegwarth, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    One reason for NASA's interest in cryogenic two-phase flow with low mass and heat flux is the need to design spacecraft heat exchangers used for vaporizing cryogenic propellants. The CD-ROM provides digitized movies of particular flow patterns observed in experimental work. The movies have been provided in (QuickTime9Trademark) format, encoded at 320w x 240h pixels, 15 fps, using the Sorenson(Trademark) Video Codec for compression. Experiments were conducted to obtain data on the two-phase (liquid and vapor) flow behavior of cryogenic nitrogen and hydrogen under low mass and heat flux conditions. Tests were performed in normal gravity with a 1.5 degree up flow configuration. View ports in the apparatus permitted visual observation of the two-phase flow patterns. Computer codes to predict flow patterns were developed from theoretical/empirical models reported in the literature. Predictions from the computer codes were compared with experimental flow pattern observations. Results are presented employing the traditional two-dimensional flow pattern map format using the liquid and gas superficial velocities as coordinates. In general, the agreement between the experimental results and the analytical predictive methods is reasonably good. Small regions of the flow pattern maps are identified where the models are deficient as a result of neglecting phase change phenomena. Certain regions of the maps were beyond the range of the experiments and could not be completely validated. Areas that could benefit from further work include modeling of the transition from separated flow, collection of additional data in the bubble and annular flow regimes, and collection of experimental data at other inclination angles, tube diameters and high heat flux.

  10. Heat and Mass Transfer Modeling of Apple Slice under Simultaneous Infrared Dry-Blanching and Dehydration Process

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To develop a new simultaneous infrared dry blanching and dehydration process for producing high-quality blanched and partially dehydrated products, apple slices with three different thicknesses, 5, 9, and 13 mm, were heated using infrared for up to 10 min at 4000W/m2 IR intensity. The surface and ce...

  11. Three dimensional simulation of nucleate boiling heat and mass transfer in cooling passages of internal combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdipour, R.; Baniamerian, Z.; Delauré, Y.

    2016-05-01

    An accurate knowledge of heat transfer and temperature distribution in vehicle engines is essential to have a good management of heat transfer performance in combustion engines. This may be achieved by numerical simulation of flow through the engine cooling passages; but the task becomes particularly challenging when boiling occurs. Neglecting two phase flow processes in the simulation would however result in significant inaccuracy in the predictions. In this study a three dimensional numerical model is proposed using Fluent 6.3 to simulate heat transfer of fluid flowing through channels of conventional size. Results of the present theoretical and numerical model are then compared with some empirical results. For high fluid flow velocities, departure between experimental and numerical results is about 9 %, while for lower velocity conditions, the model inaccuracy increases to 18 %. One of the outstanding capabilities of the present model, beside its ability to simulate two phase fluid flow and heat transfer in three dimensions, is the prediction of the location of bubble formation and condensation which can be a key issue in the evaluation of the engine performance and thermal stresses.

  12. Proportional Reasoning of Preservice Elementary Education Majors: An Epistemic Model of the Proportional Reasoning Construct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleener, M. Jayne

    Current research and learning theory suggest that a hierarchy of proportional reasoning exists that can be tested. Using G. Vergnaud's four complexity variables (structure, content, numerical characteristics, and presentation) and T. E. Kieren's model of rational number knowledge building, an epistemic model of proportional reasoning was…

  13. Heat and mass transfer in a dissociated laminar boundary layer of air with consideration of the finite rate of chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyegbesan, A. O.; Algermissen, J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical investigation of heat and mass transfer in a dissociated laminar boundary layer of air on an isothermal flat plate is carried out for different degrees of cooling of the wall. A finite-difference chemical model is used to study elementary reactions involving NO2 and N2O. The analysis is based on equations of continuity, momentum, energy, conservation and state for the two-dimensional viscous flow of a reacting multicomponent mixtures. Attention is given to the effects of both catalyticity and noncatalyticity of the wall.

  14. Heavy Ion Heating at Shocks in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korreck, K. E.; Stevens, M. L.; Lepri, S. T.; Kasper, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Ions heavier than protons can be used as tracers for heating mechamisms in solar wind plasma. Measurments by the ACE and WIND satellites provide information on the relative heating of the heavy ions versus the protons. Greater than mass proportional heating has been seen at coronal mass ejections (CME) shock fronts. Using ACE SWICS heavy ions data from CME associated shocks, heavy ion heating and the non-thermal nature of helium and oxygen distributions at 1AU is examined. The WIND SWE data set is used to examine the helium distributions at the shock fronts observed at the spacecraft. Understanding the heating and source of energetic particles and their evolution through the heliosphere is relevant to predicting space weather events and the evolution of the solar wind.

  15. Processing of Numerical and Proportional Quantifiers.

    PubMed

    Shikhare, Sailee; Heim, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Huber, Stefan; Willmes, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Quantifier expressions like "many" and "at least" are part of a rich repository of words in language representing magnitude information. The role of numerical processing in comprehending quantifiers was studied in a semantic truth value judgment task, asking adults to quickly verify sentences about visual displays using numerical (at least seven, at least thirteen, at most seven, at most thirteen) or proportional (many, few) quantifiers. The visual displays were composed of systematically varied proportions of yellow and blue circles. The results demonstrated that numerical estimation and numerical reference information are fundamental in encoding the meaning of quantifiers in terms of response times and acceptability judgments. However, a difference emerges in the comparison strategies when a fixed external reference numerosity (seven or thirteen) is used for numerical quantifiers, whereas an internal numerical criterion is invoked for proportional quantifiers. Moreover, for both quantifier types, quantifier semantics and its polarity (positive vs. negative) biased the response direction (accept/reject). Overall, our results indicate that quantifier comprehension involves core numerical and lexical semantic properties, demonstrating integrated processing of language and numbers. PMID:25631283

  16. NASA CONNECT: Proportionality: Modeling the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    'Proportionality: Modeling the Future' is the sixth of seven programs in the 1999-2000 NASA CONNECT series. Produced by NASA Langley Research Center's Office of Education, NASA CONNECT is an award-winning series of instructional programs designed to enhance the teaching of math, science and technology concepts in grades 5-8. NASA CONNECT establishes the 'connection' between the mathematics, science, and technology concepts taught in the classroom and NASA research. Each program in the series supports the national mathematics, science, and technology standards; includes a resource-rich teacher guide; and uses a classroom experiment and web-based activity to complement and enhance the math, science, and technology concepts presented in the program. NASA CONNECT is FREE and the programs in the series are in the public domain. Visit our web site and register. http://connect.larc.nasa.gov 'Proportionality: Modeling the Future', students will examine how patterns, measurement, ratios, and proportions are used in the research, development, and production of airplanes.

  17. Evaluation of Facial Beauty Using Anthropometric Proportions

    PubMed Central

    Milutinovic, Jovana

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of a patient's facial appearance is one of the main goals of contemporary orthodontic treatment. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the difference in facial proportions between attractive and anonymous females in order to establish objective facial features which are widely considered as beautiful. The study included two groups: first group consisted of 83 Caucasian female subjects between 22 and 28 years of age who were selected from the population of students at the University of Belgrade, and the second group included 24 attractive celebrity Caucasian females. The en face facial photographs were taken in natural head position (NHP). Numerous parameters were recorded on these photographs, in order to establish facial symmetry and correlation with the ideal set of proportions. This study showed significant difference between anonymous and attractive females. Attractive females showed smaller face in general and uniformity of the facial thirds and fifths, and most of the facial parameters meet the criteria of the ideal proportions. PMID:24701166

  18. The PEP Quark Search Proportional Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. I.; Harris, F.; Karliner, I.; Yount, D.; Ely, R.; Hamilton, R.; Pun, T.; Guryn, W.; Miller, D.; Fries, R.

    1981-04-01

    Proportional chambers are used in the PEP Free Quark Search to identify and remove possible background sources such as particles traversing the edges of counters, to permit geometric corrections to the dE/dx and TOF information from the scintillator and Cerenkov counters, and to look for possible high cross section quarks. The present beam pipe has a thickness of 0.007 interaction lengths (λi) and is followed in both arms (each with 45° <= θ <= 135°. Δphi = 90°) by 5 proportional chambers, each 0.0008 λi thick with 32 channels of pulse height readout, and by 3 thin scintillator planes, each 0.003 λi thick. Following this thin front end, each arm of the detector has 8 layers of scintillator (one with scintillating light pipes) interspersed with 4 proportional chambers and a layer of lucite Cerenkov counters. Both the calculated ion statistics and measurements using He-CH4 gas in a test chamber indicate that the chamber efficiencies should be > 98% for q = 1/3. The Landau spread measured in the test was equal to that observed for normal q = 1 traversals. One scintillator plane and thin chamber in each arm will have an extra set of ADC's with a wide gate bracketing the normal one so timing errors and tails of earlier pulses should not produce fake quarks.

  19. The use of polycarbonate in proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Trow, M.; Smith, A. )

    1992-01-01

    Proportional counters are relatively sensitive to contamination through outgassing and the range of electrical insulators suitable for use in their manufacture is quite limited. Although small amounts of plastics such as polychlorotrifluoroethylene have been used as feedthroughs, ceramics are most commonly used when sealed counters with long lives are required. Ceramics have poor and widely scattered mechanical properties and the use of a more robust material is often highly desirable. Of particular interest is the use of polymers and this work examines polycarbonate in particular. To investigate its suitability in terms of outgassing a simple cylindrical, single anode proportional counter containing a large sample of polycarbonate was baked at {similar to}100 {degree}C and filled with a CO{sub 2}/Ar/Xe mixture (5:47.5:47.5 by pressure, respectively). Subsequent measurements of the counter indicated an increase in gain, which, after a second similar filling, was identified to be associated with a preferential loss of CO{sub 2} to the polycarbonate. The consequences of this result and the circumstances under which polycarbonate could be used on a large scale in the construction of proportional counters are discussed.

  20. A study of heat and mass transfer in a fractional MHD flow over an infinite oscillating plate.

    PubMed

    Shahid, N

    2015-01-01

    Exact expressions of velocity, temperature and mass concentration have been calculated for free convective flow of fractional MHD viscous fluid over an oscillating plate. Expressions of velocity have been obtained both for sine and cosine oscillations of plate. Corresponding fractional differential equations have been solved by using Laplace transform and inverse Laplace transform. The expression of temperature and mass concentration have been presented in the form of Fox-H function and in the form of general Wright function, respectively and velocity is presented in the form of integral solutions using Generalized function. Some limiting cases of fluid and fractional parameters have been discussed to retrieve some solutions present in literature. The influence of thermal radiation, mass diffusion and fractional parameters on fluid flow has been analyzed through graphical illustrations. PMID:26543774

  1. Computer simulation of heat and mass transfer in tissue during high-intensity long-range laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Director, L B; Frid, S E; Mendeleev VYa; Scovorod'Ko, S N

    1998-09-11

    Three-dimensional transient finite difference numerical model of the biological tissue irradiated by powerful laser beam is developed. It is used to simulate the thermal behavior of tissue assuming that radiation wavelength is chosen to give rise for volumetric heat sources. A three-dimensional seven-flow model is used to calculate radiation propagation. Evaporation and burn-out of tissue resulting in a through hole along the axis of the beam are taken into account. Besides the water boiling and corresponding changes of thermal and optical tissue properties the model takes into account one of the heat steam transfer mechanisms. Estimates are carried out for the effects of diffusion transfer and vaporization of water from the tissue surface. Kinetics of protein denaturation process are calculated by Arrenius equation. The problem is solved numerically using discrete grid technique and adaptive time-step control algorithm.

  2. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna.

  3. Sauna, sweat and science - quantifying the proportion of condensation water versus sweat using a stable water isotope ((2)H/(1)H and (18)O/(16)O) tracer experiment.

    PubMed

    Zech, Michael; Bösel, Stefanie; Tuthorn, Mario; Benesch, Marianne; Dubbert, Maren; Cuntz, Matthias; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Most visitors of a sauna appreciate the heat pulse that is perceived when water is poured on the stones of a sauna stove. However, probably only few bathers are aware that this pleasant heat pulse is caused by latent heat being released onto our skin due to condensation of water vapour. In order to quantify the proportion of condensation water versus sweat to dripping water of test persons we conducted sauna experiments using isotopically labelled (δ(18)O and δ(2)H) thrown water as tracer. This allows differentiating between 'pure sweat' and 'condensation water'. Two ways of isotope mass balance calculations were applied and yielded similar results for both water isotopes. Accordingly, condensation contributed considerably to dripping water with mean proportions of 52 ± 12 and 54 ± 7% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2011/12 and 30 ± 13 and 33 ± 6% in a sauna experiment in winter semester 2012/13, respectively, depending on the way of calculating the isotope mass balance. It can be concluded from the results of our dual isotope labelling sauna experiment that it is not all about sweat in the sauna. PMID:26110629

  4. Heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-02-02

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections.

  5. Mass, Energy, Space And Time Systemic Theory--MEST-- heat and cold, positive electron and negative electron, up isopin and down isospin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2010-03-01

    Things have their physical system of the mass, energy, space and time of themselves-MEST. The time is from the frequency of wave, the spac is from the amplitude of wave. Sun can radiate the repulsion (energy) wave and can absorb the absorptive (mass) wave. And the radiate wave give the planets the repulsion force; the absorptive wave give the planets the gravity. The the gravity equal the repulsion force. By the same way, the nuclear have the radiate wave and the absorptive wave like the electromagnetic wave. And it give the electrons the repulsion force and the gravity like the electromagnetic force. Like charges repel each other, unlike charges attract. By the same way, Like energy (like cold and heat) repel each other, unlike temperature energy (like cold and heat) attract. So the orbit of the planets is quantization system model like the one of the electron. By the same way, the the proton have the radiate wave and the absorptive wave like the baryon-lepton wave. And it give the neutron the repulsion force and the gravity like the Strong-Weak Force. By the same way, Like isospin repel each other, unlike isospin attract. So the electromagnetic wave system modem is like the one of the baryon-lepton wave. All of their system model are the double shell structure.

  6. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to determine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2SO4 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  7. Modeling and validation of heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during the coffee roasting process using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    PubMed

    Alonso-Torres, Beatriz; Hernández-Pérez, José Alfredo; Sierra-Espinoza, Fernando; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2013-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during roasting were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Numerical equations for heat and mass transfer inside the coffee bean were solved using the finite volume technique in the commercial CFD code Fluent; the software was complemented with specific user-defined functions (UDFs). To experimentally validate the numerical model, a single coffee bean was placed in a cylindrical glass tube and roasted by a hot air flow, using the identical geometrical 3D configuration and hot air flow conditions as the ones used for numerical simulations. Temperature and humidity calculations obtained with the model were compared with experimental data. The model predicts the actual process quite accurately and represents a useful approach to monitor the coffee roasting process in real time. It provides valuable information on time-resolved process variables that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, but critical to a better understanding of the coffee roasting process at the individual bean level. This includes variables such as time-resolved 3D profiles of bean temperature and moisture content, and temperature profiles of the roasting air in the vicinity of the coffee bean.

  8. Modeling and validation of heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during the coffee roasting process using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

    PubMed

    Alonso-Torres, Beatriz; Hernández-Pérez, José Alfredo; Sierra-Espinoza, Fernando; Schenker, Stefan; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2013-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer in individual coffee beans during roasting were simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Numerical equations for heat and mass transfer inside the coffee bean were solved using the finite volume technique in the commercial CFD code Fluent; the software was complemented with specific user-defined functions (UDFs). To experimentally validate the numerical model, a single coffee bean was placed in a cylindrical glass tube and roasted by a hot air flow, using the identical geometrical 3D configuration and hot air flow conditions as the ones used for numerical simulations. Temperature and humidity calculations obtained with the model were compared with experimental data. The model predicts the actual process quite accurately and represents a useful approach to monitor the coffee roasting process in real time. It provides valuable information on time-resolved process variables that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, but critical to a better understanding of the coffee roasting process at the individual bean level. This includes variables such as time-resolved 3D profiles of bean temperature and moisture content, and temperature profiles of the roasting air in the vicinity of the coffee bean. PMID:23967709

  9. Determination of convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to burner rig test targets comparable in size to cross-stream jet diameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to be able to predict the convective diffusion heat/mass transfer rates to a cylindrical target whose height and diameter are comparable to, but less than, the diameter of the circular cross-stream jet, thereby simulating the same geometric configuration as a typical burner rig test specimen located in the cross-stream of the combustor exit nozzlle. The first set exploits the naphthalene sublimation technique to detetermine the heat/mass transfer coefficient under isothermal conditions for various flow rates (Reynolds numbers). The second set, conducted at various combustion temperatures and Reynolds numbers, utilized the temperature variation along the surface of the above-mentioned target under steady-state conditions to estimate the effect of cooling (dilution) due to the entrainment of stagnant room temperature air. The experimental information obtained is used to predict high temperature, high velocity corrosive salt vapor deposition rates in burner rigs on collectors that are geometrically the same. The agreement with preliminary data obtained from Na2S04 vapor deposition experiments is found to be excellent.

  10. Tissue equivalent proportional counter neutron monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.C.; Strode, J.N.

    1980-06-01

    The Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) is a sensitive area monitoring instrument that can be used either in place at fixed locations or as a portable neutron exposure measuring device. The system monitors low levels of neutron radiation exposure and has the capability of accurately measuring neutron exposure rates as low as 0.1 mrem/hr. The computerized analysis system calculates the quality factor which is important for situations where the neutron to gamma ratio may vary significantly and irregularly such as in fuel fabrication or handling facilities.

  11. Neutron spectrometry with He-3 proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Manolopoulou, M.; Fragopoulou, M.; Stoulos, S.; Vagena, E.; Westmeier, W.; Zamani, M.

    2011-07-01

    Helium filled proportional counters are widely used in the field of neutron detection and spectrometry. In this work the response of a commercially available He-3 counter is studied experimentally and calculated with Monte Carlo for the neutron energy range from 230 keV up to about 7 MeV. The calculated response of the system is used to determine neutron yield energy distribution emitted from an extended {sup nat}U/Pb assembly irradiated with 1.6 GeV deuterons. The results are in acceptable agreement with the calculated neutron distribution with DCM-DEM code. (authors)

  12. Double-diffusive convection as a mechanism for transferring heat and mass within the Salton Sea geothermal brine

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Robert O.

    1988-01-01

    H. C. Helgeson noted in 1968 that the salinity of the brine in the geothermal reservoir within the Salton Sea geothermal system generally increases from the top to the bottom and from the center to the sides. He also noted that pressure measurements at perforations in cased wells seemed to indicate that the formation fluids at the depths of production have a specific density about equal to 1, and that hot concentrated brines apparently exist in pressure equilibrium with comparatively cold dilute pore waters in the surrounding rocks. Since 1968 there have been no published reports that dispute these observations. However, a very high heat flux through the top of the system seems to require a substantial component of convective transfer of heat beneath an impermeable cap, whereas the apparent salinity gradient with depth seems to require little or no free convection of brine. This paradox may be resolved if double-diffusive convection is the main process that controls the depth-temperature-salinity relations. Such convection provides a mechanism for transferring heat from the bottom to the top of the hydrothermal system while maintaining vertical and horizontal salinity gradients—densities remaining close to unity. In 1981, Griffiths showed experimentally that layered double-diffusive convection cells may develop in porous media when hot saline waters underlie more dilute cooler waters. However, nagging questions remain about whether fluid densities within the Salton Sea geothermal system really adjust to unity in response to changing temperature and salinity at depths greater than about 1 km. The State 2-14 well, the Salton Sea Scientific Drill Hole, has provided one high-quality data point for a depth interval of 1,865-1,877 m, where the temperature is about 305º C. The calculated density of the pre-flashed reservoir fluid sampled from that depth is 1.0008 ± 0.0023.

  13. Effect of Non-Condensable Gas Mass Fraction on Condensation Heat Transfer for Water-Ethanol Vapor Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shixue; Utaka, Yoshio

    The condensation heat transfer characteristic curves for a ternary vapor mixture of water, ethanol and air (or nitrogen) under several ethanol concentrations and relatively low concentrations of air (or nitrogen) were measured. The effect of non-condensable gas on several different domains in the condensation curves was discussed. The effect of non-condensable gas in the domains controlled by the diffusion resistance and the filmwise condensation was not notable; whereas that in the domain dominated by the condensate resistance of dropwise mode was remarkable. Moreover, variations due to changes in non-condensable gas concentration of several characteristic points representing the curves were discussed.

  14. Effect of rib angle on local heat/mass transfer distribution in a two-pass rib-roughened channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, P. R.; Han, J. C.; Lau, S. C.

    1987-01-01

    The naphthalene sublimation technique is used to investigate the heat transfer characteristics of turbulent air flow in a two-pass channel. A test section that resembles the internal cooling passages of gas turbine airfoils is employed. The local Sherwood numbers on the ribbed walls were found to be 1.5-6.5 times those for a fully developed flow in a smooth square duct. Depending on the rib angle-of-attack and the Reynolds number, the average ribbed-wall Sherwood numbers were 2.5-3.5 times higher than the fully developed values.

  15. Model of Heat and Mass Transfer in Random Packing Layer of Powder Particles in Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, I.; Kovalev, O.; Smurov, I.

    Discretegrid model of heat transfer in granular porous mediumto describe the processes of selective laser melting of powdersis developed. The thermal conductivity in this mediumis performed through thecontact surfaces between the particles. The calculation method of morphology of random packing layer of powder considering the adhesive interaction between the particles is proposed. The internal structure of the obtained loose powder layer is a granular medium where spherical particles of different sizes are arranged in contact with each other randomly. Analytical models of powder balling process and formation of the remelted track are proposed.

  16. Energy Proportionality for Disk Storage Using Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jinoh; Rotem, Doron

    2010-09-09

    Energy saving has become a crucial concern in datacenters as several reports predict that the anticipated energy costs over a three year period will exceed hardware acquisition. In particular, saving energy for storage is of major importance as storage devices (and cooling them off) may contribute over 25 percent of the total energy consumed in a datacenter. Recent work introduced the concept of energy proportionality and argued that it is a more relevant metric than just energy saving as it takes into account the tradeoff between energy consumption and performance. In this paper, we present a novel approach, called FREP (Fractional Replication for Energy Proportionality), for energy management in large datacenters. FREP includes areplication strategy and basic functions to enable flexible energy management. Specifically, our method provides performance guarantees by adaptively controlling the power states of a group of disks based on observed and predicted workloads. Our experiments, using a set of real and synthetic traces, show that FREP dramatically reduces energy requirements with a minimal response time penalty.

  17. ProPortal: A Database for Prochlorococcus

    DOE Data Explorer

    Huang, Katherine [Chisholm lab, MIT

    Prochlorococcus is a marine cyanobacterium that numerically dominates the mid-latitude oceans, and is the smallest known oxygenic phototroph. All isolates described thus far can be assigned to either a tightly clustered high-light (HL) adapted clade, or a more divergent low-light (LL) adapted group. They are closely related to, but distinct from, marine Synechococcus. The genomes of 12 strains have been sequenced and they range in size from 1.6 to 2.6 Mbp. They represent diverse lineages, spanning the rRNA diversity (97 to 99.93% similarity) of cultured representatives of this group. Our analyses of these genomes inform our understanding of how adaptation occurs in the oceans along gradients of light, nutrients, and other environmental factors, providing essential context for interpreting rapidly expanding metagenomic datasets. [Copied from http://proportal.mit.edu/project/prochlorococcus/] ProPortal allows users to browse and search genome date for not only Prochlorococcus, but Cyanophage and Synechococcus. Microarray data, environmental cell concentration data, and metagenome information are also available.

  18. Kalman-predictive-proportional-integral-derivative (KPPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Fluerasu, A.; Sutton, M.

    2004-12-17

    With third generation synchrotron X-ray sources, it is possible to acquire detailed structural information about the system under study with time resolution orders of magnitude faster than was possible a few years ago. These advances have generated many new challenges for changing and controlling the state of the system on very short time scales, in a uniform and controlled manner. For our particular X-ray experiments on crystallization or order-disorder phase transitions in metallic alloys, we need to change the sample temperature by hundreds of degrees as fast as possible while avoiding over or under shooting. To achieve this, we designed and implemented a computer-controlled temperature tracking system which combines standard Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) feedback, thermal modeling and finite difference thermal calculations (feedforward), and Kalman filtering of the temperature readings in order to reduce the noise. The resulting Kalman-Predictive-Proportional-Integral-Derivative (KPPID) algorithm allows us to obtain accurate control, to minimize the response time and to avoid over/under shooting, even in systems with inherently noisy temperature readings and time delays. The KPPID temperature controller was successfully implemented at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratories and was used to perform coherent and time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments.

  19. Atmosphere expansion and mass loss of close-orbit giant exoplanets heated by stellar XUV. I. Modeling of hydrodynamic escape of upper atmospheric material

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Sasunov, Yu. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Erkaev, N. V.

    2014-11-10

    In the present series of papers we propose a consistent description of the mass loss process. To study in a comprehensive way the effects of the intrinsic magnetic field of a close-orbit giant exoplanet (a so-called hot Jupiter) on atmospheric material escape and the formation of a planetary inner magnetosphere, we start with a hydrodynamic model of an upper atmosphere expansion in this paper. While considering a simple hydrogen atmosphere model, we focus on the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of radiative heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas with its consequent expansion in the outer space. Primary attention is paid to an investigation of the role of the specific conditions at the inner and outer boundaries of the simulation domain, under which different regimes of material escape (free and restricted flow) are formed. A comparative study is performed of different processes, such as X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) heating, material ionization and recombination, H{sub 3}{sup +} cooling, adiabatic and Lyα cooling, and Lyα reabsorption. We confirm the basic consistency of the outcomes of our modeling with the results of other hydrodynamic models of expanding planetary atmospheres. In particular, we determine that, under the typical conditions of an orbital distance of 0.05 AU around a Sun-type star, a hot Jupiter plasma envelope may reach maximum temperatures up to ∼9000 K with a hydrodynamic escape speed of ∼9 km s{sup –1}, resulting in mass loss rates of ∼(4-7) · 10{sup 10} g s{sup –1}. In the range of the considered stellar-planetary parameters and XUV fluxes, that is close to the mass loss in the energy-limited case. The inclusion of planetary intrinsic magnetic fields in the model is a subject of the follow-up paper (Paper II).

  20. Atmosphere Expansion and Mass Loss of Close-orbit Giant Exoplanets Heated by Stellar XUV. I. Modeling of Hydrodynamic Escape of Upper Atmospheric Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Sasunov, Yu. L.; Lammer, H.; Kislyakova, K. G.; Erkaev, N. V.

    2014-11-01

    In the present series of papers we propose a consistent description of the mass loss process. To study in a comprehensive way the effects of the intrinsic magnetic field of a close-orbit giant exoplanet (a so-called hot Jupiter) on atmospheric material escape and the formation of a planetary inner magnetosphere, we start with a hydrodynamic model of an upper atmosphere expansion in this paper. While considering a simple hydrogen atmosphere model, we focus on the self-consistent inclusion of the effects of radiative heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas with its consequent expansion in the outer space. Primary attention is paid to an investigation of the role of the specific conditions at the inner and outer boundaries of the simulation domain, under which different regimes of material escape (free and restricted flow) are formed. A comparative study is performed of different processes, such as X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) heating, material ionization and recombination, H_3^ + cooling, adiabatic and Lyα cooling, and Lyα reabsorption. We confirm the basic consistency of the outcomes of our modeling with the results of other hydrodynamic models of expanding planetary atmospheres. In particular, we determine that, under the typical conditions of an orbital distance of 0.05 AU around a Sun-type star, a hot Jupiter plasma envelope may reach maximum temperatures up to ~9000 K with a hydrodynamic escape speed of ~9 km s-1, resulting in mass loss rates of ~(4-7) · 1010 g s-1. In the range of the considered stellar-planetary parameters and XUV fluxes, that is close to the mass loss in the energy-limited case. The inclusion of planetary intrinsic magnetic fields in the model is a subject of the follow-up paper (Paper II).

  1. Characterization of heat-labile toxin-subunit B from Escherichia coli by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, I; De Simone, C; Soriano, J M; Mañes, J; Ferranti, P; Ritieni, A

    2012-11-01

    The possibilities of characterizing the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) by liquid chromatography electrospray mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were investigated. The B subunit from recombinant E. coli (expression in Pichia pastoris) can be detected by LC/ESI-MS expressed in P. pastoris and the charge envelope signals can be observed; LC/ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis allowed the acquisition of labile toxin subunit B (LTB) molecular weight and preliminary structural characterization of LTB toxin. MALDI-TOF analysis after reduction and alkylation of the protein evidenced the presence of one disulfide bond in the structure of the protein. Confirmatory analysis was carried out by detection of most of the tryptic fragments of the B subunit by MALDI-TOF-MS, obtaining total coverage of the protein sequence. Possible biovariations in the toxin can mostly be determined by sequencing, where an increase of molecular mass in the N-terminal side of the protein was identified. This modification may be due to an O-GlcNAc-1-phosphorylation. PMID:22921353

  2. Conserving mass and energy in cooling models of oceanic lithosphere requires upper mantle origins for trends in subsidence and heat flux and indicates global power of 30 TW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criss, R. E.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Hamza, V. N.

    2008-12-01

    One-dimensional conductive cooling models of ocean lithosphere fail to predict the lateral variation in oceanic heat flux and provide problematic calculations of subsidence, for reasons enumerated below. Our new model follows conservation laws and shows that bathymetric trends are tied to upper mantle temperature variations, given realistic values for thermal expansivity. Heat flux increases towards mid-ocean ridges due to (1) flux varying across upper mantle convection cells and (2) redistribution of mantle heat (Qmtl) by moving magma, and also by (3) hydrothermal circulation. Foremost, widespread, lateral, uptake of Qmtl as latent heat occurs during deep lithospheric melting but this energy is released near ridges through dike emplacement during seafloor spreading. Redistribution and energy conservation account for the local heat flux maximum near x=1200 km, heretofore unexplained. We show that the trend Qmtl(x) far from the ridge is consistent with behavior near the ridge and measured global power of <30 TW , which is compatible with quasi-steady-state conditions and an enstatite chondrite model for the Earth. Observables, such as the pattern of mid-ocean ridges on the globe, point to layered convection and lack of vigor, and gross characteristics of the Earth are supported by an enstatite chondrite model. Our analysis circumvents problems associated with 1-d conductive cooling models of the lithosphere: (1) Existing models replaced conservation of rock-mass with isostatic balance, which unwittingly created subsidence by converting lithosphere to ocean. (2) Half-space models incorrectly cancelled infinities. (3) Plate models omitted latent heat which is immense. (4) 1-d models only permit vertical contraction. These faulty constructs fitted seafloor depths through erroneous use of volumetric (αV=3αL) thermal expansivity coupled with great leeway in cross-multiplied parameters. The underlying premise that thermal aspects of lithosphere can be separately

  3. Precipitation rates and atmospheric heat transport during the Cenomanian greenhouse warming in North America: Estimates from a stable isotope mass-balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ufnar, David F.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Gonzalez, L.; Grocke, D.R.

    2008-01-01

    Stable isotope mass-balance modeling results of meteoric ??18O values from the Cenomanian Stage of the Cretaceous Western Interior Basin (KWIB) suggest that precipitation and evaporation fluxes were greater than that of the present and significantly different from simulations of Albian KWIB paleohydrology. Sphaerosiderite meteoric ??18O values have been compiled from the Lower Tuscaloosa Formation of southwestern Mississippi (25??N paleolatitude), The Dakota Formation Rose Creek Pit, Fairbury Nebraska (35??N) and the Dunvegan Formation of eastern British Columbia (55??N paleolatitude). These paleosol siderite ??18O values define a paleolatitudinal gradient ranging from - 4.2??? VPDB at 25??N to - 12.5??? VPDB at 55??N. This trend is significantly steeper and more depleted than a modern theoretical siderite gradient (25??N: - 1.7???; 65??N: - 5.6??? VPDB ), and a Holocene meteoric calcite trend (27??N: - 3.6???; 67??N: - 7.4??? VPDB). The Cenomanian gradient is also comparatively steeper than the Albian trend determined for the KWIB in the mid- to high latitudes. The steep latitudinal trend in meteoric ??18O values may be the result of increased precipitation and evaporation fluxes (amount effects) under a more vigorous greenhouse-world hydrologic cycle. A stable-isotope mass-balance model has been used to generate estimates of precipitation and evaporation fluxes and precipitation rates. Estimates of Cenomanian precipitation rates based upon the mass-balance modeling of the KWIB range from 1400??mm/yr at 25??N paleolatitude to 3600??mm/yr at 45??N paleolatitude. The precipitation-evaporation (P-E) flux values were used to delineate zones of moisture surplus and moisture deficit. Comparisons between Cenomanian P-E and modern theoretical siderite, and Holocene calcite latitudinal trends shows an amplification of low-latitude moisture deficits between 5-25??N paleolatitude and moisture surpluses between 40-60??N paleolatitude. The low-latitude moisture deficits

  4. How do college students solve proportion problems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Melvin C.; Fuller, Robert G.

    Problems which could be solved using proportional reasoning were administered nationwide by college faculty to their own science classes during a three year period. The reasoning of more than 8000 students covering three sections of the country was classified as concrete, transitional, or formal using Piagetian categories. Data from the West closely replicated that from the Midwest on similar metric conversion tasks. Student performance changed noticeably with a different problem format. The percentages of students using a ratio formula, ratio attempt, or intuitive methods of solution held approximately constant over time, task, and section of the country. The data shows the use of additive and conversion methods of solution depends upon the problem presentation.

  5. Boron-10 Lined Proportional Counter Model Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2012-06-30

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) is supporting the project “Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology” at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of an alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a boron-lined proportional tube-based alternative system in the configuration of a coincidence counter. This report discusses the validation studies performed to establish the degree of accuracy of the computer modeling methods current used to simulate the response of boron-lined tubes. This is the precursor to developing models for the uranium neutron coincidence collar under Task 2 of this project.

  6. TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, W.J.

    1999-04-06

    A power controller device is disclosed which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the ``reset`` input of a R-S flip flop, while an ``0`` crossing detector controls the ``set`` input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the ``reset`` and ``set`` inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations. 9 figs.

  7. TRIAC/SCR proportional control circuit

    DOEpatents

    Hughes, Wallace J.

    1999-01-01

    A power controller device which uses a voltage-to-frequency converter in conjunction with a zero crossing detector to linearly and proportionally control AC power being supplied to a load. The output of the voltage-to frequency converter controls the "reset" input of a R-S flip flop, while an "0" crossing detector controls the "set" input. The output of the flip flop triggers a monostable multivibrator controlling the SCR or TRIAC firing circuit connected to the load. Logic gates prevent the direct triggering of the multivibrator in the rare instance where the "reset" and "set" inputs of the flip flop are in coincidence. The control circuit can be supplemented with a control loop, providing compensation for line voltage variations.

  8. Gaseous fuel and air proportioning device

    SciTech Connect

    Lassanske, G. G.; Poshlman, A. G.

    1984-01-10

    The device for proportioning a gaseous fuel and air for combustion in an internal combustion engine includes a plate-like first member having a peripheral edge portion and a second member cooperating with the first member having a peripheral edge portion and a second member cooperating with the first member to define a mixing chamber having an outlet adapted to be connected in communication with the air intake of the engine carburetor. The second member also includes an annular portion having an arcuate first wall which is convex to and spaced from the peripheral edge portion of the first member to define an annular venturi having an inlet in communication with the atmosphere and an annular outlet in communication with the mixing chamber. A base member or second wall cooperates with the arcuate wall to form a substantially closed, annular plenum chamber into which a gaseous fuel, such as natural gas, is admitted when the engine is to be operated on the gaseous fuel. The gaseous fuel is admitted into the mixing chamber from the plenum chamber through one or more ports in the arcuate wall at or in the vicinity of the throat of the annular venturi. A pair of circumferentially spaced radially extending partitions located on the opposite sides of each port define a radially extending venturi which has a throat located at or in the vicinity of the port and serves to induce flow of the gaseous fuel through the corresponding port. The proportioning device preferably is arranged to fit inside the housing of an existing air cleaner.

  9. Effects of chemical reaction, heat and mass transfer on an unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a wedge with heat generation/absorption in the presence of suction or injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapathirao, M.; Ravindran, R.; Momoniat, E.

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the effects of chemical reaction, heat and mass transfer on an unsteady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical wedge with heat generation/absorption in the presence of uniform suction or injection. The fluid is assumed to be viscous and incompressible. The unsteadiness is caused by the time dependent free stream velocity varying arbitrarily with time. Both accelerating and decelerating free stream flows are considered. Non-similar solutions are obtained numerically by using an implicit finite difference scheme in combination with the quasi-linearization technique. Numerical computations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles graphically reported in the present study. Also, numerical results are presented for the local skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt number and the local Sherwood number. Results indicate that the time effect is crucial on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles, and on the local skin friction coefficient, the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers. The buoyancy assisting force causes overshoot in the velocity profile for lower Prandtl number fluids. Results are compared with previously published work and are found to be in an excellent agreement.

  10. Simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in the experimental section of the air-condensing unit of Scientific Production Company "Turbocon"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemov, V. I.; Minko, K. B.; Yan'kov, G. G.; Kiryukhin, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    A mathematical model was developed to be used for numerical analysis of heat and mass transfer processes in the experimental section of the air condenser (ESAC) created in the Scientific Production Company (SPC) "Turbocon" and mounted on the territory of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute. The simulations were performed using the author's CFD code ANES. The verification of the models was carried out involving the experimental data obtained in the tests of ESAC. The operational capability of the proposed models to calculate the processes in steam-air mixture and cooling air and algorithms to take into account the maldistribution in the various rows of tube bundle was shown. Data on the influence of temperature and flow rate of the cooling air on the pressure in the upper header of ESAC, effective heat transfer coefficient, steam flow distribution by tube rows, and the dimensions of the ineffectively operating zones of tube bundle for two schemes of steam-air mixture flow (one-pass and two-pass ones) were presented. It was shown that the pressure behind the turbine (in the upper header) increases significantly at increase of the steam flow rate and reduction of the flow rate of cooling air and its temperature rise, and the maximum value of heat transfer coefficient is fully determined by the flow rate of cooling air. Furthermore, the steam flow rate corresponding to the maximum value of heat transfer coefficient substantially depends on the ambient temperature. The analysis of the effectiveness of the considered schemes of internal coolant flow was carried out, which showed that the two-pass scheme is more effective because it provides lower pressure in the upper header, despite the fact that its hydraulic resistance at fixed flow rate of steam-air mixture is considerably higher than at using the one-pass schema. This result is a consequence of the fact that, in the two-pass scheme, the condensation process involves the larger internal surface of tubes

  11. Experimental and numerical study of two dimensional heat and mass transfer in unsaturated soil with and application to soil thermal energy storage (SBTES) systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, A.; Smits, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    A promising energy storage option to compensate for daily and seasonal energy offsets is to inject and store heat generated from renewable energy sources (e.g. solar energy) in the ground, oftentimes referred to as soil borehole thermal energy storage (SBTES). Nonetheless in SBTES modeling efforts, it is widely recognized that the movement of water vapor is closely coupled to thermal processes. However, their mutual interactions are rarely considered in most soil water modeling efforts or in practical applications. The validation of numerical models that are designed to capture these processes is difficult due to the scarcity of experimental data, limiting the testing and refinement of heat and water transfer theories. A common assumption in most SBTES modeling approaches is to consider the soil as a purely conductive medium with constant hydraulic and thermal properties. However, this simplified approach can be improved upon by better understanding the coupled processes at play. Consequently, developing new modeling techniques along with suitable experimental tools to add more complexity in coupled processes has critical importance in obtaining necessary knowledge in efficient design and implementation of SBTES systems. The goal of this work is to better understand heat and mass transfer processes for SBTES. In this study, we implemented a fully coupled numerical model that solves for heat, liquid water and water vapor flux and allows for non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change. This model was then used to investigate the influence of different hydraulic and thermal parameterizations on SBTES system efficiency. A two dimensional tank apparatus was used with a series of soil moisture, temperature and soil thermal properties sensors. Four experiments were performed with different test soils. Experimental results provide evidences of thermally induced moisture flow that was also confirmed by numerical results. Numerical results showed that for the test conditions

  12. Investigation of combined heat and mass transfer between vertical parallel plates in a two-layer flow of couple stress nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Sultan, Faqiha; Riaz, Fatima; Jamil, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    This study is an investigation of fully-developed laminar flow in a two-layer vertical channel; one part filled with couple stress nanofluid and the other part with clear couple stress fluid. The flow is examined for combined heat and mass transfer using uniform wall temperature and concentration boundary conditions. Optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) is used to solve the nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the flow in each region. This method is based on the homotopy analysis method (HAM)which is an effective method to analytically approximate the solution of highly nonlinear problems. The influence of pertinent parameters is observed on velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions, specifically, the effect of Brownian parameter on couple stress fluid is mentioned.

  13. On the Influence of Soret and Dufour Effects on MHD Free Convective Heat and Mass Transfer Flow over a Vertical Channel with Constant Suction and Viscous Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Uwanta, Ime Jimmy; Usman, Halima

    2014-01-01

    The present paper investigates the combined effects of Soret and Dufour on free convective heat and mass transfer on the unsteady one-dimensional boundary layer flow over a vertical channel in the presence of viscous dissipation and constant suction. The governing partial differential equations are solved numerically using the implicit Crank-Nicolson method. The velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions are discussed numerically and presented through graphs. Numerical values of the skin-friction coefficient, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number at the plate are discussed numerically for various values of physical parameters and are presented through tables. It has been observed that the velocity and temperature increase with the increase in the viscous dissipation parameter and Dufour number, while an increase in Soret number causes a reduction in temperature and a rise in the velocity and concentration. PMID:27419208

  14. Nanoparticle volume fraction with heat and mass transfer on MHD mixed convection flow in a nanofluid in the presence of thermo-diffusion under convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandasamy, R.; Jeyabalan, C.; Sivagnana Prabhu, K. K.

    2016-02-01

    This article examines the influence of thermophoresis, Brownian motion of the nanoparticles with variable stream conditions in the presence of magnetic field on mixed convection heat and mass transfer in the boundary layer region of a semi-infinite porous vertical plate in a nanofluid under the convective boundary conditions. The transformed boundary layer ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Maple 18 software with fourth-fifth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method. Numerical results are presented both in tabular and graphical forms illustrating the effects of these parameters with magnetic field on momentum, thermal, nanoparticle volume fraction and solutal concentration boundary layers. The numerical results obtained for the velocity, temperature, volume fraction, and concentration profiles reveal interesting phenomenon, some of these qualitative results are presented through plots. It is interesting to note that the magnetic field plays a dominant role on nanofluid flow under the convective boundary conditions.

  15. On the role of the porous shell of the solid core of the earth in the anomalous heat and mass flow to the mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Pikin, S. A.

    2013-03-15

    The model of the pressure-induced first-order phase transition of a metal melt to the metallicglass state considers a thermodynamically nonequilibrium porous near-surface shell of the solid core of the Earth, which contacts cyclonic vortices in the liquid core. Anomalous flows of heat and light-material mass to the mantle from the solid core at these contact points are calculated. These anomalous flows are shown to be comparable with the observed ones under the assumption of a rapid increase in the melt viscosity at pressures of 1-10 Mbar, which is characteristic of a solid core. In this case, the porous layer permeability may be very low.

  16. Natural convection flows due to the combined buoyancy of heat and mass diffusion in a thermally stratified medium

    SciTech Connect

    Angirasa, D.; Srinivasan, J. )

    1989-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of laminar doubly diffusive free convection flows adjacent to a vertical surface in a stable thermally stratified medium. The two buoyant mechanisms are thermal diffusion and species diffusion. The species concentration is assumed to be small. Boussinesq approximations are incorporated and the governing conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy, and species are nondimensionalized. These equations are solved using a finite-difference method. The results are explained in terms of the basic physical mechanisms that govern these flows. It is observed that the ambient thermal stratification has a profound influence on the transport characteristics. The results show many interesting aspects of the complex interaction of the two buoyant mechanisms.

  17. The elite athlete - assessing body shape, size, proportion and composition.

    PubMed

    Kerr, D A; Ackland, T R; Schreiner, A B

    1995-03-01

    In the quest to optimize performance of the elite athlete the sport scientist has sought to determine the ideal physique for a given sport or event. For some sports, specific structural characteristics offer definite performance advantages; for example in rowing, in addition to height, a large arm span has been identified as important. In other sports. such as long distance running, low levels of adiposity or 'fatness' appear to be linked with faster running times. There are four areas where appraisal of the athlete's physique can provide useful information: (1) identification of talented athletes; (2) to assess and monitor the growing athlete; (3) to monitor training and performance; and (4) to determine 'race weight' in weight-category sports. As a research tool a particular method must be reliable and valid. Other considerations include how expensive the method is, if it is suitable for a field situation and if large amounts of data on a number of subjects can be collected quickly. The method should be safe for both the athlete and the tester and provide useful feedback for the athlete or coach. Anthropometry, with training is able to fulfil most of these criteria and is the most widely used method of physique assessment in sports science. Large anthropometric data bases have been collected on elite athletes at Olympic games and world championships according to a standard protocol. Kinanthropometry, which has developed from anthropometry, is concerned with measurement and evaluation of different aspects of human movement and individual variation in body shape, size, proportion and composition. For the assessment of adiposity a sum of skinfolds, usually over six sites, is most commonly used rather than percentage body fat formulae. Muscle mass can be assessed indirectly through girth and corrected girth measurements. Limb lengths and breadths are used to assess skeletal structure and proportional differences in limb size. The anthropometric methods most commonly

  18. CFD modeling and experimental validation of heat and mass transfer in wood poles subjected to high temperatures: a conjugate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younsi, R.; Kocaefe, D.; Poncsak, S.; Kocaefe, Y.; Gastonguay, L.

    2008-03-01

    In this article, a coupling method is presented in the case of high thermal treatment of a wood pole and a three-dimensional numerical simulation is proposed. The conservation equations for the wood sample are obtained using diffusion equation with variables diffusion coefficients and the incompressible Reynolds averaged Navier Stokes equations have been solved for the flow field. The connection between the two problems is achieved by expressing the continuity of the state variables and their respective fluxes through the interface. Turbulence closure is obtained by the use of the standard k ɛ model with the usual wall function treatment. The model equations are solved numerically by the commercial package ANSYS-CFX10. The wood pole was subjected to high temperature treatment under different operating conditions. The model validation is carried out via a comparison between the predicted values with those obtained experimentally. The comparison of the numerical and experimental results shows good agreement, implying that the proposed numerical algorithm can be used as a useful tool in designing high-temperature wood treatment processes. A parametric study was also carried out to determine the effects of several parameters such as initial moisture content, wood aspect ratio and final gas temperature on temperature and moisture content distributions within the samples during heat treatment.

  19. Transient thermoelectric supercooling: Isosceles current pulses from a response surface perspective and the performance effects of pulse cooling a heat generating mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piggott, Alfred J., III

    With increased public interest in protecting the environment, scientists and engineers aim to improve energy conversion efficiency. Thermoelectrics offer many advantages as thermal management technology. When compared to vapor compression refrigeration, above approximately 200 to 600 watts, cost in dollars per watt as well as COP are not advantageous for thermoelectrics. The goal of this work was to determine if optimized pulse supercooling operation could improve cooling capacity or efficiency of a thermoelectric device. The basis of this research is a thermal-electrical analogy based modeling study using SPICE. Two models were developed. The first model, a standalone thermocouple with no attached mass to be cooled. The second, a system that includes a module attached to a heat generating mass. With the thermocouple study, a new approach of generating response surfaces with characteristic parameters was applied. The current pulse height and pulse on-time was identified for maximizing Net Transient Advantage, a newly defined metric. The corresponding pulse height and pulse on-time was utilized for the system model. Along with the traditional steady state starting current of Imax, Iopt was employed. The pulse shape was an isosceles triangle. For the system model, metrics new to pulse cooling were Qc, power consumption and COP. The effects of optimized current pulses were studied by changing system variables. Further studies explored time spacing between pulses and temperature distribution in the thermoelement. It was found net Q c over an entire pulse event can be improved over Imax steady operation but not over steady I opt operation. Qc can be improved over Iopt operation but only during the early part of the pulse event. COP is reduced in transient pulse operation due to the different time constants of Qc and Pin. In some cases lower performance interface materials allow more Qc and better COP during transient operation than higher performance interface materials

  20. Altered proportions of RCS-rat eyes.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberger, M; Eichhorn, M; Gottanka, J; Döbig, C; Lütjen-Drecoll, E

    1994-10-01

    The growth pattern of RCS-rat eyes with hereditary retinal degeneration was analysed morphometrically, evaluating midsagittal sections of the entire globe and sections of the chamber angle region. No changes of the axial diameter of RCS-rat eyes were found if compared with eyes of age-matched controls. There were, however, characteristic proportional changes in the anterior eye segment of RCS rats. The distance between the peripheral end of Descemet's membrane (DM) and both the posterior end of Schlemm's canal and the ora serrata were significantly elongated indicating that this region might be most susceptible to growth factors. The length of the posterior globe up to the level of the ora serrata was shorter in RCS rats than in control rats. In addition, in RCS-rat eyes the pars plana was significantly elongated and the pars plicata shortened. Ultrastructural changes of ciliary epithelium were not seen before 7 months of age in RCS rats. They were only present in those parts of the circumference in which the stromal capillaries also revealed structural changes. The ciliary epithelial alterations were therefore considered secondary to narrowing or rarefication in the adjacent blood vessels.

  1. Activation of protonated peptides and molecular ions of small molecules using heated filaments in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Richard L.; Robinson, Errol W.; Williams, Evan R.

    2004-05-01

    A new apparatus that uses heated filaments to dissociate ions in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is described. With this apparatus, molecular ions of both acetophenone and n-butylbenzene can be dissociated very rapidly. A plot of the natural log of the dissociation rate constant versus inverse radiant temperature yields a straight line from which an Arrhenius activation energy is obtained. From this value, the threshold dissociation energy can be estimated. For acetophenone, we find a value that is within the range of previously measured values. However, for n-butylbenzene, the calculated threshold dissociation energy value is too high. We attribute this result, and the appearance of a higher energy dissociation product, to the absorption of visible photons produced at the high filament temperatures used, a factor not currently included in our modeling. In contrast to the small ions, larger peptide ions do not undergo significant dissociation with the current apparatus. The "effective" internal temperature of the larger ions can be measured by using the heated filaments in combination with blackbody infrared radiative dissociation. The "effective" temperature of the peptide ions is increased substantially less than that for the smaller ions.

  2. Identification of heat-induced degradation products from purified betanin, phyllocactin and hylocerenin by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Herbach, Kirsten M; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2005-01-01

    Betanin, phyllocactin (malonylbetanin) and hylocerenin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylbetanin) were isolated from purple pitaya (Hylocereus polyrhizus [Weber] Britton and Rose) juice, and their degradation products generated by heating at 85 degrees C were subsequently monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Thermal degradation of phyllocactin and hylocerenin in purified solution excluding the alleged protective effects by the juice matrix is reported for the first time. Betanin was predominantly degraded by hydrolytic cleavage, while decarboxylation and dehydrogenation were of minor relevance. In contrast, hylocerenin showed a strong tendency to decarboxylation and dehydrogenation, hydrolytic cleavage of the aldimine bond occurring secondarily. Phyllocactin degradation was most complex because of additional decarboxylation of the malonic acid moiety as well as generation and subsequent degradation of betanin due to phyllocactin demalonylation. Upon prolonged heating, all betacyanins under observation formed degradation products characterized by an additional double bond at C2-C3. Hydrolytic cleavage of the aldimine bond of phyllocactin and hylocerenin yielded previously unknown acylated cyclo-dopa derivatives traceable by positive ionization, while application of ESI(-) facilitated the detection of a glycosylated aminopropanal derivative and dopamine, which have never been described before as betanin degradation products.

  3. Assimilation of granite by basaltic magma at Burnt Lava flow, Medicine Lake volcano, northern California: Decoupling of heat and mass transfer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, T.L.; Kinzler, R.J.; Baker, M.B.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Lesher, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    At Medicine Lake volcano, California, andesite of the Holocene Burnt Lava flow has been produced by fractional crystallization of parental high alumina basalt (HAB) accompanied by assimilation of granitic crustal material. Burnt Lava contains inclusions of quenched HAB liquid, a potential parent magma of the andesite, highly melted granitic crustal xenoliths, and xenocryst assemblages which provide a record of the fractional crystallization and crustal assimilation process. Samples of granitic crustal material occur as xenoliths in other Holocene and Pleistocene lavas, and these xenoliths are used to constrain geochemical models of the assimilation process. A large amount of assimilation accompanied fractional crystallization to produce the contaminated Burnt lava andesites. Models which assume that assimilation and fractionation occurred simultaneously estimate the ratio of assimilation to fractional crystallization (R) to be >1 and best fits to all geochemical data are at an R value of 1.35 at F=0.68. Petrologic evidence, however, indicates that the assimilation process did not involve continuous addition of granitic crust as fractionation occurred. Instead, heat and mass transfer were separated in space and time. During the assimilation process, HAB magma underwent large amounts of fractional crystallization which was not accompanied by significant amounts of assimilation. This fractionation process supplied heat to melt granitic crust. The models proposed to explain the contamination process involve fractionation, replenishment by parental HAB, and mixing of evolved and parental magmas with melted granitic crust. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Shock-heated NH3 in a Molecular Jet Associated with a High-Mass Young Star.

    PubMed

    Zhang; Hunter; Sridharan; Cesaroni

    1999-12-20

    We present the discovery of shock-excited NH3 in a well-collimated jet associated with the extremely young high-mass star IRAS 20126+4104. The NH3 (3, 3) and (4, 4) emission is dominated by three clumps along the SiO jet. At the end of the jet, there exists strong and broad (+/-10 km s-1) NH3 (3, 3) emission. With typical brightness temperatures greater than 500 K, the overall emission indicates a weakly inverted population and appears in an arc, consistent with the excitation by bow shocks. There are two bright spots in the NH3 (3, 3) emission with brightness temperatures of approximately 2000 K. The narrow line width (1.5 km s-1 FWHM), the small sizes (<0&farcs;3), and the unusually high brightness temperature of the features are indicative of maser emission. Our observations provide clear evidence that NH3 (3, 3) masers are excited in shock regions in molecular outflows.

  5. APEX-CHAMP+ high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects. III. NGC 1333 IRAS 4A/4B envelope, outflow, and ultraviolet heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Umut A.; Kristensen, Lars E.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Belloche, Arnaud; van Kempen, Tim A.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Güsten, Rolf; van der Marel, Nienke

    2012-06-01

    Context. The NGC 1333 IRAS 4A and IRAS 4B sources are among the most well-studied Stage 0 low-mass protostars, which drive prominent bipolar outflows. Spectrally resolved molecular emission lines provide crucial information about the physical and chemical structure of the circumstellar material as well as the dynamics of the different components. Most studies have so far concentrated on the colder parts (T ≤ 30 K) of these regions. Aims: The aim is to characterize the warmer parts of the protostellar envelope using the new generation of submillimeter instruments. This will allow us to quantify the feedback of the protostars on their surroundings in terms of shocks, ultraviolet (UV) heating, photodissociation, and outflow dispersal. Methods: The dual frequency 2 × 7 pixel 650/850 GHz array receiver CHAMP+ mounted on APEX was used to obtain a fully sampled, large-scale ~4' × 4' map at 9″ resolution of the IRAS 4A/4B region in the 12CO J = 6-5 line. Smaller maps were observed in the 13CO 6-5 and [C i] J = 2-1 lines. In addition, a fully sampled 12CO J = 3-2 map made with HARP-B on the JCMT is presented and deep isotopolog observations are obtained at selected outflow positions to constrain the optical depth. Complementary Herschel-HIFI and ground-based lines of CO and its isotopologs, from J = 1-0 up to 10-9 (Eu/k ≈ 300 K), are collected at the source positions and used to construct velocity-resolved CO ladders and rotational diagrams. Radiative-transfer models of the dust and lines are used to determine the temperatures and masses of the outflowing and photon-heated gas and infer the CO abundance structure. Results: Broad CO emission-line profiles trace entrained shocked gas along the outflow walls, which have an average temperature of ~100 K. At other positions surrounding the outflow and the protostar, the 6-5 line profiles are narrow indicating UV excitation. The narrow 13CO 6-5 data directly reveal the UV heated gas distribution for the first time. The

  6. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  7. Determination of 1,4-Dioxane in the Cape Fear River Watershed by Heated Purge-and-Trap Preconcentration and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mei; Lopez-Velandia, Catalina; Knappe, Detlef R U

    2016-03-01

    Recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency data show that 1,4-dioxane is frequently detected in U.S. drinking water derived from both groundwater and surface water. 1,4-Dioxane is a likely human carcinogen, and an excess 10(-6) cancer risk is associated with a drinking water concentration of 0.35 μg/L. To support 1,4-dioxane occurrence investigations, source identification and exposure assessment, a rapid and sensitive analytical method capable of quantifying 1,4-dioxane over a wide concentration range in a broad spectrum of aqueous matrices was developed. The fully automated method is based on heated purge-and-trap preconcentration and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with selected-ion storage and has a reporting limit of 0.15 μg/L. Quantification of 1,4-dioxane was accomplished by isotope dilution using mass-labeled 1,4-dioxane-d8 as internal standard. Matrix spikes yielded recoveries of 86-115% in drinking water, groundwater, surface water, and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. Also, 1,3-dioxane can be distinguished from 1,4-dioxane. The method was applied to investigate 1,4-dioxane occurrence and sources in the Cape Fear River watershed of North Carolina. 1,4-Dioxane concentrations ranged from <0.15 μg/L in nonimpacted surface water to 436 μg/L downstream of a WWTP discharge. In WWTP effluent, 1,4-dioxane concentrations varied widely, with a range of 1.3-2.7 μg/L in one community and 105-1,405 μg/L in another. Discharges from three municipal WWTPs were primarily responsible for elevated 1,4-dioxane concentrations in the Cape Fear River watershed. PMID:26829406

  8. Atmosphere Expansion and Mass Loss of Close-orbit Giant Exoplanets Heated by Stellar XUV. II. Effects of Planetary Magnetic Field; Structuring of Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodachenko, M. L.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Lammer, H.; Prokopov, P. A.

    2015-11-01

    This is the second paper in a series where we build a self-consistent model to simulate the mass-loss process of a close-orbit magnetized giant exoplanet, so-called hot Jupiter (HJ). In this paper we generalize the hydrodynamic (HD) model of an HJ's expanding hydrogen atmosphere, proposed in the first paper, to include the effects of intrinsic planetary magnetic field. The proposed self-consistent axisymmetric 2D magnetohydrodynamics model incorporates radiative heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas, basic hydrogen chemistry for the appropriate account of major species composing HJ's upper atmosphere and related radiative energy deposition, and {{{H}}}3+ and Lyα cooling processes. The model also takes into account a realistic solar-type X-ray/EUV spectrum for calculation of intensity and column density distribution of the radiative energy input, as well as gravitational and rotational forces acting in a tidally locked planet-star system. An interaction between the expanding atmospheric plasma and an intrinsic planetary magnetic dipole field leads to the formation of a current-carrying magnetodisk that plays an important role for topology and scaling of the planetary magnetosphere. A cyclic character of the magnetodisk behavior, composed of consequent phases of the disk formation followed by the magnetic reconnection with the ejection of a ring-type plasmoid, has been discovered and investigated. We found that the mass-loss rate of an HD 209458b analog planet is weakly affected by the equatorial surface field <0.3 G, but is suppressed by an order of magnitude at the field of 1 G.

  9. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins.

    PubMed

    Talsness, Dana M; Belanto, Joseph J; Ervasti, James M

    2015-10-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  10. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Talsness, Dana M.; Belanto, Joseph J.; Ervasti, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  11. Mathematically modelling proportions of Japanese populations by industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Yoshito

    2016-10-01

    I propose a mathematical model for temporal changes of proportions for industrial sectors. I prove that the model keeps the proportions for the primary, the secondary, and the tertiary sectors between 0 and 100% and preserves their total as 100%. The model fits the Japanese historical data between 1950 and 2005 for the population proportions by industry very well. The model also predicts that the proportion for the secondary industry becomes negligible and becomes less than 1% at least around 2080.

  12. Evaluation of facial divine proportion in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naseem Ahmad; Nagar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gulshan Kumar; Singh, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the facial divine proportion and its relationship with facial attractiveness in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: For evaluation of various facial proportions, standardized frontal facial photographs of total 300 subjects between 18 and 30 years of age were obtained. Black and white copies of these photographs were presented in front of an evaluation jury for assigning scores of facial attractiveness and finally 130 attractive subjects were selected. These subjects were divided into two groups, Group I (attractive females n = 65) and Group II (attractive males n = 65) and they were further analyzed for various parameters of facial proportions. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare both groups. Results: Group I showed that five of seven vertical facial proportions were close to divine proportion (1.618) whereas only two vertical proportions in Group II were close to it. Transverse facial proportions in both groups deviated more from divine proportion (1.618) and were closer to silver proportion (1.414). Conclusions: Most of the facial proportions of attractive females in the North-Indian population were close to the divine proportion. Thus, facial divine proportion could be an important factor in the perception of facial attractiveness of North-Indian attractive females.

  13. Spatial Proportional Reasoning Is Associated with Formal Knowledge about Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Möhring, Wenke; Newcombe, Nora S.; Levine, Susan C.; Frick, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Proportional reasoning involves thinking about parts and wholes (i.e., about fractional quantities). Yet, research on proportional reasoning and fraction learning has proceeded separately. This study assessed proportional reasoning and formal fraction knowledge in 8- to 10-year-olds. Participants (N = 52) saw combinations of cherry juice and water…

  14. Evaluation of facial divine proportion in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naseem Ahmad; Nagar, Amit; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gulshan Kumar; Singh, Alka

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the facial divine proportion and its relationship with facial attractiveness in North Indian population. Materials and Methods: For evaluation of various facial proportions, standardized frontal facial photographs of total 300 subjects between 18 and 30 years of age were obtained. Black and white copies of these photographs were presented in front of an evaluation jury for assigning scores of facial attractiveness and finally 130 attractive subjects were selected. These subjects were divided into two groups, Group I (attractive females n = 65) and Group II (attractive males n = 65) and they were further analyzed for various parameters of facial proportions. Unpaired Student's t-test was used to compare both groups. Results: Group I showed that five of seven vertical facial proportions were close to divine proportion (1.618) whereas only two vertical proportions in Group II were close to it. Transverse facial proportions in both groups deviated more from divine proportion (1.618) and were closer to silver proportion (1.414). Conclusions: Most of the facial proportions of attractive females in the North-Indian population were close to the divine proportion. Thus, facial divine proportion could be an important factor in the perception of facial attractiveness of North-Indian attractive females. PMID:27630502

  15. State space approach to unsteady magnetohydrodynamics natural convection heat and mass transfer through a porous medium saturated with a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzat, M. A.; El-Bary, A. A.; Hatem, A. S.

    2014-07-01

    A technique of the state space approach and the inversion of the Laplace transform method are applied to dimensionless equations of an unsteady one-dimensional boundary-layer flow due to heat and mass transfer through a porous medium saturated with a viscoelastic fluid bounded by an infinite vertical plate in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is described. Complete analytical solutions for the temperature, concentration, velocity, and induced magnetic and electric fields are presented. The inversion of the Laplace transforms is carried out by using a numerical approach. The proposed method is used to solve two problems: boundary-layer flow in a viscoelastic fluid near a vertical wall subjected to the initial conditions of a stepwise temperature and concentration and viscoelastic fluid flow between two vertical walls. The solutions are found to be dependent on the governing parameters including the Prandtl number, the Schmidt number, the Grashof number, reaction rate coefficient, viscoelastic parameter, and permeability of the porous medium. Effects of these major parameters on the transport behavior are investigated methodically, and typical results are illustrated to reveal the tendency of the solutions. Representative results are presented for the velocity, temperature, concentration, and induced magnetic and electric field distributions, as well as the local skin-friction coefficient and the local Nusselt and Sherwood numbers.

  16. On the stability of two rigidly rotating magnetic fluid columns in zero gravity in the presence of mass and heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Moatimid, Galal M

    2002-06-01

    The stability of two rigidly rotating magnetic fluids separated by a cylindrical interface and stressed by a timely oscillating axial magnetic field is investigated. Only axisymmetric disturbances are considered. The interface admits both mass and heat transfer. Weak viscous effects on the interface are taken into account so that their contributions are demonstrated in the boundary conditions. The solution of the boundary value problem leads to a transcendental differential equation. It includes a periodic coefficient together with modified Bessel functions of operators involved as their arguments. In the absence of rotation and under the assumption of small amplitude of the harmonic magnetic field, the characteristic equation is analyzed by means of Whittaker's perturbation technique to determine the transition curves which separate stable from unstable solutions. While in the presence of rotation, the method of multiple-time scales is adopted to investigate the necessary and sufficient conditions for stability. The analysis results in the resonance cases as well as the nonresonance cases. In order to simplify the analysis, the periodic solutions are only considered. Therefore, stability is discussed through the marginal state. Furthermore, the rotation is considered as small. The analytical results are numerically confirmed.

  17. As-built design specification for proportion estimate software subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The Proportion Estimate Processor evaluates four estimation techniques in order to get an improved estimate of the proportion of a scene that is planted in a selected crop. The four techniques to be evaluated were provided by the techniques development section and are: (1) random sampling; (2) proportional allocation, relative count estimate; (3) proportional allocation, Bayesian estimate; and (4) sequential Bayesian allocation. The user is given two options for computation of the estimated mean square error. These are referred to as the cluster calculation option and the segment calculation option. The software for the Proportion Estimate Processor is operational on the IBM 3031 computer.

  18. Students' Understanding of Proportional, Inverse Proportional, and Affine Functions: Two Studies on the Role of External Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bock, Dirk; Van Dooren, Wim; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    We investigated students' understanding of proportional, inverse proportional, and affine functions and the way this understanding is affected by various external representations. In a first study, we focus on students' ability to model textual descriptions of situations with different kinds of representations of proportional, inverse…

  19. The Identification and Validation Process of Proportional Reasoning Attributes: An Application of a Proportional Reasoning Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjoe, Hartono; de la Torre, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the process of identifying and validating students' abilities to think proportionally. More specifically, we describe the methodology we used to identify these proportional reasoning attributes, beginning with the selection and review of relevant literature on proportional reasoning. We then continue with the…

  20. Estimating sighting proportions of American alligator nests during helicopter survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Kenneth G.; Percival, H. Franklin; Woodward, Allan R.

    2000-01-01

    Proportions of American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) nests sighted during aerial survey in Florida were estimated based upon multiple surveys by different observers. We compared sighting proportions across habitats, nesting seasons, and observer experience levels. The mean sighting proportion across all habitats and years was 0.736 (SE=0.024). Survey counts corrected by the mean sighting proportion reliably predicted total nest counts (7?2=0.933). Sighting proportions did not differ by habitat type (P=0.668) or year P=0.328). Experienced observers detected a greater proportion of nests (P<0.0001) than did either less experienced or inexperienced observers. Reliable estimates of nest abundance can be derived from aerial counts of alligator nests when corrected by the appropriate sighting proportion.

  1. Influences of limb proportions and body size on locomotor kinematics in terrestrial primates and fossil hominins.

    PubMed

    Polk, J D

    2004-10-01

    During locomotion, mammalian limb postures are influenced by many factors including the animal's limb length and body mass. Polk (2002) compared the gait of similar-sized cercopithecine monkeys that differed limb proportions and found that longer-limbed monkeys usually adopt more extended joint postures than shorter-limbed monkeys in order to moderate their joint moments. Studies of primates as well as non-primate mammals that vary in body mass have demonstrated that larger animals use more extended limb postures than smaller animals. Such extended postures in larger animals increase the extensor muscle mechanical advantage and allow postures to be maintained with relatively less muscular effort (Polk, 2002; Biewener 1989). The results of these previous studies are used here to address two anthropological questions. The first concerns the postural effects of body mass and limb proportion differences between australopithecines and members of the genus Homo. That is, H. erectus and later hominins all have larger body mass and longer legs than australopithecines, and these anatomical differences suggest that Homo probably used more extended postures and probably required relatively less muscular force to resist gravity than the smaller and shorter-limbed australopithecines. The second question investigates how animals with similar size but different limb proportions differ in locomotor performance. The effects of limb proportions on gait are relevant to inferring postural and locomotor differences between Neanderthals and modern Homo sapiens which differ in their crural indices and relative limb length. This study demonstrates that primates with relatively long limbs achieve higher walking speeds while using lower stride frequencies and lower angular excursions than shorter-limbed monkeys, and these kinematic differences may allow longer-limbed taxa to locomote more efficiently than shorter-limbed species of similar mass. Such differences may also have characterized

  2. Influences of limb proportions and body size on locomotor kinematics in terrestrial primates and fossil hominins.

    PubMed

    Polk, J D

    2004-10-01

    During locomotion, mammalian limb postures are influenced by many factors including the animal's limb length and body mass. Polk (2002) compared the gait of similar-sized cercopithecine monkeys that differed limb proportions and found that longer-limbed monkeys usually adopt more extended joint postures than shorter-limbed monkeys in order to moderate their joint moments. Studies of primates as well as non-primate mammals that vary in body mass have demonstrated that larger animals use more extended limb postures than smaller animals. Such extended postures in larger animals increase the extensor muscle mechanical advantage and allow postures to be maintained with relatively less muscular effort (Polk, 2002; Biewener 1989). The results of these previous studies are used here to address two anthropological questions. The first concerns the postural effects of body mass and limb proportion differences between australopithecines and members of the genus Homo. That is, H. erectus and later hominins all have larger body mass and longer legs than australopithecines, and these anatomical differences suggest that Homo probably used more extended postures and probably required relatively less muscular force to resist gravity than the smaller and shorter-limbed australopithecines. The second question investigates how animals with similar size but different limb proportions differ in locomotor performance. The effects of limb proportions on gait are relevant to inferring postural and locomotor differences between Neanderthals and modern Homo sapiens which differ in their crural indices and relative limb length. This study demonstrates that primates with relatively long limbs achieve higher walking speeds while using lower stride frequencies and lower angular excursions than shorter-limbed monkeys, and these kinematic differences may allow longer-limbed taxa to locomote more efficiently than shorter-limbed species of similar mass. Such differences may also have characterized

  3. [Heat waves: health impacts].

    PubMed

    Marto, Natália

    2005-01-01

    During the summer of 2003, record high temperatures were reported across Europe, causing thousands of casualties. Heat waves are sporadic recurrent events, characterised by intense and prolonged heat, associated with excess mortality and morbidity. The most frequent cause of death directly attributable to heat is heat stroke but heat waves are known to cause increases in all-cause mortality, specially circulatory and respiratory mortality. Epidemiological studies demonstrate excess casualties cluster in specific risk groups. The elderly, those with chronic medical conditions and the socially isolated are particularly vulnerable. Air conditioning is the strongest protective factor against heat-related disorders. Heat waves cause disease indirectly, by aggravating chronic disorders, and directly, by causing heat-related illnesses (HRI). Classic HRI include skin eruptions, heat cramps, heat syncope, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Heat stroke is a medical emergency characterised by hyperthermia and central nervous system dysfunction. Treatment includes immediate cooling and support of organ-system function. Despite aggressive treatment, heat stroke is often fatal and permanent neurological damage is frequent in those who survive. Heat related illness and death are preventable through behavioural adaptations, such as use of air conditioning and increased fluid intake. Other adaptation measures include heat emergency warning systems and intervention plans and environmental heat stress reduction. Heat related mortality is expected to rise as a consequence of the increasing proportion of elderly persons, the growing urban population, and the anticipated increase in number and intensity of heat waves associated with global warming. Improvements in surveillance and response capability may limit the adverse health conditions of future heat waves. It is crucial that health professionals are prepared to recognise, prevent and treat HRI and learn to cooperate with local health

  4. Multi-residue analysis of eight anticoagulant rodenticides in animal plasma and liver using liquid chromatography combined with heated electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Desmet, Noël; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2008-06-15

    A sensitive method for the simultaneous quantification of eight anticoagulant rodenticides (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, chlorophacinone, coumatetralyl, difenacoum, difethialone, flocoumafen and warfarin) in animal plasma and liver using liquid chromatography combined with heated electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-HESI-MS/MS) is described. The sample preparation includes a liquid-liquid extraction with acetone. The compound 7-acetoxy-6-(2,3-dibromopropyl)-4,8-dimethylcoumarin is used as an internal standard. Chromatographic separation was achieved using a Nucleodur C18 gravity column. Good linearity was observed up to 750 ng mL(-1) for chlorophacinone and up to 500 ng mL(-1) for the other compounds in plasma. In liver, good linearity was seen up to 500 ng g(-1) for brodifacoum, chlorophacinone, difenacoum and difethialone and up to 750 ng g(-1) for the other compounds. Depending on the compound, a level of 1 or 5 ng mL(-1) could be quantified fulfilling the criteria for accuracy and precision and was therefore set as limit of quantification of the method in plasma. In liver, the limit of quantification was set at 250 ng g(-1) for coumatetralyl and warfarin and at 100 ng g(-1) for the other compounds. In plasma, the limit of detection varied from 0.07 ng mL(-1) for flocoumafen to 3.21 ng mL(-1) for brodifacoum. In liver, the limit of detection varied from 0.37 ng g(-1) for warfarin to 4.64 ng g(-1) for chlorophacinone. The method was shown to be of use in a pharmacokinetic study after single oral administration to mice and in the confirmation of suspected poisoning cases in domestic animals. PMID:18502701

  5. Effects of tangential-type boundary condition discontinuities on the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann method for heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Like; AuYeung, Nick; Mei, Renwei; Klausner, James F.

    2016-08-01

    We present a systematic study on the effects of tangential-type boundary condition discontinuities on the accuracy of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method for Dirichlet and Neumann problems in heat and mass transfer modeling. The second-order accurate boundary condition treatments for continuous Dirichlet and Neumann problems are directly implemented for the corresponding discontinuous boundary conditions. Results from three numerical tests, including both straight and curved boundaries, are presented to show the accuracy and order of convergence of the LBE computations. Detailed error assessments are conducted for the interior temperature or concentration (denoted as a scalar ϕ) and the interior derivatives of ϕ for both types of boundary conditions, for the boundary flux in the Dirichlet problem and for the boundary ϕ values in the Neumann problem. When the discontinuity point on the straight boundary is placed at the center of the unit lattice in the Dirichlet problem, it yields only first-order accuracy for the interior distribution of ϕ, first-order accuracy for the boundary flux, and zeroth-order accuracy for the interior derivatives compared with the second-order accuracy of all quantities of interest for continuous boundary conditions. On the lattice scale, the LBE solution for the interior derivatives near the singularity is largely independent of the resolution and correspondingly the local distribution of the absolute errors is almost invariant with the changing resolution. For Neumann problems, when the discontinuity is placed at the lattice center, second-order accuracy is preserved for the interior distribution of ϕ; and a "superlinear" convergence order of 1.5 for the boundary ϕ values and first-order accuracy for the interior derivatives are obtained. For straight boundaries with the discontinuity point arbitrarily placed within the lattice and curved boundaries, the boundary flux becomes zeroth-order accurate for Dirichlet problems

  6. Secondary power-producing cell. [electrodes contain same two elements in different proportions

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, A.K.

    1971-10-26

    This cell consists of an anode and a cathode containing the same two elements in different proportions and an electrolyte which contains ions of the element which is to be transported through it. The electrodes consist of chromium, iron, lithium, sodium, cadmium, copper, or zinc and phosphorus, selenium, tellurium, sulfur, arsenic, or nitrogen. A method to heat the cathode in the regeneration cycle to transfer the electronegative component to the anode is provided. (RWR)

  7. Evaluation of natural smile: Golden proportion, RED or Golden percentage

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, B. V. Sreenivasan; Ramani, Niketa

    2008-01-01

    Creating geometric or mathematical proportion to relate the successive width of maxillary anterior teeth is a critical aspect in Esthetic dentistry. Golden proportion, recurring esthetic dental (RED) proportion and golden percentage are new theories in this field. Aim: To investigate the existence and suitability of Golden proportion, Recurring Esthetic Dental, and Golden percentage between the widths of maxillary anterior teeth in individuals with natural dentition, with the aid of digital photographs and computer analysis. Material and Methods: Standardized frontal images of 56 dental students, 20 male and 36 female, were captured. Each maxillary anterior tooth was digitally measured. Once the measurements were recorded, the three theories were applied and the data was analyzed statistically. Results: The golden proportion was found to exist only in 14-25% of the subjects, between perceived maxillary anterior teeth in natural dentition. The value of RED proportion was not constant, and as one moved distally, this proportion gradually increased. Furthermore, the results revealed that golden percentage was rather constant in terms of relative tooth width. Central incisor represented 22%, lateral incisor 15% and canine 13% of the width of six maxillary anterior teeth, as viewed from the front. Conclusion: Both golden proportion and RED proportion are unsuitable methods to relate the successive width of the maxillary anterior teeth in natural dentition. However, the golden percentage theory can be applied if percentages are adjusted, taking into consideration the ethnicity of the population. PMID:20142879

  8. Heating and cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Imig, L.A.; Gardner, M.R.

    1982-08-01

    A heating and cooling apparatus capable of cyclic heating and cooling of a test specimen undergoing fatigue testing is discussed. Cryogenic fluid is passed through a block clamped to the speciment to cool the block and the specimen. Heating cartridges penetrate the block to heat the block and the specimen to very hot temperaures. Control apparatus is provided to alternatively activate the cooling and heating modes to effect cyclic heating and cooling between very hot and very cold temperatures. The block is constructed of minimal mass to facilitate the rapid temperature changes. Official Gazette of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

  9. First birth cesarean proportion: A missed indicator in controlling policies

    PubMed Central

    Safari-Faramani, Roya; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar; Nakhaei, Nouzar; Foroudnia, Shohreh; Mahmoodabadi, Zahra; Safizadeh, Mansooreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Around one out of two mothers give births by cesarean section (CS) surgery in Iran and about half of this number is due to previous CS. Recently Health Sector Evolution (HSEP) program (started in April 2014) targets the high rate of CS in Iran. To assess the impact of the interventions, we emphasized that the First Birth Cesarean (FBC) proportion is one of the main indicators to assess the controlling programs. Methods: Data on the mode of delivery were collected in Kerman province between 21 March and 20 March 2015 classified by hospital ownership. FBC proportion is defined as the number of CS in the first pregnancies divided by the total number of first births. Chi-square test for trend was used to assess the trends. Results: Total number of births was around 34000. There were 8.9 and 13.1 percent reduction in CS and FBC proportion respectively. CS proportion was 54.5 at the end of the first quarter of the studied period and reached to 49.6 at the end of the period (p<0.0001). Also, FBC proportion was 54.1 percent at first and reached to 47 percent at the end of the study period. The main reason for CS was due to previous CS. At the hospital level, the highest reduction in CS and FBC proportion were in public hospitals. Conclusion: Results suggested more reduction in FBC proportion than the CS proportion, so this is a very good sign since more potential CS cases will be prevented. As repeated CS is one of the main indications for the operation, in the short term, even effective policies may change the overall proportion slightly, while the FBC proportion is more sensitive to reflect the impacts. Therefore, it is necessary to target the main fuel to reduce CS proportion effectively. PMID:27579285

  10. Compact multiwire proportional counters for the detection of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhingan, Akhil; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Varughese, T.; Singh, Hardev; Behera, B. R.; Mandal, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    Two large area multistep position sensitive (two dimensional) multiwire proportional counters have been developed for experiments involving study of fission dynamics using general purpose scattering chamber facility at IUAC. Both detectors have an active area of 20×10 cm2 and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) planes, timing signal for time of flight measurements and energy signal giving the differential energy loss in the active volume. The design features are optimized for the detection of low energy heavy ions at very low gas pressures. Special care was taken in setting up the readout electronics, constant fraction discriminators for position signals in particular, to get optimum position and timing resolutions along with high count rate handling capability of low energy heavy ions. A custom made charge sensitive preamplifier, having lower gain and shorter decay time, has been developed for extracting the differential energy loss signal. The position and time resolutions of the detectors were determined to be 1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 1.7 ns FWHM, respectively. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 20 kHz without any breakdown. Time of flight signal in combination with differential energy loss signal gives a clean separation of fission fragments from projectile and target like particles. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for fission coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions. This article describes systematic study of these fission counters in terms of efficiency, time resolution, count rate handling capability, position resolution, and the readout electronics. The detector has been operated with both five electrode geometry and four electrode geometry, and a comparison has been made in their performances.

  11. Compact multiwire proportional counters for the detection of fission fragments.

    PubMed

    Jhingan, Akhil; Sugathan, P; Golda, K S; Singh, R P; Varughese, T; Singh, Hardev; Behera, B R; Mandal, S K

    2009-12-01

    Two large area multistep position sensitive (two dimensional) multiwire proportional counters have been developed for experiments involving study of fission dynamics using general purpose scattering chamber facility at IUAC. Both detectors have an active area of 20x10 cm(2) and provide position signals in horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) planes, timing signal for time of flight measurements and energy signal giving the differential energy loss in the active volume. The design features are optimized for the detection of low energy heavy ions at very low gas pressures. Special care was taken in setting up the readout electronics, constant fraction discriminators for position signals in particular, to get optimum position and timing resolutions along with high count rate handling capability of low energy heavy ions. A custom made charge sensitive preamplifier, having lower gain and shorter decay time, has been developed for extracting the differential energy loss signal. The position and time resolutions of the detectors were determined to be 1.1 mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) and 1.7 ns FWHM, respectively. The detector could handle heavy ion count rates exceeding 20 kHz without any breakdown. Time of flight signal in combination with differential energy loss signal gives a clean separation of fission fragments from projectile and target like particles. The timing and position signals of the detectors are used for fission coincidence measurements and subsequent extraction of their mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions. This article describes systematic study of these fission counters in terms of efficiency, time resolution, count rate handling capability, position resolution, and the readout electronics. The detector has been operated with both five electrode geometry and four electrode geometry, and a comparison has been made in their performances.

  12. Attention Modulation by Proportion Congruency: The Asymmetrical List Shifting Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamse, Elger L.; Duthoo, Wout; Notebaert, Wim; Risko, Evan F.

    2013-01-01

    Proportion congruency effects represent hallmark phenomena in current theorizing about cognitive control. This is based on the notion that proportion congruency determines the relative levels of attention to relevant and irrelevant information in conflict tasks. However, little empirical evidence exists that uniquely supports such an attention…

  13. Longitudinal Enrollment Dynamics and Changes in Ethnic Proportionality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greaves, Fred

    The Federal Racial/Ethnic Surveys of the Salinas Union High School District were examined to identify changes in ethnic proportions within a particular class from its entry in the 9th grade until the 12th grade. The 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grade proportional distributions are reported by school (Alisal High School, North Salinas High School, and…

  14. Development of Proportional Reasoning: Where Young Children Go Wrong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ty W.; Levine, Susan C.; Huttenlocher, Janellen

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have found that children have difficulty solving proportional reasoning problems involving discrete units until 10 to 12 years of age, but can solve parallel problems involving continuous quantities by 6 years of age. The present studies examine where children go wrong in processing proportions that involve discrete quantities. A…

  15. The Failings of the Law of Definite Proportions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suchow, Lawrence

    1975-01-01

    Indicates that the concept of definite proportions or constant composition should be introduced with qualification. Presents arguments against the Law of Definite Proportions and cites examples in the areas of solid solutions, compounds of the transition and inner transition elements, and in some compounds of the representative elements. (GS)

  16. 16 CFR 240.9 - Proportionally equal terms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Proportionally equal terms. 240.9 Section 240.9 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR ADVERTISING ALLOWANCES AND OTHER MERCHANDISING PAYMENTS AND SERVICES § 240.9 Proportionally equal terms....

  17. Understanding Proportional Reasoning in Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kim H.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the proportional reasoning of pre-service teachers at the beginning of their teacher preparation program using the developmental shifts described by Lobato and Ellis (2010). They cast changes in proportional reasoning as transitions or "shifts" in students' thinking and these shifts can serve as…

  18. The influence of lower face vertical proportion on facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Johnston, D J; Hunt, O; Johnston, C D; Burden, D J; Stevenson, M; Hepper, P

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of changing lower face vertical proportion on the attractiveness ratings scored by lay people.Ninety-two social science students rated the attractiveness of a series of silhouettes with normal, reduced or increased lower face proportions. The random sequences of 10 images included an image with the Eastman normal lower face height relative to total face height [lower anterior face height/total anterior face height (LAFH/TAFH) of 55 per cent], and images with LAFH/TAFH increased or decreased by up to four standard deviations (SD) from the Eastman norm. All the images had a skeletal Class I antero-posterior (AP) relationship. A duplicate image in each sequence assessed repeatability. The participants scored each image using a 10 point numerical scale and also indicated whether they would seek treatment if the image was their own profile. The profile image with normal vertical facial proportions was rated by the lay people as the most attractive. Attractiveness scores reduced as the vertical facial proportions diverged from the normal value. Images with a reduced lower face proportion were rated as significantly more attractive than the corresponding images with an increased lower face proportion. Images with a reduced lower face proportion were also significantly less likely to be judged as needing treatment than the corresponding images with an increased lower face proportion. PMID:15961569

  19. ESTIMATING PROPORTION OF AREA OCCUPIED UNDER COMPLEX SURVEY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating proportion of sites occupied, or proportion of area occupied (PAO) is a common problem in environmental studies. Typically, field surveys do not ensure that occupancy of a site is made with perfect detection. Maximum likelihood estimation of site occupancy rates when...

  20. Influence of gravitational and vibrational convection on the heat- and mass transfer in the melt during crystal growing by Bridgman and floating zone methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    Space materials science is one of the priorities of different national and international space programs. The physical processes of heat and mass transfer in microgravity (including effect of g-jitter) is far from complete clarity, especially for important practical technology for producing crystals from the melt. The idea of the impact on crystallizing melt by low frequency vibration includes not only the possibility to suppress unwanted microaccelerations, but also to actively influence the structure of the crystallization front. This approach is one of the most effective ways to influence the quality of materials produced in flight conditions. The subject of this work is the effect of vibrations on the thermal and hydrodynamic processes during crystal growth using Bridgman and floating zone techniques, which have the greatest prospect of practical application in space. In the present approach we consider the gravitational convection, Marangoni convection, as well as the effect of vibration on the melt for some special cases. The results of simulation were compared with some experimental data obtained by the authors using a transparent model substance - succinonitrile (Bridgman method), and silicon (floating zone method). Substances used, process parameters and characteristics of the experimental units correspond the equipment developed for onboard research and serve as a basis for selecting optimum conditions vibration exposure as a factor affecting the solidification pattern. The direction of imposing vibrations coincides with the axis of the crystal, the frequency is presented by the harmonic law, and the force of gravity was varied by changing its absolute value. Mathematical model considered axisymmetric approximation of joint convective-conductive energy transfer in the system crystal - melt. Upon application of low-frequency oscillations of small amplitude along the axis of growing it was found the suppression of the secondary vortex flows near the

  1. Dehumidifying Heat Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattar, Mukesh K.

    1993-01-01

    U-shaped heat pipe partly dehumidifies air leaving air conditioner. Fits readily in air-handling unit of conditioner. Evaporator and condenser sections of heat pipe consist of finned tubes in comb pattern. Each tube sealed at one end and joined to manifold at other. Sections connected by single pipe carrying vapor to condenser manifold and liquid to evaporator manifold. Simple on/off or proportional valve used to control flow of working fluid. Valve actuated by temperature/humidity sensor.

  2. Electron heating during magnetic reconnection: A simulation scaling study

    SciTech Connect

    Shay, M. A. Haggerty, C. C.; Phan, T. D.; Oieroset, M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Cassak, P. A.; Wu, P.; Malakit, K.

    2014-12-15

    Electron bulk heating during magnetic reconnection with symmetric inflow conditions is examined using kinetic particle-in-cell simulations. Inflowing plasma parameters are varied over a wide range of conditions, and the increase in electron temperature is measured in the exhaust well downstream of the x-line. The degree of electron heating is well correlated with the inflowing Alfvén speed c{sub Ar} based on the reconnecting magnetic field through the relation ΔT{sub e}=0.033 m{sub i} c{sub Ar}{sup 2}, where ΔT{sub e} is the increase in electron temperature. For the range of simulations performed, the heating shows almost no correlation with inflow total temperature T{sub tot}=T{sub i}+T{sub e} or plasma β. An out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field of similar magnitude to the reconnecting field does not affect the total heating, but it does quench perpendicular heating, with almost all heating being in the parallel direction. These results are qualitatively consistent with a recent statistical survey of electron heating in the dayside magnetopause (Phan et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 40, 4475, 2013), which also found that ΔT{sub e} was proportional to the inflowing Alfvén speed. The net electron heating varies very little with distance downstream of the x-line. The simulations show at most a very weak dependence of electron heating on the ion to electron mass ratio. In the antiparallel reconnection case, the largely parallel heating is eventually isotropized downstream due a scattering mechanism, such as stochastic particle motion or instabilities. The simulation size is large enough to be directly relevant to reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere, and the present findings may prove to be universal in nature with applications to the solar wind, the solar corona, and other astrophysical plasmas. The study highlights key properties that must be satisfied by an electron heating mechanism: (1) preferential heating in the parallel direction; (2) heating

  3. Heat pipe array heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1987-08-25

    A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

  4. Estimation of lithofacies proportions using well and well test data

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, L.Y.; Blanc, G.; Noetinger, B.

    1996-12-31

    A crucial step of the commonly used geostatistical methods for modeling heterogeneous reservoirs (e.g. the sequential indicator simulation and the truncated Gaussian functions) is the estimation of the lithofacies local proportion (or probability density) functions. Well-test derived permeabilities show good correlation with lithofacies proportions around wells. Integrating well and well-test data in estimating lithofacies proportions could permit the building of more realistic models of reservoir heterogeneity. However this integration is difficult because of the different natures and measurement scales of these two types of data. This paper presents a two step approach to integrating well and well-test data into heterogeneous reservoir modeling. First lithofacies proportions in well-test investigation areas are estimated using a new kriging algorithm called KISCA. KISCA consists in kriging jointly the proportions of all lithofacies in a well-test investigation area so that the corresponding well-test derived permeability is respected through a weighted power averaging of lithofacies permeabilities. For multiple well-tests, an iterative process is used in KISCA to account for their interaction. After this, the estimated proportions are combined with lithofacies indicators at wells for estimating proportion (or probability density) functions over the entire reservoir field using a classical kriging method. Some numerical examples were considered to test the proposed method for estimating lithofacies proportions. In addition, a synthetic lithofacies reservoir model was generated and a well-test simulation was performed. The comparison between the experimental and estimated proportions in the well-test investigation area demonstrates the validity of the proposed method.

  5. System training and assessment in simultaneous proportional myoelectric prosthesis control

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pattern recognition control of prosthetic hands take inputs from one or more myoelectric sensors and controls one or more degrees of freedom. However, most systems created allow only sequential control of one motion class at a time. Additionally, only recently have researchers demonstrated proportional myoelectric control in such systems, an option that is believed to make fine control easier for the user. Recent developments suggest improved reliability if the user follows a so-called prosthesis guided training (PGT) scheme. Methods In this study, a system for simultaneous proportional myoelectric control has been developed for a hand prosthesis with two motor functions (hand open/close, and wrist pro-/supination). The prosthesis has been used with a prosthesis socket equivalent designed for normally-limbed subjects. An extended version of PGT was developed for use with proportional control. The control system’s performance was tested for two subjects in the Clothespin Relocation Task and the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). Simultaneous proportional control was compared with three other control strategies implemented on the same prosthesis: mutex proportional control (the same system but with simultaneous control disabled), mutex on-off control, and a more traditional, sequential proportional control system with co-contractions for state switching. Results The practical tests indicate that the simultaneous proportional control strategy and the two mutex-based pattern recognition strategies performed equally well, and superiorly to the more traditional sequential strategy according to the chosen outcome measures. Conclusions This is the first simultaneous proportional myoelectric control system demonstrated on a prosthesis affixed to the forearm of a subject. The study illustrates that PGT is a promising system training method for proportional control. Due to the limited number of subjects in this study, no definite conclusions can be

  6. Goodness-of-fit test for proportional subdistribution hazards model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingqing; Fine, Jason; Laird, Glen

    2013-09-30

    This paper concerns using modified weighted Schoenfeld residuals to test the proportionality of subdistribution hazards for the Fine-Gray model, similar to the tests proposed by Grambsch and Therneau for independently censored data. We develop a score test for the time-varying coefficients based on the modified Schoenfeld residuals derived assuming a certain form of non-proportionality. The methods perform well in simulations and a real data analysis of breast cancer data, where the treatment effect exhibits non-proportional hazards.

  7. ³⁹Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeter; Aalseth, Craig E; Bonicalzi, Ricco M; Brandenberger, Jill M; Day, Anthony R; Humble, Paul H; Mace, Emily K; Panisko, Mark E; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-dating groundwater and seawater using the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is an important tool to understand water mass-flow rates and mean residence time. Low-background proportional counters developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory use mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas. We demonstrate sensitivity to (39)Ar by comparing geological (ancient) argon recovered from a carbon dioxide gas well and commercial argon. The demonstrated sensitivity to the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years. PMID:26516993

  8. ³⁹Ar/Ar measurements using ultra-low background proportional counters.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jeter; Aalseth, Craig E; Bonicalzi, Ricco M; Brandenberger, Jill M; Day, Anthony R; Humble, Paul H; Mace, Emily K; Panisko, Mark E; Seifert, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Age-dating groundwater and seawater using the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is an important tool to understand water mass-flow rates and mean residence time. Low-background proportional counters developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory use mixtures of argon and methane as counting gas. We demonstrate sensitivity to (39)Ar by comparing geological (ancient) argon recovered from a carbon dioxide gas well and commercial argon. The demonstrated sensitivity to the (39)Ar/Ar ratio is sufficient to date water masses as old as 1000 years.

  9. Heating with waste heat

    SciTech Connect

    Beabout, R.W.

    1986-09-02

    Most of the power consumed in the gaseous diffusion process is converted into heat of compression, which is removed from the process gas and rejected into the atmosphere by recirculating cooling water over cooling towers. The water being handled through the X-333 and X-330 Process Buildings can be heated to 140 to 150/sup 0/F for heating use. The Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant is provided with a recirculating heating water (RHW) system which uses X-330 water and wasted heat. The RHW flow is diagrammed. (DLC)

  10. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, Georg; George, E. Victor; Krupke, William F.; Sooy, Walter; Sutton, Steven B.

    1996-01-01

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes.

  11. High energy bursts from a solid state laser operated in the heat capacity limited regime

    DOEpatents

    Albrecht, G.; George, E.V.; Krupke, W.F.; Sooy, W.; Sutton, S.B.

    1996-06-11

    High energy bursts are produced from a solid state laser operated in a heat capacity limited regime. Instead of cooling the laser, the active medium is thermally well isolated. As a result, the active medium will heat up until it reaches some maximum acceptable temperature. The waste heat is stored in the active medium itself. Therefore, the amount of energy the laser can put out during operation is proportional to its mass, the heat capacity of the active medium, and the temperature difference over which it is being operated. The high energy burst capacity of a heat capacity operated solid state laser, together with the absence of a heavy, power consuming steady state cooling system for the active medium, will make a variety of applications possible. Alternately, cooling takes place during a separate sequence when the laser is not operating. Industrial applications include new material working processes. 5 figs.

  12. Proportional proximity sensing for telerobots using Coherent Laser Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Sixto L.; Goode, Plesent W.; Slotwinski, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    The ability of a telerobotic manipulator to operate in confined spaces while avoiding unwanted collisions is enhanced by the accurate sensing of its proximate environment. To achieve the fidelity required for precise manipulator control, a proportional proximity sensor system with a sufficiently large measurement envelope is required. Current proximity sensors provide a binary indication of the presence of obstacles within a small envelope with coarse or no proportional measurement of their location. A proportional proximity sensor system configured as a Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) Coherent Laser Radar (CLR) using a semiconductor laser as the energy source is described and analyzed. The source and reflected energies mix coherently to generate a radio frequency (RF) signal whose frequency is proportional to the range. The system is tested for accuracy, range, depth of range, speed, and sensitivity and the results are presented. Techniques to derive orientation information and an application to telerobotic control are also described.

  13. Proportionality: a valid alternative to correlation for relative data.

    PubMed

    Lovell, David; Pawlowsky-Glahn, Vera; Egozcue, Juan José; Marguerat, Samuel; Bähler, Jürg

    2015-03-01

    In the life sciences, many measurement methods yield only the relative abundances of different components in a sample. With such relative-or compositional-data, differential expression needs careful interpretation, and correlation-a statistical workhorse for analyzing pairwise relationships-is an inappropriate measure of association. Using yeast gene expression data we show how correlation can be misleading and present proportionality as a valid alternative for relative data. We show how the strength of proportionality between two variables can be meaningfully and interpretably described by a new statistic ϕ which can be used instead of correlation as the basis of familiar analyses and visualisation methods, including co-expression networks and clustered heatmaps. While the main aim of this study is to present proportionality as a means to analyse relative data, it also raises intriguing questions about the molecular mechanisms underlying the proportional regulation of a range of yeast genes.

  14. DC motor proportional control system for orthotic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaise, H. T.; Allen, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Multi-channel proportional control system for operation of dc motors for use with externally-powered orthotic arm braces is described. Components of circuitry and principles of operation are described. Schematic diagram of control circuit is provided.

  15. Description of an ionization calorimeter complemented with proportional counters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babayan, K. P.; Boyadzhyan, N. G.; Vasiltsov, V. V.; Grigorov, N. L.; Sobinyakov, V. A.; Shestoperov, V. Y.

    1975-01-01

    An ionization calorimeter is described with a system of proportional counters which are used to determine the charge of the particles incident to the calorimeter and to estimate the number of the secondary charged particles.

  16. Improvements in estimating proportions of objects from multispectral data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, H. M.; Hyde, P. D.; Richardson, W.

    1974-01-01

    Methods for estimating proportions of objects and materials imaged within the instantaneous field of view of a multispectral sensor were developed further. Improvements in the basic proportion estimation algorithm were devised as well as improved alien object detection procedures. Also, a simplified signature set analysis scheme was introduced for determining the adequacy of signature set geometry for satisfactory proportion estimation. Averaging procedures used in conjunction with the mixtures algorithm were examined theoretically and applied to artificially generated multispectral data. A computationally simpler estimator was considered and found unsatisfactory. Experiments conducted to find a suitable procedure for setting the alien object threshold yielded little definitive result. Mixtures procedures were used on a limited amount of ERTS data to estimate wheat proportion in selected areas. Results were unsatisfactory, partly because of the ill-conditioned nature of the pure signature set.

  17. Morphology and motion: hindlimb proportions and swing phase kinematics in terrestrially locomoting charadriiform birds.

    PubMed

    Kilbourne, Brandon M; Andrada, Emanuel; Fischer, Martin S; Nyakatura, John A

    2016-05-01

    Differing limb proportions in terms of length and mass, as well as differences in mass being concentrated proximally or distally, influence the limb's moment of inertia (MOI), which represents its resistance to being swung. Limb morphology - including limb segment proportions - thus probably has direct relevance for the metabolic cost of swinging the limb during locomotion. However, it remains largely unexplored how differences in limb proportions influence limb kinematics during swing phase. To test whether differences in limb proportions are associated with differences in swing phase kinematics, we collected hindlimb kinematic data from three species of charadriiform birds differing widely in their hindlimb proportions: lapwings, oystercatchers and avocets. Using these three species, we tested for differences in maximum joint flexion, maximum joint extension and range of motion (RoM), in addition to differences in maximum segment angular velocity and excursion. We found that the taxa with greater limb MOI - oystercatchers and avocets - flex their limbs more than lapwings. However, we found no consistent differences in joint extension and RoM among species. Likewise, we found no consistent differences in limb segment angular velocity and excursion, indicating that differences in limb inertia in these three avian species do not necessarily underlie the rate or extent of limb segment movements. The observed increased limb flexion among these taxa with distally heavy limbs resulted in reduced MOI of the limb when compared with a neutral pose. A trade-off between exerting force to actively flex the limb and potential savings by a reduction of MOI is skewed towards reducing the limb's MOI as a result of MOI being in part a function of the radius of gyration squared. Increased limb flexion is a likely means to lower the cost of swinging the limbs. PMID:26944500

  18. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory. PMID:23741295

  19. MHD forced convective laminar boundary layer flow from a convectively heated moving vertical plate with radiation and transpiration effect.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, A I Md

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional steady forced convective flow of a Newtonian fluid past a convectively heated permeable vertically moving plate in the presence of a variable magnetic field and radiation effect has been investigated numerically. The plate moves either in assisting or opposing direction to the free stream. The plate and free stream velocities are considered to be proportional to x(m) whilst the magnetic field and mass transfer velocity are taken to be proportional to x((m-1)/2) where x is the distance along the plate from the leading edge of the plate. Instead of using existing similarity transformations, we use a linear group of transformations to transform the governing equations into similarity equations with relevant boundary conditions. Numerical solutions of the similarity equations are presented to show the effects of the controlling parameters on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on the friction factor, rate of heat and mass transfer. It is found that the rate of heat transfer elevates with the mass transfer velocity, convective heat transfer, Prandtl number, velocity ratio and the magnetic field parameters. It is also found that the rate of mass transfer enhances with the mass transfer velocity, velocity ratio, power law index and the Schmidt number, whilst it suppresses with the magnetic field parameter. Our results are compared with the results existing in the open literature. The comparisons are satisfactory.

  20. ["Golden proportion" and its application to calculate dentition].

    PubMed

    Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2007-01-01

    Within an evolutionary process, the nature has created the standard of aesthetics - a "gold proportion" on the basis of which, the parts of human body, to be more exact, teeth and denture correspond to each other and to own parts by the size, which is the ideal precondition for ideal appearance. The charming smile serves as the proof, that teeth in denture are located by a principle of "gold proportion". A "gold proportion" is the corner stone of beauty and it can be applied with success in stomatology. Proportion is the certain ratio between parts, and proportional means a proper correlation of parts among themselves. It is reputed, that knowledge about "gold proportion" Pythagor has got from products of the Egyptian and Babylon scientists. And this is true, proportions of cult constructions, bas-relieves, pyramids in Giza, home appliances and ornaments from Tutanhamon tomb testify, that under their creation the Egyptian masters were guided by a principle of "gold proportion". The facade of ancient Greek temple Parthenon is built by a principle of "gold proportion". During archeological digs of this temple the compasses which sculptors and architects of an ancient world used has been found. The "gold proportion" is mentioned in the work which has reached us "Beginning" the author is the scientist of antique epoch Euclid. In 1509, in Venice the book of Luka Pacholi the "Divine proportion" has been published, its illustration is attributed to Leonardo de Vinci. This work has been recognized as a "Hymn of a gold proportion". In 1885 the German researcher professor Zeising published his work - "Aesthetic researches". When Zeising has received numerical values of piece length, he saw that they coincided with figures of some numerical sequence, which was offered by the great Italian mathematician of Middle Ages Fibonacci (or Leonardo Pisano). In his composition the "Abacus Book" Leonardo Fibonacci showed aforesaid sequence of numbers, by means of which he has explained